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Sample records for iron aluminum manganese

  1. Acute Toxicity and Accumulation of Iron, Manganese and, Aluminum in Caspian Kutum Fish (Rutilus kutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Zahedi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron, manganese, and aluminum are three abundant metals on earth and their concentrations have increased in aquatic environments as a result of natural and industrial activities. This study was undertaken to report the median acute toxicity (LC50 and accumulation of the sub-lethal concentration (10% 96-h LC50 of iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and aluminum (Al in kutum (Rutilus kutum fingerlings. Methods: For the 96-h LC50, the fish were exposed to concentrations of 105, 111, 117, 123, 129 and 135 mg/l of Fe and 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, and 65 mg/l of Mn and 18, 22, 26, 30, 34 and 38 mg/l of aluminum for 4 days. For sublethal exposure, they were exposed to mediums with concentrations of 12.3, 5.4 and 2.9 for Fe, Mn, and aluminum, respectively. Metal concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in the gill tissues. Results: Probit analysis showed the 96-h LC50 values of 122.98, 54.39, and 28.89 mg/l for Fe, Mn, and aluminum, respectively. Sub-lethal tests were conducted with nominal concentrations of 12.3, 5.4, and 2.9 mg/l of Fe, Mn, and aluminum for four days, respectively. Significant accumulations were observed in gills for all tested metals as compared to the control groups in short-term exposure (P<0.05. Conclusion: Obtained results clearly show that aluminum is the most toxic metal among tested ones for kutum fingerlings and it has the highest branchial AF value during sub-lethal exposure.

  2. Effect of Iron Impurity on the Phase Composition, Structure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys Containing Manganese and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, E. F.

    2017-07-01

    Results of a study of the interaction between iron impurity and manganese and aluminum alloying elements during formation of phase composition in alloys of the Mg - Mn, Mg - Al, Mg - Al - Mn, and Mg - Al - Zn - Mn systems are presented. It is proved that this interaction results in introduction of Fe into the intermetallic phase. The phase compositions of model magnesium alloys and commercial alloys MA2-1 and MA5 are studied. It is shown that both manganese and aluminum may bind the iron impurity into phases. Composite Fe-containing intermetallic phases of different compositions influence differently the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  3. Biomonitoring for iron, manganese, chromium, aluminum, nickel and cadmium in workers exposed to welding fume: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of exposure to welding fumes is increasing importance in promoting a healthy, safe and productive work environment. This study is a case-control design, random study was conducted among welder (56 subjects and non welder (39 subjects with more than 1 years experience in the same job task in an automotive parts manufactory within the industrial area at Cikarang in 2013. All subjects were completed physical examination, informed consent and questionnaire. Blood heavy metals were determined by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. Whole blood iron, manganese, chromium and lead in welder were higher than non-welder, but not different for aluminum, nickel and cadmium. In welder, chromium and manganese correlated with smoking status, cadmium correlated with age and smoking status. In multivariate analysis, wholeblood cadmium correlates with age and smoking status.

  4. Removal of aluminum, iron and manganese ions from industrial wastes using granular activated carbon and Amberlite IR-120H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Goher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of aluminum, iron and manganese from some pollution sources that drain into Ismailia Canal has been investigated using two different sorbents; granular activated carbon (GAC and Amberlite IR-120H (AIR-120H. Batch equilibrium experiments showed that the two sorbents have maximum removal efficiency for aluminum and iron pH 5 and 10 min contact time in ambient room temperature, while pH 7 and 30 min were the most appropriate for manganese removal. Dosage of 2 g/l for both GAC and AIR-120H was established to give the maximum removal capacity. At optimum conditions, the removal trend was in order of Al+3 > Fe+2 > Mn+2 with 99.2, 99.02 and 79.05 and 99.55, 99.42 and 96.65% of metal removal with GAC and AIR-120H, respectively. For the three metals, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms showed higher R2 values, with a slightly better fitting for the Langmuir model. In addition, separation factors (RL and exponent (n values indicated favorable Langmuir (0 < RL < 1 and Freundlich (1 < n < 10 approach. GAC and AIR-120H can be used as excellent alternative, effective and inexpensive materials to remove high amounts of heavy metals from waste water.

  5. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

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    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  6. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, B.

    1959-01-01

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  7. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Neagu (Pascu), Mihaela; Alina Traistaru, Gina; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Raluca Miron, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering both local economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption m...

  8. Bioleaching of copper, aluminum, magnesium and manganese from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was done to check the bioleaching feasibility of brown shale for the recovery of copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), magnesium (Mg) and manganese (Mn) ions using Ganoderma lucidum. Different experimental parameters were optimized for the enhanced recovery of metals ions. Effect of different substrates like ...

  9. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been

  10. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  11. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  12. Metabolism of manganese, iron, copper, and selenium in calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen male Holstein calves were used to study manganese and iron metabolism. The calves were fed one of the following diets for 18 days: control, control + iron, control + manganese, and control + iron and manganese. All calves were dosed orally with manganese-54. Tissue concentrations of manganese, iron and manganese-54 were determined. Small intestinal iron was lower in calves fed the high manganese diet than in controls. Tissue manganese-54 was lower in calves fed a high manganese diet. Fecal manganese content increased in calves fed both high manganese and high manganese-high iron diets. Serum total iron was not affected by the dietary treatments. To study the effects of high dietary levels of copper and selenium on the intracellular distributions of these two elements in liver and kidney cytosol, calves were fed one of four diets for 15 days. These were 0 and 100 ppM supplemental copper and 0 and 1 ppM added selenium. The control diet containing 0.1 ppM of selenium and 15 ppM of copper. All calves were orally dosed 48 hrs prior to sacrifice with selenium-75. A high copper diet increased copper concentrations in all intracellular liver fractions and most kidney fractions. Only the effects in the liver were significant. Less copper was found in the mitochondria fractions in liver and kidney of calves fed a high selenium diet. Three major copper-binding protein peaks were separated from the soluble fractions of calf liver and kidney. Peak 1 appeared to be the major copper-binding protein in liver and kidney cytosol of copper-loaded animals. Added selenium alone or in combination with copper accentuated the copper accumulation in this peak. Most of selenium-75 was recovered in the same peak as the copper. The results of this experiment indicated that the large molecular proteins in liver and kidney cytosol of calves play an important role in copper and selenium-75 metabolism

  13. Removal of Iron and Manganese in Groundwater using Natural Biosorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharudin, F.; Tadza, M. Y. Mohd; Imran, S. N. Mohd; Jani, J.

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to measure and compare the concentration of iron, manganese and hardness of the river and groundwater and to determine the effectiveness of iron and manganese removal by using natural biosorbent which is banana peels. The samples of river and groundwater were collected at riverbank filtration site at Jenderam Hilir, Dengkil. Based on the water quality investigation, the concentration of iron and manganese in the samples of groundwater have exceeded the drinking water quality standard which are 0.3 mg/L for iron and 0.1 mg/L for manganese. The removal process of the iron and manganese in the groundwater was done by using 2, 4 and 8 grams of banana peels activated carbon. It is found that with higher amount of activated banana peels, the removal of iron and manganese is more effective. The ranges of percentage of iron and manganese removal are between 82.25% to 90.84% and 98.79% to 99.43% respectively. From the result, banana peels activated carbon can be concluded as a one of the most effective low-cost adsorbent for groundwater treatment.

  14. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    to precipitation and corrosion. Manganese and iron can either be removed physico-chemically or biologically or combined. The physico-chemical oxidation and precipitation of manganese can theoretically be achieved by aeration, but this process is slow unless pH is raised far above neutral, making the removal...... of manganese by simple aeration and precipitation under normal drinking water treatment conditions insignificant. Manganese may also be oxidized autocatalytically. Iron is usually easier to remove. First, iron is rapidly chemically oxidized by oxygen at neutral pH followed by precipitation and filtration......-filter, where iron is removed. Step 2: Filtration in an after-filter where e.g. ammonium and manganese is removed. The treatment relies on microbial processes and may present an alternative, greener and more sustainable approach for drinking water production spending less chemicals and energy than chemical (e...

  15. Bioconcentration of manganese and iron in Panaeoloideae Sing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijve, T.; Blake, C.

    1994-01-01

    According to literature, the manganese content of most basidiomycetes fluctuates between 10 and 60 mg/kg, whereas the iron levels range from 100-500 mg/kg (both expressed on dry weight). The present authors report that bioconcentration of manganese is a distinguishing feature of the Panaeoloideae,

  16. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  17. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  18. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

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    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  19. Effects of aluminum and manganese on the growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G W; Medve, R J

    1984-09-01

    Cenococcum graniforme, Suillus luteus, Thelephora terrestris, and three isolates of Pisolithus tinctorius were cultured on modified Melin-Norkrans medium at pH 3.4 and adjusted to 0 to 500 ppm (0 to 500 mug/ml) of aluminum or manganese sulfate. Except for T. terrestris, which was intolerant of aluminum at 150 and 250 to 500 ppm, and P. tinctorius isolate 250, which was intolerant of aluminum at 450 ppm, all fungi showed some growth at all concentrations of aluminum. S. luteus was the most tolerant to aluminum. Manganese was less fungitoxic than aluminum, with all fungi showing at least 65% growth at 500 ppm as compared with the control. C. graniforme was not inhibited at any concentration of manganese, and S. luteus was only affected at 500 ppm. P. tinctorius isolate 230 showed no significant variation in growth when subjected to various concentrations of three forms of manganese salts. Significant differences in growth were detected in response to three aluminum salts, but no detectable pattern was apparent. Genotypic responses to aluminum and manganese were evident for P. tinctorius. Isolates 210 and 230 were more tolerant to manganese than was isolate 250. Aluminum tolerance was in the order of isolate 230 > 210 > 250. Results of in vitro studies concerning tolerance responses of ectomycorrhizal fungi to aluminum and manganese were not consistent with field observations of the successional sequence of these fungi on acid coal spoils.

  20. Effects of aluminum and manganese on the growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.W.; Medve, R.J.

    1984-09-01

    Cenococcum graniforme, Suillus luteus, Thelephora terrestris, and three isolates of Pisolithus tinctorius were cultured on modified Melin-Norkrans medium at pH 3.4 and adjusted to 0 to 500 ppm (0 to 500 ..mu..g/ml) of aluminum or manganese sulfate. Except for T. terrestris, which was intolerant of aluminum at 150 and 250 to 500 ppm, and P. tinctorius isolate 250, which was intolerant of aluminum at 450 ppm, all fungi showed some growth at all concentrations of aluminum. S. luteus was the most tolerant to aluminum. Manganese was less fungitoxic than aluminum, with all fungi showing at least 65% growth at 500 ppm as compared with the control. C graniforme was not inhibited at any concentration of manganese, and S. luteus was only affected at 500 ppm. P. tinctorius isolate 230 showed no significant variation in growth when subjected to various concentrations of three forms of manganese salts. Significant differences in growth were detected in response to three aluminum salts, but no detectable pattern was apparent. Genotypic responses to aluminum and manganese were evident for P. tinctorius. Isolates 210 and 230 were more tolerant to manganese than was isolate 250. Aluminum tolerance was in the order of isolate 230 > 210 > 250. Results of in vitro studies concerning tolerance responses of ectomycorrhizal fungi to aluminum and manganese were not consistent with field observations of the successional sequence of these fungi on acid coal spoils. 43 references, 3 tables.

  1. Manganese and iron oxidation by fungi isolated from building stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, M A; Gomez-Alarcon, G

    1994-01-01

    Acid and nonacid generating fungal strains isolated from weathered sandstone, limestone, and granite of Spanish cathedrals were assayed for their ability to oxidize iron and manganese. In general, the concentration of the different cations present in the mineral salt media directly affected Mn(IV) oxide formation, although in some cases, the addition of glucose and nitrate to the culture media was necessary. Mn(II) oxidation in acidogenic strains was greater in a medium containing the highest concentrations of glucose, nitrate, and manganese. High concentrations of Fe(II), glucose, and mineral salts were optimal for iron oxidation. Mn(IV) precipitated as oxides or hydroxides adhered to the mycelium. Most of the Fe(III) remained in solution by chelation with organic acids excreted by acidogenic strains. Other metabolites acted as Fe(III) chelators in nonacidogenic strains, although Fe(III) deposits around the mycelium were also detected. Both iron and manganese oxidation were shown to involve extracellular, hydrosoluble enzymes, with maximum specific activities during exponential growth. Strains able to oxidize manganese were also able to oxidize iron. It is concluded that iron and manganese oxidation reported in this work were biologically induced by filamentous fungi mainly by direct (enzymatic) mechanisms.

  2. Performance of Iron Plaque of Wetland Plants for Regulating Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus from Agricultural Drainage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural drainage water continues to impact watersheds and their receiving water bodies. One approach to mitigate this problem is to use surrounding natural wetlands. Our objectives were to determine the effect of iron (Fe-rich groundwater on phosphorus (P removal and nutrient absorption by the utilization of the iron plaque on the root surface of Glyceria spiculosa (Fr. Schmidt. Rosh. The experiment was comprised of two main factors with three regimes: Fe2+ (0, 1, 20, 100, 500 mg·L−1 and P (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 mg·L−1. The deposition and structure of iron plaque was examined through a scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. Iron could, however, also impose toxic effects on the biota. We therefore provide the scanning electron microscopy (SEM on iron plaques, showing the essential elements were iron (Fe, oxygen (O, aluminum (Al, manganese (Mn, P, and sulphur (S. Results showed that (1 Iron plaque increased with increasing Fe2+ supply, and P-deficiency promoted its formation; (2 Depending on the amount of iron plaque on roots, nutrient uptake was enhanced at low levels, but at higher levels, it inhibited element accumulation and translocation; (3 The absorption of manganese was particularly affected by iron plague, which also enhanced phosphorus uptake until the external iron concentration exceeded 100 mg·L−1. Therefore, the presence of iron plaque on the root surface would increase the uptake of P, which depends on the concentration of iron-rich groundwater.

  3. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  4. Bioconcentration of manganese and iron in Panaeoloideae Sing

    OpenAIRE

    Stijve, T.; Blake, C.

    1994-01-01

    According to literature, the manganese content of most basidiomycetes fluctuates between 10 and 60 mg/kg, whereas the iron levels range from 100-500 mg/kg (both expressed on dry weight). The present authors report that bioconcentration of manganese is a distinguishing feature of the Panaeoloideae, as demonstrated by the analysis of 44 collections representing 15 taxons. Carpophores generally contain between 250 and 2500 mg/kg on dry weight, and, with the notable exception of Panaeolus semiova...

  5. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  6. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  7. [Factors affecting biological removal of iron and manganese in groundwater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gang; He, Sheng-Bing; Wang, Xin-Ze

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting biological process for removing iron and manganese in groundwater were analyzed. When DO and pH in groundwater after aeration were 7.0 - 7.5 mg/L and 6.8 - 7.0 respectively, not only can the activation of Mn2+ oxidizing bacteria be maintained, but also the demand of iron and manganese removal can be satisfied. A novel inoculating approach of grafting mature filter material into filter bed, which is easier to handle than selective culture media, was employed in this research. However, this approach was only suitable to the filter material of high-quality manganese sand with strong Mn2+ adsorption capacity. For the filter material of quartz sand with weak adsorption capacity, only culturing and domesticating Mn2+ oxidizing bacteria by selective culture media can be adopted as inoculation in filter bed. The optimal backwashing rate of biological filter bed filled with manganese sand and quartz sand should be kept at a relatively low level of 6 - 9 L/(m2 x s) and 7 -11 L/( m2 x s), respectively. Then the stability of microbial phase in filter bed was not disturbed, and iron and manganese removal efficiency recovered in less than 5h. Moreover, by using filter material with uniform particle size of 1.0 - 1.2 mm in filter bed, the filtration cycle reached as long as 35 - 38h.

  8. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not

  9. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the ... and sediment were collected and trace element concentrations were measured with an ICP-MS. ..... Clay minerals are known to have high sorption affinities ..... sediment/water quality interaction with particular reference to the.

  10. Manganese, iron and copper contents in leaves of maize plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micronutrients such as boron (B), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) play important physiological roles in humans and animals. Zn and B are the micronutrients most often deficient in maize, in Iran. A completely randomized factorial block design experiment was carried out at Fars province of Iran during ...

  11. Pilot study points way to iron/manganese removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, N.; Barnes, A. [Progressive Consulting Engineers Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The use of coal, greensand and sand in filters for removing iron and manganese from the Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, water supply was investigated. The most effective and economic treatment involved using a dual media filtration and potassium permanganate as the oxidant.

  12. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.

    2013-01-01

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  13. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  14. Gold, iron and manganese in central Amapá, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Scarpelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Greenstone belts with deposits of gold, iron and manganese are common in the Paleoproterozoic Maroni-Itacaiunas Tectonic Province of the Guiana Shield. In Brazil, in the State of Amapá and northwest of Pará, they are represented by the Vila Nova Group, constituted by a basal unit of metabasalts, covered by metasediments of clastic and chemical origin. The basal metasediments, the Serra do Navio Formation, are made of a cyclothem with lenses of manganese marbles at the top of each cycle. Under the intense weathering of the Amazon, these lenses were oxidized to large deposits of high-grade manganese oxides. The exploitation of these oxides left behind the manganese carbonates and low-grade oxides. The overlaying Serra da Canga Formation presents a calcium and magnesium domain grading to an iron domain with banded silicate and oxide iron formations, mined for iron ores. Overlapping structures and superposed metamorphic crystallizations indicate two phases of dynamothermal metamorphism, the first one with axis to north-northeast and the second one to northwest, with an intermediate phase of thermal metamorphism related to syntectonic granitic intrusions. Shears oriented north-south, possibly formed during the first dynamothermal metamorphism and reactivated in the second, are ideal sites for hydrothermalism and gold mineralization, which is greater when occurs in iron formation and carbonate-bearing rocks, as it happened at the Tucano mine. Layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the greenstones represent a potential for chromite and platinum group elements. Pegmatites are source of cassiterite and tantalite exploited from alluvial deposits.

  15. Factors affecting radium removal using mixed iron-manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, H.V. Singh, S.; Kondapally, V.R.

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments confirmed that sorption of radium by a mixed iron-manganese oxide solid phase shows promise for treating radium-contaminated water. The capacities of these mixed oxides for sorption of radium depend on the composition of the solid phase, the pH of the aqueous solution, and the presence of competing cations. The removal of the oxide-radium complexes from aqueous suspension by manganese greensand filtration was also investigated. It was found that influent radium concentrations of 100 pCi/L were reduced to 2--9 pCi/L by this process. Additional study of the fate of radium in manganese greensand filters is recommended before this procedure is used for drinking water treatment

  16. Factors affecting radium removal using mixed iron-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, H.V. Singh, S.; Kondapally, V.R. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Batch experiments confirmed that sorption of radium by a mixed iron-manganese oxide solid phase shows promise for treating radium-contaminated water. The capacities of these mixed oxides for sorption of radium depend on the composition of the solid phase, the pH of the aqueous solution, and the presence of competing cations. The removal of the oxide-radium complexes from aqueous suspension by manganese greensand filtration was also investigated. It was found that influent radium concentrations of 100 pCi/L were reduced to 2--9 pCi/L by this process. Additional study of the fate of radium in manganese greensand filters is recommended before this procedure is used for drinking water treatment.

  17. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  18. Arsenic enrichment in estuarine sediments-impact of iron and manganese mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, K.K.C.; Paimpillii, J.S.

    River Mandovi and Zuari, Goa (west coast of India) are flowing through iron and manganese mining areas and are heavily used for iron and manganese ore transport. This region generates 25-30 million tons of mining rejects per year. The iron ore...

  19. Aluminum and iron contents in phosphate treated swamp rice farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2006 aluminum and iron contents were determined in phosphate treated swamp rice farm of Mbiabet, Akwa Ibom State. The objectives were to determine the aluminum and iron contents, the effect of drying, phosphate and lime application in an acid sulphate soil grown to rice in Nigeria. The soil samples used were ...

  20. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Corathers, Lisa A.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Manganese is an essential element for modern industrial societies. Its principal use is in steelmaking, where it serves as a purifying agent in iron-ore refining and as an alloy that converts iron into steel. Although the amount of manganese consumed to make a ton of steel is small, ranging from 6 to 9 kilograms, it is an irreplaceable component in the production of this fundamental material. The United States has been totally reliant on imports of manganese for many decades and will continue to be so for at least the near future. There are no domestic reserves, and although some large low-grade resources are known, they are far inferior to manganese ores readily available on the international market. World reserves of manganese are about 630 million metric tons, and annual global consumption is about 16 million metric tons. Current reserves are adequate to meet global demand for several decades. Global resources in traditional land-based deposits, including both reserves and rocks sufficiently enriched in manganese to be ores in the future, are much larger, at about 17 billion metric tons. Manganese resources in seabed deposits of ferromanganese nodules and crusts are larger than those on land and have not been fully quantified. No production from seabed deposits has yet been done, but current research and development activities are substantial and may bring parts of these seabed resources into production in the future. The advent of economically successful seabed mining could substantially alter the current scenario of manganese supply by providing a large new source of manganese in addition to traditional land-based deposits.From a purely geologic perspective, there is no global shortage of proven ores and potential new ores that could be developed from the vast tonnage of identified resources. Reserves and resources are very unevenly distributed, however. The Kalahari manganese district in South Africa contains 70 percent of the world’s identified resources

  1. Dimensional crossover in manganese based analogues of iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zingl, Manuel; Assmann, Elias; Aichhorn, Markus [University of Technology, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Computational Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    The manganese pnicitides BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaOMnAs crystallize in the same structure as the extensively studied iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaOFeAs. In contrast to the d{sup 6} configuration of the iron systems, the manganese d-shell is only half-filled (d{sup 5}). As a consequence, electronic correlations are much stronger, placing these compounds at the verge of the Mott metal-insulator transition. In this region of the phase diagram materials are prone to enhanced magnetism, apparent in the remarkably high Neel temperature of 625 K for BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed differences in the Neel temperatures, the band gap, and the optical properties of the manganese compounds under consideration can be traced back to their effective dimensionality. Our fully charge self-consistent DFT+DMFT calculations show excellent agreement with experiments, especially measured optical spectra.

  2. Iron and manganese oxides modified maize straw to remove tylosin from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongyuan; Guo, Xuetao; Peng, Dan

    2018-08-01

    Maize straw modified by iron and manganese oxides was synthesized via a simple and environmentally friendly method. Three maize straw materials, the original maize straw, maize straw modified by manganese oxides and maize straw modified by iron and manganese oxides, were detected by SEM, BET, XPS, XRD and FTIR. The results showed that maize straw was successfully modified and maize straw modified by iron and manganese oxides has a larger surface area than MS. According to the experimental data, the sorption trend could conform to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well, and the sorption ability of tylosin on sorbents followed the order of original maize straw oxides iron and manganese oxides. The study indicated that manganese oxides and iron-manganese oxides could significantly enhance the sorption capacity of original maize straw. The sorption isotherm data of tylosin on original maize straw fit a linear model well, while Freundlich models were more suitable for maize straw modified by manganese oxides and maize straw modified by iron and manganese oxides. The pH, ionic strength and temperature can affect the sorption process. The sorption mechanisms of tylosin on iron and manganese oxides modified maize straw were attribute to the surface complexes, electrostatic interactions, H bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early diagenesis of manganese, iron and phosphorus in European continental margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, C. van der

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a project that was carried out as a part of the Sedimentary Manganese and Iron cycLEs (SMILE) research program funded by the Netherlands Organisation of Scientific Research (NWO/ALW). SMILE aimed at studying the biogeochemistry of iron and manganese cycles in

  4. Early diagenesis of Manganese, Iron and Phosphorus in European continental margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, C.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a project that was carried out as a part of the Sedimentary Manganese and Iron cycLEs (SMILE) research program funded by the Netherlands Organisation of Scientific Research (NWO/ALW). SMILE aimed at studying the biogeochemistry of iron and manganese cycles in

  5. Iron and manganese removal from a groundwater supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, W.; Seifert, K.; Kasch, O.K. (Arber Richard P. Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The treatment options and planning techniques used by the town of Castle Rock (Colorado) for a new water treatment facility are described. Castle Rock officials assessed the available treatment options for dissolved iron and manganese removal and selected potassium permanganate as the primary oxidant to be followed by manganese greensand. A backup prechlorination system for oxidation was also installed. In addition, to prevent excess headloss buildup in the manganese greensand filter media, an anthracite carbon cap was used as the top filter medium for precipitate removal. It is recommended that a treatability study be performed to determine individual design criteria to allow for specific site conditions. The town also assessed the capital and operation and maintenance costs for both treatment at individual well fields and a centralized location for treatment of a cluster of well fields. The results indicate that it is more economical to provide centralized water treatment even though there are capital costs associated with piping raw water from the individual well fields to the central facility. 3 refs.

  6. Removal of iron and manganese from groundwater: a study of using potassium permanganate and sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsheikh Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments are done for different combinations of Fe+2 and Mn+2 concentrations. The obtained results show that Potassium Permanganate (PP gives good results in iron and manganese removal. By using PP dose near to half of the theoretically required one, it can remove up to 100 % and 90 % of iron and manganese, respectively over different tested concentrations at pH=7.0. Increasing rate of filtration influences the Mn+2 removal process obviously. Sedimentation is required when combined concentrations of iron and manganese are greater than 5.0 ppm to reduce filter rapid clogging. Using conventional treatment with adding alum, flocculation, sedimentation and filtration can remove up to 97% and 18% of iron and manganese, respectively. Using PP in addition to alum enhances manganese removal but decreases iron removal. However, using alum with increasing pH to 10 leads to 100 % and 95 % of Fe+2 and Mn+2 removal and increases filter working period.

  7. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased ∼2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, 54 Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. 54 Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected 54 Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration

  8. Thermodynamic Interactions Among Carbon, Silicon and Iron in Carbon Saturated Manganese Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Min-Kyu; Lee, Won-Kyu; Jin, Jinan; Jang, Jung-Mock; Pak, Jong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamics of carbon in manganese alloy melts is important in manufacturing low carbon ferromanganese and silico-manganese alloys. In order to predict the carbon solubility in liquid Mn-Si-Fe-Csat alloys as a function of melt composition and temperature, thermodynamic interactions among carbon, silicon and iron in carbon saturated liquid manganese should be known. In the present study, the effects of silicon and iron on the carbon solubility in Mn-Si, Mn-Fe and Mn-Si-Fe melts were measured in the temperature range from 1673 to 1773 K. The carbon solubility decreases significantly as silicon and iron contents increase in liquid manganese alloy. The interaction parameters among carbon, silicon and iron in carbon saturated liquid manganese were determined from the carbon solubility data and the Lupis' relation for the interaction coefficient at constant activity.

  9. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  10. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of iron, copper, manganese and zinc in the soils, grapes and wines of the Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Ribeiro de Lima

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the determination of iron, copper, manganese and zinc in the soils, grapes and wines of the three viticultural regions of the Azores. Iron, copper and zinc were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry and manganese by graphite furnace atomic absorption. The concentrations of the four elements differed in soils of the three regions; there was no difference in the concentration in grapes, whereas significant differences were observed for the wines as regards the amounts of iron, manganese and zinc. The concentrations of these four elements in wine correspond with the mean values observed for other European regions.

  12. Synthesis, structure and magnetism of manganese and iron dipicolinates with N,N '-donor ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Svoboda, I.; Růžičková, Z.; Koman, M.; Dlháň, L.; Pavlík, J.; Moncol, J.; Boca, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 425, JAN (2015), s. 134-144 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Manganese * Iron * Dipicolinate complexes * Crystal structure * Magnetism Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.918, year: 2015

  13. Sublethal effects of cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and iron on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxicological evaluations of cadmium, iron, manganese, lead and zinc were carried out against albino mice model, Mus musculus. On the basis of 96 hrLC50 value, cadmium (0.47 mM) was found to be the most toxic followed by zinc (2.40 mM), lead (2.42 mM), iron (4.25 mM) and manganese (5.70 mM) was least toxic.

  14. Study of nanodispersed aluminum and iron alcosols by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Vladimir; de Izarra, Charles; Saveliev, Gennady

    2011-06-01

    Nanodispersed aluminum and iron alcosols were prepared by ultrasonic dispersion of nanodispersed aluminum and iron powders in absolute ethanol. The photoacoustic signal (PAS) produced in modulated CO2 laser irradiation (1.026 and 1.096 kHz) of alcosols depends on the nature and method of nanoparticle fabrication and does not depend on their concentration in ethanol (within 1-5 g/l). Chemical interaction between metal nanoparticles and ethanol activated by laser irradiation or/and ultrasound is considered as the cause of the PAS.

  15. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of silicon manganese iron slag as railway ballast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ralph Werner Heringer; Barreto, Rairane Aparecida, E-mail: ralph@em.ufop.br, E-mail: rairanebarreto@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Gilberto, E-mail: gilberto@unicerp.edu.br [Centro Universitário do Cerrado Patrocínio (UNICERP), Patrocínio, MG (Brazil); Sousa, Fabiano Carvalho, E-mail: fabiano.carvalho.sousa@vale.com [Vale, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    In nature, metal ores such as iron, lead, aluminum and others are found in an impure state, sometimes oxidized and mixed with silicates of other metals. During casting, when the ore is exposed to high temperatures, these impurities are separated from the molten metal and can be removed. The mass formed by these compounds is slag. Slag is the co-product of the smelting of ore to purify metals. It may be considered a mixture of metal oxides, but may also contain metal sulphites and metal atoms in their elemental form. After it is reprocessed to separate the metals contained, the co-products of this process can be used in cement, rail ballast, road paving and various other purposes. The objective of this research work is the presentation of the chemical and mineralogical characterization tests of the silicon-manganese iron slag with the purpose of reusing the coproduct as rail ballast. X-ray diffraction tests, quantitative chemical analyzes, scanning electron microscopy and free lime content were prepared for these characterizations. The results of these tests showed the technical feasibility of using slag as rail ballast. (author)

  16. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of silicon manganese iron slag as railway ballast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Ralph Werner Heringer; Barreto, Rairane Aparecida; Fernandes, Gilberto; Sousa, Fabiano Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    In nature, metal ores such as iron, lead, aluminum and others are found in an impure state, sometimes oxidized and mixed with silicates of other metals. During casting, when the ore is exposed to high temperatures, these impurities are separated from the molten metal and can be removed. The mass formed by these compounds is slag. Slag is the co-product of the smelting of ore to purify metals. It may be considered a mixture of metal oxides, but may also contain metal sulphites and metal atoms in their elemental form. After it is reprocessed to separate the metals contained, the co-products of this process can be used in cement, rail ballast, road paving and various other purposes. The objective of this research work is the presentation of the chemical and mineralogical characterization tests of the silicon-manganese iron slag with the purpose of reusing the coproduct as rail ballast. X-ray diffraction tests, quantitative chemical analyzes, scanning electron microscopy and free lime content were prepared for these characterizations. The results of these tests showed the technical feasibility of using slag as rail ballast. (author)

  17. Contribution to the study of iron-manganese alloy oxidation in oxygen at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, Francoise

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis reports a systematic investigation of the oxidation of three relatively pure iron-manganese alloys in oxygen, under atmospheric pressure, and between 400 and 1000 C, these alloys being annealed as well as work-hardened. It also compares their behaviour with that of non-alloyed iron oxidized under the same conditions. The author describes the experimental techniques and installations, discusses the morphology of oxide films formed under the experimental conditions, discusses the film growth kinetics which is studied by thermogravimetry, proposes interpretations of results, and outlines the influence of manganese addition to iron on iron oxidation

  18. Adhesive wear of iron chromium nickel silicon manganese molybdenum niobium alloys with duplex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Deppe, E.; Ambroziak, A.; Melzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Iron nickel chromium manganese silicon and iron chromium nickel manganese silicon molybdenum niobium alloys have a so-called duplex structure in a wide concentration range. This causes an excellent resistance to wear superior in the case of adhesive stress with optimized concentrations of manganese, silicon, molybdenum and niobium. The materials can be used for welded armouring structures wherever cobalt and boron-containing alloy systems are not permissible, e.g. in nuclear science. Within the framework of pre-investigations for manufacturing of filling wire electrodes, cast test pieces were set up with duplex structure, and their wear behavior was examined. (orig.) [de

  19. Characteristics and treatment mechanism of mine water with high concentration of iron and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.; Yang, J.; He, X.; Yang, J.; Tian, T. [Hebei University of Engineering, Handan (China)

    2006-12-15

    The characteristics and treatment of mine water with high concentration or iron and manganese were studied with mine water produced in Jiukuang and Siwan belonging to Hebi Coal Industry Group Co., Ltd. Analysis shows that the mine water is abundant in dissolved oxygen and has high TDS and high turbidity so the mine water does not need aeration. The effect of removal of iron and manganese by coagulation-sedimentation and the influence of filter material and influent water flow rate on effluent quality were investigated. It is shown that the removal rate of iron can reach 90% while removal of manganese can only reach about 20%. The concentration of iron and manganese in the effluent is lower than 0.1 mg/L with filter material of manganese sand which was immersed in KMnO{sub 4} solution at a filtration rate of 7 - 9 m/h. The results show that the layer of activated compound substance membrane formed on the surface of the manganese sand plays an important role in the removal of manganese. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Trigo duro: tolerância à toxicidade de alumínio, manganês e ferro em soluções nutritivas Durum wheat: tolerance to aluminum, manganese and iron toxicities in nutrient solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Oliveira Camargo

    1995-01-01

    exhibited root growth in the presence of 1 mg/L of Al3+, and all evaluated durum wheat inbred lines were sensitive to 0.4 mg/L of Al3+, showing an irreversible root growth. As the Mn2+ and Fe2+ concentrations were increasead into the solutions, the root length of all studied genotypes presented a significant reduction. The durum wheat inbred lines 1 (Avetoro "S" x Anhinga "S" - Purcell "S"/ D.67.2, 2 (Cando - Yavaros "S", 6 (Chen "S" e 8 (Carcomum "S" showed high level of tolerance to manganese toxicity in relation to 'Siete Cerros' and the durum wheat inbred lines 1, 6, 12 (CI 14955 x Yavaros "S"- Gediz"S"/Tropic Bird, 16 and 21 (Swan 'S" and 20 (Boyeros "S"/Cocorit-71/5/Crane/Ganso//Marte"S"/3/TiIdillo"S"/4/Memo "S" exhibited tolerance to the presence of high levels of Fe2+ into the nutrient solutions.

  1. Effects of manganese oxide and sulphate on the olefin selectivity of iron catalysts in the Fischer Tropsch reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van W.L.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Kraan, van der A.M.; van der Baan, Hessel

    1982-01-01

    Although it has been claimed by various authors that the addition of manganese oxide, MnO, to an iron catalyst gives a marked increase in the olefin selectivity of iron catalysts, we have been unable to confirm these claims in Fischer Tropsch experiments at 513 K for an iron manganese oxide catalyst

  2. Removal of iron and manganese using biological roughing up flow filtration technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Virginia Alejandra; María Ingallinella, Ana; Sanguinetti, Graciela

    2005-11-01

    The removal of iron and manganese from groundwater using biological treatment methods is almost unknown in Latin America. Biological systems used in Europe are based on the process of double rapid biofiltration during which dissolved oxygen and pH need to be strictly controlled in order to limit abiotic iron oxidation. The performance of roughing filter technology in a biological treatment process for the removal of iron and manganese, without the use of chemical agents and under natural pH conditions was studied. Two pilot plants, using two different natural groundwaters, were operated with the following treatment line: aeration, up flow roughing filtration and final filtration (either slow or rapid). Iron and manganese removal efficiencies were found to be between 85% and 95%. The high solid retention capability of the roughing filter means that it is possible to remove iron and manganese simultaneously by biotic and abiotic mechanisms. This system combines simple, low-cost operation and maintenance with high iron and manganese removal efficiencies, thus constituting a technology which is particularly suited to small waterworks.

  3. Concentration of Lead, Mercury, Cadmium, Aluminum, Arsenic and Manganese in Umbilical Cord Blood of Jamaican Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen; Dickerson, Aisha S.; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Bressler, Jan; Coore Desai, Charlene; Shakespeare-Pellington, Sydonnie; Reece, Jody-Ann; Morgan, Renee; Loveland, Katherine A.; Grove, Megan L.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation) concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL), 4.4 (2.4 μg/L), 10.9 (9.2 μg/L), and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L), respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01). After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car), the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01). Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations. PMID:25915835

  4. Concentration of Lead, Mercury, Cadmium, Aluminum, Arsenic and Manganese in Umbilical Cord Blood of Jamaican Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Rahbar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL, 4.4 (2.4 μg/L, 10.9 (9.2 μg/L, and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L, respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01. After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car, the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01. Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations.

  5. Stabilizing the strengthening precipitates in aluminum-manganese alloys by the addition of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yangyang; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M., E-mail: mmm@wpi.edu

    2017-04-13

    The Al-Mn-W system has considerable potential as a basis for lightweight aluminum alloys that are intended for use at temperatures approaching 350 °C (623 K). In this ternary system, aluminum, manganese, and tungsten co-precipitate to form the meta-stable Al{sub 12}(Mn{sub (1-x)}W{sub x}) phase, which is thermally stable and will not coarsen when held at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. This enhanced thermal stability of the Al{sub 12}(Mn{sub (1-x)}W{sub x}) phase in comparison to the Al{sub 12}Mn phase which forms in binary Al-Mn alloys is explained in terms of the Gibbs free energy of the two phases. It is shown that co-precipitating tungsten with aluminum and manganese lowers the Gibbs free energy of the precipitated phase and by so doing, it slows down its coarsening rate and enhances its thermal stability.

  6. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research suggests that taking a specific product (7-Keto Naturalean) containing manganese, 7-oxo-DHEA, L-tyrosine, ... can absorb.Milk proteinAdding milk protein to the diet might increase the amount of manganese the body ...

  7. Manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    Present article is devoted to manganese content in fluoride. The manganese content of some geologic deposits of Tajikistan was determined by means of chemical analysis. The mono mineral samples of fluorite of 5 geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was studied. The manganese content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  8. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  9. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction catalysts of manganese oxide decorated by silver nanoparticles for aluminum-air batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Miao, He; Xue, Yejian; Wang, Qin; Li, Shihua; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the hybrid catalysts of manganese oxide decorated by silver nanoparticles (Ag-MnO x ) are fully investigated and show the excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. The Ag-MnO 2 is synthesized by a facile strategy of the electroless plating of silver on the manganese oxide. The catalysts are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Then, the ORR activities of the catalysts are systematically investigated by the rotating disk electrode (RDE) and aluminum-air battery technologies. The Ag nanoparticles with the diameters at about 10 nm are anchored on the surface of α-MnO 2 and a strong interaction between Ag and MnO 2 components in the hybrid catalyst are confirmed. The electrochemical tests show that the activity and stability of the 50%Ag-MnO 2 composite catalyst (the mass ratio of Ag/MnO 2 is 1:1) toward ORR are greatly enhanced comparing with single Ag or MnO 2 catalyst. Moreover, the peak power density of the aluminum-air battery with 50%Ag-MnO 2 can reach 204 mW cm −2 .

  11. Arsenic, manganese and aluminum contamination in groundwater resources of Western Amazonia (Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meyer, Caroline M C; Rodríguez, Juan M; Carpio, Edward A; García, Pilar A; Stengel, Caroline; Berg, Michael

    2017-12-31

    This paper presents a first integrated survey on the occurrence and distribution of geogenic contaminants in groundwater resources of Western Amazonia in Peru. An increasing number of groundwater wells have been constructed for drinking water purposes in the last decades; however, the chemical quality of the groundwater resources in the Amazon region is poorly studied. We collected groundwater from the regions of Iquitos and Pucallpa to analyze the hydrochemical characteristics, including trace elements. The source aquifer of each well was determined by interpretation of the available geological information, which identified four different aquifer types with distinct hydrochemical properties. The majority of the wells in two of the aquifer types tap groundwater enriched in aluminum, arsenic, or manganese at levels harmful to human health. Holocene alluvial aquifers along the main Amazon tributaries with anoxic, near pH-neutral groundwater contained high concentrations of arsenic (up to 700μg/L) and manganese (up to 4mg/L). Around Iquitos, the acidic groundwater (4.2≤pH≤5.5) from unconfined aquifers composed of pure sand had dissolved aluminum concentrations of up to 3.3mg/L. Groundwater from older or deeper aquifers generally was of good chemical quality. The high concentrations of toxic elements highlight the urgent need to assess the groundwater quality throughout Western Amazonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of uranium and thorium isotopes in iron-manganese concretions of the Pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.Yu.; Andreev, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    Distribution of 238 U, 234 U, 232 Th, 230 Th in cross sections of samples from the Pacific Ocean iron-manganese concretions (IMC) of different genetic types has been studied, the results are presented. Possible influence of diagenetic processes in the deposits mentioned on distribution of the radionuclides in iron-manganese septarian nodules has been considered. The assumption is made that remobilization of Mn, Ni, Cu from IMC containing deposits does not upset uranium and thorium distribution in the concretions resulted from sedimentation mechanism of their formation. 18 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Daily dietary intake of iron, copper, zinc and manganese in a Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Revert, Consuelo; Reguera, Juan Ignacio; Burgos, Antonio; Hardisson, Arturo

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the daily dietary intake of essential metals in the Canary Islands, the iron, copper, zinc and manganese contents in 420 food and drink samples collected in local markets were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The estimated daily dietary intakes of iron, copper, zinc and manganese are 13.161 mg/day, 2.098 mg/day, 8.954 mg/day and 2.372 mg/day, respectively. The iron dietary intake was found to be below the recommendations fixed for adult women, while the copper and manganese dietary intakes fulfilled the Recommended Dietary Allowances. The mean daily intake of zinc was below the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Cereals were found to be the food group that contributed most to the intake of these metals. While the island of El-Hierro presented iron, copper, zinc and manganese mean intakes over the estimated intakes for the whole archipelago, Fuerteventura island showed the lowest intakes. Tenerife and Fuerteventura showed the lowest iron intakes, being below the recommendations.

  14. Iron Intermetallic Phases in the Alloy Based on Al-Si-Mg by Applying Manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podprocká R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is an effective element used for the modification of needle intermetallic phases in Al-Si alloy. These particles seriously degrade mechanical characteristics of the alloy and promote the formation of porosity. By adding manganese the particles are being excluded in more compact shape of “Chinese script” or skeletal form, which are less initiative to cracks as Al5FeSi phase. In the present article, AlSi7Mg0.3 aluminium foundry alloy with several manganese content were studied. The alloy was controlled pollution for achieve higher iron content (about 0.7 wt. % Fe. The manganese were added in amount of 0.2 wt. %, 0.6 wt. %, 1.0 wt. % and 1.4 wt. %. The influence of the alloying element on the process of crystallization of intermetallic phases were compared to microstructural observations. The results indicate that increasing manganese content (> 0.2 wt. % Mn lead to increase the temperature of solidification iron rich phase (TAl5FeSi and reduction this particles. The temperature of nucleation Al-Si eutectic increase with higher manganese content also. At adding 1.4 wt. % Mn grain refinement and skeleton particles were observed.

  15. Manganese and iron geochemistry in sediments underlying the redox-stratified Fayetteville Green Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Havig, Jeff R.; Singer, David M.; McCormick, Michael L.; Kump, Lee R.

    2018-06-01

    Manganese and iron are redox-sensitive elements that yield clues about biogeochemistry and redox conditions both in modern environments and in the geologic past. Here, we investigated Mn and Fe-bearing minerals preserved in basin sediments underlying Fayetteville Green Lake, a redox-stratified lake that serves as a geochemical analogue for Paleoproterozoic oceans. Synchrotron-source microprobe techniques (μXRF, μXANES, and μXRD) and bulk geochemical analyses were used to examine the microscale distribution and speciation of Mn, Fe, and S as a function of depth in the top 48 cm of anoxic lake sediments. Manganese was primarily associated with calcite grains as a manganese-rich carbonate that precipitated in the chemocline of the water column and settled through the euxinic basin to collect in lake sediments. Iron was preserved in framboidal iron sulfides that precipitated in euxinic bottom waters and underwent transformation to pyrite and marcasite in the sediments. Previous studies attribute the formation of manganese-rich carbonates to the diagenetic alteration of manganese oxides deposited in basins underlying oxygenated water. Our study challenges this paradigm by providing evidence that Mn-bearing carbonates form in the water column and accumulate in sediments below anoxic waters. Consequently, manganoan carbonates preserved in the rock record do not necessarily denote the presence of oxygenated bottom waters in ocean basins.

  16. Absorption of manganese and iron in a mouse model of hemochromatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease associated with excessive intestinal iron absorption, is commonly caused by loss of HFE gene function. Both iron and manganese absorption are regulated by iron status, but the relationships between the transport pathways of these metals and how they are affected by HFE-associated hemochromatosis remain poorly understood. Loss of HFE function is known to alter the intestinal expression of DMT1 (divalent metal transporter-1 and Fpn (ferroportin, transporters that have been implicated in absorption of both iron and manganese. Although the influence of HFE deficiency on dietary iron absorption has been characterized, potential effects on manganese metabolism have yet to be explored. To investigate the role of HFE in manganese absorption, we characterized the uptake and distribution of the metal in Hfe (-/- knockout mice after intravenous, intragastric, and intranasal administration of (54Mn. These values were compared to intravenous and intragastric administration of (59Fe. Intestinal absorption of (59Fe was increased and clearance of injected (59Fe was also increased in Hfe(-/- mice compared to controls. Hfe (-/- mice displayed greater intestinal absorption of (54Mn compared to wild-type Hfe(+/+ control mice. After intravenous injection, the distribution of (59Fe to heart and liver was greater in Hfe (-/- mice but no remarkable differences were observed for (54Mn. Although olfactory absorption of (54Mn into blood was unchanged in Hfe (-/- mice, higher levels of intranasally-instilled (54Mn were associated with Hfe(-/- brain compared to controls. These results show that manganese transport and metabolism can be modified by HFE deficiency.

  17. Absorption of Manganese and Iron in a Mouse Model of Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonghan; Buckett, Peter D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease associated with excessive intestinal iron absorption, is commonly caused by loss of HFE gene function. Both iron and manganese absorption are regulated by iron status, but the relationships between the transport pathways of these metals and how they are affected by HFE-associated hemochromatosis remain poorly understood. Loss of HFE function is known to alter the intestinal expression of DMT1 (divalent metal transporter-1) and Fpn (ferroportin), transporters that have been implicated in absorption of both iron and manganese. Although the influence of HFE deficiency on dietary iron absorption has been characterized, potential effects on manganese metabolism have yet to be explored. To investigate the role of HFE in manganese absorption, we characterized the uptake and distribution of the metal in Hfe −/− knockout mice after intravenous, intragastric, and intranasal administration of 54Mn. These values were compared to intravenous and intragastric administration of 59Fe. Intestinal absorption of 59Fe was increased and clearance of injected 59Fe was also increased in Hfe−/− mice compared to controls. Hfe −/− mice displayed greater intestinal absorption of 54Mn compared to wild-type Hfe+/+ control mice. After intravenous injection, the distribution of 59Fe to heart and liver was greater in Hfe −/− mice but no remarkable differences were observed for 54Mn. Although olfactory absorption of 54Mn into blood was unchanged in Hfe −/− mice, higher levels of intranasally-instilled 54Mn were associated with Hfe−/− brain compared to controls. These results show that manganese transport and metabolism can be modified by HFE deficiency. PMID:23705020

  18. The Efficiency of Iron and Manganese Removal from Groundwater Using Tower Aeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghdad Pirsaheb

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwaters passing through different layers of soil and due to its water properties and its high solubility, contain elements and minerals of material in the soil that sometimes can be dangerous for the health of consumers or at least undesirable in terms of cognitive beautiful. Iron and manganese are from constitutive of the soil and rocks of the Earth's surface. Water penetration through soil and rock can minerals such as these elements have dissolved and bring them into solution. The problems of iron and manganese in groundwater in domestic installations, commercial, industrial and refineries are created, and because much of the community water supply from underground water supplies will be removed where iron and manganese concentrations exceeded it is necessary. In this study Tower aeration system performance for the removal of iron and manganese from groundwater sources have been studied. In this research, pilot column aeration tower design, implementation and was established. This system made of PVC with a diameter and height 150 cm and 15 cm which was filled with flexible pipe parts. The initial pH=5, 7 and 9 and the initial concentration of Fe and Mn 2, 3 and 4 mg/l of the output system, sampling was done.

  19. Removal of Iron and Manganese Using Cascade Aerator and Limestone Roughing Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sanusi Azrin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination between oxidation and filtration can be used for removing iron and manganese from groundwater especially when the concentrations of these metals were high. This study focused on the effectiveness of the cascade aerator and the size of the limestone filter media to remove iron and manganese from groundwater. Water samples used for this study were collected from orphanage home, Rumah Nur Kasih, Taiping. Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM has provided a tube well of 15 m depth and 150 mm diameter for the orphanage home. However, the water cannot be used for domestic consumption due to high amount of iron and manganese at 6.48 and 1.9 mg/L which exceeded the drinking water standard of 0.3 and 0.1 mg/L respectively. Using laboratory physical model, the study has shown that the removals of iron and manganese have reduce the concentration until 0.17 and 0.2 mg/L respectively. Thus, the results from this study which utilize cascade aerator and limestone roughing filter could be implemented on site for the community to use the ground water for domestic purposes.

  20. X-ray fluorescence determination of cobalt in iron-manganese oceanic concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, V.V.; Kustov, V.N.; Metelev, A.Yu.; Rakita, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed for resolution of weak analytical lines for elements determined by radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence multi-element analysis. The method was used aboart for determining cobalt and some other commercially valuable elements in iron-manganese concretions of Pacific ocean 109 Cd was used as an ionizing radiation source

  1. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay; Los yacimientos de hierro y manganeso en el Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, B

    1959-07-01

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  2. Speciation of iron and manganese in the sediments of Mandovi Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; Rajendran, A.

    Several attempts have been made to study the distribution of iron and manganese in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India. But this is the first report of its kind on the speciation of these metals in sediments from Indian waters. This study would be useful...

  3. Redox transitions of chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel protoporphyrins in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.T.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical redox behavior of immobilized chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel protoporphyrins IX has been investigated over the pH 0–14 range. In the investigated potential domain the metalloporphyrins were observed in four different oxidation states (MI, MII, MIII and MIV). The

  4. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  5. Influence of iron supply on toxic effects of manganese, molybdenum and vanadium on soybean, peas, and flax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warington, K

    1954-01-01

    The investigations were carried out in nutrient solution with iron as ferric citrate and nitrogen in the form of nitrate. The addition of 2.5 ppm vanadium to plants in which iron chlorosis was already established, either by a lack of iron or by excess manganese, failed to counteract the condition, and caused toxic symptoms. The reduction of the standard iron supply to 1/2 or 1/3 accentuated the toxicity of 2.5 or 5 ppm V to soybean and flax, but a similar reduction in phosphorus had no influence. The toxicity to peas, however, was increased when the phosphorus was reduced to 1/10, provided the iron level was high (20 ppm Fe). Raising the iron supply to 20 or 30 ppm counteracted the toxicity of manganese (10 ppm), molybdenum (40 ppm) and vanadium (2.5 ppm), but the result was less marked when these three elements were combined. Iron supplied in successive, small doses proved less efficient in overcoming molybdenum or vanadium, but not manganese excess, than the same amount of iron supplied in fewer and larger quantities. Varying the iron supply had little effect when the concentration of the three elements was low. When increased iron supply had reduced the chlorosis caused by high manganese or vanadium, it also reduced the manganese and vanadium contents of the shoot (ppm/dm), but the molybdenum content was only lowered by high iron when given in non-toxic concentrations (0.1 ppm Mo) combined with excess manganese. Yield data for soybean and flax indicated an interaction between manganese with both molybdenum and vanadium if the iron supply was low, but none between molybdenum and vanadium. The effect of all three metals was additive in respect to iron.

  6. Role of iron and aluminum coagulant metal residuals and lead release from drinking water pipe materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Alisha D; Nguyen, Caroline K; Edwards, Marc A; Stoddart, Amina; McIlwain, Brad; Gagnon, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    Bench-scale experiments investigated the role of iron and aluminum residuals in lead release in a low alkalinity and high (> 0.5) chloride-to-sulfate mass ratio (CSMR) in water. Lead leaching was examined for two lead-bearing plumbing materials, including harvested lead pipe and new lead: tin solder, after exposure to water with simulated aluminum sulfate, polyaluminum chloride and ferric sulfate coagulation treatments with 1-25-μM levels of iron or aluminum residuals in the water. The release of lead from systems with harvested lead pipe was highly correlated with levels of residual aluminum or iron present in samples (R(2) = 0.66-0.88), consistent with sorption of lead onto the aluminum and iron hydroxides during stagnation. The results indicate that aluminum and iron coagulant residuals, at levels complying with recommended guidelines, can sometimes play a significant role in lead mobilization from premise plumbing.

  7. Extraction of Iron and Manganese from Pyrolusite Absorption Residue by Ammonium Sulphate Roasting–Leaching Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The residue from desulfurization and denitrification of exhaust gas treatment process with pyrolusite ore as absorbent is regarded as a potential source of iron and manganese. In this study, an extraction process is proposed for recovery of iron and manganese with ammonium sulphate roasting followed by sulphuric acid leaching. Firstly, the conversion mechanism was analyzed through mineral phase analysis of roasting products at different roasting temperature by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD technology. Then, the parameters of the roasting procedure such as roasting temperature and time, ammonium sulphate dosage, leaching temperature, leaching time, and sulphuric acid concentration are examined. The results implicate that the iron oxide and manganese dioxide in the residue are firstly converted into the water-soluble ( NH 4 3 Fe ( SO 4 3 and ( NH 4 2 Mn 2 ( SO 4 3 at 200–350 °C, and then the more stable NH 4 Fe ( SO 4 2 and MnSO 4 are formed, at temperature higher than 350 °C. Under optimum conditions, 95.2% Fe and 97.0% Mn can be extracted. Reactant diffusion through inert layer of silicon dioxide was considered as the rate-limiting step for iron extraction with an activation energy of 20.56 kJ/mol, while, the recovery process of Mn was controlled by both reactant diffusion and chemical reaction with an activation energy of 29.52 kJ/mol.

  8. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  9. A predictive regression model for the geochemical variability of iron and manganese in a coral reef ecosystem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinath, A.; Kumar, N.C.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Padmalal, D.; Nair, S.M.

    This article focuses on the influence of nutrient forms (nitrogen/phosphorous forms) and parameters like pH and organic carbon in the distributional characteristics of two important trace metals, viz. iron and manganese, in different sedimentary...

  10. Methods for the shipboard determination of dissolved iron and manganese in samples of sediment interstitial water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydes, D.J.; Chapman, E.

    1986-01-01

    Iron is extremely unstable in the presence of oxygen. A working atmosphere containing less than 0.2% oxygen is required if iron losses are not to be significant. Iron can be determined with a single addition of reagent, either manually or by a continuous flow procedure using ferrozine. Using a continuous flow procedure with a 5 cm colorimeter cell the method is linear up to 40 μM Fe and the precision is 2%. Manganese can similarly be determined with a single reagent addition using formaldoxime. For the continuous flow procedure with a 5 cm colorimeter cell the method is linear up to 60 μM Mn and the precision is 1%; however, under these conditions a solution containing 100 μm of iron produces an interference equivalent to 4.7 μM of manganese. A two-reagent procedure was developed using EDTA to suppress the iron interference. Using a 5% EDTA solution interference from a solution containing 100 μM of iron was undetectable. (author)

  11. Comparison of tolerance to soil acidity among crop plants. II. Tolerance to high levels of aluminum and manganese. Comparative plant nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, A; Hayakawa, Y

    1975-01-01

    Research was conducted by growing various species of plants in solutions containing high concentrations of manganese or aluminum. A comparison was made of the tolerance of these plants to low pH and to the manganese and aluminum. In addition, the element content of the plants was compared. Plants high in calcium were found to have an intermediate tolerance to high concentrations of manganese and aluminum. Gramineae had a high tolerance to these elements and to low pH. They also accumulated high levels of these elements. Legumes had a high tolerance to manganese and aluminum and to low pH. However, they also accumulated high levels of these elements. Legumes had a high tolerance to manganese and aluminum and to low pH. However, they also accumulated high levels of these elements. Cruciferae had a low tolerance to the elements and to low pH. They contained low levels of manganese and aluminum. Chenopodiaceae had a low tolerance to the elements as well as low element contents. However, they were highly tolerant to low pH.

  12. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Henn Birgit

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5 μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]. TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements.

  13. Biomimetic oxidation of piperine and piplartine catalyzed by iron(III) and manganese(III) porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaab, Estela Hanauer; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Lotufo, Letícia Veras Costa; Lopes, Norberto Peporine

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic metalloporphyrins, in the presence of monooxygen donors, are known to mimetize various reactions of cytochrome P450 enzymes systems in the oxidation of drugs and natural products. The oxidation of piperine and piplartine by iodosylbenzene using iron(III) and manganese(III) porphyrins yielded mono- and dihydroxylated products, respectively. Piplartine showed to be a more reactive substrate towards the catalysts tested. The structures of the oxidation products were proposed based on electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

  14. Evaluation of iron, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in oral hospital diets.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Daniele Caroline Faria; Sá, Júlia Sommerlatte Manzoli de; Cerqueira, Isabel B.; Oliveira, Ana P. F. de; Morgano, Marcelo Antonio; Quintaes, Késia Diego

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Many trace elements are nutrients essential to humans, acting in the metabolism as constituents or as enzymatic co-factors. The iron, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium contents of hospital diets (regular, blend and soft) and of oral food complement (OFC) were determined, evaluating the adequacy of each element in relation to the nutritional recommendations (DRIs) and the percent contribution alone and with OFC. Methods: Duplicate samples were taken of six daily meals ...

  15. Effect of direct contact with iron on gas evolution behavior of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1998-01-01

    Dry Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW), incombustible solid LLW, generated from nuclear power stations is planed to be solidified with cement backfill in drums. The solidified dry LLW will be buried to shallow underground at Rokkasyo LLW Disposal Center. It is well known that corrosion of aluminum and hydrogen gas evolution occur in high pH environments such as mortar. Gas evolution from aluminum is likely to effect the leachability of solidified dry LLW with mortar. Though aluminum removal from dry LLW is planed, a small amount of aluminum will be actually included in dry LLW. Large effects of pH and temperature on corrosion rate of aluminum and gas evolution were recognized in our previous study. It was also found that 1.5 mole hydrogen gas evolves while 1 mole aluminum corrodes under 60degC. Actually aluminum in drums is likely to contact with carbon steel of which main element is iron. The gas evolution behavior of aluminum is expected to be affected by its direct contact with iron. Therefore, effect of direct contact with iron on gas evolution behavior of aluminum was studied. The corrosion rate of aluminum increased by contacting it with iron in simulating mortar environments. The amount of gas evolution from aluminum was reduced by contacting with iron. The reduction in gas evolution was considered to result from the change of cathode reaction from hydrogen evolution to oxygen reduction. When aluminum contacts with iron, the corrosion and gas evolution behavior of aluminum is significantly affected oxygen in environment. (author)

  16. Use of a portable X-ray analyser for manganese and iron assay in minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taqueda, M.H.S.; Agudo, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a protable X-ray fluorescence analyser for manganese and iron assay in minerals is described. The concentration range in the measured samples was 30% to 60% for Mn and 2% to 20% for Fe. The excitation source used was a 3 mCi 109 Cd sealed source. Balanced filters were used for the X-ray analysis. The statistical study of results showed a precision better than 0,5 for Mn, but only 4% for iron. They can be improved either increasing the counting time or using a 238 Pu source

  17. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  18. The concentration of manganese, iron and strontium in bone of red fox Vulpes vulpes (L. 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budis, Halina; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Lanocha, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I

    2013-12-01

    The aims of the study were to determine manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr) concentrations in fox bone samples from north-western Poland and to examine the relationships between the bone Mn, Fe and Sr concentrations and the sex and age of the foxes. In the studied samples of fox cartilage, cartilage with adjacent compact bone, compact bone and spongy bone, the concentrations of the analysed metals had the following descending order: Fe > Sr > Mn. The only exception was in compact bone, in which the concentrations were arranged in the order Sr > Fe > Mn. Manganese concentrations were significantly higher in cartilage, compact bone and cartilage with compact bone than in spongy bone. Iron concentrations were higher in cartilage and spongy bone compared with compact bone. Strontium concentrations were greater in compact bone than in cartilage and spongy bone. The manganese, iron and strontium concentrations in the same type of bone material in many cases correlated with each other, with the strongest correlation (r > 0.70) between Mn and Fe in almost all types of samples. In addition, concentrations of the same metals in different bone materials were closely correlated for Mn and Fe in cartilage and cartilage with adjacent compact bone, and for Sr in compact bone and cartilage with compact bone. In the fox from NW Poland, there were no statistically significant differences in Mn, Fe and Sr in any of the types of bone material between the sexes and immature and adult foxes.

  19. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Fei; Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L -1 iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L -1 manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH) 3(am) or MnO 2(am) coat the algal cells , which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  20. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Fei, E-mail: gefei@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH){sub 3(am)} or MnO{sub 2(am)} coat the algal cells{sub ,} which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  1. Enthalpy of formation of vanadates of iron, chromium, and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesler, Y.A.; Cheshnitskii, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret' yakov, Y.D.

    1985-09-01

    The study of vanadates of iron, aluminum and chromium is of importance for the analysis of the functioning of catalysts of organic synthesis reactions and for the study of vanadium corrosion of structural materials. Of principal interest, however, are the processes in the treatment of vanadium-containing metallurgical slags and waste from thermal power plants, in which these compounds play a major role. At the same time, the thermochemical properties of these substances, which are necessary for creating the physicochemical foundations of industrially important processes, have not been investigated sufficiently. The authors therefore undertake here a study of the compounds FeVO/sub 4/, AIVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/ and FeCr(VO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, to determine their enthalpies of formation.

  2. The Corrosion of Magnesium and of the Magnesium Aluminum Alloys Containing Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, J A

    1927-01-01

    The extensive use of magnesium and its alloys in aircraft has been seriously handicapped by the uncertainties surrounding their resistance to corrosion. This problem has been given intense study by the American Magnesium Corporation and at the request of the Subcommittee on Materials for Aircraft of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics this report was prepared on the corrosion of magnesium. The tentative conclusions drawn from the experimental facts of this investigation are as follows: the overvoltage of pure magnesium is quite high. On immersion in salt water the metal corrodes with the liberation of hydrogen until the film of corrosion product lowers the potential to a critical value. When the potential reaches this value it no longer exceeds the theoretical hydrogen potential plus the overvoltage of the metal. Rapid corrosion consequently ceases. When aluminum is added, especially when in large amounts, the overvoltage is decreased and hydrogen plates out at a much lower potential than with pure magnesium. The addition of small amount of manganese raises the overvoltage back to practically that of pure metal, and the film is again negative.

  3. Removal of iron and manganese using granular activated carbon and zeolite in artificial barrier of riverbank filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Abustan; Harmuni, Halim; Mohd, Remy Rozainy M. A. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Iron and Manganese was examined from riverbank filtration (RBF) and river water in Sungai Kerian, Lubok Buntar, Serdang Kedah. Water from the RBF was influenced by geochemical and hydro chemical processes in the aquifer that made concentrations of iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn) high, and exceeded the standard values set by the Malaysia Ministry of Health. Therefore, in order to overcome the problem, the artificial barrier was proposed to improve the performance of the RBF. In this study, the capability and performance of granular activated carbon, zeolite and sand were investigated in this research. The effects of dosage, shaking speed, pH and contact time on removal of iron and manganese were studied to determine the best performance. For the removal of iron using granular activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite, the optimum contact time was at 2 hours with 200rpm shaking speed with 5g and 10g at pH 5 with percentage removal of iron was 87.81% and 83.20% respectively. The removal of manganese and zeolite arose sharply in 75 minutes with 90.21% removal, with 100rpm shaking speed. The GAC gave the best performance with 99.39% removal of manganese. The highest removal of manganese was achieved when the adsorbent dosage increased to 10g with shaking speed of 200rpm.

  4. Preparing rare earth-silicon-iron-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, J.D.; Morrice, E.; Herve, B.P.; Wong, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    As part of its mission to assure the maximum recovery and use of the Nation's mineral resources, the Bureau of Mines, investigated an improved procedure for producing rare earth-silicon alloys. For example, a charge consisting of 681 grams of mixed rare-earth oxides, 309 grams of ferrosilicon (75 wt-pct Si), and 182 grams of aluminum metal along with a flux consisting of 681 grams of CaO and 45 grams of MgO was reacted at 1500 0 C in an induction furnace. Good slag-metal separation was achieved. The alloy product contained, in weight-percent, 53 RE, 28 Si, 11 Fe, and 4 Al with a rare earth recovery of 80 pct. In current industrial practice rare earth recoveries are usually about 60 pct in alloy products that contain approximately 30 wt-pct each of rare earths and silicon. Metallurgical evaluations showed the alloys prepared in this investigation to be as effective in controlling the detrimental effect of sulfur in steel and cast iron as the commercial rare earth-silicon-iron alloys presently used in the steel industry

  5. Simultaneous removal of iron and manganese of aqueous solutions using as adsorbent a Mexican natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, A.; Solache R, M. J.; Olguin G, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    In this work was evaluated the removal capacity of iron and manganese of aqueous solutions using a Mexican natural zeolite. It was observed that the Freundlich pattern describes the adsorption process appropriately and that a competitive effect exists between both metals by the exchange places of the zeolite, when it is starting of solutions that contain to both metals, impacting mainly in the manganese removal. A natural zeolite coming from the Puebla State, Mexico was used. The material was milled and sieved to a mesh size 30 and was conditioned with a solution 0.5 N of sodium chloride. Later on was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  6. [Influence of aluminum and manganese on the growth, nutrient uptake and the efflux by ectomycorrhizal fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Huang, Jian-Guo; Yuan, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Al3+ and Mn2+ limit forest growth and vegetation restoration in strongly acidic soils and mining areas of aluminum and manganese. The knowledge on the influence of these two elements on ectomycorrhizal fungi can provide theoretical and technical supports for the selection of powerful ectomycorrhizal fungal strains and the bioremediation of contaminated soil. Three ectomycorrhizal fungal strains, namely Suillus luteus 13 (Sl 13), Cenococcum geophilum 04 (Cg 04) and Pisolithus tinctorius 715 (Pt 715), were grown in liquid culture mediums with Al3+ and Mn2+ added alone and together to investigate fungal growth, nutrient uptake and organic acid efflux. The results showed that the biomass of Sl 13, Cg 04 and Pt 715 was decreased by 70.35%, 52.44% and 18.55%, respectively, under Mn2+ stress. Al3 also decreased the biomass of Sl 13 by 50.74% but increased that of Cg 04. The growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi was further inhibited when grown in culture solutions with addition of both Mn2+ and Al3 and the least growth inhibition was found with Pt 715. Cg 04 might thus have a strong resistance to Al3+ stress and Pt 715 to both Al3+ and Mn2+ compared to the others. Al3+ and Mn2+ decreased the nutrient uptake by the fungi, particularly by Sl 13 which showed more obvious reduction than Pt 715 and Cg 04. However, Al3+ and Mn2+ increased the efflux of oxalic acid and protons by ectomycorrhizal fungi. An additional oxalic acid exudation by Cg 04 was observed in the coexistence of Al3+ and Mn2+ and Pt 715 exuded not only oxalic acid but also succinic acid. Therefore, ectomycorrhizal fungi resistant to Mn2+ and Al3+ could effuse more organic acids than the sensitive ones in order to alleviate the harmfulness through complexation under the stress.

  7. Magnetic composites based on hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Tiago P.; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Sasaki, Jose M.; Fabris, J.D.; Oliveira, Diana Q.L. de; Valentini, Antoninho

    2010-01-01

    Materials containing hybrid spheres of aluminum oxide and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxides were obtained from a chemical precursor prepared by admixing chitosan and iron and aluminum hydroxides. The oxides were first characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed the size distribution of the resulting spheres to be highly homogeneous. The occurrence of nano-composites containing aluminum oxides and iron oxides was confirmed from powder X-ray diffraction patterns; except for the sample with no aluminum, the superparamagnetic relaxation due to iron oxide particles were observed from Moessbauer spectra obtained at 298 and 110 K; the onset six line-spectrum collected at 20 K indicates a magnetic ordering related to the blocking relaxation effect for significant portion of small spheres in the sample with a molar ratio Al:Fe of 2:1.

  8. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Removal of iron and manganese by artificial destratification in a tropical climate (Upper Layang Reservoir, Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R; Kassim, M A; Inman, M; Baharim, N H; Azman, S

    2002-01-01

    Environmental monitoring was carried out at Upper Layang Reservoir situated in Masai, Johor, Malaysia. The study shows that thermal stratification and natural mixing of the water column do exist in the reservoir and the level of stratification varies at different times of the year. Artificial destratification via diffused air aeration techniques was employed at the reservoir for two months. The results show that thermal stratification was eliminated after a week of continuous aeration. The concentrations of iron and to a lesser extent manganese in the water column was also reduced during the aeration period.

  10. Control of manganese and iron in Skagerrak sediments (northeastern North Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajendran, A.; DileepKumar, M.; Bakker, J.F.

    - 80. I00 E E 40" "I- l-- n 6Or hl 80" ioo (a) MANGANESE ( mmo\\[. kg ''1 ) ,? 2,0 3p ~, A ,o =o 40" 6O" I00 B (b) IRON (mmol. kg '-I ) 4o 6o- 8O" IO( ~o,oo ,ooo i I I 590 I A o 20- . 40" 60" ,J o 2o 40" 60" 80- IOO... in these sediments, expressed as change in concentration with time on a volume basis of sediments or pore water \\[see Berner (1980) for a discussion \\], the steady-state equations of Burdige and Gieskes (1983) have been used. These are, ( 1 ) oxic zone...

  11. Treatment of leachate by electrocoagulation using aluminum and iron electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Fatih; Kurt, Ugur; Apaydin, Omer; Gonullu, M Talha

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, treatment of leachate by electrocoagulation (EC) has been investigated in a batch process. The sample of leachate was supplied from Odayeri Landfill Site in Istanbul. Firstly, EC was compared with classical chemical coagulation (CC) process via COD removal. The first comparison results with 348 A/m2 current density showed that EC process has higher treatment performance than CC process. Secondly, effects of process variables such as electrode material, current density (from 348 to 631 A/m2), pH, treatment cost, and operating time for EC process are investigated on COD and NH4-N removal efficiencies. The appropriate electrode type search for EC provided that aluminum supplies more COD removal (56%) than iron electrode (35%) at the end of the 30 min operating time. Finally, EC experiments were also continued to determine the efficiency of ammonia removal, and the effects of current density, mixing, and aeration. All the findings of the study revealed that treatment of leachate by EC can be used as a step of a joint treatment.

  12. Effects of Exogenous Gibberellic Acid3 on Iron and Manganese Plaque Amounts and Iron and Manganese Uptake in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L-1) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L-1) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  13. The corrosion behavior of iron and aluminum under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, R.; Cho, T.; Sugahara, K.; Takizawa, Y.; Hironaga, M.

    1997-01-01

    The generation of hydrogen gas from metallic waste in corrosive disposal environment is an important issue for the safety analysis of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities in Japan. In particular iron and aluminum are the possibly important elements regarding the gas generation. However, the corrosion behavior of these metals has not been sufficiently investigated under the highly alkaline non-oxidizing disposal conditions yet. The authors studied the corrosion behavior of iron and aluminum under simulated disposal environments. The quantity of hydrogen gas generated from iron was measured in a closed cell under highly alkaline non-oxidizing conditions. The observed corrosion rate of iron in the initial period of immersion was 4 nm/year at 15 C, 20 nm/year at 30 C, and 200 nm/year at 45 C. The activation energy was found to be 100 kJ/mol from Arrhenius plotting of the above corrosion rates. The corrosion behavior of aluminum was studied under an environment simulating conditions in which aluminum was solidified with mortar. In the initial period aluminum corroded rapidly with a corrosion rate of 20 mm/year. However, the corrosion rate decreased with time, and after 1,000 hours the rate reached 0.001 to 0.01 mm/year. Thus the authors obtained data on hydrogen gas generation from iron and aluminum under the disposal environment relevant to the safety analysis of low-level radioactive disposal facilities in Japan

  14. Redox speciation of particulate iron and manganese during river/ocean mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw, M.; Szymczak, R.; Payne, T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A synchrotron radiation experiment was performed at the Australian National Beamline Facility (Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan) to investigate changes in the physico-chemical nature of particles during estuarine mixing. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra (XANES) analysis was used to determine solid-state redox speciation of iron and manganese throughout the river/ocean salinity transects. Particles (>0.4μm) collected using clean techniques were stored under nitrogen during TROPICS Project expeditions to the Fly and Sepik Rivers, PNG. Results indicated that initially, particulate manganese was mostly present as Mn(IV) and Mn(III) compounds with some surface-adsorbed Mn(II). Similarly, iron was present as particulate Fe(III) and Fe(II/III) compounds with some adsorbed Fe(II). During river-ocean mixing, the proportions of both Mn(II) and Fe(III) significantly increased. These observations maybe due to increasing photochemical activity in the river plume, surface-sorption of reduced species related to the estuarine residence time of particles, or enhanced scavenging of ocean-sourced elements. Copyright (2000) American Chemical Society

  15. Evaluation of chromium, nickel, iron and manganese content in wheat, flour, bran and selected baked products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bawiec Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the nutritional values, breadstuff plays a big part in covering human nourishment needs and constitutes a base of all day diet. Moreover, bread is an excellent source of numerous vitamins and minerals the abundance of which depends on the degree of grinding. Thus, it seems to be very important to know the composition and level of bio-elements. That is why the main target of this study was to evaluate the concentration of selected trace elements: chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni, iron (Fe and manganese (Mn in wheat grain, wheat bran, different wheat and rye flour types and variety of breadstuff also with addition of grains and seeds from different bakeries and mills. Another task was to analyze if the technological process has an influence on secondary despoil of bread goods with heavy metal elements. The analyzed trace elements were measured with a precise and accurate atomic absorption spectrophotometric method (AAS and the results were expressed in mg/kg of selected sample. Obtained results show that bread and grain products are a good source of trace elements like chromium, nickel, iron and manganese. However, the higher levels of chromium and nickel in bread goods could rather be an effect of impurity caused by a technological process in mill and bakeries.

  16. Multimicronutrient Slow-Release Fertilizer of Zinc, Iron, Manganese, and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siladitya Bandyopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process for the production of a slow-release micronutrient fertilizer is described. The compound contains zinc, iron, manganese, and copper as micronutrients and is produced by polymerizing a system containing phosphoric acid, zinc oxide, hematite, pyrolusite, copper sulfate, and magnesium oxide followed by neutralization of the polyphosphate chain with ammonium hydroxide. Changes in temperature, density, and viscosity of the reaction system during polymerization were studied. Reaction kinetics was studied at three different temperatures. Rate curves revealed a multistage process with essentially linear rates at each stage. Thus, each stage displayed zero order kinetics. The product was crystalline and revealed ordering of P-O-P chains. It had low solubility in water but high solubility in 0.33 M citric acid and 0.005 M DTPA. Three different field trials showed significant yield increments using the slow-release micronutrient fertilizer compared to the conventional micronutrients. Yield increments in rice were in the range of 10–55% over control (with no micronutrient and up to 17% over the conventional micronutrient fertilizers. There were significant increases in total uptake of zinc, iron, and manganese in the grain. Slow-release fertilizers also produced significant yield increases in potato as well as significant increase in vitamin C content of the tuber.

  17. Pilot scale evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes for the removal of high level of iron and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannoni, C.C.; Kinsley, B.P. [Fay, Spofford & Thorndike, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Marston, T.R. [Connecticut Water Company, Clinton, CT (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Iron and manganese originating from groundwater supplies have a long history of causing consumer complaints in water distribution systems. Although iron and manganese are not public health concerns, they are a major concern from an aesthetic standpoint. The elevated awareness of consumers in regard to the quality of drinking water, an increase in regulations requiring additional treatment and the cost associated with developing new sources of supply, has required many utilities to implement improvements to existing facilities. Historical water quality data collected from the Connecticut Water Company`s (CWC) Westbrook Well revealed an increasing trend in iron and manganese concentrations. As a result, the existing greensand filtration facility located at the well, provides insufficient removal rates and inefficient operating cycles. Variations in operating procedures were not successful in correcting these problems. A water treatment feasibility study recommended evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes to reduce iron (9 mg/l) and manganese (1.5 mg/l) levels below the secondary maximum contaminant levels of 0.30 and 0.05 mg/l, respectively. Assessment of these processes was accomplished through the construction and operation of a 5 gallon per minute (gpm) capacity pilot plant at the Westbrook Water Treatment Plant. Application of biological treatment for iron removal was then piloted on the existing full-scale treatment facility.

  18. Phase Transformation Behavior of Medium Manganese Steels with 3 Wt Pct Aluminum and 3 Wt Pct Silicon During Intercritical Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Binhan; Fazeli, Fateh; Scott, Colin; Yue, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Medium manganese steels alloyed with sufficient aluminum and silicon amounts contain high fractions of retained austenite adjustable to various transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity effects, in addition to a reduced density suitable for lightweight vehicle body-in-white assemblies. Two hot rolled medium manganese steels containing 3 wt pct aluminum and 3 wt pct silicon were subjected to different annealing treatments in the present study. The evolution of the microstructure in terms of austenite transformation upon reheating and the subsequent austenite decomposition during quenching was investigated. Manganese content of the steels prevailed the microstructural response. The microstructure of the leaner alloy with 7 wt pct Mn (7Mn) was substantially influenced by the annealing temperature, including the variation of phase constituents, the morphology and composition of intercritical austenite, the Ms temperature and the retained austenite fraction. In contrast, the richer variant 10 wt pct Mn steel (10Mn) exhibited a substantially stable ferrite-austenite duplex phase microstructure containing a fixed amount of retained austenite which was found to be independent of the variations of intercritical annealing temperature. Austenite formation from hot band ferrite-pearlite/bainite mixtures was very rapid during annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C), regardless of Mn contents. Austenite growth was believed to be controlled at early stages by carbon diffusion following pearlite/bainite dissolution. The redistribution of Mn in ferrite and particularly in austenite at later stages was too subtle to result in a measureable change in austenite fraction. Further, the hot band microstructure of both steels contained a large fraction of coarse-grained δ-ferrite, which remained almost unchanged during intercritical annealing. A recently developed thermodynamic database was evaluated using the experimental data. The new database achieved a better agreement

  19. Aluminum fin-stock alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.M.; Mutasher, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have long been used in the production of heat exchanger fins. The comparative properties of the different alloys used for this purpose has not been an issue in the past, because of the significant thickness of the finstock material. However, in order to make fins lighter in weight, there is a growing demand for thinner finstock materials, which has emphasized the need for improved mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance. The objective of this project is to determine the effect of iron, silicon and manganese percentage increment on the required mechanical properties for this application by analyzing four different aluminum alloys. The four selected aluminum alloys are 1100, 8011, 8079 and 8150, which are wrought non-heat treatable alloys with different amount of the above elements. Aluminum alloy 1100 serve as a control specimen, as it is commercially pure aluminum. The study also reports the effect of different annealing cycles on the mechanical properties of the selected alloys. Metallographic examination was also preformed to study the effect of annealing on the precipitate phases and the distribution of these phases for each alloy. The microstructure analysis of the aluminum alloys studied indicates that the precipitated phase in the case of aluminum alloys 1100 and 8079 is beta-FeAI3, while in 8011 it is a-alfa AIFeSi, and the aluminum alloy 8150 contains AI6(Mn,Fe) phase. The comparison of aluminum alloys 8011 and 8079 with aluminum alloy 1100 show that the addition of iron and silicon improves the percent elongation and reduces strength. The manganese addition increases the stability of mechanical properties along the annealing range as shown by the comparison of aluminum alloy 8150 with aluminum alloy 1100. Alloy 8150 show superior properties over the other alloys due to the reaction of iron and manganese, resulting in a preferable response to thermal treatment and improved mechanical properties. (author)

  20. Recovery of manganese from manganese oxide ores in the EDTA solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Shuai; Cao, Zhan-fang; Zhong, Hong

    2018-04-01

    A new process has been experimentally and theoretically established for the recovery of manganese from manganese oxide ores, mainly including the reductive leaching of manganese by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), EDTA recovery, and manganese electrolysis. The experimental conditions for this process were investigated. Moderate leaching environment by EDTA with the pH in the range of 5-6 is of benefit to leach manganese from some manganese oxide ores with high-content impurities, such as iron and aluminum. Most of EDTA can be recovered by acidification. A small amount of the residual EDTA in the electrolyte can prevent the generation of anode mud. In addition, trimanganese tetroxide (Mn3O4) can be obtained by the roasting of the EDTA-Mn crystallized product.

  1. Correlation between airborne manganese concentration at the workstations in the iron foundry and manganese concentration in workers’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedtaghi Mirmohammadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manganese (Mn used as raw material for melting process in the ferrous foundry is considered as hazardous neurotoxic substance because it accumulates in the central nervous system and may cause neurological disorders. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace. The objective of the research has been to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn and air-manganese (air-Mn measurement. Material and Methods: Air-Mn and Mn of blood serum were measured involving workers who worked in a big-sized foundry during 1 year. The standard method of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA ID-121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. Results: The air sampling results have revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3 in the workplace as compared to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH time weighted average (the reference time-weighted average (TWA = 1 mg/m3. The average blood serum Mn concentration was 2.745 μg/l for subjects working for shorter than 3 months and 274.85 μg/l for subjects working 3–12 months. Conclusions: Against the research hypothesis there was no correlation between the air-Mn concentration and the B-Mn (serum level of manganese in the serum of the exposed subjects. It may be due to short time of air sampling of manganese airborne particles, and a real-time monitoring of airborne manganese particles is suggested for any future study. Med Pr 2017;68(4:449–458

  2. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  3. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  4. Study of granitic biotites by X-ray fluorescence analysis: determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium, potassium, silicon and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubes, R. O.; Bermudez Polonio, J.

    1968-01-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium potassium, silicon, and aluminium, is reported, Sample preparation is carried out by the miniature flux technique, and rubidium is used as internal standard for silicon and aluminium. (Author) 5 refs

  5. Bio-inspired iron and manganese complexes derived from mixed N,O ligands for the oxidation of olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moelands, M.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    This Thesis describes the synthesis and structural analysis of bio-inspired iron and manganese complexes used for the catalytic oxidation of olefin substrates. The development of catalytic systems for oxidation chemistry that are based on first row transition metals and that apply a green oxidant

  6. The synthesis, structures and characterisation of new mixed-ligand manganese and iron complexes with tripodal, tetradentate ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkum, R.; Berding, J.; Mills, A.M.; Kooijman, H.; Tooke, D.M.; Spek, A.L.; Mutikainen, I.; Turpeinen, U.; Reedijk, J.; Bouwman, E.

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of new manganese and iron complexes with the general formula [M(tripod)(anion)] is described, where M = FeIII or MnIII, “tripod” is a dianionic tetradentate tripodal ligand and the anion is a chelating β-diketonate, 8-oxyquinoline or acetate. The synthesis of this type of complexes

  7. Iron and manganese shuttles control the formation of authigenic phosphorus minerals in the euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835714; Slomp, C.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159424003

    2013-01-01

    Microanalysis of epoxy resin-embedded sediments is used to demonstrate the presence of authigenic iron (Fe) (II) phosphates and manganese (Mn)-calcium (Ca)-carbonate-phosphates in the deep euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea. These minerals constitute major burial phases of phosphorus (P) in this area,

  8. The iron-regulated transporter 1 plays an essential role in uptake, translocation and grain-loading of manganese, but not iron, in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Lizhi; Persson, Daniel Olaf; Duan, Fengying

    2018-01-01

    Transporters involved in manganese (Mn) uptake and intracellular Mn homeostasis in Arabidopsis and rice are well characterized, while much less is known for barley, which is particularly prone to Mn deficiency. In this study we have investigated the role of the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1...

  9. Removal of Iron and Manganese from Natural Groundwater by Continuous Reactor Using Activated and Natural Mordenite Mineral Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevi, Y.; Dewita, S.; Aghasa, A.; Dwinandha, D.

    2018-01-01

    Mordenite minerals derived from Sukabumi natural green stone founded in Indonesia was tested in order to remove iron and manganese from natural groundwater. This research used two types of adsorbents which were consisted of physically activated and natural mordenite. Physical activation of the mordenite was carried out by heating at 400-600°C for two hours. Batch system experiments was also conducted as a preliminary experiment. Batch system proved that both activated and natural mordenite minerals were capable of reducing iron and manganese concentration from natural groundwater. Then, continuous experiment was conducted using down-flow system with 45 ml/minute of constant flow rate. The iron & manganese removal efficiency using continuous reactor for physically activated and natural mordenite were 1.38-1.99%/minute & 0.8-1.49%/minute and 2.26%/minute & 1.37-2.26%/minute respectively. In addition, the regeneration treatment using NH4Cl solution managed to improve the removal efficiency of iron & manganese to 1.98%/minute & 1.77-1.90%/minute and 2.25%/minute & 2.02-2.21%/minute on physically activated mordenite and natural mordenite respectively. Subsequently, the activation of the new mordenite was carried out by immersing mordenite in NH4Cl solution. This chemical activation showed 2.42-2.75%/minute & 0.96 - 2.67 %/minute and 2.66 - 2.78 %/minute & 1.34 - 2.32 %/minute of iron & manganese removal efficiency per detention time for chemically activated and natural mordenite respectively.

  10. The quality of Metroxylon Sago sucker: morphology and uptake of manganese and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat; Abdul Khalik Wood; Ramli Ishak

    2001-01-01

    Metroxylon sago or sagopalm is an important source of carbohydrate for the South East Asian countries, apart from rice. In Malaysia, wild sagopalm grows in Sarawak in its natural habitats, the coastal peat swamp. The quality of sucker growing vegetatively on sagopalm was studied at Sungai Talau experimental station, Dalat plantation and Oya/Mukah plantation in Sarawak. The coefficients of variability (C) and Index of similiarity (I) were calculated based on sucker morphology and uptake of manganese and iron, The matrix of hypothetical exact interpoint distances (Indices of Similarity and Dissimilarity) shows that sucker on matured sagopalm at Sungai Talam experimental station was a high quality, sucker on 5 years old sagopalm at Mukah sago plantation was approximately one-third as good, whereas sucker on 1.5 years old sagopalm at Oya/dalat sago plantation was of inferior quality. (Author)

  11. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate.

  12. Fluoride Removal From Drinking Water by Electrocoagulation Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takdastan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Existence of fluoride in drinking water above the permissible level causes human skeletal fluorosis. Objectives Electrocoagulation by iron and aluminum electrodes was proposed for removing fluoride from drinking water. Materials and Methods Effects of different operating conditions such as treatment time, initial pH, applied voltage, type and number of electrodes, the spaces between aluminum and iron electrodes, and energy consumption during electrocoagulation were investigated in the batch reactor. Variable concentrations of fluoride solution were prepared by mixing proper amounts of sodium fluoride with deionized water. Results Experimental results showed that aluminum electrode is more effective in fluoride removal than iron, as in 40 minutes and initial pH of 7.5 at 20 V, the fluoride removal process reached to 97.86%. The final recommendable limit of fluoride (1.5 mg/L was obtained in 10 minutes at 20 V with the aluminum electrode. Conclusions In electrocoagulation with iron and aluminum electrodes, increase of voltage, number of electrodes and reaction time as well as decrease of the spaces between electrodes, enhanced the fluoride removal efficiency from drinking water. In addition the effect of pH and initial concentration of fluoride varied with types of electrodes.

  13. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  14. Integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed-membrane hybrid process for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtban Kenari, Seyedeh Laleh; Barbeau, Benoit

    2017-04-15

    Newly developed ceramic membrane technologies offer numerous advantages over the conventional polymeric membranes. This work proposes a new configuration, an integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed (PFB)-ceramic MF/UF hybrid process, for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water. A pilot-scale study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this process with respect to iron and manganese control as well as membrane fouling. In addition, the fouling of commercially available ceramic membranes in conventional preoxidation-MF/UF process was compared with the hybrid process configuration. In this regard, a series of experiments were conducted under different influent water quality and operating conditions. Fouling mechanisms and reversibility were analyzed using blocking law and resistance-in-series models. The results evidenced that the flux rate and the concentration of calcium and humic acids in the feed water have a substantial impact on the filtration behavior of both membranes. The model for constant flux compressible cake formation well described the rise in transmembrane pressure. The compressibility of the filter cake substantially increased in the presence of 2 mg/L humic acids. The presence of calcium ions caused significant aggregation of manganese dioxide and humic acid which severely impacted the extent of membrane fouling. The PFB pretreatment properly alleviated membrane fouling by removing more than 75% and 95% of iron and manganese, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diversity and dynamics of rhizobial populations in acidic soils with aluminum and manganese toxicities in forest zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Manet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity in the humid forest zones of Cameroon is one of the major constraints to agricultural productivity. This study was carried out to assess the rhizobial communities of two acidic soils; with aluminum toxicity (Nkoemvone and manganese toxicity (Nkolbisson for their potential to improve soil fertility in Cameroon. These two soils were used to inoculate to the host plants cowpea and siratro. At harvest, 120 rhizobacterial isolates were extracted from the nodules of these two hosts and subjected to morphological characterization. Twenty isolates per site were selected and analyzed for their 16S rDNA genetic profile following restrictions with endonucleases of PCR products and electrophoresis. The restriction patterns of the 16S rDNA of the 40 isolates showed 12 different profiles. Eight occurred in both types of soils, where as 4 were specific to the manganese-toxic-acidic soil. While the Al toxicity reduced the nodulation and growth of both plants, the Mn toxicity mostly affect the cowpea. This study ascertained the distribution of rhizobia based on soil characteristics. Further molecular analyses would allow the identification of the isolates recovered as well as their phylogenetical relationships.

  16. Evaluation of trends for iron and manganese concentrations in wells, reservoirs, and water distribution networks, Qom city, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fahiminia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to evaluated trends for iron and manganese concentrations in wells, reservoirs, and water distribution networks in Qom city during the summer of 2012. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. The studied scopes consisted of groundwater (60 wells, reservoirs (10 tanks, and water distribution network (33 points. One sample was taken from each source monthly. Statistical tests used included post hoc tests (Tukey HSD. Finally, the results were compared with drinking water standards. Results: The average concentrations of iron in groundwater, reservoirs, and distribution networks were 0.09, 0.07, and 0.07 mg/l, respectively. The average concentrations of manganese in groundwater, reservoirs, and distribution networks were 0.15, 0.09, and 0.1 mg/l, respectively. The turbidity averages in groundwater, reservoirs, and distribution networks were 0.58, 0.6, and 0.52 NTU, respectively. The average concentrations of free chlorine residual in water reservoirs and distribution networks were 1.74 and 1.06 mg/l, respectively. The pH averages in groundwater, reservoirs, and distribution networks were 7.4, 7.7, and 7.5, respectively. The amounts of iron, manganese, turbidity, free chlorine residual, and pH in the investigated resources had no significant differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The amounts of iron, manganese, turbidity, free chlorine residual and pH in groundwater, reservoirs, and water distribution networks of Qom are within permissible limits of national standards and EPA guidelines. Only the amount of manganese was higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA permissible limit.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of the iron and manganese reconstituted tyrosyl radical in Bacillus cereus ribonucleotide reductase R2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane B Tomter

    Full Text Available Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g(1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g(1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν(7a = 1500 cm(-1 was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the (18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm(-1 of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g(1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011 J Biol Chem 286: 33053-33060 indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8

  18. Development of low-cost technology for the removal of iron and manganese from ground water in siwa oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Hesham M

    2010-01-01

    Ground water is the only water resource for Siwa Oasis. It is obtained from natural freshwater wells and springs fed by the Nubian aquifer. Water samples collected from Siwa Oasis had relatively higher iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) than the permissible limits specified in WHO Guidelines and Egyptian Standards for drinking water quality. Aeration followed by sand filtration is the most commonly used method for the removal of iron from ground water. The study aimed at development of low-cost technology for the removal of iron and manganese from ground water in Siwa Oasis. The study was carried out on Laboratory-scale columns experiments sand filters with variable depths of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 cm and three graded types of sand were studied. The graded sand (E.S. =0.205 mm, U.C. =3.366, depth of sand = 60 cm and filtration rate = 1.44 m3/m2/hr) was the best type of filter media. Iron and manganese concentrations measured in ground water with aeration only, decreased with an average removal percentage of 16%, 13% respectively. Iron and manganese concentrations after filtration with aeration came down to 0.1123, 0.05 mg/L respectively in all cases from an initial concentration of 1.14, 0.34 mg/L respectively. Advantages of such treatment unit included simplicity, low cost design, and no need for chemical addition. In addition, the only maintenance required was periodic washing of the sand filter or replacement of the sand in order to maintain reasonable flow rate through the system.

  19. Electroerosion formation and technology of cast iron coatings on aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolentsev Vladislav P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present in the course of designing basic production parts and industrial equipment designers pay more and more attention to aluminum alloys having a number of properties compared favorably with other materials. In particular, technological aluminum tool electrodes without coating in the presence of products of processing with alkali in the composition of operation environment are being destroyed at the expense of intensified material dissolution. It is shown in the paper that the method offered by the authors and covered by the patents on cast iron coating of products made of aluminum alloys, allows obtaining on a product surface the layers with high adhesion durability ensuring a high protection against destruction in the friction units including operation in hostile environment. Thereupon, aluminum, as compared with iron-based alloys used at manufacturing technological equipment for electrical methods of processing, has a high electrical and thermal conduction, its application will allow achieving considerable energy-saving in the course of parts production. A procedure for the design of a technological process of qualitative cast iron coatings upon aluminum tool electrodes and parts of basic production used in different branches of mechanical engineering is developed.

  20. Bio-accumulation of copper, zinc, iron and manganese in oyster Saccostrea cucullata, Snail Cerithium rubus and Clam Tellina angulata from the Bombay coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Nair, V.R; Moraes, C.

    accumulation was high in S. cucullata, manganese in C. rubus and iron in T. angulata. Similarly, copper and zinc in S. cucullata and copper in C. rubus were found occasionally higher than accepted health standards...

  1. Low alloy additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the literature has been made on the experimental results of small additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium. Information is also included on the constitution, mechanical properties, heat treatment, and deformation of various binary and ternary alloys. 42 references, 24 figures, 13 tables

  2. Fluoride Removal From Drinking Water by Electrocoagulation Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Takdastan; Emami Tabar; Neisi; Eslami

    2014-01-01

    Background Existence of fluoride in drinking water above the permissible level causes human skeletal fluorosis. Objectives Electrocoagulation by iron and aluminum electrodes was proposed for removing fluoride from drinking water. Materials and Methods Effects of different operating conditions such as treatment time, initial pH, applied voltage, type and number of electrodes, the sp...

  3. Characterization of ion-implanted aluminum and iron by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodkin, J.S.; Franzen, W.; Culbertson, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The change in the optical constants of aluminum alloy and iron samples caused by implantation with nitrogen and chromium ions has been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The objective is to develop a method for simple, non-destructive characterization of ion-implanted metals. 5 refs., 6 figs

  4. Phosphorus, iron, and aluminum losses in runoff from a rotationally-grazed pasture in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastures can be a source of phosphorus (P) contributing to eutrophication and impairment of water resources. Phosphorus is tightly held in soils that are highly weathered, acidic, and with high iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) content like the Ultisols of southeastern USA. We used 11-yr (1999-2009) of da...

  5. Thermomagnetic identification of manganese and iron minerals present in soils and industrial dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawer, Małgorzata; Rachwał, Marzena; Jabłońska, Mariola; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Magiera, Tadeusz

    2017-04-01

    Many industries (e.g. metallurgy, power, cement, and coking plants) constitute a sources of industrial dusts containing technogenic magnetic particles (TMP). TMP are mostly iron oxides with ferrimagnetic or antiferromagnetic properties, therefore their presence in dusts, soils and sediments can be easily detected by magnetic susceptibility measurements. TMP, thanks their specific mineral and magnetic properties, and well developed specific surface area, are characterized by a chemical affinity for some elements like heavy metals. The main objective of this study was identification of manganese and iron (hydro)oxides occurring in industrial dusts and soils being under their deposition for long time period. In principle, Mn and Fe (hydro)oxides present in these samples originate from high-temperature technological processes. Soils samples (collected from different soil horizons) taken from surroundings of power station, iron/steel and non-ferrous plants as well as metallurgical dusts and fly ashes from power stations were subjected to investigation. During the studies temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray powder diffraction analyses were applied. Thermomagnetic analyses (K-T) revealed differences between samples from particular industries, however an inflexion at 450-500°C of all curves was observed indicating a probable occurrence of maghemite- or titanomagnetite-like phases. The curves of TMP emitted by power plants have inflection at 580 °C indicating that magnetite was the main magnetic phase. In case of TMP originated from non-ferrous metal smelting additional curve deflection at 130 and 210 °C occurred relating to intermediate titanomagnetite or iron sulfides. X-ray diffraction proved the occurrence of magnetite and maghemite in almost all samples, especially connected with power industry and iron/steel metallurgy. Mineral analysis revealed that kind of industrial process influenced on the dominating mineral forms found in

  6. Evaluation of Iron and Manganese-Coated Pumice Application for the Removal of as(v from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Babaie Far

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declinedfollowing every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by bothadsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could beconsidered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions.

  7. Determination of calcium, copper, chromium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium and zinc in ethanol by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, E.A.N.

    1981-01-01

    The direct determinacao of calcium, copper, chomium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium and zinc in ethanol by atomic absorption spectrometry with, air-acetylene flame is proposed. Effects of fuel/oxidant ratio, burner height and water content in the samples were investigated in detail. The method allows the determition of the elements with good precision (r.s.d. -1 for the elements tested. (author) [pt

  8. Charge state mapping of mixed valent iron and manganese mineral particles using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecher, K.; Nealson, K.; Kneedler, E.; Rothe, J.; Meigs, G.; Warwick, T.; Tonner, B.

    2000-01-01

    The interfaces between solid mineral particles and water play a crucial role in partitioning and chemical transformation of many inorganic as well as organic pollutants in environmental systems. Among environmentally significant minerals, mixed-valent oxides and hydroxides of iron (e.g. magnetite, green rusts) and manganese (hausmanite, birnessite) have been recognized as particularly strong sorbents for metal ions. In addition, minerals containing Fe(II) have recently been proven to be powerful reductants for a wide range of pollutants. Chemical properties of these minerals strongly depend on the distribution and availability of reactive sites and little is known quantitatively about the nature of these sites. We have investigated the bulk distribution of charge states of manganese (Mn (II, III, IV)) and iron (Fe(II, III)) in single particles of natural manganese nodules and synthetic green rusts using Scanning Transmission X-ray SpectroMicroscopy (STXM). Pixel resolved spectra (XANES) extracted from stacks of images taken at different wave lengths across the metal absorption edge were fitted to total electron yield (TEY) spectra of single valent reference compounds. Two dimensional maps of bulk charge state distributions clearly reveal domains of different oxidation states within single particles of Mn-nodules and green rust precipitates. Changes of oxidation states of iron were followed as a result of reductive transformation of an environmental contaminant (CCl 4 ) using green rust as the only reductant

  9. Chemical equilibrium modeling of organic acids, pH, aluminum, and iron in Swedish surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Carin S; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Köhler, Stephan J

    2010-11-15

    A consistent chemical equilibrium model that calculates pH from charge balance constraints and aluminum and iron speciation in the presence of natural organic matter is presented. The model requires input data for total aluminum, iron, organic carbon, fluoride, sulfate, and charge balance ANC. The model is calibrated to pH measurements (n = 322) by adjusting the fraction of active organic matter only, which results in an error of pH prediction on average below 0.2 pH units. The small systematic discrepancy between the analytical results for the monomeric aluminum fractionation and the model results is corrected for separately for two different fractionation techniques (n = 499) and validated on a large number (n = 3419) of geographically widely spread samples all over Sweden. The resulting average error for inorganic monomeric aluminum is around 1 µM. In its present form the model is the first internally consistent modeling approach for Sweden and may now be used as a tool for environmental quality management. Soil gibbsite with a log *Ks of 8.29 at 25°C together with a pH dependent loading function that uses molar Al/C ratios describes the amount of aluminum in solution in the presence of organic matter if the pH is roughly above 6.0.

  10. Hcl extractable minerals (Iron ,Zinc ,Calcium, Lead,Aluminum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Georgette Koduah

    2012-05-07

    http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/DRI-Tables.aspx. National Research Council. National Academy of Sciences, 2011. Accessed. May 7, 2012. 29. Coltman CA Pagophagia and Iron lack. JAMA, 1969; 207: 513- 516. 30. Dreyer MJ, Chaushev PG and RF Gledhill Biochemical investigations in geophagia.

  11. Growth rates of iron-manganese concretions in the Pacific and Indian oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Pospelov, Yu.N.

    1978-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis has been used for studying the distribution of 231 Pa, 230 Th, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 234 U, and 238 U isotopes in nineteen iron-manganese concretions. The study has shown a considerable violation of the equilibrium between uranium and daughter isotopes, viz, protactinium-231 and thorium-230. A sharp decrease of the ratios between the 231 Pain concretions made it possible to find the growth rates of 10 concretions from pelagic regions of the Pacific and Indian oceans. The obtained data deviate in narrow limits and amount to (3-6)mm/10 6 years when evaluation is made according to 230 Th decay and (4-7)mm/10 6 years when 231 Pa is used. The presence of Ra excess (as compared with mother isotopes 230 Th) in inner layers of the concretions points to the fact that the growth rates determined by the radium method are raised too high due to radium migration from the surface layers into the depth of the concretion. It is shown that accumulation of 231 Pa and 230 Th in concretions accounts for a small part (less than 25%) of their production from uranium dissolved in the sea water

  12. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca 9.4 Fe 0.4 Mn 0.2 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe 3+ ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn 2+ ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca 2+ ions, indicate that the Mn 2+ ion substitute into the Ca 2+ sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Manganese and Iron Food Frequency Questionnaire for Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Frida B; Falciglia, Grace A; Kuhnell, Pierce; Haynes, Erin N

    2017-09-14

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, but overexposure can lead to neurotoxicity. Given the essentiality of Mn in the diet, particularly during children's growth and development, it is imperative to quantify dietary Mn intake in populations that may be exposed to industrial sources of Mn. Dietary absorption of Mn is inversely associated with iron (Fe) stores, yet there is currently no food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to assess dietary Mn and Fe intake. The study objective was to develop and evaluate the validity of a FFQ to measure dietary Mn and Fe intake in pediatrics by comparing the estimated intakes of Mn and Fe with biomarkers: Mn in blood and hair and Fe in serum. This study utilized a subset of the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study (CARES) population residing in Guernsey County, Ohio. Dietary Mn was not correlated with either blood or hair Mn; however, dietary Mn and serum ferritin were significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. Moreover, dietary Fe and serum ferritin were also significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. This FFQ is a valid measurement tool for Fe intake as measured by serum ferritin; however, Mn intake did not correlate with either blood or hair Mn.

  14. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S + 4H(2)O --> SO(4) + 3H(2)S + 2H. Subsequent chemical reactions between...... reduction of MnO(2) to Mn. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO(2), the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO(4) and H(2)S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S. The observed microbial disproportionation of S only proceeds...... significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO(2) was high, > 10 cm in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic...

  15. Concentrations of manganese and iron in some woody and herbs plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Dragica M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are the substances that indicate environmental pollution. The plants polluted with heavy metals may endanger natural environment and cause health problems in humans. In our multidisciplinary research of the concentrations of pollutants in forest ecosystems and natural environment in Belgrade, we examined the contents of heavy metals essential for plants but harmful in greater concentrations on a long-term basis. The fact that heavy metals manganese and iron are accumulated in plants to the greatest extent focused our work on determination of the level of concentrations of Mn and Fe in the vegetative parts of 8 plant types on three locations on the Avala Mountain and one location in the centre of the city of Belgrade. The analyses of heavy metals contents in plants were performed by the method of flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The examination of the existence of important differences between the average values was performed by implementation of Duncan’s test for the level of significance of 95%. The current contents of heavy metals in plants in the area of the protected natural resource Avala do not represent danger that would presently cause notable damage to forests but show the tendency of the increase of concentrations. Therefore, this issue should be constantly monitored.

  16. Thiosulfate and sulfite distributions in porewater of marine sediments related to manganese, iron, and sulfur geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Fossing, Henrik; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    1994-01-01

    Depth distributions of thiosulfate (S 2O 32-) and sulfite (SO 32-) were measured in the porewaters of a Danish salt marsh and subtidal marine sediments by HPLC analysis after derivatization with DTNP [2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine)]. The distributions were compared to the redox zonation as indicated by Eh and Mn 2+, Fe 2+ and H 2S distributions. Concentrations of S 2O 32- varied from below detection (<50 nM) to 600 nM while SO 32- concentrations generally were 2-3 times higher, 100-1500 nM. Depth distributions of the two species were roughly similar. Lowest concentrations were found in the oxidized zone, including both the oxic surface layer and the suboxic zone of intense manganese and iron reduction, and concentrations tended to increase through the suboxic and into the reduced, sulfidic zone. The similarity of SO 32- and S 2O 32- profiles suggested a close coupling of the cycling of the two species. Rates of consumption were suggested as the main factor governing their distribution. Rapid turnover times for S 2O 32- and H 2S of 4 and 1.1 h, respectively, were estimated for the upper 0-1 cm of a subtidal sediment.

  17. Using Iron-Manganese Co-Oxide Filter Film to Remove Ammonium from Surface Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruifeng; Huang, Tinglin; Wen, Gang; Chen, Yongpan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Beibei

    2017-07-19

    An iron-manganese co-oxide filter film (MeO x ) has been proven to be a good catalyst for the chemical catalytic oxidation of ammonium in groundwater. Compared with groundwater, surface water is generally used more widely and has characteristics that make ammonium removal more difficult. In this study, MeO x was used to remove ammonium from surface water. It indicated that the average ammonium removal efficiency of MeO x was greater than 90%, even though the water quality changed dramatically and the water temperature was reduced to about 6-8 °C. Then, through inactivating microorganisms, it showed that the removal capability of MeO x included both biological (accounted for about 41.05%) and chemical catalytic oxidation and chemical catalytic oxidation (accounted for about 58.95%). The investigation of the characterizations suggested that MeO x was formed by abiotic ways and the main elements on the surface of MeO x were distributed homogenously. The analysis of the catalytic oxidation process indicated that ammonia nitrogen may interact with MeO x as both ammonia molecules and ammonium ions and the active species of O₂ were possibly • O and O₂ - .

  18. Evaluation of iron, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in oral hospital diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniele C F; de Sá, Júlia S M; Cerqueira, Isabela B; Oliveira, Ana P F; Morgano, Marcelo A; Quintaes, Késia D

    2014-10-01

    Many trace elements are nutrients essential to humans, acting in the metabolism as constituents or as enzymatic co-factors. The iron, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium contents of hospital diets (regular, blend and soft) and of oral food complement (OFC) were determined, evaluating the adequacy of each element in relation to the nutritional recommendations (DRIs) and the percent contribution alone and with OFC. Duplicate samples were taken of six daily meals and of the OFC on two non-consecutive days from a hospital in Belo Horizonte (MG, Brazil) in May and September of 2010 and January of 2011. The elements were determined by ICP OES. Of the diets, the soft diet showed the highest elements content. Offering the OFC was insufficient to provide adequate levels of the trace elements. The oral hospital diets were inadequate in relation to the RDAs for the trace elements studied and the use of the OFCs was insufficient to compensate the values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of calcium, magnesium, zinc, aluminum and manganese deposition in bones and CNS of rats fed calcium-deficient diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Masayuki; Ota, Kiichiro; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Iwata, Shiro.

    1994-01-01

    The long term intake of unbalanced mineral diets has been reported to be one of the pathogenetic factors of central nervous system (CNS) degeneration, and the unbalanced mineral distribution in the bones clinically is expressed as a metabolic bone disorder or deposition of neurotoxic minerals/metals. The unbalanced mineral or metal diets in animals provoke the unbalanced mineral distribution in bones and soft tissues. In this study, the calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) contents in the CNS and the bones of rats maintained on unbalanced mineral diets were analyzed to investigate the roles of bone on CNS degeneration. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 90 days on the following diets: (A) standard diet, (B) low Ca diet, (C) low Ca-Mg diet, (D) low Ca-Mg diet with high Al. Al and Mn contents were determined in the frontal cortex, spinal cord, lumbar spine and femur using inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP) for Ca, Mg and Zn, and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for Al and Mn. Intake of low Ca and Mg with added Al in rats led to the abnormal distribution of metals or minerals in the bones and in the CNS. These results illustrate that unbalanced mineral diets and metal-metal interactions may lead to the irregular deposition of Al and Mn in the bones and ultimately in the CNS, thus inducing CNS degeneration. (author)

  20. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacquart, Thomas [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Frisbie, Seth [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Mitchell, Erika [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Grigg, Laurie [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Cole, Christopher [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Small, Colleen [Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, Burlington, VT (United States); Sarkar, Bibudhendra, E-mail: bsarkar@sickkids.ca [Department of Molecular Structure and Function, The Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  1. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-01-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  2. Microbial community response reveals underlying mechanism of industrial-scale manganese sand biofilters used for the simultaneous removal of iron, manganese and ammonia from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Rui; Zhou, Aijuan; Zhang, Jiaguang; Luan, Yunbo; Jia, Jianna; Yue, Xiuping; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-08

    Most studies have employed aeration-biofiltration process for the simultaneous removal of iron, manganese and ammonia in groundwater. However, what's inside the "black box", i.e., the potential contribution of functional microorganisms behavior and interactions have seldom been investigated. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the correlations between environmental variables and functional microorganisms. In this study, the performance of industrial-scale biofilters for the contaminated groundwater treatment was studied. The effluent were all far below the permitted concentration level in the current drinking water standard. Pyrosequencing illustrated that shifts in microbial community structure were observed in the microbial samples from different depths of filter. Microbial networks showed that the microbial community structure in the middle- and deep-layer samples was similar, in which a wide range of manganese-oxidizing bacteria was identified. By contrast, canonical correlation analysis showed that the bacteria capable of ammonia-oxidizing and nitrification was enriched in the upper-layer, i.e., Propionibacterium, Nitrosomonas, Nitrosomonas and Candidatus Nitrotoga. The stable biofilm on the biofilter media, created by certain microorganisms from the groundwater microflora, played a crucial role in the simultaneous removal of the three pollutants.

  3. Evaluation of the production, composition and aluminum and iron complexation of algogenic organic matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivokonský, Martin; Klouček, Ondřej; Pivokonská, Lenka

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 16 (2006), s. 3045-3052 ISSN 0043-1354 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200600501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : affinity chromatography * algogenic organic matter * aluminum and iron coagulants * extracellular organic matter * molecular weight fractionation * intracellular organic matter Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.459, year: 2006

  4. Atomic contributions to the valence band photoelectron spectra of metal-free, iron and manganese phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidermane, I., E-mail: ieva.bidermane@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 7588, F-75005 Paris (France); Brumboiu, I.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Totani, R. [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito, I-67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Grazioli, C. [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, ss. 14 km. 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Departement of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste (Italy); Shariati-Nilsson, M.N.; Herper, H.C.; Eriksson, O.; Sanyal, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Ressel, B. [University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska Cesta 11c, 5270 Ajdovščina (Slovenia); Simone, M. de [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, ss. 14 km. 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Lozzi, L. [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito, I-67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Brena, B.; Puglia, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • In detail comparison between the valence band structure of H{sub 2}Pc, FePc and MnPc. • Comparison between the gas phase samples and thin evaporated films on Au (1 1 1). • Detailed analysis of the atomic orbital contributions to the valence band features. • DFT/HSE06 study of the valence band electronic structure of H{sub 2}Pc, FePc and MnPc. - Abstract: The present work reports a photoelectron spectroscopy study of the low-energy region of the valence band of metal-free phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc) compared with those of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc). We have analysed in detail the atomic orbital composition of the valence band both experimentally, by making use of the variation in photoionization cross-sections with photon energy, and theoretically, by means of density functional theory. The atomic character of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO), reflected on the outermost valence band binding energy region, is different for MnPc as compared to the other two molecules. The peaks related to the C 2p contributions, result in the HOMO for H{sub 2}Pc and FePc and in the HOMO-1 for MnPc as described by the theoretical predictions, in very good agreement with the experimental results. The DFT simulations, discerning the atomic contribution to the density of states, indicate how the central metal atom interacts with the C and N atoms of the molecule, giving rise to different partial and total density of states for these three Pc molecules.

  5. Control of arsenic mobilization in paddy soils by manganese and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Peng; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2017-12-01

    Reductive mobilization of arsenic (As) in paddy soils under flooded conditions is an important reason for the relatively high accumulation of As in rice, posing a risk to food safety and human health. The extent of As mobilization varies widely among paddy soils, but the reasons are not well understood. In this study, we investigated As mobilization in six As-contaminated paddy soils (total As ranging from 73 to 122 mg kg -1 ) in flooded incubation and pot experiments. Arsenic speciation in the solution and solid phases were determined. The magnitude of As mobilization into the porewater varied by > 100 times among the six soils. Porewater As concentration correlated closely with the concentration of oxalate-extractable As, suggesting that As associated with amorphous iron (oxyhydr)oxides represents the potentially mobilizable pool of As under flooded conditions. Soil containing a high level of manganese oxides showed the lowest As mobilization, likely because Mn oxides retard As mobilization by slowing down the drop of redox potential upon soil flooding and maintaining a higher arsenate to arsenite ratio in the solid and solution phases. Additions of a synthetic Mn oxide (hausmannite) to two paddy soils increased arsenite oxidation, decreased As mobilization into the porewater and decreased As concentrations in rice grain and straw. Consistent with previous studies using simplified model systems or pure mineral phases, the present study shows that Mn oxides and amorphous Fe (oxyhydr)oxides are important factors controlling reductive As mobilization in As-contaminated paddy soils. In addition, this study also suggests a potential mitigation strategy using exogenous Mn oxides to decrease As uptake by rice in paddy soils containing low levels of indigenous Mn oxides, although further work is needed to verify its efficacy and possible secondary effects under field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influences of iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon on the hypolimnetic cycling of amended mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Shawn P.; Babiarz, Chris L.; Hurley, James P.; Armstrong, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of iron, manganese, sulfide, and dissolved organic carbon were investigated to provide information on the transport and removal processes that control the bioavailability of isotopic mercury amended to a lake. Lake profiles showed a similar trend of hypolimnetic enrichment of Fe, Mn, DOC, sulfide, and the lake spike ( 202 Hg, purity 90.8%) and ambient of pools of total mercury (HgT) and methylmercury (MeHg). Hypolimnetic enrichment of Fe and Mn indicated that reductive mobilization occurred primarily at the sediment-water interface and that Fe and Mn oxides were abundant within the sediments prior to the onset of anoxia. A strong relationship (r 2 = 0.986, n = 15, p 2 = 0.966, n = 15, p 2 = 0.964, n = 15, p 2 = 0.920, n = 27, p 2 = 0.967, n = 23, p 2 = 0.406, n = 27, p 2 = 0.314, n = 15, p = 0.002) suggest a role of organic matter in Hg transport and cycling. However, a weak relationship between the ambient and lake spike pools of MeHg to DOC indicated that other processes have a major role in controlling the abundance and distribution of MeHg. Our results suggest that Fe and Mn play important roles in the transport and cycling of ambient and spike HgT and MeHg in the hypolimnion, in part through processes linked to the formation and dissolution of organic matter-containing Fe and Mn hydrous oxides particles

  7. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-01-01

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH) 3 and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe 2+ stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  8. The effect of electron irradiation on the structure and iron speciation in sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S.V., E-mail: serge.stefanovsky@yandex.ru [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation); Presniakov, I.A.; Sobolev, A.V.; Glazkova, I.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kadyko, M.I.; Stefanovsky, O.I. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron irradiation on the structure of glasses in the series 40 Na{sub 2}O, (20-x) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, x Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 40 P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (mol.%) and on the iron speciation in these samples was studied by FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Irradiation up to a dose of 1.0 MGy has no appreciable effects on the character of the bonds within anionic motif of the glass network. Electron irradiation increases the fraction of aluminum in octahedral coordination. Iron in both unirradiated and irradiated glasses is present mainly as Fe(III) (60–75% of the total amount) in the glasses and partly as Fe(II) and the ratio of two forms remains constant up to a dose of 1.0 MGy.

  9. Coprecipitation of arsenate with metal oxides. 3. Nature, mineralogy, and reactivity of iron(III)-aluminum precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Antonio; Pigna, Massimo; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Banerjee, Dipanjan

    2009-03-01

    Coprecipitation involving arsenic with aluminum or iron has been studied because this technique is considered particularly efficient for removal of this toxic element from polluted waters. Coprecipitation of arsenic with mixed iron-aluminum solutions has received scant attention. In this work we studied (i)the mineralogy, surface properties, and chemical composition of mixed iron-aluminum oxides formed at initial Fe/Al molar ratio of 1.0 in the absence or presence of arsenate [As/ Fe+Al molar ratio (R) of 0, 0.01, or 0.1] and at pH 4.0, 7.0, and 10.0 and aged for 30 and 210 days at 50 degrees C and (ii) the removal of arsenate from the coprecipitates after addition of phosphate. The amounts of short-range ordered precipitates (ferrihydrite, aluminous ferrihydrite and/or poorly crystalline boehmite) were greater than those found in iron and aluminum systems (studied in previous works), due to the capacity of both aluminum and arsenate to retard or inhibitthe transformation of the initially formed precipitates into well-crystallized oxides (gibbsite, bayerite, and hematite). As a consequence, the surface areas of the iron-aluminum oxides formed in the absence or presence of arsenate were usually much larger than those of aluminum or iron oxides formed under the same conditions. Arsenate was found to be associated mainly into short-range ordered materials. Chemical composition of all samples was affected by pH, initial R, and aging. Phosphate sorption was facilitated by the presence of short-range ordered materials, mainly those richer in aluminum, but was inhibited by arsenate present in the samples. The quantities of arsenate replaced by phosphate, expressed as percentages of its total amount present in the samples, were particularly low, ranging from 10% to 26%. A comparison of the desorption of arsenate by phosphate from aluminum-arsenate and iron-arsenate (studied in previous works) and iron-aluminum-arsenate coprecipitates evidenced that phosphate has a greater

  10. Manganese: it turns iron into steel (and does so much more)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is a common ferrous metal with atomic weight of 25 and the chemical symbol Mn. It constitutes roughly 0.1 percent of the Earth’s crust, making it the 12th most abundant element. Its early uses were limited largely to pigments and oxidants in chemical processes and experiments, but the significance of manganese to human societies exploded with the development of modern steelmaking technology in the 1860s. U.S consumption of manganese is about 500,000 metric tons each year, predominantly by the steel industry. Because manganese is essential and irreplaceable in steelmaking and its global mining industry is dominated by just a few nations, it is considered one of the most critical mineral commodities for the United States.

  11. Investigation of aluminum and iron deposition on metaplastic bones in three patients with diffuse pulmonary ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Yuji; Mori, Kousuke; Ohnishi, Hirozo; Enzan, Hideaki; Iguchi, Mitsuko; Lee, Gang-Hong; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse pulmonary ossification (DPO) is a rare pulmonary lesion. DPO is typically detected at autopsy rather than premortem. Recently, however, several cases were diagnosed antemortem using computed tomography, high-resolution computed tomography, or video-assisted thoracic surgery. In the present study, we evaluated DPO at autopsy from two patients with post-myocardial infarction (cases 1 and 3) and one patient with duodenal cancer (case 2). Multiple metaplastic bones (nodular in case 1 and 3 or dendriform in case 2) were detected in these three cases. In an attempt to detect aluminum and iron deposition in these metaplastic bones, histochemical investigations were performed. The two nodular types of one and three cases were positive for aluminum and iron, but the dendriform type of case 2 was positive only for aluminum. The depositions occurred in a linear pattern along the calcifying front. It is of great interest that these deposition patterns were similar to those of bones from three previously reported DPO cases and from the bones of hemodialysis patients. It is suggested that these abnormal metal depositions in the calcifying front might disturb the normal mineralization processes of the metaplastic bones, although no morphological abnormality was detected, except for dense black color of calcifying front lines. Further investigations are needed in more patients with DPO to obtain more information on this topic.

  12. Relating dynamic conditions to the performance of biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium, iron, and manganese from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    consistently meeting regulatory guidelines for compounds like ammonium and reduced forms of iron and manganese. These compounds can cause biological instability in the distribution system and can lead to many problems including the growth of pathogens and aesthetic problems (taste, odor, and color...... and media samples were collected throughout the depth of the column and over the operational cycle of the columns. Substrate analysis included ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, iron, and manganese. Qpcr analysis were also performed to quantify ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOBs), ammonium oxidizing archea ( AOAs...

  13. Grains of Nonferrous and Noble Metals in Iron-Manganese Formations and Igneous Rocks of Submarine Elevations of the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnik, O. N.; Astakhova, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    Iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks of submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan contain overlapping mineral phases (grains) with quite identical morphology, localization, and chemical composition. Most of the grains conform to oxides, intermetallic compounds, native elements, sulfides, and sulfates in terms of the set of nonferrous, noble, and certain other metals (Cu, Zn, Sn, Pb, Ni, Mo, Ag, Pd, and Pt). The main conclusion that postvolcanic hydrothermal fluids are the key sources of metals is based upon a comparison of the data of electron microprobe analysis of iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks dredged at the same submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan.

  14. Influence of biofilms on iron and manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Wylie, Jason; Plumb, Jason

    2011-02-01

    Although health risk due to discoloured water is minimal, such water continues to be the source of one of the major complaints received by most water utilities in Australia. Elevated levels of iron (Fe) and/or manganese (Mn) in bulk water are associated with discoloured water incidents. The accumulation of these two elements in distribution systems is believed to be one of the main causes for such elevated levels. An investigation into the contribution of pipe wall biofilms towards Fe and Mn deposition, and discoloured water events is reported in this study. Eight laboratory-scale reactors were operated to test four different conditions in duplicate. Four reactors were exposed to low Fe (0.05 mg l(-1)) and Mn (0.02 mg l(-1)) concentrations and the remaining four were exposed to a higher (0.3 and 0.4 mg l(-1) for Fe and Mn, respectively) concentration. Two of the four reactors which received low and high Fe and Mn concentrations were chlorinated (3.0 mg l(-1) of chlorine). The biological activity (measured in terms of ATP) on the glass rings in these reactors was very low (∼1.5 ng cm(-2) ring). Higher concentrations of Fe and Mn in bulk water and active biofilms resulted in increased deposition of Fe and Mn on the glass rings. Moreover, with an increase in biological activity, an increase in Fe and Mn deposition was observed. The observations in the laboratory-scale experiments were in line with the results of field observations that were carried out using biofilm monitors. The field data additionally demonstrated the effect of seasons, where increased biofilm activities observed on pipe wall biofilms during late summer and early autumn were found to be associated with increased deposition of Fe and Mn. In contrast, during the cooler months, biofilm activities were a magnitude lower and the deposited metal concentrations were also significantly less (ie a drop of 68% for Fe and 86% for Mn). Based on the laboratory-scale investigations, detachment of pipe wall

  15. Surface chemistry and electrocatalytic behaviour of tetra-carboxy substituted iron, cobalt and manganese phthalocyanine monolayers on gold electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashazi, Philani N.; Westbroek, Philippe; Ozoemena, Kenneth I.; Nyokong, Tebello

    2007-01-01

    Surface chemistry and electrocatalytic properties of self-assembled monolayers of metal tetra-carboxylic acid phthalocyanine complexes with cobalt (Co), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) as central metal ions have been studied. These phthalocyanine molecules are immobilized on gold electrode via the coupling reaction between the ring substituents and pre-formed mercaptoethanol self-assembled monolayer (Au-ME SAM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy confirmed chemisorption of mercaptoethanol via sulfur group on gold electrode and also coupling reaction between phthalocyanines and Au-ME SAM. Electrochemical parameters of the immobilized molecules show that these molecules are densely packed with a perpendicular orientation. The potential applications of the gold modified electrodes were investigated towards L-cysteine detection and the analysis at phthalocyanine SAMs. Cobalt and iron tetra-carboxylic acid phthalocyanine monolayers showed good oxidation peak for L-cysteine at potentials where metal oxidation (M III /M II ) takes place and this metal oxidation mediates the catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine. Manganese tetra-carboxylic acid phthalocyanine monolayer also exhibited a good catalytic oxidation peak towards L-cysteine at potentials where Mn IV /Mn III redox peak occurs and this redox peak mediates L-cysteine oxidation. The analysis of cysteine at phthalocyanine monolayers displayed good analytical parameters with good detection limits of the orders of 10 -7 mol L -1 and good linearity for a studied concentration range up to 60 μmol L -1

  16. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana [Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Aix-Marseille Universites-CNRS (UMR 6264), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France); Hanna, Khalil [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, CNRS-Universite Henri Poincare-Nancy 1 (UMR 7564), 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France); Chiron, Serge [Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Aix-Marseille Universites-CNRS (UMR 6264), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: serge.chiron@univ-provence.fr

    2009-04-15

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity. - Iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of macrolide antibacterial agents.

  17. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors with oxygen, nitrate, manganese (IV), iron (III) and sulfate as electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Natalie; Page, Declan; Tiehm, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds was examined in long term batch experiments for a period of two and a half years to obtain more insight into the effects of redox conditions. A mix including lipid lowering agents (e.g. clofibric acid, gemfibrozil), analgesics (e.g. diclofenac, naproxen), beta blockers (e.g. atenolol, propranolol), X-ray contrast media (e.g. diatrizoic acid, iomeprol) as well as the antiepileptic carbamazepine and endocrine disruptors (e.g. bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol) was analyzed in batch tests in the presence of oxygen, nitrate, manganese (IV), iron (III), and sulfate. Out of the 23 selected substances, 14 showed a degradation of > 50% of their initial concentrations under aerobic conditions. The beta blockers propranolol and atenolol and the analgesics pentoxifylline and naproxen showed a removal of > 50% under anaerobic conditions. In particular naproxen proved to be degradable with oxygen and under most anaerobic conditions, i.e. with manganese (IV), iron (III), or sulfate. The natural estrogens estriol, estrone and 17β-estradiol showed complete biodegradation under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions, with a temporary increase of estrone during transformation of estriol and 17β-estradiol. Transformation of 17β-estradiol under Fe(III)-reducing conditions resulted in an increase of estriol as well. Concentrations of clofibric acid, carbamazepine, iopamidol and diatrizoic acid, known for their recalcitrance in the environment, remained unchanged.

  18. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana; Hanna, Khalil; Chiron, Serge

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity. - Iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of macrolide antibacterial agents

  19. Radium desorption, manganese and iron dissolution from sand filters of a conventional ground water treatment plant under reductive conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hobaib, A.S.; Al-Sulaiman, K.M.; Al-Dhayan, D.M.; Al-Suhybani, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Sand filters are used as a filter bed in many ground water treatment plants to remove the physical contaminants and oxidation products. A build-up of radioactivity may take place on the granules, where iron and manganese oxides are deposited and form thin films on the surface of sand filter. The oxides of iron and manganese play an important role in adsorbing radium from ground water. The disposal of those granules makes a significant problem. A batch technique is used for solubilization of radium from sand filters in the presence of some organic acids, which act as reducing agents. These acids are formic acid, acetic acid, benzoic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, phthalic acid, and adipic acid. The data were obtained as a function of acidity, temperature, contact time and liquid/solid ratio particle size and shaking speed. It was found that oxalic acid was the best for radium removal. The effectiveness of these acids on radium removal was as follows: oxalic acid > phthalic acid > adipic acid > succinic acid > formic acid > acetic acid. The maximum removal obtained was 69.9% at 1M oxalic acid at 8 ml/g ratio. Reaction kinetics and mechanism parameters of the dissolution process were studied and compared with other published data. (author)

  20. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  1. Influences of iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon on the hypolimnetic cycling of amended mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Shawn P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706-1481 (United States)]. E-mail: spchadwick@wisc.edu; Babiarz, Chris L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706-1481 (United States); Hurley, James P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706-1481 (United States); University of Wisconsin Aquatic Sciences Center, 1975 Willow Drive Madison, WI 53706-1177 (United States); Armstrong, David E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706-1481 (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of iron, manganese, sulfide, and dissolved organic carbon were investigated to provide information on the transport and removal processes that control the bioavailability of isotopic mercury amended to a lake. Lake profiles showed a similar trend of hypolimnetic enrichment of Fe, Mn, DOC, sulfide, and the lake spike ({sup 202}Hg, purity 90.8%) and ambient of pools of total mercury (HgT) and methylmercury (MeHg). Hypolimnetic enrichment of Fe and Mn indicated that reductive mobilization occurred primarily at the sediment-water interface and that Fe and Mn oxides were abundant within the sediments prior to the onset of anoxia. A strong relationship (r {sup 2} = 0.986, n = 15, p < 0.001) between filterable Fe and Mn indicated that reduction of Fe and Mn hydrous oxides in the sediments is a common in-lake source of Fe(II) and Mn(II) to the hypolimnion and that a consistent Mn : Fe mass ratio of 0.05 exists in the lake. A strong linear relationship of both the filterable [Fe] (r {sup 2} = 0.966, n = 15, p < 0.001) and [Mn] (r {sup 2} = 0.964, n = 15, p < 0.001) to [DOC] indicated a close linkage of the cycles of Fe and Mn to DOC. Persistence of iron oxides in anoxic environments suggested that DOC was being co-precipitated with Fe oxide and released into solution by the reductive dissolution of the oxide. The relationship between ambient and lake spike HgT (r {sup 2} = 0.920, n = 27, p < 0.001) and MeHg (r {sup 2} = 0.967, n = 23, p < 0.001) indicated that similar biogeochemical processes control the temporal and spatial distribution in the water column. The larger fraction of MeHg in the lake spike compared to the ambient pool in the hypolimnion suggests that lake spike may be more available for methylation. A linear relationship of DOC to both filterable ambient HgT (r {sup 2} = 0.406, n = 27, p < 0.001) and lake spike HgT (r {sup 2} = 0.314, n = 15, p = 0.002) suggest a role of organic matter in Hg transport and cycling. However, a weak

  2. Adsorption of Trametes versicolor laccase to soil iron and aluminum minerals: enzyme activity, kinetics and stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Griffiths, Bryan S; Li, Huixin

    2014-02-01

    Laccases play an important role in the degradation of soil phenol or phenol-like substance and can be potentially used in soil remediation through immobilization. Iron and aluminum minerals can adsorb extracellular enzymes in soil environment. In the present study, we investigated the adsorptive interaction of laccase, from the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, with soil iron and aluminum minerals and characterized the properties of the enzyme after adsorption to minerals. Results showed that both soil iron and aluminum minerals adsorbed great amount of laccase, independent of the mineral specific surface areas. Adsorbed laccases retained 26-64% of the activity of the free enzyme. Compared to the free laccase, all adsorbed laccases showed higher Km values and lower Vmax values, indicating a reduced enzyme-substrate affinity and a lower rate of substrate conversion in reactions catalyzed by the adsorbed laccase. Adsorbed laccases exhibited increased catalytic activities compared to the free laccase at low pH, implying the suitable application of iron and aluminum mineral-adsorbed T. versicolor laccase in soil bioremediation, especially in acid soils. In terms of the thermal profiles, adsorbed laccases showed decreased thermal stability and higher temperature sensitivity relative to the free laccase. Moreover, adsorption improved the resistance of laccase to proteolysis and extended the lifespan of laccase. Our results implied that adsorbed T. versicolor laccase on soil iron and aluminum minerals had promising potential in soil remediation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heat capacity of iron, aluminum, and chromium vanadates at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheshnitskii, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Ignashin, V.P.; Kesler, Y.A.

    1985-09-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of compounds participating in the processing of vanadium-containing raw materials have not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper the authors report on measurements of the heat capacities of the compounds FeVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/, AIVO/sub 4/, Fe/sub 2/V/sub 4/O/sub 13/ and FeCr(VO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ at high temperatures. The obtained experimental data on the high-temperature heat capacity of iron, aluminum, and chromium vanadates makes it possible to calculate the thermodynamic functions of these compounds at high temperatures.

  4. Preparation of Highly Pure Vanadyl Sulfate from Sulfate Solutions Containing Impurities of Iron and Aluminum by Solvent Extraction Using EHEHPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of highly pure vanadyl sulfate from sulfate solutions containing impurities of iron and aluminumwas investigated by solvent extraction with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (EHEHPA and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP as the phase modifier. The extraction and stripping conditions of vanadium (IV and its separation from iron and aluminum were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the extraction of vanadium (IV and iron were 68% and 53%, respectively, while only 2% aluminum was extracted in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from aluminum. Sulfuric acid solution was used for the stripping. Nearly 100% vanadium (IV and 95% aluminum were stripped, while only 10% iron was stripped under the optimal stripping conditions in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from iron. After five stages of extraction and stripping, highly pure vanadyl sulfate containing 76.5 g/L V (IV with the impurities of 12 mg/L Fe and 10 mg/L Al was obtained, which is suitable for the electrolyte of a vanadium redox flow battery. Organic solution was well regenerated after stripping by oxalic acid solution to remove the remaining iron. The mechanism of vanadium (IV extraction using EHEHPA was also discussed based on the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR analysis.

  5. [Effect of selenium on the uptake and translocation of manganese, iron, phosphorus and selenium in rice (Oryza sativa L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Huang, Yi-Zong; Huang, Yan-Chao; Liu, Yun-Xia; Liang, Jian-Hong

    2013-10-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to clarify the effect of selenium on the uptake and translocation of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) , phosphorus (P) and selenium (Se) in rice ( Oryza sativa L.). The results showed that addition of Se led to the significant increase of Se concentration in iron plaque on the root surface, root, shoot, husk and brown rice, and significant decrease of Mn concentration in shoot, husk and brown rice. At the Se concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg.kg-1 in soil, Mn concentrations in rice shoot decreased by 32. 2% and 35.0% respectively, in husk 22.0% and 42.6% , in brown rice 27.5% and 28.5% , compared with the Se-free treatment. There was no significant effect of Se on the P and Fe concentrations in every parts of rice, except for Fe concentrations in husk. The translocation of P and Fe from iron plaque, root, shoot and husk to brown rice was not significantly affected by Se addition, but Mn translocation from iron plaque and root to brown rice was significantly inhibited by Se addition. Addition of 1.0 mg.kg-1. Se resulted in the decrease of translocation factor from iron plaque and root to brown rice by 38.9% and 37.9%, respectively, compared with the control treatment. The distribution ratios of Mn, Fe, P and Se in iron plaque, root, shoot, husk and brown rice were also affected by Se addition. The results indicated that Mn uptake, accumulation and translocation in rice could be decreased by the addition of Se in soil, therefore, Se addition could reduce the Mn harm to human health through food chain.

  6. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  7. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S.

    2013-11-01

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  8. Effects of resuspension on benthic fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, dissolved inorganic carbon, iron and manganese in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almroth, E.; Tengberg, A.; Andersson, J.H.; Pakhomova, S.; Hall, P.O.J.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resuspension on benthic fluxes of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), silicate (Si(OH)4), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved iron (Fe) and total dissolved manganese (Mn) was studied at three different stations in the Gulf of Finland (GoF),

  9. Application of Electrocoagulation Process Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes for Fluoride Removal from Aqueous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Bazrafshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride in drinking water above permissible level is responsible for human being affected by skeletal fluorosis. The present study was carried out to assess the ability of electrocoagulation process with iron and aluminum electrodes in order to removal of fluoride from aqueous solutions. Several working parameters, such as fluoride concentration, pH, applied voltage and reaction time were studied to achieve a higher removal capacity. Variable concentrations (1, 5 and 10 mg L-1 of fluoride solutions were prepared by mixing proper amount of sodium fluoride with deionized water. The varying pH of the initial solution (3, 7 and 10 was also studied to measure their effects on the fluoride removal efficiency. Results obtained with synthetic solution revealed that the most effective removal capacities of fluoride could be achieved at 40 V electrical potential. In addition, the increase of electrical potential, in the range of 10-40 V, enhanced the treatment rate. Also comparison of fluoride removal efficiency showed that removal efficiency is similar with iron and aluminum electrodes. Finally it can be concluded that the electrocoagulation process has the potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of fluoride from water and wastewater.

  10. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  11. Pilot study of iron and manganese removal from Mexican drinking water supply sources; Estudio piloto para remocion de fierro y manganeso en las fuentes de abastecimiento de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova, Verguinia Petkova; Mintchev, Mintcho Lliev; Rivera, Maria Lourdes [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    This study demonstrates the efficiency of a technique for manganese removal through adsorption-oxidation on zeolite. Several Mexican groundwater sources were selected for pilot installations. The results show that the final iron and manganese concentrations are within the limits set in the Official Mexican Standard, NOM-127-SSA1, referring to drinking water. An analysis was made of the effect of the operating rate and the granule size of the filtering material on iron and manganese removal and of calcium and magnesium salts associated with hardness. Zeolite covered with manganese precipitates was highly selective for iron and manganese; this made the treatment of groundwater with high iron and manganese concentrations possible, even in the presence of hardness and alkalinity. A description is given of the procedures to prepare the material and regenerate its filtration capacity without interrupting the filtration process. [Spanish] El presente estudio comprueba la eficiencia de la tecnica propuesta para la remocion de manganeso por adsorcion-oxidacion sobre zeolita a traves de estudios piloto en varias fuentes subterraneas de Mexico. Los resultados demuestran que la concentracion de fierro y manganeso en el agua producida cumple con la Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-127-SSA1 para el consumo humano en todo los casos estudiados. Fueron analizadas la influencia de la tasa de operacion y la granulometria del material filtrante sobre el grado de remocion de fierro y manganeso, asi como el efecto de las sales de calcio y magnesio que originan la dureza del agua. Durante la experimentacion se comprobo que la zeolita recubierta con los precipitados de manganeso es altamente selectiva respecto al fierro y manganeso, lo que permite tratar el agua de las fuentes subterraneas con elevada concentracion de Fe y Mn en presencia de alta dureza y alcalinidad. En el articulo se describen los procedimientos para la preparacion del material filtrante y la regeneracion de su capacidad sin

  12. Metal Tolerance Protein 8 Mediates Manganese Homeostasis and Iron Reallocation during Seed Development and Germination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eroglu, S.; Giehl, R.F.H.; Meier, B.; Takahashi, M.; Terada, Y.; Ignatyev, K.; Andresen, Elisa; Küpper, Hendrik; Peiter, E.; von Wiren, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 174, č. 3 (2017), s. 1633-1647 ISSN 0032-0889 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : diffusion facilitator family * arabidopsis-thaliana * x-ray * vacuolar manganese Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  13. Distribution of iron, manganese, cobalt and nickel in sediment cores of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, Ch.M.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    :72; 3:205; and 6:265; (b) for the slope it is 1:116; and (c) the basin 6:170. The values are highest in one core. This suggests an enrichment of manganese in the shelf region and in the basin, but great mobility in the slope and parts of the shelf...

  14. Leaching of aluminum and iron from boiler slag generated from a typical Chinese Steel Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinping; Gan, Jinhua; Li, Xianwang

    2009-07-30

    This paper presents a new way of recycling aluminum and iron in boiler slag derived from coal combustion plants, which integrates efficient extraction and reuse of the leached pellets together. The boiler slag was pelletized together with washed coal and lime prior to sintering and then was sintered at 800-1200 degrees C for different periods to produce sintered pellets for the leaching test. An elemental analysis of aqueous solutions leached by sulfuric acid was determined by EDTA-Na(2)-ZnCl(2) titration method. The components and microstructures of the samples, sintered pellets and leached residue were examined by means of XRF, XRD and SEM. XRD analysis indicates that predominate minerals such as kaolinite, quartz, calcium silicide, hematate and metakoalin exist in the boiler slag. An aluminum extraction efficiency of 86.50% was achieved. The maximum extraction efficiency of Fe was 94.60% in the same conditions of that for the maximum extraction efficiency of Al. The extraction efficiencies of Al and Fe increased with an increase in temperature, leaching time and acidity. High Al extraction efficiency was obtained for pellets with high CaO content. The final product of alumina would be used directly for the production of metallic aluminum.

  15. Modeling the Performance of Biological Rapid Sand Filters Used to Remove Ammonium, Iron, and Manganese From Drinking Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    activated carbon and are often used following ozonation to remove additional biodegradable organics created during ozonation. In Europe, biological filters are also used to remove ammonium and reduced forms of iron and manganese. These compounds can cause biological instability in the distribution system...... tracer, are performed during an operational cycle of a filter to examine how the filter flow changes with time. The data is used to validate a mathematical model that can both predict process performance and to gain an understanding of how dynamic conditions can influence filter performance....... The mathematical model developed is intended to assist in the design of new filters, set up of pilot plant studies, and as a tool to troubleshoot existing problems in full scale filters. Unlike previous models, the model developed accounts for the effects of particle/precipitate accumulation and its effects...

  16. Water-soluble Manganese and Iron Mesotetrakis(carboxyl)porphyrin: DNA Binding, Oxidative Cleavage, and Cytotoxic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Jiang, Yi-Yu; Jiang, Tao; Yin, Wei; Yang, Jian-Ping; Cao, Man-Li; Fang, Yu-Qi; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2017-06-29

    Two new water-soluble metal carboxyl porphyrins, manganese (III) meso -tetrakis (carboxyl) porphyrin and iron (III) meso -tetrakis (carboxyl) porphyrin, were synthesized and characterized. Their interactions with ct-DNA were investigated by UV-Vis titration, fluorescence spectra, viscosity measurement and CD spectra. The results showed they can strongly bind to ct-DNA via outside binding mode. Electrophoresis experiments revealed that both complexes can cleave pBR322 DNA efficiently in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, albeit 2-Mn exhibited a little higher efficiency. The inhibitor tests suggest the oxidative DNA cleavage by these two complexes may involve hydroxyl radical active intermediates. Notably, 2-Mn exhibited considerable photocytotoxicity against Hep G2 cell via triggering a significant generation of ROS and causing disruption of MMP after irradiation.

  17. Iron and manganese in oxide minerals and in glasses: preliminary consideration of Eh buffering potential at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporuscio, F.A.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1985-04-01

    The tuffs of Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep burial site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. One of the main concerns is the effect of oxidizing groundwater on the transport of radionuclides. Rock components that may affect the oxygen content of groundwater include Fe-Ti oxides, Mn oxides, and glasses that contain ferrous iron. Some phenocryst Fe-Ti oxides at Yucca Mountain are in reduced states, whereas groundmass Fe-Ti oxides have been oxidized to hematite, rutile, and pseudobrookite (Fe 3+ -bearing phases) exclusively. Estimates of Fe 2+ -bearing oxides indicate that less than 0.33 vol% phenocrysts is available to act as solid buffering agents of Eh. Of this percentage, significant amounts of Fe-Ti oxides are isolated from effective interaction with groundwater because they occur in densely welded, devitrified tuffs that have low interstitial permeability. Manganese oxides occur primarily along fractures in the ash-flow tuffs. Because the Mn oxides are concentrated along the same pathways (fractures) where transport has occurred in the past, these small volume percentages could act as buffers. However, the oxidation states of actual Mn-oxide phases are high (Mn 4+ ), and these minerals have virtually no potential for reducing groundwater Eh. Manganese oxides may even act as oxidizing agents. However, regardless of their poor capabilities as reducing agents, the Mn oxides could be important as sorbents of heavy metals at Yucca Mountain. The lack of accessible, pristine Fe-Ti oxides and the generally high oxidation states of Mn oxides seem to rule out these oxides as Eh buffers of the Yucca Mountain groundwater system. Reduction of ferrous iron within glassy tuffs may have some effect on Eh, but further study is needed. At present it is prudent to assume that minerals and glasses have little or no capacity for reducing oxygen-rich groundwater at Yucca Mountain. 25 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  18. QUANTITATIVE CHANGES OF IRON, MANGANESE, ZINC AND COPPER IN PINE BARK COMPOSTED WITH PLANT MASS AND EFFECTIVE MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Czekała

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the investigation was to ascertain changes in the total contents, as well as water-soluble forms of iron, manganese, zinc and copper during the process of composting of pine bark with plant material (PM, with or without the addition of effective microorganisms (EM. Experiments were carried out at a forest nursery area and comprised the following treatments: pile 1. pine bark, pile 2. pine bark + PM, pile 3. pine bark + PM + EM. Compost piles were formed from pine bark (4 m3 and as described above, 2 Mg of plant material were added to pile 2 and to pile 3 – plant material and effective microorganisms in the amount of 3 dm3·m-3 bark. All compost files were also supplemented with 0.3 kg P2O5·m-3 (in the form of superphosphate 20% P2O5 and 0,1 kg K2O·m-3 (in the form of potassium salt 60%. The plant material comprised a mixture of buckwheat, field pea, serradella and vetch harvested before flowering. Piles were mixed and formed with the tractor aerator. At defined dates, using the method of atomic spectrophotometry, total contents of iron, manganese, zinc and copper, as well as their water-soluble forms were determined. It was found that all the examined elements underwent changes, albeit with different dynamics. This was particularly apparent in the case of water-soluble forms. This solubility was, in general, high during the initial days of the process and declined with the passage of time. No significant impact of effective microorganisms on the solubility of the examined chemical elements was determined, especially in mature composts.

  19. [Vitamin and mineral supplements in the diet of military personnel: effect on the balance of iron, copper and manganese, immune reactivity and physical work-capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtseva, I P; Nosolodin, V V; Zaĭtsev, O N; Gladkikh, I P; Koznienko, I V; Beliakov, R A; Arshinov, N P

    2012-03-01

    Conducted with the participation of 50 students of military educational study the effect of various vitamin and mineral complexes for the provision by the body naturally iron, copper and manganese on the immune and physical status. Found that diets enriched BMV was accompanied by a significant delay in the micro-elements, mainly iron, which indicates a deficiency of these bioelements in chickens Santo during the summer. Under the influence of vitamin-mineral complexes significantly increased rates of natural and specific immunity. As the delay increases significantly increased iron medical indicators of immunological reaction efficiency and physical performance.

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and yttrium aluminum iron garnet (YAIG) nanoferrites prepared by microemulsion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, Majid Niaz, E-mail: majidniazakhtar@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bakar Sulong, Abu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Khan, Muhammad Azhar [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Mukhtar [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Murtaza, Ghulam [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore, Pakistan" f Department of Mechanical Engineering, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology Sahiwal Pakistan (Pakistan); Raza, M.R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology Sahiwal (Pakistan); Raza, R.; Saleem, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Kashif, M. [Department of Physics, Govt. College University Faisalabad (Pakistan)

    2016-03-01

    Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and yttrium aluminum iron garnet (YAIG) nanoferrite samples were synthesized by microemulsion method. The effect of sintering was examined by heating the samples at 900, 1000, and 1100 °C. The YIG and YAIG samples were then characterized using X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Static and dynamic magnetic properties were measured by evaluating initial permeability, Q factor, and vibrating sample magnetometry properties of YIG and YAIG samples. YIG samples sintered at 1100 °C showed higher initial permeability and Q factor compared with YAIG samples. However, hysteresis loops also showed variations in the saturation magnetization, remanence, and coercivity of YIG and YAIG samples sintered at 900, 1000, and 1100 °C. The observed magnetic parameter such as saturation magnetization, coercivity and initial permeability are strongly affected by increasing temperature. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of YIG and YAIG nanoferrites were found in the range 11.56–19.92 emu/g and 7.30–87.70 Oe respectively. Furthermore, the decreasing trends in the static and magnetic properties of YAIG samples may be due to the introduction of Al ions in the YIG crystal lattice. Thus, YIG and YAIG sintered at 1100 °C can be used for wide-ranging frequency applications. - Highlights: • Static and dynamic magnetic properties of YIG and YAIG nanoferrites were determined. • Saturation magnetization, Q and initial permeability increased in YIG nanoferites. • Possible use of these nanoferrites for sensing and switching applications.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Iron-Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application for Efficient Nickel Ion Removal from Aqueous Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Antonio; Monteduro, Anna Grazia; Padmanabhan, Sanosh Kunjalukkal; Licciulli, Antonio; Bonfrate, Valentina; Salvatore, Luca; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, synthesized by a simple procedure, were used to remove nickel ion from aqueous solutions. Nanostructures, prepared by using different weight percents of manganese, were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Adsorption/desorption isotherm curves demonstrated that manganese inclusions enhance the specific surface area three times and the pores volume ten times. This feature was crucial to decontaminate both aqueous samples and food extracts from nickel ion. Efficient removal of Ni2+ was highlighted by the well-known dimethylglyoxime test and by ICP-MS analysis and the possibility of regenerating the nanostructure was obtained by a washing treatment in disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate solution. PMID:28804670

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Iron-Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application for Efficient Nickel Ion Removal from Aqueous Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Buccolieri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, synthesized by a simple procedure, were used to remove nickel ion from aqueous solutions. Nanostructures, prepared by using different weight percents of manganese, were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Adsorption/desorption isotherm curves demonstrated that manganese inclusions enhance the specific surface area three times and the pores volume ten times. This feature was crucial to decontaminate both aqueous samples and food extracts from nickel ion. Efficient removal of Ni2+ was highlighted by the well-known dimethylglyoxime test and by ICP-MS analysis and the possibility of regenerating the nanostructure was obtained by a washing treatment in disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate solution.

  3. Trithiocyanurate Complexes of Iron, Manganese and Nickel and Their Anticholinesterase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kopel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The complexes of Fe(II, Mn(II and Ni(II with a combination of a Schiff base, nitrogen-donor ligand or macrocyclic ligand and trithiocyanuric acid (ttcH3 were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopies. Crystal and molecular structures of the iron complex of composition [Fe(L1](ttcH2(ClO4·EtOH·H2O (1, where L1 is Schiff base derived from tris(2-aminoethylamine and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, were solved. It was found that the Schiff base is coordinated to the central iron atom by six nitrogens forming deformed octahedral arrangement, whereas trithiocyanurate(1- anion, perchlorate and solvent molecules are not coordinated. The X-ray structure of the Schiff base sodium salt is also presented and compared with the iron complex. The anticholinesterase activity of the complexes was also studied.

  4. Hydrometallurgical method for recycling rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Vinicius Emmanuel de Oliveira dos; Lelis, Maria de Fatima Fontes; Freitas, Marcos Benedito Jose Geraldo de

    2014-01-01

    A hydrometallurgical method for the recovery of rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from the negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries was developed. The rare earth compounds were obtained by chemical precipitation at pH 1.5, with sodium cerium sulfate (NaCe(SO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O) and lanthanum sulfate (La 2 (SO 4 ) 3 .H 2 O) as the major recovered components. Iron was recovered as Fe(OH) 3 and FeO. Manganese was obtained as Mn 3 O 4 .The recovered Ni(OH) 2 and Co(OH) 2 were subsequently used to synthesize LiCoO 2 , LiNiO 2 and CoO, for use as cathodes in ion-Li batteries. The anodes and recycled materials were characterized by analytical techniques. (author)

  5. Effects of aluminum on root growth and absorption of nutrients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum (Al) is a biotoxic which often influences the absorption of nutrients by plants in strongly acidic soils. In this experiment, the effect of Al on root growth, absorption of macronutrients; phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and micronutrients; iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc ...

  6. Adsorption of Arsenate by Nano Scaled Activated Carbon Modified by Iron and Manganese Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Gallios

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arsenic in water supplies is a major problem for public health and still concerns large parts of population in Southeast Asia, Latin America and Europe. Removal of arsenic is usually accomplished either by coagulation with iron salts or by adsorption with iron oxides or activated alumina. However, these materials, although very efficient for arsenic, normally do not remove other undesirable constituents from waters, such as chlorine and organo-chlorine compounds, which are the results of water chlorination. Activated carbon has this affinity for organic compounds, but does not remove arsenic efficiently. Therefore, in the present study, iron modified activated carbons are investigated as alternative sorbents for the removal of arsenic(V from aqueous solutions. In addition, modified activated carbons with magnetic properties can easily be separated from the solutions. In the present study, a simple and efficient method was used for the preparation of magnetic Fe3(Mn2+O4 (M:Fe and/or Mn activated carbons. Activated carbons were impregnated with magnetic precursor solutions and then calcinated at 400 °C. The obtained carbons were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements. Their adsorption performance for As(V was evaluated. The iron impregnation presented an increase in As(V maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax from about 4 mg g−1 for the raw carbon to 11.05 mg g−1, while Mn incorporation further increased the adsorption capacity at 19.35 mg g−1.

  7. Effect of Microstructures on Working Properties of Nickel-Manganese-Copper Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Medyński

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effects, on basic usable properties (abrasive wear and corrosion resistance, of solidification (acc. to the stable and non-stable equilibrium system and transformations occurring in the matrix during the cooling of castings of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron were determined. Abrasive wear resistance was mainly determined by the types and arrangements of high-carbon phases (indicated by eutectic saturation degree, and the kinds of matrices (indicated by the nickel equivalent value, calculated from chemical composition. The highest abrasive wear resistance was found for white cast iron, with the highest degree of austenite to martensite transformation occurring in its matrix. Irrespective of solidification, a decrease of the equivalent value below a limit value resulted in increased austenite transformation, and thus, to a significant rise in hardness and abrasive wear resistance for the castings. At the same time, corrosion resistance of the alloy was slightly reduced. The examinations showed that corrosion resistance of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron is, too a much lesser degree, decided by the means of solidification of the castings, rather than transformations occurring in the matrix, as controlled by nickel equivalent value (especially elements with high electrochemical potential.

  8. Nanostructured Iron and Manganese Oxide Electrode Materials for Lithium Batteries: Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties on Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Jessica L.

    The widespread use of portable electronics and growing interest in electric and hybrid vehicles has generated a mass market for batteries with increased energy densities and enhanced electrochemical performance. In order to address a variety of applications, commercially fabricated secondary lithium-ion batteries employ transition metal oxide based electrodes, the most prominent of which include lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (LiNixMn yCo1-x-yO2), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), and lithium manganese oxide (LiMn 2O4). Transition metal oxides are of particular interest as cathode materials due to their robust framework for lithium intercalation, potential for high energy density, and utilization of earth-abundant elements (i.e. iron and manganese) leading to decreased toxicity and cost-effective battery production on industrial scales. Specifically, this research focuses on MgFe2O4, AgxMn8O16, and AgFeO 2 transition metal oxides for use as electrode materials in lithium-based batteries. The electrode materials are prepared via co-precipitation, reflux, and hydrothermal methods and characterized by several techniques (XRD, SEM, BET, TGA, DSC, XPS, Raman, etc.). The low-temperature syntheses allowed for precise manipulation of structural, compositional, and/or functional properties of MgFe2O4, AgxMn8 O16, and AgFeO2 which have been shown to influence electrochemical behavior. In addition, advanced in situ and ex situ characterization techniques are employed to study the lithiation/de-lithiation process and establish valid redox mechanisms. With respect to both chemical and physical properties, the influence of MgFe2O4 particle size and morphology on electrochemical behavior was established using ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Based on composition, tunneled AgxMn8O16 nanorods, prepared with distinct Ag+ contents and crystallite sizes, display dramatic differences in ion-transport kinetics due to

  9. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G. E. Jr.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals

  10. Environmental natural radioactive and radiation hazard in sedimentary rocks for manganese-iron ore at Um Bogma Area, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Zeid, H.M; Nada, A; Abd-Elmaksoud, T.M; Ragab, F.M.; El-Assy, I

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure concentrations and distributions of natural radionuclides occurring in sedimentary rocks. The activity concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th,and 40 K in the manganese-iron ore of Um Bogma area which subdivided into three localities Wadi Nasieb (NS), Abu Thor (AT) and Um Bogma (UB) were measured using a high-purity germanium detector.The average concentration values of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K in the surveyed samples in Wadi Nasieb are 261.38, 9.57 and 130.63 Bqkg -1 respectively also in Abu Thor 224.51,6.7,94.99 Bqkg -1 and in Um Bogma 441.47,7.87 and 272.69 Bqkg -1 . The overall outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rates fluctuate from 103.38 to 193.5 nGyh -1 for all localities. The annual effective dose rate for all localities ranged from 0.13 to 0.24 mSvy -1 have been compared with the global averages which are within the safety range for workers in the studied localities.

  11. Deferribacter thermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic manganese- and iron-reducing bacterium isolated from a petroleum reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, A C; Patel, B K; Sheehy, A J

    1997-04-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated strain BMAT (T = type strain), was isolated from the production water of Beatrice oil field in the North Sea (United Kingdom). The cells were straight to bent rods (1 to 5 by 0.3 to 0.5 microns) which stained gram negative. Strain BMAT obtained energy from the reduction of manganese (IV), iron(III), and nitrate in the presence of yeast extract, peptone, Casamino Acids, tryptone, hydrogen, malate, acetate, citrate, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, and valerate. The isolate grew optimally at 60 degrees C (temperature range for growth, 50 to 65 degrees C) and in the presence of 2% (wt/vol) NaCl (NaCl range for growth, 0 to 5% [wt/vol]). The DNA base composition was 34 mol% G + C. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain BMAT is a member of the domain Bacteria. The closest known bacterium is the moderate thermophile Flexistipes sinusarabici (similarity value, 88%). Strain BMAT possesses phenotypic and phylogenetic traits that do not allow its classification as a member of any previously described genus; therefore, we propose that this isolate should be described as a member of a novel species of a new genus, Deferribacter thermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov.

  12. Surface properties of self-assembled monolayer films of tetra-substituted cobalt, iron and manganese alkylthio phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinbulu, Isaac Adebayo; Khene, Samson [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Nyokong, Tebello, E-mail: t.nyokong@ru.ac.z [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa)

    2010-09-30

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of iron (SAM-1), cobalt (SAM-2) and manganese (SAM-3) phthalocyanine complexes, tetra-substituted with diethylaminoethanethio at the non-peripheral positions, were formed on gold electrode in dimethylformamide (DMF). Electrochemical, impedimentary and surface properties of the SAM films were investigated. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties of the films. Ability of the films to inhibit common faradaic processes on bare gold surface (gold oxidation, solution redox chemistry of [Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 3+}/[Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} and underpotential deposition (UDP) of copper) was investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-} redox process as a probe, offered insights into the electrical properties of the films/electrode interfaces. Surface properties of the films were probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The films were employed for the electrocatalytic oxidation of the pesticide, carbofuran. Electrocatalysis was evidenced from enhanced current signal and less positive oxidation potential of the pesticide on each film, relative to that observed on the bare gold electrode. Mechanism of electrocatalytic oxidation of the pesticide was studied using rotating disc electrode voltammetry.

  13. Treatment of hospital wastewater by electrocoagulation using aluminum and iron electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Dehghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The main goal of this study was to determine of the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD from educational hospital waste-water using electrocoagulation process by using iron and aluminum electrodes. Materials and Methods: A laboratory-scale batch reactor was conducted to determine the removal efficiency by the electrocoagulation method. Fifty-five samples of Shahid Mohammadi Hospital waste-water in Bandar Abbas were collected for the periods of 6 months according to standard methods. The removal of COD from the waste-water was determined at pH 3, 7, and 11 in the voltage range of 10, 20, and 30 V at the operation time of 30, 45, and 60 min. Data were analyzed in SPSS (version 16 using Pearson′s correlation coefficient to analyze the relationship between these parameters. Results: The removal efficiency is increased by 6.2% with decreasing pH from 11 to 3 at the optimal condition of 30 V and 60 min operation time. By increasing the reaction time from 30 min to 60 min at voltages (10, 20, and 30 V, the removal efficiency was increased from 32.3% to 87.1%. The maximum COD removal efficiency was observed at pH 3 and voltage of 30 V and 60 min reaction time using four iron electrodes. Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between voltage and the reaction time with the removal efficiencies (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Due to the high efficiency of the electrocoagulation process and also the simplicity and relatively low-cost, it can be used for removing COD from hospital waste-water.

  14. Iron-chrome-aluminum alloy cladding for increasing safety in nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2017-12-01

    After a tsunami caused plant black out at Fukushima, followed by hydrogen explosions, the US Department of Energy partnered with fuel vendors to study safer alternatives to the current UO2-zirconium alloy system. This accident tolerant fuel alternative should better tolerate loss of cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. General electric, Oak ridge national laboratory, and their partners are proposing to replace zirconium alloy cladding in current commercial light water power reactors with an iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding such as APMT or C26M. Extensive testing and evaluation is being conducted to determine the suitability of FeCrAl under normal operation conditions and under severe accident conditions. Results show that FeCrAl has excellent corrosion resistance under normal operation conditions and FeCrAl is several orders of magnitude more resistant than zirconium alloys to degradation by superheated steam under accident conditions, generating less heat of oxidation and lower amount of combustible hydrogen gas. Higher neutron absorption and tritium release effects can be minimized by design changes. The implementation of FeCrAl cladding is a near term solution to enhance the safety of the current fleet of commercial light water power reactors.

  15. Laser sintering of magnesia with nanoparticles of iron oxide and aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Roy, T.K. Das; Castillo, G.A.; Shaji, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser sintered MgO pellets with nanoparticles of Al 2 O 3 and Fe 2 O 3 . • Characterized these pellets by XRD, SEM and XPS. • Spinel formations were observed in both cases. • Changes in morphology and structure were analyzed. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 , 20–40 nm) and aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 , 50 nm) were mixed in different concentrations (3, 5 and 7 wt%) in a magnesium oxide (MgO) matrix. The mixture pellet was irradiated with 532 nm output from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser using different laser fluence and translation speed for sintering. The refractory samples obtained were analyzed using X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples irradiated at translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm 2 with a concentration of 5 and 7 wt% of Fe 2 O 3 presented the MgFe 2 O 4 spinel-type phase. With the addition of Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles, at a translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm 2 , there were the formations of MgAl 2 O 4 spinel phase. The changes in morphologies and microstructure due to laser irradiation were analyzed

  16. Experimental investigation of aluminum complexing with sodium ion and of gallium and iron (III) speciation in natural solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakonov, Igor

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work is to acquire thermodynamic data on the aqueous complexes forming between sodium and aluminum, gallium and hydroxide, and iron (III) and hydroxide. These data will provide for a better understanding of the transport and distribution of these elements in surface and hydrothermal fluids. Stability constants of the sodium-aluminate complex (Na Al(OH) 4 deg.) were obtained from boehmite solubility measurements at temperatures from 125 to 350 deg. C in alkaline solutions containing from 0.1 to 1 mol/L sodium. Complementary potentiometric measurements were performed with a sodium selective electrode, between 75 and 200 deg C (the potentiometric study was carried out by Gleb Pokrovski). Analyses of these data within the framework of the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) model allowed determination of the HKF parameters for Na Al(OH) 4 deg. and calculation of its thermodynamic properties to 800 deg. C and 5 kb. The results of this work show that Na Al(OH) 4 deg. complex formation increases significantly the solubility of aluminum-bearing minerals and consequently aluminum mobility in hydrothermal fluids. Gallium speciation in surface and hydrothermal fluids is dominated by the negatively charged species, Ga(OH) 4 - . The thermodynamic properties of this species were determined from of OEGaOOH solubility measurements as a function of pH and temperature from 25 to 250 deg. C. In general, the variation of gallium aqueous speciation with pH is similar to that of aluminum other than at temperatures less than 200 deg. C over the pH range 3 - 6. This difference can account for the independent behavior of gallium versus aluminum in numerous low temperature natural systems. The thermodynamic properties of Fe(OH) 3 deg. which dominates the speciation of Fe(III) in surface waters and Fe(OH) 4 - were determined from hematite solubility measurements as a function of pH, oxygen pressure and temperature from 110 to 300 deg. C. The available thermodynamic data on

  17. Fundamental studies of oral contrast agents for MR. Comparison of manganese agent and iron agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Osamu; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Suginobu, Yoshito; Takeuchi, Masayasu; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1996-01-01

    We investigated and compared signal intensity and the effect of imaging the upper abdomen with blueberry juice (B.J.), a Mn agent utilizing the properties of paramagnetic metals, and FerriSeltz (F.S.), an iron agent. Since the relaxation effect was much stronger with B.J. than with F.S., the signal intensity required of a peroral contrast agent was able to be obtained at a much lower concentration of B.J. In imaging the upper abdomen, B.J. had a positive effect on imaging in T1-weighted images, and a negative effect in T2-weighted images. F.S. had a positive imaging effect in both, and because it showed extremely high signals in T2-weighted images, motion artifact arose. (author)

  18. Manganese, Iron, and Sulfur Cycling in a Coastal Marine Sediment, Aarhus Bay, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    THAMDRUP, B.; FOSSING, H.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    -scale measurements showed that it extended to the upper 0-2.5 mm during summer, when the zones of Mn and Fe reduction were compressed towards the surface. Most of the H2S produced precipitated as iron sulfides and S0 by reaction with Fe. Both Fe(III) and a nonsulfur-bound authigenic Fe(II) pool reacted efficiently...... of a diatom spring bloom caused distinct maxima in SRR and Mn2+ at 0.5-1 cm depth within two weeks. In autumn, the reactive Mn oxides were depleted due to a net release of Mn2+ to the water column. Thus, the Mn cycle extended significantly into the water column, while a constant Fe pool over the year suggests...

  19. Preconcentration and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel and zinc in water samples using 6-methyl-2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuhawar, M.Y.; Das, P.; Dewani, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    The reagent 6-methyl-2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (MPAPT) has been examined for the pre-concentration of metal ions and determination using air acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The method is based on the complexation and extraction of cadmium (II), cobalt(III), copper(II), lead(II), nickel(II), iron(II), iron(II), manganese(II) and zinc(II) in chloroform. The metal iron are back extracted in nitric acid (1:1) or after evaporation of solvent the residue is digested in nitric acid. After necessary adjustment of volume the metal ions were determined in aqueous solution. Pre-concentration is obtained 10-25 times. Metal ions recovery was 95.4-100.8% with coefficient of variation 0.2-7.5%. The method used for the determination of metals in canal and sewerage waters, within 2-6433 mu g/L with C. V 0.-5.2%. (author)

  20. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments.

  1. Zinc, iron, manganese and copper uptake requirement in response to nitrogen supply and the increased grain yield of summer maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xue

    Full Text Available The relationships between grain yields and whole-plant accumulation of micronutrients such as zinc (Zn, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and copper (Cu in maize (Zea mays L. were investigated by studying their reciprocal internal efficiencies (RIEs, g of micronutrient requirement in plant dry matter per Mg of grain. Field experiments were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in North China to evaluate RIEs and shoot micronutrient accumulation dynamics during different growth stages under different yield and nitrogen (N levels. Fe, Mn and Cu RIEs (average 64.4, 18.1 and 5.3 g, respectively were less affected by the yield and N levels. ZnRIE increased by 15% with an increased N supply but decreased from 36.3 to 18.0 g with increasing yield. The effect of cultivars on ZnRIE was similar to that of yield ranges. The substantial decrease in ZnRIE may be attributed to an increased Zn harvest index (from 41% to 60% and decreased Zn concentrations in straw (a 56% decrease and grain (decreased from 16.9 to 12.2 mg kg-1 rather than greater shoot Zn accumulation. Shoot Fe, Mn and Cu accumulation at maturity tended to increase but the proportions of pre-silking shoot Fe, Cu and Zn accumulation consistently decreased (from 95% to 59%, 90% to 71% and 91% to 66%, respectively. The decrease indicated the high reproductive-stage demands for Fe, Zn and Cu with the increasing yields. Optimized N supply achieved the highest yield and tended to increase grain concentrations of micronutrients compared to no or lower N supply. Excessive N supply did not result in any increases in yield or micronutrient nutrition for shoot or grain. These results indicate that optimized N management may be an economical method of improving micronutrient concentrations in maize grain with higher grain yield.

  2. Cobalt-Iron-Manganese Catalysts for the Conversion of End-of-Life-Tire-Derived Syngas into Light Terminal Olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenhagen, Jan P; Maisonneuve, Lise; Paalanen, Pasi P; Coste, Nathalie; Malicki, Nicolas; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-03-26

    Co-Fe-Mn/γ-Al 2 O 3 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were synthesized, characterized and tested for CO hydrogenation, mimicking end-of-life-tire (ELT)-derived syngas. It was found that an increase of C 2 -C 4 olefin selectivities to 49 % could be reached for 5 wt % Co, 5 wt % Fe, 2.5 wt % Mn/γ-Al 2 O 3 with Na at ambient pressure. Furthermore, by using a 5 wt % Co, 5 wt % Fe, 2.5 wt % Mn, 1.2 wt % Na, 0.03 wt % S/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst the selectivity towards the fractions of C 5+ and CH 4 could be reduced, whereas the selectivity towards the fraction of C 4 olefins could be improved to 12.6 % at 10 bar. Moreover, the Na/S ratio influences the ratio of terminal to internal olefins observed as products, that is, a high Na loading prevents the isomerization of primary olefins, which is unwanted if 1,3-butadiene is the target product. Thus, by fine-tuning the addition of promoter elements the volume of waste streams that need to be recycled, treated or upgraded during ELT syngas processing could be reduced. The most promising catalyst (5 wt % Co, 5 wt % Fe, 2.5 wt % Mn, 1.2 wt % Na, 0.03 wt % S/γ-Al 2 O 3 ) has been investigated using operando transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that a cobalt-iron alloy was formed, whereas manganese remained in its oxidic phase. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Manganese associated nanoparticles agglomerate of iron(III) oxide: synthesis, characterization and arsenic(III) sorption behavior with mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kaushik; Maity, Arjun; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2010-12-15

    Three samples of manganese associated hydrous iron(III) oxide (MNHFO), prepared by incinerating metal hydroxide precipitate at T (± 5)=90, 300 and 600°C, showed increase of crystalline nature in XRD patterns with decreasing As(III) removal percentages. TEM images showed the increase of crystallinity from sample-1 (MNHFO-1) to sample-3 (MNHFO-3). Dimensions (nm) of particles estimated were 5.0, 7.0 and 97.5. Optimization of pH indicated that MNHFO-1 could remove aqueous As(III) efficiently at pH between 3.0 and 7.0. Kinetic and equilibrium data of reactions under the experimental conditions described the pseudo-second order and the Langmuir isotherm equations very well, respectively. The Langmuir capacity (q(m)) estimated was 691.04 mmol kg(-1). The values of enthalpy, Gibb's free energy and entropy changes (ΔH(0)=+23.23 kJ mol(-1), ΔG(0)=-3.43 to -7.20 kJ mol(-1) at T=283-323K, ΔS(0)=+0.094 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)) suggested that the reaction was endothermic, spontaneous and took place with increasing entropy. The As(III) sorbed by MNHFO-1 underwent surface oxidation to As(V), and evidences appeared from the XPS and FTIR investigations. MNHFO-1 packed column (internal diameter: 1.0 cm, height: 3.7 cm) filtered 11.5 dm(3) groundwater (105 μg As dm(-3)) with reducing arsenic concentration to ≤ 10 μg dm(-3). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n - butane and propane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsz-Keung, Cheung; d`Itri, J.L.; Lange, F.C.; Gates, B.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate the potential value of solid superacid catalysts of the sulfated zirconia type for light hydrocarbon conversion. The key experiments catalytic testing of the performance of such catalysts in a flow reactor fed with streams containing, for example, n-butane or propane. Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia was used to catalyze the conversion of n-butane at atmospheric pressure, 225-450{degrees}C, and n-butane partial pressures in the range of 0.0025-0.01 atm. At temperatures <225{degrees}C, these reactions were accompanied by cracking; at temperatures >350{degrees}C, cracking and isomerization occurred. Catalyst deactivation, resulting at least in part from coke formation, was rapid. The primary cracking products were methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene. The observation of these products along with an ethane/ethylene molar ratio of nearly 1 at 450{degrees}C is consistent with cracking occurring, at least in part, by the Haag-Dessau mechanism, whereby the strongly acidic catalyst protonates n-butane to give carbonium ions. The rate of methane formation from n-butane cracking catalyzed by Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia at 450{degrees}C was about 3 x 10{sup -8} mol/(g of catalyst {center_dot}s). The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

  5. Trace Element Status (Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Iron, Manganese) in Patients with Long-Term Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Šenkyřík, Michal; Dastych, Milan; Novák, František; Wohl, Petr; Maňák, Jan; Kohout, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), selenium (Se) in blood plasma and manganese (Mn) in the whole blood in patients with long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in comparison to the control group. We examined 68 patients (16 men and 52 women) aged from 28 to 68 years on a long-term HPN lasting from 4 to 96 months. The short bowel syndrome was an indication for HPN. The daily doses of Zn, Cu, Fe, Se and Mn in the last 3 months were determined. No significant differences in blood plasma were found for Zn, Cu and Fe in patients with HPN and in the control group (p > 0.05). The concentration of Mn in whole blood was significantly increased in HPN patients (p < 0.0001), while Se concentration in these patients was significantly decreased (p < 0.005). The concentration of Mn in the whole blood of 16 patients with cholestasis was significantly increased compared to the patients without cholestasis (p < 0.001). The Cu concentration was increased with no statistical significance. In long-term HPN, the status of trace elements in the patients has to be continually monitored and the daily substitution doses of these elements have to be flexibly adjusted. Dosing schedule needs to be adjusted especially in cases of cholestatic hepatopathy. A discussion about the optimal daily dose of Mn in patients on HPN is appropriate. For clinical practice, the availability of a substitution mixture of trace elements lacking Mn would be advantageous. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Laser sintering of magnesia with nanoparticles of iron oxide and aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Roy, T.K. Das; Castillo, G.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66451 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66451 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser sintered MgO pellets with nanoparticles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Characterized these pellets by XRD, SEM and XPS. • Spinel formations were observed in both cases. • Changes in morphology and structure were analyzed. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 20–40 nm) and aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 50 nm) were mixed in different concentrations (3, 5 and 7 wt%) in a magnesium oxide (MgO) matrix. The mixture pellet was irradiated with 532 nm output from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser using different laser fluence and translation speed for sintering. The refractory samples obtained were analyzed using X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples irradiated at translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm{sup 2} with a concentration of 5 and 7 wt% of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} presented the MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type phase. With the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles, at a translation speed of 110 μm/s and energy fluence of 1.7 J/cm{sup 2}, there were the formations of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. The changes in morphologies and microstructure due to laser irradiation were analyzed.

  7. Fractionation of fulvic acid by iron and aluminum oxides: influence on copper toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Ranville, James F.; Lesher, Emily K.; Diedrich, Daniel J.; McKnight, Diane M.; Sofield, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect on aquatic copper toxicity of the chemical fractionation of fulvic acid (FA) that results from its association with iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide precipitates. Fractionated and unfractionated FAs obtained from streamwater and suspended sediment were utilized in acute Cu toxicity tests on ,i>Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity test results with equal FA concentrations (6 mg FA/L) show that the fractionated dissolved FA was 3 times less effective at reducing Cu toxicity (EC50 13 ± 0.6 μg Cu/L) than were the unfractionated dissolved FAs (EC50 39 ± 0.4 and 41 ± 1.2 μg Cu/L). The fractionation is a consequence of preferential sorption of molecules having strong metal-binding (more aromatic) moieties to precipitating Fe- and Al-rich oxyhydroxides, causing the remaining dissolved FA to be depleted in these functional groups. As a result, there is more bioavailable dissolved Cu in the water and hence greater potential for Cu toxicity to aquatic organisms. In predicting Cu toxicity, biotic ligand models (BLMs) take into account dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration; however, unless DOC characteristics are accounted for, model predictions can underestimate acute Cu toxicity for water containing fractionated dissolved FA. This may have implications for water-quality criteria in systems containing Fe- and Al-rich sediment, and in mined and mineralized areas in particular. Optical measurements, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), show promise for use as spectral indicators of DOC chemical fractionation and inferred increased Cu toxicity.

  8. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  9. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-01-01

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin 2 for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110≤Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  10. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for decomposition of wine samples - Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter N.L. dos [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade do Estado da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Campus Ondina, Salvador, Bahia, 40170-290 Brazil (Brazil)], E-mail: wlopes@uneb.br; Brandao, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Campus Ondina, Salvador, Bahia, 40170-290 Brazil (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L{sup - 1}), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 {mu}g L{sup - 1}, respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L{sup - 1}, respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L{sup - 1} for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L{sup - 1} for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level)

  11. Investigation of the mechanism of microplasma impact on iron and aluminum load using solutions of organic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanova, G L; Yurmazova, T A; Shiyan, L N; Voyno, D A

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on the study of mechanism of electroeffects on iron and aluminum and pellets with using solutions of organic substances. Methylene blue solution, furacilin and eosin were used. It is observed the reactions of the pulse at the time and after switching off the voltage source. It is shown that there are two developing process in the conditions studied. The first process depends on material of electrodes and pulse parameters. The second process occurs spontaneously and it is determined by the redox reaction and sorption processes. The products of electrode erosion and active particles react in the redox reactions. Active particles are formed in solution by the action of pulsed electric discharge in water. The highest efficiency of the process was demonstrated on an iron pellets. (paper)

  12. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego, E-mail: dcarriagada@gmail.com; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  13. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  14. Equation of State of Aluminum-Iron Oxide-Epoxy Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, Jennifer L; Foley, Jason R; Dick, Richard D; Ferranti, Louis; Thadhani, Naresh N; McDowell, David L; Austin, Ryan A; Benson, David J

    2007-01-01

    ...) donor material, using piezoelectric pins. The explosive loading of the metal donors (aluminum and copper) will be discussed. Gas gun experiments provide complementary lower pressure data in which piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride...

  15. Determination of small amounts of aluminum in iron and steel by x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minao; Sato, Shoki; Narita, Masanao

    1981-01-01

    The accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis for determining aluminum in steel is generally poor when the aluminum content is below 0.1%. In this study, it is confirmed that the existence of inhomogeneous acid-insoluble aluminum causes the poor accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis. The accuracy can be improved by adding granular ferro-zirconium to molten steel when sampling. By using this method, the accuracy of determining aluminum was 0.0024% for low alloy steels and 0.0022% for stainless steels as the standard deviation obtained for a series of differences between an analytical result and a standard value. Corrections for overlapping of the chromium spectrum, and for absorption and enhancement effects of co-existent elements are not necessary for the analysis of low alloy steels, whereas these corrections are necessary for the analysis of stainless steels. (author)

  16. Adsorption of low concentration ceftazidime from aqueous solutions using impregnated activated carbon promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, three impregnated activated carbon IAC (AC-Cu, AC-Fe, and AC-Al) promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum were used for adsorption of ceftazidime. Iron(III), Copper(II) and Aluminum(III) nitrate were used as an impregnant. The IACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The influence of factors, such as ion strength, pH, temperature, initial concentration, and concentration of natural organic matter organic matter on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of ceftazidime were studied for the three IACs. The results showed that the adsorption was accurately represented by pseudo-second order model. Under different temperature, the maximum adsorption quantity of ceftazidime on AC-Cu calculated by pseudo-second order kinetic model were 200.0 mg g-1 (298 K), 196.1 mg g-1 (303 K) and 185.2 mg g-1 (308 K). It was much higher than that of AC-Fe and AC-Al. And the process was controlled by both film diffusion and intra particle mass transport. The results also showed that, the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm fit the adsorption well.

  17. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle, E-mail: helle.margrete.meltzer@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Lise Brantsaeter, Anne [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Borch-Iohnsen, Berit [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Ellingsen, Dag G. [National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Alexander, Jan [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Thomassen, Yngvar [National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Stigum, Hein [Division of Epidemiology, Department of Chronic Diseases, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Ydersbond, Trond A. [Statistics Norway, P.Box 8131 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  18. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility

  19. Study of granitic biotites by X-ray fluorescence analysis: determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium, potassium, silicon and aluminium; Estudio de biotitas graniticas por fluorescencia de rayos X: Determinacion de hierro, manganeso, titanio, calcio, potasio, silicio y aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toubes, R. O.; Bermudez Polonio, J.

    1968-07-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium potassium, silicon, and aluminium, is reported, Sample preparation is carried out by the miniature flux technique, and rubidium is used as internal standard for silicon and aluminium. (Author) 5 refs.

  20. Microplasma synthesis on aluminum with additions of iron and nickel soluble complexes in electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogov, A.B., E-mail: alex-lab@bk.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry. 3, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mironov, I.V.; Terleeva, O.P.; Slonova, A.I. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry. 3, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline homogeneous electrolyte with transition metals complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coatings contain metallic iron, nickel and their oxides in alumina-silica matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of Fe/Ni ratio on coatings properties and process characteristics. - Abstract: The microplasma synthesis of coatings containing iron and nickel from homogeneous electrolytes has been studied. For stabilization of transition metals in solution, it is proposed to use chelation. It was found that the synthesis of coatings using alternating current leads to the formation of metallic iron and nickel particles in addition to oxide phases. The iron and nickel complexes concentrations ratio in the electrolyte correlates with the coatings composition. Obtained coatings have been studied by scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalyser and by X-ray diffraction with Cu and Mo radiation. The metal content in the coating was determined spectrophotometrically from the absorption of iron thiocyanate complexes and nickel dimethylglyoxime complex.

  1. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  2. Effects of Iron and Aluminum on Phase Boundaries at 600-800 km Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Ye, Yu; Prakapenka, Vitali; Meng, Yue

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic studies have reported complex discontinuity structures at 600-800 km depths. However, the origin of the structures have not been well understood. In order to understand compositional effects, we have measured the post-spinel, post-garnet, and post-ilmenite phase boundaries in MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (iron free) and CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO (iron bearing) systems with pyrolitic oxide ratios. In-situ X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at 20-30 GPa and 1500-2300 K in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at the GSECARS and HPCAT sectors of the Advanced Photon Source. We use the Pt and Au pressure scales for the iron-free and iron-bearing compositions, respectively. The Pt and Au scales were calibrated with respect to each other in separate experiments. In most experiments, Ar was cryogenically loaded in the sample chamber as a thermal insulation and pressure transmitting medium, except for a few experiments where a KCl medium was used. At temperatures above 1900 K, the post-garnet transition occurs at higher pressures than the post-spinel transition in both the iron-free and iron-bearing systems. At lower temperatures, while the post-ilmenite transition occurs at nearly same pressures as the post-spinel transition in the iron-bearing system, the post-ilmenite transition occurs at slightly higher pressure (1 GPa) than the post-spinel transitions in the iron-free system. In the iron-free system, akimotoite is stable to much higher temperature (2300 K) than previously thought. In the iron-bearing system, the stability of akimotoite is limited to 2050 K. Our data indicate that Al partitions more into akimotoite than garnet in the iron-free system, which is the opposite to what has been found in iron-bearing systems. The high Al content in akimotoite seems to be responsible for the high-temperature stability of akimotoite in the iron-free system. The Clapeyron slope of the post-garnet boundary is greater by a factor of 2.5 in the iron-bearing system

  3. Combined Effects of Copper and Tin at Intermediate Level of Manganese on the Structure and Properties of As-Cast Nodular Graphite Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaze J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper, manganese and tin are commonly used as pearlite promoter elements in cast irons. A number of studies have been aimed at quantitatively evaluate the effect of each of these elements, individually or at given levels of the others. As a matter of fact, while tin may be necessary for achieving a fully pearlitic matrix, it is known that when in excess it is detrimental for mechanical properties. As the pearlite promoting effect of each of those elements is totally different, it is of real interest to know the optimum combination of them for a given cooling rate. The present report is a first part of a work dedicated at characterizing the best alloying levels in terms of room temperature mechanical properties of as-cast pearlitic materials.

  4. Monitoring of occupational exposure in manufacturing of stainless steel constructions. Part I: Chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium in the workplace air of stainless steel welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, J; Bencko, V; Pápayová, A; Saligová, D; Tejral, J; Borská, L

    2001-11-01

    Exposure to workplace airborne pollutants was examined in a group of 20 workers dealing mainly with welding, polishing, drilling and assembling of stainless steel constructions. Airborne particulate matter (APM) collected using both personal and stationary samplers was analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Quality assurance procedures of both sampling and analytical stages are described. Of the elements determined, results are presented for chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium. The median values of element concentrations exceeded the maximum admissible limits for workplace pollutants only for chromium, while for nickel the limit was exceeded in several individual cases. Sampling of hair, nails, blood, urine and saliva to be used for biological monitoring of the exposed and control groups is also described.

  5. Survey of heavy metal pollution (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron and manganese in drinking water resources of Nurabad city, Lorestan, Iran 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHodratolah Shams Khorramabadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy water passes through the pipelines from supply resources to consuming places in which passing from these stages may cause some cases of contamination like heavy metal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination of heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese in water resources of Nurabad city of Lorestan in 2013. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, samples were collected from 7 wells of drinking water and 2 water storage tanks during 6 months in Nurabad. So that, heavy metal parameters such as copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese were measured using an atomic absorption device and also electrical conductivity, sulfate, chloride and total dissolved solids were also measured in accordance with standard methods. Results: Results indicated that the concentration of studied metals in water sources was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard, and in the water supply system the concentration of some metals was more than standard level. Moreover, the results showed that the concentration of studied heavy metals were more in winter than in autumn. Conclusion: Generally, in the water resources of Nurabad city the concentration of studied heavy metals was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard and there are not problems for water consumers. However, due to public health and the presence of a high concentration of these metals in the distribution supply, the heavy metal concentration in drinking water of this region should be monitored regularly by responsible organizations.

  6. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  7. Thin wall ductile iron casting as a substitute for aluminum alloy casting in automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper it is presented thin wall ductile iron casting (TWDI as a substitute of aluminium alloy casting. Upper control arm made of ductile iron with wall thickness ranging from 2 – 3.7 mm was produced by inmold process. Structure, mechanical properties and computer simulations were investigated. Structural analysis of TWDI shows pearlitic-ferritic matrix free from chills and porosity. Mechanical testing disclose superior ultimate tensile strength (Rm, yield strength (Rp0,2 and slightly lower elongation (E of TWDI in comparison with forged control arm made of aluminium alloy (6061-T6. Moreover results of computer simulation of static loading for tested control arms are presented. Analysis show that the light-weight ductile iron casting can be loaded to similar working conditions as the forged Al alloy without any potential failures.

  8. Utilization of aluminum to obtaining a duplex type stainless steel using high energy ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlak, I.E.; Cintho, O.M.; Capocchi, J.D.T.

    2010-01-01

    The obtaining of stainless steel using aluminum in its composition - FeMnAl system, has been researches subject since the sixties, by good mechanical properties and resistance to oxidation presented, when compared with conventional FeNiCr stainless steel system. In another point, the aluminum and manganese are low cost then traditional elements. This work, metallic powders of iron, manganese and pure aluminum, were processed in a Spex type high-energy ball mill in nitrogen atmosphere. The milling products were compressed into pastille form and sintered under inert atmosphere. The final products were characterized by optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness test. The metallographic analysis shows a typical austenite and ferrite duplex type microstructure. The presence of these phases was confirmed according X ray diffraction analysis. (author)

  9. Adsorption of low concentration ceftazidime from aqueous solutions using impregnated activated carbon promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiang, E-mail: huxiang@mail.buct.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Centre for Environmental Pollution Control and Resource Reuse Engineering of Beijing City, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Centre for Environmental Pollution Control and Resource Reuse Engineering of Beijing City, Beijing 100029 (China); Sun, Zhirong, E-mail: zrsun@bjut.edu.cn [College of Environmental & Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The graphic abstract describes the research that we used modified activated carbons impregnated with iron nitrate, copper nitrate and aluminium nitrate to adsorb ceftazidime from aqueous solution. The surface functional groups of the modified activated carbons were different, and thus resulted in the big difference in the adsorption performance of the modified activated carbons. The theory and the experiments both showed the preferable adsorption of ceftazidime could be achieved on modified activated carbons. - Highlights: • Three modified activated carbons were prepared by impregnating metal nitrate. • Characteristics of the modified activated carbons were analyzed. • Adsorption capacity of ceftazidime on modified activated carbons was improved. • The adsorption behavior of ceftazidime on modified activated carbons were revealed. • The nature of ceftazidime adsorption on modified activated carbons was elucidated. - Abstract: In this paper, three impregnated activated carbon IAC (AC-Cu, AC-Fe, and AC-Al) promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum were used for adsorption of ceftazidime. Iron(III), Copper(II) and Aluminum(III) nitrate were used as an impregnant. The IACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The influence of factors, such as ion strength, pH, temperature, initial concentration, and concentration of natural organic matter organic matter on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of ceftazidime were studied for the three IACs. The results showed that the adsorption was accurately represented by pseudo-second order model. Under different temperature, the maximum adsorption quantity of ceftazidime on AC-Cu calculated by pseudo-second order kinetic model were 200.0 mg g{sup −1} (298 K), 196.1 mg g{sup −1} (303 K) and 185.2 mg g

  10. Adsorption of low concentration ceftazidime from aqueous solutions using impregnated activated carbon promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The graphic abstract describes the research that we used modified activated carbons impregnated with iron nitrate, copper nitrate and aluminium nitrate to adsorb ceftazidime from aqueous solution. The surface functional groups of the modified activated carbons were different, and thus resulted in the big difference in the adsorption performance of the modified activated carbons. The theory and the experiments both showed the preferable adsorption of ceftazidime could be achieved on modified activated carbons. - Highlights: • Three modified activated carbons were prepared by impregnating metal nitrate. • Characteristics of the modified activated carbons were analyzed. • Adsorption capacity of ceftazidime on modified activated carbons was improved. • The adsorption behavior of ceftazidime on modified activated carbons were revealed. • The nature of ceftazidime adsorption on modified activated carbons was elucidated. - Abstract: In this paper, three impregnated activated carbon IAC (AC-Cu, AC-Fe, and AC-Al) promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum were used for adsorption of ceftazidime. Iron(III), Copper(II) and Aluminum(III) nitrate were used as an impregnant. The IACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The influence of factors, such as ion strength, pH, temperature, initial concentration, and concentration of natural organic matter organic matter on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of ceftazidime were studied for the three IACs. The results showed that the adsorption was accurately represented by pseudo-second order model. Under different temperature, the maximum adsorption quantity of ceftazidime on AC-Cu calculated by pseudo-second order kinetic model were 200.0 mg g"−"1 (298 K), 196.1 mg g"−"1 (303 K) and 185.2 mg g"−"1 (308 K

  11. Study of the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron doped with carbon, manganese and phosphorus; Etude des mecanismes de recristallisation dans le fer de ultra-haute purete dope en carbone, manganese et phosphore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesne, L.

    2000-07-04

    High purity steels have the potential to improve deep drawing properties for automotive applications. Understanding the influence of the chemical composition on the recrystallization mechanisms and on texture development should help to improve their properties. We have studied the influence of 10 ppm of carbon, 1000 ppm of manganese and 120 ppm of phosphorus on the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron (UHP iron > 99.997%). For this purpose we used 4 materials: one undoped (UHP), one doped with C, one doped with C, Mn and one doped With C, Mn, P. In order to restrict grain coarsening in the hot strips, hot rolling was performed in the ferritic region, in one pass of 80% thickness reduction. The hot bands were then fully recrystallized but exhibited non-isotropic textures, with in particular an intense Goss [110]<001> component for the doped materials. The hot-bands were subsequently cold rolled down to a thickness of 0.8 mm corresponding to a thickness reduction of 80%, and then continuously annealed at 10 deg. C/s. The recrystallization kinetics are delayed with the addition of doping elements. In particular, the incubation time for nucleation is shifted towards higher temperatures while the recrystallization velocity increases. The textures of the fully recrystallized materials exhibit a strong Goss component prejudicial for deep drawing properties. We have established that this component can only appear if coarse grains and carbon in solid solution were simultaneously present in the material before deformation. Characterisation of the cold deformed state enabled us to evaluate the energy stored during deformation as a function of the material composition and the grain orientation: - the overall stored energy increases with the doping elements content. - the stored energy in the {gamma} fibre grains is greater than in the {alpha} fibre grains: 30 J/mol for the {gamma} fibre instead of 5 J/mol for the {alpha} fibre, in the undoped UHP iron. In the

  12. Effects of toxic levels of sodium, arsenic, iron and aluminum on the rice plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockard, R G; McWalter, A R

    1956-01-01

    The results of two sand culture experiments on rice plants are described. In one, the toxic effects of sodium, as sodium chloride, and of arsenic, as sodium arsenate, were tested; in the other, iron, chelated with the disodium salt of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid, and aluminium, as aluminium sulfate, were tried out. The former was undertaken because of the existence of these sub

  13. Simultaneous sorption of fluoride and arsenic ions (V) in a naturally occurring material modified with iron and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez M, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, two materials, zeolite and pozzolans from the States of Oaxaca and Mexico, were used respectively, which were modified to evaluate their efficiencies to remove F and As(V) ions from solution and natural water. The materials were modified with iron and aluminum using an electrochemical cell, and with the hydroxides formed with iron and aluminum chloride solutions. The natural and modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis, specific area and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Experimental data on the sorption processes of F- ions by modified zeolite and pozzolans were adjusted to the kinetic models of pseudo-second-order (q e, 0408 mg /g K, 4.33 g / mg h) and Lagergen (q e, 0.807 mg/g K L, 1.83 1/min), respectively. Both materials showed the best fit to the Freundlich isotherm, Kf, 0.33 and 0.64 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively; suggesting a physical adsorption process on a heterogeneous material. Experimental adsorption capacities of pozzolans and modified zeolite for F ions were 0.36 and 0.83 mg/g respectively. The results of the kinetics of adsorption of As(V) were treated with the Largergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models; however the adsorption rate was high and consequently the rate constants could not be calculated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Freundlich model and the constants Kf were 6.24 and 11.15 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption processes suggest endothermic adsorption for F- ions by both materials and for As(V) by the pozzolans. The free energy values ΔG indicate spontaneous processes and not spontaneous for F- ions by pozzolans. The adsorption of As (V) by the pozzolans presented an exothermic and spontaneous behavior. Finally, a study was performed in columns with

  14. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.

    2016-06-10

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  15. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.; Conca, Erika; Bakaimi, Ioanna; Sathya, Ayyappan; Materia, Maria Elena; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Sogne, Elisa; Pellegrino, Teresa; Kanaras, Antonios G.

    2016-01-01

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  16. Magnesium, Iron and Aluminum in LLNL Air Particulate and Rain Samples with Reference to Magnesium in Industrial Storm Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bibby, Richard K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, Craig [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Storm water runoff from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) main site and Site 300 periodically exceeds the Discharge Permit Numeric Action Level (NAL) for Magnesium (Mg) under the Industrial General Permit (IGP) Order No. 2014-0057-DWQ. Of particular interest is the source of magnesium in storm water runoff from the site. This special study compares new metals data from air particulate and precipitation samples from the LLNL main site and Site 300 to previous metals data for storm water from the main site and Site 300 and alluvial sediment from the main site to investigate the potential source of elevated Mg in storm water runoff. Data for three metals (Mg, Iron {Fe}, and Aluminum {Al}) were available from all media; data for additional metals, such as Europium (Eu), were available from rain, air particulates, and alluvial sediment. To attribute source, this study compared metals concentration data (for Mg, Al, and Fe) in storm water and rain; metal-metal correlations (Mg with Fe, Mg with Al, Al with Fe, Mg with Eu, Eu with Fe, and Eu with Al) in storm water, rain, air particulates, and sediments; and metal-metal ratios ((Mg/Fe, Mg/Al, Al/Fe, Mg/Eu, Eu/Fe, and Eu/Al) in storm water, rain, air particulates and sediments. The results presented in this study are consistent with a simple conceptual model where the source of Mg in storm water runoff is air particulate matter that has dry-deposited on impervious surfaces and subsequently entrained in runoff during precipitation events. Such a conceptual model is consistent with 1) higher concentrations of metals in storm water runoff than in precipitation, 2) the strong correlation of Mg with Aluminum (Al) and Iron (Fe) in both storm water and air particulates, and 3) the similarity in metal mass ratios between storm water and air particulates in contrast to the dissimilarity of metal mass ratios between storm water and precipitation or alluvial sediment. The strong correlation of Mg with Fe and Al

  17. Manganese-induced hydroxyl radical formation in rat striatum is not attenuated by dopamine depletion or iron chelation in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.N. Sloot (W.); J. Korf (Jakob); J.F. Koster (Johan); L.E.A. de Wit (Elly); J.-B.P. Gramsbergen (J. B P)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe present studies were aimed at investigating the possible roles of dopamine (DA) and iron in production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) in rat striatum after Mn2+ intoxication. For this purpose, DA depletions were assessed concomitant with in vivo 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA)

  18. [Effect of polymeric aluminum-iron on EPS and bio-flocculation in A2/O system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qin-Xue; Liu, Ai-Cui; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Shi, Han-Chang; Lü, Bing-Nan

    2012-04-01

    Polymeric aluminum-iron (PAFC) was added at the end of aeration tank to enhance phosphorus removal, so that the phosphorus concentration in the effluent could meet the calss A standard in municipal sewage treatment plant pollutant discharge standard (GB 18918-2002). The characteristics of extracellular polymer substances (EPS) and bio-flocculation for the activated sludge in the A2/O system were analyzed in the experiment. The results showed that, the gross of EPS varied little with the increase in PAFC dosage, while, the ratio of albumen to polysaccharide declined from 3.30 to 2.30. When the PAFC dosage increased, the concentration of Al3+ in EPS increased during the whole anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic cycle. The flocs of activated sludge became larger after PAFC addition, Zeta potential of the effluent dropped significantly from - 15.83 mV to -21.20 mV and sludge yield increased. Therefore, bio-flocculation of the activated sludge in the A2/O system improved when a proper amount of PAFC was added, subsequently improve the water quality of the effluent.

  19. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe2O3) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe2O3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe2O3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe2O3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe2O3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  20. High temperature Moessbauer study of order-disorder transformation in iron-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Kensuke; Yamamura, Akihiko; Kudo, Kazunao; Eguchi, Tetsuo

    1979-01-01

    Ordering process of iron rich Fe-Al alloys has been investigated at elevated temperatures by mean of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The observed spectra are analyzed to obtain the temperature dependences of the internal field, isomer shift and line width, and the results are discussed in connection with the ordering process. The alloy with 24.7 at% Al exhibits spectra, which are characteristic of the superposition of a single-line spectrum and a six-line one, originating from the ordered paramagnetic B2 or DO 3 state and disordered ferromagnetic α, respectively, and the results confirm the coexistence of α phase with B2 or DO 3 . The isomer shift of the paramagnetic component of the spectra shows discontinuous changes at the temperatures of transformation α reversible B2 and B2 reversible DO 3 . (author)

  1. Streptococcus sanguinis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase: high activity with both iron and manganese cofactors and structural insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlynets, Olga; Boal, Amie K; Rhodes, Delacy V; Kitten, Todd; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2014-02-28

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a causative agent of infective endocarditis. Deletion of SsaB, a manganese transporter, drastically reduces S. sanguinis virulence. Many pathogenic organisms require class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides under aerobic conditions, and recent studies demonstrate that this enzyme uses a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical (Mn(III)2-Y(•)) cofactor in vivo. The proteins required for S. sanguinis ribonucleotide reduction (NrdE and NrdF, α and β subunits of RNR; NrdH and TrxR, a glutaredoxin-like thioredoxin and a thioredoxin reductase; and NrdI, a flavodoxin essential for assembly of the RNR metallo-cofactor) have been identified and characterized. Apo-NrdF with Fe(II) and O2 can self-assemble a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y(•)) cofactor (1.2 Y(•)/β2) and with the help of NrdI can assemble a Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor (0.9 Y(•)/β2). The activity of RNR with its endogenous reductants, NrdH and TrxR, is 5,000 and 1,500 units/mg for the Mn- and Fe-NrdFs (Fe-loaded NrdF), respectively. X-ray structures of S. sanguinis NrdIox and Mn(II)2-NrdF are reported and provide a possible rationale for the weak affinity (2.9 μM) between them. These streptococcal proteins form a structurally distinct subclass relative to other Ib proteins with unique features likely important in cluster assembly, including a long and negatively charged loop near the NrdI flavin and a bulky residue (Thr) at a constriction in the oxidant channel to the NrdI interface. These studies set the stage for identifying the active form of S. sanguinis class Ib RNR in an animal model for infective endocarditis and establishing whether the manganese requirement for pathogenesis is associated with RNR.

  2. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  3. Hydroxyapatite formation on titania-based materials in a solution mimicking body fluid: Effects of manganese and iron addition in anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Euisup; Kim, Ill Yong; Cho, Sung Baek; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite formation on the surfaces of implanted materials plays an important role in osteoconduction of bone substitutes in bone tissues. Titania hydrogels are known to instigate hydroxyapatite formation in a solution mimicking human blood plasma. To date, the relationship between the surface characteristics of titania and hydroxyapatite formation on its surface remains unclear. In this study, titania powders with varying surface characteristics were prepared by addition of manganese or iron to examine hydroxyapatite formation in a type of simulated body fluid (Kokubo solution). Hydroxyapatite formation was monitored by observation of deposited particles with scale-like morphology on the prepared titania powders. The effect of the titania surface characteristics, i.e., crystal structure, zeta potential, hydroxy group content, and specific surface area, on hydroxyapatite formation was examined. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed on the surface of titania powders that were primarily anatase, and featured a negative zeta potential and low specific surface areas irrespective of the hydroxy group content. High specific surface areas inhibited the formation of hydroxyapatite because calcium and phosphate ions were mostly consumed by adsorption on the titania surface. Thus, these surface characteristics of titania determine its osteoconductivity following exposure to body fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of iron and manganese minerals and their associated microbiota in different mine sites to reveal the potential interactions of microbiota with mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Bong-Soo; Chon, Chul-Min

    2018-01-01

    Different environmental conditions such as pH and dissolved elements of mine stream induce precipitation of different minerals and their associated microbial community may vary. Therefore, mine precipitates from various environmental conditions were collected and their associated microbiota were analyzed through metagenomic DNA sequencing. Various Fe and Mn minerals including ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, goethite, birnessite, and Mn-substituted δ-FeOOH (δ-(Fe 1-x , Mn x )OOH) were found in the different environmental conditions. The Fe and Mn minerals were enriched with toxic metal(loid)s including As, Cd, Ni and Zn, indicating they can act as scavengers of toxic metal(loid)s in mine streams. Under acidic conditions, Acidobacteria was dominant phylum and Gallionella (Fe oxidizing bacteria) was the predominant genus in these Fe rich environments. Manganese oxidizing bacteria, Hyphomicrobium, was found in birnessite forming environments. Leptolyngbya within Cyanobacteria was found in Fe and Mn oxidizing environments, and might contribute to Fe and Mn oxidation through the production of molecular oxygen. The potential interaction of microbial community with minerals in mine sites can be traced by analysis of microbial community in different Fe and Mn mineral forming environments. Iron and Mn minerals contribute to the removal of toxic metal(loid)s from mine water. Therefore, the understanding characteristics of mine precipitates and their associated microbes helps to develop strategies for the management of contaminated mine water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring of occupational exposure in manufacturing of stainless steel constructions. Part I: Chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium in the workplace air of stainless steel welders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Bencko, V.; Papayova, A.; Saligova, D.; Tejral, J.; Borska, L.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to workplace airborne pollutants was examined in a group of 20 workers dealing mainly with welding, polishing, drilling and assembling of stainless steel constructions. Monitoring of airborne particulate matter (ARM) was performed using both personal and stationary samplers. For the personal full-shift monitoring, a SKC 224 PCRX-4 constant flow rate pump was used which was connected to a sampling head with mixed cellulose matched-weight filters having a diameter of 32 mm and a 0.8 μm pore size. The constant flow rate amounted to 2 L min -1 . For the stationary sampling, the ''Gent'' stacked filter unit PM10 sampler was used, operating at a flow rate of 16 L min -1 . It collects particles having an equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD) of less than 10,um in the separate ''coarse'' (2-10 μm EAD) and ''fine'' (< 2 μm EAD) size fractions on two sequential polycarbonate (Costar, Nuclepore) filters with a 47 mm diameter. The filters of both types were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Of the elements determined, results for chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium are presented. Procedures for quality assurance of both sampling and analytical stages are described. Sampling of biological material for elemental analysis (hair, nails, urine and blood and/or serum) of exposed and control persons in contamination-free conditions was also performed. In addition, saliva samples were collected for studying immunological and genotoxicity aspects of occupational exposure. (author)

  6. Synthesis of nanostructured mixed oxide CeO2-Mn2O3 and investigation of their sorption ability for arsenic, ammoniac, iron, manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Minh Dai; Dao Ngoc Nhiem; Duong Thi Lim

    2012-01-01

    The nanostrutured mixed oxide CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 have been synthesised at low temperature (350 o C) by the combustion of gel prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Ce (NO 3 ) 4 and Mn(No 3 ) 3 , CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 characterizations were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET (Brunauce-Emmet-Teller) measurements. The phase of CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 , with large specific surface ares 65.3 m 2 /g was obtained at 350 o C for 2 hours. The nanostructured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 has been investigated for removing iron, manganese, arsenic and ammoniac from water. The sorption characteristics of the nanostrutured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 for AS(V), NH4 + , Fe(III), Mn(II) according to the langmuir isotherm. The sorption capacities of nanostrutured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 are 57.10 mg As(V)g; 154.54 mg NH4 + /g; 72.97 mg Fe(III)/g; 60.27 Mn(II) / g. (author)

  7. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficiency of Aluminum and Iron Electrodes for the Removal of Heavy Metals [(Ni (II), Pb (II), Cd (II)] by Electrocoagulation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar; Hussain, Amira; Muneer, Majid; Zia, Khalid Mahmood [Government College Univ., Faisalabad (Pakistan); Hafeez, Samia [Bahaud-din-Zakariya Univ., Multan (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15

    Electrocoagulation (EC) technique is applied for the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals ions such as nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) by using sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant flocs usually aluminium or iron cations into the solution. During electrolytic reactions hydrogen gas evolve at the cathode. All the experiments were carried out in Batch mode. The tank was filled with synthetic wastewater containing heavy metals and efficiency of electrocoagulation in combination with aluminum and iron electrodes were investigated for removal of such metals. Several parameters, such as contact time, pH, electro-coagulant concentration, and current density were optimized to achieve maximum removal efficiency (%). The concentrations of heavy metals were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). It is found that the electro-coagulation process has potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of heavy metals from wastewater specially using iron electrodes in terms of high removal efficiencies and operating cost.

  9. Efficiency of Aluminum and Iron Electrodes for the Removal of Heavy Metals [(Ni (II), Pb (II), Cd (II)] by Electrocoagulation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar; Hussain, Amira; Muneer, Majid; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Hafeez, Samia

    2013-01-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) technique is applied for the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals ions such as nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) by using sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant flocs usually aluminium or iron cations into the solution. During electrolytic reactions hydrogen gas evolve at the cathode. All the experiments were carried out in Batch mode. The tank was filled with synthetic wastewater containing heavy metals and efficiency of electrocoagulation in combination with aluminum and iron electrodes were investigated for removal of such metals. Several parameters, such as contact time, pH, electro-coagulant concentration, and current density were optimized to achieve maximum removal efficiency (%). The concentrations of heavy metals were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). It is found that the electro-coagulation process has potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of heavy metals from wastewater specially using iron electrodes in terms of high removal efficiencies and operating cost

  10. Sodium aluminum-iron phosphate glass-ceramics for immobilization of lanthanide oxide wastes from pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Stefanovsky, O. I.; Kadyko, M. I.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2018-03-01

    Sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glass ceramics containing of up to 20 wt.% rare earth (RE) oxides simulating pyroprocessing waste were produced by melting at 1250 °C followed by either quenching or slow cooling to room temperature. The iron-free glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor phosphotridymite and monazite. The iron-bearing glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor monazite and Na-Al-Fe orthophosphate at low waste loadings (5-10 wt.%) and major orthophosphate and minor monazite as well as interstitial glass at high waste loadings (15-20 wt.%). Slowly cooled samples contained higher amount of crystalline phases than quenched ones. Monazite is major phase for REs. Leach rates from the materials of major elements (Na, Al, Fe, P) are 10-5-10-7 g cm-2 d-1, RE elements - lower than 10-5 g cm-2 d-1.

  11. Diel cycle of iron, aluminum and other heavy metals in a volcano watershed in northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that heavy metals in surface water show diel (24-hr) changes in concentrations due to diel biogeochemical cycle. Accordingly, it is important to have a better sampling policy for monitoring the environmental impact of heavy metals of surface water, especially volcanic and mining areas. This study investigated Tatun Volcano watershed in northern Taiwan with a 24-h sampling operation to explore the diel cycle of arsenic concentrations and discuss on the corresponding biogeochemical processes. According to the previous studies, solar energy is the main factor of diel cycles, which could have strong effects on temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and many other water qualities. These changes produce a series of chain reactions and finally result in the change of heavy metal concentrations. In general, diel cycle of dissolved oxygen is dominated by metabolism of aquatic plants and sunlight photoreduction in acidic stream water; therefore, the Fe and Al contents would be accordingly changed. In addition, the concentrations of heavy metals will be simultaneously modified due to the high adsorption capacity of Fe and Al hydroxides. In this study, the results of hydro chemical analysis show that creek water is characterized by higher temperature, low pH value (3.0-4.5) and high SO4content(60-400 ppm) due to the mixing of hot spring. That the pH dramatically drops in the noon demonstrates that pH is highly dependent on photoreduction. This can be confirmed by the opposite trend of Fe concentration. The high Fe content in the noon also demonstrates that the precipitation of Fe hydroxides is not dominant in the day time and Fe is mainly in dissolved and/or colloid forms. Under the situation, heavy metals are supposed to have a similar trend with Fe. However, arsenic, aluminum and rare earth elements show a quite different diel cycle from Fe and other heavy metals. It concludes that arsenic and rare earth elements may be adsorbed by Al hydroxides instead of Fe

  12. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe 2 O 3 unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe 2 O 3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  13. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hao, Haixia [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hui, Longfei [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Zhao, Fengqi [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Feng, Hao, E-mail: fenghao98@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); State Key Laboratory of Fluorine and Nitrogen Chemicals, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  14. In vitro and in vivo corrosion properties of new iron-manganese alloys designed for cardiovascular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drynda, Andreas; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm; Peuster, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    The principle of biodegradation for the production of temporary implant materials (e.g. stents) plays an important role in the treatment of congenital heart defects. In the last decade several attempts have been made with different alloy materials-mainly based on iron and magnesium. None of the currently available materials in this field have demonstrated satisfying results and have therefore not found entry into broad clinical practice. While magnesium or magnesium alloy systems corrode too fast, the corrosion rate of pure iron-stents is too slow for cardiovascular applications. In the last years FeMn alloy systems were developed with the idea that galvanic effects, caused by different electrochemical properties of Fe and Mn, would increase the corrosion rate. In vitro tests with alloys containing up to 30% Mn showed promising results in terms of biocompatibility. This study deals with the development of new FeMn alloy systems with lower Mn concentrations (FeMn 0.5 wt %, FeMn 2.7 wt %, FeMn 6.9 wt %) to avoid Mn toxicity. Our results show, that these alloys exhibit good mechanical features as well as suitable in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion properties. In contrast, the evaluation of these alloys in a mouse model led to unexpected results-even after 9 months no significant corrosion was detectable. Preliminary SEM investigations showed that passivation layers (FeMn phosphates) might be the reason for corrosion resistance. If this can be proved in further experiments, strategies to prevent or dissolve those layers need to be developed to expedite the in vivo corrosion of FeMn alloys. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder...

  16. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  17. THE ROLE OF IRON IN Deinococcus radiodurans ENGINEERED FOR GROWTH ON TOLUENE AND THE ROLE OF MANGANESE IN THE EXTREME RADIATION RESISTANCE PHENOTYPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan Brim; Elena K. Gaidamakova; Vera Y. Matrosova; Min Zhai; Amudhan Venkateswaran; Marina Omelchenko; Kira S. Makarova; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson; Michael J. Daly

    2004-01-01

    Toluene and other fuel hydrocarbons are commonly found in association with radionuclides at numerous Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently occurring together with Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. In this study, the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was engineered for complete toluene mineralization by cloned expression of tod and xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida. The recombinant Tod/Xyl strain showed significant incorporation of carbon from the toluene aromatic ring into cellular macromolecules and carbon dioxide, in the absence or presence of chronic radiation. We have shown that intracellular iron concentrations in wild-type D. radiodurans in minimal medium are exceptionally low and not sufficient to support growth on toluene using Fe-dependent oxygenases cloned from P. putida. Introducing the fur mutation into D. radiodurans increased intracellular Fe levels, and imparted on the engineered strain the ability to grow on meta-toluate as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism's native Cr(VI) reduction capabilities were facilitated by toluene when present as the sole carbon and energy source in natural sediment analogues of DOE contaminated environments. The engineered bacteria were able to oxidize toluene under both minimal and complex nutrient conditions, which is important since both conditions have environmental equivalents in the context of bioremediation processes. As such, the Tod/Xyl strain is providing a model for understanding the role of Fe and reduction of metals coupled to organic contaminant oxidation in aerobic radionuclide contaminated sediments. We have shown that D. radiodurans contains high intracellular manganese levels, and that Mn restriction sensitizes cells to irradiation. We propose that the unusually high Mn/Fe ratio of D. radiodurans facilitates survival by quenching oxidative stress during recovery.

  18. Manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide-graphene magnetic nanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, and application for the arsenic(III)-sorption from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Gupta, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup Kumar [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); De, Amitabha [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Chemical Science Division (India); Banerjee, Sangam [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Surface Physics Division (India); Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2012-12-15

    High specific surface area of graphene (GR) has gained special scientific attention in developing magnetic GR nanocomposite aiming to apply for the remediation of diverse environmental problems like point-of-use water purification and simultaneous separation of contaminants applying low external magnetic field (<1.0 T) from ground water. Fabrication of magnetic manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide (Mn{sub x}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2-x}{sup 3+}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}) (IMBO)-GR nanocomposite is reported by exfoliating the GR layers. Latest microscopic, spectroscopic, powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device characterizations showed that the material is a magnetic nanocomposite with high specific surface area (280 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) and pore volume (0.3362 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}). Use of this composite for the immobilization of carcinogenic As(III) from water at 300 K and pH {approx}7.0 showed that the nanocomposite has higher binding efficiency with As(III) than the IMBO owing to its high specific surface area. The composite showed almost complete (>99.9 %) As(III) removal ({<=}10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) from water. External magnetic field of 0.3 T efficiently separated the water dispersed composite (0.01 g/10 mL) at room temperature (300 K). Thus, this composite is a promising material which can be used effectively as a potent As(III) immobilizer from the contaminated groundwater (>10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) to improve drinking water quality.

  19. Removal and distribution of iron, manganese, cobalt and nickel within a Pennsylvania constructed wetland treating coal combustion by-product leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.H.; Whiting, S.N.; Lin, Z.-Q.; Lytle, C.M.; Qian, J.H.; Terry, N. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology

    2001-08-01

    A flow-through wetland treatment system was constructed to treat coal combustion by-product leachate from an electrical power station at Springdale, Pennsylvania. In a nine-compartment treatment system, four cattail (Typha latifolia L.) wetland cells (designated Cells 1 through 4) successfully removed iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) from the inlet water; Fe and Mn concentrations were decreased by an average of 91% in the first year and by 94 and 98% in the second year respectively. Cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) were decreased by an average of 39 and 47% in the first and 98 and 63% in the second year respectively. Most of the metal removed by the wetland cells was accumulated in sediments, which constituted the largest sink. Except for Fe, metal concentrations in the sediments tended to be greater in the top 5 cm of sediment than in the 5 to 10 or 10 to 15 cm layers and in Cell 1 than in Cells 2, 3 and 4. Plants constituted a much smaller sink for metals; only 0.91, 4.18, 0.19, and 0.38% of the Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were accumulated annually in the aboveground tissues of cattail, respectively. A greater proportion of each metal (except Mn) was accumulated in cattail fallen litter and submerged Chara (a macroalga) tissues, that is 2.81, 2.75 and 1.05% for Fe, Co and Ni, respectively. Considerably higher concentrations of metals were associated with cattail root than shoots, although Mn was a notable exception. 48 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. THE ROLE OF IRON IN Deinococcus radiodurans ENGINEERED FOR GROWTH ON TOLUENE AND THE ROLE OF MANGANESE IN THE EXTREME RADIATION RESISTANCE PHENOTYPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan Brim; Elena K. Gaidamakova; Vera Y. Matrosova; Min Zhai; Amudhan Venkateswaran; Marina Omelchenko; Kira S. Makarova; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson; Michael J. Daly

    2004-03-17

    Toluene and other fuel hydrocarbons are commonly found in association with radionuclides at numerous Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently occurring together with Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. In this study, the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was engineered for complete toluene mineralization by cloned expression of tod and xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida. The recombinant Tod/Xyl strain showed significant incorporation of carbon from the toluene aromatic ring into cellular macromolecules and carbon dioxide, in the absence or presence of chronic radiation. We have shown that intracellular iron concentrations in wild-type D. radiodurans in minimal medium are exceptionally low and not sufficient to support growth on toluene using Fe-dependent oxygenases cloned from P. putida. Introducing the fur mutation into D. radiodurans increased intracellular Fe levels, and imparted on the engineered strain the ability to grow on meta-toluate as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism's native Cr(VI) reduction capabilities were facilitated by toluene when present as the sole carbon and energy source in natural sediment analogues of DOE contaminated environments. The engineered bacteria were able to oxidize toluene under both minimal and complex nutrient conditions, which is important since both conditions have environmental equivalents in the context of bioremediation processes. As such, the Tod/Xyl strain is providing a model for understanding the role of Fe and reduction of metals coupled to organic contaminant oxidation in aerobic radionuclide contaminated sediments. We have shown that D. radiodurans contains high intracellular manganese levels, and that Mn restriction sensitizes cells to irradiation. We propose that the unusually high Mn/Fe ratio of D. radiodurans facilitates survival by quenching oxidative stress during recovery.

  1. Steel dust in the New York City subway system as a source of manganese, chromium, and iron exposures for transit workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillrud, Steven N; Grass, David; Ross, James M; Coulibaly, Drissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Epstein, David; Sax, Sonja N; Pederson, Dee; Johnson, David; Spengler, John D; Kinney, Patrick L; Simpson, H James; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 reflected increasing concern about potential effects of low-level airborne metal exposure on a wide array of illnesses. Here we summarize results demonstrating that the New York City (NYC) subway system provides an important microenvironment for metal exposures for NYC commuters and subway workers and also describe an ongoing pilot study of NYC transit workers' exposure to steel dust. Results from the TEACH (Toxic Exposure Assessment, a Columbia and Harvard) study in 1999 of 41 high-school students strongly suggest that elevated levels of iron, manganese, and chromium in personal air samples were due to exposure to steel dust in the NYC subway. Airborne concentrations of these three metals associated with fine particulate matter were observed to be more than 100 times greater in the subway environment than in home indoor or outdoor settings in NYC. While there are currently no known health effects at the airborne levels observed in the subway system, the primary aim of the ongoing pilot study is to ascertain whether the levels of these metals in the subway air affect concentrations of these metals or related metabolites in the blood or urine of exposed transit workers, who due to their job activities could plausibly have appreciably higher exposures than typical commuters. The study design involves recruitment of 40 transit workers representing a large range in expected exposures to steel dust, the collection of personal air samples of fine particulate matter, and the collection of blood and urine samples from each monitored transit worker.

  2. Interlaboratory comparison survey of the determination of chromium, manganese, iron, titanium in dust and arsenic, cadmium, cobalt and chromium in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Jytte Molin

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an intercomparison survey based on the Danish External Quality Assessment Scheme (DEQAS). The study was carried out in 1998 for 10 laboratories in a research project on assessment of levels and health effects of airborne particulate matter in mining, metal refining and metal working industries using nuclear and related analytical techniques. The project was co-ordinated by the IAEA. Eight laboratories measured chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and titanium (Ti) in welding fume dust loaded on filters. Six laboratories measured arsenic (As), four laboratories measured cadmium (Cd), five laboratories measured cobalt (Co) and four laboratories measured chromium (Cr) in urine. The target values of the quality control materials were traceable to certified reference materials with respect to Cr in welding fume and As, Cd, Co and Cr in urine. For Mn, Fe and Ti in welding fume the target values were established based on values from reference laboratories and consensus values from several DEQAS rounds. For evaluating the analytical performance the z-score and E n number were calculated as recommended in ISO 45. The judgement of laboratories according to the performance scores revealed that few laboratories could maintain an ideal z-score below 3 and an ideal E n number below 1. Nearly all participants had a high precision in the reported results. This is a good basis for improvements. The deviations from the target values appear to be systematic, because the deviations for Mn, Fe, Ti in welding dust as well as for As, Cd, Co and Cr in urine were a linear function of the target values (ISO 5725 evaluation). The cause for this bias is unknown at present and might not be the same for all participants. It is necessary to look further into the cause for this bias. Therefore, validation of the methodologies and regularly use of certified reference materials are highly recommended. (author)

  3. Spatial variability of arsenic concentration in soils and plants, and its relationship with iron, manganese and phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.B.; Jahiruddin, M.; Panaullah, G.M.; Loeppert, R.H.; Islam, M.R.; Duxbury, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial distribution of arsenic (As) concentrations of irrigation water, soil and plant (rice) in a shallow tube-well (STW) command area (8 ha), and their relationship with Fe, Mn and P were studied. Arsenic concentrations of water in the 110 m long irrigation channel clearly decreased with distance from the STW point, the range being 68-136 μg L -1 . Such decreasing trend was also noticed with Fe and P concentrations, but the trend for Mn concentrations was not remarkable. Concerning soil As, the concentration showed a decreasing tendency with distance from the pump. The NH 4 -oxalate extractable As contributed 36% of total As and this amount of As was associated with poorly crystalline Fe-oxides. Furthermore only 22% of total As was phosphate extractable so that most of the As was tightly retained by soil constituents and was not readily exchangeable by phosphate. Soil As (both total and extractable As) was significantly and positively correlated with rice grain As (0.296 ± 0.063 μg g -1 , n = 56). Next to drinking water, rice could be a potential source of As exposure of the people living in the As affected areas of Bangladesh. - Arsenic concentrations of irrigation water, soil and rice decreased with distance from STW point and it was related with iron and phosphorus concentrations

  4. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1α protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1α hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1α degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1α protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

  5. Transport of trace metals in the Magela Creek system, Northern Territory. I. Concentrations and loads of iron, manganese, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc during flood periods in the 1978-1979 wet season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, B.T.; Davies, S.H.R.; Thomas, P.A.

    1981-12-01

    In order that realistic effluent standards may be established for the Ranger uranium operations at Jabiru, Northern Territory, it is necessary that there be a clear and detailed knowledge of the pre-mining levels of trace metals and their behaviour within the Magela Creek system. During the wet season, floodwaters were sampled for conductivity, suspended solids and the trace metals, iron, manganese, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc. All concentrations were found to be very low, as were the denudation rates for the trace metals and suspended materials

  6. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis and catalytic performance of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles for NOX and SO₂ removal with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, reproducible and low-cost strategy is introduced for the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles (NIAO(x/y)). The as-synthesized NIAO(x/y) catalyze decomposition of H2O2 yielding highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) for NOX and SO2 removal. 100% SO2 removal is achieved. NIAO(x/y) with Fe/Al molar ratio of 7/3 (NIAO(7/3)) shows the highest NOX removal of nearly 80% at >170°C, whereas much lower NOX removal (oxides in NIAO(7/3) promotes the formation of lamellar products, thus improving the specific surface areas and mesoporous distribution, benefiting the production of OH radicals. Furthermore, the NIAO(7/3) leads to the minor increase of points of zero charges (PZC), apparent enhancement of FeOH content and high oxidizing ability of Fe(III), further improving the production of OH radicals. However, the NIAO(3/7) results in the formation of aluminum surface-enriched spherical particles, thus decreasing the surface atomic ratio of iron oxides, decreasing OH radical production. More importantly, the generation of FeOAl causes the decline of active sites. Finally, the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on NIAO(x/y) is proposed. And the well catalytic stability of NIAO(7/3) is obtained for evaluation of 30 h. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A mixed iron-manganese based pyrophosphate cathode, Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7, for rechargeable sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Rana A; Park, Chan Sun; Raja, Arsalan A; Shin, Jaeho; Kahraman, Ramazan

    2016-02-07

    The development of secondary batteries based on abundant and cheap elements is vital. Among various alternatives to conventional lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are promising due to the abundant resources and low cost of sodium. While there are many challenges associated with the SIB system, cathode is an important factor in determining the electrochemical performance of this battery system. Accordingly, ongoing research in the field of SIBs is inclined towards the development of safe, cost effective cathode materials having improved performance. In particular, pyrophosphate cathodes have recently demonstrated decent electrochemical performance and thermal stability. Herein, we report the synthesis, electrochemical properties, and thermal behavior of a novel Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 cathode for SIBs. The material was synthesized through a solid state process. The structural analysis reveals that the mixed substitution of manganese and iron has resulted in a triclinic crystal structure (P1[combining macron] space group). Galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements indicate that Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 is electrochemically active with a reversible capacity of ∼80 mA h g(-1) at a C/20 rate with an average redox potential of 3.2 V. (vs. Na/Na(+)). It is noticed that 84% of initial capacity is preserved over 90 cycles showing promising cyclability. It is also noticed that the rate capability of Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 is better than Na2MnP2O7. Ex situ and CV analyses indicate that Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 undergoes a single phase reaction rather than a biphasic reaction due to different Na coordination environment and different Na site occupancy when compared to other pyrophosphate materials (Na2FeP2O7 and Na2MnP2O7). Thermogravimetric analysis (25-550 °C) confirms good thermal stability of Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 with only 2% weight loss. Owing to promising electrochemical properties and decent thermal stability, Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7, can be an attractive cathode for SIBs.

  8. One-step hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical performance of sodium-manganese-iron phosphate as cathode material for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karegeya, Claude; Mahmoud, Abdelfattah; Vertruyen, Bénédicte; Hatert, Frédéric; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Cloots, Rudi; Boschini, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    The sodium-manganese-iron phosphate Na2Mn1.5Fe1.5(PO4)3 (NMFP) with alluaudite structure was obtained by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis route. The physical properties and structure of this material were obtained through XRD and Mössbauer analyses. X-ray diffraction Rietveld refinements confirm a cationic distribution of Na+ and presence of vacancies in A(2)', Na+ and small amounts of Mn2+ in A(1), Mn2+ in M(1), 0.5 Mn2+ and Fe cations (Mn2+,Fe2+ and Fe3+) in M(2), leading to the structural formula Na2Mn(Mn0.5Fe1.5)(PO4)3. The particles morphology was investigated by SEM. Several reactions with different hydrothermal reaction times were attempted to design a suitable synthesis protocol of NMFP compound. The time of reaction was varied from 6 to 48 h at 220 °C. The pure phase of NMFP particles was firstly obtained when the hydrothermal reaction of NMFP precursors mixture was maintained at 220 °C for 6 h. When the reaction time was increased from 6 to 12, 24 and 48 h, the dandelion structure was destroyed in favor of NMFP micro-rods. The combination of NMFP (NMFP-6H, NMFP-12H, NMFP-24H and NMFP-48H) structure refinement and Mössbauer characterizations shows that the increase of the reaction time leads to the progressive increment of Fe(III) and the decrease of the crystal size. The electrochemical tests indicated that NMFP is a 3 V sodium intercalating cathode. The comparison of the discharge capacity evolution of studied NMFP electrode materials at C/5 current density shows different capacities of 48, 40, 34 and 34 mA h g-1 for NMFP-6H, NMFP-12H, NMFP-24H and NMFP-48H respectively. Interestingly, all samples show excellent capacity retention of about 99% during 50 cycles.

  9. Distribution of iron and manganese

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mesquita, A.; Kaisary, S.

    inverse distance weighting the spatial distributions of the particulate and dissolved concentrations of Fe and Mn were mapped along the salinity gradient of the two rivers. Significant seasonal signals were observed in the spatial variations...

  10. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  11. Utilization of aluminum to obtaining a duplex type stainless steel using high energy ball milling; Obtencao de um aco inoxidavel de estrutura duplex do sistema FeMnAl processado por moagem de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlak, I.E.; Cintho, O.M., E-mail: eng.igorpavlak@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Capocchi, J.D.T. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The obtaining of stainless steel using aluminum in its composition - FeMnAl system, has been researches subject since the sixties, by good mechanical properties and resistance to oxidation presented, when compared with conventional FeNiCr stainless steel system. In another point, the aluminum and manganese are low cost then traditional elements. This work, metallic powders of iron, manganese and pure aluminum, were processed in a Spex type high-energy ball mill in nitrogen atmosphere. The milling products were compressed into pastille form and sintered under inert atmosphere. The final products were characterized by optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness test. The metallographic analysis shows a typical austenite and ferrite duplex type microstructure. The presence of these phases was confirmed according X ray diffraction analysis. (author)

  12. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  13. Study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst, by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.; Alonso, A.; Tumbarell, O.; Bustanmete, E.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), has the advantage of its simplicity, speed and low cost. All this, together with its high sensibility and selectivity, makes the AAS one the most widely used analytic techniques. The present work shows, the study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst of a refinery, by using this technique. The results are compared to those of two laboratories which use the ICP-AES and AAS techniques and shows the processing of the statistics with the use of the t of Student and the F of Snedecor. The results using different methods are also shown as well as the recommended application of this results in the chemical characterization of this type of catalysts

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Dissolved Silica on the H2O2 Decomposition by Iron(III) and Manganese(IV) Oxides: Implications for H2O2-based In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Doyle, Fiona M.; Sedlak, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of H2O2 on iron minerals can generate •OH, a strong oxidant that can transform a wide range of contaminants. This reaction is critical to In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) processes used for soil and groundwater remediation, as well as advanced oxidation processes employed in waste treatment systems. The presence of dissolved silica at concentrations comparable to those encountered in natural waters decreases the reactivity of iron minerals toward H2O2, because silica adsorbs onto the surface of iron minerals and alters catalytic sites. At circumneutral pH values, goethite, amorphous iron oxide, hematite, iron-coated sand and montmorillonite that were pre-equilibrated with 0.05 – 1.5 mM SiO2 were significantly less reactive toward H2O2 decomposition than their original counterparts, with the H2O2 loss rates inversely proportional to the SiO2 concentration. In the goethite/H2O2 system, the overall •OH yield, defined as the percentage of decomposed H2O2 producing •OH, was almost halved in the presence of 1.5 mM SiO2. Dissolved SiO2 also slows the H2O2 decomposition on manganese(IV) oxide. The presence of dissolved SiO2 results in greater persistence of H2O2 in groundwater, lower H2O2 utilization efficiency and should be considered in the design of H2O2-based treatment systems. PMID:22129132

  15. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work

  16. Effect of increased manganese addition and mould type on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The wear resistance of high chromium iron is well recorded. However, the same is not the case as regards the use of manganese at higher percentages in high chromium irons and its influence on wear behaviour. Hence, this work highlights the slurry wear characteristics of chromium (□ ◻ 16–19%) iron following the ...

  17. Application of Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with high-frequency modulation polarization for the direct determination of aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, manganese, nickel, lead, and thallium in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Natalya B; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Anatoly A; Ganeev, Alexander A

    2012-10-01

    Determination of aluminum (Al), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and thallium (Tl) concentrations in human blood using high-frequency modulation polarization Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was performed. No sample digestion was used in the current study. Blood samples were diluted with deionized water or 0.1 % (m/v) Triton X-100 solution for Tl. Dilution factors ranged from 1/5 per volume for Be and Tl to 1/20 per volume for Cd and Pb. For Tl, Cd, and Hg, noble metals (gold, platinum, rhodium, etc.) were applied as surface modifiers. To mitigate chloride interference, 2 % (m/v) solution of NH(4)NO(3) was used as matrix modifier for Tl and Ni assessment. The use of Pd(NO(3))(2) as oxidative modifier was necessary for blood Hg and Tl measurement. Validation of the methods was performed by analyzing two-level reference material Seronorm. The precision of the designed methods as relative SD was between 4 and 12 % (middle of a dynamic range) depending on the element. For additional validation, spiked blood samples were analyzed. Limits of detection (LoDs, 3σ, n = 10) for undiluted blood samples were 2.0 μg L(-1) for Al, 0.08 μg L(-1) for Be, 0.10 μg L(-1) for Cd, 2.2 μg L(-1) for Cr, 7 μg L(-1) for Hg, 0.4 μg L(-1) for Mn, 2.3 μg L(-1) for Ni, 3.4 μg L(-1) for Pb, and 0.5 μg L(-1) for Tl. The LoDs achieved allowed determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Pb at both toxic and background levels. Be, Hg, and Tl could be reliably measured at toxic levels only. The methods developed are used for clinical diagnostics and biological monitoring of work-related exposure.

  18. Efeito de três fertilizantes acidificantes sobre a concentração de alumínio e de manganês em folhas e raízes de cafeeiros Effect of three acidifying fertilizers on the concentration of aluminum and manganese on coffee leaves and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Roberto Pupo de Moraes

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi determinada a concentração de alumínio e de manganês em folhas de cafeeiros cultivados em vasos com três solos diferentes e com aplicação de três fertilizantes nitrogenados acidificantes (nitrato de amônio, uréia e sulfato de amônio e um não acidificante (salitre-do-chile, além de dois tratamentos extras com corretivos de acidez e um com enxofre. Nas raízes estes elementos foram também determinados para os tratamentos que receberam uréia, uréia mais enxofre e o controle sem nitrogênio. Nos três solos determinou-se o efeito dos tratamentos sobre o pH e a concentração de A1(3+ e Mn3+. A análise foliar revelou diferenças significativas entre tratamentos na concentração de alumínio e manganês das folhas e em todos os três solos estudados. Alguns sintomas específicos observados nas folhas e raízes estiveram associados à presença de níveis elevados de manganês nessas partes vegetais.There were determined concentrations of aluminum and manganese in leaves of coffee trees cultivated in pots with 3 different soils fertilized with acidifying nitrogen fertilizers (ammonium nitrate, urea and ammonium sulphate and non acidifying nitrogen fertilizer (chilean nitrate and 3 other treatments (urea plus calcium carbonate, urea plus lime and urea plus sulfur. Aluminum and manganese were determined in coffee roots of pots fertilized with urea, urea plus sulfur and a control without nitrogen. The relation of pH and concentration of Al3+ and Mn2+ are discussed for the soils utilized. Leaves analysis showed significant differences in aluminum and manganese concentration in the leaves among treatments and among the 3 soils types. Symptoms correlated with high levels of manganese in the leaves and roots of the coffee trees were observed.

  19. Gastroprotective Properties of Manganese Chloride on Acetic Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Drugs with multiple mechanisms of protective action may be effective in minimizing ... that Manganese had dose and treatment duration dependent effect on healing of ulcerated stomach. .... The stomach was bathed with normal saline ..... Arnaud, J., and Favier, A. (1995): "Copper, iron, manganese ... Experimental Toxic.

  20. Determination of point isotropic buildup factors of gamma rays including incoherent and coherent scattering for aluminum, iron, lead, and water by discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, S.; Assad, A.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure and energy absorption buildup factors for aluminum, iron, lead, and water are calculated by the SNID discrete ordinates code for an isotropic point source in a homogeneous medium. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the effects of both bound-electron Compton (incoherent) and coherent (Rayleigh) scattering. A comparison with buildup factors from the literature shows that these two effects greatly increase the buildup factors for energies below a few hundred kilo-electron-volts, and thus the new results are improved relative to the experiment. This greater accuracy is due to the increase in the linear attenuation coefficient, which leads to the calculation of the buildup factors for a mean free path with a smaller shield thickness. On the other hand, for the same shield thickness, exposure increases when only incoherent scattering is included and decreases when only coherent scattering is included, so that the exposure finally decreases when both effects are included. Great care must also be taken when checking the approximations for gamma-ray deep-penetration transport calculations, as well as for the cross-section treatment and origin

  1. Dissolution of manganese and cobalt and their deposition on Type 304 stainless steel in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1989-01-01

    Dissolution of manganese and cobalt and their deposition on Type 304 stainless steel in liquid sodium at 833 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks were examined using a liquid sodium pot. Manganese was easily dissolved in sodium from the iron-manganese alloy specimen and deposited on the steel to form two kind of deposition particles, α-phase (body-centered cubic) composed of iron and γ-phase (face-centered cubic) composed of iron and manganese, respectively. Cobalt which was less easily dissolved than manganese also deposited on the Type 304 stainless steel, giving an iron-cobalt alloy. These three deposition particles corresponded to the precipitation lines of iron-manganese and iron-cobalt phase diagrams at 833 K, respectively. Therefore, the deposition process of manganese or cobalt in sodium was explained as a precipitation process of iron-manganese or iron-cobalt in the solid region of the binary phase diagram. A sodium chromite (NaCrO 2 ) layer was formed on the steel surface. (author)

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental data for aluminum removal from aqueous solution by raw and iron-modified granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Mahdavi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This dataset deals with the modification of granular activated carbon (GAC with FeCl3 under basic conditions (pH ≈ 12 for removal of aluminium (Al from aqueous solution. The structural properties and operational parameters including Al ion concentration (2.15 and 10.3 mg/L, pH solution (2–10, adsorbent dosage (0.1–5 g/L, and contact time (0–10 h was investigated for raw and modified GAC. This dataset provides information about Al removal by GAC and modified GAC at conditions including: pH = 8, contact time = 6 h, initial Al concentration = 2.15 mg/L. The characterization data of the adsorbents was analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET test. The data showed that Freundlich isotherm with and Pseudo second order kinetic model were the best models for describing the Al adsorption reactions. The acquired data indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of GAC and modified GAC to uptake Al (C0 = 10.3 mg/L was 3 and 4.37 mg/g respectively. Keywords: Aluminium removal, Adsorption, Iron-modified GAC, Water treatment

  4. A modular continuous flow reactor system for the selective bio-oxidation of iron and precipitation of schwertmannite from mine-impacted waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2012-02-01

    A novel modular bioremediation system which facilitates the selective removal of soluble iron from extremely acidic (pH ∼2) metal-rich wastewaters by ferrous iron oxidation and selective precipitation of the ferric iron produced is described. In the first of the three modules, rapid ferrous iron oxidation was mediated by the recently-characterized iron-oxidizing autotrophic acidophile, "Ferrovum myxofaciens", which grew as long "streamers" within the reactor. Over 90% of the iron present in influent test liquors containing 280mg/L iron was oxidized at a dilution rate of 0.41h(-1), in a proton-consuming reaction. The ferric iron-rich solutions produced were pumped into a second reactor where controlled addition of sodium hydroxide caused the water pH to increase to 3.5 and ferric iron to precipitate as the mineral schwertmannite. Addition of a flocculating agent promoted rapid aggregation and settling of the fine-grain schwertmannite particles. A third passive module (a packed-bed bioreactor, also inoculated with "Fv. myxofaciens") acted as a polishing reactor, lowering soluble iron concentrations in the processed water to iron from a synthetic acidic (pH 2.1) mine water that contained soluble aluminum, copper, manganese and zinc in addition to iron. Schwertmannite was again produced, with little or no co-precipitation of other metals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Escherichia coli small protein MntS and exporter MntP optimize the intracellular concentration of manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia E Martin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli does not routinely import manganese, but it will do so when iron is unavailable, so that manganese can substitute for iron as an enzyme cofactor. When intracellular manganese levels are low, the cell induces the MntH manganese importer plus MntS, a small protein of unknown function; when manganese levels are high, the cell induces the MntP manganese exporter and reduces expression of MntH and MntS. The role of MntS has not been clear. Previous work showed that forced MntS synthesis under manganese-rich conditions caused bacteriostasis. Here we find that when manganese is scarce, MntS helps manganese to activate a variety of enzymes. Its overproduction under manganese-rich conditions caused manganese to accumulate to very high levels inside the cell; simultaneously, iron levels dropped precipitously, apparently because manganese-bound Fur blocked the production of iron importers. Under these conditions, heme synthesis stopped, ultimately depleting cytochrome oxidase activity and causing the failure of aerobic metabolism. Protoporphyrin IX accumulated, indicating that the combination of excess manganese and iron deficiency had stalled ferrochelatase. The same chain of events occurred when mutants lacking MntP, the manganese exporter, were exposed to manganese. Genetic analysis suggested the possibility that MntS exerts this effect by inhibiting MntP. We discuss a model wherein during transitions between low- and high-manganese environments E. coli uses MntP to compensate for MntH overactivity, and MntS to compensate for MntP overactivity.

  6. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments.

  7. Effects of silicon, copper and iron on static and dynamic properties of alloy 206 (aluminum-copper) in semi-solids produced by the SEED process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Alain

    The advantages of producing metal parts by rheocasting are generally recognised for common foundry alloys of Al-Si. However, other more performing alloys in terms of mechanical properties could have a great interest in specialized applications in the automotive industry, while remaining competitive in the forming. Indeed, the growing demand for more competitive products requires the development of new alloys better suited to semi-solid processes. Among others, Al-Cu alloys of the 2XX series are known for their superior mechanical strength. However, in the past, 2XX alloys were never candidates for pressure die casting. The main reason is their propensity to hot tearing. Semi-solid processes provide better conditions for molding with the rheological behavior of dough and molding temperatures lower reducing this type of defect. In the initial phase, this research has studied factors that reduce hot tearing susceptibility of castings produced by semi-solid SEED of alloy 206. Subsequently, a comparative study on the tensile properties and fatigue was performed on four variants of the alloy 206. The results of tensile strength and fatigue were compared with the specifications for applications in the automotive industry and also to other competing processes and alloys. During this study, several metallurgical aspects were analyzed. The following main points have been validated: i) the main effects of compositional variations of silicon, iron and copper alloy Al-Cu (206) on the mechanical properties, and ii) certain relationships between the mechanism of hot cracking and the solidification rate in semi-solid. Parts produced from the semi-solid paste coming from the SEED process combined with modified 206 alloys have been successfully molded and achieved superior mechanical properties than the requirements of the automotive industry. The fatigue properties of the two best modified 206 alloys were higher than those of A357 alloy castings and are close to those of the

  8. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    .8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work

  9. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  10. Arsenic removal by manganese greensand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phommavong, T. [Saskatchewan Environment, Regina (Canada); Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Some of the small communities in Saskatchewan are expected to have difficulty complying with the new maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 25 {micro}g/L for arsenic. A test column was set up in the laboratory to study the removal of arsenic from the potable water using oxidation with KMnO{sub 4}, followed by manganese greensand filtration. Tests were run using water from the tap having a background arsenic concentration of <0.5 {micro}g/L and iron concentration in the range of 0.02 to 0.77 mg/L. The test water was spiked with arsenic and iron. Results showed that 61 % to 98% of arsenic can be removed from the potable water by oxidation with KMnO{sub 4} followed by manganese greensand filtration.

  11. Hydrometallurgical method for recycling rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries; Metodo hidrometalurgico para reciclagem de metais terras raras, cobalto, niquel, ferro e manganes de eletrodos negativos de baterias exauridas de Ni-MH de telefone celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Vinicius Emmanuel de Oliveira dos; Lelis, Maria de Fatima Fontes; Freitas, Marcos Benedito Jose Geraldo de, E-mail: viniciusemmanuel@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Celante, Vinicius Guilherme [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo (IFES), Aracruz, ES (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A hydrometallurgical method for the recovery of rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from the negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries was developed. The rare earth compounds were obtained by chemical precipitation at pH 1.5, with sodium cerium sulfate (NaCe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O) and lanthanum sulfate (La{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.H{sub 2}O) as the major recovered components. Iron was recovered as Fe(OH){sub 3} and FeO. Manganese was obtained as Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}.The recovered Ni(OH){sub 2} and Co(OH){sub 2} were subsequently used to synthesize LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and CoO, for use as cathodes in ion-Li batteries. The anodes and recycled materials were characterized by analytical techniques. (author)

  12. Precipitation hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy having good swelling resistance and low neutron absorbence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenko, M.K.; Merrick, H.F.; Gibson, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    An iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloy suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding utilizes the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and has a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime phase and delta phase distributed at or near the grain boundaries. The alloy consists essentially of about 40-50 percent nickel, 7.5-14 percent chromium, 1.5-4 percent niobium, .25-.75 percent silicon, 1-3 percent titanium, .1-.5 percent aluminum, .02-1 percent carbon, .002-.015 percent boron, and the balance iron. Up to 2 percent manganese and up to .01 percent magnesium may be added to inhibit trace element effects; up to .1 percent zirconium may be added to increase radiation swelling resistance; and up to 3 percent molybdenum may be added to increase strength

  13. Aluminum-air research and development program. Summary report for FY 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.

    1983-04-01

    The aluminum-air program focused on the following research areas: (1) experimental investigation of alternative cell configurations; (2) testing of specific configurations in multicell stacks; (3) long term testing of air electrodes under simulated vehicle duty cycles; (4) determination of kinetic of aluminum trihydroxide crystallization under candidate battery operating conditions; and (5) studies of anode behavior of alloys containing minor impurities such as iron, manganese, gallium, and phosphorus. The major achievements were: the operation of six celled and two cell stacks without degration of performance compared to laboratory baseline cells, redesign of solution side current collection grid and successful application to wedge shaped cells on the engineering scale (600 cm(2)); demonstration of ability of such cells for continuous anode feed and rapid refueling, fabrication and testing of air electrodes catalyzed with certain macrocyclic complexes; extension of cycle life to above 1000 standard drive cycles using nonnoble metal catalysts, determination of role of minor electrolye additions and precipitated Al(OH)3 on air electrode life, development of a comprehensive mathematical model of aluminum trihydroxide precipitation under battery conditions.

  14. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerden, James L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group

  15. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weijiang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); South China Institute of Environmental Science, MEP, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Fu, Fenglian, E-mail: fufenglian2006@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Acid-washed zero-valent iron and zero-valent aluminum were used in PRBs. • The time that removal efficiencies of heavy metal were above 99.5% can keep 300 h. • Removal mechanism of Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} was discussed. • Heavy metal ions were removed by reduction, adsorption, and co-precipitation. - Abstract: The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  16. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Acid-washed zero-valent iron and zero-valent aluminum were used in PRBs. • The time that removal efficiencies of heavy metal were above 99.5% can keep 300 h. • Removal mechanism of Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ was discussed. • Heavy metal ions were removed by reduction, adsorption, and co-precipitation. - Abstract: The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ ) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  17. Economic value of Valentines iron minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, B.

    1960-01-01

    This work is a investigation required by the government of Uruguay about the economic value of iron and manganese deposits in Valentines ferriferrous zone. The purpose is to study the potential commercial for the exportation.

  18. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CONCENTRAÇÕES RESIDUAIS DE COBRE, FERRO, MANGANÊS E ZINCO EM LATOSSOLO ROXO EUTRÓFICO SOB DIFERENTES TIPOS DE MANEJO RESIDUAL CONCENTRATION OF COPPER, IRON, MANGANESE AND ZINC IN EUTROPHIC 'LATOSSOLO ROXO’ UNDER DIFFERENT SOIL MANAGEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Pereira de Oliveira

    2007-09-01

    shallow harrow plowing and 4 deep stirring, using a chiseling plower and three level of fertilization: 1 Check (natural soil fertility, 2 Goiás State recommendation and 3 Fertilizers to cover the nutrients extracted by grain exportation. Larger values of the pH were observed in the superficial layer of soil submitted to deep moldboard plowing in relation to no-till, shallow harrow plowing and deep stirring. Uniform distributions of iron, manganese and zinc were observed in areas submitted to deep moldboard plowing. The 40-60 cm layer presented similar concentrations in all types of soil management. Copper tried in the superficial layer and at deepest layers can be explained by the larger concentration of organic matter and origin of the soil. No variation was observed in relation to fertilizers application.

    KEY-WORDS: Micronutrients; no till system; cerrado soil.

  20. Preconcentration of trace manganese from natural waters by complexation with dithiocarbamate and adsorption onto C18-solid phase extraction column for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmani, S.B.; Abdullah, M.P.; Bobaker, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed for the preconcentration and separation of trace manganese from natural water samples by complexation with dithiocarbamate followed by adsorption onto C 18 -solid phase extraction column prior to irradiation. The Mn recovery was better than 99.8% without interference from iron(III) at 5 mg x l -1 , copper(II), zinc(II), aluminum(III) and cobalt(II) at 0.5 mg x l -1 and sodium(I), potassium(I), magnesium(II) and calcium(II) at 1 mg x l -1 . The separation factor was 100 and the detection limit was 0.01 μg x l -1 with good precision and accuracy with a relative error lower than 3%. The method was applied to the determination of Mn in tap, well, river and treated water samples. (author)

  1. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnarsson, M.K., E-mail: marga@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 Degree-Sign C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112{sup Macron }3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  2. Manganese in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnarsson, M.K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-01-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H–SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400–2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112 ¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  3. Simultaneous sorption of fluoride and arsenic ions (V) in a naturally occurring material modified with iron and aluminum; Sorcion simultanea de iones fluoruros y arsenico (V) en un material de origen natural modificado con hierro y aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez M, G.

    2016-07-01

    In this research, two materials, zeolite and pozzolans from the States of Oaxaca and Mexico, were used respectively, which were modified to evaluate their efficiencies to remove F and As(V) ions from solution and natural water. The materials were modified with iron and aluminum using an electrochemical cell, and with the hydroxides formed with iron and aluminum chloride solutions. The natural and modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis, specific area and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Experimental data on the sorption processes of F- ions by modified zeolite and pozzolans were adjusted to the kinetic models of pseudo-second-order (q e, 0408 mg /g K, 4.33 g / mg h) and Lagergen (q e, 0.807 mg/g K L, 1.83 1/min), respectively. Both materials showed the best fit to the Freundlich isotherm, Kf, 0.33 and 0.64 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively; suggesting a physical adsorption process on a heterogeneous material. Experimental adsorption capacities of pozzolans and modified zeolite for F ions were 0.36 and 0.83 mg/g respectively. The results of the kinetics of adsorption of As(V) were treated with the Largergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models; however the adsorption rate was high and consequently the rate constants could not be calculated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Freundlich model and the constants Kf were 6.24 and 11.15 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption processes suggest endothermic adsorption for F- ions by both materials and for As(V) by the pozzolans. The free energy values ΔG indicate spontaneous processes and not spontaneous for F- ions by pozzolans. The adsorption of As (V) by the pozzolans presented an exothermic and spontaneous behavior. Finally, a study was performed in columns with

  4. Determination of the oxidizing capacity of manganese ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R

    1974-09-01

    An accurate method is described for determining the amount of active oxygen in manganese ores, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between the ore and arsenic(III) in presence of ammonium molybdate, followed by the back-titration of excess of arsenic(III) with cerium(IV), using osmium tetroxide as catalyst and Disulphine Blue V as indicator. A survey has been made of the applicability of this method to various pyrolusite ores containing less than 0.2% phosphorus. Aluminium(III), copper(II), iron(III), manganese(II), and molybdenum(VI) do not interfere. Up to 30% phosphorus(V) causes no interference.

  5. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart...

  6. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Producción de hierros nodulares ferríticos directamente de fundición partiendo de chatarra de acero de alto manganeso // Production of ferrítics nodular irons directly from foundry leaving of high manganese scrap steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DeFranch

    1999-07-01

    ñinos; lo que necesitaría de una gran inversión en cuanto a extractores y procesadores de estos gases.Los factores críticos en el proceso que emplea óxido de hierro para la eliminación del manganeso son: temperatura,composición química del baño y elementos presentes en la escoria, con el mismo se han logrado eliminaciones del manganesode hasta un 80% del contenido inicial y fundiciones ferríticas con elongaciones de hasta un 23%.Palabras claves: hierro nodular, fundición___________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe production of nodular irons with main ferrític is usually achieved with the use of special arrabios with contained first floorof elements formadores of carbides, or by means of long and expensive thermal treatments. These arrabios has high prices, forwhat becomes necessary the search of more economic variants for the production of this material type. The objective of thiswork is the obtaining of this material using like load steel scrap, which has a price a lot but I lower.The structure of the womb in the nodular iron, depends on its chemical composition, its cooling speed, as well as of the formand quantity of graphite nodules. When is wanted a main ferrítics, the elements who make the perlitic estructure they shouldbe maintained in contents the lowest thing possible for less susecful this way the solidification according to the diagram.The scrap use outlines the problem of the present manganese levels in the same one (generally between 0.6 and 0.8%. Themanganese that is an element who make the perlitic estructure avoids the obtaining of high elongations since the womb itDr. Ing C. DeFranch, Dr. Ing. T. Rodríguez Moliner26would be never completely ferrític. It is for this reason that if she/he wants himself to use steel scrap as load material it isnecessary the study in ways of eliminating it of the bathroom.For the elimination of the manganese diverse references exist in the literature to processes

  8. Method of coating an iron-based article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdefrau, Neal; Beals, James T.; Sun, Ellen Y.; Yamanis, Jean

    2016-11-29

    A method of coating an iron-based article includes a first heating step of heating a substrate that includes an iron-based material in the presence of an aluminum source material and halide diffusion activator. The heating is conducted in a substantially non-oxidizing environment, to cause the formation of an aluminum-rich layer in the iron-based material. In a second heating step, the substrate that has the aluminum-rich layer is heated in an oxidizing environment to oxidize the aluminum in the aluminum-rich layer.

  9. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using iron removal processes that include oxidation/filtration and the manganese greensand processes. Presentation includes results of U.S. EPA field studies conducted in Michigan and Ohio on existing iron remo...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L1) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouEl-Enein, S A; El-Saied, F A; Kasher, T I; El-Wardany, A H

    2007-07-01

    Salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(1)) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(2)) and their iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by IR, electronic spectra, molar conductivities, magnetic susceptibilities and ESR. Mononuclear complexes are formed with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 (M:L). The IR studies reveal various modes of chelation. The electronic absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the iron(III), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(1) have octahedral geometry. While the cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(2) were separated as tetrahedral structure. The copper(II) complexes have square planar stereochemistry. The ESR parameters of the copper(II) complexes at room temperature were calculated. The g values for copper(II) complexes proved that the Cu-O and Cu-N bonds are of high covalency.

  11. Hydrogeochemistry in a relatively unmodified subtropical catchment: Insights regarding the health and aesthetic risks of manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam K. Rose

    2017-10-01

    New hydrological insights for region: Results show that the hydrogeochemistry of Baffle Creek was predominantly driven by rain events, with differing responses to varying magnitudes of rain and discharge. Following a flushing event, dissolved aluminium and nitrate increased in the surface and drinking water, whereas manganese and ammonia were undetectable in the drinking water and occurred only in small concentrations in the surface waters. In contrast, when rainfall events occurred without an associated flush, manganese, iron and ammonia concentrations increased in the drinking water. The hydrochemistry of manganese and iron in the supply chain infrastructure was strongly positively correlated with ammonia, and aluminium correlated with nitrate concentrations. Currently the drinking water supply does not pose a threat to chronic manganese exposure for humans, however elevated concentrations are experienced periodically; and may become more problematic under climate change scenarios.

  12. Biological manganese removal from acid mine drainage in constructed wetlands and prototype bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2005-02-01

    Mine drainage waters vary considerably in the range and concentration of heavy metals they contain. Besides iron, manganese is frequently present at elevated concentrations in waters draining both coal and metal mines. Passive treatment systems (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors) are designed to remove iron by biologically induced oxidation/precipitation. Manganese, however, is problematic as it does not readily form sulfidic minerals and requires elevated pH (>8) for abiotic oxidation of Mn (II) to insoluble Mn (IV). As a result, manganese removal in passive remediation systems is often less effective than removal of iron. This was found to be the case at the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) constructed to treat water draining the former Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall, UK, where effective removal of manganese occurred only in one of the three rock filter components of the composite systems over a 1-year period of monitoring. Water in the two rock filter systems where manganese removal was relatively poor was generally system. These differences in water chemistry and manganese removal were due to variable performances in the compost bioreactors that feed the rock filter units in the composite passive systems at Wheal Jane. An alternative approach for removing soluble manganese from mine waters, using fixed bed bioreactors, was developed. Ferromanganese nodules (about 2 cm diameter), collected from an abandoned mine adit in north Wales, were used to inoculate the bioreactors (working volume ca. 700 ml). Following colonization by manganese-oxidizing microbes, the aerated bioreactor catalysed the removal of soluble manganese, via oxidation of Mn (II) and precipitation of the resultant Mn (IV) in the bioreactor, in synthetic media and mine water from the Wheal Jane PPTP. Such an approach has potential application for removing soluble Mn from mine streams and other Mn-contaminated water courses.

  13. Effect of Silicon on Desulfurization of Aluminum-killed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debdutta

    Recent reports have suggested that silicon has a beneficial effect on the rate of desulfurization of Al-killed steel. This effect is difficult to understand looking at the overall desulfurization reaction which does not include silicon. However an explanation is proposed by taking into account the (SiO2)/[Si] equilibrium in which some Al reaching the slag-metal interface is used in reducing the SiO2 in the slag. This reaction can be suppressed to some extent if the silicon content of the metal is increased and in doing so, more Al will be available at the slag-metal interface for the desulfurization reaction and this would increase the rate of the desulfurization reaction. A model was developed, assuming the rates are controlled by mass transfer, taking into account the coupled reactions of the reduction of silica, and other unstable oxides, namely iron oxide and manganese oxide, in the slag and desulfurization reaction in the steel by aluminum. The model predicts that increasing silicon increases the rate and extent of desulfurization. Plant data was analyzed to obtain rough estimates of ladle desulfurization rates and also used to validate the model predictions. Experiments have been conducted on a kilogram scale of material in an induction furnace to test the hypothesis. The major conclusions of the study are as follows: The rate and extent of desulfurization improve with increasing initial silicon content in the steel; the effect diminishes at silicon contents higher than approximately 0.2% and with increasing slag basicity. This was confirmed with kilogram-scale laboratory experiments. The effects of the silicon content in the steel (and of initial FeO and MnO in the slag) largely arise from the dominant effects of these reactions on the equilibrium aluminum content of the steel: as far as aluminum consumption or pick-up is concerned, the Si/SiO2 reaction dominates, and desulfurization has only a minor effect on aluminum consumption. The rate is primarily

  14. Scientific Background for Processing of Aluminum Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononchuk, Olga; Alekseev, Alexey; Zubkova, Olga; Udovitsky, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Changing the source of raw materials for producing aluminum and the emergence of a huge number of secondary alumina waste (foundry slag, sludge, spent catalysts, mineral parts of coal and others that are formed in various industrial enterprises) require the creation of scientific and theoretical foundations for their processing. In this paper, the aluminum alloys (GOST 4784-97) are used as an aluminum raw material component, containing the aluminum component produced as chips in the machine-building enterprises. The aluminum waste is a whole range of metallic aluminum alloys including elements: magnesium, copper, silica, zinc and iron. Analysis of the aluminum waste A1- Zn-Cu-Si-Fe shows that depending on the content of the metal the dissolution process of an aluminum alloy should be treated as the result of the chemical interaction of the metal with an alkaline solution. It is necessary to consider the behavior of the main components of alloys in an alkaline solution as applied to the system Na2O - Al2O3 - SiO2 - CO2 - H2O.

  15. Bioleaching of copper, aluminum, magnesium and manganese from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... Takao screened organic acid producing strains of basidiomycetes and found that oxalic acid was the main acid along with citric and tartaric acid. .... process by using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Statistical analysis.

  16. Research on the removal of radium from uranium effluent by air-aeration hydrated manganese hydroxide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqing; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    In the acidic leaching uranium process, pyrolusite or manganese oxide (MnO 2 ) powder is often used as an oxidizer. In the processed effluent, manganese ion present as a contaminant in addition to U, Ra, Th, As, Zn, Cu, F, SO 4 2- , etc. Manganese ion content is about 100∼200 mg/1 in effluent. In this case, a new process technique can be developed to treat the effluent using the Mn 2+ present in the effluent. The approach is as follows: The effluent is neutralized by lime milk to pH about 11. As a result, most contaminants are precipitated to meet the uranium effluent discharge standards (U, Th, Mn, SO 4 2- etc.), but radium is still present in the effluent. In this process, manganese ion forms manganese hydroxide Mn(OH) 2 . The manganese hydroxide is easily to oxide to form MnO(OH) 2 by air aeration. This hydrated manganese hydroxide complex can then be used to adsorb radium in effluent. The experiments show: (1) Effluent pH, manganese concentration in effluent, and aeration strength and time etc. influence the radium removal efficiency. Under the test conditions, when manganese in effluent is between 100∼300 mg/l, and pH is over 10.5, radium can be reduced to lower 1.11 Bq/1 in the processed effluent. Higher contents of impurity elements such as aluminum, silicon and magnesium in the effluent affect the removal efficiency; (2) Under the experimental conditions, the lime precipitation air-aeration formed hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge is stable. There is no obvious release of radium from the adsorbed hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge; (3) The current experiments show that hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge has a very good re-adsorption ability for removal of radium from uranium effluent. Some experimental parameters have been measured. (author)

  17. Microwave Production of Manganese from Manganese (IV) Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... energy consumption occurs in the upper part of the ferromanganese furnace ... The pre-reduction of manganese ores by carbon has been investigated by Abdel ..... Awaso Bauxite Ore using Waste Pure Water. Sachets as ...

  18. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  19. Crystal structure of (Na0.70(Na0.70,Mn0.30(Fe3+,Fe2+2Fe2+(VO43, a sodium-, iron- and manganese-based vanadate with the alluaudite-type structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhassan Benhsina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, sodium (sodium,manganese triiron(II,III tris[vanadate(V], (Na0.70(Na0.70,Mn0.30(Fe3+,Fe2+2Fe2+(VO43, was prepared by solid-state reactions. It crystallizes in an alluaudite-like structure, characterized by a partial cationic disorder. In the structure, four of the 12 sites in the asymmetric unit are located on special positions, three on a twofold rotation axis (Wyckoff position 4e and one on an inversion centre (4b. Two sites on the twofold rotation axis are entirely filled by Fe2+ and V5+, whereas the third site has a partial occupancy of 70% by Na+. The site on the inversion centre is occupied by Na+ and Mn2+ cations in a 0.7:0.3 ratio. The remaining Fe2+ and Fe3+ atoms are statistically distributed on a general position. The three-dimensional framework of this structure is made up of kinked chains of edge-sharing [FeO6] octahedra stacked parallel to [10-1]. These chains are held together by VO4 tetrahedral groups, forming polyhedral sheets perpendicular to [010]. Within this framework, two types of channels extending along [001] are present. One is occupied by (Na+/Mn2+ while the second is partially occupied by Na+. The mixed site containing (Na+/Mn2+ has an octahedral coordination sphere, while the Na+ cations in the second channel are coordinated by eight O atoms.

  20. A regional mineralogical study of the manganese-bearing Voelwater subgroup in the northern Cape Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleyenstueber, A.S.E.

    1985-11-01

    The Voelwater Subgroup, of the Proterozoic Transvaal Sequence, in the Hotazel area, is preserved in five structurally controlled basins, on the eastern side of the Dimoten syncline. The Subgroup represents a relatively undisturbed unit of mixed volcanogenic - chemical sedimentary rocks. The Hotazel Formation within the Voelwater Subgroup, consists of a finely banded carbonate - silicate - hematite - manganese lutite sequence of banded iron-formation and must be unique in that it contains the world's largest land-based repository of manganese. Twenty-one drill cores, sampled lithologically at intervals of approximately one metre through the total sedimentary sequence, were studied by microscopic, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe methods. The mineralogy of the Voelwater Subgroup was studied on a regional scale, with the emphasis on the minerals within the manganese beds of the Hotazel Formation. The objective of the study was: a. To study the variation and distrubution of minerals in the various manganese ores on a regional scale. b. To compare the mineralogical differences of the different ores mined, in order to gain a better understanding of their metallurgical behaviour. c. To try to locate high-grade manganese ore target areas for future exploration, with the aid of mineralogical information. d. To try to establish the origin of the manganese in the Voelwater Formation. e. To study the relationship of the manganese units with the adjacent chemical sediments of the Hotazel Formation

  1. Magnetic properties and morphology of manganese ferrite nanoparticles in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, I; Ivanova, O; Ivantsov, I; Velikanov, D; Petrakovskaja, E; Artemenko, A; Curély, J; Kliava, J; Zaikovskiy, V; Stepanov, S

    2011-01-01

    Static magnetization (SM), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies are reported of borate glasses 22.5 K 2 O-22.5 Al 2 O 3 -55 B 2 O 3 co-doped with iron and manganese oxides. In as-prepared glasses the paramagnetic ions usually are in diluted state; however, if the ratio of the iron and manganese oxides in the charge is 3/2, magnetic nanoparticles are found already in as-prepared glass. After additional thermal treatment all glasses show magnetic behaviour, MCD and EMR due to the presence of magnetic nanoparticles with characteristics close to those of manganese ferrite. By computer simulating the EMR spectra at variable temperatures, their morphological characteristics are deduced: relatively broad size and shape distribution with average diameter of ca. 3-4 nm. The characteristic temperature-dependent shift of the apparent resonance field is explained by a strong temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the nanoparticles. The potassium-alumina-borate glasses containing magnetic nanoparticles represent a novel class of materials: t ransparent magnets . Indeed, they remain transparent in a part of visible and near infrared spectral range while showing magnetic and magneto-optical properties characteristic of magnetically ordered materials.

  2. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    green nucleic acid staining further confirmed the neurotoxic effect of cadmium in this cell model (Fig 10C). Next, we examined the enzymatic activity...Quantification of Nissl bodies revealed a widespread reduction in SNpc cell numbers. Other areas of the basal ganglia were also altered by manganese as...the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) following manganese treatment. Quantification of Nissl bodies revealed a widespread reduction in SNpc

  3. Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, S.G.; Webber, B.N.

    1944-01-01

    The manganese deposits of the Artillery Mountains region lie within an area of about 25 square miles between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, on the west side of the Bill Williams River in west-central Arizona. The richest croppings are on the northeast side of this area, among the foothills of the Artillery Mountains. They are 6 to 10 miles from Alamo. The nearest shipping points are Congress, about 50 miles to the east, and Aguila, about 50 miles to the southeast. The principal manganese deposits are part of a sequence of alluvial fan and playa material, probably of early Pliocene age, which were laid down in a fault basin. They are overlain by later Pliocene (?) basalt flows and sediments and by Quaternary basalt and alluvium. The Pliocene (?) rocks are folded into a shallow composite S1ncline ttat occupies the valley between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, and the folded rocks along either side of the valley, together with the overlying Quaternary basalt, are broken by faults that have produced a group of horsts, grabens, and step-fault blocks. The manganiferous beds, lie at two zones, 750 to 1,000 feet apart stratigraphically, each of which is locally as much as 300 to 400 feet thick. The main, or upper, zone contains three kinds of ore - sandstone ore, clay ore, and 'hard' ore. The sandstone and clay ores differ from the associated barren sandstone and clay, with which they are interlayered and into which they grade, primarily in containing a variable proportion of amorphous manganese oxides, besides iron oxides and clayey material such as are present in the barren beds. The 'hard' ore is sandstone that has been impregnated with opal and calcite and in which the original amorphous manganese oxides have been largely converted to psilomelane and manganite. The average manganese content of the sandstone and clay ores is between 3 and 4 percent and that of the 'hard' ore is between 6 and 7 percent. The ore contains an average of 3 percent of iron, 0

  4. X-ray thickness measurement of aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of x-ray thickness gauging is extended to reveal the conditions under which a fixed anode voltage is ideal. A mathematical model of an alloy and computations reveal that two voltages can be used to measure the aluminum alloys with an error of roughly 1 percent, determined by the tolerance on manganese content rather than the large errors ordinarily a consequence of the tolerances on copper and zinc content. Implementation is discussed

  5. Reductive Leaching Kinetics of Low Grade Manganese Deposits in H2SO4 Solution Using Malonic Acid as Reducing Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Taysser Lasheen; S. A. Abu Elenein; W. A. Saleh; A. H Orabi; D. A Ismaiel

    2014-01-01

    A leaching process was developed to extract manganese and metal values from Alloga manganese concentrate. The preferential leaching process was achieved through reductive leaching in dilute sulfuric acid medium with malonic acid as the reducing agent. Leaching parameters were optimized as 1.0 M H2SO4, 10% malonic acid in solid/liquid ratio 1:10 for 90 min at 80 C and using ore ground to – 74 µm. Under these conditions, the leaching efficiency of manganese reaches 97%, whilst iron dissolution ...

  6. Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by bioleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Baoping; Chen, Bing; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residues using bioleaching was investigated in this paper. The maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 93% by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at 4.0 g/l sulfur after bioleaching of 9days, while the maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 81% by pyrite-leaching bacteria at 4.0 g/l pyrite. The series bioleaching first by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and followed by pyrite-leaching bacteria evidently promoted the extraction of manganese, witnessing the maximum extraction efficiency of 98.1%. In the case of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, the strong dissolution of bio-generated sulfuric acid resulted in extraction of soluble Mn2+, while both the Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ and weak acidic dissolution of Mn2+ accounted for the extraction of manganese with pyrite-leaching bacteria. The chemical simulation of bioleaching process further confirmed that the acid dissolution of Mn2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ were the bioleaching mechanisms involved for Mn extraction from electrolytic manganese residues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Progress in development of iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackay, V.V.; Parker, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of development of new iron base high-strength alloys are considered. Perspectiveness of ferritic steel strengthening with intermetallides (TaFe 2 , for instance) is shown. Favourable combination of plasticity, strength and fracture toughness in nickel-free iron-manganese alloys (16-20%) is also pointed out. A strength level of alloyed maraging steels can be achieved by changes in chemical composition and by proper heat treatments of low- and medium-alloyed steels

  8. Iron and aluminum forms and their relationship with texture, mineralogy and organic carbon in the Cerrado OxisolFormas de ferro e alumínio e suas relações com textura, mineralogia e carbono orgânico em Latossolos do Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robélio Lenadro Marchão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oxisols of the Cerrado region have a simple mineralogy, and are composed mainly of kaolinite and iron and aluminium oxides. The aim of this work was to perform a sequential extraction of iron and aluminium and to relate them to texture, mineralogy and organic carbon in Oxisols of the Cerrado region. The soil samples, 35 in total, were taken from the 0–20 cm layer in Oxisols under pasture located in the Brazilian Cerrado Region. The levels of iron and aluminum extracted by full attack, dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, ammonium oxalate and sodium pyrophosphate were analyzed according to the textural classes using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Then these data were related to the mineralogy and organic carbon through a principal component analysis. Whatever the textures, iron oxides of high degree of crystallinity were the main form of iron and are positively correlated with the iron total content. The aluminum oxides have a high affinity to organic carbon than iron oxides. The levels of iron and aluminum extracted by sodium pyrophosphate were closely related to soil pH.Os Latossolos da região do Cerrado apresentam mineralogia da fração argila relativamente simples, sendo constituídos principalmente por caulinita e óxidos de ferro e de alumínio. O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar extrações sequênciais de ferro e de alumínio e relacioná-los à mineralogia, textura e teores de carbono orgânico em Latossolos da região do Cerrado. Coletaram-se 35 amostras na camada de 0-20 cm de Latossolos sob pastagem da Região do Cerrado. Os teores de ferro e de alumínio extraídos pelo ataque total, ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato de sódio, oxalato ácido de amônia e pirofosfato de sódio foram analisados de acordo com a classe textural através do teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis. Em seguida estes dados foram relacionados com a mineralogia e o carbono orgânico por meio de uma análise de componentes principais

  9. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L −1 for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31–355 μg L −1 for Mn(II) and 0.34–380 μg L −1 for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. - Highlights: • We use synthesized graphene oxide as adsorbent for SPE of Mn(II) and Fe(III) ions. • Adsorption mechanism was investigated by PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface. • Detection limits were 145 and 162 ng L −1 for Mn and Fe, respectively. • The preconcentration factor was 325 and sample flow rate is 8 mL min −1 . • It was successfully applied to the determination of Mn and Fe ions in real samples

  10. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: pourjavid@gmail.com [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sehat, Ali Akbari [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31–355 μg L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and 0.34–380 μg L{sup −1} for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. - Highlights: • We use synthesized graphene oxide as adsorbent for SPE of Mn(II) and Fe(III) ions. • Adsorption mechanism was investigated by PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface. • Detection limits were 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn and Fe, respectively. • The preconcentration factor was 325 and sample flow rate is 8 mL min{sup −1}. • It was successfully applied to the determination of Mn and Fe ions in real samples.

  11. Determination of manganese content in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, S.D.; Smith, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The three analytical methods used in the hydrogen-to-manganese cross-section ratio measurement were: volumetric determination of manganese, gravimetric analysis of manganous sulfate; and densimetric determination of manganous sulfate

  12. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  13. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. Multitracer method of diffusion measurement in chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudala, J.; Stegowski, Z.; Gilewicz-Wolter, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an application of multitracer method to diffusion measurement in Cr-Mn steels. Radioisotope tracers of chromium 51 Cr, manganese 54 Mn and iron 59 Fe were used simultaneously in the diffusion process, Gamma-spectrum measurement and the proper analysis enabled evaluation of concentration distribution for each tracer. As a new tool, artificial neural networks (ANN) method was used for spectrum analysis. The proper solution of the diffusion model was applied to the experimental tracers' distribution data and diffusion coefficients were determined. (author)

  17. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  18. Improvement in thermal fatigue resistance of cast iron piston; Chutetsu piston no tainetsu hiro sekkei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, K; Uosaki, Y; Takeshige, N [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Cast iron piston is superior in reduction of diesel engine emission to aluminum piston because of its characteristic of heat insulation. In order to study thermal fatigue characteristics of cast iron, thermal fatigue tests were carried out on two kinds of ferrite ductile cast iron. Differences between cast iron piston and aluminum piston in thermal fatigue resistance have been investigated by using FEM analysis. 5 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Economic value of Valentines iron minerals; Valor economico de los minerales de hierro de Valentines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, B.

    1960-07-01

    This work is a investigation required by the government of Uruguay about the economic value of iron and manganese deposits in Valentines ferriferrous zone. The purpose is to study the potential commercial for the exportation.

  20. Iron concretions in Brazilian Soils. 2. Mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, M.R.; Silva, E.G. da

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy of six concretionary material from several pedological domains in Brazil were examined by x-ray diffratometry analysis and room temperature (RT) 57 Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy. In two samples (from 'Quadrilatero Ferrifero' and Itaituba, in the state of Para) hematite was the predominant mineralogical phase, while in the other samples, from Chapada do Apodi (State of Rio Grande do Norte), Calciolandia (State of Minas Gerais), and Vicosa (State of Minas Gerais), goethite appeared as the main occurring mineral, in the (hydr) oxide crystallized fraction. The goethitic character was related to the manganese content in the concretions. The Moessbauer patterns exhibited superparamagnetic relaxation effects, although a six line hyperfine magnetic splitting, and a central doublet appeared at least in three cases. Exceptionally, in the two samples from Chapada do Apodi the six line pattern collapsed completely, and only a central doublet remained. The hyperfine magnetic field was drastically reduced both by particle size and isomorphically substituted aluminum in the iron oxide structure, probably, of Al-hematites. From the Moessbauer parameters, Al-goethite seemed to be present only in the sample from Vicosa, although it should be emphasized that the RT measurements do not always permit access to the hyperfine strucutre in this kind of material, as a result of small size particle effects. (Author) [pt

  1. Dietary manganese in the Glasgow area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Dale, I.M.; Raie, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The manganese content of the diet and human tissue (adult and infant) in the Glasgow area is established. The total manganese intake by a breast fed infant (6 μg/day) is very much lower than that of an adult (5 mg/day). This does not appear to cause any upset in the infant's metabolism and the tissue levels of both groups are similar. This indicates that the human system can obtain its required manganese from both levels of intake. Tea is the major source of manganese in the diet: tobacco, which is rich in manganese, does not contribute a significant amount when smoked. (author)

  2. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F.; Paras, Joseph; Rafiee, Mohammad A.; Rafiee, Javad; Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  3. Noncollinear magnetism in manganese nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelený, Martin; Šob, Mojmír; Hafner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 14 (2009), 144414/1-144414/19 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk OC09011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnetism of nanostructures * nanowires * noncollinear magnetism * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  4. Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Elizabeth C; Chen, Lixia; Hansel, Colleen M; Krumholz, Lee R; Elwood Madden, Andrew S; Lan, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi), present predominantly as CrO4(2-) in water at neutral pH) is a common ground water pollutant, and reductive immobilization is a frequent remediation alternative. The Cr(iii) that forms upon microbial or abiotic reduction often co-precipitates with naturally present or added iron (Fe), and the stability of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate is a function of its mineral properties. In this study, Fe-Cr solids were formed by microbial Cr(vi) reduction using Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1 in the presence of the Fe-bearing minerals hematite, aluminum substituted goethite (Al-goethite), and nontronite (NAu-2, Clay Minerals Society), or by abiotic Cr(vi) reduction by dithionite reduced NAu-2 or iron sulfide (FeS). The properties of the resulting Fe-Cr solids and their behavior upon exposure to the oxidant manganese (Mn) oxide (birnessite) differed significantly. In microcosms containing strain RCH1 and hematite or Al-goethite, there was significant initial loss of Cr(vi) in a pattern consistent with adsorption, and significant Cr(vi) was found in the resulting solids. The solid formed when Cr(vi) was reduced by FeS contained a high proportion of Cr(iii) and was poorly crystalline. In microcosms with strain RCH1 and hematite, Cr precipitates appeared to be concentrated in organic biofilms. Reaction between birnessite and the abiotically formed Cr(iii) solids led to production of significant dissolved Cr(vi) compared to the no-birnessite controls. This pattern was not observed in the solids generated by microbial Cr(vi) reduction, possibly due to re-reduction of any Cr(vi) generated upon oxidation by birnessite by active bacteria or microbial enzymes. The results of this study suggest that Fe-Cr precipitates formed in groundwater remediation may remain stable only in the presence of active anaerobic microbial reduction. If exposed to environmentally common Mn oxides such as birnessite in the absence of microbial activity, there is the potential

  5. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  6. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  7. Response of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to iron stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.I.; Morel, F.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The coastal diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii responds to iron limitation with decreasing growth rate, decreasing quotas of cellular iron, and increasing rates of maximum short term uptake. Growth response to steady iron limitation can be modeled according to the equations of Droop and Monod. The cellular iron quota varies from about 2 to 25 x 10 -1 mol iron per liter-cell with increasing iron; the half-saturation constant for growth, Kμ, is 1.1 x 10 -21 M (free ferric ion). In contrast, the half-saturation constant for 59 I iron uptake, K/sub rho/ is about 3 x 10 -19 M; the maximum iron uptake rate (rho/sub max/) is increased several-fold under iron limitation, resulting in a potential short term uptake rate that is a few hundred times the steady state rate. At a fixed concentration of free manganese ion, the cellular manganese quota is increased several-fold in iron-limited cultures compared to iron-sufficient cultures

  8. Photoluminescent properties of nanoporous anodic alumina doped with manganese ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenkova, I.V. [State Research and Production Association ' Optic, Optoelectronic and Laser techniques”, 68 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Mukhurov, N.I., E-mail: n.mukhurov@ifanbel.bas-net.by [State Research and Production Association ' Optic, Optoelectronic and Laser techniques”, 68 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Zhvavyi, S.P.; Kolesnik, E.E. [State Research and Production Association ' Optic, Optoelectronic and Laser techniques”, 68 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Stupak, A.P. [B.I.Stepanov Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220072 (Belarus)

    2017-05-15

    The results are presented of a comparative study of photoluminescent (PL) properties of unalloyed and Mn-alloyed porous anodic alumina (PAA) subjected to annealing at temperatures in the range of ГђВў{sub a}=200–1300 °ГђВЎ. The possibility of alloying of PAA with metal atoms is illustrated through an example of Mn atoms, and the effect of this impurity on the optical properties of aluminum oxide is examined. Alloying of PAA with Mn ions leads to the formation of complex defects including manganese ions and oxygen vacancies. The difference observed in the spectral dependences of the PL intensity of alloyed and unalloyed specimens is explained by the change in the valence of manganese ions in the complex defects. A decrease has been discovered in the PL intensity of the PL bands and R-lines of Mn and Cr ions in the α-phase under prolonged UV-exposure of the alloyed samples.

  9. Aluminum deoxidation equilibria and inclusion modification mechanism by calcium treatment of stainless steel melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, Sang Beom

    2005-01-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium between aluminum and oxygen along with the inclusion morphology in Fe-16%Cr stainless steel was investigated to understand the fundamentals of aluminum deoxidation technology for ferritic stainless steels. Further, the effects of calcium addition on the changes in chemistry and morphology of inclusions were discussed. The measured results for aluminum-oxygen equilibria exhibit relatively good agreement with the calculated values, indicating that the introduction of the first- and second-order interaction parameters, recently reported, is reasonable to numerically express aluminum deoxidation equilibrium in a ferritic stainless steel. In the composition of dissolved aluminum content greater than about 60 ppm, pure alumina particles were observed, while the alumino-manganese silicates containing Cr 2 O 3 were appeared at less than 20 mass ppm of dissolved aluminum. The formation of calcium aluminate inclusions after Ca treatment could be discussed based on the thermodynamic equilibrium with calcium, aluminum, and oxygen in the steel melts. In the composition of steel melt with relatively high content of calcium and low aluminum, the log(X CaO /X Al 2 O 3 ) of inclusions linearly increases with increasing the log [a Ca /a Al 2 ·a O 2 ] with the slope close to unity. However, the slope of the line is significantly lower than the expected value in the composition of steel melt with relatively low calcium and high aluminum contents

  10. Oxidative Precipitation of Manganese from Acid Mine Drainage by Potassium Permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regeane M. Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although oxidative precipitation by potassium permanganate is a widely recognised process for manganese removal, research dealing with highly contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD has yet to be performed. The present study investigated the efficiency of KMnO4 in removing manganese from AMD effluents. Samples of AMD that originated from inactive uranium mine in Brazil were chemically characterised and treated by KMnO4 at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. Analyses by Raman spectroscopy and geochemical modelling using PHREEQC code were employed to assess solid phases. Results indicated that the manganese was rapidly oxidised by KMnO4 in a process enhanced at higher pH. The greatest removal, that is, 99%, occurred at pH 7.0, when treated waters presented manganese levels as low as 1.0 mg/L, the limit established by the Brazilian legislation. Birnessite (MnO2, hausmannite (Mn3O4, and manganite (MnOOH were detected by Raman spectroscopy. These phases were consistently identified by the geochemical model, which also predicted phases containing iron, uranium, manganese, and aluminium during the correction of the pH as well as bixbyite (Mn2O3, nsutite (MnO2, pyrolusite (MnO2, and fluorite (CaF2 following the KMnO4 addition.

  11. Use of hydrous titanium dioxide as potential sorbent for the removal of manganese from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan Kamaraj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research article deals with an electrosynthesis of hydrous titanium dioxide by anodic dissolution of titanium sacrificial anodes and their application for the adsorption of manganese from aqueous solution. Titanium sheet was used as the sacrificial anode and galvanized iron sheet was used as the cathode. The optimization of different experimental parameters like initial ion concentration, current density, pH, temperature, etc., on the removal efficiency of manganese was carried out. The maximum removal efficiency of 97.55 % was achieved at a current density of 0.08 A dm-2 and pH of 7.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich Peterson isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The adsorption of manganese preferably followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption kinetics was modelled by first- and second- order rate models and the adsorption kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of manganese was best described using the second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the adsorption of manganese on hydrous titanium dioxide was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic.

  12. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  13. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  14. Manganese and iron as oxygen carriers to anoxie estuarine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayner, F. M. M.; Matvienko, B.

    2003-05-01

    We studied the concentration of a series of transition metals including Mn and Fe in an estuarine fishpond. The pond is situated at latitude 8°10'S and longitude 34°55'W, in the Capibaribe River estuary, within the Recife city boundaries, which is located in Pernambuco, a state of the Brazilian Northeast Pond area is 1.5 ha and it bas a 0.5 m depth. It is separated from the river by dikes. Water temperature at 28° C is stable throughout the year. Light breezes keep the water aerated, but intense ongoing decomposition makes the sediment anoxie. The area, originally of mangrove type, has been changed by antropic action on its fauna and vegetation. The study focuses on changes in behaviour of heavy metals. Samples of bottom sediments wore collected by Eckman dredge sediment sampler and total metal concentration was determined by the lithium borate fusion method. Water, recent sediment, and consolidated sediment were examined in this fishpond where Mn and Fe are brought in periodically by water and then gradually go into the sediment at respective rates of 10.52 and 1332 mg m^{-2}a^{-1}. Strong bioturbation re-suspends sediment while simultaneously re-dissolution of these ions is going on fhrough reduction in the anoxie sédiment. As soluble species these ions migrate from sediment to water and are there continually oxidized by dissolved oxygen, becoming insoluble. With their precipitation, chemically bound oxygen is carried down to the sediment, constituting a parallel channel of transport in addition to migration into the sediment bydiffusion of the oxygen dissolved in the water. The estimated flow rates are 3.25 and 76 mg O2 m^{-2}a^{-1} due to Mn and Fe respectively. The rates were established using natural silicon as a tracer.

  15. Anaerobic manganese- or iron-mediated pharmaceutical degradation in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wenbo

    2018-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds, originating mainly from industrial production and public consumption, are detected at extremely low levels (ng·L-1 –µg·L-1) in groundwater, surface water, and wastewater. So far, the adverse effects of pharmaceuticals and their intermediates have been widely reported,

  16. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies have a negative impact in the lives of millions of people worldwide. Most affected are children and pregnant women in developing regions. Biofortification is a sustainable way to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies in at-risk populations. To optimize the biofortificati...

  17. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  18. Iron persistence in a distal hydrothermal plume supported by dissolved-particulate exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; John, Seth G.; Marsay, Christopher M.; Hoffman, Colleen L.; Nicholas, Sarah L.; Toner, Brandy M.; German, Christopher R.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrothermally sourced dissolved metals have been recorded in all ocean basins. In the oceans' largest known hydrothermal plume, extending westwards across the Pacific from the Southern East Pacific Rise, dissolved iron and manganese were shown by the GEOTRACES program to be transported halfway across the Pacific. Here, we report that particulate iron and manganese in the same plume also exceed background concentrations, even 4,000 km from the vent source. Both dissolved and particulate iron deepen by more than 350 m relative to 3He--a non-reactive tracer of hydrothermal input--crossing isopycnals. Manganese shows no similar descent. Individual plume particle analyses indicate that particulate iron occurs within low-density organic matrices, consistent with its slow sinking rate of 5-10 m yr-1. Chemical speciation and isotopic composition analyses reveal that particulate iron consists of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, whereas dissolved iron consists of nanoparticulate Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and an organically complexed iron phase. The descent of plume-dissolved iron is best explained by reversible exchange onto slowly sinking particles, probably mediated by organic compounds binding iron. We suggest that in ocean regimes with high particulate iron loadings, dissolved iron fluxes may depend on the balance between stabilization in the dissolved phase and the reversibility of exchange onto sinking particles.

  19. 10Be in manganese nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Parker, P.; Mangini, A.; Cochran, K.; Turekian, K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sharma, P.

    1981-01-01

    10 Be (t/sub 1/2) = 1.5 MY) is(formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation on nitrogen and oxygen. It is transported to the earth's surface via precipitation. In the oceans it is eventually associated with solid phases depositing on the ocean floor such as manganese nodules and deep-sea sediments. One of the assumptions that is normally made in analysis of such processes is that 10 Be has been produced at a relatively uniform rate over the pat several million years. If we assume, in addition, that the initial specific concentration of 10 Be as it precipitates with a solid phase is invariant with time, then we would expect that the decrease of the 10 Be concentration as a function of depth in a deep-sea core or in a manganese nodule would provide a record of sediment accumulation rate in the former and of growth rate in the latter. The possibility of using cosmic-ray produced 10 Be for the dating of marine deposits had been proposed 25 years ago by Arnold and Goel et al. The method of analysis used by these investigators, and those subsequently pursuing the problem, was low-level β counting. Though the potential of using 10 Be for dating manganese nodules was explored more than a decade ago, only a few measurements of 10 Be in nodules exist in date. This is largely because of the 10 Be measurements in environmental samples have gained considerable momentum during the past 3 to 4 years, after the development of accelerator mass spectrometry for its determination

  20. Using X-ray Diffraction to Assess Residual Stresses in Laser Peened and Welded Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    inch thick. The chemical composition of this plate material is: magnesium 4.7, manganese 0.9, iron 0.20, silicon 0.10, chromium 0.08, zinc 0.03...19. The plates were clamped to the welding table using L-shaped clamps. The welded areas were surface ground to remove any slag and debris.[1] 28

  1. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet—it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn2+, and ultimately water.

  2. ON THE REACTIONS IN ILMENITE, ALUMINUM AND GRAPHITE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khoshhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3/TiC composites are used as cutting tools for machining gray cast iron and steels. The addition of iron improves the toughness of Al2O3/TiC composites. Ilmenite, aluminum and graphite can be used to produce in-situ Al2O3/TiC–Fe composites. However, the formation mechanism and reaction sequences of this system are not clear enough. Therefore, the present research is designed to determine the reactions mechanism of the first step of reactions that may be occurred between raw materials. In this research, pure ilmenite was synthesized to eliminate the effects of impurities available in the natural ilmenite in the system. The milled and pressed samples, prepared from the synthesized ilmenite, aluminum and graphite mixture with a molar ratio of 1:2:1, were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. In addition, two samples one containing ilmenite and aluminum with a molar ratio of 1:2 and ilmenite and graphite with a molar ratio of 1:1 were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. The final products were analyzed with XRD. It was found that at 720°C, aluminum reacts with FeTiO3, forming Fe, TiO2 and Al2O3. Since the aluminum content used in the mixture was more than the stoichiometry for reaction of ilmenite and aluminum, some unreacted aluminum remains. Therefore, the residual aluminum reacts with the reduced Fe to form Fe2Al5.

  3. The separation and determination of trace elements in iron ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    The separation, concentration, and determination of trace elements in iron ores are described. After the sample has been dissolved, the iron is separated by liquid-liquid extraction with a liquid cation-exchanger, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. The trace elements aluminium, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, magnesium, manganese, mercury, potassium, sodium, vanadium, and zinc are determined in the aqueous phase by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

  4. Painting rusted steel: The role of aluminum phosphosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselli, S.N.; Amo, B. del; Carbonari, R.O.; Di Sarli, A.R.; Romagnoli, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Aluminum phosphosilicate is an acid pigment which could act as mild phosphating agent. •Aluminum phosphosilicate can phosphatize iron oxides on rusted surfaces. •Aluminum phosphosilicate is compatible with acid binders. •Aluminum phosphosilicate could replace chromate in complete painting schemes. •Aluminum phosphosilicate primers improve paints adhesion on rusted surfaces. -- Abstract: Surface preparation is a key factor for the adequate performance of a paint system. The aim of this investigation is to employ a wash-primer to accomplish the chemical conversion of rusted surface when current cleaning operations are difficult to carry out. The active component of the wash-primer was aluminum phosphosilicate whose electrochemical behavior and the composition of the generated protective layer, both, were studied by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Primed rusted steel panels were coated with an alkyd system to perform accelerated tests in the salt spray chamber and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS). These tests were conducted in parallel with a chromate wash primer and the same alkyd system. Results showed that the wash-primer containing aluminum phosphosilicate could be used satisfactorily to paint rusted steel exhibiting a similar performance to the chromate primer

  5. Influence of Irrigation Rate and Soil Type on the Vertical Migration of Iron and Manganese in the Soils of South-East Spain; Influencia de la Cantidad de Riego y Tipo de Suelo sobre la Emigracion Vertical de Hierro y Manganeso en Suelos del Sureste Espanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, F.; Carpena, O. [Instituto Nacional de Edafologia y Agrobiologia, Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Segura, Murcia (Spain); Esparraguera, I.; Ortin, N.; Del Val, M.; La Cruz, F. de; Cellini, R. F. [Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    1967-11-15

    The citrus plantations in south-east Spain, situated largely on calcareous soils which are submitted to intensive cultivation, are investigating nutritional changes caused mainly by deficiencies of trace elements, especially iron and manganese, which result in a lower yield and premature exhaustion of the trees. The paper deals with a radioactive tracer study of the behaviour of these ions in soils and with the factors influencing their migration to the root zone; the object of the work is to develop a rational and economic fertilization policy. The work has been based on two types of soil, representing extreme situations encountered in practice; one soil is calcareous and the other non-calcareous. A set of columnsiwas assembled, each column having a length of 1 m and a cross-section of 32 cm{sup 2} ; solutions of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 54}Mn were added to these columns both in sulphate and chelate form. A definite amount of water, proportional to the requirements .of citrus plantations, was intermittently passed through these columns. Soil samples were taken periodically and the total activity and the activity of the assimilable and non-assimilable fractions of the elements being studied were measured. At the same time an apparatus involving a collimated scintillation detector was developed to follow the vertical migration of these ions in soils; the water drained from the columns after each irrigation was analysed radiochemically for the same purpose. (author) [Spanish] Las plantaciones citrfcolas del sureste espanol, radicadas en gran parte sobre suelos calizos y sometidos a cultivos intensivos, experimentan con el tiempo alteraciones de orden nutritivo debido principalmente a deficiencias de oligoelementos, especialmente hierro y manganeso, que se traduce en una menor produccion y en un agotamiento prematuro de los arboles. En la presente comunicacion se estudia, mediante trazadores radiactivos, el comportamiento de estos iones en los suelos, asi como los factores

  6. Nanocrystalline Aluminum Truss Cores for Lightweight Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chan, Lisa J.; Clough, Eric C.; Stilke, Morgan A.; Hundley, Jacob M.; Masur, Lawrence J.

    2017-12-01

    Substitution of conventional honeycomb composite sandwich structures with lighter alternatives has the potential to reduce the mass of future vehicles. Here we demonstrate nanocrystalline aluminum-manganese truss cores that achieve 2-4 times higher strength than aluminum alloy 5056 honeycombs of the same density. The scalable fabrication approach starts with additive manufacturing of polymer templates, followed by electrodeposition of nanocrystalline Al-Mn alloy, removal of the polymer, and facesheet integration. This facilitates curved and net-shaped sandwich structures, as well as co-curing of the facesheets, which eliminates the need for extra adhesive. The nanocrystalline Al-Mn alloy thin-film material exhibits high strength and ductility and can be converted into a three-dimensional hollow truss structure with this approach. Ultra-lightweight sandwich structures are of interest for a range of applications in aerospace, such as fairings, wings, and flaps, as well as for the automotive and sports industries.

  7. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  8. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  9. Effect of processing variables on mechanical properties of sintered manganese steels Fe-3%Mn-0.8%C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulowski, M.; Cias, A.

    1998-01-01

    The powder metallurgy route may allow sintered manganese steels to be made based on pure iron powder and ferromanganese powder with control over alloy microstructure. The factors that contribute to the mechanical properties of sintered Fe-3%Mn-0.8%C manganese steel, such as the sintering atmosphere, dew point, sintering temperature, cooling rate are summarised. The paper shows the influence of these parameters on the tensile strength, yield strength, transverse rupture strength, impact strength and hardness. It is showed that tensile high strength level higher than those of many present sintered steels can be obtained already in the as-sintered condition. (author)

  10. Growth and characterization of gel grown pure and mixed iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    is to grow pure and mixed iron (II)–manganese levo-tartrate crystals by the single diffusion gel growth technique and characterize them by several methods. 2. ... also attracted several researchers to grow different crystals for various ...

  11. Iron and its complexes in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article is the first in a series of two reviews on the properties of iron in silicon. It offers a comprehensive of the current state of understanding of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon. The first section of this review discusses the position of iron in the silicon lattice and the electrical properties of interstitial iron. Updated expressions for the solubility and the diffusivity of iron in silicon are presented, and possible explanations for conflicting experimental data obtained by different groups are discussed. The second section of the article considers the electrical and the structural properties of complexes of interstitial iron with shallow acceptors (boron, aluminum, indium, gallium, and thallium), shallow donors (phosphorus and arsenic) and other impurities (gold, silver, platinum, palladium, zinc, sulfur, oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen). Special attention is paid to the kinetics of iron pairing with shallow acceptors, the dissociation of these pairs, and the metastability of iron-acceptor pairs. The parameters of iron-related defects in silicon are summarized in tables that include more than 30 complexes of iron as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and almost 20 energy levels in the band gap associated with iron. The data presented in this review illustrate the enormous complexing activity of iron, which is attributed to the partial or complete (depending on the temperature and the conductivity type) ionization of iron as well as the high diffusivity of iron in silicon. It is shown that studies of iron in silicon require exceptional cleanliness of experimental facilities and highly reproducible diffusion and temperature ramping (quenching) procedures. Properties of iron that are not yet completely understood and need further research are outlined.

  12. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  13. Mutation in HFE gene decreases manganese accumulation and oxidative stress in the brain after olfactory manganese exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2016-06-01

    Increased accumulation of manganese (Mn) in the brain is significantly associated with neurobehavioral deficits and impaired brain function. Airborne Mn has a high systemic bioavailability and can be directly taken up into the brain, making it highly neurotoxic. While Mn transport is in part mediated by several iron transporters, the expression of these transporters is altered by the iron regulatory gene, HFE. Mutations in the HFE gene are the major cause of the iron overload disorder, hereditary hemochromatosis, one of the prevalent genetic diseases in humans. However, whether or not HFE mutation modifies Mn-induced neurotoxicity has not been evaluated. Therefore, our goal was to define the role of HFE mutation in Mn deposition in the brain and the resultant neurotoxic effects after olfactory Mn exposure. Mice carrying the H67D HFE mutation, which is homologous to the H63D mutation in humans, and their control, wild-type mice, were intranasally instilled with MnCl2 with different doses (0, 0.2, 1.0 and 5.0 mg kg(-1)) daily for 3 days. Mn levels in the blood, liver and brain were determined using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). H67D mutant mice showed significantly lower Mn levels in the blood, liver, and most brain regions, especially in the striatum, while mice fed an iron-overload diet did not. Moreover, mRNA expression of ferroportin, an essential exporter of iron and Mn, was up-regulated in the striatum. In addition, the levels of isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, were increased in the striatum after Mn exposure in wild-type mice, but were unchanged in H67D mice. Together, our results suggest that the H67D mutation provides decreased susceptibility to Mn accumulation in the brain and neurotoxicity induced by inhaled Mn.

  14. Antioxidant, Iron-chelating and Anti-glucosidase Activities of Typha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron chelating activity was assessed using a ferrozine-based assay. Anti- glucosidase activity was determined using 4-nitrophenyl ... flavonoid (TF) content was determined based an aluminum chloride colorimetric assay [6]. TF content was ..... Dietary iron restriction or iron chelation protects from diabetes and loss of β-cell.

  15. The aluminosilicate fraction of North Pacific manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J.L.; Piper, D.Z.; Leong, K.

    1981-01-01

    Nine nodules collected from throughout the deep North Pacific were analyzed for their mineralogy and major-element composition before and after leaching with Chester-Hughes solution. Data indicate that the mineral phillipsite accounts for the major part (> 75%) of the aluminosilicate fraction of all nodules. It is suggested that formation of phillipsite takes place on growing nodule surfaces coupled with the oxidation of absorbed manganous ion. All the nodules could be described as ternary mixtures of amorphous iron fraction (Fe-Ti-P), manganese oxide fraction (Mn-Mg Cu-Ni), and phillipsite fraction (Al-Si-K-Na), these fractions accounting for 96% of the variability of the chemical composition. ?? 1981.

  16. Manganese oxide nanoparticles, methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruna, Hector D.; Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A.

    2017-08-29

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles having a chemical composition that includes Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, a sponge like morphology and a particle size from about 65 to about 95 nanometers may be formed by calcining a manganese hydroxide material at a temperature from about 200 to about 400 degrees centigrade for a time period from about 1 to about 20 hours in an oxygen containing environment. The particular manganese oxide nanoparticles with the foregoing physical features may be used within a battery component, and in particular an anode within a lithium battery to provide enhanced performance.

  17. Microbial dissimilatory iron(III) reduction: Studies on the mechanism and on processes of environmental relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Many microbes are able to respire aerobically oxygen or anaerobically other electron acceptors for example sulphate, nitrate, manganese(IV) or Fe(III). As iron minerals are widespread in nature, dissimilatory iron(III) reduction by different microorganisms is a very important process of anaerobic respiration. The general goal of this work was to improve the knowledge of processes, in which iron-reducing microbes are said to play an important role. For this purpose, in one part the focus wa...

  18. Comparison of two Q-switched lasers and a short-pulse erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser for treatment of cosmetic tattoos containing titanium and iron in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chen; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Yang, An-Hang; Chen, Chih-Kang; Lee, Shao-Chen; Leu, Fur-Jiang

    2010-11-01

    Cosmetic tattoos contain titanium and ferric oxide and darken through reduction after Q-switched laser irradiation. The optimal treatment for removing these pigments remains unknown. To compare the effects of two Q-switched lasers and a short-pulse erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (SP Er:YAG) laser to remove cosmetic tattoos in an animal model. Rats were tattooed using white, flesh-colored, and brown inks (4 bands of each color) on their backs. For each color, one band was left untreated, and one each was treated with a Q-switched neodymium-doped YAG laser, a Q-switched alexandrite laser, and a SP Er:YAG laser every 3 weeks until the pigments were clear. The two Q-switched lasers were equally effective; all three pigments darkened initially and then resolved gradually. Up to 20, 18, and 10 sessions were required to remove white, flesh-colored, and brown tattoos, respectively. Only six sessions were required with the SP Er:YAG laser. Minimal scarring was observed with all lasers. Skin biopsies confirmed pigment granule fragmentation after Q-switched laser treatment and a decrease in the amount of pigment after SP Er:YAG laser treatment. The SP Er:YAG laser was superior to the Q-switched lasers for removing cosmetic tattoos. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  19. TANK 12 SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, S.; Hay, Michael; Zeigler, Kristine; Stone, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of ∼7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low (∼20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the

  20. The detection of magnetotactic bacteria in deep sea sediments from the east Pacific Manganese Nodule Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Wuchang; Zhang, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuan; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei; Pan, Hongmiao

    2016-04-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are distributed ubiquitously in sediments from coastal environments to the deep sea. The Pacific Manganese Nodule Province contains numerous polymetallic nodules mainly composed of manganese, iron, cobalt, copper and nickel. In the present study we used Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology to assess the communities of putative MTB in deep sea surface sediments at nine stations in the east Pacific Manganese Nodule Province. A total of 402 sequence reads from MTB were classified into six operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Among these, OTU113 and OTU759 were affiliated with the genus Magnetospira, OTU2224 and OTU2794 were affiliated with the genus Magnetococcus and Magnetovibrio, respectively, OTU3017 had no known genus affiliation, and OTU2556 was most similar to Candidatus Magnetananas. Interestingly, OTU759 was widely distributed, occurring at all study sites. Magnetism measurements revealed that all sediments were dominated by low coercivity, non-interacting single domain magnetic minerals. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the magnetic minerals were magnetosomes. Our data suggest that diverse putative MTB are widely distributed in deep sea surface sediments from the east Pacific Manganese Nodule Province. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aluminum industry options paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    In 1990, Canada's producers of aluminum (third largest in the world) emitted 10 million tonnes of carbon dioxide and equivalent, corresponding to 6.4 tonnes of greenhouse gas intensity per tonne of aluminum. In 2000, the projection is that on a business-as-usual (BAU) basis Canadian producers now producing 60 per cent more aluminum than in 1990, will emit 10.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide and equivalent, corresponding to a GHG intensity of 4.2 tonnes per tonne of aluminum. This improvement is due to production being based largely on hydro-electricity, and partly because in general, Canadian plants are modern, with technology that is relatively GHG-friendly. The Aluminum Association of Canada estimates that based on anticipated production, and under a BAU scenario, GHG emissions from aluminum production will rise by 18 per cent by 2010 and by 30 per cent by 2020. GHG emissions could be reduced below the BAU forecast first, by new control and monitoring systems at some operations at a cost of $4.5 to 7.5 million per smelter. These systems could reduce carbon dioxide equivalent emissions by 0.8 million tonnes per year. A second alternative would require installation of breaker feeders which would further reduce perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions by 0.9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. Cost of the breakers feeders would be in the order of $200 million per smelter. The third option calls for the the shutting down of some of the smelters with older technology by 2015. In this scenario GHG emissions would be reduced by 2010 by 0.8 million tonnes per year of carbon dioxide equivalent. However, the cost in this case would be about $1.36 billion. The industry would support measures that would encourage the first two sets of actions, which would produce GHG emissions from aluminum production in Canada of about 10.2 million tonnes per year of carbon dioxide equivalent, or about two per cent above 1990 levels with double the aluminum production of 1990. Credit for

  2. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the p...

  3. Effect of excess supply of heavy metals on the absorption and translocation of iron (/sup 59/Fe) in barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, C P; Bisht, S S; Agarwala, S C [Lucknow Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany

    1978-03-01

    The effects of an excess supply of manganese, copper, zinc, cobalt, and nickel on the absorption and translocation of iron tagged with /sup 59/Fe were xamined in 15 days old barley seedlings raised in solution culture. Excess heavy metal treatments and /sup 59/Fe were administered in three different ways: (i) both excess heavy metals and iron supplied through roots- Series A; (ii) excess heavy metal supplied as foliar spray and iron through roots- Series B; and (iii) excess heavy metal supplied through roots and iron as foliar spray-Series C. Results obtained revealed that excess concentrations of manganese, zinc, cobalt, and a to a lesser extent copper interfered with the absorption of iron from the rooting medium, but excess nickel enhanced the absorption and translocation of iron. Thus, unlike other metals, a toxic supply of nickel does not induce iron deficiency.

  4. Mesoporous aluminum phosphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Haskouri, Jamal; Perez-Cabero, Monica; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre, Julio; Beltran, Aurelio; Beltran, Daniel; Amoros, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    High surface area pure mesoporous aluminum-phosphorus oxide-based derivatives have been synthesized through an S + I - surfactant-assisted cooperative mechanism by means of a one-pot preparative procedure from aqueous solution and starting from aluminum atrane complexes and phosphoric and/or phosphorous acids. A soft chemical extraction procedure allows opening the pore system of the parent as-prepared materials by exchanging the surfactant without mesostructure collapse. The nature of the pore wall can be modulated from mesoporous aluminum phosphate (ALPO) up to total incorporation of phosphite entities (mesoporous aluminum phosphite), which results in a gradual evolution of the acidic properties of the final materials. While phosphate groups in ALPO act as network building blocks (bridging Al atoms), the phosphite entities become basically attached to the pore surface, what gives practically empty channels. The mesoporous nature of the final materials is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The materials present regular unimodal pore systems whose order decreases as the phosphite content increases. NMR spectroscopic results confirm the incorporation of oxo-phosphorus entities to the framework of these materials and also provide us useful information concerning the mechanism through which they are formed. - Abstract: TEM image of the mesoporous aluminum phosphite showing the hexagonal disordered pore array that is generated by using surfactant micelles as template. Also a scheme emphasizing the presence of an alumina-rich core and an ALPO-like pore surface is presented.

  5. Manganese(II) chelate contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocklage, S.M.; Quay, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    New chelate forming compounds for use as contrast media in NMR imaging are described. Especially mentioned are manganese(II) ion chelates of N,N' dipyridoxaldiamine, N,N' diacetic acid, and salts and esters thereof. 1 fig

  6. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample, not less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics...

  7. Personality traits in persons with manganese poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, A A

    1976-10-01

    Results of studies with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in 3 groups of arc welders with various degrees of manganese poisoning (22 symptom-free, 23 with functional disturbances, 55 with organic symptoms) and 50 controls were discussed. There was a close relation between the severity of the poisoning and quantitative and qualitative personality changes. Personality tests are considered a useful addition to the clinical diagnosis of chronic manganese poisoning.

  8. Iron behavior in the ozonation and filtration of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallanko, J.; Lakso, E.; Ropelinen, J. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-08-15

    In Finnish groundwater, the main substances that require treatment are iron and manganese. In addition to this, groundwaters are soft and acidic. Iron removal is usually relatively effective by oxidizing dissolved iron into an insoluble form, either by aeration or chemical oxidation and removing the formed precipitate by sand filtration. Sometimes, if the untreated water contains high amounts of organic matter, problems may arise for iron removal. In Finland, it is quite common that groundwater contains high levels of both iron and natural organic matter, mainly as humic substances. The groundwater of the Kukkala intake plant in Liminka has been found to be problematic, due to its high level of natural organic matter. This research studied the removal of iron from this water by means of oxidation with ozone and filtration. While the oxidation of iron by ozone was rapid, the precipitate particles formed were small, and thus could not be removed by sand and anthracite filtration, and the iron residue in the treated water was more than 2 mg L{sup -1}. And while the filtration was able to remove iron well without the feed of ozone, the iron residue in the treated water was only 0.30 mg L{sup -1}. In this case, iron was led to the filter in a bivalent dissolved form. So, the result of iron removal was the best when the sand/anthracite filter functioned largely as an adsorption filter.

  9. Improving of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloys by Removing Intermetallic Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seri, Osami [Muroran it., Hokkaido (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    It is well known that iron is one of the most common impurity elements sound in aluminum and its alloys. Iron in the aluminum forms an intermetallic compounds such as FeAl{sub 3}. The FeAl{sub 3} particles on the aluminum surface are one of the most detrimental phases to the corrosion process and anodizing procedure for aluminum and its alloys. Trial and error surface treatment will be carried out to find the preferential and effective removal of FeAl{sub 3} particles on the surfaces without dissolution of aluminum matrix around the particles. One of the preferable surface treatments for the aim of getting FeAl{sub 3} free surface was an electrochemical treatment such as cathodic current density of -2 kAm{sup -2} in a 20-30 mass% HNO{sub 3} solution for the period of 300s. The corrosion characteristics of aluminum surface with FeAl{sub 3} free particles are examined in a 0.1 kmol/m{sup 3} NaCl solution. It is found that aluminum with free FeAl{sub 3} particles shows higher corrosion resistance than aluminum with FeAl{sub 3} particles.

  10. Improving of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloys by Removing Intermetallic Compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seri, Osami

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that iron is one of the most common impurity elements sound in aluminum and its alloys. Iron in the aluminum forms an intermetallic compounds such as FeAl 3 . The FeAl 3 particles on the aluminum surface are one of the most detrimental phases to the corrosion process and anodizing procedure for aluminum and its alloys. Trial and error surface treatment will be carried out to find the preferential and effective removal of FeAl 3 particles on the surfaces without dissolution of aluminum matrix around the particles. One of the preferable surface treatments for the aim of getting FeAl 3 free surface was an electrochemical treatment such as cathodic current density of -2 kAm -2 in a 20-30 mass% HNO 3 solution for the period of 300s. The corrosion characteristics of aluminum surface with FeAl 3 free particles are examined in a 0.1 kmol/m 3 NaCl solution. It is found that aluminum with free FeAl 3 particles shows higher corrosion resistance than aluminum with FeAl 3 particles

  11. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  12. Magnesium and manganese content of halophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Medicis, E.; Paquette, J.; Gauthier, J.J.; Shapcott, D.

    1986-01-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by 54 Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation

  13. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  14. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  15. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  16. Silicic Acid and Beer Consumption Reverses the Metal Imbalance and the Prooxidant Status Induced by Aluminum Nitrate in Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Muñoz, María José; Garcimartán, Alba; Meseguer, Isabel; Mateos-Vega, Carmen José; Orellana, José María; Peña-Fernández, Antonio; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that by affecting mineral balance, aluminum (Al) may enhance some events associated with neurodegenerative diseases. To examine the effect of Al(NO3)3 exposure on brain Al, cooper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), silicon (Si), and zinc (Zn) levels, and the metal-change implication in brain oxidant and inflammatory status. Four groups of six-week-old male NMRI mice were treated for three months: i) controls, administrated with deionized water; ii) Al, which received Al(NO3)3; iii) Al+silicic acid, which were given Al(NO3)3 plus silicic acid; and iv) Al+beer, which received Al(NO3)3 plus beer. Brain Al and TBARS levels and TNFα and GPx expressions increased, while Cu, Mn, and Zn levels, and catalase and CuZn-SOD expression decreased (at least, p beer specimens while Cu, Mn, and Zn levels and antioxidant expression increased versus the Al group. Brain Al levels correlated negatively with those of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn, and catalase, CuZn-SOD, and GPx enzyme expressions but positively with Si and TBARS levels and TNFα expression. Two components of the principal component analysis (PCA) explained 71.2% of total data variance (p beer administration.

  17. Understanding the nature of the manganese hot dip phosphatizing process of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado M, G.; Fuentes A, J. C.; Salinas R, A.; Rodriguez V, F. J., E-mail: juan.fuentes@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Parque Industrial Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the phosphatizing process of steel is investigated using open circuit potential and Tafel curves as well as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results reveal that a ph of 2.57 in the phosphatizing solution promotes the dissociation of phosphoric acid which assist the formation of the manganese tertiary salt (Mn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}), which is deposited on the substrate. It was also observed that an increase in the temperature from 25 to 90 C and the presence of HNO{sub 3} as catalysts enhances the manganese phosphatizing kinetics. On the other hand, the generation of iron phosphates and oxides is predominant at a ph of 1 and 90 C. These observations are supported by species distribution and Pourbaix thermodynamic diagrams. (Author)

  18. Understanding the nature of the manganese hot dip phosphatizing process of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado M, G.; Fuentes A, J. C.; Salinas R, A.; Rodriguez V, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the phosphatizing process of steel is investigated using open circuit potential and Tafel curves as well as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results reveal that a ph of 2.57 in the phosphatizing solution promotes the dissociation of phosphoric acid which assist the formation of the manganese tertiary salt (Mn 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ), which is deposited on the substrate. It was also observed that an increase in the temperature from 25 to 90 C and the presence of HNO 3 as catalysts enhances the manganese phosphatizing kinetics. On the other hand, the generation of iron phosphates and oxides is predominant at a ph of 1 and 90 C. These observations are supported by species distribution and Pourbaix thermodynamic diagrams. (Author)

  19. Determinação rápida de alumínio em plantas Rapid determination of aluminum in plant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Romano Gallo

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available Um método rápido e sensível espectrofotométrico de determinação do sistema alumínio-hematoxilina pode ser usado para se conhecer o teor de alumínio em tecidos de plantas. Êste trabalho descreve o método analítico com modificações introduzidos, estuda as interferências e inclui sua adaptação para plantas. Depois do incineração do material orgânico, o alumínio é dosado usualmente numa alíquota do extrato de cinzas equivalente a 0,005 a 0,020 g de material sêco. A côr é obtida em condições controladas de pH com solução buffer de acetato e alcalinização com carbonato de amônio. No processo podem ser determinadas, rapidamente, pequenas quantidades de alumínio, sem interferência de outros elementos, nos concentrações que usualmente ocorrem nas plantas.A procedure is described for the spectrophotometric determination of aluminum in ash extracts of plant tissue using the organic dye hematoxylin, without removal of iron. It has been devised by modifying and incorporating previously published procedures for water and uranium materials. The proposed method provides a rapid determination of small amounts of aluminum up to 5 micrograms, with a recovery error smaller than ±5 per cent, as tested for several plant materials. Manganese, copper, molybdenum, vanadium, cobalt, and chromium in quantities usually encountered in plant tissue do not interfere with the method.

  20. Leaching of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by electro-reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an improved process for leaching manganese from electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) by electro-reduction was developed. The mechanisms of the electro-reduction leaching were investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and Brunauer Emmett Teller. The results show that the electric field could change the surface charge distribution of EMR particles, and the high-valent manganese can be reduced by electric field. The leaching efficient of manganese reached 84.1% under the optimal leaching condition: 9.2 wt% H 2 SO 4 , current density of 25 mA/cm 2 , solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5, and leaching time for 1 h. It is 37.9% higher than that attained without an electric field. Meanwhile, the manganese content in EMR decreased from 2.57% to 0.48%.

  1. Effect of manganese on neonatal rat: manganese concentration and enzymatic alterations in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, P K; Husain, R; Mushtaq, M; Chandra, S V

    1977-01-01

    Suckling rats were exposed for 15 and 30 days to manganese through the milk of nursing dams receiving 15 mg MnCl/sub 2/.4H/sub 2/O/kg/day orally and after which the neurological manifestations of metal poisoning were studied. No significant differences in the growth rate, developmental landmarks and walking movements were observed between the control and manganese-exposed pups. The metal concentration was significantly increased in the brain of manganese-fed pups at 15 days and exhibited a further three-fold increase over the control, at 30 days. The accumulation of the metal in the brain of manganese-exposed nursing dams was comparatively much less. A significant decrease in succinic dehydrogenase, adenosine triphosphatase, adenosine deaminase, acetylcholine esterase and an increase in monoamine oxidase activity was observed in the brain of experimental pups and dams. The results suggest that the developing brain may also be susceptible to manganese.

  2. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  3. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  4. Aluminum concentration in hydrangeas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagawa, M.; Haruyama, Y.; Saito, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have been trying to measure concentration of aluminum in Ajisai, Hydrangea macrophylla for these days. But due to bad luck, we have encountered detector trouble for two years in a low. Thus, we have few data to analyze and obtained quite limited results. (author)

  5. Iron-ore resources of the United States including Alaska and Puerto Rico, 1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Martha S.; Dutton, Carl E.

    1959-01-01

    The importance of iron ore, the basic raw material of steel, as a fundamental mineral, resource is shown by the fact that about 100 million long tons of steel is used annually in the economy of the United States, as compared with a combined total of about 5 million long tons of copper, lead, zinc, and aluminum. Satisfying this annual demand for steel requires about 110 million tons of iron ore and 70 million tons of scrap iron and steel. The average annual consumption of iron ore in the United States from 1951 to 1955, inclusive, was about 110 million long tons, which is about twice the annual average from 1900 to 1930. Production of iron ore in the United States in this 5-year period averaged approximately 100 million long tons annually, divided by regions as follows (in percent): Lake Superior, 84.1; southeastern, 6.7; western, 6.7; northeastern, 1.4; and central and gulf, 1.1. Mining of iron ore began in the American Colonies about 1619, and for 225 years it was limited to eastern United States where fuel and markets were readily available. Production of iron ore from the Lake Superior region began in 1846; the region became the leading domestic source by 1890, and the Mesabi range in Minnesota has been the world's most productive area since 1896. Proximity of raw materials, water transportation, and markets has resulted in centralization of the country's iron and steel industry in the lower Great Lakes area. Increased imports of iron ore being delivered to eastern United States as well as demands for steel in nearby markets have given impetus to expansion in the steel-making capacity in this area. The four chief iron-ore minerals - hematite, liminite, magnetite, and siderite - are widely distributed but only locally form deposits of sufficient tonnage and grade to be commercially valuable at the present time. The iron content of these minerals, of which hematite is the most important, ranges from 48 percent in siderite to 72 percent in magnetite, but as these

  6. Old age and gender influence the pharmacokinetics of inhaled manganese sulfate and manganese phosphate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, David C.; McManus, Brian E.; Marshall, Marianne W.; James, R. Arden; Struve, Melanie F.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether gender or age influences the pharmacokinetics of manganese sulfate (MnSO 4 ) or manganese phosphate (as the mineral form hureaulite). Young male and female rats and aged male rats (16 months old) were exposed 6 h day -1 for 5 days week -1 to air, MnSO 4 (at 0.01, 0.1, or 0.5 mg Mn m -3 ), or hureaulite (0.1 mg Mn m -3 ). Tissue manganese concentrations were determined in all groups at the end of the 90-day exposure and 45 days later. Tissue manganese concentrations were also determined in young male rats following 32 exposure days and 91 days after the 90-day exposure. Intravenous 54 Mn tracer studies were also performed in all groups immediately after the 90-day inhalation to assess whole-body manganese clearance rates. Gender and age did not affect manganese delivery to the striatum, a known target site for neurotoxicity in humans, but did influence manganese concentrations in other tissues. End-of-exposure olfactory bulb, lung, and blood manganese concentrations were higher in young male rats than in female or aged male rats and may reflect a portal-of-entry effect. Old male rats had higher testis but lower pancreas manganese concentrations when compared with young males. Young male and female rats exposed to MnSO 4 at 0.5 mg Mn m -3 had increased 54 Mn clearance rates when compared with air-exposed controls, while senescent males did not develop higher 54 Mn clearance rates. Data from this study should prove useful in developing dosimetry models for manganese that consider age or gender as potential sensitivity factors

  7. Loss of hfe function reverses impaired recognition memory caused by olfactory manganese exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-03-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) in the brain promotes a variety of abnormal behaviors, including memory deficits, decreased motor skills and psychotic behavior resembling Parkinson's disease. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a prevalent genetic iron overload disorder worldwide. Dysfunction in HFE gene is the major cause of HH. Our previous study has demonstrated that olfactory Mn uptake is altered by HFE deficiency, suggesting that loss of HFE function could alter manganese-associated neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, Hfe-knockout (Hfe (-/-)) and wild-type (Hfe (+/+)) mice mice were intranasally-instilled with manganese chloride (MnCl2 5 mg/kg) or water daily for 3 weeks and examined for memory function. Olfactory Mn diminished both short-term recognition and spatial memory in Hfe (+/+) mice, as examined by novel object recognition task and Barnes maze test, respectively. Interestingly, Hfe (-/-) mice did not show impaired recognition memory caused by Mn exposure, suggesting a potential protective effect of Hfe deficiency against Mn-induced memory deficits. Since many of the neurotoxic effects of manganese are thought to result from increased oxidative stress, we quantified activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Mn instillation decreased superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity in Hfe (+/+) mice, but not in Hfe (-/-) mice. In addition, Hfe deficiency up-regulated SOD1 and glutathione peroxidase activities. These results suggest a beneficial role of Hfe deficiency in attenuating Mn-induced oxidative stress in the PFC. Furthermore, Mn exposure reduced nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in the PFC, indicating that blunted acetylcholine signaling could contribute to impaired memory associated with intranasal manganese. Together, our model suggests that disrupted cholinergic system in the brain is involved in airborne Mn-induced memory deficits and loss of HFE function could in part prevent memory loss via a potential up-regulation of

  8. Effect of manganese and zinc on the growth of Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, L.H.; Lustigman, B.; Dandorf, D. (Montclair State College, Upper Montclair, NJ (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Anacystis nidulans is a unicellular member of the cyanobacteria, one of the largest groups of the Kingdom Monera. It is similar to other bacteria in the structure and chemistry of the cell wall, and its cell division and genetic recombination. Photoautotrophy is the main mode of nutrition and the photosynthetic apparatus is similar to that of other cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are excellent organisms to serve as environmental pollution indicators for the investigation of a wide variety of biological problems. There have been several studies on the effects of heavy metals on A. nidulans. Some of these elements, such as manganese, are known to be essential nutrients for cyanobacteria. Others, such as cadmium, are not known to be necessary for normal growth and metabolism. Large amounts of either essential or non-essential elements can be toxic. Manganese and zinc are essential elements for all living organisms. Manganese is a cofactor for a number of different enzymatic reactions particularly those involved in phosphorylation. Iron deficiency induced by a number of metals, cobalt and manganese in particular, inhibit chlorophyll biosynthesis. Zinc deficiency affects early mitotic events and the cells are large and aberrant in appearance. Light is essential for cells to take in zinc. As an industrial contaminant, zinc has been found to block photosynthesis by causing structural damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. In the presence of various pH ranges, high zinc concentrations can be associated with low pH. It has been indicated that pH value and EDTA (Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid) have an influence on the effect of some metals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of manganese and zinc on the growth of Anacystis nidulans, with and without EDTA.

  9. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  10. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  11. Determination of the content of aluminium, manganese, fluorine, lead and cadmium in water for human consumption in a sector of Santa Barbara of Heredia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Sanchez, F.

    1995-01-01

    This study developed an analytical procedure dependable and precise, for the determination of manganese and aluminum by means of the technique of Atomic Emission with Plasma Fountain Coupled Inductively (Icp-Aes), and applied to the water that they supply to a sector of the community of Santa Barbara of Heredia. For the determination of aluminum and manganese, the samples showed that they don't need any prior mineralization or preconcentration processing, for which the analysis is rapid and economic. It determined the concentrations of lead and cadmium in the samples, by means of the volt amperometric method of Anodic Spoils with Differential Pulse, and the technique of standard addition for the quantization of the samples. It also determined the concentrations of fluorine by the colorimetric method of SPANDS. (author) [es

  12. Study on Friction and Wear Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy Hydraulic Valve Body and Its Antiwear Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order for the working status of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body to be controlled in actual conditions, a new friction and wear design device was designed for the cast iron and aluminum alloyed valve bodies comparison under the same conditions. The results displayed that: (1 The oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body was higher than the corresponding oil leakage of the iron body during the initial running stage. Besides during a later running stage, the oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed body was lower than corresponding oil leakage of the iron body; (2 The actual oil leakage of different materials consisted of two parts: the foundation leakage that was the leakage of the valve without wear and wear leakage that was caused by the worn valve body; (3 The aluminum alloyed valve could rely on the dust filling furrow and melting mechanism that led the body surface to retain dynamic balance, resulting in the valve leakage preservation at a low level. The aluminum alloy modified valve body can meet the requirements of hydraulic leakage under pressure, possibly constituting this alloy suitable for hydraulic valve body manufacturing.

  13. Aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, S.; Mikami, K.; Yamada, K.

    1980-01-01

    An aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance, which consists essentially of, in weight percentage: zinc - 0.3 to 3.0%, magnesium - 0.2 to 4.0%, manganese - 0.3 to 2.0%, and, the balance aluminum and incidental impurities; said alloy including an aluminum alloy also containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of, in weight percentage: indium - 0.005 to 0.2%, tin - 0.01 to 0.3%, and, bismuth - 0.01 to 0.3%; provided that the total content of indium, tin and bismuth being up to 0.3%

  14. Photogeochemical reactions of manganese under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Yee, N.; Piotrowiak, P.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Photogeochemistry describes reactions involving light and naturally occurring chemical species. These reactions often involve a photo-induced electron transfer that does not occur in the absence of light. Although photogeochemical reactions have been known for decades, they are often ignored in geochemical models. In particular, reactions caused by UV radiation during an ozone free early Earth could have influenced the available oxidation states of manganese. Manganese is one of the most abundant transition metals in the crust and is important in both biology and geology. For example, the presence of manganese (VI) oxides in the geologic record has been used as a proxy for oxygenic photosynthesis; however, we suggest that the high oxidation state of Mn can be produced abiotically by photochemical reactions. Aqueous solutions of manganese (II) as well as suspensions of rhodochrosite (MnCO3) were irradiated under anoxic condition using a 450 W mercury lamp and custom built quartz reaction vessels. The photoreaction of the homogeneous solution of Mn(II) produced H2 gas and akhtenskite (ɛ-MnO2) as the solid product . This product is different than the previously identified birnessite. The irradiation of rhodochrosite suspensions also produced H2 gas and resulted in both a spectral shift as well as morphology changes of the mineral particles in the SEM images. These reactions offer alternative, abiotic pathways for the formation of manganese oxides.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  16. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  17. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional

  18. Investigation into iron moessbauer atom state in a deformed iron-manganese alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mints, R.I.; Semenkin, V.A.; Shevchenko, Yu.A.

    1977-01-01

    A plastically deformed Fe + 12 at. %. Mn alloy was investigated by the method of nuclear gamma-resonance on Fe 57 nuclei. The specimens were deformed by 5 to 57 %. The obtained nuclear gamma-resonance spectra, which are a superposition of the paramagnetic single line (ν-phase) and the Zeeman splitting line (α-phase), were statistically processed with the aid of a computer. The behaviour of the values of Moessbauer parameters possessing a least dispersion, such as isomer chemical shift, quadrupolar reaction constant, effectiveness of magnetic field and of area of the nuclear gamma-resonance spectrum, points to their connection with the degree of the deformation disintegration of the initial solid solution

  19. Criticality of iron and its principal alloying elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Philip; Harper, E M; Nassar, N T; Reck, Barbara K; Graedel, T E

    2014-04-01

    Because modern technology depends on reliable supplies of a wide variety of materials and because of increasing concern about those supplies, a comprehensive methodology was created to quantify the degree of criticality of the metals of the periodic table. In this paper, we apply this methodology to iron and several of its main alloying elements (i.e., vanadium, chromium, manganese, and niobium). These elements represent the basic metals of any industrial society and are vital for national security and economic well-being. Assessments relating to the dimensions of criticality - supply risk, vulnerability to supply restriction, and environmental implications - for 2008 are made on the global level and for the United States. Evaluations of each of the multiple indicators are presented, with aggregate results plotted in "criticality space", together with Monte Carlo simulation-derived "uncertainty cloud" estimates. Iron has the lowest supply risk, primarily because of its widespread geological occurrence. Vanadium displays the highest cradle-to-gate environmental implications, followed by niobium, chromium, manganese, and iron. Chromium and manganese, both essential in steel making, display the highest vulnerability to supply restriction, largely because substitution or substitution at equal performance is not possible for all end-uses. From a comprehensive perspective, we regard the overall criticality as low for iron and modest for the alloying elements we evaluated.

  20. Aluminum and bone: Review of new clinical circumstances associated with Al(3+) deposition in the calcified matrix of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappard, D; Bizot, P; Mabilleau, G; Hubert, L

    2016-06-01

    Several decades ago, aluminum encephalopathy associated with osteomalacia has been recognized as the major complication of chronic renal failure in dialyzed patients. Removal of aluminum from the dialysate has led to a disappearance of the disease. However, aluminum deposit occurs in the hydroxyapatite of the bone matrix in some clinical circumstances that are presented in this review. We have encountered aluminum in bone in patients with an increased intestinal permeability (coeliac disease), or in the case of prolonged administration of aluminum anti-acid drugs. A colocalisation of aluminum with iron was also noted in cases of hemochromatosis and sickle cell anemia. Aluminium was also identified in a series of patients with exostosis, a frequent benign bone tumor. Corrosion of prosthetic implants composed of grade V titanium (TA6V is an alloy containing 6% aluminum and 4% vanadium) was also observed in a series of hip or knee revisions. Aluminum can be identified in undecalcified bone matrix stained by solochrome azurine, a highly specific stain allowing the detection of 0.03 atomic %. Colocalization of aluminum and iron does not seem to be the fruit of chance but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Histochemistry is superior to spectroscopic analyses (EDS and WDS in scanning electron microscopy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  2. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  3. A novel process for recovery of iron, titanium, and vanadium from titanomagnetite concentrates: NaOH molten salt roasting and water leaching processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Desheng; Zhao, Longsheng; Liu, Yahui; Qi, Tao; Wang, Jianchong; Wang, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The conversion of titanium is 96.6% in the rich titanium–vanadium slag. ► MgTi 2 O 5 and M 3 O 5 (M = Ti, Mg, Fe) were converted to Na 2 TiO 3 and NaMO 2 , respectively. ► Na 2 TiO 3 is converted to undefined structure of H 2 TiO 3 . ► NaMO 2 is converted to α-NaFeO 2 -type structure of HMO 2 . ► 87.3% of sodium, 42.3% of silicon, 43.2% of aluminum, 22.8% of manganese and 96.6% of vanadium were leached out. -- Abstract: A novel process for recovering iron, titanium, and vanadium from titanomagnetite concentrates has been developed. In the present paper, the treatment of rich titanium–vanadium slag by NaOH molten salt roasting and water leaching processes is investigated. In the NaOH molten salt roasting process, the metallic iron is oxidized into ferriferous oxide, MgTi 2 O 5 is converted to NaCl-type structure of Na 2 TiO 3 , and M 3 O 5 (M = Ti, Mg, Fe) is converted to α-NaFeO 2 -type structure of NaMO 2 , respectively. Roasting temperature and NaOH–slag mass ratio played a considerable role in the conversion of titanium in the rich titanium–vanadium slag during the NaOH molten salt roasting process. Roasting at 500 °C for 60 min and a 1:1 NaOH–slag mass ratio produces 96.3% titanium conversion. In the water leaching process, the Na + was exchanged with H + , Na 2 TiO 3 is converted to undefined structure of H 2 TiO 3 , and NaMO 2 is converted to α-NaFeO 2 -type structure of HMO 2 . Under the optimal conditions, 87.3% of the sodium, 42.3% of the silicon, 43.2% of the aluminum, 22.8% of the manganese, and 96.6% of the vanadium are leached out

  4. W-containing oxide layers obtained on aluminum and titanium by PEO as catalysts in thiophene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnev, V. S.; Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Vasilyeva, M. S.; Morozova, V. P.; Zelikman, V. M.; Tarkhanova, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    W-containing oxide layers fabricated on titanium and aluminum alloys by Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) have been tested in the reaction of the peroxide oxidation of thiophene. Samples with two types of coatings have been investigated. Coatings I contained tungsten oxide in the matrix and on the surface of amorphous silica-titania or silica-alumina layers, while coatings II comprised crystalline WO3 and/or Al2(WO4)3. Aluminum-supported catalyst containing a smallest amount of transition metals in the form of tungsten oxides and manganese oxides in low oxidation levels showed high activity and stability.

  5. High Manganese Tolerance and Biooxidation Ability of Serratia marcescens Isolated from Manganese Mine Water in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália R. Barboza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is an important metal for the maintenance of several biological functions, but it can be toxic in high concentrations. One of the main forms of human exposure to metals, such as manganese (Mn, is the consumption of solar salt contaminated. Mn-tolerant bacteria could be used to decrease the concentration of this metal from contaminated sites through safer environmental-friendly alternative technology in the future. Therefore, this study was undertaken to isolate and identify Mn resistant bacteria from water samples collected from a Mn mine in the Iron Quadrangle region (Minas Gerais, Brazil. Two bacterial isolates were identified as Serratia marcescens based on morphological, biochemical, 16S rDNA gene sequencing and phylogeny analysis. Maximum resistance of the selected isolates against increasing concentrations of Mn(II, up to 1200 mg L-1 was determined in solid media. A batch assay was developed to analyze and quantify the Mn removal capacities of the isolates. Biological Mn removal capacities of over 55% were detected for both isolates. Whereas that mechanism like biosorption, precipitation and oxidation could be explaining the Mn removal, we seek to give an insight into some of the molecular mechanisms adopted by S. marcescens isolates. For this purpose, the following approaches were adopted: leucoberbelin blue I assay, Mn(II oxidation by cell-free filtrate and electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses. Overall, these results indicate that S. marcescens promotes Mn removal in an indirect mechanism by the formation of Mn oxides precipitates around the cells, which should be further explored for potential biotechnological applications for water recycling both in hydrometallurgical and mineral processing operations.

  6. Manganese phospate physical chemistry and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera R, N.; Romero G, E. T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the manganese phosphate (III) synthesis (MnP0 4 H 2 0) from manganese chloride. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The surface characterization is obtained through the determination of surface area, point of zero charge and kinetics of moisture. As a phosphate compound of a metal with low oxidation state is a promising compound for removal pollutants from water and soil, can be used for the potential construction of containment barriers for radioactive wastes. (Author)

  7. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  8. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  9. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki [Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshio [The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 – 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  10. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum. It...

  11. Effect of manganese on neonatal rat: manganese distribution in vital organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, R; Mushtaq, M; Seth, P K; Chandra, S V

    1976-01-01

    At present very little is known about the effect of manganese on the early stage of life, though the metal poisoning in adult humans and experimental animals has been known for quite some time. The possibility of the exposure of the general public to the deleterious effects of the metal through the environmental contamination resulting from its increasing industrial applications, and the use of Methyl Cyclopentadienyl Manganese Tricarbonyl (MMT) in gasoline and motor fuel, points to the need for such an information. Our recent studies in this direction have shown that manganese exposed nursing dams can transfer significant amounts of the metal via maternal milk of their sucklings and the brain of the latter exhibited marked enzymatic alterations. The present communication deals with the distribution of manganese in the vital organs of rat pups nursing on mothers receiving the metal orally.

  12. Natural radioactivity in iron and steel materials by low-level gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, G.; Tanase, Maria

    2003-01-01

    High resolution low-level gamma spectrometry was applied to perform a radioactivity measurement in iron and steel raw materials (coal, coke, iron ore, pellets, manganese ore, limestone, dolomite), auxiliary materials (scorialite, oxide of Ti, bentonite), and some related final products (cast iron, slag, blast-furnace, flue dust) involved in iron making processing. We control the activity of materials in various kinds of samples and we investigate for transfer of radioactivity during the blast-furnace process. Artificial radioisotopes are rarely encountered. (authors)

  13. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  14. The distribution of uranium in some Pacific manganese nodules and crusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzendorf, H.; Glasby, G.P.; Plueger, W.L.; Friedrich, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 1386 bulk samples of manganese nodules from several areas of the North and South Pacific were analysed for uranium; variations in the U contents of nodules within individual nodules and crusts have been documented on a local scale and on a regional scale. Uranium appears to be one of those elements not associated with the biogenic cycling of elements into nodules in the equatorial high-productivity zone. The principal factor controlling these variations appears to be the clear association of U with Fe in the nodules. Uranium is therefore most probably coprecipitated with Fe from seawater in an iron-rich ferromanganese oxide phase. This explains the higher U contents of nodules containing MnO 2 compared to 10A manganite as the principal manganese oxide phase. Data for a manganese crust from the equatorial North Pacific nodule belt suggest normal seawater deposition for uranium and other metals (Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu) superimposed on possibly basalt alteration as the principal growth mechanisms for the crust. (Auth.)

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of Manganese and Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    This work reviews and discusses the data on the various thermodynamic properties of manganese and molybdenum available through March 1985. These include heat capacity, enthalpy, enthalpy of transitions and melting, vapor pressure, and enthalpy of vaporization. The existing data have been critically evaluated and analyzed. The recommended values for the heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy function from 0.5 to 2400 K for manganese and from 0.4 to 5000 K for molybdenum have been generated, as have heat capacity values for supercooled β-Mn and for γ-Mn below 298.15 K. The recommended values for vapor pressure cover the temperature range from 298.15 to 2400 K for manganese and from 298.15 to 5000 K for molybdenum. These values are referred to temperatures based on IPTS-1968. The uncertainties in the recommended values of the heat capacity range from +-3% to +-5% for manganese and from +-1.5% to +-3% for molybdenum

  16. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ... and its esters are important intermediates in syntheses of vitamins B1 and B6, barbitu- ... been a subject of interest because of the importance of such interactions in a ... The d-values of the Bragg peaks in the XRD. Figure 1. (a) Manganese ...

  17. Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jiwei [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Nanfang [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan (China)

    2013-11-15

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building material due to some contaminants such as soluble manganese, ammonia nitrogen and other toxic substances. To immobilize the contaminants and reduce their release into the environment, treating EMR using alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia was investigated. The physical and chemical characteristics of the original EMR were characterized by XRFS, XRD, and SEM. Leaching test of the original EMR shows that the risks to the environment are the high content of soluble manganese and ammonia nitrogen. The influence of various alkaline additives, solidifying reaction time, and other solidifying reaction conditions such as outdoor ventilation and sunlight, and rain flow on the efficiencies of Mn{sup 2+} solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal was investigated. The results show that with mass ratio of CaO to residue 1 : 8, when the solidifying reaction was carried out indoors for 4 h with no rain flow, the highest efficiencies of Mn{sup 2+} solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal (99.98% and 99.21%) are obtained. Leaching test shows that the concentration and emission of manganese and ammonia nitrogen of the treated EMR meets the requirements of the Chinese government legislation (GB8978-1996)

  18. Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jiwei; Wang, Nanfang

    2013-01-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building material due to some contaminants such as soluble manganese, ammonia nitrogen and other toxic substances. To immobilize the contaminants and reduce their release into the environment, treating EMR using alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia was investigated. The physical and chemical characteristics of the original EMR were characterized by XRFS, XRD, and SEM. Leaching test of the original EMR shows that the risks to the environment are the high content of soluble manganese and ammonia nitrogen. The influence of various alkaline additives, solidifying reaction time, and other solidifying reaction conditions such as outdoor ventilation and sunlight, and rain flow on the efficiencies of Mn"2"+ solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal was investigated. The results show that with mass ratio of CaO to residue 1 : 8, when the solidifying reaction was carried out indoors for 4 h with no rain flow, the highest efficiencies of Mn"2"+ solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal (99.98% and 99.21%) are obtained. Leaching test shows that the concentration and emission of manganese and ammonia nitrogen of the treated EMR meets the requirements of the Chinese government legislation (GB8978-1996)

  19. Effect of Hfe Deficiency on Memory Capacity and Motor Coordination after Manganese Exposure by Drinking Water in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-12-01

    Excess manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic. Increased manganese stores in the brain are associated with a number of behavioral problems, including motor dysfunction, memory loss and psychiatric disorders. We previously showed that the transport and neurotoxicity of manganese after intranasal instillation of the metal are altered in Hfe-deficient mice, a mouse model of the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). However, it is not fully understood whether loss of Hfe function modifies Mn neurotoxicity after ingestion. To investigate the role of Hfe in oral Mn toxicity, we exposed Hfe-knockout (Hfe (-/-)) and their control wild-type (Hfe (+/+)) mice to MnCl2 in drinking water (5 mg/mL) for 5 weeks. Motor coordination and spatial memory capacity were determined by the rotarod test and the Barnes maze test, respectively. Brain and liver metal levels were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared with the water-drinking group, mice drinking Mn significantly increased Mn concentrations in the liver and brain of both genotypes. Mn exposure decreased iron levels in the liver, but not in the brain. Neither Mn nor Hfe deficiency altered tissue concentrations of copper or zinc. The rotarod test showed that Mn exposure decreased motor skills in Hfe (+/+) mice, but not in Hfe (-/-) mice (p = 0.023). In the Barns maze test, latency to find the target hole was not altered in Mn-exposed Hfe (+/+) compared with water-drinking Hfe (+/+) mice. However, Mn-exposed Hfe (-/-) mice spent more time to find the target hole than Mn-drinking Hfe (+/+) mice (p = 0.028). These data indicate that loss of Hfe function impairs spatial memory upon Mn exposure in drinking water. Our results suggest that individuals with hemochromatosis could be more vulnerable to memory deficits induced by Mn ingestion from our environment. The pathophysiological role of HFE in manganese neurotoxicity should be carefully examined in patients with HFE-associated hemochromatosis and

  20. SYNTHESIS, STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF POTASSIUMALUMINA- BORATE GLASS WITH NANOCRYSTALS OF MANGANESE FERRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Sobolev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents research results of optical properties of potassium-alumina-borate glass, activated with ions of iron and manganese. The formation process of nanocrystals of manganese ferrite MnFe2O4 in potassium-alumina-borate glass host was studied. Magneto-optical characteristics were analyzed. Method. The studied glasses were synthesized by the method of charge melting in the crucible. Potassium-alumina-borate glass system was used (K2O-Al2O3-B2O3 proposed by S.A. Stepanov (Vavilov State Institute. Glass system was doped by 3 wt% of Fe2O3 and 2 wt% MnO by weight (composition 1 and 2 wt% Fe2O3 and 1 wt% MnO by weight (composition 2. The glass transition temperature was 430 °C. Segregating of the crystal phase of manganese ferrite MnFe2O4 occurred during heat treatment at 550 °C for 2 hours in a programmable muffle furnace. The absorption spectrum in the wavelength range 200-2000 nm was recorded with Perkin Elmer Lambda 650 and Varian Cary 500 spectrophotometers. The XRD patterns were obtained on Rigaku Ultima IV X-ray diffractometer by copper anode with a wavelength λ (Cu = 0.15418 nm. Magneto-optical Verde constant was measured by the angle of polarization plane rotation of the passing light through the sample when the sample is placed in magnetic field. Main Results. New technological modes of potassium-alumina-borate glass synthesis doped with ions of iron and manganese were developed and studied. It is established that during heat treatment nanocrystals of manganese ferrites are evolved with an average size of 18 nm. These glasses have a Verde constant equal to 0.9 arc.min/(cm·Oe. It is shown that obtained glasses possess high absorbance in ultra-violet and visible light spectrum. Practical Relevance. Proposed and analyzed nanoglass-ceramics could be accepted as a basis for creation of sensing environments for sensors current and magnetic field and for creation of optical isolators based on the Faraday effect.

  1. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  2. Mutations in sit B and sit D genes affect manganese-growth requirements in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platero, Raúl A; Jaureguy, Melina; Battistoni, Federico J; Fabiano, Elena R

    2003-01-21

    Two transposon-induced mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 242 were isolated based on their inability to grow on rich medium supplemented with the metal chelator ethylenediamine di-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and either heme-compounds or siderophores as iron sources. Tagged loci of these mutants were identified as sit B and sit D genes. These genes encode components of an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) metal-type permease in several Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, the phenotypes of these two mutants were compared with those of two siderophore-mediated iron transport mutants. The results strongly implicate a role of the sit genes in manganese acquisition when this metal is limiting in S. meliloti.

  3. Applied Electrochemistry of Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Qiu, Zhuxian

    Electrochemistry of aluminum is of special importance from both theoretical and technological point of view. It covers a wide range of electrolyte systems from molten fluoride melts at around 1000oC to room temperature molten salts, from aqueous to various organic media and from liquid to solid...... electrolytes. The book is an updated review of the technological advances in the fields of electrolytic production and refining of metals, electroplating, anodizing and other electrochemical surface treatments, primary and secondary batteries, electrolytic capacitors; corrosion and protection and others....

  4. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  5. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-Al-C Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-04-01

    To assist developments of the continuous-casting technology of Fe-Mn-Al-C steels, the solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-Al-C steel ingots with different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by FactSage (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is the highest, whereas the thermal conductivity of the 8Mn steel is slightly higher than that of the 17Mn steel. Increasing the manganese content promotes a columnar solidification structure and coarse grains in steel. With the increase of manganese content, the mass fraction of austenite phase is increased. Finally, a single austenite phase is formed in the 17Mn steel. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.3 × 10-5 to 2.3 × 10-5 K-1, and these values increase with the increase of manganese content. The ductility of the 17Mn steel and the 8Mn steel are higher than 40 pct in the temperature range from 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C), and the cracking during the straightening operation should be avoided. However, the ductility of the 0Mn steel is lower than 40 pct at 973 K and 1123 K (700 °C and 850 °C), which indicates that the temperature of the straightening operation during the continuous-casting process should be above 1173 K (900 °C). Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the δ-ferrite phase region and α-ferrite phase region. At the 2.1 mass pct aluminum level, the precipitate temperature of AlN is high. Thus, the formed AlN is too coarse to deteriorate the hot ductility of steel.

  6. Helium trapping in aluminum and sintered aluminum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Rossing, T.

    1975-01-01

    The surface erosion of annealed aluminum and of sintered aluminum powder (SAP) due to blistering from implantation of 100-keV 4 He + ions at room temperature has been investigated. A substantial reduction in the blistering erosion rate in SAP was observed from that in pure annealed aluminum. In order to determine whether the observed reduction in blistering is due to enhanced helium trapping or due to helium released, the implanted helium profiles in annealed aluminum and in SAP have been studied by Rutherford backscattering. The results show that more helium is trapped in SAP than in aluminum for identical irradiation conditions. The observed reduction in erosion from helium blistering in SAP is more likely due to the dispersion of trapped helium at the large Al-Al 2 O 3 interfaces and at the large grain boundaries in SAP than to helium release

  7. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  8. [Aluminum dissolution and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of copper by aggregates of paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Dao-Yuan; Qin, Chao; Li, Yu-Jiao; Dong, Chang-Xun

    2014-01-01

    Size fractions of soil aggregates in Lake Tai region were collected by the low-energy ultrasonic dispersion and the freeze-desiccation methods. The dissolution of aluminum and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of Cu2+ and changes of the dissolution of aluminum at different pH in the solution of Cu2+ by aggregates were studied by the equilibrium sorption method. The results showed that in the process of Cu2+ sorption by aggregates, the aluminum was dissoluted and the pH decreased. The elution amount of aluminum and the decrease of pH changed with the sorption of Cu2+, both increasing with the increase of Cu2+ sorption. Under the same conditions, the dissolution of aluminum and the decrease of pH were in the order of coarse silt fraction > silt fraction > sand fraction > clay fraction, which was negatively correlated with the amount of iron oxide, aluminum and organic matter. It suggested that iron oxide, aluminum and organic matters had inhibitory and buffering effect on the aluminum dissolution and the decrease of pH during the sorption of Cu2+.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  11. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  19. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  2. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  3. Microstructural Effects of Multiple Passes during Friction Stir Processing of Nickel Aluminum Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    various tool steel compositions for use with aluminum, and materials such as Densimet®, a tungsten-iron composite. Additionally, various other...mixture of martensite or bainite in which Widmanstätten α ahs also formed. These features likely reflect the effect of the tool shoulder as it pulls base

  4. Melhoramento do trigo: XXX. Avaliação de linhagens com tolerância a toxicidade de alumínio, manganês e ferro em condições de campo Wheat breeding: XXX. Evaluation of inbred lines tolerant to aluminum, manganese and iron toxicities under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Oliveira Camargo

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Compararam-se 23 linhagens tolerantes, ao mesmo tempo, à toxicidade de Al3+ Mn2+ e Fe2+, provindas do cruzamento entre 'BH-1146' (tolerante à toxicidade de A1(3+ e sensível à de Mn2+ e Fe2+ e 'Siete Cerros' (sensível à toxicidade de A1(3+ e tolerante à de Mn2+ e Fe2+ e os dois cultivares utilizados como pais em quatro ensaios instalados nas Estações Experimentais de Itararé (1990-92 e de Capão Bonito (1992, em solos ácidos, e em cinco ensaios realizados no Centro Experimental de Campinas (1990-92 e na Fazenda Santa Lúcia (1990-91, município de Cruzália, em solos corrigidos, analisando os seguintes parâmetros: rendimento de grãos, características agronômicas e resistência às doenças. Em solos ácidos, vinte linhagens e o 'BH-1146' mostraram maior rendimento de grãos em relação ao 'Siete Cerros' indicando que a toxicidade de alumínio foi um dos principais fatores limitantes à produção. Em solos corrigidos, não se verificaram diferenças significativas entre os genótipos estudados quanto ao rendimento de grãos, mostrando não haver urna associação entre baixa produtividade e tolerância ao A1(3+ nessas condições. A linhagem 21 foi moderadamente resistente ao agente causal de oídio em condições naturais de infecção. Todos os genótipos avaliados revelaram suscetibilidade aos agentes causais das manchas foliares. O 'Siete Cerros' e as linhagens 3 a 12 apresentaram porte baixo associado à menor porcentagem de acamamento; as 13, 14 e 23 mostraram espigas compridas; a 12, maior número de espiguetas e grãos por espiga, e a 17, grãos mais pesados, representando fontes genéticas de valor para essas características.Twenty three inbred lines showing at the same time tolerance to A1(3+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ toxicities, originated from the cross between 'BH-1146' (tolerant to Al3+ toxicity and sensitive to Mn2+ and Fe2+ toxicities and 'Siete Cerros' (sensitive to Al3+ and tolerant to Mn2+ and Fe2+ toxicities, and the two cultivars used as parents were evaluated in four trials carried out in acid soils, at Itararé (1990-92 and Capão Bonito (1992 Experimental Stations and in five trials carried out in limed soils, at Campinas (1990-92 Experimental Center and in a private farm located in Cruzália (1990-91. The following parameters were assessed: grain yield, agronomic characteristics and disease resistance. Twenty inbred lines and 'BH-1146' presented greater grain yield than 'Siete Cerros' in acid soils indicating that Al3+ toxicity was one of the main factors limiting yield. In limed soils, differences in yield were not observed, considering all studied genotypes, showing that no association between low yield and Al3+ tolerance was found in this condition. The line 21 was moderately resistant to powdery mildew. All studied genotypes presented susceptibility to the causal agents of leaf spots. 'Siete Cerros' and the lines 3 to 12 exhibited short stature associated with logding resistance; the lines 13, 14 and 23 showed long heads; the line 12, the highest number of spikelets and grains per spike; and the line 17, the heaviest grains. These genotypes represented, valuable genetic sources for these characteristics.

  5. Validity of manganese as a surrogate of heavy metals removal in constructed wetlands treating acidic mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, E.; Unz, R.F.; Hellier, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of manganese as a surrogate for heavy metal behavior in two wetland treatment systems receiving acidic coal mine drainage in central Pennsylvania was investigated. The use of manganese as an indicator is based on physical/chemical treatment processes quite different from wetland treatment. The treatment systems represented one anoxic, subsurface flow system and one oxic surface flow system. Water quality parameters measured included pH, alkalinity, acidity, and a suite of metals. Correlation and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the ability of a candidate predictor variable (indicator) to predict heavy metal concentrations and removal. The use of manganese as a predictor of effluent quality proved to be poor in both wetland treatment systems, as evidenced by low linear R 2 values and negative correlations. Zinc emerged as the best predictor of the detectable heavy metals at the anoxic wetland. Zinc exhibited positive strong linear correlations with copper, cobalt, and nickel (R 2 values of 0.843, 0.881, and 0.970, respectively). Effluent pH was a slightly better predictor of effluent copper levels in the anoxic wetland. Iron and cobalt effluent concentrations showed the only strong relationship (R 2 value = 0.778) in the oxic system. The lack of good correlations with manganese strongly challenges its appropriateness as a surrogate for heavy metals in these systems

  6. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al 3+ ) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe 3 ) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation

  7. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent remained elevated (10-2.4 to 10-1.7atm). The elevated PCO 2 maintained the pH within the system at values less than 7 and hence slowed the rate of Fe2+ oxidation compared to the aeration experiment. Kinetic models of Fe2+ oxidation that consider effects of pH and dissolved O2 were incorporated in the geochemical computer program PHREEQC to evaluate the effects of detention time, pH, and other variables on Fe2+ oxidation and removal rates. These models and the laboratory aeration experiment indicate that performance of this and other aerobic

  8. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: → Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. → The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. → Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  9. Manganese binding proteins in human and cow's milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerdal, B.; Keen, C.L.; Hurley, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Manganese nutrition in the neonatal period is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of information on the amount of manganese in infant foods and its bioavailability. Since the molecular localization of an element in foods is one determinant of its subsequent bioavailability, a study was made of the binding of manganese in human and cow's milk. An extrinsic label of 54 Mn was shown to equilibrate isotopically with native manganese in milks and formulas. Milk samples were separated into fat, casein and whey by ultracentrifugation. In human milk, the major part (71%) of manganese was found in whey, 11% in casein and 18% in the lipid fraction. In contrast, in cow's milk, 32% of total manganese was in whey, 67% in casein and 1% in lipid. Within the human whey fraction, most of the manganese was bound to lactoferrin, while in cow's whey, manganese was mostly complexed to ligands with molecular weights less than 200. The distribution of manganese in formulas was closer to that of human milk than of cow's milk. The bioavailability of manganese associated with lactoferrin, casein and low molecular weight complexes needs to be assessed

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  11. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.; Van Halem, Doris; Verberk, J. Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  12. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.

    2012-06-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  13. Association between colloidal iron, aluminum, phosphorus, and humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, J.; Chardon, W.J.; Japenga, J.

    1999-01-01

    In temperate regions a distinct part of phosphorus (P) in soils is associated with organic matter. Organic macromolecules can desorb from the soil matrix and, consequently, act as carriers for P in environments where it would otherwise be immobile, However, not all organic forms of P in soils have

  14. Antibacterial, Prooxidative and Genotoxic Activities of Gallic Acid and its Copper and Iron Complexes against Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    JONATHAN M. BARCELO; MILDIAMOND GUIEB; ANDERSON VENTURA; ARYZA NACINO; HERMINIA PINASEN; LEAH VIERNES; TRISHIA YODONG; BIANCA LOU ESTRADA; DANIEL VALDEZ; THRESHA BINWAG

    2014-01-01

    In this study, gallic acid and its complexes with aluminum and iron were investigated for their antibacterial, pro-oxidative, and genotoxic properties at alkaline pH. At 4.0μmol/mL, gallic acid displayed bacteriostatic property while aluminum-gallic acid and iron-gallic acid complexes showed bactericidal property against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. A higher antibacterial activity was observed in the turbidimetric assay compared to the well-diffusion assay. The metal complexes of ...

  15. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Characterization of Sumbawa manganese ore and recovery of manganese sulfate as leaching products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, Retno; Rahmani, Siti Astari; Widayatno, Wahyu Bambang; Wismogroho, Agus Sukarto; Nugroho, Dwi Wahyu; Maulana, Syahrizal; Rochman, Nurul Taufiqu; Amal, M. Ikhlasul

    2018-05-01

    The aims of this research were to study the leaching process of manganese ore which originated from Sumbawa, Indonesia and its characterization. A high grade Indonesian manganese ore from Sumbawa, West of Nusa Tenggara was characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The result showed composition of 78.8 % Mn, 17.77% Fe and the rest were trace elements such as Si, Co, Ti, Zn, V and Zr contents. X-Ray Diffraction analysis showed that the manganese ore was consisted of pyrolusite (MnO2), rhodonite (MnSiO3), rhodochrosite (MnCO3) and hematite (Fe2O3). Manganese ore was also analyzed by thermal analysis to observe their thermal decomposition character. In this study, sulphuric acid (H2SO4, 6 M) was deployed as leaching agent. The leaching process was performed at 90 °C for two hours with the addition of NH4OH to control pH. Recovery percentage of leaching process yielded of 87 % Mn extracted. The crystallization process result at heating temperature of 200 °C was confirmed by XRD as manganese sulfate.

  17. Hydrometallurgical Process and Kinetics of Leaching Manganese from Semi-Oxidized Manganese Ores with Sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of manganese from a semi-oxidized manganese ore was investigated with sucrose as the reducing agent in dilute sulfuric acid medium. The kinetics of leaching manganese from the complex ore containing MnCO3 and MnO2 was also investigated. The effects of sucrose and sulfuric acid concentrations, leaching temperature and reaction time on the total Mn (TMn, MnO2 and MnCO3 leaching were investigated. Results showed that MnCO3 could more easily react with hydrogen ions than MnO2 in ores, and MnO2 decomposition could be advantageous for MnCO3 leaching. The leaching efficiencies of 91.8% for total Mn, 91.4% for MnO2 and 96.9% for MnCO3 were obtained under the following optimized conditions: 0.035 mol/L sucrose concentration, 5 mol/L sulfuric acid concentration, 60 min of reaction time and 363.2 K of leaching temperature. In addition, it was found that the leaching process of semi-oxidized manganese ore follows the shrinking core model and the leaching rate was controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion. The apparent activation energy of the total manganese, MnO2, and MnCO3 leaching were 40.83, 40.59, and 53.33 kJ·mol−1, respectively.

  18. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  19. Bioleaching of a manganese and silver Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porro, S.; Tedesco, P.H.; La Plata

    1990-01-01

    The bioleaching with a strain of Thiobacillus thiooxidans of the ore of Farallon Negro (Catamarca, Argentina) was studied in order to estimate its application to the solution and recovery of the manganese, and to improve the silver extraction. The State company which works the mine has not yet found an economical process to extract the manganese and has only reached a 30% efficiency in the recovery of silver by cianuration. The effects of pulp density variations and the addition of different quantities of FeS were analysed looking for the best working conditions. 74 μm (mesh Tyler 200) of ore particles were used because that is the size used in this plant for the cianuration process. (Author)

  20. Microwave irradiation controls the manganese oxidation states of nanostructured (Li[Li0.2Mn0.52Ni0.13Co0.13Al0.02]O2) layered cathode materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jafta, CJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid synthesis procedure, combining microwave irradiation and conventional annealing process, is described for the preparation of lithium-rich manganese-rich cathode materials, Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 (LMNC) and its aluminum...