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Sample records for iron aluminide feal

  1. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Corneliusson, J.; Turba, K.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C.

  2. Tape casting as a fabrication process for iron aluminide (FeAl) thin sheets

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    Mistler, R.E. [Richard E. Mistler Inc., Morrisville, PA (United States); Sikka, V.K. [ORNL, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Scorey, C.R.; McKernan, J.E. [Ametek Inc., 21 Toelles Road, Wallingford, CT 06492 (United States); Hajaligol, M.R. [Research and Development Center, Philip Morris USA, PO Box 26581, Richmond, VA 23261 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The conversion of iron aluminide powder into a slurry followed by tape casting into a green sheet was investigated. Casting parameters affecting green sheet properties were studied. Application of thermo-mechanical processing including sintering, cold rolling, annealing and heat treating resulted in sheets with a fine-grain structure at essentially 100% of theoretical density. The various microstructures developed throughout the process are described, along with tensile property measurements on the fully dense product. Differences in property with sheets made by other processes are explained, and it is demonstrated that tape casting is a viable method of making thin gauge sheets of iron aluminide with a wide range of compositions. (orig.) 9 refs.

  3. A thermomechanical process to make iron aluminide (FeAl) sheet

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    Hajaligol, M.R.; Deevi, S.C. [Philip Morris Research Center, Richmond, VA (United States); Sikka, V.K. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37387 (United States); Scorey, C.R. [Ametek Specialty Metals Division, Wallingford, CT 06492 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    An innovative combination of roll compaction, and thermomechanical processing allowed manufacture of FeAl alloy intermetallic sheets with 24 wt.% Al content. Green sheets of FeAl were obtained by roll compaction of water atomized FeAl powder with a polymeric binder. Roll compacted green sheets were de-bindered and partially sintered prior to cold rolling through tungsten carbide rolls. Cold rolling decreased the thickness, reduced the level of porosity and work-hardened the sheets. Several intermediate annealings at or above 1100 C were found to be necessary to relieve the work hardening stresses prior to rolling the sheets to a final thickness of 0.20 mm. The annealing temperatures were chosen to be at or above 1100 C to allow concurrent sintering of FeAl necessary for the densification of FeAl sheets. Thermomechanical processing of cold rolled sheets allowed commercial manufacture of FeAl intermetallic sheets without the necessity of hot rolling of a cast FeAl ingot. Fully dense sheets possess fine grain microstructure with an average grain size of 20 {mu}m. The electrical resistivities of FeAl sheets can be varied from 140 to 155 {mu}{Omega} cm{sup -1}, and the high resistivities make them ideally suited for resistive heating applications. Mechanical properties of FeAl sheets are comparable to the properties of hot extruded FeAl alloys. (orig.) 26 refs.

  4. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys

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    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A boron-microalloyed FeAl alloy (Fe-36Al-0.2Mo-0.05Zr-0.13C, at.%, with 100-400 appm B) with improved weldability and mechanical properties was developed in FY 1994. A new scale-up and industry technology development phase for this work began in FY 1995, pursuing two parallel paths. One path was developing monolithic FeAl component and application technology, and the other was developing coating/cladding technology for alloy steels, stainless steels and other Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. In FY 1995, it was found that cast FeAl alloys had good strength at 700-750{degrees}C, and some (2.5%) ductility in air at room-temperature. Hot-extruded FeAl with refined grain size was found to have ductility and to also have good impact-toughness at room-temperature. Further, it was discovered that powder-metallurgy (P/M) FeAl, consolidated by direct hot-extrusion at 950-1000{degrees}C to have an ultra fine-grained microstructure, had the highest ductility, strength and impact-toughness ever seen in such intermetallic alloys.

  5. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

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    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  6. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

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    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  7. Development of iron aluminides

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    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  8. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the material, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered.

    Durante los últimos años se ha prestado mucha atención a la familia de intermetálicos Fe-Al, puesto que estos constituyen un considerable potencial como materiales de ingeniería en aplicaciones a temperaturas intermedias o altas, sobre todo en casos donde se necesita alta resistencia a la oxidación o corrosión. A pesar del considerable esfuerzo desarrollado para obtener aleaciones con mejores propiedades, su resistencia mecánica a alta temperatura no es muy elevada. Se discutirán los aspectos que contribuyen a la baja resistencia mecánica a temperatura elevada en función de la estructura de dislocaciones y los mecanismos de anclaje que operan en este intermetálico. Se considerarán, también, maneras alternativas para mejorar la resistencia a temperatura elevada mediante la modificación de la microestructura y la incorporación de partículas de segunda fase.

  9. Precipitation-strengthening effects in iron-aluminides

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    Maziasz, P.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce precipitation to improve both high-temperature strength and room-temperature ductibility in FeAl-type(B2 phase) iron-aluminides. Previous work has focused on primarily wrought products, but stable precipitates can also refine the grain size and affect the properties of as-cast and/or welded material as well. New work began in FY 1994 on the properties of these weldable, strong FeAl alloys in the as-cast condition. Because the end product of this project is components for industry testing, simpler and better (cheaper, near-net-shape) processing methods must be developed for industrial applications of FeAl alloys.

  10. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Sharma; M Sundararaman; N Prabhu; G L Goswami

    2003-04-01

    Room temperature dry sliding wear behaviour of iron aluminides containing 28% aluminium and various amounts of chromium has been investigated using pin on disk wear tester. The aluminides were heat treated to have ordered 3 structure. It was found that wear rate of the aluminides increased with the increase of applied normal load and sliding speed. Wear resistance of the aluminides increased with increase in chromium content. SEM observation of the worn surface showed that the microcutting and microploughing were the dominant sliding wear mechanisms.

  11. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

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    Milena Voderova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  12. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voděrová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  13. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  14. Aqueous Corrosion Behavior of Iron aluminide Intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Garima; Singh, P. R.; Sharma, R. K.; Gaonkar, K. B.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2007-12-01

    Iron aluminide intermetallics based on DO3 ordered structure are being developed for use as structural materials and cladding material for conventional engineering alloys. Aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminides has been studied extensively by electrochemical techniques. Studies were carried out on pure Fe (99.9%), Fe-28Al (at.%), Fe-28Al-3Cr (at.%), and AISI SS 304 so as to compare and contrast their behavior in same experimental condition. Polarization behavior under different pH conditions was examined to evaluate their performance in acidic, basic, and neutral solutions. Pitting behavior was also studied in solution containing Cl-1 ions. The stability of the passive film formed was studied by current time transients and potential decay profiles. The presence of 3 at.% Cr in iron aluminides was found to improve the aqueous corrosion resistance and makes it comparable to AISI SS 304.

  15. High-temperature corrosion of iron aluminides

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    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Cho, W.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. This paper describes results from an ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne involves thermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and coal combustion. Corrosion experiments were conducted to determine the effect of gas flow rate and different levels of HCl at a gas temperature of 650 C on three heats of aluminide material, namely, FA 61, FA 129, and FAX. In addition, specimens of Type 316 stainless steel with an overlay alloying of iron aluminide were prepared by electrospark deposition and tested for their corrosion resistance. Detailed microstructural evaluations of tested specimens were performed. Results are used to assess the corrosion resistance of various iron aluminides for service in fossil energy systems that utilize coal as a feedstock.

  16. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

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    Kang, B.S.; Yao, Qizhou; Cooper, B.R. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Comparative creep crack growth tests of FA-186 and FA-187 iron aluminides under either dry oxygen or air environment showed that both alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Test results also revealed that FA-187 is intrinsically a more brittle material than FA-186. Atomistic computational modeling is being undertaken to find the preferred geometries, structures and formation energies of iron vacancies and vacancy pairs (Fe-Fe) in FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al. An indication of vacancy clustering in Fe{sub 3}Al, with consequences for dislocation behavior, may be important for understanding the role of dislocation assisted diffusion in the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  17. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

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    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  18. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in single- and multioxidant environments.

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    Natesan, K.

    1998-06-22

    Iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to their strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures through the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Even though these intermetallics develop protective oxide scales in single-oxidant environments, the simultaneous presence of several reactants in the environment (typical of practical systems) can lead to development of oxide scales that are nonprotective and that undergo breakaway corrosion, or to nonoxide scales that are detrimental to the performance of the underlying alloy. This paper describes the corrosion performance of Fe-Al intermetallics in environments that contain sulfur, carbon, chlorine, and oxygen and that are typical of fossil energy systems. Emphasis is on mechanisms of scale development and breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, and approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics to improve their corrosion resistance.

  19. Characterization of the alumina film with cerium doped on the iron-aluminide diffusion coating

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    Zhan, Q., E-mail: zhanqin1983@163.com; Yang, H.G.; Zhao, W.W.; Yuan, X.M.; Hu, Y.

    2013-11-15

    An iron-aluminide layer with a thin alumina film on the top as a composite tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coating was characterized under different oxidation conditions. The TPB coating was prepared initially on a China Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (CLAM) steel by a pack cementation aluminizing process and then an alumina film was formed on the surface of this iron-aluminide diffusion layer by an oxidizing process. To modify the properties of the FeAl/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite TPB coatings, the rare earth element (cerium) was introduced as a dopant while oxidizing. Characterization showed that a continuous oxide scale with a thickness of about 300–400 nm was formed on the FeAl diffusion layer. The film was mainly composed of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with a little CeO{sub 2}. In addition, the concentration of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increased with elevated temperature while oxidizing. The phase transformation behavior of alumina scale on the surface of an iron-aluminide layer was studied in this paper.

  20. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

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    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  1. Commercialization of nickel and iron aluminides

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    Sikka, V.K.

    1996-12-31

    Metallurgists are taught that intermetallics are brittle phases and should be avoided in alloys of commercial interest. This education is so deeply rooted that irrespective of significant advances made in ductilization of aluminides,the road to their acceptance commercialization is extremely difficult. This paper identifies the requirements for commercialization of any new alloys and reports the activities carried out to commercialize Ni and Fe aluminides. The paper also identifies areas which meet the current commercialization requirements and areas needing additional effort.

  2. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

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    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  3. Preparation of iron aluminate (FeAl2O4) nanoparticles from FeAl2O4 hollow particles fabricated by using a spray pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaecheol; Kim, Yangdo; Park, Dahee; Yun, Jung-Yeul

    2015-05-01

    Iron aluminate (FeAl2O4) hollow particles with a spinel structure were synthesized by using a spray pyrolysis process. FeAl2O4 hollow particles were formed at a reaction temperature of 900 °C at a flow rate of 40 L/min as a result of the rapid solvent evaporation and decomposition gases from the droplets in the spray solution prepared from metal salts and organic reagents. FeAl2O4 hollow particles were fabricated at a reaction temperature of 900 °C with a flow rate of 40 L/min. The FeAl2O4 hollow particles were heat treated for 3 hours at 600 °C in a 5% H2/Ar atmosphere to form the crystal particles. Subsequently, FeAl2O4 nanoparticles were fabricated from the FeAl2O4 hollow particles by using the wet milling process. After milling for 60 minutes, transmission electron microscopy revealed the FeAl2O4 particles to have a mean size of approximately 50 nm. The FeAl2O4 nanoparticles were fabricated successfully by using a two-step process, spray pyrolysis and wet milling.

  4. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on oxidation performance of iron-aluminide layers on 316L stainless steel

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    Yang, Hong-guang; Zhan, Qin; Zhao, Wei-wei; Yuan, Xiao-ming [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Reactor Engineering Research and Design

    2009-07-01

    Tritium permeation barriers (TPB) are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the structural materials such as type 316 stainless steel. Iron-aluminide layers with alumina on top have been selected as the reference materials for TPB. Aluminide were prepared on the 316L (00Cr17Ni14Mo2) stainless steel by a specific aluminizing process and its oxidation behaviors have been studied in CIAE. This paper is focused on the effect of oxygen partial pressure on the characterization of the surface alumina films. Alumina films were formed on the Fe-Al coatings under the oxygen partial pressure below 200Pa, which is mainly composed of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the thickness upto 300nm, and a little CeO{sub 2} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It shows the formation of alumina films because of the selective oxidation of the aluminide on the top surface. (orig.)

  5. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

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    Judkins, Roddie Reagan (Knoxville, TN); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Sikka, Vinod Kumar (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  6. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

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    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

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    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  8. Evaluation of Iron Aluminide Coatings for Oxidation Protection in Water Vapor Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Wang, Y. Q. [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Long-term (> 10,000h) oxidation behavior of aluminide coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or pack cementation on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) are being studied in air + 10% water vapor in the temperature range of 650-800 C. Unlike the uncoated alloys, which are severely attacked in this environment, the CVD aluminide coatings have not failed after 16,000h at 700 C or 10,000h at 800 C. The pack aluminide coatings also show good oxidation protection after testing for {approx}5,000h at 700 C. In addition, initial efforts have been made to fabricate coatings at lower aluminizing temperatures and the current results suggest that FeAl coatings can be synthesized at temperatures as low as 700 C.

  9. Al2O3 Scale Development on Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Thaidigsmann, Katja; Ager, Joel; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-11-10

    The structure and phase of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale that forms on an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy (Fe-28Al-5Cr) (at %) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Oxidation was performed at 900 C and 1000 C for up to 190 min. TEM revealed that single-layer scales were formed after short oxidation times. Electron diffraction was used to show that the scales are composed of nanoscale crystallites of the {theta}, {gamma}, and {alpha} phases of alumina. Band-like structure was observed extending along three 120{sup o}-separated directions within the surface plane. Textured {theta} and {gamma} grains were the main components of the bands, while mixed {alpha} and transient phases were found between the bands. Extended oxidation produced a double-layered scale structure, with a continuous {alpha} layer at the scale/alloy interface, and a {gamma}/{theta} layer at the gas surface. The mechanism for the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales on iron aluminide alloys is discussed and compared to that for nickel aluminide alloys.

  10. The Effect of Laves Phase (Fe,Al)2Zr on the High-Temperature Strength of Carbon-Alloyed Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Vodičková, Věra; Král, Robert; Švec, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The effects of carbon on the phase structure and on the yield stress σ 0.2 in the temperature range from 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C) of the Fe3Al type aluminides alloyed by Zr are analyzed. Four alloys with Zr and C in ranging from 1.0 to 5.0 at. pct of additives were used. The appearing of either Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Zr and/or carbides depend on the difference in concentrations, c Zr - c C. This parameter ( c Zr - c C) has been selected instead of the concentration ratio c Zr/ c C used in previous works since it exhibits a significantly better correlation with the Laves phase concentration which influences the high-temperature yield stress, σ 0.2, of the tested alloys. The presence of Laves phase or eutectic (matrix—Laves phase), respectively, enhances the value of the yield stress σ 0.2. The amount of Laves phase is decreased by the presence of C due to the affinity of carbon to Zr.

  11. Development of Improved Iron-Aluminide Filter Tubes and Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Sutton, T.G.; Miller, C.J.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    2008-01-14

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to explore and develop advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate sintered iron-aluminide intermetallic porous bodies used for gas filtration so as to reduce production costs while maintaining or improving performance in advanced coal gasification and combustion systems. The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas requires some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, and/or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years.

  12. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  13. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  14. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Voděrová; Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the pro...

  15. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  16. Formation of Al2O3/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sanjib; Paul, Bhaskar; Chakraborty, Poulami; Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe2Al5, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4-6 μm thick Al2O3 scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al2O3/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation.

  17. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, S.C.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; Sikka, V.K.; Hajaligol, M.R.

    2000-03-07

    A powder metallurgical process is dislosed for preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1 % rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  18. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  19. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hall, F.; Valykeo, J. [Hoskins Mfg. Co., Hamburg, MI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  20. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  1. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Vernieres

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO3 phase and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  2. High-temperature oxidation/sulfidation resistance of iron-aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.

    1996-04-01

    Iron aluminides containing > 20-25 at. % Al have oxidation and sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. Accordingly, these alloys may find application as coatings or claddings on more conventional higher-strength materials which are generally less corrosion-resistant at high temperatures. To this end, iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. Specimens were cut from weld deposits and exposed to a highly aggressive oxidizing-sulfidizing (H2S-H2-H2O-Ar) environment at 800 C. All the weld overlayers showed good corrosion behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc-produced deposit with only 21 at. % Al. Rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initally grown scales spalled and the rate of reaction was then not controlled by formation of slowly growing Al oxide. Higher starting Al concentrations (> {approximately} 25 at. %) are needed to assure overall oxidation-sulfidation resistance of the weld overlays, but hydrogen cracking susceptibility must be minimized in order to physically separate the corrosive species from the reactive substrate material.

  3. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam

    2002-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of two carbon-alloyed iron aluminides was studied. Weakening of some carbide–metal interfaces in the presence of hydrogen was indicated. The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the microstructure has also been addressed.

  4. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {le}1% Cr and either {ge}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {ge}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14--32% Al, {le}2% Ti, {le}2% Mo, {le}1% Zr, {le}1% C, {le}0.1% B, {le}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {le}1% rare earth metal, {le}1% oxygen, {le}3% Cu, balance Fe.

  5. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  6. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  7. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  8. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sriram; R Balasubramaniam; M N Mungole; S Bharagava; R G Baligidad

    2005-10-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based intermetallic has been studied. Three different alloys of composition, Fe–18.5Al–3.6C, Fe–20.0Al–2.0C and Fe–19.2Al–3.3C–0.07Ce (in at%), were prepared by electroslag remelting process. Their microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopies. Stereological methods were utilized to understand the observed microstructures. All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes were finer and uniformly distributed throughout the matrix. The effect of Ce addition on the carbide morphology has been explained based on the known effect of Ce in modifying carbide morphology in cast irons.

  9. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Anderson, M.T. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide alloys based on Fe3Al have been formed by reaction synthesis from elemental powders followed by hot extrusion. The resulting alloys have approximately 2.5% by volume Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles dispersed throughout the material. A proper combination of extrusion temperature, extrusion ratio, and post-consolidation heat treatment results in a secondary recrystallized microstructure with grain sizes greater than 25mm. ODS material with 5% Cr addition exhibits approximately an order of magnitude increase in time to failure at 650 C compared to a similar alloy without the oxide dispersion. Addition of Nb and Mo along with Cr results in decreased minimum creep rates, however, the time to rupture is greatly reduced due to fracture at low strains initiated at large Nb particles that were not put into solution. The activation energy for creep in the 5% Cr ODS material is on the order of 210 kJ/mole and the power law creep exponent is 9--9.5. Transmission electron microscopy examination of the substructure of deformed samples indicates some formation of low angle dislocation boundaries, however, most of the dislocations are pinned at particles. The TEM observations and the value of the creep exponent are indicative of dislocation breakaway from particles as the rate controlling deformation mechanism. The TEM results indicate that particles smaller than about 100nm and larger than about 500 nm do not contribute significantly to dislocation pinning.

  10. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  11. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  12. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-07-04

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe{sub 3}Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  13. Influence of Cumulative Plastic Deformation on Microstructure of the Fe-Al Intermetallic Phase Base Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarczyk I.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of the research on the microstructural phenomena that take place during hot deformation of intermetallic phase-based alloy. The research aims at design an effective thermo - mechanical processing technology for the investigated intermetallic alloy. The iron aluminides FeAl have been among the most widely studied intermetallics because their low cost, low density, good wear resistance, easy of fabrication and resistance to oxidation and corrosion. There advantages create wide prospects for their industrial applications for components of machines working at a high temperature and in corrosive environment. The problem restricting their application is their low plasticity and their brittle cracking susceptibility, hampers their development as construction materials. Consequently, the research of intermetallic-phase-based alloys focuses on improvement their plasticity by hot working proceses. The study addresses the influence of deformation parameters on the structure of an Fe-38% at. Al alloy with Zr, B Mo and C microadditions, using multi – axis deformation simulator. The influence of deformation parameters on microstructure and substructure was determined. It was revealed that application of cumulative plastic deformation method causes intensive reduction of grain size in FeAl phase base alloy.

  14. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  15. ODS iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  16. ODS iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-06-01

    Interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system, has led to investigation of materials for heat exchangers capable of operation at temperatures of the order of 1200 to 1300{degrees}C. The candidate materials are ceramics and, possibly, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. An ODS FeCrAl alloy was found to meet the strength requirements for such an application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C over a tube length of 4 m. The oxidation life of ODS FeCrAl alloys is determined by their ability to form or reform a protective alumina scale, and can be related to the time for the aluminum content of the alloy to be depleted to some minimum level. As a result, the service life is a function of the available aluminum content of the alloys and the minimum aluminum level at which breakaway oxidation occurs, hence there is a limit on the minimum cross section which can be safely employed at temperatures above 1200{degrees}C. Because of their significantly higher aluminum content ({ge}28 atom %/{ge}16 wt. percent compared to {approx}9 atom %15 wt. percent), alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al afford a potentially larger reservoir of aluminum to sustain oxidation resistance at higher temperatures and, therefore, offer a possible improvement over the currently-available ODS FeCrAl alloys, providing they can be strengthened in a similar manner.

  17. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound Fe{sub 3}Al exhibit many attractive properties, particularly excellent resistance to high temperature oxidation. Their use in commercial applications has been limited, however, by the limited workability of wrought material and the susceptibility of weldments to both hot and cold cracking. Prior efforts have systematically evaluated the effect of alloy composition on hot cracking. By the use of the Sigmajig test, we have found that hot cracking can essentially be eliminated by the addition of carbon and the control of maximum levels of niobium, zirconium, and other alloying elements. Cold cracking, however, remains an issue, and recent efforts have been aimed at minimizing its occurrence, concurrent with development of welding filler metals, processes, and procedures aimed at commercial applications.

  18. ODS iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    There has been a recent increase of interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system. In a program conducted as part of the European COST-501 Concerted Action Project, available alloys based on FeCrAl-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated for use in the main heat exchanger in a similar closed-cycle gas turbine application. One of the currently available ODS FeCrAl alloys was found to meet the strength requirements for this application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa (131 psi) flowing at 5,889 kg/hr (12,955 lb/hr) was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C (1472 to 2012{degrees}F) over a tube length of 4 m (13 ft).

  19. Development of Iron Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    in the case of the slow-cool aging, Figure 162a , and transgranular with the additional isothermal aging, Figure 162b. A 208 possible reason for the...change in fracture mode can be deduced from Figure 162a , which also shows some cracking of the large perovekite particles at grain boundaries indicating

  20. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  1. Mechanical properties and electronic structures of Fe-Al intermetallic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YaHui; Chong, XiaoYu; Jiang, YeHua; Zhou, Rong; Feng, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, the elastic properties, anisotropy properties, electronic structures, Debye temperature and stability of Fe-Al (Fe3Al, FeAl, FeAl2, Fe2Al5 and FeAl3) binary compounds were calculated. The formation enthalpy and cohesive energy of these Fe-Al compounds are negative, and show they are thermodynamically stable structures. Fe2Al5 has the lowest formation enthalpy, which shows the Fe2Al5 is the most stable of Fe-Al binary compounds. These Fe-Al compounds display disparate anisotropy due to the calculated different shape of the 3D curved surface of the Young's modulus and anisotropic index. Fe3Al has the biggest bulk modulus with the value 233.2 GPa. FeAl has the biggest Yong's modulus and shear modulus with the value 296.2 GPa and 119.8 GPa, respectively. The partial density of states, total density of states and electron density distribution maps of the binary Fe-Al binary compounds are analyzed. The bonding characteristics of these Fe-Al binary compounds are mainly combination by covalent bond and metallic bonds. Meanwhile, also exist anti-bond effect. Moreover, the Debye temperatures and sound velocity of these Fe-Al compounds are explored.

  2. Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a

  3. Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a

  4. Forging of FeAl intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Juarez, J.; Campillo, B.; Martinez, L. [UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Lab. de Cuernavaca; Schneibel, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Much activity has been concentrated on the development of intermetallic compounds with the aim of improving tensile ductility, fracture toughness and high notch sensitivity in order to develop an attractive combination of properties for high and low temperature applications. This paper reports experience in processing and forging of FeAl intermetallic of B2 type. During the experiments two different temperatures were employed, and the specimens were forged after annealing in air, 10{sup {minus}2} torr vacuum and argon. From the results it was learned that annealing FeAl in argon atmosphere prior to forging resulted in better deformation behavior than for the other two environments. For the higher forging temperature used in the experiments (700C), the as-cast microstructure becomes partially recrystallized.

  5. Preparation of aluminide coatings on the inner surface of tubes by heat treatment of Al coatings electrodeposited from an ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Dongpeng; Chen, Yimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ling, Guoping, E-mail: linggp@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Kezhao; Chen, Chang’an; Zhang, Guikai [National Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Al coating is prepared on the inner surface of one-meter tube. • Al coating shows good adherence to the substrate. • The thickness of Al coating is uniform along the tube. • Aluminide coating is obtained by heat treating Al coating. • Structure of aluminide coating is regulated by different thickness of Al coating. - Abstract: Aluminide coatings were prepared on the inner surface of 316L stainless steel tubes with size of Ø 12 mm × 1000 mm by heat-treating Al coatings electrodeposited from AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (AlCl{sub 3}–EMIC) ionic liquid at room temperature. Studies on the electrolytic etching pretreatment of stainless tubes before Al coating electrodeposition were carried out. The Al coating showed good adherence to the substrate after electrolytic etching at 10 mA/cm{sup 2} for 10 min. The thickness of Al coatings was uniform along the tube. The structure of prepared aluminide coatings can be regulated by different thickness of Al coating. The outer layer of aluminide coatings was FeAl, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3} for the samples of 1-μm, 5-μm and 10-μm thick Al coatings, respectively.

  6. Mechanical properties and electronic structures of Fe-Al intermetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, YaHui; Chong, XiaoYu; Jiang, YeHua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Zhou, Rong; Feng, Jing, E-mail: jingfeng@kmust.edu.cn

    2017-02-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, the elastic properties, anisotropy properties, electronic structures, Debye temperature and stability of Fe-Al (Fe{sub 3}Al, FeAl, FeAl{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}) binary compounds were calculated. The formation enthalpy and cohesive energy of these Fe-Al compounds are negative, and show they are thermodynamically stable structures. Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} has the lowest formation enthalpy, which shows the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} is the most stable of Fe-Al binary compounds. These Fe-Al compounds display disparate anisotropy due to the calculated different shape of the 3D curved surface of the Young’s modulus and anisotropic index. Fe{sub 3}Al has the biggest bulk modulus with the value 233.2 GPa. FeAl has the biggest Yong’s modulus and shear modulus with the value 296.2 GPa and 119.8 GPa, respectively. The partial density of states, total density of states and electron density distribution maps of the binary Fe-Al binary compounds are analyzed. The bonding characteristics of these Fe-Al binary compounds are mainly combination by covalent bond and metallic bonds. Meanwhile, also exist anti-bond effect. Moreover, the Debye temperatures and sound velocity of these Fe-Al compounds are explored.

  7. The Effect of Low Concentrations Nb and C on the Structure and High-Temperature Strength of Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Švec, Martin; Vodičková, Věra

    2017-09-01

    The Fe3Al iron aluminide alloyed by low concentrations of Nb and C ( c Nb, c C) is studied. The influence of the c Nb/ c C ratio on the structure and high-temperature yield strength of iron aluminide was investigated. The structure and phase composition were studied by scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS and EBSD. The strengthening mechanisms are detected as strengthening by incoherent precipitates of NbC and as a solid solution hardening by Nb atoms.

  8. The cavitational erosion resistance of the B2-type Fe-Al casting alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jasionowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the destruction of turbo-machinery components is very complex, because it consists of processes of erosion and corrosion. The most dangerous factor is the cavitation phenomenon, which is very difficult to eliminate through the use of design solutions. It causes deterioration of the operating characteristics of machinery and equipment, such as water turbines, steam turbines, centrifugal pumps, screw vessels, cylinder liners with water-cooled engines, acoustic probe. The most commonly used method of limiting the destruction of cavitation phenomenon is the optimum choice of parameters of geometric and hydraulic machines, the appropriate design of elements and streamlined flow and providing working conditions of flow devices. The above-mentioned methods by design, the size of flow devices are limited, so better action to prevent the flow of erosion may use the material for greater resistance to erosion and cavitation corrosion is the alloy of intermetallic FeAl phase, which production costs are low compared to cast steel and cast iron alloy based on chromium and nickel.The paper presents results of an investigation carried out for cavitational resistance of the B2-type Fe-Al casting alloys using a flux-impact measuring device. The intermetallic FeAl alloys proved to have good resistance to this type of erosion in comparison to other construction materials, investigated by flux-impact device.

  9. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleishhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2003-12-09

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  10. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  11. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, M.R.; Scorey, C.; Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; German, R.M.

    2000-02-29

    A powder metallurgical process is disclosed of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}0.05% Zr{<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Ni, {<=}0.75% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 {mu}m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  12. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2016-05-09

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% FeAl2O4 and 13.5wt% Fe0, showed a stable CMD activity at 750°C for as long as 10h. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electrical discharge machining studies on reactive sintered FeAl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Khanra; S Patra; M M Godkhindi

    2006-06-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) studies on reactive sintered FeAl were carried out with different process parameters. The metal removal rate and tool removal rate were found to increase with the applied pulse on-time. The surface roughness of machined surface also changed with the applied pulse on-time. XRD analysis of machined surface of sintered FeAl showed the formation of Fe3C phase during the EDM process. The debris analysis was used to identify the material removal mechanism occurring during the EDM of sintered FeAl.

  14. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  15. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  16. Environmental embrittlement of intermetallic compounds in Fe-Al alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建民; 张瑞林; S.H.YU; 余瑞璜

    1996-01-01

    First,it is proposed that hydrogen atoms occupy the interstitial sites in Fe3Al and FeAl.Then the environmental embrittlement of intermetallic compounds in Fe-Al alloys is studied in the light of calculated valence electron structures and bond energy of Fe3Al and FeAl containing hydrogen atoms.From the analyses it is found that the states of metal atoms will change,in which more lattice electrons will become covalent electrons to bond with hydrogen atoms when the atomic hydrogen diffuses into the intermetallic compounds in Fe-Al alloys,which will result in the decrease of local metallicity in Fe3Al and FeAl.Meanwhile,it is found that the crystal will easily cleave since solute hydrogen bonds with metal atoms and severely anisotropic bonds form.As a conclusion,these factors result in the environmental embrittlement of Fe3Al and FeAl.

  17. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam; A V Ramesh Kumar

    2000-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of two carbon-alloyed intermetallics of composition Fe–28.1Al–2.1C and Fe–27.5Al–3.7C has been studied and compared with that of binary intermetallics. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that the intermetallics exhibited active–passive behaviour in an acidic solution of pH = 1, whereas they exhibited stable passivity in a buffer solution of pH 8.4. Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides.

  18. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  19. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  20. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1997-08-05

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy cutting edge is discussed. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800 C for a period of time followed by rolling at 650 C, cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge. 1 fig.

  1. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

  2. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Marrero-Santos, Y.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile density due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications, despite their excellent corrosion properties. Improvements in room temperature tensile ductility have been realized mainly through alloying effects, changes in thermomechanical processing to control microstructure, and by control of the specimen`s surface condition. Ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa have been reported. In terms of creep-rupture strength, small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr have produced significant improvements, but at the expense of weldability and room-temperature tensile ductility. Recently an alloy containing these additions, designated FA-180, was shown to exhibit a creep-rupture life of over 2000 h after a heat treatment of 1 h at 1150{degrees}C. This study presents the results of creep-rupture tests at various test temperatures and stresses and discusses the results as part of our effort to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved with heat treatment at 1150{degrees}C.

  3. Interdiffusion Behavior in Aluminide Coatings for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Pint, B.A.; Haynes, J.A.; Cooley, K.M.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    One of the critical issues for the application of iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coating into the Fe-base substrate alloys which do not contain aluminum. The interdiffusion behavior between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings and ferritic and austenitic substrates is being studied for times up to 10,000h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized using a laboratory-scale CVD reactor on representative commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys. The aluminide coatings on both alloys typically consisted of a relatively thin (20-25 {micro}m) Al-rich outer layer and a thicker (150- 250 {micro}m) inner layer with less Al. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe-9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys. Particularly, a two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior also was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles although more work is needed to confirm assumptions made in the model.

  4. Effect of Fe/Al Hydroxides on Desorption of K+ and NH4+ from Two Soils and Kaolinite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-Ping; XU Ren-Kou; LI Jiu-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) are essential nutrients for plants.Adsorption and desorption in soils affect K+ and NH4+ availabilities to plants and can be affected by the interaction between the electrical double layers on oppositely charged particles because the interaction can decrease the surface charge density of the particles by neutralization of positive and negative charges.We studied the effect of iron (Fe)/aluminum (Al) hydroxides on desorption of K+ and NH4+ from soils and kaolinite and proposed desorption mechanisms based on the overlapping of diffuse layers between negatively charged soils and mineral particles and the positively charged Fe/Al hydroxide particles.Our results indicated that the overlapping of diffuse layers of electrical double layers between positively charged Fe/Al hydroxides,as amorphous Al(OH)3 or Fe(OH)3,and negatively charged surfaces from an Ultisol,an Alfisol,and a kaolinite standard caused the effective negative surface charge density on the soils and kaolinite to become less negative.Thus the adsorption affinity of these negatively charged surfaces for K+ and NH4+ declined as a result of the incorporation of the Fe/Al hydroxides.Consequently,the release of exchangeable K+ and NH4+ from the surfaces of the soils and kaolinite increased with the amount of the Fe/Al hydroxides added.The greater the positive charge on the surfaces of Fe/Al hydroxides,the stronger was the interactive effect between the hydroxides and soils or kaolinite,and thus the more release of K+ and NH4+.A decrease in pH led to increased positive surface charge on the Fe/Al hydroxides and enhanced interactive effects between the hydroxides and soils/kaolinite.As a result,more K+ and NH4+ were desorbed from the soils and kaolinite.This study suggests that the interaction between oppositely charged particles of variable charge soils can enhance the mobility of K+ and NH4+ in the soils and thus increase their leaching loss.

  5. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  6. Fe/Al bimetallic particles for the fast and highly efficient removal of Cr(VI) over a wide pH range: Performance and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Bing

    2015-11-15

    The iron/aluminum (Fe/Al) bimetallic particles with high efficiency for the removal of Cr(VI) were prepared. Fe/Al bimetallic particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), SEM mapping, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM mapping showed that the core of bimetal was Al, and the planting Fe was deposited on the surface of Al. In acidic and neutral conditions, Fe/Al bimetal can completely remove Cr(VI) from wastewater in 20 min. Even at pH 11.0, the Cr(VI) removal efficiency achieved was 93.5%. Galvanic cell effect and high specific surface area are the main reasons for the enhanced removal of Cr(VI) by bimetallic particles. There were no iron ions released in solutions at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0. The released Al(3+) ions concentrations in acidic and neutral conditions were all less than 0.2mg/L. The bimetal can be used 4 times without losing activity at initial pH 3.0. XPS indicated that the removed Cr(VI) was immobilized via the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide and Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide/oxyhydroxide on the surface of Fe/Al bimetal. The Fe/Al bimetallic particles are promising for further testing for the rapid and effective removal of contaminants from water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation of particulate Fe-Al films by selective oxidation of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Pyungwoo; Shin, Seung Chan

    2013-09-01

    Fe-5wt%Al films were RF-sputtered and annealed in an atmosphere of hydrogen and water vapor mixture at 1173 K for up to 200 min in order to selectively oxidize aluminum. As the annealing time increased, the morphology of the films changed from the continuous to the discontinuous type; thus, particulate Fe-Al films formed after 100 min. Thermodynamics simulation was performed to determine the ideal conditions for this process. Temperatures exceeding 1073 K are necessary to prevent iron from oxidation confirmed by both the depth profile in XPS and magnetic moment increment in VSM. Annealing the films in an atmosphere with a very low dew point of 77 K did not make the films become particulate. New findings are expected to be applied to the thin film inductors for GHz application as well as to manufacturing process of nanoparticles.

  8. Fe/Al bimetallic particles for the fast and highly efficient removal of Cr(VI) over a wide pH range: Performance and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Fenglian, E-mail: fufenglian2006@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Environmental Engineering and Science Program, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering (DBCEE), University of Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States); Cheng, Zihang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D., E-mail: dionysios.d.dionysiou@uc.edu [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering (DBCEE), University of Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States); Tang, Bing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Bimetallic particles with different Fe/Al mass ratios were prepared. • High removal rate of Cr(VI) was achieved in acidic, neutral, and alkaline pH. • No total iron ions at pH 3.0–11.0 and nearly no Al{sup 3+} at pH 3.0–7.0 were released. • Galvanic cell effect and high specific surface area contributed to Cr(VI) removal. - Abstract: The iron/aluminum (Fe/Al) bimetallic particles with high efficiency for the removal of Cr(VI) were prepared. Fe/Al bimetallic particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), SEM mapping, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM mapping showed that the core of bimetal was Al, and the planting Fe was deposited on the surface of Al. In acidic and neutral conditions, Fe/Al bimetal can completely remove Cr(VI) from wastewater in 20 min. Even at pH 11.0, the Cr(VI) removal efficiency achieved was 93.5%. Galvanic cell effect and high specific surface area are the main reasons for the enhanced removal of Cr(VI) by bimetallic particles. There were no iron ions released in solutions at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0. The released Al{sup 3+} ions concentrations in acidic and neutral conditions were all less than 0.2 mg/L. The bimetal can be used 4 times without losing activity at initial pH 3.0. XPS indicated that the removed Cr(VI) was immobilized via the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide and Cr(III)–Fe(III) hydroxide/oxyhydroxide on the surface of Fe/Al bimetal. The Fe/Al bimetallic particles are promising for further testing for the rapid and effective removal of contaminants from water.

  9. Large Scale Evaluation fo Nickel Aluminide Rolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This completed project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem Steel (now Mittal Steel) to demonstrate the effectiveness of using nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated, energy-efficient, commercial annealing furnace system.

  10. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.

    1992-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition.

  11. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  12. EXAFS study of ion beam mixed Fe/Al multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Arcon, I; Zalar, A; Kodre, A; Jagielski, J

    2003-01-01

    Composition and structure of Fe/Al multilayer coatings after ion beam mixing at different temperatures are studied. Samples were prepared by consecutive sputter deposition of Fe and Al on well-polished silicon substrate. The samples were ion beam mixed with 330 keV Ar ions at the dose of 3x10 sup 1 sup 5 ions/cm sup 2 in the temperature range between room temperature and 400 deg. C. AES depth profiles showed that mixing between Fe and Al layers started at 100 deg. C and was complete at 400 deg. C. Fe K-edge EXAFS, however, reveals that Fe bcc metallic phase is still present at all temperatures. The amount of an additional Fe-Al phase is about 20% up to 300 deg. C, increasing to 50% at 400 deg. C.

  13. Novel mesoporous FeAl bimetal oxides for As(III) removal: Performance and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zecong; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Lu, Jianwei; Tang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    In this study, novel mesoporous FeAl bimetal oxides were successfully synthesized, characterized, and employed for As(III) removal. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of Fe/Al molar ratio, dosage, and initial solution pH values on As(III) removal. The results showed that the FeAl bimetal oxide with Fe/Al molar ratio 4:1 (shorten as FeAl-4) can quickly remove As(III) from aqueous solution in a wide pH range. The FeAl-4 before and after reaction with As(III) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BET results showed that the original FeAl-4 with a high surface area of 223.9 m(2)/g was a mesoporous material. XPS analysis indicated that the surface of FeAl-4 possessed a high concentration of M-OH (where M represents Fe and Al), which was beneficial to the immobility of As(III). The excellent performance of FeAl-4 makes it a potentially attractive material for As(III) removal from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of high-strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior of Nl-, Fe-, and Ti- based aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III

    1996-09-01

    The majority of the strength characterization studies on ordered intermetallics have concentrated on the assessment of strength and work-hardening at conventional strain rates. Although the influence of strain rate on the structure/property relationships of pure nickel, iron, and titanium and a variety of their alloys have been extensively studied, the effect of strain rate on the stress-strain response of Ni-, Fe-, and Ti-based aluminides remains poorly understood. Dynamic constitutive behavior is however relevant to high speed impact performance of these materials such as during foreign object damage in aerospace applications, high-rate forging, and localized deformation behavior during machining. The influence of strain rate, varied between 0.001 and 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}, and temperatures, between 77 & 800K, on the compressive mechanical behavior of Ni{sub 3}A1, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe-40Al-0.1B, Ti-24Al-11Nb, and Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb will be presented. In this paper the influence of strain rate on the anomalous temperature dependency of the flow stresses in these aluminides will be reviewed and compared between aluminides. The rate sensitivity and work hardening of each aluminide will be discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature and contrasted to each other and to the values typical for their respective disordered base metals. 66 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31

    content in the Cr-Al alloys. Cr-25Al and Cr-15Al were chosen as the masteralloys in the pack cementation process. In contrast to pure Al masteralloy which led to the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings at 650 C, a coating consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an FeAl inner layer was formed at 700 C with the Cr-25Al masteralloy. By switching to the Cr-15Al masteralloy, thin FeAl coatings ({approx}12 {micro}m) containing < 50 at.% Al were achieved at 700 C. The effect of the amount of masteralloys on coating growth was also studied by employing packs containing 2NH{sub 4}Cl-x(Cr-15Al)-(98-x)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where x = 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 wt.%. It was noticed that when the Cr-15Al masteralloy was increased from 10 to 40 wt.% in the pack, both coating thickness and surface Al content increased, suggesting that gas phase kinetics played an important role in Al deposition. However, with further increase of the masteralloy, solid state diffusion became the rate-limiting factor. The long-term oxidation performance of the aluminide coatings synthesized at 700 C with Cr-25Al and Cr-15Al masteralloys was evaluated in the water vapor environment at 650-700 C. The low-temperature pack coatings demonstrated excellent oxidation resistance at 650 C in humid air after {approx}1.2 yr testing. Longer lifetimes can be expected for these thin coatings due to minimal interdiffusion at this testing temperature. Exposure at 700 C was conducted to accelerate coating failure via increased interdiffusion of Al with the substrate alloy. The coatings also exhibited good oxidation protection up to 6,000-8,000 h at 700 C, with longer testing needed for coating failure to occur. Furthermore, the oxidation results indicate that in addition to the Al reservoir (as determined by the Al content and coating thickness), the initial coating surface quality had a significant impact on the oxidation behavior. In addition, the effect of various pack aluminide coatings on the

  16. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  18. Hydrogen behavior in titanium aluminide alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Bao-wu; CHU Wu-yang

    2006-01-01

    This is a synthetical report about hydrogen behavior in titanium aluminide alloys in our group. There are two kinds of hydrogen solubility in titanium aluminides, one is the overall solubility at high temperature in the matrix without hydride and the other is the terminal solubility at low temperature in the matrix in equilibrium with the hydride. The former decreases but the later increases with increasing temperature. Hydrogen as a temporary β stabilizer clearly decreases the size of the α2 phase, and increases greatly the amount of β phase, and then increases evidently the mechanical properties of Ti3Al+Nb. The cathodic corrosion of TiAl during charging is due to hydride on the surface. The decrease of the strength, the strain to fracture and fracture toughness for hydrogenated samples is due to hydride. The enrichment of atomic hydrogen at the crack tip during charging under sustained load can enhance localized plastic deformation and cause hydrogen-induced delayed cracking.

  19. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  20. Interaction between electrical double layers of soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides in suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Xu, Renkou; Tiwari, Diwakar; Zhao, Anzhen

    2007-06-15

    Phyllosilicates with net negative surface charge and Fe/Al oxides with net positive surface charge coexist in variable-charge soils, and the interaction between these oppositely charged particles affects the stability of mixed colloids, aggregation, and even the surface chemical properties of variable-charge soils. The interaction of the diffuse layers of electrical double layers between the negatively charged soil colloidal particles and the positively charged particles of goethite or gamma-Al(2)O(3) was investigated in this article through the comparison of zeta potentials between single-soil colloidal systems and binary systems containing soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides. The results showed that the presence of goethite and gamma-Al(2)O(3) increased the zeta potential of the binary system containing soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides, which clearly suggests the overlapping of the diffuse layers in soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides. The overlapping of the diffuse layers leads to a decrease in the effective negative charge density on soil colloid and thus causes a shift of pH-zeta potential curves toward the more positive-value side. The interaction of the electrical double layers is also related to the charge characteristics on the Fe/Al oxides: the higher the positive charge density on Fe/Al oxides, the stronger the interaction of the electrical double layers between the soil colloid particles and the Fe/Al oxides.

  1. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650 ℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. D. Xiang; S. R. Rose; P. K. Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-lMo (wt.%)alloy steel by pack cementation at 650 ℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ℃ in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential Al oxidation.

  2. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D.Xiang; S.R.Rose; P.K.Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) alloy steel by pack cementation at 650℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ~C in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential A1 oxidation.

  3. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  4. ELECTROLYSIS OF SWINE MANURE EFFLUENTS USING THREE DIFFERENT ELECTRODES Fe-Fe, Al-Al AND Fe-Al

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine effluent with high organic strength need to be treated to make it suitable for applying to crop/pasture fields, or discharging to any waterways. Electrocoagulation is a relatively simpler and cheaper technique over biological and chemical treatment methods currently used to treat high-strength industrial and municipal wastewater. The performance of an electrocoagulation system mainly depends on the pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC of the medium, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD loading rates and catalytic activity of the electrodes used. In this research, a study was conducted to compare the pollutant removal efficiencies of three electrodes (Fe-Fe, Al-Al and Fe-Al with three electric current levels (500, 1000 and 2000 mA while treating swine manure effluents. The electrochemical cell consisted of two parallel rectangular plates (90×25×1.5 mm of Iron (Fe-Fe, Aluminum (Al-Al and Iron-Aluminum (Fe-Al, later on described as hybrid electrodes; immersed in a beaker with 550 mL swine effluents and powered by a Direct Current (DC supply. All studies were conducted in batches at room temperature. In general, removal efficiencies were increased with increasing current densities and electrolysis times for electrodes evaluated. Aluminum electrodes outperformed iron and hybrid (iron-aluminum electrodes in removing Total Phosphorus (TP at all current density levels tested. Overall, use of hybrid electrodes resulted in better COD removal. For the same treatment times (1200 s at higher current density (21 mA cm-2, hybrid electrodes removed about 100% COD, which are about 1.9 and 1.3 times higher than those of aluminum and iron electrodes, respectively. Iron electrodes showed the highest removal efficiency (85% for Total Organic Carbon (TOC at 21 mA cm-2 current density and 1200 s treatment time. Overall, lower Specific Electrical Energy Consumptions (SEECs per kg of Pollutants (TP, COD and TOC were estimated for the aluminum

  5. Stabilization of itinerant (band) magnetism in FeAl by Ga substitution for Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.; Mazin, I. I.; Hathaway, K. B.

    2001-06-01

    Band structure calculations of FeGa{sub 1{minus}x}Al{sub x} have been performed, to further investigate the stability of ferromagnetism in FeAl. The Stoner parameter increases by about 20% at the FeGa end. This is also confirmed by our spin-polarized calculations. We conclude that Ga substitution for Al is likely to stabilize the elusive (or illusive) ferromagnetic state in FeAl. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. 过渡金属铝化物 FeAl 和 CoAl 弹性性质的第一性原理研究%First-principles study on the elastic properties of the transition-metal aluminides:FeAl and CoAl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿晓菊; 武少华; 冯明海; 李冉

    2014-01-01

    本文通过第一性原理计算(密度泛函理论结合均匀形变方法)得到过渡金属铝化物FeAl和CoAl的二阶和三阶弹性常数,这些弹性常数是通过拟合计算出的能量与应力关系得到的.计算结果和理论数据及实验值符合的很好.接下来本文又研究了 FeAl和CoAl在不同压强下的弹性性质.不同压强下的弹性常数 Cij ,体模量 B ,剪切模量 G ,泊松比σ也成功的得到了.B/G比值和柯西压强 PC都表明在零压下FeAl和CoAl表现出脆性.在压强小于60GPa的情况下,增大压强可以增强它们的韧性,但它们始终表现为脆性.%The second-and third-order elastic constants of the B2-type translation-metal aluminides FeAl and CoAl have been calculated by using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory , in combination with the scheme of homogeneous deformation ,they are obtained by fitting the polynomi-als to the calculated energy-strain relationships .The calculated results are in good agreement with the a-vailable theoretical values and experimental data .We have also investigated the elastic properties of FeAl and CoAl under high pressures .The elastic constants Cij ,bulk modulus B ,shear modulus G and Pois-son’s ratio σ,as a function of pressure are presented .Through the Pugh ratio B/G and Cauchy pressure PC under different pressures ,the B2-type translation-metal aluminides FeAl and CoAl are predicted to have brittle behaviors at zero pressure .The pressure could yield improved ductility of FeAl and CoAl without significant changes at P < 60GPa ,but they have brittle behaviors in the pressure range of 0-60GPa .

  7. Processing of Intermetallic Titanium Aluminide Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Kühn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the possibility of processing titanium aluminide wires by cold deformation and annealing. An accumulative swaging and bundling technique is used to co-deform Ti and Al. Subsequently, a two step heat treatment is applied to form the desired intermetallics, which strongly depends on the ratio of Ti and Al in the final composite and therefore on the geometry of the starting composite. In a first step, the whole amount of Al is transformed to TiAl3 by Al diffusion into Ti. This involves the formation of 12% porosity. In a second step, the complete microstructure is transformed into the equilibrium state of -TiAl and TiAl3. Using this approach, it is possible to obtain various kinds of gradient materials, since there is an intrinsic concentration gradient installed due to the swaging and bundling technique, but the processing of pure -TiAl wires is possible as well.

  8. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, R.; Sieber, M.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na2SiO3·5H2O and K4P2O7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum.

  9. Characterization of segregation in nickel and titanium aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Larson, D.J.; Russell, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to characterize the distributions of microalloying additions in the microstructure of a variety of nickel and titanium aluminides. In Ni{sub 3}Al, boron additions were found to segregate to dislocations, low angle boundaries, stacking faults, antiphase boundaries, and grain boundaries. The boron and aluminum levels at grain boundaries were found to vary both from boundary to boundary and also along an individual boundary segment. In some cases, a boron-enriched film up to {approximately}3 nm thick was observed. In aluminum-enriched Ni{sub 3}Al, ultrafine clusters containing up to approximately 10 boron atoms were detected in the matrix. In contrast, the majority of the boron additions in NiAl was determined to be in the form of ultrafine MB{sub 2}-type precipitates. These precipitates offset the benefits of the boron segregation to the high angle grain boundaries. In molybdenum-doped NiAl, atom probe analyses indicated extremely low solubilities of the molybdenum and other trace impurities in the matrix and significant enrichments of molybdenum, nitrogen and silicon, boron, and iron at the grain boundaries. In boron-doped two phase {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} TiAl containing chromium, niobium, and tungsten, the boron level was found to be significantly depleted from the bulk level in both the {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases and a variety of coarse borides including TiB, TiB{sub 2} and a finer chromium-enriched (Ti, Cr){sub 2}B precipitate was observed. The tungsten and chromium were determined to partition preferentially to the {alpha}{sub 2} phase and also to segregated to the {alpha}{sub 2}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma} interfaces. These results indicate that a significant proportion of the microalloying elements are consumed by the boride precipitates.

  10. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  11. Strength anomaly in B2 FeAl single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimi, K.; Hanada, S.; Yoo, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matsumoto, N. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan). Graduate School

    1994-12-31

    Strength and deformation microstructure of B2 Fe-39 and 48%Al single crystals (composition given in atomic percent), which were fully annealed to remove frozen-in vacancies, have been investigated at temperatures between room temperature and 1073K. The hardness of as-homogenized Fe-48Al is higher than that of as-homogenized Fe-39Al while after additional annealing at 698K the hardness of Fe-48Al becomes lower than that of Fe-39Al. Fe-39Al single crystals slowly cooled after homogenizing at a high temperature were deformed in compression as a function of temperature and crystal orientation. A peak of yield strength appears around 0.5T{sub m} (T{sub m} = melting temperature). The orientation dependence of the critical resolved shear stress does not obey Schmid`s law even at room temperature and is quite different from that of b.c.c. metals and B2 intermetallics at low temperatures. At the peak temperature slip transition from <111>-type to <001>-type is found to occur macroscopically and microscopically, while it is observed in TEM that some of the [111] dislocations decompose into [101] and [010] on the (1096I) plane below the peak temperature. The physical sources for the positive temperature dependence of yield stress of B2 FeAl are discussed based on the obtained results.

  12. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys has been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a%Al-5a%Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added have been tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. Fracture path tends to be transgranular in all alloys and environments. The results will be discussed in the light of possible effects of Zr on oxide formation.

  13. Development of iron-aluminide hot-gas filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Judkins, R.R.

    1996-06-01

    Removal of particles from hot synthesis gas produced by coal gasification is vital to the success of these systems. In Integrated [Coal] Gasification Combined Cycle systems, the synthesis gas is the fuel for gas turbines. To avoid damage to turbine components, it is necessary that particles be removed from the fuel gas prior to combustion and introduction into the turbine. Reliability and durability of the hot-gas filtering devices used to remove the particles is, of course, of special importance. Hot-gas filter materials include both ceramics and metals. Numerous considerations must be made in selecting materials for these filters. Constituents in the hot gases may potentially degrade the properties and performance of the filters to the point that they are ineffective in removing the particles. Very significant efforts have been made by DOE and others to develop effective hot-particle filters and, although improvements have been made, alternative materials and structures are still needed.

  14. Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides under cyclic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagna, A.; Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior in air in hydrogen and in oxygen of an Fe-Al-Cr-Zr alloy is described. The results are compared to data for FA-129. A detailed analysis of frequency effects on fatigue crack growth rates of FA-129, tested in the B2 condition, shows that dislocation transport of hydrogen from the surface is the rate limiting step in fatigue crack growth.

  15. Characterization of Field-Exposed Iron Aluminide Hot Gas Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; McCleary, D.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Sawyer, J.; Lara-Curzio, E.; Judkins, R.R.

    2002-09-19

    The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas will require some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years (see, for example, Alvin 1997, Nieminen et al. 1996, Oakey et al. 1997, Quick and Weber 1995, Tortorelli, et al. 1999).

  16. Synthesis of Fe-Al nanoparticles by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Tong; Li Xing Guo

    2003-01-01

    Fe-Al nanoparticles of eight kinds have been prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction. The morphology, crystal structure, and chemical composition of the nanoparticles obtained were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), and induction-coupled plasma spectroscopy. The particle size was determined by TEM and Brunaumer-Emmet-Teller gas adsorption. It was found that all the nanoparticles have spherical shapes, with average particle size in the range of 29-46 nm. The oxide layer in nanoparticles containing Al after passivation is not observable by XRD and TEM. The Al contents in Fe-Al ultrafine particles are about 1.2-1.5 times those in the master alloys. The evaporation speeds of Al and Fe in Fe-Al alloys are mutually accelerated at a certain composition. The crystal structures of the Fe-Al nanoparticles vary with the composition of the master alloys. Pure Fe sub 3 Al (D0 sub 3) and FeAl (B2) structures are successfully produced with 15 and 25 at.% Al in bulks, respe...

  17. The Effect of Aluminum Content on the Microstructure and Cavitation Wear of Feal Intermetallic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasionowski Robert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic-based alloys (so called intermetallics of the Fe-Al binary system are modern construction materials, which in recent decades have found application in many branches of the power, chemical and automotive industries. High resistance of FeAl based alloys to cavitational erosion results first of all from their high hardness in the as-cast state, large compressive stresses in the material, as well as homogeneous structure. In the present paper, the effect of aluminum content on the microstructure, texture and strain implemented upon cavitation wear of FeAl intermetallic alloys, have been analyzed by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG SEM and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD analysis. Obtained results of structural characterization indicates that with increasing aluminium content effects of orientation randomization (weakening of //ND casting texture, grain refinement and rising of mechanical strenght (and so cavitational resistance take place.

  18. Tribological properties of high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al based composite coatings at elevated temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Shu; XU Wei-pu; ZU Zi-xin; XU Bin-shi

    2004-01-01

    Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were in-situ synthesized using Fe-Al/Cr3C2 or Fe-Al/WC cored wires and high velocity are spraying (HVAS) technology. The tribological properties of the Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were investigated using a ball-on-disc tribotester from room temperature to 650 ℃. The results show that the coatings have relatively high bond strength and micro-hardness. The tribological properties of Fe-Al/Cr3C2 and Fe-Al/WC composite coatings were further analyzed and compared. Low and stable wear rates of the Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were indicated from room temperature to 650 ℃. The excellent wear resistance of the composite coatings in high temperature was discussed.

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PERFORMANCE OF ALUMINIDE COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, B.A.; Zhang, Y.; Haynes, J.A.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    In order to determine the potential benefits and limitations of aluminide coatings, coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Fe- and Ni-base alloy substrates are being evaluated in various high-temperature environments. Testing of coatings on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys has found that high frequency thermal cycling (1h cycle time) can significantly degrade the coating. Based on comparison with similar specimens with no thermal cycling or a longer cycle time (100h), this degradation was not due to Al loss from the coating but most likely because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and the substrate. Several coated Ni-base alloys were tested in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO2 environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Coated specimens showed less mass loss than the uncoated specimens after 1000h at 900 C and preliminary characterization examined the post-test coating structure and extent of attack.

  20. Study of Microwave Absorbing Performances of Nanometer Fe-Al Solid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Wang; Xiaoping Liang; Shaobo Xin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Fe-Al solid solution was prepared by mechanical alloying technology, and Fe-Al powder was dispersed into unsaturated polyester (UP) with different contents as absorber to form mixture Fe-Al-UP. The results indicate that the alloying process is almost accomplished and most of the particles are nanometer. Meanwhile, the microwave absorbability of Fe-Al-UP samples in frequency from 0.3 MHz to 1.5 GHz was studied. The results indicate that the more the absorber, the better the absorbing property. The absorbing property of Fe-50Al-UP was slightly higher than Fe-28Al-UP.

  1. Spin freezing in the spin-liquid compound FeAl2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Strydom, André M.

    2015-02-01

    Spin freezing in the A -site spinel FeAl2O4 , which is a spin-liquid candidate, is studied using remnant magnetization and nonlinear magnetic susceptibility and isofield cooling and heating protocols. The remnant magnetization behavior of FeAl2O4 differs significantly from that of a canonical spin glass, which is also supported by analysis of the nonlinear magnetic susceptibility term χ3(T ) . Through the power-law analysis of χ3(T ) , a spin-freezing temperature Tg=11.4 ±0.9 K and critical exponent γ =1.48 ±0.59 are obtained. A Cole-Cole analysis of magnetic susceptibility shows the presence of broad spin relaxation times in FeAl2O4 , however, the irreversible dc susceptibility plot discourages an interpretation based on conventional spin-glass features. The magnetization measured using the cooling-and-heating-in-unequal-fields protocol brings more insight into the magnetic nature of this frustrated magnet and reveals unconventional glassy behavior. Combining our results, we arrive at the conclusion that the present sample of FeAl2O4 consists of a majority spin-liquid phase with "glassy" regions embedded.

  2. Gilbert damping parameter characterization in perpendicular magnetized Co2FeAl films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yishen; Lu, Jiwei; Khodadadi, Behrouz; Schäfer, Sebastian; Mewes, Tim; Wolf, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy(PMA) have gotten extensive recent attention because of their potential application in spintronic devices such as spin transfer torque random access memory (STT-RAM). It was shown that a much lower switching current density(JC) is required to write STT-RAM tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy ferromagnetic electrodes (p-MTJ). Additionally Heusler alloy Co2FeAl is expected to further reduce JC due to its ultra low Gilbert damping parameter. In our study, Heusler alloy Co2FeAl films were prepared using a Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition (BTIBD) technique. We demonstrated a low Gilbert damping parameter achieved in thick B2-Co2FeAl films. Besides, we achieved an interfacial PMA in ultra thin Co2FeAl films by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) with no external field presented. Annealing conditions were carefully adjusted to maximize the interfacial PMA. However it was noticed that a higher annealing temperature was required for a low damping parameter which to some extent sacrificed the interfacial PMA. We also deposited ultra thin CoFeB films and characterized their damping parameters for comparison. We acknowledge the financial support from DARPA.

  3. The Structure of FeAl Sinters Fabricated Using Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Durejko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A two stage process including a sintering under a cyclic loading is proposed as an alternative fabrication method of dense FeAl intermetallics from elemental powder mixtures. The first stage (pre-sintering is conducted at two temperature values (620 °C and 670 °C, respectively under a static and a cyclic loading with a frequency of 20, 40 and 60 Hz. The second one includes a pressureless sintering at temperature of 1250 °C, under a protective argon atmosphere. A suitable selection of pre-sintering parameters (temperature, type and frequency of pressing allows approximately five times grain size reduction of FeAl phase in comparison to particle size of raw Fe and Al powder material (40–60 µm, as well as induces an effective fragmentation of oxide layers. For the sinters obtained using 60 Hz loading frequency an oxide particle size of 4.0 or 4.5 µm (smaller for sintering with liquid phase is observed. Material obtained after the full heat treatment are characterized by a fine-grained structure of chemically homogeneous FeAl phase with uniformly distributed Al2O3 spherical particles along grain boundaries. Moreover, it was found that temperature and frequency of loading during the presintering process also affect a consolidation level of the Fe-Al powder mixture, which increases with rising both temperature and frequency.

  4. Magnetic damping and spin polarization of highly ordered B2 Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yishen [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Lu, Jiwei, E-mail: jl5tk@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Schäfer, Sebastian; Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mewes, Tim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Osofsky, Mike [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Wolf, Stuart A. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    Epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl films were synthesized using the Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition technique. Post annealing yielded Co{sub 2}FeAl films with an improved B2 chemical ordering. Both the magnetization and the Gilbert damping parameter were reduced with increased B2 ordering. A low damping parameter, ∼0.002, was attained in B2 ordered Co{sub 2}FeAl films without the presence of the L2{sub 1} Heusler phase, which suggests that the B2 structure is sufficient for providing low damping in Co{sub 2}FeAl. The spin polarization was ∼53% and was insensitive to the chemical ordering.

  5. Atomic origin of the spin-polarization of the Co2FeAl Heusler compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jaw-Yeu; Lam, Tu-Ngoc; Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chang, Shu-Jui; Lin, Hong-Ji; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Using synchrotron x-ray techniques, we studied the Co2FeAl spin-polarization state that generates the half-metallicity of the compound during an A2 (low-spin)  →  B2 (high-spin) phase transition. Given the advantage of element specificity of x-ray techniques, we could fingerprint the structural and magnetic cross-reactions between Co and Fe within a complex Co2FeAl structure deposited on a MgO (0 0 1) substrate. X-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure investigations determined that the Co atoms preferably populate the (1/4,1/4,1/4) and (3/4,3/4,3/4) sites during the development of the B2 phase. X-ray magnetic spectroscopy showed that although the two magnetic elements were ferromagnetically coupled, they interacted in a competing manner via a charge-transfer effect, which enhanced Co spin polarization at the expense of Fe spin polarization during the phase transition. This means that the spin-polarization of Co2FeAl was electronically dominated by Fe in A2 whereas the charge transfer turned the dominance to Co upon B2 formation. Helicity-dependent x-ray absorption spectra also revealed that only the minority state of Co/Fe was involved in the charge-transfer effect whereas the majority state was independent of it. Despite an overall increase of Co2FeAl magnetization, the charge-transfer effect created an undesired trade-off during the Co-Fe exchange interactions, because of the presence of twice as many X sites (Co) as Y sites (Fe) in the Heusler X 2 YZ formula. This suggests that the spin-polarization of Co2FeAl is unfortunately regulated by compromising the enhanced X (Co) sites and the suppressed Y (Fe) sites, irrespective of the development of the previously known high-spin-polarization phase of B2. This finding provides a possible cause for the limited half-metallicity of Co2FeAl discovered recently. Electronic tuning between the X and Y sites is necessary to further increase the spin-polarization, and likely the half

  6. Properties of Co2FeAl Heusler Alloy Nano-particles Synthesized by Coprecipitation and Thermal Deoxidization Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.H.Du; Y.L.Zuo; Z.Wang; J.H.Ma; L.Xi

    2013-01-01

    Co2FeAl nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing the coprecipitated precursor of CoCl2·6H2O,Fe(NO3)3·9H2O and Al2(SO4)3·18H2O under H2 atmosphere with various annealing temperatures and durations.X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the crystal structure and microstructure of Co2FeAl particles,respectively.The investigation indicates that the crystal structure of Co2FeAl particles tends to be B2 structure,in which atoms are partially ordered.The saturation magnetization and hyperfine field of Co2FeAl particles,which were measured under a vibrating sample magnetometer and a 57Fe M(o)ssbauer spectroscope,are consistent with those of the bulk sample and thin films.Furthermore,the higher annealing temperature and the longer annealing time,the better crystallinity of Co2FeAl and more ordered arrangement of atoms will be.It turned out that the coprecipitation thermal deoxidization method could be an easy and high efficient way to obtain the half-metallic Co2FeAl nanoparticles.

  7. Processing and properties of FeAl sheets obtained by roll compaction and sintering of water atomized powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, S.C.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Sikka, V.K.; McKernon, J.; Scorey, C.R.

    1999-07-01

    The low ductilities of FeAl alloys led us to explore powder metallurgical processing technology to obtain sheets of 0.2mm thickness as opposed to manufacturing processes based on hot rolling of cast FeAl alloys. In their approach, water atomized FeAl powders were roll compacted to 0.66mm with a polymeric binder using two counter rotating rolls to a green density of 3.1 g/cc. Roll compacted green sheets were then de-bindered in nitrogen in the temperature range of 300 to 600 C for several hours prior to sintering the sheets in vacuum. Sintered sheets were rolled down from 0.66 to 0.20 mm in three different stages resulting in a total reduction of 69%. Vacuum annealing of the sheets was carried out between each stage of the reduction process to eliminate edge cracking associated with the work hardening of the FeAl. The properties of the FeAl sheets depend on the Al content, annealing temperature and time in a vacuum furnace. The fine microstructure of FeAl sheets led to tensile elongations of 4 to 6%. The sheets are formable at room temperature, and possess excellent mechanical properties both at room and high temperatures.

  8. EFFECT OF MAGNETRON-SPUTTERED Al FILM ON LOW-TEMPERATURE PACK-ALUMINIZING COATING FOR OIL CASING STEEL N80

    OpenAIRE

    MIN HUANG; YU WANG; MENG-XIAN ZHANG; YAN-QIU HUO; PENG-JIN GAO

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature aluminizing coating was prepared onto the surface of oil casing steel N80 with a magnetron-sputtered Al film to improve its corrosion resistance. Results show that magnetron-sputtered Al film is able to form gradient aluminide coating, composed of iron aluminide FeAl3, Fe2Al5 and Fe3Al with different contents of aluminum. Both the density and continuity of iron aluminide layer for oil casing steel N80 with magnetron-sputtered Al film can be improved. Under the same corrosion c...

  9. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  10. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  11. Preparation of aluminide coatings at relatively low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhao-lin; HE Ye-dong; WANG De-ren; GAO Wei

    2006-01-01

    A method was presented to prepare aluminide coatings on metals by combining the pack aluminizing with the ball impact process. This technique applied mechanical vibration to a retort, which was loaded with pack-aluminizing powder, specimens and alloy balls. Pack aluminizing was carried out with repeated ball impact, which accelerated chemical reactions and atomic diffusion.Aluminide coatings were formed at a relatively lower temperature (below 600 ℃) and in a shorter treatment time, compared with the conventional pack aluminizing. The effects of the operation temperature and the treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analysed. The SEM, EDS and XRD analysis results show that the aluminide coatings appear to be homogeneous, with a high density and free of porosity, and have excellent adherence to the substrate. The coatings mainly consist of Al-rich phases such as η-Fe2Al5,θ-FeAl3 and CrAl5. Oxidation resistance was studied by high-temperature tests. The formation mechanism of the Al-coatings was also investigated. This technique provides a new approach for industrial diffusion coatings with great energy and time savings.

  12. Ceramic Conversion Treatment of Titanium Aluminide for Improved Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingXIA; ChenxiLI; HanshanDONG; TomBELL

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides have great potential in the automotive industries (e.g. valves in a car engine), but tribological property could be one of the crucial factors in determining the life and performance of a titanium aluminide part. A surface modification technique, namely ceramic conversion (CC) treatment has been developed to improve the tribological properties of a γ-based titanium aluminide (Ti-48A1-2Nb-2Cr-B), and the surface properties were fully characterised. The results indicate that ceramic conversion treatment can produce an oxide layer consisting of a top TiO2 surface followed by a mixture of TiO2 and Al2O3. Such hardened layer has significantly improved the load-bearing capacity and wear resistance of the intermetallics, as evidenced by an increase of scuffing load up to 4 times and a wear rate reduction of two orders of magnitude. The coefficient of friction has also been reduced from 0.5-0.7 for the untreated to an average of 0.22 for the CC-treated alloy under dry sliding contact conditions.

  13. Ceramic Conversion Treatment of Titanium Aluminide for Improved Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing XIA; Chenxi LI; Hanshan DONG; Tom BELL

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides have great potential in the automotive industries (e.g. valves in a car engine),but tribological property could be one of the crucial factors in determining the life and performance of a titanium aluminide part. A surface modification technique, namely ceramic conversion (CC) treatment has been developed to improve the tribological properties of a γ-based titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr-B), and the surface properties were fully characterised. The results indicate that ceramic conversion treatment can produce an oxide layer consisting of a top TiO2 surface followed by a mixture of TiO2 and Al2O3. Such hardened layer has significantly improved the load-bearing capacity and wear resistance of the intermetallics, as evidenced by an increase of scuffing load up to 4 times and a wear rate reduction of two orders of magnitude. The coefficient of friction has also been reduced from 0.5-0.7 for the untreated to an average of 0.22 for the CC-treated alloy under dry sliding contact conditions.

  14. Dynamic recrystallization and grain boundary migration in B2 FeAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, I.; Gaydosh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy were used to examine polycrystalline specimens of the B2-structured alloy FeAl strained under tension to fracture at elevated temperature. Strain-induced grain boundary migration was observed above 900 K and dynamic recrystallization was found at 1000 K and 1100 K. Little evidence of dynamic recovery was evident but some networks were formed at 1100 K.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  16. Shear faults and dislocation core structure simulations in B2 FeAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vailhe, C.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-11-01

    Embedded atom potentials were derived for the Fe-Al system reproducing lattice and elastic properties of B2 FeAl. The structure and energy of vacancies, antisites and anti phase boundaries (APBs) were studied. A significant decrease in the APB energy was obtained for Fe-rich B2 alloys. Shear fault energies along the {l_brace}110{r_brace} and {l_brace}112{r_brace} planes were computed showing that stable planar faults deviated from the exact APB fault. Core structures and critical Peierls stress values were simulated for the <100> and <111> dislocations. The superpartials created in the dissociation reactions were not of the 1/2<111> type, but 1/8<334> in accordance with the stable planar fault in the {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes. The results obtained for these simulations are discussed in terms of the mechanical behavior of FeAl and in comparison with B2 NiAl.

  17. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  18. Study of electronic structure and magnetic properties of epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler Alloy Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, S. [Department of Pure & Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324007 (India); Dalela, S., E-mail: sdphysics@rediffmail.com [Department of Pure & Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324007 (India); Sharma, S.S. [Department of Physics, Govt. Women Engineering College, Ajmer (India); Liu, E.K.; Wang, W.H.; Wu, G.H. [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kumar, M. [Department of Physics, Malviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur-302017 (India); Garg, K.B. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India)

    2016-07-25

    This work reports the magnetic and electronic characterization of plane magnetized buried Heusler Co{sub 2}FeAl nano thin films of different thickness by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements. . The spectra on both Fe- and Co L{sub 2,3} edges show a pronounced magnetic dichroic signal in remanence, corresponding to a ferromagnetically-aligned moments on Fe and Co atoms conditioning the peculiar characteristics of the Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler compound (a half-metallic ferromagnet). The detailed knowledge of the related magnetic and electronic properties of these samples over a wide range of thickness of films are indispensable for achieving a higher tunnel magnetoresistance ratio, and thus for spintronics device applications. - Highlights: • Electronic structure and Magnetic Properties of Epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler Films. • X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). • Fe- and Co L{sub 2,3} edges show a pronounced magnetic dichroic signal in remanence. • Calculated Orbital, Spin and total magnetic moments of Fe and Co for 30 nm Co{sub 2}FeAl thin film. • The total magnetic moment of Fe at L{sub 2,3} edges increases with the thickness of the Co2FeAl films.

  19. Ratio of Fe-Al compound at interface of steel-backed Al-graphite semi-solid bonding plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; DU Yun-hui; LIU Han-wu; ZHANG Jun; ZENG Da-ben; BA Li-min

    2007-01-01

    The ratio of Fe-Al compound at the bonding interface of solid steel plate to Al-7graphite slurry was used to characterize the interfacial structure of steel-Al-7graphite semi-solid bonding plate quantitatively. The relationship between the ratio of Fe-Al compound at interface and bonding parameters (such as preheat temperature of steel plate. solid fraction of Al-7graphite slurry and rolling speed) was established by artificial neural networks perfectly. The results show that when the bonding parameters are 516 ℃ for preheat temperature of steel plate, 32.5% for solid fraction of Al-7graphite slurry and 12 mm/s for rolling speed.the reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound corresponding to the largest interfacial shear strength of bonding plate is obtained to be 70.1%.This reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound is a quantitative criterion of interfacial embrimement, namely, when the ratio of Fe-Al compound at intefface is larger than 70.1%.interfacial embrittlement will occur.

  20. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  1. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  2. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  3. Processing of carbon containing gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.D.H.; Froebel, U.; Oehring, M.; Appel, F. [Inst. for Materials Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys have received much attention over the last decade with the intention of being used in turbine applications. In the as-cast state these alloys are relatively brittle when compared with conventional materials. In order to meet property requirements, optimisation of both alloy composition and microstructure are necessary. Alloys based on Ti-45Al-(5-10)Nb (at.%) with carbon additions seems capable of meeting many of the properties necessary for application. This paper addresses the reasons behind the choice of this alloy composition and discusses a relevant processing route. (orig.)

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of FeAl Intermetallics Prepared by Mechanical Alloying and Hot-Pressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haixia; WU Yunxin; TANG Chuan'an; YUAN Shuai; GONG Qianming; LIANG Ji

    2009-01-01

    FeAl intermetallics were prepared by mechanical alloying and vacuum hot-pressing. The Fe-48 at.% Al powder was ball-milled for 3-12 h, producing a solid solution structure of Fe (Al) with trace Al (Fe). Subsequent vacuum annealing or hot-pressing introduced phase transformations into the FeAl (B2) inter-metallics and Al2O3 inclusions. The hot-pressed FeAl intermetallics possess a high flexural strength of 831 Mpa and a fairly good strain at break of 3.2%. The results show that the addition of 0.5 at,% B reduces the peak temperature for hot-pressing from 1180℃ to 1100℃, and increases the density of the compacts from 95% to 96.3%, but results in no significant improvement in the mechanical properties.

  5. Interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and damping parameter in ultra thin Co{sub 2}FeAl films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yishen [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Khodadadi, Behrouz; Schaefer, Sebastian; Mewes, Tim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Lu, Jiwei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Wolf, Stuart A. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2013-04-22

    B2-ordered Co{sub 2}FeAl films were synthesized using an ion beam deposition tool. A high degree of chemical ordering {approx}81.2% with a low damping parameter ({alpha}) less than 0.004 was obtained in a 50 nm thick film via rapid thermal annealing at 600 Degree-Sign C. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was optimized in ultra thin Co{sub 2}FeAl films annealed at 350 Degree-Sign C without an external magnetic field. The reduced thickness and annealing temperature to achieve PMA introduced extrinsic factors thus increasing {alpha} significantly. However, the observed damping of Co{sub 2}FeAl films was still lower than that of Co{sub 60}Fe{sub 20}B{sub 20} films prepared at the same thickness and annealing temperature.

  6. Fabrication of FeAl-WC composite and metal/metal joint using pulse current sintering technique; Pulse tsudenshoketsu gijutsu wo riyoshita FEAl-WC fukugozai narabini kinzoku setsugotaino sakusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Nishio, T.; Ozaki, K.; Sugiyama, A.; Kamiya, A.; Asahina, T. [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya,Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-10-25

    Fe-40at%Al+0 {approx} 5at%B powder mixtures were milled in a planetary ball mill under argon atmosphere. The size of the particles decreased with increasing the B content. The mechanical properties such as transverse rupture strength and vickers hardness for Fe-40at%Al+3at%B compacts prepared by pulse current sintering were improved relative to Fe-40at%Al compacts. FeAl{sub 3}-0 {approx} 65vol%WC composites were prepared by using pulse current sintering in vacuum at the sintering temperature of 1,373 - 1,473K. The B added FeAl composites with 50vol% WC exhibited a transverse rupture strength of 1.7GPa and vickers hardness of 1,240. These values were 1.2 {approx} 1.5 times higher than those of FeAl-50vol%WC composites. A novel process for diffusion joining, a combination of pulse current sintering with pseudo-hot isostatic pressing (PHIP-PCS), was proposed. The joining between iron and aluminium tablets using PHIP-PCS process was successfully performed. (author)

  7. Procesado y caracterización de aleaciones Fe-Al

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Quevedo, Antoni

    2005-01-01

    Las aleaciones de Fe-Al forman intermetálicos que son una rama de las aleaciones que consiste en dos o mas metales, como por ejemplo Fe2-Al5. Los materiales intermetálicos son fases o compuestos con relaciones atómicas bien definidas con un intervalo muy limitado de composiciones posibles. Poseen una estructura cristalográfica con orden de largo alcance que puede mantenerse hasta la temperatura de fusión o puede desordenarse a una temperatura característica más baja. Esta estru...

  8. Rapid growth of FeAl inter-metallic compound under high undercooling conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yongjun; WEI Bingbo

    2004-01-01

    Fe-58at%Al alloy is undercooled up to 222 K(0.15TL) with the drop tube technique. It is found that there exists a critical undercooling about 185 K, beyond which a "dendrite-equiaxed" growth morphology transition occurs in FeAI intermetallic compound. This transition is characterized by sharp decrease of its grain size. Once the undercooling exceeds 215 K, the peritectic transformation is suppressed completely and a fibrous structure is formed, which results from the cooperative growth of FeAI and FeAl2 compounds.

  9. Cyclic-Oxidation Behavior of Multilayered Pt/Ru-Modified Aluminide Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxue Song; Hideyuki Murakami; Chungen Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered Pt/Ru modified aluminide coating for thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems has been investigated. 2 μm Pt+2μm Ru+2 μm Pt was first deposited on nickel-base superalloy DZ125 by electrodeposition, and then the coating was treated by annealing and a conventional pack-cementation aluminizing process. The cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. It was found that the thermal cyclic oxidation resistance of Pt/Ru-modified aluminide coating was comparable to that of Pt-modified aluminide coating, which was much better than simply aluminized DZ125. The addition of Ru to Pt-modified aluminide coating increased the resistance to rumpling. The microstructures and phase constitutions of the coating before and after oxidation were investigated.

  10. Protective Aluminide Coatings for NiCr Alloys in Combustion Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Schauer, J [TRW; Levin, V [TRW

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory exposures that simulated the oxidation-related attack in natural gas-fired reciprocating engines were conducted on Ni-Cr alloys with and without aluminide coatings. Exposure of uncoated Ni-Cr alloy specimens to humid air at 800 C resulted in a mass loss due to CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} evaporation and internal oxidation. Both model and commercial aluminide coatings reduced the amount of attack. The reaction products and Al interdiffusion were evaluated.

  11. Chromium and reactive element modified aluminide diffusion coatings on superalloys - Environmental testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Smialek, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The high temperature performance of reactive element (RE)-doped and Cr/RE-modified aluminide diffusion coatings on commercial Ni-base alloy substrates was determined. In isothermal oxidation at 1100 C in air, RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC substrates formed a continuous slow-growing n-Al2O3 scale after 44 hrs of exposure. The coatings were protected by either an outer ridge Al2O3 scale with an inner compact Al2O3 scale rich in RE or by a continuous compact scale without any noticeable cracks or flaws. The cyclic oxidation behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and IN 713LC alloys and of RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC alloys at 1100 C in static air was determined. Pack powder entrapment from the powder contacting (PC) process detracted significantly from the overall cyclic oxidation performance. Type I hot corrosion behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and Mar-M247 alloy substrates at 900 C in a catalyzed 0.1 percent SO3/O3 gas mixture was determined. The modified coatings produced from the PC arrangement provided significantly better resistance to hot corrosion attack than commercial low-activity aluminide coatings produced by the above pack arrangement.

  12. Influence of gas detonation spraying conditions on the quality of Fe-Al intermetallic protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senderowski C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present generalized research results and analyses of the quality of coatings produced with self decomposing Fe-Al intermetallic powders deposited on 1045 steel in the gas detonation spraying (GDS. A number of GDS experiments has been carried out with significantly changed operational spraying parameters (the volume of the fuel gas, carrier gas, distance and the frequency of spraying which define the process energy level directly influencing the quality of the coating. On the basis of the initial results the choice of the process parameters has been made to obtain the most advantageous set of geometrical and physical-mechanical properties of the coating material and substrate. The quality of the coatings was considered by taking into account the grain morphology, chemical content, phase inhomogeneity, cohesive porosity, as well as adhesive porosity in the substrate coating joint. The coating roughness was also considered. It was found that all GDS coatings produced are built with lamellar splats which result from the GDS process transformed (changed plasticity and geometry powder particles forming the deposit. The result of the GDS spraying parameters optimization is the lack of signs of melting of the material (even in microareas while the geometry of the deposited grains is considerably changed. This phenomenon has been considered as a proof of high plasticity of the GDS formed Fe-Al intermetallic coatings.

  13. Co{sub 2}FeAl films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in multilayer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X Q; Xu, X G; Yin, S Q; Zhang, D L; Miao, J; Jiang, Y, E-mail: xgxu@ustb.edu.cn, E-mail: yjiang@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-01-01

    We have fabricated Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a (Co{sub 2}FeAl/Ni){sub 6} multilayer structure. The effects of underlayer Cu thickness (t{sub Cu}), Co{sub 2}FeAl thickness (t{sub CFA}) and Ni thickness (t{sub Ni}) on the magnetic properties have been studied. The PMA is realized with a large anisotropy energy density K = 3.7x10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, a high squareness M{sub r}/M{sub s} = 1 and a small perpendicular coercivity H{sub c} = 60 Oe, while t{sub Cu}, t{sub CFA} and t{sub Ni} are 9 nm, 0.2 nm and 0.6 nm respectively. The PMA remains after 300 {sup 0}C annealing, which demonstrates better thermal stability of the (Co{sub 2}FeAl/Ni){sub 6} multilayer than that of (Co/Ni){sub n}.

  14. Effect of aluminum content on the passivation behavior of Fe-Al alloys in sulfuric acid solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Luu, W.C.; Wu, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    -Al alloys, which the Al content of alloy exceeds 19 at %, have wide passivation regions with low passivation current. However, when the Al content of Fe-Al alloys exceeds this range, the increment of Al content has slight influence on passivation behavior compared with ternary Cr addition....

  15. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Licai Fu; Jun Yang; Weimin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on...

  16. Effect of La_2O_3 on microstructure and high-temperature wear property of hot-press sintering FeAl intermetallic compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马兴伟; 金洙吉; 闫石; 徐久军

    2009-01-01

    FeAl intermetallic compound with different contents of rare earth oxide La2O3 addition was prepared by hot pressing the mechanically alloyed powders.Effect of La2O3 on microstructure and high-temperature wear property of the sintered FeAl samples was investigated in this paper.The results showed that 1 wt.% La2O3 addition could refine the microstructure and increase the density of the FeAl intermetallic compound,and correspondingly improved the high-temperature wear resistance.SEM and EDS analyses of the wo...

  17. Evaluation of natural organic matter adsorption on Fe-Al binary oxide: Comparison with single metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Jo; Jang, Am

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption characteristics of three types of standard natural organic matter (NOM) on iron-aluminum (Fe-Al) binary oxide (FAO) and heated aluminum oxide (HAO) under natural surface water condition were investigated using various adsorption isotherms and kinetic models. FAO was synthesized by Fe oxide and Al oxide, mixed using the sol-gel hydrothermal method, and aluminum sulfate was used to make HAO. The amount of adsorbed NOM was increased to 79.6 mg g(-1) for humic acid (HA), 101.1 mg g(-1) for sodium alginate (SA) in the FAO, but the maximum adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) (461.3 mg g(-1)) was identified on the HAO. The adsorption of HA, BSA, and SA dramatically increased (>70%) on FAO in 5 min and HA was significantly removed (90%) among the three NOM. Mutual interaction among the adsorbed NOM (BSA) occurred on the HAO surface during adsorption due to formation of monolayer by protein molecules at neutral pH. The pseudo second order clearly represented the adsorption kinetics for both adsorbents. The equilibrium isotherm data of FAO was better exhibited by the Langmuir isotherm model than by the Freundlich isotherm, but HAO was a slightly non-linear Langmuir type. Also, the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of adsorption were determined from the thermodynamic experiments. Adsorption on FAO was spontaneous and an exothermic process. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (FEEM) spectra were used to elucidate the variation in organic components. The results obtained suggests that the significant changes in the surface property of the adsorbent (large surface area, increased crystalline intensity, and fine particle size) were effectively determined by the Fe-synthesized Al oxide mixed using the sol-gel hydrothermal method. The results also suggest that the changes enhanced the adsorption capacity, whereby three NOM were notably removed on FAO regardless of NOM characteristics (hydrophobic and hydrophilic). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  18. Fracture behavior of DO3-ordered Fe-Al alloy with V addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼白杨; 鲁聪达; 金杰; 杨继隆

    2003-01-01

    The fracture behaviors of DO3-ordered Fe-28Al alloys with or without V addition were studied. The results show that addition of element V into Fe-Al alloy can improve the mechanical properties of the alloy. Contrasted with transgranular fracture of Fe3Al alloy at room temperature, the Fe3Al containing V has intergranular and transgranular cleavage mixed fracture mode. The theoretical calculation conforms that V addition could increase cleavage strength of Fe3Al alloy from 98.405 7 kJ/mol to 173.144 5 kJ/mol in 〈111〉 direction and from 29.660 4 kJ/mol to 47.673 0 kJ/mol in 〈100〉 direction.

  19. Sliding wear behavior of high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱子新; 徐滨士; 马世宁; 张伟

    2003-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of Fe-Al intermetallics based coating produced by high velocity arc spraying technique under dry sliding at room temperature were investigated using a ball-on-disc tribotester. The effect of sliding speed on friction coefficient and wear of the coating was studied. The worn surface of the coating was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to explore sliding friction and wear mechanism. The results show that the variations of friction coefficient can be divided into three distinct steps during the trail. Both the friction coefficient and the wear of the coating increase with increased sliding speed due to accelerated crack propagation rate and lamellar structure with poor ductility of the coating. The coating surface is subjected to alternately tensile stress and compression stress during sliding wear process, and the predominant wear mechanism of the coatings appears to be brittle fracture and delamination.

  20. Increased magnetic damping in ultrathin films of Co2FeAl with perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y. K.; Miura, Y.; Choi, R.; Ohkubo, T.; Wen, Z. C.; Ishioka, K.; Mandal, R.; Medapalli, R.; Sukegawa, H.; Mitani, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Hono, K.

    2017-06-01

    We estimated the magnetic damping constant α of Co2FeAl (CFA) Heusler alloy films of different thicknesses with an MgO capping layer by means of time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. CFA films with thicknesses of 1.2 nm and below exhibited perpendicular magnetic anisotropy arising from the presence of the interface with MgO. While α increased gradually with decreasing CFA film thickness down to 1.2 nm, it was increased substantially when the thickness was reduced further to 1.0 nm. Based on the microstructure analyses and first-principles calculations, we attributed the origin of the large α in the ultrathin CFA film primarily to the Al deficiency in the CFA layer, which caused an increase in the density of states and thereby in the scatterings of their spins.

  1. Ab-initio electronic and magnetic properties of Fe-Al alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiñaniz, E.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents ab-initio self-consistent calculations performed with the TB-LMTO code to study the different phases of the Fe-Al phase diagram, corresponding to the ordered structures B2, DO3 and B32 and for Fe50Al50 and Fe3Al compositions. Both, unpolarized and spin-polarized calculations have been performed to deduce the energetic difference between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state of the corresponding structure. Calculations for the disordered structures have also been performed for the previously mentioned compositions. These results show that by disordering the alloy magnetism is enhanced and that the equilibrium lattice parameter increases.

    En este trabajo se presentan cálculos autoconsistentes ab-initio realizados con el método TB-LMTO (Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Orbital con el fin de estudiar las diferentes estructuras que se presentan en el diagrama de fases de las aleaciones Fe-Al. Se han estudiado las estructuras ordenadas B2, DO3 y B32 para las siguientes concentraciones: Fe50Al50 y Fe3Al. Asimismo, se han realizado cálculos teniendo y sin tener en cuenta la polarización de spin con el fin de poder deducir la diferencia energética entre los estados ferromágneticos y paramágneticos de la misma estructura. Por otra parte se han realizado estos mismos cálculos para estructuras desordenadas y las mismas concentraciones. Los resultados muestran que mediante el desorden aumenta el magnetismo de estas aleaciones y crece el parámetro de red.

  2. Influence of addition of Si in FeAl alloys: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiñaniz, E.; Legarra, E.; Plazaola, F.; Garitaonandia, J. S.

    The magnetic behaviour of Fe-based magnetic systems has been studied theoretically and experimentally for many years [E.P. Wohlfath, K.H.J. Buschow, Handbook of Ferromagnetic Materials, vol. 4, North-Holland Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Tokyo, 1988 (Chapter 1)]. Starting with Al dissolved in Fe, the first stable structure is the D03 cubic structure and it exists over the range 23-37 at% Al. In this range these alloys present interesting magnetic properties. The other stable compound existing over a wide range of composition is FeAl which is also cubic, with the B2 structure (CsCl), and it exists over the range 37-50 at% Al. On the other hand, the FeAlSi alloys show the D03 structure, but do not show the B2 structure. The effect of Si in these alloys is double; on the one hand, it contributes to the decrease of the lattice parameter which, as reported by Nogues et al. [Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 024407], has a major influence on the magnetism and, on the other hand, having one more p electron than the Al atom, it promotes the charge transfer from Si to Fe atoms, as reported by Legarra et al. [Hyperfine Interact. 169 (2006) 1217-1222]. In this work, we perform ab-initio electronic calculations by means of tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TBLMTO) and Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) in order to study the magnetic contribution of Si/Al substitution in the FeAl alloys.

  3. Properties of porous FeAlO/FeAl ceramic matrix composite influenced by mechanical activation of FeAl powder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Usoltsev; S Tikhov; A Salanov; V Sadykov; G Golubkova; O Lomovskii

    2013-12-01

    Porous ceramic matrix composites FeAlO/FeAl with incorporated metal inclusions (cermets) were synthesized by pressureless method, which includes hydrothermal treatment of mechanically alloyed FeAl powder followed by calcination. Their main structural, textural and mechanical features are described. Variation of FeAl powder alloying time results in non-monotonous changes of the porosity and mechanical strength. Details of the cermet microstructure and its relation to the mechanical properties are discussed.

  4. Point Defects Quenched in Nickel Aluminide and Related Intermetallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiawen

    Point defects in the highly ordered B2 compounds NiAl, CoAl and FeAl were studied using the perturbed gammagamma angular correlations (PAC) technique. Quadrupole interactions detected at dilute ^{111}In probes on Al sites in NiAl and CoAl were identified with complexes containing one or two vacancies in the first atomic shell. Measurements on rapidly quenched NiAl and CoAl exhibited increases in site fractions of vacancy-probe complexes caused by formation of thermal defects. Site fractions were analyzed using the law of mass action to obtain absolute vacancy concentrations. PAC is shown to be a powerful new technique for the quantitative study of equilibrium defects in solids. For NiAl, the vacancy concentration quenched-in from a given temperature was found to be independent of composition over the range 50.4 -53.5 at.% Ni, identifying the Schottky defect (vacancy pair) as the dominant equilibrium defect, and ruling out the so-called triple defect. Formation energies and entropies of Schottky pairs were determined to be 2.66(8) and 3.48(12) eV, and 12(1) and 17(2) k_{rm B}, respectively, for NiAl and CoAl. The entropies suggest huge vacancy concentrations, 13%, at the melting temperatures of NiAl and CoAl. Migration energies of Ni and Co vacancies were found to be 1.8(2) and 2.5(2) eV, respectively. FeAl exhibited complex behavior. A low-temperature regime was detected in NiAl and CoAl within which vacancies are mobile but do not anneal out, so that the vacancy concentration remains constant. In NiAl, this "bottleneck" regime extends from 350 to 700 ^circC. Vacancies were found to be bound to the In probes with an energy very close to 0.20 eV in NiAl and CoAl. An explanation of the bottleneck is proposed in terms of saturation of all lattice sinks. This annealing bottleneck should exist in a wide range of intermetallic compounds when there is a sufficiently high vacancy concentration.

  5. Development of niobium aluminide-based composites with improved toughness using treated reinforcements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woytera, S.A.; Bhagat, R.B.; Amateau, M.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.

    1996-03-01

    Many ordered intermetallic compounds exhibit attractive properties for high temperature structural aerospace applications. The major obstacles limiting the use of these materials are their low ductility and toughness at room temperature and poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. In this investigation treated silicon carbide whisker and niobium particle reinforced niobium aluminide matrix composites have been fabricated by reaction hot pressing in vacuum. Elemental matrix powders react exothermally and form the niobium aluminide matrix in situ. A suitable hot pressing cycle has been established for the successful development of the niobium aluminide matrix, while reducing adverse reactions between the matrix and the reinforcements. The composites with treated reinforcements are expected to have high resistance to creep at elevated temperatures and they show relatively low hardness and higher toughness in comparison with the composites reinforced with untreated whiskers.

  6. X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism studies of Co2FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebke, D.; Kugler, Z.; Thomas, P.; Schebaum, O.; Schafers, M.; Nissen, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Hutten, A.; Arenholz, E.; Thomas, A.

    2010-01-11

    The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment of Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively. A high magnetic moment can be achieved for all annealing temperatures and the predicted bulk and interface magnetic moment of about 5 {tilde A}{sub B} are reached via heating. We will also present tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 153% at room temperature and 260% at 13 K for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes.

  7. The in-plane anisotropic magnetic damping of ultrathin epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Shuang [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Heibei Key Laboratory of Optic-Electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yan, Wei; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui, E-mail: xinhuiz@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The in-plane orientation-dependent effective damping of ultrathin Co{sub 2}FeAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been investigated by employing the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) measurements. It is found that the interface-induced uniaxial anisotropy is favorable for precession response and the anisotropy of precession frequency is mainly determined by this uniaxial anisotropy, while the magnetic relaxation time and damping factor exhibit the fourfold anisotropy at high-field regime. The field-independent anisotropic damping factor obtained at high fields indicates that the effective damping shows an intrinsic fourfold anisotropy for the epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films.

  8. Oxidation Behavior of α-alumina Scales on Fe-Al Diffusion Coating of China Activation Martensitic Steel(CLAM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN; Qin; YANG; Hong-guang; ZHAO; Wei-wei; YUAN; Xiao-ming; ZHU; Xin-xin

    2013-01-01

    It is well known thatα-Al2O3 phase has stable,high permeation reduction factor(PRF)and good resistance performance in liquid LiPb,which is considered as the reference tritium permeation barriercoating in future fusion reactor.In order to study the formation mechanism of stableα-Al2O3 scales on fusion structure material,the oxidation behavior of Fe-Al diffusion coating on China Low Activation

  9. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: I. Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, V. V.; Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2011-10-01

    The structures of the interfaces and transition zones of bimetallic metal-intermetallide joints produced by explosion welding under various conditions have been studied. The welded materials were commercial-purity titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide of two alloying schemes. The specific features of the structure and substructure of the zones under study are discussed. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones, as well as tracks of particles related to the transfer of particles of one metal into the other one, were observed. A possible scenario of formation of interfaces, depending on the composition of titanium aluminide and welding conditions, is proposed.

  10. A Finite Difference Method for Determining Interdiffusivity of Aluminide Coating Formed on Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua WEI; Xiaofeng SUN; Qi ZHENG; Guichen HOU; Hengrong GUAN; Zhuangqi HU

    2004-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed to extract the composition-dependent interdiffusivity from the concentration profiles in the aluminide coating prepared by pack cementation. The procedure is based on the classic finite difference method (FDM). In order to simplify the model, effect of some alloying elements on interdiffusivity can be negligible.Calculated results indicate the interdiffusivity in aluminide coating strongly depends on the composition and give the formulas used to calculate interdiffusivity at 850, 950 and 1050℃. The effect on interdiffusivity is briefly discussed.

  11. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Boice, J D

    2005-12-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl(x)) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl(x) occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl(x) in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information.

  12. Phase evolution and alloying mechanism of titanium aluminide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, J.S.; Li, K.; Li, X.B. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shu, Y.J. [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Y.J., E-mail: tangyongjian2000@sina.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • An evolution of phase composition of TiAl alloy nanoparticles was investigated. • An alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. • The alloying reaction was possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al. • The alloying product is determined by the temperature of Ti and Al small clusters. • The alloying mechanism can be explained based on Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction. - Abstract: The evolution of phase composition of titanium aluminide nanoparticles synthesized by the flow-levitation method was systematically investigated by adjustment of the evaporating temperature of the mixed metallic droplet and the X-ray diffraction spectrum. Their alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. ε(h, l)-TiAl{sub 3,} γ-TiAl and α{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al phases are gradually formed in TiAl alloy nanoparticles with the increasing of evaporating temperature of the mixed droplet. The alloying reaction is possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al during the cooling process with high cooling rate. And the alloying mechanism can be explained based on the Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction of Ti and Al small clusters.

  13. Magnetron-sputtered coatings for titanium aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewska, E.; Mitoraj, M.; Mania, R. [AGH-UST, Cracow (Poland). Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics; Zimowski, S.; Kot, M. [AGH-UST, Cracow (Poland). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics

    2010-07-01

    Third-generation titanium aluminide alloys fulfil major requirements as lightweight materials for structural applications at moderate temperatures and loads. They are known for attractive combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties, e.g. low density, good oxidation resistance and strength. Still a lot of work is being done to develop protection systems enabling their use at temperatures exceeding current limit of about 600-650 C. The protection systems under investigation include thick thermal barriers similar to the state-of-the-art coatings for superalloys but also thin layers functioning as diffusion barriers for gases to prevent embrittlement. The paper presents investigations on surface modification of a ({alpha}+{gamma}{sub 2}) Ti-46-8Nb alloy by means of magnetron sputtering of two-component targets: Cr-0.5Si, Cr-5Si, CrSi{sub 2} and Ti-10Si. Targets were obtained from elemental powders by hot pressing. The properties of thus produced surface layers were evaluated on the basis of nanoindentation and scratch tests in the as-received condition and after exposure to air at elevated temperature. Surfaces and cross-sections of the oxidized specimens were examined by SEM, EDS and XRD/GID. (orig.)

  14. Structure and magnetism of granular Fe-Al 2O 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Ardisson, J. D.; Viegas, A. D. C.; Schmidt, J. E.; Persiano, A. I. C.; Macedo, W. A. A.

    2001-05-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of granular Fe-Al 2O 3 nanocomposite obtained starting from sol-gel processing are presented. Samples with nominal Fe content ranging from 20% to 62% in volume were prepared. The conversion of Fe oxides into metallic Fe was obtained by calcination at 800°C followed by reduction at 600°C for 2 h in H 2 atmosphere. After reduction, our results indicated up to 78% α-Fe, preserving the mean diameter of the metallic nanoparticles between 50 and 80 nm, ˜16% Fe oxides and ˜7% interstitial Fe 2+ and substitutional Fe 3+ cations in the Al 2O 3 lattice. Vibrating sample magnetometry at 300 K resulted in coercivity between 400 and 630 Oe and saturation magnetization between 40 and 134 emu/g. From transport measurements, the highest magnetoresistance, close to 2% at room temperature, was observed for samples with 25% α-Fe and 51 vol% total Fe.

  15. Nanophase intermetallic FeAl obtained by sintering after mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, L., E-mail: luisa.dangelo@gmail.co [Departamento de Mecanica, UNEXPO, Luis Caballero Mejias, Charallave (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); D' Onofrio, L. [Facultad de Ciencias, Dpto. Fisica, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gonzalez, G., E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.v [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Apdo. 21827, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-08-26

    The preparation of bulk nanophase materials from nanocrystalline powders has been carried out by the application of sintering at high pressure. Fe-50 at.%Al system has been prepared by mechanical alloying for different milling periods from 1 to 50 h, using vials and balls of stainless steel and a ball-to-powder weight ratio (BPR) of 8:1 in a SPEX 8000 mill. Sintering of the 5 and 50 h milled powders was performed under high uniaxial pressure at 700 deg. C. The characterization of powders from each interval of milling was performed by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. After 5 h of milling formation of a nanocrystalline alpha-Fe(Al) solid solution that remains stable up to 50 h occurs. The grain size decreases to 7 nm after 50 h of milling. The sintering of the milled powders resulted in a nanophase-ordered FeAl alloys with a grain size of 16 nm. Grain growth during sintering was very small due to the effect of the high pressure applied.

  16. Theoretical study on Fe-Al clusters:geometric structure,bonding law and electronic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shougang; YIN Yansheng; WANG Daoping; LU Yao

    2004-01-01

    Structures of the small Fe-Al clusters with different atom proportion are calculated using the B3LYP method in density functional theory (DFT). Calculated results show that the Al atoms lose electrons easily while the Fe atoms capture electrons easily. The most stable geometry is the bonding between Fe and Fe atoms and between Fe and Al atoms with the largest possibility, and the cluster stability law with the same atom proportion accords with the change of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy and the entropy of cluster system. Moreover, the electronic structure study of the ground-state Fe3Al and Fe2CrAl clusters shows that the substitution of Cr atom for the Fe atom located at the next neighboring site of Al atom reduces localized electrons not only between Al atom and the next neighboring Cr atom, but also between Al atom and the nearest neighboring Fe atom. Although the substitution increases the plasticity and the magnetism of intermetallic compound, the stability of the system slightly decreases. Our theoretical results agree well with the experimental results.

  17. OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF NANOCRYSTAL ODS ALUMINIDE COATINGS PRODUCED BY PACK ALUMINIZING PROCESS ASSISTED BY BALL PEENING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.L. Zhan; Y.D. He; W. Gao

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystal ODS (oxide dispersion strengthening) aluminide coatings were produced on a stainless steel and nickel-based superalloy by the pack aluminizing process assisted by ball peening. Pure Al powders and 1% of ultra-fine Y2O3 powders were mixed by ball milling. The ultra-fine Y2O3powders were dispersed in Al particles. Ball peening welded the Al particles onto the substrate and accelerated the formation of aluminide coating. Nanocrystal ODS aluminide coatings were produced by the outward growth at a much low temperature (below 600℃) in a short treatment time.The effects of the operation temperature and treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analyzed. SEM (scanning electron microscope), AFM (atomic force microscope), EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), XRF (X-ray fluorescence spectrometer) and XRD (X-ray diffraction )methods were applied to investigate the microstructure of the coatings. High-temperature oxidation tests were carried out to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the ODS aluminide coatings.

  18. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  19. Study of boron effect on FeAl alloys with an ordered B2 structure; Etude de l'effet du bore sur les alliages FeAl ordonnes de structure B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay-Brun, A.S

    1998-06-01

    FeAl alloys with an ordered B2 structure have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high temperature. Nevertheless, their use is limited by the intergranular embrittlement at ambient temperature. It has already been shown that a doping by low amounts of boron can solve the problem of intergranular embrittlement. The aim of this work is to better understand the boron effect on the FeAl alloys. It has been confirmed that the boron doping change the mode of rupture of the FeAl alloys with a B2 structure; their strain on breaking point is increased. The limit of solubility of boron in Fe-40Al has been estimated between 400 and 800 ppm at 500 degrees Celsius. Above this limit, Fe{sub 2}B precipitates. The intergranular segregation of boron has been observed by Auger electron spectroscopy for all the FeAl alloys. The intergranular amount of boron is low (below 12%). In the range of boron solubility, the intergranular concentration of boron increases with its voluminal amount. From this result, boron segregation has been described by different models of equilibrium segregation; thus has been shown that it exists a strong repulsion energy between the segregated boron atoms. On the other hand, no equilibrium segregation model can describe the independence to temperature of the boron segregation and its very fast kinetics: these two characteristics have certainly to be explained by a segregation mechanism under equilibrium. The existence of a segregation mechanism under equilibrium has been confirmed by the observation of the acceleration of the vacancies elimination kinetics by boron. The interaction between the boron atoms and the thermal vacancies which migrates to grain boundaries lead to the formation of complexes. The importance of the boron effect is not limited to its role to grain boundaries. Indeed, has been observed a strong decrease of the long order distance in the alloys doped with boron. The structure of the dislocations created by the

  20. Large anisotropic Fe orbital moments in perpendicularly magnetized Co2FeAl Heusler alloy thin films revealed by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Jun; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Heusler alloy Co2FeAl thin films sharing an interface with a MgO layer is investigated by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Orbital and spin magnetic moments are deduced separately for Fe and Co 3d electrons. In addition, the PMA energies are estimated using the orbital magnetic moments parallel and perpendicular to the film surfaces. We found that PMA in Co2FeAl is determined mainly by the contribution of Fe atoms with large orbital magnetic moments, which are enhanced at the interface between Co2FeAl and MgO. Furthermore, element specific magnetization curves of Fe and Co are found to be similar, suggesting the existence of ferromagnetic coupling between Fe and Co PMA directions.

  1. Adhesion of Escherichia coli to nano-Fe/Al oxides and its effect on the surface chemical properties of Fe/Al oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-Dong; Li, Jiu-Yu; Jiang, Jun; Hong, Zhi-Neng; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the adhesion of Escherichia coli to α-Fe2O3 and γ-Al2O3 and the effects of adhesion on the surface properties of the oxides in batch experiments, where we conducted potentiometric titration, zeta potential measurements, and FTIR spectroscopy. The adhesion isotherms fitted a Langmuir equation well. γ-Al2O3 had a higher adhesion capacity than α-Fe2O3 because of the higher positive charge on γ-Al2O3. The adhesion of E. coli to Fe/Al oxides decreased with increasing pH. Adhesion increased with increasing NaCl concentration, reaching its maximum at 0.05M for α-Fe2O3 and at 0.1M for γ-Al2O3, after which it decreased with further increases in NaCl concentration. Therefore, the electrostatic force plays an important role in the adhesion of E. coli to Fe/Al oxides. The zeta potential-pH curves of the binary-system fell between that for bacteria and those for Fe/Al oxides. Thus, overlapping of the diffuse layers of the electric double layers on the negatively-charged E. coli and positively-charged Fe/Al oxides reduced the effective surface charge density of the minerals and bacteria. E. coli adhesion decreased the point of zero salt effect and the isoelectric point of the Fe/Al oxides. The FTIR spectra indicated that non-electrostatic force also contributed to the interaction between E. coli and Fe/Al oxides, in addition to the electrostatic force between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of Magnetically Modified Fe-Al Pillared Bentonite and Heterogeneous Fenton-like Degradation of Orange II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Kun; WANG Guanghua; LI Wenbing; WAN Dong; HU Qin; LU Lulu; WEI Xiaobi; CHENG Zhengzai

    2015-01-01

    Magnetically modified Fe-Al pillared bentonite (Fe3O4/ Fe-Al-Bent) was prepared via chemical co-precipitation method and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A series of experiments were carried out to investigate the degradation of Orange II by the obtained heterogeneous catalysts in the presence of H2O2. The experimental result indicated that the synthetic materials had a high catalytic activity and good reusability.

  3. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  4. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  5. Co2FeAl based magnetic tunnel junctions with BaO and MgO/BaO barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rogge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We succeed to integrate BaO as a tunneling barrier into Co2FeAl based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy it could be proven that the applied annealing temperatures during BaO deposition and afterwards do not cause any diffusion of Ba neither into the lower Heusler compound lead nor into the upper Fe counter electrode. Nevertheless, a negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR ratio of -10% is found for Co2FeAl (24 nm / BaO (5 nm / Fe (7 nm MTJs, which can be attributed to the preparation procedure and can be explained by the formation of Co- and Fe-oxides at the interfaces between the Heusler and the crystalline BaO barrier by comparing with theory. Although an amorphous structure of the BaO barrier seems to be confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, it cannot entirely be ruled out that this is an artifact of TEM sample preparation due to the sensitivity of BaO to moisture. By replacing the BaO tunneling barrier with an MgO/BaO double layer barrier, the electric stability could effectively be increased by a factor of five. The resulting TMR effect is found to be about +20% at room temperature, although a fully antiparallel state has not been realized.

  6. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-08-01

    An Fe-28%Al alloy containing 5% Cr has been synthesized by reaction of elemental powders, followed by consolidation using hot extrusion. The resulting material is fully dense, homogeneous, and has a grain size of less than 5{mu}m. Reaction synthesis results in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion that is uniformly dispersed during hot extrusion. Under some circumstances the hot extruded material undergoes secondary recrystallization, resulting in grain sizes greater than 25 millimeters. The fine grained material exhibits improved yield strength compared to the coarse grained material up to test temperatures of 800{degrees}C. Creep testing has shown that the coarse grained material has significantly improved time to rupture compared to fine grained material. The oxide dispersion strengthened material has significantly improved creep resistance compared to conventional powder metallurgy material. With proper heat treatment, the coarse grained material exhibits time to rupture of 425 hours at 650{degrees}C and a stress of 75 MPa, compared to 40 hours for conventional material of similar composition.

  7. Mechanical behavior of iron aluminides: A comparison of nanoindentation, compression and bending of micropillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanzade, Mohammad, E-mail: m.zamanzade@matsci.uni-sb.de [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Velayarce, Jorge Rafael [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Abad, Oscar Torrents [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials and Saarland University, Saarbrücken (Germany); Motz, Christian [Saarland University, Institute of Material Science and Methods, Saarbrücken (Germany); Barnoush, Afrooz [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    Various local testing methods, namely, nanoindentation, compression and bending tests of micropillars were used to better understand the influence of ternary Cr atoms on the extrinsic and intrinsic mechanical properties of Fe{sub 3}Al intermetallics with the D0{sub 3} super lattice. Using such local techniques enables us to quantify the influence of Cr on the enhancement of the Young´s modulus. Furthermore, the effect of Cr on the yield stress, strain hardening and appearance of slip traces was studied based on the stress–strain curves and secondary electron micrographs of the bended and compressed pillars.

  8. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    An Fe-28%Al alloy containing 5% Cr has been synthesized by reaction of elemental powders, followed by consolidation using hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion. The resulting materials are fully dense, homogeneous, and have a grain size of less than 5{mu}m. Processing strongly influences the propensity toward secondary recrystallization. While HIPped material is extremely resistant to grain growth, under some circumstances hot extruded material undergoes secondary recrystallization, resulting in grain sizes as large as 25 millimeters. Elevated temperature tensile properties and strain rate sensitivities are reported for fine and very coarse grained materials. Grain boundary sliding is not a significant deformation mode for any of the materials. The properties are compared to those of Fe{sub 3}Al processed from conventional hot extruded prealloyed. powder. It has been found that the reaction synthesized materials generally have superior elevated temperature tensile strength.

  9. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  10. An investigation of fracture and fatigue crack growth behavior of cast niobium aluminide intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, F.; Soboyejo, W.O. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 213 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0237 (United States)

    1999-05-31

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in cast Nb-15Al-xTi (x=10, 25 and 40 at%) niobium aluminide-based intermetallics. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth resistance are shown to improve significantly in the cast alloy containing 40 at% Ti. The improvements in the fracture toughness of the 40Ti alloy are shown to be due to the combined effects of ligament toughening, crack-tip plasticity and crack-tip blunting. The atomistic simulations show that the increased plasticity in these alloys is associated with their higher Ti content. The micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth are also elucidated. The implications of the results are discussed for potential structural application of niobium aluminide intermetallics. (orig.) 19 refs.

  11. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  12. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  13. The influence of Si on oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings on TiAl alloy

    OpenAIRE

    M. Goral; G. Moskal; L. Swadzba

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurrymethod and investigation of the influence of Si addition on isothermal oxidation of TiAlNb intermetallic alloy.Design/methodology/approach: : The isothermal oxidation resistance tests were done in the chamber furnaceat 900ºC for 500h time in the air atmosphere. The structure of coatings was investigated by light and scanningmicroscopy. The chemical composition of coatings and scales w...

  14. Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Aluminide via Electron Beam Melting Using Prealloyed and Blended Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Cormier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminide (TiAl is an intermetallic compound possessing excellent high-temperature performance while having significantly lower density than nickel-based superalloys. This paper presents preliminary results of experiments aimed at processing TiAl via the electron beam melting (EBM process. Two processing routes are explored. The first uses prealloyed powder, whereas the second explores controlled reaction synthesis. Issues such as processing parameters, vaporization of alloying elements, microstructure, and properties are discussed.

  15. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  16. Formation of vortices during explosion welding (titanium-orthorhombic titanium aluminide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, V. V.; Greenberg, B. A.; Antonova, O. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Sidorov, I. I.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of cladding commercially pure titanium by a plate of orthorhombic titanium aluminide has been investigated. The bimetallic joints of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium have been obtained by explosion welding. It has been found that the weld joint investigated had a multilayer structure consisting of a zone of continuous deformation observed in both materials, a zone of titanium recrystallization, and a transition zone near the interface. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones have been observed. It has been found that upon explosion welding the bonding of the surfaces is effected via melting and subsequent mixing (in the zone of vortices) and the transfer of particles of one metal into another with the formation of particle tracks (outside the zone of vortices). A possible scenario of the formation of the vortex zone in the melt with a subsequent eutectic decomposition is proposed. The structure of the vortex zones was found to consist of an ultrafine mixture of α and β grains (both phases are disordered) with the grain size changing in the limits of 50-300 nm. The regions of transition from the vortex zone to the region of continuous deformation of the aluminide and to the recrystallized zone of titanium have been investigated.

  17. A New Process for Titanium Aluminides Production from TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.R.Kamali; H. Razavizadeh; S.M.M. Hadavi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new process for producing titanium aluminides, in particular TiAl, from TiO2 raw material. On the basis of obtained results, the non-completed reaction of TiO2 with Al and Ca in a special reaction vessel results in the production of granulates of titanium aluminides especially Ti3Al and other TiAl phases as the metallic product and Ca12Al14O33 as the non-metallic product. By adding KClO4 in the mixture, a nearly completed reaction can be carried out. The products of this reaction are titanium aluminide particularly TiAl as the metallic part and CaAl4O7 (grossite) as the non-metallic slag part. Both product and slag are produced in a separated form. This process, called KRH-method is described in this article.The scanning electron microscopic microstructure of metallic part of the product shows different phases: the matrix phase is TiAl, where the needle form precipitation is TiAl2 and the plate form precipitation includes TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The microstructure of the remelted metallic part indicates dendritic phase with a lamellar structure comprising of TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The interdendritic phase of TiAl is also seen.

  18. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.P., E-mail: thpfys@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L. [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2015-06-11

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways.

  19. The Effect of Zirconium Addition on the Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Pytel, Maciej; Romanowska, Jolanta; Sieniawski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Nickel, Mar M247, and Mar M200 superalloys were coated with zirconium-doped aluminide deposited by the chemical vapor deposition method. All coatings consisted of two layers: an additive one, comprising of the β-NiAl phase and the interdiffusion one. The interdiffusion layer on pure nickel consisted of the γ'-Ni3Al phase and β-NiAl phase on superalloys. Precipitations of zirconium-rich particles were found near the coating's surface and at the interface between the additive and the interdiffusion layer. Zirconium doping of aluminide coating improved the oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings deposited both on the nickel substrate and on the Mar M200 superalloy. Precipitations of ZrO2 embedded by the Al2O3 oxide were formed during oxidation. It seems that the ZrO2 oxide increases adhesion of the Al2O3 oxide to the coating and decreases the propensity of the Al2O3 oxide rumpling and spalling.

  20. Epitactical FeAl films on sapphire and their magnetic properties; Epitaktische FeAl-Filme auf Saphir und ihre magnetischen Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautvetter, Moritz

    2011-05-05

    In the presented thesis epitaxial FeAl thin films on sapphire have been prepared by pulse laser deposition (PLD). The thin films deposited at room temperature exhibits ferromagnetism and subsequent annealing is necessary to transform the thin films to paramagnetic B2-phase, where the transition temperature depends on the crystalline orientation of the sapphire substrate. Alternatively, by deposition at higher substrate temperature the B2-phase is obtained directly. However, morphology of the FeAl film is influenced by different growth modes resulting from different substrate temperatures. The paramagnetic FeAl films can then be transformed to ferromagnetic phase by successive ion irradiation. Independent of the ion species used for irradiation, the same universal relation between thin films' coercive fields and irradiation damage is identified. The ion irradiation ferromagnetism can be transformed back to paramagnetism by subsequent annealing. The mutual transition between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases has been performed several times and shows full reversibility. The ferromagnetic phase induced by Kr{sup +} irradiation exhibits structural relaxation, where the saturate magnetization of FeAl thin film gradually decreases in several days. Later, ion irradiation has been performed selectively on defined areas of the thin film with the help of an unconventional lithography technique. The subsequent thin film is composed of ordered hexagonal array of ferromagnetic nano-cylinders separated by a paramagnetic matrix, suggesting a promising system for magnetic data storage. (orig.)

  1. Tritium permeation characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coatings as tritium permeation barriers on 321 type stainless steel containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feilong; Xiang, Xin; Lu, Guangda; Zhang, Guikai, E-mail: zhangguikai@caep.cn; Tang, Tao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-09-15

    Accurate tritium transport properties of prospective tritium permeation barriers (TPBs) are essential to tritium systems in fusion reactors. By passing a temperature and rate-controlled sweeping gas over specimen surfaces to carry the permeated tritium to an ion chamber, the gas-driven permeation of tritium has been performed on 321 type stainless steel containers with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl barriers, to determine the T-permeation resistant performance and mechanism of the barrier. The tritium permeability of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coated container was reduced by 3 orders of magnitude at 500–700 °C by contrast with that of the bare one, which meets the requirement of the tritium permeation reduction factor (PRF) of TPBs for tritium operating components in the CN-HCCB TBM. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl barrier resists the tritium permeation by the diffusion in the bulk substrate at a limited number of defect sites with an effective area and thickness, suggesting that the TPB quality is a very important factor for efficient T-permeation resistance. - Highlights: • T-permeation has been measured on bare and coated type 321 SS containers. • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coating give a reduction of T-permeability of 3 orders of magnitude. • Mechanism of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl barrier resisting T-permeation has obtained. • Quality of TPB is a very important factor for efficient T-permeating reduction.

  2. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licai Fu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on the synthesis of nanocrystalline metals and alloys prepared by combustion synthesis technique are reviewed. Then, the mechanical and tribological properties of these materials with microstructure control are discussed.

  3. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Licai Fu; Jun Yang; Weimin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on the synthesis of nanocrystalline metals and alloys prepared by combustion synthesis technique are reviewed. Then, the mechanical and tribological properties of these materials with microstructure control are discussed.

  4. Microstructural and Hardness Study of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Surface Alloyed Aluminum with Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Soltani, Reza; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud; Valefi, Zia

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the feasibility of the formation of surface layers containing hard iron aluminides on AA6061-T6 aluminum via pre-plasma spraying with iron and subsequently double surface melting by pulsed Nd:YAG laser is studied. The effects of single and double laser surface melting on microstructure, phase formation, and hardness of the treated layers are examined. Single-step laser treatment resulted in the presence of undissolved iron particles surrounded by lump-like Al5Fe2 and needle-like Al3Fe intermetallic compounds. Double laser surface melting dissolved the retained undissolved irons and resulted in the formation of Al-Al3Fe eutectic structure. Microhardness profiles along cross section and top surface of the treated layers indicated that laser surface alloying with iron enhanced the hardness of the aluminum to more than twice of that of the base material.

  5. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: II. Local melting zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Antonova, O. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the local melting zones that form during explosion welding of orthorhombic titanium aluminide with commercial-purity titanium near a wavy interface between them are studied. The Rayleigh number is estimated to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of a concentric structure in these zones. Titanium aluminide fragments are detected near the zone boundaries. It is assumed that the fragmentation in the transition zone is caused by the division of a material into loosely coupled microvolumes under the action of a strong external action in a time comparable with the explosion time. Outside the transition zone, fragmentation occurs via a traditional way beginning from dislocation accumulation. Both processes occur in titanium aluminide and only one process (banded structure formation) takes place in titanium.

  6. Effect of chromium on the corrosion resistance of aluminide coatings on nickel and nickel-based substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewski, K.; Godlewska, E.

    1987-04-01

    The aluminide and Cr-Al diffusion coatings on nickel and the nickel-based alloy EI 867 obtained by a two-step pack cementation technique were subjected to various corrosion tests consisting of oxidation under thermal cycling conditions as well as isothermal oxidation in the presence of fused Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The presence of chromium in the surface layer of aluminide coatings had a beneficial effect on their resistance to oxidation in that the oxide layer formed was less prone to spallation. This type of coating microstructure also appeared to be advantageous with respect to hot corrosion since pitting, which is typical of the degradation of aluminide coatings, was not observed. It is postulated that the chromium-enriched zone acts as a barrier to the oxidation of refractory metals (molybdenum, tungsten and vanadium) present in somewhat deeper coating layers in the form of carbide or intermetallic phases, thus preventing the onset of catastrophic corrosion.

  7. Pack Cementation Aluminide Coatings on Superalloys: Codeposition of Cr and Reactive Elements (RE). Technical Report 1. Chromium and Reactive Element(RE)- Modified Aluminide Diffusion Coatings on Superalloys: Environmental Testing. Technical Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Y, or Si) into commercial Ni-base alloy substrates (IN 713LC, Mar - M247 , Ren6 80, Ren6 80H, and Ren6 N4). The growth mechanisms and kinetics for the...34] A RE (Zr,Hf,Y)-doped aluminide coating with low Cr was therefore 17 developed for IN 713LC and Mar - M247 alloys using the "above pack" arrangement...concentrations and ionic conductivity. A Si-modified, Cr-enriched aluminide diffusion coating on Mar - M247 Ni-base alloy substrates was attempted using a

  8. Magnetic properties and high room temperature TMR ratios of Co{sub 2}FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebke, Daniel; Kugler, Zoe; Thomas, Patrick; Schebaum, Oliver; Schaefers, Markus; Nissen, Dennis; Schmalhorst, Jan; Huetten, Andreas; Thomas, Andy [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Physics Department, Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Spintronic devices have found a lot of attention in the recent years due to the possible new applications, e.g. a magnetic random access memory (MRAM). Therefore, materials with a high spin polarization such as half metallic Heusler compounds are eligible. In this work, we present low temperature tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 270% for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes. A low temperature dependence leads to high room temperature TMR values of about 150%. The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment at the barrier interface were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively.

  9. Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR on Fe-Al2O3 Nano Granular Film Growth by Helicon Plasma Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purwanto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Al2O3 nanogranular thin film by helicon plasma sputtering with the variation of Fe content from 0.1 to 0.7 volume fraction have been prepared. The magnetic and magnetoresistance properties were investigated by a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM and a Four Point Probe (FPP. The Rutherford BackScattering (RBS was performed with the SIMNRA software. Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS study was also performed to estimate the fraction of Fe and α-Fe2O3 in the granular film. The results suggested that the percolation concentration occured at 0.55 Fe volume fractions, with the maximum Magnetoresistance (MR ratio of 3%. The present MR ratio that was lower than the previous results may be related to the existence of α-Fe2O3 phase.

  10. The effect of boron doping on the magnetostriction of Fe-Ga and Fe-Al samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Mathias; Granovsky, Sergey; Loewenhaupt, Michael [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (Germany); Teodoro dos Santos, Claudio; Bormio-Nunes, Cristina [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, Lorena (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fe-Ga (Galfenol) based alloys are used in a number of magnetomechanical applications because of the high magnetostriction values of more than 100 ppm at room temperature. The addition of boron inhibits the crystallographic ordering of the alloys and stabilizes the disordered A2 structure that is responsible for the high striction values. Especially, polycrystalline and rapid cooled Fe-Ga-B and Fe-Al-B samples were investigated in our project. Magnetization and longitudinal as well as transversal magnetostriction measurements at temperatures of 5 K, 80 K and 300 K show a similar effect of the amount of B as found on single crystals. Whereas the saturation magnetization is nearly the same and mainly determined by the Fe content, a dependence of the striction values on the amount of B is visible (more than 10% in the Fe-Al system). The results illustrate the influence of the stoichiometry and the preparation conditions on the magnetomechanical properties.

  11. Thermal degradation of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) over synthesized Fe-Al composite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Qianqian; Su, Guijin; Huang, Xinchen; Li, Binke; Zhao, Yanhui; Miao, Xue; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-05-01

    A series of Fe-Al composite oxides were synthesized by the hydrothermal method using different urea dosages and examined towards the degradation of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) at 300 °C. The as-prepared oxides were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The morphology and composition of the prepared materials could be regulated by controlling the urea concentration. Interestingly, these properties influenced the nature and amount of the hydrodebromination products generated during the degradation of BDE-47. The degradation of BDE-47 over the composite oxide prepared at a urea dosage of 3 mmol generated BDE-17 as the major isomer product, followed by BDE-28/33, -30, and -32, among the tribromodiphenyl ethers (tri-BDEs). Regarding the dibromodiphenyl ethers (di-BDEs) produced, the amount of the isomers decreased in the order of BDE-8/11 > BDE-7 > BDE-15 > BDE-10. And the BDE-1 among monobromodiphenyl was determined. In contrast, over the composite oxides prepared at urea dosages greater than 3 mmol, BDE-28/33 gradually become the major isomer product instead of BDE-17 among tri-BDEs. The amount of the other di-BDEs isomer such as BDE-15 and -10 approach to be comparable to that BDE-8/11. However, regardless of the urea dosage, BDE-47 converted into BDE-75 via an isomerization reaction. Based on these intermediate products identification, a possible hydrodebromination mechanism of BDE-47 over Fe-Al composite oxide was comprehensively traced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic and structural properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films grown on Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmeguenai, Mohamed, E-mail: belmeguenai.mohamed@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407) 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément Université Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Tuzcuoglu, Hanife [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407) 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément Université Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gabor, Mihai; Petrisor, Traian [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Street Memorandumului No. 28, RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tiusan, Coriolan [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Street Memorandumului No. 28, RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Nancy, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Berling, Dominique [IS2M (CNRS-LRC 7228), 15 rue Jean Starcky, Université de Haute-Alsace, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse-Cedex (France); Zighem, Fatih; Mourad Chérif, Salim [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407) 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément Université Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between magnetic and structural properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) thin films of different thicknesses (10 nmFeAl thin films were grown on a Si(001) substrates and annealed at 600 °C. • The thickness dependence of magnetic and structural properties has been studied. • X-ray measurements revealed an (011) out-of-plane textured growth of the films. • The easy axis coercive field varies linearly with the inverse CFA thickness. • The effective magnetization increases linearly with the inverse film thickness.

  13. Trends in dislocation core structures and mechanical behavior in B2 aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vailhe, C.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to understand the deformation mechanism in high temperature B2 intermetallics, atomistic simulations were carried out for dislocation cores in a series of compounds exhibiting the B2 structure (FeAl, NiAl, CoAl). A comparison was made on the basis of core structures, dislocation splittings and Peierls stress values. The (110) and (112) {gamma} surfaces were computed for these three compounds. The importance of the APB values and the maximum shear faults for explaining the dislocation behavior is discussed.

  14. Intermetallic blades for fabric cutting. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shih, H.R. [Jackson State Univ., MS (United States); Off, J.W.A. [Textile/Clothing Technology Corp., Cary, NC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the evaluation of nickel- and iron-aluminide blades for cutting fabric as opposed to conventional steel blades. The aluminides were selected as blade material because of their extremely high work-hardening rate and the possibility of forming aluminum oxide on the surface to further enhance the wear resistance. Unlike steel blades, they do not require heat treating to become strong. A testing facility using an Eastman cutter was designed and built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing of blades. Denim fabric supplied by Levi Strauss was used. For lack of sufficient fabric, heavy paper was also used. Extensive testing revealed that there were several issues in getting the true comparison between various blades. The most important issue was the consistent sharpening of the blade edge. With all of the effort and precautions, identical edges could not be put on the blades of all the different materials. The second issue was the limited availability of fabric to evaluate the end-of-life limit for the blade edges. Two nickel- and three iron-aluminide compositions were evaluated. Under test conditions, the iron-aluminide alloy (PM-60), based on FeAl, was found to outperform other aluminides and the steel blade. Based on the data presented in this report, the authors recommend that additional testing be carried out on both the steel and aluminide blades to determine the number of times each blade can be sharpened prior to its replacement. However, the recommended testing needs to be conducted on blades for which the identical cutting edges and sharpening are incorporated. They further recommend that if the iron-aluminide blade is truly superior, a cost analysis be performed to determine its commercial feasibility. The best aluminide blades should be tested by commercial textile companies.

  15. Intermetallic blades for fabric cutting. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shih, H.R. [Jackson State Univ., MS (United States); Off, J.W.A. [Textile/Clothing Technology Corp., Cary, NC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the evaluation of nickel- and iron-aluminide blades for cutting fabric as opposed to conventional steel blades. The aluminides were selected as blade material because of their extremely high work-hardening rate and the possibility of forming aluminum oxide on the surface to further enhance the wear resistance. Unlike steel blades, they do not require heat treating to become strong. A testing facility using an Eastman cutter was designed and built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing of blades. Denim fabric supplied by Levi Strauss was used. For lack of sufficient fabric, heavy paper was also used. Extensive testing revealed that there were several issues in getting the true comparison between various blades. The most important issue was the consistent sharpening of the blade edge. With all of the effort and precautions, identical edges could not be put on the blades of all the different materials. The second issue was the limited availability of fabric to evaluate the end-of-life limit for the blade edges. Two nickel- and three iron-aluminide compositions were evaluated. Under test conditions, the iron-aluminide alloy (PM-60), based on FeAl, was found to outperform other aluminides and the steel blade. Based on the data presented in this report, the authors recommend that additional testing be carried out on both the steel and aluminide blades to determine the number of times each blade can be sharpened prior to its replacement. However, the recommended testing needs to be conducted on blades for which the identical cutting edges and sharpening are incorporated. They further recommend that if the iron-aluminide blade is truly superior, a cost analysis be performed to determine its commercial feasibility. The best aluminide blades should be tested by commercial textile companies.

  16. Differential scanning calorimetry and reaction kinetics studies of {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India)

    2012-12-14

    Reaction synthesis method for titanium aluminide processing consists of an exothermic reaction among alloying elements present and primarily between titanium and aluminium particles at specific temperature range. Study of this reaction helps in understanding the process of aluminide formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study is the suitable method to study such reactions. In the present work, five different alloy mixtures based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B are prepared and DSC study is carried out. Onset temperature, peak temperature and completion temperature of the major exothermic reaction is analyzed at different heating rates. Further, kinetics of the reaction is studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Activation energy and Avrami parameter are calculated and compared with the reported works on binary alloy. It has been observed that exothermic reaction is triggered by melting of aluminium. Boron assists in increasing the enthalpy of reaction by boride formation. Primary reaction product is found to be TiAl{sub 3}. Activation energy as well as Avrami parameter is found to have marginal variation due to small change in alloying elements in different alloys and due to heating rates in the same alloy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction kinetics studies of Ti-aluminide alloy powder mixtures carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five compositions studied through non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of minor boron addition and role of Ti particle size is noted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energies using JMA equations are between 169.5 and 192.49 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  17. Piercing mandrel strengthening by surfacing with nickel aluminide-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, I. V.; Dubtsov, Yu N.; Sokolov, G. N.; Artem'ev, A. A.; Lysak, V. I.; Elsukov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrode composite wire (CW) was used for argon-arc surfacing of a thermal-resisting nickel aluminide-based alloy (Ni-Al-Cr-W-Mo-Ta system) on the butt-end surface of the non-water-cooled piercing mandrel. It was shown that multipassing surfacing forms a defect-free deposited metal based on the γ’-Ni3Al phase of various structural origins. Using high-temperature sclerometry and thermal fatigue testing methods, the metal deposited with CW containing ultrafine particle of 0.3-0.4 % wt. WC carbide features increased resistance to thermal and force effects at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  18. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  1. Fabrication of highly spin-polarized Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vahidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic Heusler Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 epitaxial thin-films have been fabricated in the L21 structure with saturation magnetizations over 1200 emu/cm3. Andreev reflection measurements show that the spin polarization is as high as 80% in samples sputtered on unheated MgO (100 substrates and annealed at high temperatures. However, the spin polarization is considerably smaller in samples deposited on heated substrates.

  2. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of the smallest metal clusters: the diatomic 3D transition metal aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-06-01

    A systematic study of the electronic spectroscopy, electronic structure, and chemical bonding has been initiated for the 3d series of diatomic transition metal aluminides. This report provides a review of the progress to date, with specific emphasis on AlCa, AlV, AlCr, AlMn, AlCo, AlNi, AlCu, and AlZn.

  3. Heat resistance of Fe-Al intermetallics in the context of selected heat-resistant and hihg-temperature creep resistant steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baranowski

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Results are hereby presented of heat-resistance tests of two Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys in the context of St41k-typeboiler steel and 50H21G9N4 high-temperature creep resistant steel. It has been ascertained that heat resistance of the 50H21G9N4 steeland of the Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys significantly exceeds that of the boiler steel tested in the air atmosphere and the atmosphere of a flue gas with CO, CO2, SiO2 content alike. Improvement of these properties depends of exposure conditions. The largest differences have been observed when the tests were carried out in temperature 1023 K and in the flue gas atmosphere. The differences have been more and more noticeable as the exposition duration extended. A tendency has been also recorded of smaller mass decrements of the Fe3Al and FeAl intermetallic phase-based alloys as compared to the 50H21G9N4 steel.

  4. Tunable ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling in perpendicularly magnetized L1{sub 0}-MnGa/Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Q. L., E-mail: qinli-ma@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Mizukami, S.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan)

    2014-12-21

    In this work, we report a tailorable exchange coupling (J{sub ex}) at the Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38}/Co{sub 2}FeAl interface, where Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} and Co{sub 2}FeAl alloys are tetragonal Heusler alloy with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and typical cubic Heusler alloy with soft magnetism, respectively. As the post annealing temperature (T{sub a}) is lower than 375 °C, the J{sub ex} is ferromagnetic with strength controllable from 7.5 to 0.5 erg/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, as T{sub a} increases higher than 400 °C, an antiferromagnetic J{sub ex} of −5.5 erg/cm{sup 2} is observed. The ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic transition is further evidenced by the spin dependent transport property of the magnetic tunnel junctions with Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38}/Co{sub 2}FeAl as electrode. Based on structure characterization, the variation of J{sub ex} during annealing is discussed.

  5. Tritium permeation characterization of Al2O3/FeAl coatings as tritium permeation barriers on 321 type stainless steel containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feilong; Xiang, Xin; Lu, Guangda; Zhang, Guikai; Tang, Tao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    Accurate tritium transport properties of prospective tritium permeation barriers (TPBs) are essential to tritium systems in fusion reactors. By passing a temperature and rate-controlled sweeping gas over specimen surfaces to carry the permeated tritium to an ion chamber, the gas-driven permeation of tritium has been performed on 321 type stainless steel containers with Al2O3/FeAl barriers, to determine the T-permeation resistant performance and mechanism of the barrier. The tritium permeability of the Al2O3/FeAl coated container was reduced by 3 orders of magnitude at 500-700 °C by contrast with that of the bare one, which meets the requirement of the tritium permeation reduction factor (PRF) of TPBs for tritium operating components in the CN-HCCB TBM. The Al2O3/FeAl barrier resists the tritium permeation by the diffusion in the bulk substrate at a limited number of defect sites with an effective area and thickness, suggesting that the TPB quality is a very important factor for efficient T-permeation resistance.

  6. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe-Al intermetallic coating on 45 steel synthesized by double glow plasma surface alloying technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiao-lin; YAO Zheng-jun; GU Xue-dong; CONG Wei; ZHANG Ping-ze

    2009-01-01

    A binary Fe-Al alloyed layer was synthesized on 45 steel by means of double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The corrosion-resisting layer prepared is composed of a sedimentary layer and a diffusion layer, with a total thickness of about 180 μm. The aluminum content of the alloyed layer shows gradual change from surface to the inside of substrate. The ideal profile is beneficial to the metallurgical bonding of the surface alloying layer with substrate materials. The microstructure of both layers consists of the Fe-Al intermetallic compound, which is FeAl with B2 structure in the sedimentary layer and Fe3Al with incompletely ordered DO3 structure in the diffusion layer. The protective film exhibits high micro-hardness. In comparison with the substrate of 45 steel, the corrosion resistance of the aluminized sample is much higher in 2.0% Na2S and 0.05 mol/L Na2SO4 + 0.5 mol/L NaCl mixed solutions.

  7. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  8. Nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in an explosion-welded laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Pavlyukova, D. V.; Yartsev, P. S.; Golovin, E. D.

    2012-10-01

    Processes of nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in a 23-layer aluminum-titanium composite produced by explosion welding have been studied. In the vortex zones of seven upper welds, microvolumes of melted metal whose microhardness is ˜5500 MPa have been revealed, which corresponds to the microhardness of the intermetallic compound Al3Ti. No formation of titanium aluminide in welded junctions that were not subjected to additional heat treatment has been revealed by X-ray diffraction. The holding of the composites at 630°C is accompanied by the formation of interlayers of intermetallic compounds of the Al3Ti type. Intermetallic compounds of two morphological types are formed in the welds. In the regions of vortex zones, compact precipitates of Al3Ti are formed; in the other regions of the welds, intermetallic compounds in the form of a film are precipitated. The intermetallic compounds of the first type grow more rapidly and in final account absorb the precipitates of the film type. The activation of diffusion in the upper junctions that occurs upon heating of the welded composites is favored by the nonequilibrium state of the material caused by the strain hardening of the initial samples. In the welds located deeper than the 13th layer, no signs of the formation of compact intermetallic compounds have been revealed upon the annealing for 5 h and less.

  9. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  10. High temperature performance of nickel aluminide castings for furnace fixtures and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, J.E. [United Defense, Anniston, AL (United States); Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Materials are often the key to technological advancement. To remain competitive and create new markets, modern heat treating industries must utilize these technological advances to increase production and process efficiencies. These challenges are frequently met by increasing process temperatures and minimizing down time for maintenance and unscheduled repairs. This requirement has frequently been a challenge in the past since an increase in the process temperature typically results in a decrease in the life of the furnace fixtures and components. Nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys, based on the Ni{sub 3}Al composition and structure, are a new class of materials for use in the heat treating industries. These alloys provide excellent strength at elevated temperatures combined with very good resistance to carburization (in reducing and oxidizing environments) and high temperature oxidation. The mechanical and physical properties of cast nickel aluminide alloys are presented and compared to other commercially available cast and wrought heat resistant alloys. The advances in the development of these alloys are also discussed.

  11. Microstructural Study on Oxidation Resistance of Nonmodified and Platinum Modified Aluminide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Sieniawski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Platinum electroplating layers (3 and 7 μm thick) were deposited on the surface of the Inconel 713 LC, CMSX 4, and Inconel 625 Ni-base superalloys. Diffusion treatment at 1050°C for 2 h under argon atmosphere was performed after electroplating. Diffusion treated samples were aluminized according to the low activity CVD process at 1050°C for 8 h. The nonmodified aluminide coatings consist of NiAl phase. Platinum modification let to obtain the (Ni,Pt)Al phase in coatings. The coated samples were subjected to cyclic oxidation testing at 1100°C. It was discovered that increase of the platinum electroplating thickness from 3 to 7 μm provides the improvement of oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings. Increase of the platinum thickness causes decreases in weight change and decreases in parabolic constant during oxidation. The platinum provides the pure Al2O3 oxide formation, slow growth oxide layer, and delay the oxide spalling during heating-cooling thermal cycles.

  12. Formation and Characterization of Titanium Modified Aluminide Coatings on IN738LC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Moradi; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh

    2004-01-01

    Up to now, the aluminide coatings used to protect industrial components at high temperature and corrosive environments have been modified by Pt, Cr, Si and Ni. In this investigation, aluminide coatings were modified by titanium and the microstructural feature and formation mechanism were evaluated. The coatings were formed on a Ni-based superalloy(IN738LC) by a two stage process including titanizing at first and aluminizing thereafter. Pack cementation titanizing performed at temperatures 950℃ and 1050℃ in several mixtures of Ti, Al2O3 and NH4Cl. At the second stage,aluminum diffused into surface of the specimens by an industrial aluminizing process known as Elcoatl01(4 hrs at 1050℃C). The modified coatings were characterized by means of standard optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy,energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-Ray diffraction methods. The results show that Ti in the coatings is mainly present in the form of TiNi and Al67CrsTi25. Titanium modified coatings grew with a mechanism similar to simple aluminizing; this includes inward diffusion of Al from the pack to the substrate and then outward diffusion of Ni from the substrate to the coating. The advantages and characteristics of this two-stage modified coating is discussed and the process parameters are proposed to obtain a coating of optimum microstructure.

  13. Struktura i svojstva plazma sprej Aps - Nikal - Aluminid prevlake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo Rade Mrdak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cilj ovog istraživanja je da se optimizacijom parametara deponovanja dobiju optimalne strukturne i mehaničke karakteristike Ni20Al slojeva, koji će se primeniti na delu za radarsku stanicu. Prah je deponovan atmosferskim plazma sprej (APS postupkom sa plazma sprej (PS odstojanjem 80, 90 i 100 mm. Prevlaka sa najboljim karakteristikama deponovana je na utvrđivaču  turbo- gasnog motora GTD 2PV8 za radarsku stanicu, da bi se smanjio uticaj oksidacije  i vibracija na habanje na 450–500°C. Procene Ni20Al slojeva prevlake urađene su na osnovu njihovih mikrostruktura, mikrotvrdoća i zatezne čvrstoće. Najbolju strukturu i mehaničke  karakteristike pokazali su slojevi deponovani sa plazma sprej odstojanjem od 80 mm. Morfologija površine deponovane prevlake i morfologija loma najboljih slojeva ispitana je na SEM-u (skening elektronskom mikroskopu. Mikrostruktura slojeva deponovanih prevlaka ispitana je na svetlosnom mikroskopu. Mikrostrukturna analiza deponovanih slojevima urađena je u skladu sa standardom Pratt-Whitney. Procena mehaničkih karakteristika slojeva urađena je ispitivanjem mikrotvrdoće metodom HV0.3 i čvrstoće spoja ispitivanjem na zatezanje. Istraživanja su pokazala da plazma sprej odstojanje bitno utiče na mehaničke osobine i mikrostrukture prevlaka. Efekat primene Ni20Al prevlake ispitan je na utvrđivaču  turbogasnog motora GTD 2PV8 na radarskoj stanici.   Uvod   Kompozitni nikal-aluminid prah Ni20Al razvijen je za potrebe vazduhoplovne industrije. Važna karakteristika je dobro deponovanje praha plazma sprejom na atmosferskom pritisku (APS. Ovaj materijal ima dobru otpornost na oksidaciju,  koroziju i eroziju. Materijal se može proizvoditi kao legura ili kao  kompozitni prah. Najvažnija karakteristika nikal-aluminida je velika čvrstoća i žilavost  sa odličnom otpornošću na visoke temperature. NiAl prevlake deponovane plazma sprejom našle su široku primenu za zaštitu delova koji su izlo

  14. Assessing the role of iron-acceptor pairs in solar grade multicrystalline silicon wafers from the metallurgical route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvidsten Dahl, Espen [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Elkem AS Technology, Kristiansand (Norway); Osinniy, Viktor [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); RACell Solar AS, Fredriksberg (Denmark); Friestad, Kenneth; Soeiland, Anne-Karin [Elkem AS Solar, Kristiansand (Norway); Safir, Yakov [RACell Solar AS, Fredriksberg (Denmark); Skorupa, Wolgang [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Tronstad, Ragnar [Elkem AS Technology, Kristiansand (Norway); Nylandsted Larsen, Arne [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    The recombination parameters of iron-boron (FeB), iron-aluminium (FeAl) and iron-gallium (FeGa) pairs in Fe implanted FZ monocrystalline silicon wafers and Fe contaminated multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers of solar grade feedstock from the metallurgical route have been studied by combining the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Microwave Photoconductive Decay ({mu}-PCD) techniques. Energy levels associated with FeB, FeAl and FeGa pairs were detected in the monocrystalline samples. The activation energy and capture cross section of these levels were determined. FeGa gave the strongest recombination effect, reducing the minority carrier lifetime of the sample from about 39 {mu}s to 0.7 {mu}s at a concentration of 4x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. No electrically active iron-acceptor pairs could be detected in the mc-Si wafer. However, it was demonstrated that micrometer-sized clusters, most likely composed of metallic oxides, collect iron from the bulk. This iron collection may reduce the available amount of iron for creating electrically active iron-acceptor pairs below the detection limit of DLTS. The contamination did, however, degrade the lifetime from 40 {mu}s to less than 1 {mu}s in the wafer. This is likely a result of at least three overlapping energy levels believed to be related to iron (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Fe-Al2O3 nanocomposites prepared by high-energy ball milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Pedersen, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Nanocomposites of alpha-Fe and alpha-Al2O3, prepared by high-energy ball milling, exhibit coercivities which are enhanced by about two orders of magnitude with respect to the bulk value. The degree of enhancement depends on the volume fraction (x(upsilon)) of Fe, with a maximum for x(upsilon) alm......Nanocomposites of alpha-Fe and alpha-Al2O3, prepared by high-energy ball milling, exhibit coercivities which are enhanced by about two orders of magnitude with respect to the bulk value. The degree of enhancement depends on the volume fraction (x(upsilon)) of Fe, with a maximum for x......(upsilon) almost-equal-to 0.25. The effect is ascribed to the production of single-domain magnetic grains. Mossbauer spectroscopy reveals the presence of iron oxide phases which could not be seen by x-ray and electron diffraction measurements....

  16. Preparation of Fe-Al Intermetallic / TiC-Al2O3 Ceramic Composites from Ilmenite by SHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallic/TiC-Al2O3 ceramic composites were successfully prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) from natural ilmenite, aluminium and carbon as the raw materials. The effects of carbon sources, preheating time and heat treatment temperature on synthesis process and products were investigated in detail, and the reaction process of the FeTiO3-Al-C system was also discussed.It is shown that the temperature and velocity of the combustion wave are higher when graphite is used as the carbon source, which can reflect the effect of the carbon source structure on the combustion synthesis;Prolonging the preheating time or heat treatment temperature is beneficial to the formation of the ordered intermetallics; The temperature and velocity of the combustion wave arc improved, but the disordered alloys are difficult to eliminate with the preheating time prolonged. The compound powders mainly containing ordered Fe3Al intermetallic can be prepared through heat treatment at 750 ℃.

  17. Effect of the annealing temperature on dynamic and structural properties of Co2FeAl thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmeguenai M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 10 nm and 50 nm thick Co2FeAl (CFA thin films have been deposited on thermally oxidized Si(001 substrates by magnetron sputtering using a Tantalum cap layer and were then ex-situ annealed at 415°C, 515°C and 615°C during 15 minutes in vacuum. X-rays diffraction indicates that films CFA are polycrystalline and exhibit an in-plane isotropy growth. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements, using a microstrip line (MS-FMR, reveal a huge interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and small in-plane uniaxial anisotropy both annealing temperature-dependent. The MS-FMR data also allow concluding that the gyromagnetic factor remains constant and that the exchange stiffness constant increases with annealing temperature. Finally, the FMR linewidth decreases with increasing annealing temperature due to the enhancement of the chemical order, and allow deriving a very low intrinsic damping parameter (1.3×10−3 at 615°C.

  18. Physicochemical laws of the interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements: II. Interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements and/or interstitial phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povarova, K. B.; Kazanskaya, N. K.; Drozdov, A. A.; Morozov, A. E.

    2007-10-01

    The Ni-Al- X ( X is an interstitial element or phase) phase diagrams are analyzed to reveal systems that can be used as the basis for designing promising alloys and natural composites based on nickel aluminides reinforced by interstitial phases (natural composites I). The most thermally stable materials are shown to be heterophase alloys and composite materials (CMs) located in the eutectic-type (including degenerate eutectic) pseudobinary sections of ternary or multicomponent phase diagrams. They exhibit insignificant (or zero) dissolution of interstitial phases at operating temperatures and the absence of an intense interaction between CM components (natural composites II). Natural composites I based on the NiAl-or Ni3Al-interstitial phase alloys produced upon cooling from a melt can be reinforced by the refractory thermally stable rigid interstitial phases, namely, borides and carbides, that are present in pseudobinary sections in equilibrium with these nickel aluminides, since the elements forming these phases dissolve completely in matrix melts and the mutual solubility of these phases in the solid state is low. Such borides are TiB2 and HfB2 in equilibrium with β-NiAl, and such carbides are, e.g., TiC and HfC in equilibrium with β-NiAl and La2C3, NbC, and TaC in equilibrium with γ'-Ni3Al. Natural composites II should be produced using solid-phase methods (NiAl with AlN, Y2O3, Al2O3) or a combination of methods, where a refractory interstitial phase of the Al2O3 or Y2O3 type is solid and the intermetallic NiAl or Ni3Al matrix is liquid. NiAl-TiB2 (HfB2), NiAl-Al2O3 (Y2O3), and Ni3Al-La2C3 (NbC, TaC) composites are considered as examples.

  19. Thin coatings for protecting titanium aluminides in high-temperature oxidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Taylor, P. J.; Clark, R. K.; Wallace, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have high specific strengths at high temperatures but are susceptible to environmental attack. Their use in many aerospace applications would require that they be protected with coatings that, for structural efficiency, must be thin. It is conceivable that acceptable coatings might be found in several oxide systems, and consequently, oxide coatings of many compositions were prepared from sol-gels for study. Response-surface methodology was used to refine coating compositions and factorial experiments were used to develop coating strategies. Oxygen permeability diagrams of two-layer coatings for several oxide systems, an analysis of multiple-layer coatings on rough and polished surfaces, and modeling of the oxidation weight gain are presented.

  20. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-19

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  1. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  2. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alcala, G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: galcades@yahoo.es; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work.

  3. Oxidation behaviors of the aluminide coated TZM alloy via pack cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, S.; Park, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    TZM is a traditional alloy for high temperature applications, in which (Ti, Zr)C particles are dispersed in a Mo matrix. However, due to easy formation of an oxide layer on the TZM alloy under ambient atmosphere, an oxidation protective coating is needed for any high temperature structural applications of TZM. In this study, aluminium pack cementation coatings have been carried out on TZM alloys, resulting in the formation of Al8Mo3 layer on the surface of TZM alloys. In order to examine the oxidation stability, the TZM alloy was exposed in an aerobic atmosphere. For the aluminide coated TZM alloys, an alumina layer was produced at the outer surface layer. The alminide coated TZM alloys showed excellent oxidation resistance. The coating layer kinetics and the corresponding oxidation stability are also discussed in terms of microstructural observations.

  4. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kubicki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were determined. Coatings capacity of carbon diffusion inhibition and thermal shocks resistance of coatings were determined with different methods. It was found, that all of the coatings reduce carbon diffusion in different degree and all coatings liable to degradation in consequence cracking and oxidation. Coating life time is mainly dependent on morphology, phase composition and service condition (thermal shocks first of all.

  5. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of Pd-Modified Aluminide Coating at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    (Ni,Pd)Al coating, prepared by low pressure pack cementation on the Ni-base superalloy M38 where Pd-20 wt pct Nialloy was predeposited, consists of a single β-(Ni,Pd)Al phase. The initial isothermal oxidation behavior of (Ni,Pd)Alcoating was investigated by TGA, XRD, SEM/EDS at 800~1100℃. Results show that oxidation kinetics accordpreferably with parabolic law at 800, 900 and 1100℃, but not at 1000℃. θ-Al2O3 was observed at 800~1100℃. ltis found that Pd plays an important role in accelerating the diffusion of Ti from the substrate to the coating surfacein the aluminide coating.

  7. Comparison between field and laboratory steam oxidation testing on aluminide coatings on P92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueero, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gutierrez, M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain); Knoedler, R.; Straub, S. [Alstom Power Systems GmbH, Boveristrasse 22, 68309 Mannheim (Germany); Muelas, R. [Ingenieria y Servicios Aeroespaciales, P Pintor Rosales 34, 28008 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Steam oxidation has become an important issue for steam power plants as operating temperatures increase from the current 550 to 600-650 C. For the last 10 years several groups have been carrying out steam oxidation testing of both uncoated substrates and coatings in the laboratory. On the other hand, field testing results are very scarce. In this paper, a comparison of laboratory steam oxidation testing with field test results carried out by Alstom at the Kraftwerk Westfalen power station located in Hamm, Germany will be presented. Both slurry deposited aluminide coatings and uncoated P92 steel have been included in the study. Under steam (atmospheric pressure) and isothermal conditions in the laboratory at 650 C, spallation of oxides formed on ferritic steels occurs after significantly longer time when compared to exposure to real operating conditions. Oxide spallation results in serious damage in steam power plants by obstructing heat exchanger tubes, erosion of valves and turbine blades, etc. Moreover, the thickness of the oxide scales formed under field testing conditions is significantly higher after similar exposure. On the other hand, aluminide coated P92, which exhibit thickness through cracks, have shown to be stable in the laboratory for up to 60 000 h at 650 C under steam, without evidence of crack propagation. However, field test results indicate that some degree of crack propagation occurs but without causing substrate attack up to 21 700 h of exposure. Moreover, the aluminium oxide observed in both laboratory and field tested specimens is different. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  9. Effect of niobium alloying level on the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminides at 850°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Alexandra; Marcu, Maria; Petrescu, Simona; Ionescu, Nicolae; Paraschiv, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the alloying of titanium aluminides used in aircraft engine applications and automobiles. The oxidation resistance behavior of two titanium aluminides of α2 + γ(Ti3Al + TiAl) and orthorhombic Ti2NbAl, recognized as candidates for high-temperature applications, was investigated by exposure of the alloys for 100 h in air. Thus, oxidation resistance was expressed as the mass gain rate, whereas surface aspects were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the type of oxidation products was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic Ti2NbAl alloy was embrittled, and pores and microcracks were formed as a result of oxygen diffusion through the external oxide layer formed during thermal oxidation for 100 h.

  10. Effect of niobium alloying level on the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminides at 850°C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandra Banu; Maria Marcu; Simona Petrescu; Nicolae Ionescu; Alexandru Paraschiv

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the alloying of titanium aluminides used in aircraft engine applications and automobiles. The oxidation resis-tance behavior of two titanium aluminides ofα2+γ (Ti3Al + TiAl) and orthorhombic Ti2NbAl, recognized as candidates for high-temperature applications, was investigated by exposure of the alloys for 100 h in air. Thus, oxidation resistance was expressed as the mass gain rate, whereas surface aspects were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the type of oxidation products was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic Ti2NbAl alloy was embrittled, and pores and microcracks were formed as a result of oxygen diffusion through the external oxide layer formed during thermal oxidation for 100 h.

  11. Growth of Co2FeAl Heusler alloy thin films on Si(100) having very small Gilbert damping by Ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sajid; Akansel, Serkan; Kumar, Ankit; Svedlindh, Peter; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2016-06-30

    The influence of growth temperature Ts (300-773 K) on the structural phase ordering, static and dynamic magnetization behaviour has been investigated in ion beam sputtered full Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) thin films on industrially important Si(100) substrate. The B2 type magnetic ordering is established in these films based on the clear observation of the (200) diffraction peak. These ion beam sputtered CFA films possess very small surface roughness of the order of subatomic dimensions (<3 Å) as determined from the fitting of XRR spectra and also by AFM imaging. This is supported by the occurrence of distinct Kiessig fringes spanning over the whole scanning range (~4°) in the x-ray reflectivity (XRR) spectra. The Gilbert damping constant α and effective magnetization 4πMeff are found to vary from 0.0053 ± 0.0002 to 0.0015 ± 0.0001 and 13.45 ± 00.03 kG to 14.03 ± 0.04 kG, respectively. These Co2FeAl films possess saturation magnetization ranging from 4.82 ± 0.09 to 5.22 ± 0.10 μB/f.u. consistent with the bulk L21-type ordering. A record low α-value of 0.0015 is obtained for Co2FeAl films deposited on Si substrate at Ts ~ 573 K.

  12. Annealing temperature and thickness dependencies of structural and magnetic properties of Co2FeAl thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmeguenai, M.; Gabor, M. S.; Zighem, F.; Roussigné, Y.; Faurie, D.; Tiusan, C.

    2016-09-01

    Co2FeAl (CFA) thin films, of various thicknesses (3 nm≤t ≤50 nm ), have been grown by sputtering on (001) MgO single-crystal substrates and annealed at different temperatures (RT≤Ta≤600 ∘C , where RT is the room temperature). The influence of the CFA thickness (t ), as well as ex situ annealing temperature (Ta), on the magnetic and structural properties has been investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry, and broadband microstrip ferromagnetic resonance (MS-FMR). The XRD revealed an epitaxial growth of the films with the cubic [001] CFA axis normal to the substrate plane and that the chemical order varies from the B 2 phase to the A 2 phase when decreasing t or Ta. The deduced lattice parameters showed an in-plane tetragonal distortion and in-plane and out-plane strains that increase with Ta and 1 /t . For all Ta values, the variation of the effective magnetization, deduced from the fit of MS-FMR measurements, shows two different regimes separated by a critical thickness, which is Ta dependent. It decreases (increases) linearly with the inverse thickness (1 /t ) in the first (second) regime due to the contribution of the magnetoelastic anisotropy to surface (to volume) anisotropy. The observed behavior has been analyzed through a model allowing for the separation of the magnetocrystalline, magnetoelastic, and Néel-type interface anisotropy constants to the surface and the volume anisotropies. Similar behavior has been observed for the effective fourfold anisotropy field which governs the in-plane anisotropy present in all the samples. Finally, the MS-FMR data also allow one to conclude that the gyromagnetic factor remains constant and that the exchange stiffness constant increases with Ta.

  13. Corrosion resistance of FeAl intermetallic phase based alloy in water solution of NaCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebulski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recognizing of corrosion mechanisms in liquid mediums can lead to obtain corrosion-proof material e.g. by applying passivation phenomenon. In this paper attention was paid to determine the corrosion resistance of Fe40Al intermetallic phase based alloy in corrosive medium of liquid NaCl. Research of material susceptibility to surface activation in the pipeline of corrosion processes are conducted.Design/methodology/approach: In the corrosion research electrolyser, potentiostat „Solartron 1285” and computer with „CorrWare 2” software were used. Results of the research were worked out with „CorrView” software. The potentials values were determined in relation to normal hydrogen electrode (NEW. The recording of potential/density of current - time curve was conducted for 300 s. Polarization of samples were conducted in range of potential from 300 mV lower than stationary to Ecor + 1500 mV. Potential change rate amounted 10 mV/min every time.Findings: The results of research conducted in 3% NaCl solution, the best electrochemical corrosion resistance were showed by samples after annealing during 72 hours. It was confirmed by the lowest value of corrosion current density, low value of passive current density, pitting corrosion resistance much higher than in other samples.Practical implications: The last feature is the reason to conduct the research for this group of materials as corrosion resistance materials. Especially FeAl intermetallic phase based alloys are objects of research in Poland and all world during last years.Originality/value: The goal of this work was to determine the influence of passivation in water solutions of H2SO4 and HNO3 on corrosion resistance of Fe40Al intermetallic phase based alloy in 3% NaCl solutions.

  14. Stress-anneal-induced magnetic anisotropy in highly textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al magnetostrictive strips for bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jin Park

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga and Fe-Al alloys are promising materials for use in bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters. For this study, 50.8 mm × 5.0 mm × 0.5 mm strips of Fe-Ga and Fe-Al were cut from 0.50-mm thick rolled sheet. An atmospheric anneal was used to develop a Goss texture through an abnormal grain growth process. The anneal lead to large (011 grains that covered over 90% of sample surface area. The resulting highly-textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al strips exhibited saturation magnetostriction values (λsat =  λ∥ − λ⊥ of ∼280 ppm and ∼130 ppm, respectively. To maximize 90° rotation of magnetic moments during bending of the strips, we employed compressive stress annealing (SA. Samples were heated to 500°C, and a 100-150 MPa compressive stress was applied while at 500°C for 30 minutes and while being cooled. The effectiveness of the SA on magnetic moment rotation was inferred by comparing post-SA magnetostriction with the maximum possible yield of rotated magnetic moments, which is achieved when λ∥ = λsat and λ⊥ = 0. The uniformity of the SA along the sample length and the impact of the SA on sensing/energy harvesting performance were then assessed by comparing pre- and post-SA bending-stress-induced changes in magnetization at five different locations along the samples. The SA process with a 150 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Ga actuation along the sample length from 170 to 225 ppm (from ∼60% to within ∼80% of λsat. The corresponding sensing/energy harvesting performance improved by as much as a factor of eight in the best sample, however the improvement was not at all uniform along the sample length. The SA process with a 100 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Al actuation along the sample length from 60 to 73 ppm (from ∼46% to ∼56% of λsat, indicating only a marginally effective SA and suggesting the need for modification of the SA protocol. In spite of this, the SA was effective at improving the sensing

  15. Stress-anneal-induced magnetic anisotropy in highly textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al magnetostrictive strips for bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jin; Na, Suok-Min; Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga and Fe-Al alloys are promising materials for use in bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters. For this study, 50.8 mm × 5.0 mm × 0.5 mm strips of Fe-Ga and Fe-Al were cut from 0.50-mm thick rolled sheet. An atmospheric anneal was used to develop a Goss texture through an abnormal grain growth process. The anneal lead to large (011) grains that covered over 90% of sample surface area. The resulting highly-textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al strips exhibited saturation magnetostriction values (λsat = λ∥ - λ⊥) of ˜280 ppm and ˜130 ppm, respectively. To maximize 90° rotation of magnetic moments during bending of the strips, we employed compressive stress annealing (SA). Samples were heated to 500°C, and a 100-150 MPa compressive stress was applied while at 500°C for 30 minutes and while being cooled. The effectiveness of the SA on magnetic moment rotation was inferred by comparing post-SA magnetostriction with the maximum possible yield of rotated magnetic moments, which is achieved when λ∥ = λsat and λ⊥ = 0. The uniformity of the SA along the sample length and the impact of the SA on sensing/energy harvesting performance were then assessed by comparing pre- and post-SA bending-stress-induced changes in magnetization at five different locations along the samples. The SA process with a 150 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Ga actuation along the sample length from 170 to 225 ppm (from ˜60% to within ˜80% of λsat). The corresponding sensing/energy harvesting performance improved by as much as a factor of eight in the best sample, however the improvement was not at all uniform along the sample length. The SA process with a 100 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Al actuation along the sample length from 60 to 73 ppm (from ˜46% to ˜56% of λsat, indicating only a marginally effective SA and suggesting the need for modification of the SA protocol. In spite of this, the SA was effective at improving the sensing/energy harvesting

  16. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  17. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  18. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  19. 铁铝混合粉热喷涂及扩散处理组织分析%Microstructure of Coatings Obtained by Air Plasma Spray of Iron and Aluminium Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵学刚; 余新泉; 孙扬善; 冯文博; 孙建荣

    2001-01-01

    The coatings of mixed iron aluminides and oxide phases on 18-8 stainless steel substrates were obtained by air plasma spraying mixed powder of iron and aluminium.Microstructures of coatings were investigated by optical microscope,SEM and XRD.The results show that reactions between iron and aluminium sprayed through plasma torch in high speed take place when melted spray of iron and aluminium impinge on the 18-8 stainless steel substrates.Microstructure observations also find the joint of the coatings and substrates is fine and no cracks have been observed.The amount of iron aluminides in coatings increases after the diffusion treatment at 600℃.After the coatings were diffusionally treated at 800℃ and 1000℃,pure Al in coatings disappears completely,but pure Fe still remains,the coatings consist of pure Fe,iron aluminides and oxide phases.%利用等离子喷涂方法在不锈钢基体上喷涂铁铝混合粉获得了铁铝涂层,并对涂层的组织进行了分析。研究结果表明,Fe粉和Al粉熔化后由喷枪高速喷出,沉积在基体上可发生部分化合反应,生成少量的铁铝金属间化合物,涂层与基体结合良好。600℃扩散处理后,涂层中的铁铝金属间化合物增多。800℃和1000℃扩散处理后,Al全部反应,Fe有剩余,涂层由Fe、铁铝金属间化合物和氧化物组成。

  20. Fe speciation and Fe/Al ratio in the sediments of southeastern Arabian Sea as an indicator of climate change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.; Gupta, S.M.; Mir, I.A.

    Aluminium, titanium and iron are the major lithogeneous contributors to the marine sediment and their abundance varies strikingly with the intensity of monsoonal precipitation. Al and Ti concentrations in a sediment core (SK-129/GC-05) from...

  1. Advanced hot gas filter development. Topical report, May 1995--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.L.; June, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Porous iron aluminide was evaluated for use as a particulate filter in pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with a short term test. Three alloy compositions were tested: Fe{sub 3}Al 5% chromium (FAL), Fe{sub 3}Al 2% chromium (FAS) and FeAl 0% chromium. The test conditions simulated air blown (Tampa Electric) and oxygen blown (Sierra Pacific) gasifiers with one test gas composition. Four test conditions were used with hydrogen sulfide levels varying from 783 ppm to 78,3000 ppm at 1 atmosphere along with temperatures ranging between 925 F and 1200 F. The iron aluminide was found capable of withstanding the proposed operating conditions and capable of giving years of service. The production method and preferred composition were established as seamless cylinders of Fe{sub 3}Al 2% chromium with a preoxidation of seven hours at 1472 F.

  2. Na2SO4- and NaCl- Induced Hot Corrosion Behaviors of a Nickel-Base Superalloy with Aluminide Diffusion Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hot-corrosion behaviors of nickel-base superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating have been investigated in conditions of contents of Na2SO4 and NaCl molten salts at 900℃ by means of XRD and SEM.Hot-corrosion scale of the superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating were analyzed and their surface morphologies were observed.The results demonstrate that both coated and uncoated specimens are not susceptible to various contents of NaCl.That may be resulted from the Al2O3 scale formation.Growth stress was characterized by the formation of convoluted scales.

  3. Large-Scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rools In A Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethlehem Steel's (now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mengel; Anthony Martocci; Larry Fabina; RObert Petrusha; Ronald Chango

    2003-09-01

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system.

  4. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  5. Deformation behaviour of {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide processed through reaction synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Kumar, Vinod [SAIL-RDCIS, Ranchi (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India)

    2013-01-01

    {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} titanium aluminide alloys made through reaction synthesis have been used for deformation study. Hot isothermal compression test is carried out to study the deformation characteristics of the alloys using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (at%) are tested at different temperatures and at different strain rates. True stress-true strain plots are analyzed along with analysis of tested specimens. Tested specimens are observed under optical and electron microscopes. Presence of various deformation morphologies and phases were confirmed. Microhardness evaluation and transmission electron microscopic examination are used to confirm the presence of different phases. It is found that dynamic recrystallization is mainly playing role in deformation of these alloys. Presence of dynamically recrystallized (DRX) grains and lamellar microstructures is confirmed at the intergranular area and inside the grains, respectively. A nucleation model is suggested for DRX and lamellar grain nucleation during deformation. Attempt has been made to quantify the presence of various phases through optical microscopy. Hot workability map is also suggested on the basis of microstructural and visual observation of compression tested specimens.

  6. Sintering Behavior and Microstructure Formation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys Processed by Metal Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Juliano; Oehring, Michael; Ebel, Thomas; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Pyczak, Florian

    2017-04-01

    The sintering behavior of metal injection molded titanium aluminide alloys, their microstructure formation and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. As reference material, the alloy Ti-45Al-5Nb-0.2B-0.2C at.% (TNB-V5) was selected. Additionally, two other variations with Mo and Mo + Si additions were prepared: Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-0.2B-0.2C at.% and Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-1Si-0.2B-0.2C at.%. The results indicate that the optimum sintering temperature was slightly above the solidus line. With proper sintering parameters, very low porosities (phase transformations upon cooling could be described as L + β → β → α + β → α → α + γ → α2 + γ, which was in agreement with the microstructures observed. The effects of Mo and Si were opposite regarding the sintering behavior. Mo addition led to an increase in the optimum sintering temperature, whereas Si caused a significant decrease.

  7. Examination of the platinum effect on the oxidation behavior ofnickel-aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.; Tolpygo, V.K.

    2007-05-15

    Oxidation resistant nickel-aluminide coatings are designed to develop a protective alumina scale during high temperature exposure. It is well established that platinum additions, typically about 6-8 at%, provide substantial improvements in oxidation resistance of such coatings, yet the nature of the platinum effect is still not fully understood. In this work, the oxidation behavior of two commercial NiAl and NiPtAl coatings deposited on the same Ni-base single crystal alloy CMSX-4 was analyzed. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation tests were conducted at 1150 C in air. Microstructure development and alumina/coating interface chemistry were studied as a function of oxidation time. Numerous voids developed at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl interface, and sulfur was found to segregate at the void surfaces and at the contact interface, leading to spallation of the scale over the convex areas along ridges on the coating surface. The presence of platinum prevented sulfur segregation and void formation at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiPtAl interface. As a result, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on the NiPtAl coating remained adherent and virtually no spallation was observed even after prolonged cyclic oxidation.

  8. Sintering Behavior and Microstructure Formation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys Processed by Metal Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Juliano; Oehring, Michael; Ebel, Thomas; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Pyczak, Florian

    2017-01-01

    The sintering behavior of metal injection molded titanium aluminide alloys, their microstructure formation and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. As reference material, the alloy Ti-45Al-5Nb-0.2B-0.2C at.% (TNB-V5) was selected. Additionally, two other variations with Mo and Mo + Si additions were prepared: Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-0.2B-0.2C at.% and Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-1Si-0.2B-0.2C at.%. The results indicate that the optimum sintering temperature was slightly above the solidus line. With proper sintering parameters, very low porosities (<0.5%) and fine microstructures with a colony size <85 µm could be achieved. Considering the sintering temperatures applied, the phase transformations upon cooling could be described as L + β → β → α + β → α → α + γ → α2 + γ, which was in agreement with the microstructures observed. The effects of Mo and Si were opposite regarding the sintering behavior. Mo addition led to an increase in the optimum sintering temperature, whereas Si caused a significant decrease.

  9. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  10. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  11. Processing and characterization of niobium aluminide-based composites. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woytera, S.A.; Bhagat, R.B.

    1995-11-01

    Many ordered intermetallic compounds exhibit attractive properties for high temperature structural aerospace applications. These materials provide an alternative to and surpass the performance of existing high temperature superalloys and ceramics. High melting point, low density, high strength, and relatively good corrosion resistance are the attractive properties that have led to the current thrust of research in these materials. However, the major obstacles limiting the use of these materials are their low ductility and toughness at room temperature and poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. Previous studies have shown that micro and macro-alloying of several systems lead to improvements in low temperature ductility and toughness, while the use of suitable ceramic reinforcements lead to increases in creep resistance. However, the reinforcements of the composites are not protected from reaction with the matrix at elevated temperatures. Thus, they do not have appropriate microstructures for thermal stability and are likely to have poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. In this investigation a novel approach has been devised to address both low and high temperature problems by the incorporation of `treated` refractory metal and ceramic reinforcements into a niobium aluminide matrix. The `treated` ductile phase is to improve room temperature toughness and the `treated` ceramic phase is to improve creep resistance. The `treatment`, an oxide layer produced on the reinforcements (niobium and silicon carbide whiskers) by elevated temperature exposure, is to protect them from reacting with the matrix materials during hot pressing or subsequent use at elevated temperatures.

  12. Study on Process of Preparing Fe-Al2O3 Magnetic Abrasive by High Energy Ball Milling%高能球磨法制备Al2O3/Fe磁性磨粒的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓峰; 李文辉

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic abrasive finishing machining technology is a new technology to use the magnetic field force produced by permanent magnetic or electromagnetic device asthe driving force of magnetic abrasive finishing machining of parts surface,which can realize the surface polishing,deburring,eliminating the micro crack,and reducing the surface roughness of parts.4 new technology of preparing magnetic abrasives used high energy ball milling was put forward and the working principle was analyzed in the ball milling.Pure iron powder was used as the magnetic phase,corundum powder as the abrasive,and three different times Fe-Al2O3 magnetic abrasives were prepared by high energy ball milling method.X-ray diffraction and SEM were used to analyze the morphology and phase components of the magnetic abrasives.Magnetic flux density of the magnetic abrasives were tested by the instrument.It finds that the process is easy and low cost,so it would have great hope to accomplish large-scale industrialized production.%磁性磨粒光整加工技术是利用永磁或者电磁发生装置产生的磁场力作为磁性磨粒的源动力对零件表面进行光整加工的一种新技术,它可以实现对零件进行表面抛光、去除毛刺、消除微观裂纹、降低表面粗糙度等加工.提出应用高能球磨法制备磁性磨粒的新工艺,分析了球磨过程中的工作原理.用纯铁粉作为磁性体,三氧化二铝粉作为磨料相,采用高能球磨法制备了三种不同时间的Fe-Al2O3磁性磨粒.采用X射线衍射仪和扫描电子显微镜分析了该磁性磨粒的物相组成和外观形貌,用特斯拉仪测试了磁性磨粒的磁感应强度.发现了该工艺简单,成本低,且有望进行大规模工业化生产.

  13. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  14. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  15. Mechanisms of spallation of electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings with and without platinum aluminide bond coat ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, K.; Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy; Jordan, E. [Dept. Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, CT-06269, Storrs (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Grain boundary ridges, that form on the surface of platinum aluminide [(Ni,Pt)Al] bond coats prior to the deposition of the yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic layer by the electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, were shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in (Ni,Pt)Al/EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings. When these ridges are removed prior to deposition of the ceramic layer, a 3 x life improvement is achieved. This study compares the spallation mechanisms in specimens with and without bond coat ridges, in order to explain the improvement in spallation life. (orig.)

  16. Structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere: Experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Medina, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Liu, H.B. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Canizal, G. [Centro de Educacion Continua y a Distancia (Unidad Allende), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Allende No. 38, Centro, Mexico D.F. 06010 (Mexico); Ascencio, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico)]. E-mail: ascencio@imp.mx

    2007-01-15

    Characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy analysis with energy dispersive spectrometry and scanning probe microscope for structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere at high temperature. First principle calculations were also employed in order to clarify the formation of new product on the surface and its mechanism. The results demonstrate that the tendency of the structure with oxygen atoms involve a stronger interaction and lower energy to be formed with the surface and consequently the possible production of oxide-species is more probable and multiple aggregates with different shapes can be generated for the temperatures of 625 and 700 deg. C, with no preferential crystal habit. Sample treated at 775 deg. C denotes the production of hexagonal crystals, which is externally characterized by polyhedrons growing in axial direction as fibbers with flat faces that match with the alumina.

  17. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 film sandwiched by MgO layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Sheng; Li Xiao-Qi; Bai Li-Juan; Xu Xiao-Guang; Miao Jun; Jiang Yong

    2013-01-01

    Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 (CFAS)-based multilayers sandwiched by MgO layers have been deposited and annealed at different temperatures.Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with the magnetic anisotropy energy density Ku ≈2.5× 106 erg/cm3 (1 erg =10-7 J) and the coercivity Hc =363 Oe (1Oe =79.9775 A.m-1) has been achieved in the Si/SiO2/MgO (1.5 nm)/CFAS (2.5 nm)/MgO (0.8 nm)/Pt (5 nm) film annealed at 300 ℃.The strong PMA is mainly due to the top MgO layer.The structure can be used as top magnetic electrodes in half-metallic perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions.

  18. Synthesis of nano onion-like fullerenes by using Fe/Al2O3 as catalyst by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XuGuang; WANG CunJing; YANG YongZhen; GUO XingMei; WEN HaiRong; XU BingShe

    2009-01-01

    Nano-carbon materials were synthesized by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene at 400℃ by using Fe/Al2O3 as catalyst. The product was refiuxed in 36% concentrated HCI at 60℃ for 48 h in order to re-move the catalyst support. The samples were examined by scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nano onion-like fullerenes encapsulating a Fe3C core were obtained. These had a structure of stacked graphitic fragments, with diameters ranging from 15-50 nm. When the product was further heat-treated at 1100℃ for 2 h, nano onion-like fullerenes with a clear concentric graphitic layer structure were obtained. The growth mechanism of nano onion-like fullerenes encapsulating metal cores is suggested to follow a vapor-solid growth model.

  19. Static and dynamic properties of Co2FeAl thin films: Effect of MgO and Ta as capping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sajid; Barwal, Vineet; Kumar, Ankit; Behera, Nilamani; Akansel, Serkan; Goyat, Ekta; Svedlindh, Peter; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2017-05-01

    The influence of MgO and Ta capping layers on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of Co2FeAl (CFA) Heusler alloy thin films has been investigated. It is observed that the CFA film deposited with MgO capping layer is preeminent compared to the uncapped or Ta capped CFA film. In particular, the magnetic inhomogeneity contribution to the ferromagnetic resonance line broadening and damping constant are found to be minimal for the MgO capped CFA thin film i.e., 0.12±0.01 Oe and 0.0074±0.00014, respectively. The saturation magnetization was found to be 960±25emu/cc.

  20. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  1. Environmental effect of S02-bearing atmosphere on the creep fatigue failure of aluminide-coated MM-002 nickel-base superalloy at 870°C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aghion, E

    1995-04-15

    Full Text Available High-temperature low-cycle fatigue (HTLCF) failure mechanisms of aluminide-coated MAR-M002 nickel-base superalloy in air, argon and Ar+5% SO2 atmospheres were investigated at 870°C. The loading conditions were constant and consisted of creep tension...

  2. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  3. Hertzian indentation of colloidally processed titanium carbide-nickel aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R. Bradley

    Advanced cermets based on titanium carbide (TiC), with a ductile nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) binder, have shown significant promise for use in a variety of demanding wear environments, due to a combination of high strength and good corrosion behaviour. A unique feature of TiC-Ni3Al cermets is that they show increasing strength from room temperature up to ˜1,000°C, while current materials such as tungsten carbide/cobalt (WC/Co) show significant strength degradation above ˜500°C. In this thesis, aqueous colloidal forming methods have been applied to process TiC preforms. The mechanisms and effectiveness of suspension stabilization were examined using methods such as zeta potential analysis, rheological measurements, and sedimentation trials for two common dispersants; an ammonium salt of polymethacrylate (PMA-NH 4) and two molecular weights (l,800 and 10,000) of polyethylenimine (PEI). TiC preforms were prepared by slip casting suspensions of up to 50 vol. % solids content. After drying, the TiC-based cermets were processed by melt infiltration with the Ni3Al alloy (IC-50) at 1475°C.Ni 3Al content was varied between 20 and 50 vol. % using this approach, resulting in final densities that exceeded 98% of theoretical. These samples were subjected to Hertzian indentation testing with loads ranging from 250 -- 2000 N, using WC-Co spheres with sizes ranging from 1.191 to 2.38 mm. Indentation stress-strain curves were produced from the indentation data and compared to the calculated elastic Hertzian response. The bonded interface method was used to examine the subsurface deformation of the material under load. Significant deformation of the binder and the eventual fracture of the TiC grains were observed. The nature of the quasi-plasticity of TiC-Ni 3Al and the effects of binder content on surface and subsurface deformation is examined.

  4. Production of Al nanocomposite reinforced by Fe-Al intermetallic, Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and nano-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles using wet milling in toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S., E-mail: ser105@mail.usask.ca [Islamic Azad University, Shahrood Branch, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani-Rad, R. [Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box 31787/316, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Manafi, S.A. [Islamic Azad University, Shahrood Branch, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-02

    Highlights: > Production of Al nanocomposite reinforced by Fe-Al intermetallic, Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and nano-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles using wet milling in toluene. > Production of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles from mechanochemical reaction of Al with PCA. > Effect of second phase particles on sintering. - Abstract: Al matrix nanocomposites were produced by wet milling of Al and nano-alumina powders in a toluene media. X-ray diffraction patterns, inductively coupled plasma, carbon measurement analysis and scanning electron microscopy show that impurities introduced by decomposition of toluene and abrasion of balls and vials are uniformly dispersed in the Al matrix as Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and Fe-Al intermetallic particles. Though producing homogenous nanocomposites, these second phase particles seem to have a retarding effect on densification of nanocomposite powders.

  5. The role of Pt underlayer on the magnetization dynamics of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besbas, Jean; Loong, Li Ming; Wu, Yang; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the role of Pt on the magnetization dynamics of Pt/Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/MgO with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using the time resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect. Pt/Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/MgO shows ultrafast magnetization dynamics comparable to 3d ferromagnets and can be fully demagnetized. The demagnetization time τd ˜ 0.27 ps and magnetic heat capacity are independent of the Pt underlayer, whereas the value of the electron-phonon coupling time τe ˜ 0.77 ps depends on the presence of the Pt layer. We further measure the effective damping αeff ˜ 1 that does not scale as the inverse demagnetization time (1/τd), but is strongly affected by the Pt layer.

  6. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  7. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  8. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  9. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  10. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  11. Large-scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rolls in a Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethelehem Steel's (Now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengel, J.

    2003-12-16

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system. Many challenges were involved in this project, including developing welding procedures for joining nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys with H-series austenitic alloys, developing commercial cast roll manufacturing specifications, working with several commercial suppliers to produce a quantity of high quality, reproducible nickel aluminide rolls for a large steel industrial annealing furnace, installing and demonstrating the capability of the rolls in this furnace, performing processing trials to evaluate the benefits of new equipment and processes, and documenting the findings. Updated furnace equipment including twenty-five new automated furnace control dampers have been installed replacing older design, less effective units. These dampers, along with upgraded flame-safety control equipment and new AC motors and roll-speed control equipment, are providing improved furnace control and additional energy efficiency. Energy data shows up to a 34% energy reduction from baseline after the installation of upgraded furnace damper controls along with up to a 34% reduction in greenhouse gases, potential for an additional 3 to 6% energy reduction per campaign of light-up and shutdown, and a 46% energy reduction from baseline for limited trials of a combination of improved damper control and straight-through plate processing. The straight

  12. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used ... fewer red blood cells. The red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron- ...

  14. Spatially varying microhardness in a platinum-modified nickel aluminide bond coat in a thermal barrier coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue White 418, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States); Heuer, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue White 418, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States)]. E-mail: heuer@case.edu

    2006-04-15

    hardness of a Pt-modified Ni aluminide bond coat and its ZrO{sub 2} top coat in an electron beam-physical vapor deposition ZrO{sub 2}-based thermal barrier coating system has been studied as a function of temperature in as-deposited and aged (1200 deg. C/1 h) coupon samples, and in a used blade taken out of service after a (modest) fraction of life. A marked brittle to ductile transition at 580 {+-} 30 deg. C was observed in the as-deposited material, in agreement with previous uniaxial tensile data in this system. Significant spatial variation in the hardness of the bond coats were observed at room temperature and could be correlated with spatially varying microstructures.

  15. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  16. Influence of the surfactant and annealing rate on the morphology, magnetic and structural characteristics of Co{sub 2}FeAl nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezeshki-Nejad, Zahra [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramazani, Abdolali [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Kashan, 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alikhanzadeh-Arani, Sima [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Almasi-Kashi, Mohammad [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Kashan, 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    This research focuses on the synthesis and characterization of the attractive magnetic alloys, full-Heusler Co{sub 2}FeAl nanoparticles. A modified co-precipitation method has been developed in a template of chitosan biopolymer. XRD pattern of the product confirmed the high crystalline quality of the L2{sub 1}‒ordered nanoparticles, refined by Rietveld analysis. It was found that using different annealing rates can be surprisingly effective to achieve different morphologies from granular microstructure to fibrous-shaped nanostructure. Based on the obtained results of the high resolution TEM image, the presence of both populations of large single crystal grains and polycrystalline clusters containing several small particles (about 10 nm) can be found in the sample annealed up to 700 °C with 5 °C/min. This particle size distribution led to the co-existence of high and low coercive-field phases in the related FORC diagram. Major hysteresis loops showed that the using of chitosan biopolymer resulted in a smaller magnetic saturation compared to that of the control sample, probably due to presence of the oxide shell around the surface of nanoparticles when exposed to air. - Highlights: • First Order Reversal Curves (FORCs) analysis was used to study precisely. • A simple chemical process of co- precipitation rout was used for synthesizing the nanoparticles. • Well known chitosan biopolymer was used as polymer template for coating the nanoparticles. • Effects of the temperature and heating rate in the annealing process were investigated.

  17. Diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal superalloys turbine blades: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubovadzhyan, S. A.; Galoyan, A. G.

    2012-09-01

    Process of formation rhenium or refractory carbides based diffusion barrier layer (coating) on internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal high-temperature alloys (superalloy) turbine blades, prior to diffusion aluminide coating deposition, is studied. It is shown that diffusion barrier layer is preventing deleterious secondary reaction zone formation under aluminide coating during long-term high-temperature operation. The kinetics of powder carburizing process of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing high-temperature alloys is investigated, and conditions for carburizing these alloys are determined. The phase composition of the surface layer after carburizing is studied, and the effect of the fractional composition of a carbon-based powder mixture on the carburizing rate is determined.

  18. Effects of Platinum Additions and Sulfur Impurities on the Microstructure and Scale Adhesion Behavior of Single-Phase CVD Aluminide Bond Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.; Zhang, Y.

    1999-02-28

    The adhesion of alumina scales to aluminide bond coats is a life-limiting factor for some advanced thermal barrier coating systems. This study investigated the effects of aluminide bond coat sulfur and platinum contents on alumina scale adhesion and coating microstructural evolution during isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing at 1150 C. Low-sulfur NiAl and NiPtAl bond coats were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Lowering the sulfur contents of CVD NiAl bond coatings significantly improved scale adhesion, but localized scale spallation eventually initiated along coating grain boundaries. Further improvements in scale adhesion were obtained with Pt additions. The observed influences of Pt additions included: (1) mitigation of the detrimental effects of high sulfur levels, (2) drastic reductions in void growth along the scale-metal interface, (3) alteration of the oxide-metal interface morphology, and (4) elimination of Ta-rich oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales during thermal cycling. The results of this study also suggested that the microstructure (especially the grain size) of CVD aluminide bond coatings plays a significant role in scale adhesion.

  19. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  20. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  1. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  2. Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler thin films grown on Si and MgO substrates: Annealing temperature effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmeguenai, M., E-mail: belmeguenai.mohamed@univ-paris13.fr; Tuzcuoglu, H.; Zighem, F.; Chérif, S. M.; Moch, P. [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407), 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Université Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gabor, M. S., E-mail: mihai.gabor@phys.utcluj.ro; Petrisor, T. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tiusan, C. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Nancy, BP 70239, F–54506 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2014-01-28

    10 nm and 50 nm Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) thin films have been deposited on MgO(001) and Si(001) substrates by magnetron sputtering and annealed at different temperatures. X-rays diffraction revealed polycrystalline or epitaxial growth (according to CFA(001)[110]//MgO(001)[100] epitaxial relation) for CFA films grown on a Si and on a MgO substrate, respectively. For these later, the chemical order varies from the A2 phase to the B2 phase when increasing the annealing temperature (T{sub a}), while only the A2 disorder type has been observed for CFA grown on Si. Microstrip ferromagnetic resonance (MS-FMR) measurements revealed that the in-plane anisotropy results from the superposition of a uniaxial and a fourfold symmetry term for CFA grown on MgO substrates. This fourfold anisotropy, which disappears completely for samples grown on Si, is in accord with the crystal structure of the samples. The fourfold anisotropy field decreases when increasing T{sub a}, while the uniaxial anisotropy field is nearly unaffected by T{sub a} within the investigated range. The MS-FMR data also allow for concluding that the gyromagnetic factor remains constant and that the exchange stiffness constant increases with T{sub a}. Finally, the FMR linewidth decreases when increasing T{sub a}, due to the enhancement of the chemical order. We derive a very low intrinsic damping parameter (1.1×10{sup −3} and 1.3×10{sup −3} for films of 50 nm thickness annealed at 615 °C grown on MgO and on Si, respectively)

  3. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Recovery of iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite by high-temperature reduction and smelting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-yi Zhang; Wei L; Yuan-hong Qi; Zong-shu Zou

    2016-01-01

    A high-temperature reduction and smelting process was used to recover iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite. The effects of w(CaO)/w(SiO2) ratio, anthracite ratio, and reduction temperature and time on the recovery and size of iron nuggets and on the Al2O3 grade of the calcium aluminate slag were investigated through thermodynamic calculations and experiments. The optimized process conditions were the bauxite/anthracite/slaked lime weight ratio of 100:16.17:59.37, reduction temperature of 1450°C and reduction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, high-quality iron nuggets and calcium aluminate slag were obtained. The largest size and the highest recov-ery rate of iron nuggets were 11.42 mm and 92.79wt%, respectively. The calcium aluminate slag mainly comprised Ca2SiO4 and Ca12Al14O33, with small amounts of FeAl2O4, CaAl2O4, and Ca2Al2SiO7.

  5. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  9. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  12. Aluminide slurry coatings for protection of ferritic steel in molten nitrate corrosion for concentrated solar power technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigié, Pauline; Bizien, Nicolas; Baráibar, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pastor, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Agüero, Alina

    2017-06-01

    Molten nitrates can be employed as heat storage fluids in solar concentration power plants. However molten nitrates are corrosive and if operating temperatures are raised to increase efficiencies, the corrosion rates will also increase. High temperature corrosion resistant coatings based on Al have demonstrated excellent results in other sectors such as gas turbines. Aluminide slurry coated and uncoated P92 steel specimens were exposed to the so called Solar Salt (industrial grade), a binary eutectic mixture of 60 % NaNO3 - 40 % KNO3, in air for 2000 hours at 550°C and 580°C in order to analyze their behavior as candidates to be used in future solar concentration power plants employing molten nitrates as heat transfer fluids. Coated ferritic steels constitute a lower cost technology than Ni based alloy. Two different coating morphologies resulting from two heat treatment performed at 700 and 1050°C after slurry application were tested. The coated systems exhibited excellent corrosion resistance at both temperatures, whereas uncoated P92 showed significant mass loss from the beginning of the test. The coatings showed very slow reaction with the molten Solar Salt. In contrast, uncoated P92 developed a stratified, unprotected Fe, Cr oxide with low adherence which shows oscillating Cr content as a function of coating depth. NaFeO2 was also found at the oxide surface as well as within the Fe, Cr oxide.

  13. Hot workability of {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} titanium aluminide: Development of processing map and constitutive equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Narayana Murty, S.V.S.; Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformation studies of five TiAl alloys carried out through processing map. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRX domain and superplastic domain identified in power efficiency map. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Safe working zone for alloys found at 1223-1423 K at strain rates (10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} s{sup -1}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy, Zener Hollomon parameter (Z) are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive equations derived and verified. DRX grain size correlated with Z. - Abstract: Gamma titanium alumindes are intermetallics, which have very narrow working range. Hot isothermal working is the most suitable process for hot working of alloy. Accordingly, hot isothermal compression test is carried out on reaction synthesized and homogenized titanium aluminide alloys at different temperatures and strain rates using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (atom%) have been used in the study. Stress-strain data obtained from the test has been used to construct processing map, which indicates the safe and unsafe working zone. Strain rate sensitivity and Zener-Hollomon parameter has been calculated. Further, constitutive equations have been generated and verified. It is found that alloy has good workability in the temperature range of 1223-1423 K at strain rates of 0.01-0.001 s{sup -1}. In this range of parameters, the alloys nearly follow the constitutive equations.

  14. A Model for Creep and Creep Damage in the γ-Titanium Aluminide Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Harrison

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gamma titanium aluminides (γ-TiAl display significantly improved high temperature mechanical properties over conventional titanium alloys. Due to their low densities, these alloys are increasingly becoming strong candidates to replace nickel-base superalloys in future gas turbine aeroengine components. To determine the safe operating life of such components, a good understanding of their creep properties is essential. Of particular importance to gas turbine component design is the ability to accurately predict the rate of accumulation of creep strain to ensure that excessive deformation does not occur during the component’s service life and to quantify the effects of creep on fatigue life. The theta (θ projection technique is an illustrative example of a creep curve method which has, in this paper, been utilised to accurately represent the creep behaviour of the γ-TiAl alloy Ti -45Al-2Mn-2Nb. Furthermore, a continuum damage approach based on the θ-projection method has also been used to represent tertiary creep damage and accurately predict creep rupture.

  15. Processing and application properties of silicon-doped titanium aluminides; Formgebungs- und Anwendungseigenschaften silizidhaltiger TiAl-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanta, G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2001-07-01

    Submicrocrystalline intermetallic/ceramic composites based on the system Ti-Al-Si are prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent powder consolidation. Finely dispersed silicides prevent coarsening of the {gamma}-TiAl matrix during hot-forming. Therefore, the deformation temperatures can be reduced by about 200 C compared to conventional titanium aluminides. After a subsequent coarsening heat treatment, creep properties comparable to those of conventional TiAl based alloys (1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} at 700 C) are achieved. This study demonstrates that microstructure design allows for favorable processing properties without compromises regarding the desired application properties. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung des technischen Anwendungspotenzials submikrokristalliner Werkstoffe werden silizidhaltige {gamma}-TiAl-Basislegierungen durch Hochenergiemahlen und heissisostatisches Pressen hergestellt. Bei der industriellen Formgebung ermoeglicht die durch Silizide stabilisierte feine Mikrostruktur eine deutliche Temperaturabsenkung von 200 C im Vergleich zu den fuer Titanaluminide ueblichen Prozesstemperaturen. Nach einer anschliessend durchgefuehrten Gefuegeumwandlung werden Kriechgeschwindigkeiten gemessen, die mit 1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} bei 700 C im Bereich der Werte schmelzmetallurgisch hergestellter TiAl-Legierungen liegen. Eine gezielte Mikrostrukturgestaltung ermoeglicht somit eine deutliche Verbesserung der Umformeigenschaften unter Beibehaltung der guenstigen Eigenschaften fuer Hochtemperaturanwendungen. (orig.)

  16. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  17. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  18. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  19. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  20. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  3. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  4. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  5. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  6. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  7. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  8. Study on rich iron ore for martin steel and the by-products of Cu and Co in Zhangjiawa iron deposit of Shandong province%山东莱芜张家洼铁矿平炉富矿和伴生的铜、钴组分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗信德; 李卫; 王建; 乔伟; 张俊峰; 刘纪涛

    2012-01-01

    Zhangjiawa iron deposit is located at the plunge of Kuangshan arc anticline with proven rich I-ron ore resources of 7 060 X 104 t for martin steel making and by-product Cu 217 256. 1 t and Co 48 548. 3 t. According to the general occurrence of the rich iron ore and the by-products at the disconformity and structural superimpositions and tremendous high iron (copper) and sulfur contents of ore deposits (bodies) occrring in Benxi formation we consider that the ore materials are related to the high background values of Fe,Cu,Co of Shanxi style iron ore and Fe-Al shale of Benxi formation in Yuemengou group. Shanxi style iron ore and Fe-Al shale were in situ reworked and superimposed by hydrothermal fluid to form composite ore bodies at or near the disconformity and local rich iron ore for martin steel making and the by-product resources, or strutures channeled the hydrothermal fluid and transport the ore materials into contact zones and the wall rocks leading to bi-replacement filtration and formation of composite ore bodies at contact zone or nearby and small volume of rich iron ore for martin steel making and the by-products resources. Therefore, Shanxi style iron ore and Fe-Al shale are the main source for the rich iron ore for martin steel making and the by-products of Cu, Co.%山东莱芜张家洼铁矿赋存于矿山弧形背斜倾没端,已查明平炉富矿资源储量7 060×104t,伴生组分铜金属资源储量217 256.1 t,钴金属资源储量48 548.3 t.根据平炉富矿、伴生组分铜钴主要分布在假整合面及其复合部位,以及赋存在本溪组中的矿床(体)铁(铜)硫特高的特点,认为矿质与月门沟群本溪组中的山西式铁矿以及铁铝页岩层位中Fe,Cu,Co元素的高背景值有关.山西式铁矿和铁铝页岩层位或因热液作用就地改造叠加,在假整合面及附近形成复合矿体,并局部构成平炉富矿和伴生的铜、钻资源;或因构造沟通,被活化迁移至接触带与围岩中,产生

  9. Hydrostatic Compression Behavior and High-Pressure Stabilized β-Phase in γ-Based Titanium Aluminide Intermetallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Dieter Liss

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides find application in modern light-weight, high-temperature turbines, such as aircraft engines, but suffer from poor plasticity during manufacturing and processing. Huge forging presses enable materials processing in the 10-GPa range, and hence, it is necessary to investigate the phase diagrams of candidate materials under these extreme conditions. Here, we report on an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study in a large-volume press of a modern (α2 + γ two-phase material, Ti-45Al-7.5Nb-0.25C, under pressures up to 9.6 GPa and temperatures up to 1686 K. At room temperature, the volume response to pressure is accommodated by the transformation γ → α2, rather than volumetric strain, expressed by the apparently high bulk moduli of both constituent phases. Crystallographic aspects, specifically lattice strain and atomic order, are discussed in detail. It is interesting to note that this transformation takes place despite an increase in atomic volume, which is due to the high ordering energy of γ. Upon heating under high pressure, both the eutectoid and γ-solvus transition temperatures are elevated, and a third, cubic β-phase is stabilized above 1350 K. Earlier research has shown that this β-phase is very ductile during plastic deformation, essential in near-conventional forging processes. Here, we were able to identify an ideal processing window for near-conventional forging, while the presence of the detrimental β-phase is not present under operating conditions. Novel processing routes can be defined from these findings.

  10. Devising Strain Hardening Models Using Kocks–Mecking Plots—A Comparison of Model Development for Titanium Aluminides and Case Hardening Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Bambach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the development of strain hardening models taking into account the peculiarities of titanium aluminides. In comparison to steels, whose behavior has been studied extensively in the past, titanium aluminides possess a much larger initial work hardening rate, a sharp peak stress and pronounced softening. The work hardening behavior of a TNB-V4 (Ti–44.5Al–6.25Nb–0.8Mo–0.1B alloy is studied using isothermal hot compression tests conducted on a Gleeble 3500 simulator, and compared to the typical case hardening steel 25MoCrS4. The behavior is analyzed with the help of the Kocks-Mecking plots. In contrast to steel the TNB-V4 alloy shows a non-linear course of θ (i.e., no stage-III hardening initially and exhibits neither a plateau (stage IV hardening nor an inflection point at all deformation conditions. The present paper describes the development and application of a methodology for the design of strain hardening models for the TNB-V4 alloy and the 25CrMoS4 steel by taking the course of the Kocks-Mecking plots into account. Both models use different approaches for the hardening and softening mechanisms and accurately predict the flow stress over a wide range of deformation conditions. The methodology may hence assist in further developments of more sophisticated physically-based strain hardening models for TiAl-alloys.

  11. Multi-objective optimization of hole characteristics during pulsed Nd:YAG laser microdrilling of gamma-titanium aluminide alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, R.; Kuar, A. S.; Mitra, S.

    2014-09-01

    Nd:YAG laser microdrilled holes on gamma-titanium aluminide, a newly developed alloy having wide applications in turbine blades, engine valves, cases, metal cutting tools, missile components, nuclear fuel and biomedical engineering, are important from the dimensional accuracy and quality of hole point of view. Keeping this in mind, a central composite design (CCD) based on response surface methodology (RSM) is employed for multi-objective optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser microdrilling operation on gamma-titanium aluminide alloy sheet to achieve optimum hole characteristics within existing resources. The three characteristics such as hole diameter at entry, hole diameter at exit and hole taper have been considered for simultaneous optimization. The individual optimization of all three responses has also been carried out. The input parameters considered are lamp current, pulse frequency, assist air pressure and thickness of the job. The responses at predicted optimum parameter level are in good agreement with the results of confirmation experiments conducted for verification tests.

  12. Preparation of Si-modified aluminide coating by CVD process%硅改性铝化物涂层的CVD制备工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 杨甫; 吴勇

    2016-01-01

    研究了CVD法制备硅改性铝化物涂层工艺。结果表明,采用先渗硅后渗铝的两步法工艺可在Inconel 718表面获得铝-硅涂层。铝-硅涂层分为明显的两层结构,内层富硅,外层富铝。硅的加入阻碍高温条件下Al原子的内扩散,并促进了试样表面Al2 O3膜的生成。铝-硅涂层具有比单一的铝化物涂层更为优秀的耐高温氧化性能。%CVD process was studied to form Silicon modified aluminide coatings. The results show that Al-Si coatings can be formed on the surface of Inconel 718 nickel-based super alloy by two steps method. The first step is siliconizing and second step is aluminizing. The Al-Si coatings is two layers structure in which the inner layer is Si-rich and outer layer is Al-rich. The addition of Si decreases the internal diffusion rate of Al atoms under high temperature, and promote the formation of Al2 O3 film on the surface. The high temperature oxidation resistance of Al-Si coatings is better than that of single aluminide coatings.

  13. Ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  14. Spin Injection, Transport, and Detection at Room Temperature in a Lateral Spin Transport Device with Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/n-GaAs Schottky Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuya; Tezuka, Nobuki; Matsuura, Masashi; Sugimoto, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    We observed spin-valve signals and Hanle signals in four-terminal nonlocal measurements on a lateral spin transport device with Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5(CFAS)/n-GaAs Schottky tunnel junctions. The estimated spin injection/detection efficiency was 0.06 at 4.2 K, which is larger than those of the devices with Fe and CoFe electrodes [Nature Physics 3 (2007) 197 and Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 (2011) 082108]. The spin diffusion length estimated from Hanle signals was consistent with the gap length dependency of the spin-valve signals. Furthermore, the spin-valve signals were observed at up to 290 K. This is the first demonstration of detecting spin accumulation in semiconductor with full-Heusler alloys electrodes at room temperature.

  15. Combustion synthesized copper-ion substituted FeAl2O4 (Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4): A superior catalyst for methanol steam reforming compared to its impregnated analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Sayantani; Llorca, Jordi; Dominguez, Montserrat; Colussi, Sara; Trovarelli, Alessandro; Priolkar, Kaustubh R.; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Gayen, Arup

    2016-02-01

    A series of copper ion substituted MAl2O4 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn) spinels is prepared by a single step solution combustion synthesis (SCS) and tested for methanol steam reforming (MSR). The copper ion substituted Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4 appears to be the most active, showing ∼98% methanol conversion at 300 °C with ∼5% CO selectivity at GHSV = 30,000 h-1 and H2O:CH3OH = 1.1. The analogous impregnated catalyst, CuO (10 at%)/FeAl2O4, is found to be much less active. These materials are characterized by XRD, H2-TPR, BET, HRTEM, XPS and XANES analyses. Spinel phase formation is highly facilitated upon Cu-ion substitution and Cu loading beyond 10 at% leads to the formation of CuO as an additional phase. The ionic substitution of copper in FeAl2O4 leads to the highly crystalline SCS catalyst containing Cu2+ ion sites that are shown to be more active than the dispersed CuO nano-crystallites on the FeAl2O4 impregnated catalyst, despite its lower surface area. The as prepared SCS catalyst contains also a portion of copper as Cu1+ that increases when subjected to reforming atmosphere. The MSR activity of the SCS catalyst decreases with time-on-stream due to the sintering of catalyst crystallites as established from XPS and HRTEM analyses.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  17. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meat (especially beef) Oysters Poultry, dark red meat Salmon Tuna Whole grains Reasonable amounts of iron are ... iron up to three times. Foods rich in vitamin C ( such as citrus, strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This ... video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron ... can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the ... other complications. Infants and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron- ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  4. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron ... can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin ...

  6. Iron age: novel targets for iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-12-05

    Excess iron deposition in vital organs is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients affected by β-thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis. In both disorders, inappropriately low levels of the liver hormone hepcidin are responsible for the increased iron absorption, leading to toxic iron accumulation in many organs. Several studies have shown that targeting iron absorption could be beneficial in reducing or preventing iron overload in these 2 disorders, with promising preclinical data. New approaches target Tmprss6, the main suppressor of hepcidin expression, or use minihepcidins, small peptide hepcidin agonists. Additional strategies in β-thalassemia are showing beneficial effects in ameliorating ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia. Due to the suppressive nature of the erythropoiesis on hepcidin expression, these approaches are also showing beneficial effects on iron metabolism. The goal of this review is to discuss the major factors controlling iron metabolism and erythropoiesis and to discuss potential novel therapeutic approaches to reduce or prevent iron overload in these 2 disorders and ameliorate anemia in β-thalassemia.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  14. A heat treatment procedure to produce fine-grained lamellar microstructures in a P/M titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Peter

    A process for fabricating advanced aerospace titanium aluminide alloys starting from metal powders (the hot isostatically consolidated P/M process) is presented in this thesis. This process does not suffer the difficulties of chemical inhomogeneities and coarse grain structure of castings. In addition heat treatments which take advantage of the refined structure of HIP processed materials are developed to achieve microstructure control and subsequent mechanical property control. It is shown that a better "property balance" is possible after the heat treatment of HIP consolidated materials than it is with alternative processing. It is well understood that the standard microstructures (near-gamma, duplex, nearly lamellar, and fully lamellar) do not have the balanced mechanical properties (tensile, yield, creep and fatigue strength, ductility and fracture toughness) necessary for optimal performance in aero engine and automotive applications. In this work a fine-grained fully lamellar (FGFL) microstructure is developed for property control and in particular for achieving a much improved property balance. A heat treatment procedure for this purpose which consists of cyclic processing in the alpha transus temperature region to achieve an FGFL structure with grain sizes in the range of 50 mum to 150 mum is presented. Compared with conventional duplex structured materials, the minimum creep rate is an order of magnitude lower with only a 10% loss in tensile yield strength. Moreover, a three-fold increase in tensile elongation is possible by converting to an FGFL structure with only a 30% loss in minimum creep rate. These are attractive trade-offs when considering the use of these alloys for aerospace purposes. A thorough literature review of the mechanisms of formation of standard microstructures and their deformation under mechanical loading is contained in the thesis. In addition, conventional techniques to produce FGFL microstructures in wrought and cast materials are

  15. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  16. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  17. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  18. Malabsorption of iron in children with iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S J; Stuart, M J; Swender, P T; Oski, F A

    1976-05-01

    Inability to absorb oral iron is believed to be an extremely rare cause of therapeutic failure in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Six patients who had failed to respond to oral iron therapy were studied by a simple oral absorption test and contrasted with 25 patients with untreated iron deficiency anemia and 10 normal subjects. All six of the patients who were therapeutic failures demonstrated impaired iron absorption in the absence of other clinical evidence of gastrointestinal disease. In the 25 newly diagnosed patients with iron deficiency. 24 demonstrated elevated iron absorptions while 10 ironreplete normal subjects had minimal elevations in their serum iron values following the administration of the test dose of 1 mg of elemental iron per kilogram. When the therapeutic failures were treated with parenteral iron, all had a therapeutic response. In addition, after treatment the impaired absorption of iron improved transiently. All children who absorbed iron readily responded to oral iron therapy.

  19. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM, an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  20. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-02-21

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  1. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M.; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-01-01

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route. PMID:28772572

  2. Iron chelating agents for iron overload diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Crisponi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although iron is an essential element for life, an excessive amount may become extremely toxic both for its ability to generate reactive oxygen species, and for the lack in humans of regulatory mechanisms for iron excretion. Chelation therapy has been introduced in clinical practice in the seventies of last century to defend thalassemic patients from the effects of iron overload and, in spite of all its limitations, it has dramatically changed both life expectancy and quality of life of patients. It has to be considered that the drugs in clinical use present some disadvantages too, this makes urgent new more suitable chelating agents. The requirements of an iron chelator have been better and better defined over the years and in this paper they will be discussed in detail. As a final point the most interesting ligands studied in the last years will be presented.

  3. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  4. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  5. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  7. Fabrication of iron aluminum alloy/steel laminate by clad rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masahashi, N.; Watanabe, S.; Hanada, S.; Komatsu, K.; Kimura, G.

    2006-05-01

    Laminates of an iron-aluminum alloy (20Al) and three types of steel—chromium molybdenum (CrMo), high carbon (FeCMn), and precipitation hardening steel with niobium carbide (FeCNb)—were fabricated at 600 °C and 1000 °C by clad rolling based on the compression stress ratio of 20Al to steel. The laminates fabricated at 600 °C exhibit a deformation microstructure with partial recrystallization, while those at 1000 °C reveal a refined microstructure. The 20Al layer of all the laminates exhibit a {001} texture, and the intensity of the texture increases with a decrease in the fabrication temperature and an increase in the reduction. The bending deformability of a laminate increases with a decrease in the compression stress ratio and by a reduction in the intensity of the {001} texture. The clad plate is further rolled at room temperature to a thickness of approximately 150 µm, which enables winding without damage. It is concluded that a high-strength steel at high temperatures and a high Al content in the Fe-Al alloy is beneficial for the fabrication of deformable laminates.

  8. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  10. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  11. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  12. Iron and the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedekum, Natalie A; Dimeff, Robert J

    2005-08-01

    Iron is an important mineral necessary for many biologic pathways. Different levels of deficiency can occur in the athlete, resulting in symptoms that range from none to severe fatigue. Iron deficiency without anemia may adversely affect athletic performance. Causes of iron deficiency include poor intake, menstrual losses, gastrointestinal and genitourinary losses due to exercise-induced ischemia or organ movement, foot strike hemolysis, thermohemolysis, and sweat losses. A higher incidence of deficiency occurs in female athletes compared with males.

  13. Physics of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  14. Iron, Meat and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Geissler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a summary of the publication “Iron and Health” by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN to the U.K. Government (2010, which reviews the dietary intake of iron and the impact of different dietary patterns on the nutritional and health status of the U.K. population. It concludes that several uncertainties make it difficult to determine dose-response relationships or to confidently characterize the risks associated with iron deficiency or excess. The publication makes several recommendations concerning iron intakes from food, including meat, and from supplements, as well as recommendations for further research.

  15. Recalling the Iron Girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The phrase "iron girl" is symbolic of an era. Widely used in the 1960s and the early 1970s, it was a term that described women who, in the spirit of sexual equality, found in themselves a physical strength that surpassed their psychologi cal expectations. With their might and power, they proved to society that women could do everything that men could. The title of "iron girl" was their pride.The well-known writer Fan Xiaoqing, was one such iron girl. She says the "iron girls" were nothing less than a quest for perfection.

  16. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  17. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  18. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  1. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the intestines not properly absorbing vitamin B12 ( pernicious anemia ) Sickle cell anemia Risks There is very little risk involved with ... test Hemoglobin Hemolytic anemia Iron deficiency anemia Pernicious anemia Serum iron test Sickle cell anemia Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ...

  2. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, ...

  4. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  6. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don' ... from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers ...

  8. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries.

  9. Metallography of Aluminide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Aero-Space Technologies Australia, Systems Division Librarian Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library Australian Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited...Fink, R, W. Heakel. " Analysis of Microstructural Change due to Cyclic Oxidation in Aluminilde-coated NI-Al. NI-Cr and NI-Cr-Al Alloys". High Temperature

  10. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  11. Weldability of polycrystalline aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasching, A.A.; Edwards, G.R.; Burt, R.P. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Slow strain rate tensile tests were conducted in varying water vapor atmospheres on weldments refined by magnetic arc oscillation with average fusion zone grain sizes ranging between 115 and 530{mu}m. Fracture strength and percent strain to fracture were measured for each fusion zone microstructure. The fracture strength data followed Hall-Petch behavior, and water vapor significantly reduced fracture strength. The finer grain size fusion zones were found to be less susceptible to hydrogen cracking and more tolerant of high hydrogen concentrations than coarse fusion zone grain structures. Microstructural refinement via arc oscillation was also found to be suitable only for well-controlled fabrication environments.

  12. Effect of an interface Mg insertion layer on the reliability of a magnetic tunnel junction based on a Co{sub 2}FeAl full-Heusler alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungmin; Kil, Gyuhyun; Lee, Gaehun; Choi, Chulmin; Song, Yunheub [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji [National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    The reliability of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) based on a Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler alloy with a MgO tunnel barrier was evaluated. In particular, the effect of a Mg insertion layer under the MgO was investigated in view of resistance drift by using various voltage stress tests. We compared the resistance change during constant voltage stress (CVS) and confirmed a trap/detrap phenomenon during the interval stress test for samples with and without a Mg insertion layer. The MTJ with a Mg insertion layer showed a relatively small resistance change for the CVS test and a reduced trap/detrap phenomenon for the interval stress test compared to the sample without a Mg insertion layer. This is understood to be caused by the improved crystallinity at the bottom of the CFA/MgO interface due to the Mg insertion layer, which provides a smaller number of trap site during the stress test. As a result, the interface condition of the MgO layer is very important for the reliability of a MTJ using a full-Heusler alloy, and the the insert of a Mg layer at the MgO interface is expected to be an effective method for enhancing the reliability of a MTJ.

  13. Piezostrain tuning non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation in Co2FeAl Heusler alloy film grown on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cai; Wang, Fenglong; Dunzhu, Gesang; Yao, Jinli; Jiang, Changjun

    2016-11-01

    Non-volatile electric field-based control of magnetic anisotropy in Co2FeAl/ Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (CFA/PMN-PT) heterostructures is investigated at room temperature. The remnant magnetization response under different electric fields shows a asymmetric butterfly-like behavior; specifically, this behavior is consistent with the asymmetric butterfly-like piezostrain versus applied electric field curve. Thus electric field-induced non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation can be attributed to the piezostrain effect. Further, the result measured by rotating-angle ferromagnetic resonance demonstrates piezostrain-mediated non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation at the initial state and the two remnant polarization states after application of the poling fields of 10 and  -10 kV cm-1 turned off. The angular dependence of magnetic damping also indicates a 90° phase shift at the above mentioned three different states. Additionally, the piezostrain-mediated non-volatile stable magnetization reversal in the two directions of easy and hard magnetization axes are observed under positive and negative pulsed electric fields, which can be used to improve the performance of low-loss multiple-state memory devices.

  14. Iron and the endurance athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2014-09-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that is highly significant to endurance athletes. Iron is critical to optimal athletic performance because of its role in energy metabolism, oxygen transport, and acid-base balance. Endurance athletes are at increased risk for suboptimal iron status, with potential negative consequences on performance, because of the combination of increased iron needs and inadequate dietary intake. This review paper summarizes the role of iron in maximal and submaximal exercise and describes the effects of iron deficiency on exercise performance. Mechanisms that explain the increased risk of iron deficiency in endurance athletes, including exercise-associated inflammation and hepcidin release on iron sequestration, are described. Information on screening athletes for iron deficiency is presented, and suggestions to increase iron intake through diet modification or supplemental iron are provided.

  15. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  16. From Iron Bowl to Iron Stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; L.; O’NEAL

    2009-01-01

    A few decades ago, "Iron Bowl" referred to not having to go hungry in China if you were employed by the Agovernment. The government gave you a job that secured the filling of one’s rice bowl. This concept and practice did create loyalty, as the times were hard. China has moved far past those times to become the

  17. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  19. Effect of Al2O3 Binder on the Precipitated Iron-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Wan; Bao-Shan Wu; Xia An; Ting-Zhen Li; Zhi-Chao Tao; Hong-Wei Xiang; Yong-Wang Li

    2007-01-01

    A series of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts incorporated with Al2O3 binder were prepared by the combination of co-precipitation and spray drying technology. The catalyst samples were characterized by using N2 physical adsorption, temperature-programmed reduction/desorption (TPR/TPD) and M(o)ssbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) methods. The characterization results indicated that the BET surface area increases with increasing Al2O3 content and passes through a maximum at the Al2O3/Fe ratio of 10/100 (weight basis). After the point, it decreases with further increase in Al2O3 content. The incorporation of Al2O3 binder was found to weaken the surface basicity and suppress the reduction and carburization of iron-based catalysts probably due to the strong K-Al2O3 and Fe-Al2O3 interactions. Furthermore, the H2 adsorption ability of the catalysts is enhanced with increasing Al2O3 content. The FTS performances of the catalysts were tested in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under the reaction conditions of 260 ℃, 1.5 MPa, 1000 h-1 and molar ratio of H2/CO 0.67 for 200 h. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of Al2O3 affects the activity of iron-based catalysts to a little extent. However, with further increase of Al2O3 content, the FTS activity and water gas shift reaction (WGS) activity are decreased severely. The addition of appropriate Al2O3 do not affect the product selectivity, but the catalysts incorporated with large amounts of Al2O3 have higher selectivity for light hydrocarbons and lower selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons.

  20. Uptake of Zn2+ ions by a fully iron-exchanged clinoptilolite. Case study of heavily contaminated drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimirkou, Anthoula

    2007-06-01

    Clinoptilolite, a natural zeolite, was used for the synthesis of a high surface area clinoptilolite (Clin)-iron (Fe) oxide system, in order to be used for the removal of Zn(2+) ions from drinking water samples. The new system was obtained by adding natural Clin in an iron nitrate solution under strongly basic conditions. The Clin-Fe system has specific surface area equal to 151 m(2)/g and is fully iron exchanged (Fe/Al=1.23). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to determine the effectiveness of the Clin and the Clin-Fe system in removal of Zn from drinking water. Adsorption experiments were conducted by mixing 1.00 g of each of the substrates with certain volume of water samples contaminated with ten different Zn concentrations (from 7.65x10(-5) to 3.82x10(-2)M or from 5.00 to 2500 ppm Zn). For our experimental conditions, the maximum adsorbed Zn amount by Clin was 71.3mg/g, whereas by the Clin-Fe system 94.8 mg/g. The main factors that contribute to different adsorbed Zn amounts by the two solids are due to new surface species and negative charge of the Clin-Fe system. In addition, the release of counterbalanced ions (i.e. Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+) and K(+)) was examined, as well as the dissolution of framework Si and Al. It was found that for most of the samples the Clin-Fe system releases lower concentrations of Ca, Mg and Na and higher concentrations of K than Clin, while the dissolution of Si/Al was limited. Changes in the composition of water samples, as well as in their pH and conductivities values were reported and explained.

  1. Use of an iron-overexchanged clinoptilolite for the removal of Cu2+ ions from heavily contaminated drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doula, M K; Dimirkou, A

    2008-03-01

    Clinoptilolite, a natural zeolite, was used for the synthesis of a high surface area clinoptilolite-iron oxide system, in order to be used for the removal of Cu2+ ions from drinking water samples. The solid system was obtained by adding natural clinoptilolite in an iron nitrate solution under strongly basic conditions. The Clin-Fe system has specific surface area equal to 151 m2 g(-1) and is fully iron exchanged (Fe/Al=1.23). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to determine the effectiveness of the Clin and the Clin-Fe system in removal of copper from drinking water. Adsorption experiments were conducted by mixing 1.00 g of each of the substrates with certain volume of water samples contaminated with 10 different Cu concentrations (from 3.15x10(-5) to 315x10(-2) M or from 2.00 to 2000 ppm Cu). For our experimental conditions, the maximum adsorbed Cu amount on Clin was 13.6 mg g(-1) whereas on the Clin-Fe system was 37.5 mg g(-1). The main factors that contribute to different adsorption capacities of the two solids are due to new surface species and negative charge of the Clin-Fe system. In addition, the release of counterbalanced ions (i.e. Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+) was examined, as well as the dissolution of framework Si and Al. It was found that for the most of the samples the Clin-Fe system releases lower concentrations of Ca, Mg and Na and higher concentrations of K than Clin, while the dissolution of Si/Al was limited. Changes in the composition of water samples, as well as in their pH and conductivities values were reported and explained.

  2. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  3. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Vermicular graphite cast iron(VG iron for short in the following sections)is a type of cast iron in which the graphite is intermediate in shape between flake and spheroidal.Compared with the normal flake graphite in grey iron, the graphite in VG iron is shorter and thicker and shows a curved, more rounded shape.Because its outer contour is exactly like a worm, hence it is called vermicular graphite.

  4. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  5. Physical and mechanical properties of iron-aluminium (Mn, Si) lightweight steels; Proprietes physiques et mecaniques des aciers alleges fer-aluminium (au Mn-Si)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frommeyer, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Drewes, E.J.; Bernhard, E. [Thyssen Krupp Stahl (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Complete text of publication follows: iron-aluminium alloys containing up to 9 wt-% (18 at-%) Al exhibit promising physical and mechanical properties for the development of high performance light-weight steels for automotive applications and for building constructions, specifically facades. The Fe-Al phase diagram shows on the iron rich side three type of b.c.c. lattices. These are the non ordered A2 and the ordered DO{sub 3} and B2 lattices, which influence strongly the physical and mechanical properties of these alloys. Macro alloying with manganese favours the formation of the austenite phase and decreases the stacking fault energy in combination with additions of silicon. Micro alloying and thermomechanical processing including texture development will improve the plastic anisotropy properties (r-values, {epsilon}{sub 1}/{epsilon}{sub 2}-curves) and the strain hardening exponents. The reduced density, the higher flow stresses and tensile strength combined with extended ductility, and the considerably improved impact strength of these light-weight steels reveal great potential application for stretch and deep drawing operations as well. Regarding these advantages, the newly developed materials will enable further improvements in light-weight constructions with steel. (authors)

  6. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ... to stop her monthly periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  20. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red blood cell that carries oxygen from the lungs to the body. Iron gives hemoglobin the strength ... dried beans and peas dried fruits leafy dark green ... serving coffee or tea at mealtime — both contain tannins that reduce the ...

  1. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrous sulfate provides the iron needed by the body to produce red blood cells. It is used ... Ferrous sulfate comes as regular, coated, and extended-release (long-acting) tablets; regular and extended-release capsules; ...

  2. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...

  3. Microbes: Mini Iron Factories

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via con...

  4. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin; İdil Yenicesu

    2015-01-01

    Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron def...

  5. Intravenous Iron Sucrose for Children With Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneva, Kristiyana; Chow, Erika; Rosenfield, Cathy G; Kelly, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in children. Most children with IDA are treated with oral iron preparations. However, intravenous (IV) iron is an alternative for children with severe IDA who have difficulty in adhering to or absorbing oral iron. We sought to describe the safety and effectiveness of IV iron sucrose for treatment of IDA in children. Pharmacy records of children who received IV iron sucrose at a children's hospital between 2004 and 2014 were reviewed. Laboratory markers of anemia and iron studies were obtained and preinfusion and postinfusion values were compared. Records were also reviewed for adverse reactions. A total of 142 patients received IV iron sucrose over 10 years. The mean age was 11 years, 9 months. One patient of 142 developed cough and wheezing during the infusion. No other adverse events were found. IV iron sucrose resulted in a statistically significant and clinically meaningful increase in hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, serum iron, ferritin, and % iron saturation, with a corresponding decrease in total iron binding capacity. The use of IV iron sucrose in pediatric patients with IDA is safe and leads to a moderate increase in hemoglobin and substantial improvement in iron studies.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite - (Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm-1 assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO42- units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm-1 are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm-1 are attributed to the ν1PO43- symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3PO43- antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm-1 are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood.

  7. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  8. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Wei-Lung, E-mail: wlchou0388@hotmail.com [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Ta [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan Hsien 717, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kai-Yu [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  9. Investigation of wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MgAION-based ceramics by X-ray sessile drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Matsushita, T.; Seetharaman, S.; Li, W. C.

    2006-06-01

    The wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MgAION-based composite ceramics were investigated using X-ray sessile drop technique. The contact angles were measured on substrates of different composites as functions of temperature and varying partial pressures of oxygen. The results with pure argon gas showed that contact angles kept almost constant in the temperature range 1823 to 1873 K. The contact angle was found to show a slight increase with increasing boron nitride (BN) content in MgAION-BN composites. These are attributed to the higher contact angle between BN substrate and liquid iron drop compared with that obtained for MgAION substrate. When the CO-CO2-Ar gas mixtures were introduced into the system, the contact angle showed an initial quick decrease followed by a slow decrease and then a period of nearly constant contact angle at a given temperature corresponding to the steady-state condition. Even in this case, BN seemed to cause an increase in the equilibrium contact angle. The equilibrium contact angle was found to decrease with increasing temperature. XRD results indicated that the substrate was oxidized and the oxidation products combined with FeO formed by the oxidation of the iron drop to from FeAl2O4 and Mg1-xFex) These were likely to form a ternary FeO-Al2O3-MgO slag or a quaternary slag by combining with B2O3. An interesting observation is that the iron drop moved away from the original site, probably due to the Marangoni effect.

  10. High pressure studies of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} negative thermal expansion materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, AlGa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Lindsay; Gadient, Jennifer; Gao, Xiaodong; Lind, Cora, E-mail: cora.lind@utoledo.edu

    2016-05-15

    High pressure powder X-ray diffraction studies of several A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, and AlGa) were conducted up to 6–7 GPa. All materials adopted a monoclinic structure under ambient conditions, and displayed similar phase transition behavior upon compression. The initial isotropic compressibility first became anisotropic, followed by a small but distinct drop in cell volume. These patterns could be described by a distorted variant of the ambient pressure polymorph. At higher pressures, a distinct high pressure phase formed. Indexing results confirmed that all materials adopted the same high pressure phase. All changes were reversible on decompression, although some hysteresis was observed. The similarity of the high pressure cells to previously reported Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} suggested that this material undergoes the same sequence of transitions as all materials investigated in this paper. It was found that the transition pressures for all phase changes increased with decreasing radius of the A-site cations. - Graphical abstract: Overlay of variable pressure X-ray diffraction data of Al{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} collected in a diamond anvil cell. Both subtle and discontinuous phase transitions are clearly observed. - Highlights: • The high pressure behavior of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} (A=Al, Fe, (AlGa), (AlFe)) was studied. • All compounds undergo the same sequence of pressure-induced phase transitions. • The phase transition pressures correlate with the average size of the A-site cation. • All transitions were reversible with hysteresis. • Previously studied Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} undergoes the same sequence of transitions.

  11. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  12. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  13. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  14. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  15. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside versus iron sucrose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Richard; Roman, Eloy; Modiano, Manuel R; Achebe, Maureen M; Thomsen, Lars L; Auerbach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in many chronic diseases, and intravenous (IV) iron offers a rapid and efficient iron correction. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside and iron sucrose in patients with IDA who were intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron. The trial was an open-label, comparative, multi-center trial. Five hundred and eleven patients with IDA from different causes were randomized 2:1 to iron isomaltoside or iron sucrose and followed for 5 weeks. The cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was based on body weight and hemoglobin (Hb), administered as either a 1000 mg infusion over more than 15 minutes or 500 mg injection over 2 minutes. The cumulative dose of iron sucrose was calculated according to Ganzoni and administered as repeated 200 mg infusions over 30 minutes. The mean cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was 1640.2 (standard deviation (SD): 357.6) mg and of iron sucrose 1127.9 (SD: 343.3) mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline at any time between weeks 1-5. Both non-inferiority and superiority were confirmed for the primary endpoint, and a shorter time to Hb increase ≥2 g/dL was observed with iron isomaltoside. For all biochemical efficacy parameters, faster and/or greater improvements were found with iron isomaltoside. Both treatments were well tolerated; 0.6% experienced a serious adverse drug reaction. Iron isomaltoside was more effective than iron sucrose in achieving a rapid improvement in Hb. Furthermore, iron isomaltoside has an advantage over iron sucrose in allowing higher cumulative dosing in fewer administrations. Both treatments were well tolerated in a broad population with IDA.

  16. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  17. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  18. Iron prophylaxis during pregnancy -- how much iron is needed? A randomized dose- response study of 20-80 mg ferrous iron daily in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksen, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.......To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy....

  19. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  20. Electro-spark deposited coatings for protection of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The coating is fused (metallurgically bonded) to the substrate with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperature. Rapid solidification of the deposit typically results in an extremely fine-grained deposit that may be amorphous for some materials. Nearly any electrically conductive metal, alloy or cermet can be applied to metallic substrates. The ESD process allows multi-layer coatings to be built-up using different materials to create graded structures or surface compositions that would be difficult to achieve by other means. A series of iron-aluminide coatings based on Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl in combination with refractory metal diffusion-barrier coatings and supplementary additions of other elements are in corrosion testing at ANL. The most recent FeAl coatings are showing a factor of three better corrosion performance than the best previous coatings. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, major new applications in gas turbine engines and steam turbine blade coatings, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  2. Oral iron chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2010-02-01

    Effective chelation therapy can prevent or reverse organ toxicity related to iron overload, yet cardiac complications and premature death continue to occur, largely related to difficulties with compliance in patients who receive parenteral therapy. The use of oral chelators may be able to overcome these difficulties and improve patient outcomes. A chelator's efficacy at cardiac and liver iron removal and side-effect profile should be considered when tailoring individual chelation regimens. Broader options for chelation therapy, including possible combination therapy, should improve clinical efficacy and enhance patient care.

  3. Hepcidin Suppresses Brain Iron Accumulation by Downregulating Iron Transport Proteins in Iron-Overloaded Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Luo, Qianqian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Iron accumulates progressively in the brain with age, and iron-induced oxidative stress has been considered as one of the initial causes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Based on the role of hepcidin in peripheral organs and its expression in the brain, we hypothesized that this peptide has a role to reduce iron in the brain and hence has the potential to prevent or delay brain iron accumulation in iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of hepcidin expression adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) and hepcidin peptide on brain iron contents, iron transport across the brain-blood barrier, iron uptake and release, and also the expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons. We demonstrated that hepcidin significantly reduced brain iron in iron-overloaded rats and suppressed transport of transferrin-bound iron (Tf-Fe) from the periphery into the brain. Also, the peptide significantly inhibited expression of TfR1, DMT1, and Fpn1 as well as reduced Tf-Fe and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake and iron release in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons, while downregulation of hepcidin with hepcidin siRNA retrovirus generated opposite results. We concluded that, under iron-overload, hepcidin functions to reduce iron in the brain by downregulating iron transport proteins. Upregulation of brain hepcidin by ad-hepcidin emerges as a new pharmacological treatment and prevention for iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Grey Iron(Ⅲ) 2.5 Crystallization of the LTF during final stage of eutectic solidification of grey iron In the final stage of eutectic solidification, eutectic cells grow gradually into large sizes; the liquid iron between the cells enters the last stage of solidification. At this time, the region of the remaining liquid iron is called last to freeze volume, LTF in short, as shown in Fig.2-39.

  5. Phytases for improved iron absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Phytase enzymes present an alternative to iron supplements, because they have been shown to improve iron absorption by means of catalysing the degradation of a potent iron absorption inhibitor: phytic acid. Phytic acid is a hexaphosphate of inositol and is particularly prevalent in cereal grains...

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  7. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of the open 3d subshell transition metal aluminides: AlV, AlCr, and AlCo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Jane M.; Brugh, Dale J.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-10-01

    Three open 3d subshell transition metal aluminides, AlV, AlCr, and AlCo, have been investigated by resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy to elucidate the chemical bonding in these diatomic molecules. The open nature of the 3d subshell results in a vast number of excited electronic states in these species, allowing bond strengths to be measured by the observation of abrupt predissociation thresholds in a congested optical spectrum, giving D00(AlV)=1.489±0.010 eV, D00(AlCr)=2.272±0.009 eV, and D00(AlCo)=1.844±0.002 eV. At lower excitation energies the presence of discrete transitions has permitted determinations of the ground state symmetries and bond lengths of AlV and AlCo through rotationally resolved studies, giving r0` (AlV, Ω`=0)=2.620±0.004 Å and r0` (AlCo, Ω`=3)=2.3833±0.0005 Å. Ionization energies were also measured for all three species, yielding IE(AlV)=6.01±0.10 eV, IE(AlCr)=5.96±0.04 eV, and IE(AlCo)=6.99±0.17 eV. A discussion of these results is presented in the context of previous work on AlCu, AlNi, AlCa, and AlZn.

  9. Spectroscopy of jet-cooled AlMn and trends in the electronic structure of the 3d transition metal aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-10-01

    Jet-cooled diatomic AlMn has been spectroscopically investigated and is shown to possess a 5Πi ground state deriving from the Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn (3d54s2,6S) separated atom limit. This implies that the aluminum atom favors a 3pπ approach to the manganese atom, a result that is in agreement with previous studies on the related AlCa and AlZn molecules. The ground state bond length has been measured as 2.6384±0.0010 Å, a value which includes corrections due to spin-uncoupling effects in the X 5Πi state. It is suggested that the 5Πi state emerges as the ground state due to a particularly favorable configuration interaction with a low-lying 5Πi state that derives from the interaction of Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn [3d6(5D)4s1,6D]. Combination of the atoms in this excited state leads to a strong σ2 covalent bond via a 3pσAl-4sσMn interaction, which causes this excited electronic state to drop in energy so that it is expected to lie within a few thousand cm-1 of the ground electronic state. Following a discussion of the spectroscopic results on AlMn, an overall summary of the spectroscopic results on the 3d series of transition metal aluminides is presented, along with predictions of the ground electronic states of the as yet unobserved AlSc, AlTi, and AlFe molecules.

  10. Preliminary study of HDA coating on CLAM steel followed by high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: newboy.chen@163.com; Huang, Qunying; Yan, Zilin; Song, Yong; Liu, Shaojun; Jiang, Zhizhong

    2013-11-15

    A hot-dip aluminizing process is expected to produce aluminide coatings on structural materials to resist tritium permeation, corrosion, and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects in the fusion reactor blanket. China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel, which is the candidate structural material for the LiPb blanket system in China, was coated with pure aluminum and with an Al–Si alloy. Factors affecting the thickness and morphology of the aluminide coatings were studied. After the hot-dipping treatment, FeAl{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} were observed at the Al/steel interface. The existence of silicon in the molten aluminum suppressed the growth of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, built up the thickness of FeAl{sub 3} slightly, and contributed to reducing the thickness of the intermetallic layer. The brittle phase of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} had completely transformed to ductile phases of FeAl{sub 2}, FeAl and α-Fe(Al) after high temperature heat-treatment in air. Kirkendall voids were found in the diffusion layer, due to the rapid interdiffusion of iron and aluminum during oxidation. Cracks and pores were observed on the coating surface and at the interlayer. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction indicates the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the oxide layer.

  11. Atmospheric transport of mineral dust from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Temporal variability, acid processing, and iron solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.; Rengarajan, R.

    2014-08-01

    transport of chemical constituents from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal is a conspicuous seasonal feature that occurs during the late NE-monsoon (December-March). With this perspective, aerosol composition and abundance of mineral dust have been studied during November 2009 to March 2010 from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the IGP, representing the atmospheric outflow to the Bay of Bengal. The chemical composition of PM2.5 suggests the dominance of nss-SO42- (6.9-24.3 µg m-3); whereas the abundance of mineral dust varied from 3 to 18 µg m-3. The concentration of aerosol iron (FeTot) and its fractional solubility (Fews % = Fews/FeTot *100, where Fews is the water-soluble fraction of FeTot) varied from 60 to 1144 ng m-3 and from 6.7 to 26.5%, respectively. A striking similarity in the temporal variability of total inorganic acidity (TIA = NO3- + nss-SO42-) and Fews (%) provides evidence for acid processing of mineral dust (alluvium) during atmospheric transport from the IGP. The contribution of TIA to water-soluble inorganic species [(nss-SO42- + NO3-)/ΣWSIS], mass ratios of Ca/Al and Fe/Al, and abundance of dust (%) and Fews (%) in the IGP-outflow are similar to the aerosol composition over the Bay of Bengal. With the rapid increase in anthropogenic activities over south and south-east Asia, the enhanced fractional solubility of aerosol iron (attributed to acid processing of mineral dust) has implications to further increase in the air-sea deposition of Fe to the Ocean surface.

  12. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  13. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  14. State of the iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Bhandari, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) frequently occurs in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and negatively impacts their quality of life. Nevertheless, the condition appears to be both under-diagnosed and undertreated. Regular biochemical screening of patients with IBD for anemia...

  15. The New Iron Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sinosteel wins a hard-fought victory in the marathon battle for Australia’s Midwest Sinosteel Corp.,one of China’s larg- est steelmakers,has finally clinched its AU$1.36 billion($1.31 billion) takeover of Midwest Corp.,a Perth (Australia)-based iron ore miner,after a

  16. Intermetallic titanium aluminides as innovative high temperature lightweight structural materials. How materialographic methods have contributed to their development; Intermetallische Titanaluminide als innovative Hochtemperaturleichtbauwerkstoffe. Wie materialographische Methoden zu ihrer Entwicklung beigetragen haben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria). Dept. Metallkunde und Werkstoffpruefung

    2015-07-01

    The present article is considered the continuation of the two review articles ''Intermetallische γ-Titanaluminid-Basislegierungen aus metallographischer Sicht'' (''Intermetallic γ titanium aluminide based alloys from a metallographic point of view'') by H. Clemens and F. Jeglitsch in Pract. Metallogr. 37 (2000) 194 - 217 and ''Intermetallische γ-Titanaluminid-Basislegierungen aus metallographischer Sicht - eine Fortsetzung'' (''Intermetallic γ titanium aluminide based alloy from a metallographic point of view - a continuation'') by H. Clemens and S. Mayer in Pract. Metallogr. 48 (2011) 64 - 100. With reference to a γ TiAl based alloy specifically developed for aircraft engines, the so-called TNM alloy, this third and concluding part describes how materialographic methods, in combination with a targeted use of complementary investigation methods, have contributed to their development, manufacture, and processing, and, eventually, to their industrial launch. In this context, the alloy development strategy is discussed and representative microstructures and nanostructures are shown and described after different processing and heat treatment processes. Selected case studies from materialographic examinations are presented and interpreted using, for each and every of these aspects, approaches from the fields of physical metallurgy und metal physics.

  17. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  18. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  19. In Situ Observation of MgO Inclusions in Liquid Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haoyuan; Zhang, Tongsheng; Yang, Liang; Xavier, Rodrigo R.; Fruehan, Richard J.; Webler, Bryan A.

    2016-08-01

    This study showed that MgO inclusions can be stable in liquid iron with elevated Al and it illustrated an important role of vaporization in the evolution of inclusions. Previous studies have shown that dissolved Al reduces MgO from slags and refractories, leading to spinel (MgAl2O4) inclusions. The elevated Al content of newer steels raises the possibility that MgO inclusions can be stable. In this work, MgO inclusions were produced and observed in an Fe-Al alloy. The inclusions in the liquid alloy at 1873 K (1600 °C) were observed in situ with a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM). Two types of experiments were performed: one where only a metal sample was melted and the other where the sample was in contact with a liquid, MgO-saturated slag. When no slag was present, the MgO inclusions shrank and disappeared at 1873 K (1600 °C). No inclusions were observed in situ during cooling or in post-CLSM analysis. When the MgO-saturated slag was present, the inclusion sizes were essentially constant and MgO was observed on the surface of post-CLSM samples. Analysis of the results showed that MgO can be stable in 1873 K (1600 °C), but that its presence depends on the rate of removal of Mg due to vaporization and the supply of Mg due to slag/metal or refractory/metal reactions.

  20. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  1. Iron-fortified milk can improve iron status in young women with low iron stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz-Ahrens, K.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Kip, P.; Elbers, F.; Boeing, H.; Schrezenmeir, J.

    2004-01-01

    A considerable proportion of the populations of developing and industrialised nations does not meet the recommended daily allowance for iron and are thus at risk of chronic iron-deficiency anaemia. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we investigated whether supplementation with iron-enriched

  2. Iron-fortified milk can improve iron status in young women with low iron stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz-Ahrens, K.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Kip, P.; Elbers, F.; Boeing, H.; Schrezenmeir, J.

    2004-01-01

    A considerable proportion of the populations of developing and industrialised nations does not meet the recommended daily allowance for iron and are thus at risk of chronic iron-deficiency anaemia. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we investigated whether supplementation with iron-enriched

  3. [Iron deficiency, thrombocytosis and thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatiev, Rayko

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency, the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide, is often associated with reactive thrombocytosis. Although secondary thrombocytosis is commonly considered to be harmless, there is accumulating evidence that elevated platelet counts, especially in the setting of iron deficiency, can lead to an increased thromboembolic risk in both arterial and venous systems. Here we present the mechanisms of iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis and summarize its clinical consequences especially in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, chronic kidney disease or cancer. We hypothesize that iron deficiency is an underestimated thromboembolic risk factor, and that iron replacement therapy can become an effective preventive strategy in a variety of clinical settings.

  4. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  5. Osmundiron, cleaved iron bars and slags (Osmundjern, kloder og kalotslagger)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchwald, Vagn Fabritius

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages.......Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages....

  6. High efficiency iron electrode and additives for use in rechargeable iron-based batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Aniszfeld, Robert; Manohar, Aswin; Malkhandi, Souradip; Yang, Bo

    2017-02-21

    An iron electrode and a method of manufacturing an iron electrode for use in an iron-based rechargeable battery are disclosed. In one embodiment, the iron electrode includes carbonyl iron powder and one of a metal sulfide additive or metal oxide additive selected from the group of metals consisting of bismuth, lead, mercury, indium, gallium, and tin for suppressing hydrogen evolution at the iron electrode during charging of the iron-based rechargeable battery. An iron-air rechargeable battery including an iron electrode comprising carbonyl iron is also disclosed, as is an iron-air battery wherein at least one of the iron electrode and the electrolyte includes an organosulfur additive.

  7. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  8. Studies on the pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 1. Urinary iron excretion in iron deficiency anemia patients and rats in various iron states

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    In the "iron excretion test" , urinary iron excretion after injection of saccharated iron oxide has been reported to be accelerated in relapsing idiopathic iron deficiency anemia. To determine the relevance of urinary iron excretion to clinical factors other than iron metabolism, 15 clinical parameters were evaluated. The serum creatinine level was positively and the serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urinary iron excretion, showing coefficients of r=0.97,-0.86 respectively, a...

  9. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  10. Studying Irony Detection Beyond Ironic Criticism: Let's Include Ironic Praise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruntsch, Richard; Ruch, Willibald

    2017-01-01

    Studies of irony detection have commonly used ironic criticisms (i.e., mock positive evaluation of negative circumstances) as stimulus materials. Another basic type of verbal irony, ironic praise (i.e., mock negative evaluation of positive circumstances) is largely absent from studies on individuals' aptitude to detect verbal irony. However, it can be argued that ironic praise needs to be considered in order to investigate the detection of irony in the variety of its facets. To explore whether the detection ironic praise has a benefit beyond ironic criticism, three studies were conducted. In Study 1, an instrument (Test of Verbal Irony Detection Aptitude; TOVIDA) was constructed and its factorial structure was tested using N = 311 subjects. The TOVIDA contains 26 scenario-based items and contains two scales for the detection of ironic criticism vs. ironic praise. To validate the measurement method, the two scales of the TOVIDA were experimentally evaluated with N = 154 subjects in Study 2. In Study 3, N = 183 subjects were tested to explore personality and ability correlates of the two TOVIDA scales. Results indicate that the co-variance between the ironic TOVIDA items was organized by two inter-correlated but distinct factors: one representing ironic praise detection aptitude and one representing ironic criticism detection aptitude. Experimental validation showed that the TOVIDA items truly contain irony and that item scores reflect irony detection. Trait bad mood and benevolent humor (as a facet of the sense of humor) were found as joint correlates for both ironic criticism and ironic praise detection scores. In contrast, intelligence, trait cheerfulness, and corrective humor were found as unique correlates of ironic praise detection scores, even when statistically controlling for the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Our results indicate that the aptitude to detect ironic praise can be seen as distinct from the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Generating

  11. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  12. Iron Curtains ?

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Vlček

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the emotional and multi-sensorial dimensions of care within a transnational family separated by the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. It will argue that processes of supportive and compassionate engagement amongst transnational kin are not only shaped by long-distance communication, financial support and practical help within specific political and economic contexts, but also by personal desires and interpersonal conflict. The dialectics of proximity and distance are explo...

  13. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    some cyanobacteria has been investigated through culture-based and genomic approaches (Ferreira and Straus, 1994; Katoh et al, 2001; Kutzki, 1998...numerically abundant marine cyanobacterium, Prochlorococcus. With its minimal genome and ubiquity in the global ocean, Prochlorococcus represents a model...then examined the molecular basis for the ability of MIT9313 to grow at lower iron concentrations than MED4 by assessing whole- genome transcription

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Iron homeostasis: new players, newer insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Eunice S; Bajel, Ashish; Chandy, Mammen

    2008-12-01

    Although iron is a relatively abundant element in the universe, it is estimated that more than 2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency results in impaired production of iron-containing proteins, the most prominent of which is hemoglobin. Cellular iron deficiency inhibits cell growth and subsequently leads to cell death. Hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder results in disproportionate absorption of iron and the extra iron builds up in tissues resulting in organ damage. As both iron deficiency and iron overload have adverse effects, cellular and systemic iron homeostasis is critically important. Recent advances in the field of iron metabolism have led to newer understanding of the pathways involved in iron homeostasis and the diseases which arise from alteration in the regulators. Although insight into this complex regulation of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis has been obtained mainly through animal studies, it is most likely that this knowledge can be directly extrapolated to humans.

  16. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  17. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  18. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Serum Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) in Iron Deficiency State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Naveed; Ijaz, Aamir; Rafi, Tariq; Haroon, Zujaja Hina; Bashir, Saima; Ayyub, Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum iron and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) in detection of iron deficiency. Descriptive, analytical study. Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, from January 2013 to October 2015. Data of 1,815 patients with results of serum iron, TIBC and ferritin from January 2013 to October 2015 was retrieved from Laboratory information System (LIMS) of AFIP. Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) guidelines were followed. Subjects of either gender, aged 1 - 68 years were included. Cases with raised serum ferritin levels (male > 336 ng/ml, female > 307 ng/ml) were excluded. Serum Ferritin was taken as gold standard with specificity of 99% and sensitivity of 80% at concentration of 30 ng/ml. Transferrin saturation was determined by dividing serum iron by TIBC and multiplying by 100. Out of 1,815 subjects, 931 (51.29%) were males and 884 (48.71%) were females. The median age of the patients were 29.1 years (Inter-quartile range, IQR 19.1). Taking ferritin as gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of serum iron was 63.5% and 38.6%, respectively; while that of TIBC was 64.5 % and 42.8%, respectively. Ferritin showed poor correlation with iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation. Serum iron and TIBC give no additional information in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and these tests are redundant for the diagnosis of iron deficiency state, if serum ferritin is available.

  20. The irony of iron -- biogenic iron oxides as an iron source to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEmerson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  1. Iron in Skin of Mice with Three Etiologies of Systemic Iron Overload

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In human hemochromatosis, tissue toxicity is a function of tissue iron levels. Despite reports of skin toxicity in hemochromatosis, little is known about iron levels in skin of individuals with systemic iron overload. We measured skin iron and studied skin histology in three mouse models of systemic iron overload: mice with a deletion of the hemochromatosis (Hfe) gene, mice fed a high iron diet, and mice given parenteral injections of iron. In Hfe−/− mice, iron content in the epidermis and de...

  2. Pathogenic Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload: New Insights for Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kotze, MJ; van Velden, DP; van Rensburg, SJ; Erasmus, R

    2009-01-01

    Iron uptake, utilisation, release and storage occur at the gene level. Individuals with variant forms of genes involved in iron metabolism may have different requirements for iron and are likely to respond differently to the same amount of iron in the diet, a concept termed nutrigenetics. Iron deficiency, iron overload and the anemia of inflammation are the commonest iron-related disorders. While at least four types of hereditary iron overload have been identified to date, our knowledge of th...

  3. Iron and Ferritin Levels in Saliva of Patients with Thalassemia and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Canatan, Duran; Akdeniz, Sevgi Kosaci

    2012-01-01

    Most of the techniques for measuring iron stores such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy can be troublesome or invasive for patients with thalassemia. The salivary iron measurement could be of potential advantage being an easy and non invasive approach for diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload . The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum of patients affected by thalassemia or iron defici...

  4. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  5. Iron fortification and iron supplementation are cost-effective interventions to reduce iron deficiency in four subregions of the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Knai; M. Sharan; R.M.P.M. Baltussen (Rob)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world, affecting millions of people in both nonindustrialized and industrialized countries. We estimated the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and iron

  6. Iron fortification and iron supplementation are cost-effective interventions to reduce iron deficiency in four subregions of the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Knai; M. Sharan; R.M.P.M. Baltussen (Rob)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world, affecting millions of people in both nonindustrialized and industrialized countries. We estimated the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and iron fortificati

  7. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should...

  8. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  9. Chemiluminescence of iron-chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Toshimasa; Ohno, Osamu; Kotake, Tomohiko; Igarashi, Shukuro

    2005-01-01

    The iron-chlorophyllin complex was found to be chemiluminescent (CL) in an acetonitrile (22%)/water mixed solvent. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, when iron-chlorophyllin was added to the mixed solvent, a sharp CL signal immediately appeared. Also, analysis of the absorption spectra revealed decomposition of iron-chlorophyllin (based on decrease in absorbance at 396 nm), hence iron-chlorophyllin is the CL substance. Moreover, the CL intensity decreased in the presence of potassium thiocyanate (KSCN), indicating that the axial coordinative position of iron-chlorophyllin acts as a point of catalytic activation. In addition, when fluorophores were present with iron-chlorophyllin CL, their CL intensity values were similar to or greater than that of the well-known trichlorophenylperoxalate ester (TCPO) CL. Thus, during the decomposition reaction of iron-chlorophyllin, the latter transfers its energy to the coexisting fluorophores. Moreover, since the decomposed compound in this CL reaction had a fluorescence, it was found that the iron-chlorophyllin also functions as an energy donor. Therefore, the iron-chlorophyllin complex acts not only as a CL substance, but also as a catalyst and energy donor in the reaction.

  10. Phytases for Improved Iron Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial phytases (EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse dephosphorylation of phytic acid, which is the primary storage compound for phosphorous in cereal kernels. The negatively charged phosphates in phytic acid chelate iron (Fe3+) and thus retards iron bioavailability in humans 1. Supplementation of microbial...... phytase can improve iron absorption from cereal-based diets 2. In order for phytase to catalyse iron release in vivo the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. Our work has compared the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability...

  11. Retinoic acid and iron metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Sayal, Kirtimaan

    2014-01-01

    tuberculosis controlling molecules in the days to come. Iron has proven to be essential for pathogenesis of tuberculosis and retinoic acid is known to influence the iron metabolism pathway. Retenoic acid is also known to exhibit antitubercular effect in in vivo system. Therefore there is every possibility...... that retinoic acid by affecting the iron metabolism pathway exhibits its antimycobacterial effect. These aspects are reviewed in the present manuscript for understanding the antimycobacterial role of retinoic acid in the context of iron metabolism and other immunological aspects....

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  13. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia” gibi genetik durumlar üzerinde yapılan çalışmalar, vücuttaki demir dengesini kontrol eden moleküler mekanizmalar ile ilgili önemli ipuçları sunmuştur. Bu ilerlemeler, gelecekte, hem genetik hem de kazanılmış demir bozukluklarının daha etkili şekilde tedavi edilmesi amacıyla kullanılabilir. IRIDA, demir eksikliği ile giden durumlarda, hepsidin üretimini baskılayan matriptaz-2’yi kodlayan TMPRSS6 genindeki mutasyonlardan kaynaklanmaktadır. Hastalığın tipik özellikleri, hipokrom, mikrositer anemi, çok düşük ortalama eritrosit hacmi, oral demir tedavisine yanıtsızlık (veya yetersiz yanıt ve parenteral demire kısmi yanıttır. Klasik demir eksikliği anemisinin aksine, serum ferritin değeri genellikle hafif düşük ya da normal aralıkta; serum ve idrar hepsidin değerleri ise, aneminin derecesi ile orantısız şekilde yüksek bulunur. Şimdiye kadar literatürde bildirilmiş olguların sayısı 100’ü geçmediği halde, IRIDA’nın, “atipik” mikrositik anemilerin en sık nedeni olduğu düşünülmektedir. Bu derlemenin amacı, IRIDA hakkındaki güncel bilgileri araştırıcılar ile paylaşmak ve bu alandaki farkındalıklarını arttırmaktır.

  14. Nanosized Iron Oxide Colloids Strongly Enhance Microbial Iron Reduction▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Julian; Heister, Katja; Hofmann, Thilo; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant subsurface process. The rate-limiting bioavailability of the insoluble iron oxyhydroxides, however, is a topic for debate. Surface area and mineral structure are recognized as crucial parameters for microbial reduction rates of bulk, macroaggregate iron minerals. However, a significant fraction of iron oxide minerals in the subsurface is supposed to be present as nanosized colloids. We therefore studied the role of colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. In batch growth experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, colloids of ferrihydrite (hydrodynamic diameter, 336 nm), hematite (123 nm), goethite (157 nm), and akaganeite (64 nm) were added as electron acceptors. The colloidal iron oxides were reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude more rapidly (up to 1,255 pmol h−1 cell−1) than bulk macroaggregates of the same iron phases (6 to 70 pmol h−1 cell−1). The increased reactivity was not only due to the large surface areas of the colloidal aggregates but also was due to a higher reactivity per unit surface. We hypothesize that this can be attributed to the high bioavailability of the nanosized aggregates and their colloidal suspension. Furthermore, a strong enhancement of reduction rates of bulk ferrihydrite was observed when nanosized ferrihydrite aggregates were added. PMID:19915036

  15. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  16. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  17. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  18. measurements of iron status and survival in african iron overload

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iron status to diagnose this form of iron overload has not been clarified. Methods. ..... U-test and categorical variables were compared with the Fisher exact or the Pearson ..... 5eftel He, Keeley Iq, lsaacson C, BothweU TH. Siderosis in the ...

  19. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...