WorldWideScience

Sample records for ir camera images

  1. Image quality testing of assembled IR camera modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Daniel; Erichsen, Patrik

    2013-10-01

    Infrared (IR) camera modules for the LWIR (8-12_m) that combine IR imaging optics with microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) sensors with readout electronics are becoming more and more a mass market product. At the same time, steady improvements in sensor resolution in the higher priced markets raise the requirement for imaging performance of objectives and the proper alignment between objective and FPA. This puts pressure on camera manufacturers and system integrators to assess the image quality of finished camera modules in a cost-efficient and automated way for quality control or during end-of-line testing. In this paper we present recent development work done in the field of image quality testing of IR camera modules. This technology provides a wealth of additional information in contrast to the more traditional test methods like minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) which give only a subjective overall test result. Parameters that can be measured are image quality via the modulation transfer function (MTF) for broadband or with various bandpass filters on- and off-axis and optical parameters like e.g. effective focal length (EFL) and distortion. If the camera module allows for refocusing the optics, additional parameters like best focus plane, image plane tilt, auto-focus quality, chief ray angle etc. can be characterized. Additionally, the homogeneity and response of the sensor with the optics can be characterized in order to calculate the appropriate tables for non-uniformity correction (NUC). The technology can also be used to control active alignment methods during mechanical assembly of optics to high resolution sensors. Other important points that are discussed are the flexibility of the technology to test IR modules with different form factors, electrical interfaces and last but not least the suitability for fully automated measurements in mass production.

  2. Design and Calibration of a Dispersive Imaging Spectrometer Adaptor for a Fast IR Camera on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reksoatmodjo, Richard; Gray, Travis; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    A dispersive spectrometer adaptor was designed, constructed and calibrated for use on a fast infrared camera employed to measure temperatures on the lower divertor tiles of the NSTX-U tokamak. This adaptor efficiently and evenly filters and distributes long-wavelength infrared photons between 8.0 and 12.0 microns across the 128x128 pixel detector of the fast IR camera. By determining the width of these separated wavelength bands across the camera detector, and then determining the corresponding average photon count for each photon wavelength, a very accurate measurement of the temperature, and thus heat flux, of the divertor tiles can be calculated using Plank's law. This approach of designing an exterior dispersive adaptor for the fast IR camera allows accurate temperature measurements to be made of materials with unknown emissivity. Further, the relative simplicity and affordability of this adaptor design provides an attractive option over more expensive, slower, dispersive IR camera systems. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Selective-imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  4. Motorcycle detection and counting using stereo camera, IR camera, and microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bo; Gibson, David R. P.; Middleton, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Detection, classification, and characterization are the key to enhancing motorcycle safety, motorcycle operations and motorcycle travel estimation. Average motorcycle fatalities per Vehicle Mile Traveled (VMT) are currently estimated at 30 times those of auto fatalities. Although it has been an active research area for many years, motorcycle detection still remains a challenging task. Working with FHWA, we have developed a hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system using a suite of sensors including stereo camera, thermal IR camera and unidirectional microphone array. The IR thermal camera can capture the unique thermal signatures associated with the motorcycle's exhaust pipes that often show bright elongated blobs in IR images. The stereo camera in the system is used to detect the motorcyclist who can be easily windowed out in the stereo disparity map. If the motorcyclist is detected through his or her 3D body recognition, motorcycle is detected. Microphones are used to detect motorcycles that often produce low frequency acoustic signals. All three microphones in the microphone array are placed in strategic locations on the sensor platform to minimize the interferences of background noises from sources such as rain and wind. Field test results show that this hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system has an excellent performance.

  5. IR Camera Report for the 7 Day Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-22

    The following report gives a summary of the IR camera performance results and data for the 7 day production run that occurred from 10 Sep 2015 thru 16 Sep 2015. During this production run our goal was to see how well the camera performed its task of monitoring the target window temperature with our improved alignment procedure and emissivity measurements. We also wanted to see if the increased shielding would be effective in protecting the camera from damage and failure.

  6. About possibility of temperature trace observing on the human skin using commercially available IR camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Shestakov, Ivan L.; Blednov, Roman G.

    2016-09-01

    One of urgent security problems is a detection of objects placed inside the human body. Obviously, for safety reasons one cannot use X-rays for such object detection widely and often. Three years ago, we have demonstrated principal possibility to see a temperature trace, induced by food eating or water drinking, on the human body skin by using a passive THz camera. However, this camera is very expensive. Therefore, for practice it will be very convenient if one can use the IR camera for this purpose. In contrast to passive THz camera using, the IR camera does not allow to see the object under clothing, if an image, produced by this camera, is used directly. Of course, this is a big disadvantage for a security problem solution based on the IR camera using. To overcome this disadvantage we develop novel approach for computer processing of IR camera images. It allows us to increase a temperature resolution of IR camera as well as increasing of human year effective susceptibility. As a consequence of this, a possibility for seeing of a human body temperature changing through clothing appears. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water and eats chocolate. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments were made with measurements of a body temperature covered by T-shirt. Shown results are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, cancelled inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  7. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  8. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  9. IR-camera methods for automotive brake system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Lee, Kwangjin

    1998-03-01

    Automotive brake systems are energy conversion devices that convert kinetic energy into heat energy. Several mechanisms, mostly related to noise and vibration problems, can occur during brake operation and are often related to non-uniform temperature distribution on the brake disk. These problems are of significant cost to the industry and are a quality concern to automotive companies and brake system vendors. One such problem is thermo-elastic instabilities in brake system. During the occurrence of these instabilities several localized hot spots will form around the circumferential direction of the brake disk. The temperature distribution and the time dependence of these hot spots, a critical factor in analyzing this problem and in developing a fundamental understanding of this phenomenon, were recorded. Other modes of non-uniform temperature distributions which include hot banding and extreme localized heating were also observed. All of these modes of non-uniform temperature distributions were observed on automotive brake systems using a high speed IR camera operating in snap-shot mode. The camera was synchronized with the rotation of the brake disk so that the time evolution of hot regions could be studied. This paper discusses the experimental approach in detail.

  10. A new high-speed IR camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Jeffrey W.; Shu, Peter K.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Kasten, Michael S.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Casey, Sean C.; Mcgovern, Lawrence K.; Luers, Philip J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Kaipa, Ravi C.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-organizational team at the Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a new far infrared (FIR) camera system which furthers the state of the art for this type of instrument by the incorporating recent advances in several technological disciplines. All aspects of the camera system are optimized for operation at the high data rates required for astronomical observations in the far infrared. The instrument is built around a Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detector array which exhibits responsivity over a broad wavelength band and which is capable of operating at 1000 frames/sec, and consists of a focal plane dewar, a compact camera head electronics package, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP)-based data system residing in a standard 486 personal computer. In this paper we discuss the overall system architecture, the focal plane dewar, and advanced features and design considerations for the electronics. This system, or one derived from it, may prove useful for many commercial and/or industrial infrared imaging or spectroscopic applications, including thermal machine vision for robotic manufacturing, photographic observation of short-duration thermal events such as combustion or chemical reactions, and high-resolution surveillance imaging.

  11. Thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT) for thermal-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Allen; Swartz, Stephen; Huff, Michael; Gross, Steven

    2008-04-01

    We have been developing a novel thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT), an uncooled thermal-IR imager that is based on a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI). The FPI-based IR imager can convert a thermal-IR image to a video electronic image. IR radiation that is emitted by an object in the scene is imaged onto an IR-absorbing material that is located within an FPI. Temperature variations generated by the spatial variations in the IR image intensity cause variations in optical thickness, modulating the reflectivity seen by a probe laser beam. The reflected probe is imaged onto a visible array, producing a visible image of the IR scene. This technology can provide low-cost IR cameras with excellent sensitivity, low power consumption, and the potential for self-registered fusion of thermal-IR and visible images. We will describe characteristics of requisite pixelated arrays that we have fabricated.

  12. Image compensation for camera and lighting variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Wayne D.; Britton, Douglas F.

    1996-12-01

    With the current trend of integrating machine vision systems in industrial manufacturing and inspection applications comes the issue of camera and illumination stabilization. Unless each application is built around a particular camera and highly controlled lighting environment, the interchangeability of cameras of fluctuations in lighting become a problem as each camera usually has a different response. An empirical approach is proposed where color tile data is acquired using the camera of interest, and a mapping is developed to some predetermined reference image using neural networks. A similar analytical approach based on a rough analysis of the imaging systems is also considered for deriving a mapping between cameras. Once a mapping has been determined, all data from one camera is mapped to correspond to the images of the other prior to performing any processing on the data. Instead of writing separate image processing algorithms for the particular image data being received, the image data is adjusted based on each particular camera and lighting situation. All that is required when swapping cameras is the new mapping for the camera being inserted. The image processing algorithms can remain the same as the input data has been adjusted appropriately. The results of utilizing this technique are presented for an inspection application.

  13. Automated recognition and tracking of aerosol threat plumes with an IR camera pod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Ryan; Powell, Christopher; Gruber, Thomas; Clapp, Dan

    2012-06-01

    Protection of fixed sites from chemical, biological, or radiological aerosol plume attacks depends on early warning so that there is time to take mitigating actions. Early warning requires continuous, autonomous, and rapid coverage of large surrounding areas; however, this must be done at an affordable cost. Once a potential threat plume is detected though, a different type of sensor (e.g., a more expensive, slower sensor) may be cued for identification purposes, but the problem is to quickly identify all of the potential threats around the fixed site of interest. To address this problem of low cost, persistent, wide area surveillance, an IR camera pod and multi-image stitching and processing algorithms have been developed for automatic recognition and tracking of aerosol plumes. A rugged, modular, static pod design, which accommodates as many as four micro-bolometer IR cameras for 45deg to 180deg of azimuth coverage, is presented. Various OpenCV1 based image-processing algorithms, including stitching of multiple adjacent FOVs, recognition of aerosol plume objects, and the tracking of aerosol plumes, are presented using process block diagrams and sample field test results, including chemical and biological simulant plumes. Methods for dealing with the background removal, brightness equalization between images, and focus quality for optimal plume tracking are also discussed.

  14. Premier's imaging IR limb sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Stefan; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2017-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation. PREMIER went recently through the process of a feasibility study (Phase A) within the Earth Observation Envelope Program. Emerging from recent advanced instrument technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder (called STEAMR), explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3D imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in a tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby improve meteorological and environmental analyses.

  15. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  16. Wavefront analysis for plenoptic camera imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Yin-Sen; Xu Bing; Yang Ping; Tang Guo-Mao

    2017-01-01

    The plenoptic camera is a single lens stereo camera which can retrieve the direction of light rays while detecting their intensity distribution. In this paper, to reveal more truths of plenoptic camera imaging, we present the wavefront analysis for the plenoptic camera imaging from the angle of physical optics but not from the ray tracing model of geometric optics. Specifically, the wavefront imaging model of a plenoptic camera is analyzed and simulated by scalar diffraction theory and the depth estimation is redescribed based on physical optics. We simulate a set of raw plenoptic images of an object scene, thereby validating the analysis and derivations and the difference between the imaging analysis methods based on geometric optics and physical optics are also shown in simulations. (paper)

  17. Optimization of grate combustion by means of an IR camera. Final report; Optimering af risteforbraending IR-kamera. Slut rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didriksen, H.; Jensen, Joergen Peter; Hansen, Joergen (DONG Energy, Fredericia (Denmark)); Clausen, Soennik; Larsen, Henning (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-09-15

    The target of the project has been to improve the control and regulation of grate-fired straw boilers by involving measuring signals from a specially developed IR camera in a new regulation concept. The project was carried out with the straw boiler at the Avedoere power station. The conclusion has been that it is a very demanding task to develop an IR camera, including software, which must function as a process measuring device for continuous on-line measuring under very demanding conditions in a straw fired boiler. The result showed that this was not possible within the framework of this project. The developed camera has on the other hand proved to be very well suited for measuring campaigns, where the camera is ''manned''/continuously monitored. (Energy 11)

  18. Image registration of naval IR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodland, Arne J.

    1996-06-01

    In a real world application an image from a stabilized sensor on a moving platform will not be 100 percent stabilized. There will always be a small unknown error in the stabilization due to factors such as dynamic deformations in the structure between sensor and reference Inertial Navigation Unit, servo inaccuracies, etc. For a high resolution imaging sensor this stabilization error causes the image to move several pixels in unknown direction between frames. TO be able to detect and track small moving objects from such a sensor, this unknown movement of the sensor image must be estimated. An algorithm that searches for land contours in the image has been evaluated. The algorithm searches for high contrast points distributed over the whole image. As long as moving objects in the scene only cover a small area of the scene, most of the points are located on solid ground. By matching the list of points from frame to frame, the movement of the image due to stabilization errors can be estimated and compensated. The point list is searched for points with diverging movement from the estimated stabilization error. These points are then assumed to be located on moving objects. Points assumed to be located on moving objects are gradually exchanged with new points located in the same area. Most of the processing is performed on the list of points and not on the complete image. The algorithm is therefore very fast and well suited for real time implementation. The algorithm has been tested on images from an experimental IR scanner. Stabilization errors were added artificially to the image such that the output from the algorithm could be compared with the artificially added stabilization errors.

  19. Camera Trajectory fromWide Baseline Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlena, M.; Torii, A.; Pajdla, T.

    2008-09-01

    Camera trajectory estimation, which is closely related to the structure from motion computation, is one of the fundamental tasks in computer vision. Reliable camera trajectory estimation plays an important role in 3D reconstruction, self localization, and object recognition. There are essential issues for a reliable camera trajectory estimation, for instance, choice of the camera and its geometric projection model, camera calibration, image feature detection and description, and robust 3D structure computation. Most of approaches rely on classical perspective cameras because of the simplicity of their projection models and ease of their calibration. However, classical perspective cameras offer only a limited field of view, and thus occlusions and sharp camera turns may cause that consecutive frames look completely different when the baseline becomes longer. This makes the image feature matching very difficult (or impossible) and the camera trajectory estimation fails under such conditions. These problems can be avoided if omnidirectional cameras, e.g. a fish-eye lens convertor, are used. The hardware which we are using in practice is a combination of Nikon FC-E9 mounted via a mechanical adaptor onto a Kyocera Finecam M410R digital camera. Nikon FC-E9 is a megapixel omnidirectional addon convertor with 180° view angle which provides images of photographic quality. Kyocera Finecam M410R delivers 2272×1704 images at 3 frames per second. The resulting combination yields a circular view of diameter 1600 pixels in the image. Since consecutive frames of the omnidirectional camera often share a common region in 3D space, the image feature matching is often feasible. On the other hand, the calibration of these cameras is non-trivial and is crucial for the accuracy of the resulting 3D reconstruction. We calibrate omnidirectional cameras off-line using the state-of-the-art technique and Mičušík's two-parameter model, that links the radius of the image point r to the

  20. Imaging capabilities of germanium gamma cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steidley, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative methods of analysis based on the use of a computer simulation were developed and used to investigate the imaging capabilities of germanium gamma cameras. The main advantage of the computer simulation is that the inherent unknowns of clinical imaging procedures are removed from the investigation. The effects of patient scattered radiation were incorporated using a mathematical LSF model which was empirically developed and experimentally verified. Image modifying effects of patient motion, spatial distortions, and count rate capabilities were also included in the model. Spatial domain and frequency domain modeling techniques were developed and used in the simulation as required. The imaging capabilities of gamma cameras were assessed using low contrast lesion source distributions. The results showed that an improvement in energy resolution from 10% to 2% offers significant clinical advantages in terms of improved contrast, increased detectability, and reduced patient dose. The improvements are of greatest significance for small lesions at low contrast. The results of the computer simulation were also used to compare a design of a hypothetical germanium gamma camera with a state-of-the-art scintillation camera. The computer model performed a parametric analysis of the interrelated effects of inherent and technological limitations of gamma camera imaging. In particular, the trade-off between collimator resolution and collimator efficiency for detection of a given low contrast lesion was directly addressed. This trade-off is an inherent limitation of both gamma cameras. The image degrading effects of patient motion, camera spatial distortions, and low count rate were shown to modify the improvements due to better energy resolution. Thus, based on this research, the continued development of germanium cameras to the point of clinical demonstration is recommended

  1. An imaging system for a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed description is given of a novel gamma camera which is designed to produce superior images than conventional cameras used in nuclear medicine. The detector consists of a solid state detector (e.g. germanium) which is formed to have a plurality of discrete components to enable 2-dimensional position identification. Details of the electronic processing circuits are given and the problems and limitations introduced by noise are discussed in full. (U.K.)

  2. Imaging camera with multiwire proportional chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votruba, J.

    1980-01-01

    The camera for imaging radioisotope dislocations for use in nuclear medicine or for other applications, claimed in the patent, is provided by two multiwire lattices for the x-coordinate connected to a first coincidence circuit, and by two multiwire lattices for the y-coordinate connected to a second coincidence circuit. This arrangement eliminates the need of using a collimator and increases camera sensitivity while reducing production cost. (Ha)

  3. Multiple-image oscilloscope camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasillo, N.J.

    1978-01-01

    An optical device for placing automatically a plurality of images at selected locations on one film comprises a stepping motor coupled to a rotating mirror and lens. A mechanical connection from the mirror controls an electronic logical system to allow rotation of the mirror to place a focused image at tge desired preselected location. The device is of especial utility when used to place four images on a single film to record oscilloscope views obtained in gamma radiography

  4. Mid-IR Imaging: Upconversion imager improves IR gas sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlberg, Anna-Lena; Li, Zhongshan; Høgstedt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear upconversion detector shows near-shot-noise-limited performance and compares favorably—while adding additional imaging information—to conventional cryogenic detectors in the measurement of trace-level gases at atmospheric pressure....

  5. About possibility of temperature trace observing on a human skin through clothes by using computer processing of IR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Shestakov, Ivan L.; Blednov, Roman G.

    2017-05-01

    One of urgent security problems is a detection of objects placed inside the human body. Obviously, for safety reasons one cannot use X-rays for such object detection widely and often. For this purpose, we propose to use THz camera and IR camera. Below we continue a possibility of IR camera using for a detection of temperature trace on a human body. In contrast to passive THz camera using, the IR camera does not allow to see very pronounced the object under clothing. Of course, this is a big disadvantage for a security problem solution based on the IR camera using. To find possible ways for this disadvantage overcoming we make some experiments with IR camera, produced by FLIR Company and develop novel approach for computer processing of images captured by IR camera. It allows us to increase a temperature resolution of IR camera as well as human year effective susceptibility enhancing. As a consequence of this, a possibility for seeing of a human body temperature changing through clothing appears. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water and eats chocolate. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments are made with observing of temperature trace from objects placed behind think overall. Demonstrated results are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, concealed inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  6. Improvement of passive THz camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Piszczek, Marek; Palka, Norbert; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz technology is one of emerging technologies that has a potential to change our life. There are a lot of attractive applications in fields like security, astronomy, biology and medicine. Until recent years, terahertz (THz) waves were an undiscovered, or most importantly, an unexploited area of electromagnetic spectrum. The reasons of this fact were difficulties in generation and detection of THz waves. Recent advances in hardware technology have started to open up the field to new applications such as THz imaging. The THz waves can penetrate through various materials. However, automated processing of THz images can be challenging. The THz frequency band is specially suited for clothes penetration because this radiation does not point any harmful ionizing effects thus it is safe for human beings. Strong technology development in this band have sparked with few interesting devices. Even if the development of THz cameras is an emerging topic, commercially available passive cameras still offer images of poor quality mainly because of its low resolution and low detectors sensitivity. Therefore, THz image processing is very challenging and urgent topic. Digital THz image processing is a really promising and cost-effective way for demanding security and defense applications. In the article we demonstrate the results of image quality enhancement and image fusion of images captured by a commercially available passive THz camera by means of various combined methods. Our research is focused on dangerous objects detection - guns, knives and bombs hidden under some popular types of clothing.

  7. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  8. Infrared Imaging Camera Final Report CRADA No. TC02061.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nebeker, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cordin Company (Cordin) to enhance the U.S. ability to develop a commercial infrared camera capable of capturing high-resolution images in a l 00 nanoseconds (ns) time frame. The Department of Energy (DOE), under an Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) project, funded the Russian Federation Nuclear Center All-Russian Scientific Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) in Sarov. VNIIEF was funded to develop a prototype commercial infrared (IR) framing camera and to deliver a prototype IR camera to LLNL. LLNL and Cordin were partners with VNIIEF on this project. A prototype IR camera was delivered by VNIIEF to LLNL in December 2006. In June of 2007, LLNL and Cordin evaluated the camera and the test results revealed that the camera exceeded presently available commercial IR cameras. Cordin believes that the camera can be sold on the international market. The camera is currently being used as a scientific tool within Russian nuclear centers. This project was originally designated as a two year project. The project was not started on time due to changes in the IPP project funding conditions; the project funding was re-directed through the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), which delayed the project start by over one year. The project was not completed on schedule due to changes within the Russian government export regulations. These changes were directed by Export Control regulations on the export of high technology items that can be used to develop military weapons. The IR camera was on the list that export controls required. The ISTC and Russian government, after negotiations, allowed the delivery of the camera to LLNL. There were no significant technical or business changes to the original project.

  9. Thermal imaging cameras characteristics and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ability to see through smoke and mist and the ability to use the variances in temperature to differentiate between targets and their backgrounds are invaluable in military applications and have become major motivators for the further development of thermal imagers. As the potential of thermal imaging is more clearly understood and the cost decreases, the number of industrial and civil applications being exploited is growing quickly. In order to evaluate the suitability of particular thermal imaging cameras for particular applications, it is important to have the means to specify and measur

  10. Lane Departure System Design using with IR Camera for Night-time Road Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Onur Akırmak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the largest areas of research and development in the automobile industry is road safety. Many deaths and injuries occur every year on public roads from accidents caused by sleepy drivers, that technology could have been used to prevent. Lane detection at night-time is an important issue in driving assistance systems. This paper deals with vision-based lane detection and tracking at night-time. This project consists of a research and development of an algorithm for automotive systems to detect the departure of vehicle from out of lane. Once the situation is detected, a warning is issued to the driver with sound and visual message through “Head Up Display” (HUD system. The lane departure is detected through the images obtained from a single IR camera, which identifies the departure at a satisfactory accuracy via improved quality of video stream. Our experimental results and accuracy evaluation show that our algorithm has good precision and our detecting method is suitable for night-time road conditions.

  11. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  12. Improving Situational Awareness in camera surveillance by combining top-view maps with camera images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Zeeders, R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the experiment described is to improve today's camera surveillance in public spaces. Three designs with the camera images combined on a top-view map were compared to each other and to the current situation in camera surveillance. The goal was to test which design makes spatial

  13. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  14. SCC500: next-generation infrared imaging camera core products with highly flexible architecture for unique camera designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Roy N.; Grealish, Kevin; Kacir, Tom; Arsenault, Barry; Murphy, Robert H.; Miller, Scott

    2003-09-01

    A new 4th generation MicroIR architecture is introduced as the latest in the highly successful Standard Camera Core (SCC) series by BAE SYSTEMS to offer an infrared imaging engine with greatly reduced size, weight, power, and cost. The advanced SCC500 architecture provides great flexibility in configuration to include multiple resolutions, an industry standard Real Time Operating System (RTOS) for customer specific software application plug-ins, and a highly modular construction for unique physical and interface options. These microbolometer based camera cores offer outstanding and reliable performance over an extended operating temperature range to meet the demanding requirements of real-world environments. A highly integrated lens and shutter is included in the new SCC500 product enabling easy, drop-in camera designs for quick time-to-market product introductions.

  15. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  16. Vertically Integrated Edgeless Photon Imaging Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, Farah [Fermilab; Deptuch, Grzegorz [Fermilab; Shenai, Alpana [Fermilab; Maj, Piotr [AGH-UST, Cracow; Kmon, Piotr [AGH-UST, Cracow; Grybos, Pawel [AGH-UST, Cracow; Szczygiel, Robert [AGH-UST, Cracow; Siddons, D. Peter [Brookhaven; Rumaiz, Abdul [Brookhaven; Kuczewski, Anthony [Brookhaven; Mead, Joseph [Brookhaven; Bradford, Rebecca [Argonne; Weizeorick, John [Argonne

    2017-01-01

    The Vertically Integrated Photon Imaging Chip - Large, (VIPIC-L), is a large area, small pixel (65μm), 3D integrated, photon counting ASIC with zero-suppressed or full frame dead-time-less data readout. It features data throughput of 14.4 Gbps per chip with a full frame readout speed of 56kframes/s in the imaging mode. VIPIC-L contain 192 x 192 pixel array and the total size of the chip is 1.248cm x 1.248cm with only a 5μm periphery. It contains about 120M transistors. A 1.3M pixel camera module will be developed by arranging a 6 x 6 array of 3D VIPIC-L’s bonded to a large area silicon sensor on the analog side and to a readout board on the digital side. The readout board hosts a bank of FPGA’s, one per VIPIC-L to allow processing of up to 0.7 Tbps of raw data produced by the camera.

  17. IMAGE ACQUISITION CONSTRAINTS FOR PANORAMIC FRAME CAMERA IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kauhanen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an approach to quantify the amount of projective error produced by an offset of projection centres in a panoramic imaging workflow. We have limited this research to such panoramic workflows in which several sub-images using planar image sensor are taken and then stitched together as a large panoramic image mosaic. The aim is to simulate how large the offset can be before it introduces significant error to the dataset. The method uses geometrical analysis to calculate the error in various cases. Constraints for shooting distance, focal length and the depth of the area of interest are taken into account. Considering these constraints, it is possible to safely use even poorly calibrated panoramic camera rig with noticeable offset in projection centre locations. The aim is to create datasets suited for photogrammetric reconstruction. Similar constraints can be used also for finding recommended areas from the image planes for automatic feature matching and thus improve stitching of sub-images into full panoramic mosaics. The results are mainly designed to be used with long focal length cameras where the offset of projection centre of sub-images can seem to be significant but on the other hand the shooting distance is also long. We show that in such situations the error introduced by the offset of the projection centres results only in negligible error when stitching a metric panorama. Even if the main use of the results is with cameras of long focal length, they are feasible for all focal lengths.

  18. Image Alignment for Multiple Camera High Dynamic Range Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Eastwood, Brian S.; Childs, Elisabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of image alignment for multiple camera high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. HDR imaging combines information from images taken with different exposure settings. Combining information from multiple cameras requires an alignment process that is robust to the intensity differences in the images. HDR applications that use a limited number of component images require an alignment technique that is robust to large exposure differences. We evaluate the suitability fo...

  19. Image Alignment for Multiple Camera High Dynamic Range Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Brian S; Childs, Elisabeth C

    2012-01-09

    This paper investigates the problem of image alignment for multiple camera high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. HDR imaging combines information from images taken with different exposure settings. Combining information from multiple cameras requires an alignment process that is robust to the intensity differences in the images. HDR applications that use a limited number of component images require an alignment technique that is robust to large exposure differences. We evaluate the suitability for HDR alignment of three exposure-robust techniques. We conclude that image alignment based on matching feature descriptors extracted from radiant power images from calibrated cameras yields the most accurate and robust solution. We demonstrate the use of this alignment technique in a high dynamic range video microscope that enables live specimen imaging with a greater level of detail than can be captured with a single camera.

  20. Simultaneous monitoring of ice accretion and thermography of an airfoil: an IR imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni, M; Frioult, M; Amirfazli, A

    2012-01-01

    A novel image analysis methodology based on infrared (IR) imaging was developed for simultaneous monitoring of ice accretion and thermography of airfoils. In this study, an IR camera was calibrated and used to measure the surface temperature of the energized airfoils, and monitor the ice accretion and growth pattern on the airfoils’ surfaces. The methodology comprises the automatic processing of a series of IR video frames with the purpose of detecting ice pattern evolution during the icing test period. A specially developed MATLAB code was used to detect the iced areas in the IR images, and simultaneously monitor surface temperature evolution of the airfoil during an icing test. Knowing the correlation between the icing pattern and surface temperature changes during an icing test is essential for energy efficient design of thermal icing mitigation systems. Processed IR images were also used to determine the ice accumulation rate on the airfoil's surface in a given icing test. The proposed methodology has been demonstrated to work successfully, since the optical images taken at the end of icing tests from the airfoils’ surfaces compared well with the processed IR images detecting the ice grown outward from the airfoils’ leading edge area. (paper)

  1. Using VIS/NIR and IR spectral cameras for detecting and separating crime scene details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuula, Jaana; Pölönen, Ilkka; Puupponen, Hannu-Heikki; Selander, Tuomas; Reinikainen, Tapani; Kalenius, Tapani; Saari, Heikki

    2012-06-01

    Detecting invisible details and separating mixed evidence is critical for forensic inspection. If this can be done reliably and fast at the crime scene, irrelevant objects do not require further examination at the laboratory. This will speed up the inspection process and release resources for other critical tasks. This article reports on tests which have been carried out at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland together with the Central Finland Police Department and the National Bureau of Investigation for detecting and separating forensic details with hyperspectral technology. In the tests evidence was sought after at an assumed violent burglary scene with the use of VTT's 500-900 nm wavelength VNIR camera, Specim's 400- 1000 nm VNIR camera, and Specim's 1000-2500 nm SWIR camera. The tested details were dried blood on a ceramic plate, a stain of four types of mixed and absorbed blood, and blood which had been washed off a table. Other examined details included untreated latent fingerprints, gunshot residue, primer residue, and layered paint on small pieces of wood. All cameras could detect visible details and separate mixed paint. The SWIR camera could also separate four types of human and animal blood which were mixed in the same stain and absorbed into a fabric. None of the cameras could however detect primer residue, untreated latent fingerprints, or blood that had been washed off. The results are encouraging and indicate the need for further studies. The results also emphasize the importance of creating optimal imaging conditions into the crime scene for each kind of subjects and backgrounds.

  2. Dynamic imaging with coincidence gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmassi, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a technique to calculate dynamic parameters from data acquired using gamma-camera PET (gc PET). Our method is based on an algorithm development for dynamic SPECT, which processes all decency projection data simultaneously instead of reconstructing a series of static images individually. The algorithm was modified to account for the extra data that is obtained with gc PET (compared with SPEC). The method was tested using simulated projection data for both a SPECT and a gc PET geometry. These studies showed the ability of the code to reconstruct simulated data with a varying range of half-lives. The accuracy of the algorithm was measured in terms of the reconstructed half-life and initial activity for the simulated object. The reconstruction of gc PET data showed improvement in half-life and activity compared to SPECT data of 23% and 20%, respectively (at 50 iterations). The gc PET algorithm was also tested using data from an experimental phantom and finally, applied to a clinical dataset, where the algorithm was further modified to deal with the situation where the activity in certain pixels decreases and then increases during the acquisition. (author)

  3. A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G. A.; Dunn, J. P.; Stephey, L. A.; Biedermann, C.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Gamradt, M.

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution imaging system, consisting of megapixel mid-IR and visible cameras along the same line of sight, has been prepared for the new W7-X stellarator and was operated during Operational Period 1.1 to view one of the five inboard graphite limiters. The radial line of sight, through a large diameter (184 mm clear aperture) uncoated sapphire window, couples a direct viewing 1344 × 784 pixel FLIR SC8303HD camera. A germanium beam-splitter sends visible light to a 1024 × 1024 pixel Allied Vision Technologies Prosilica GX1050 color camera. Both achieve sub-millimeter resolution on the 161 mm wide, inertially cooled, segmented graphite tiles. The IR and visible cameras are controlled via optical fibers over full Camera Link and dual GigE Ethernet (2 Gbit/s data rates) interfaces, respectively. While they are mounted outside the cryostat at a distance of 3.2 m from the limiter, they are close to a large magnetic trim coil and require soft iron shielding. We have taken IR data at 125 Hz to 1.25 kHz frame rates and seen that surface temperature increases in excess of 350 °C, especially on leading edges or defect hot spots. The IR camera sees heat-load stripe patterns on the limiter and has been used to infer limiter power fluxes (∼1–4.5 MW/m"2), during the ECRH heating phase. IR images have also been used calorimetrically between shots to measure equilibrated bulk tile temperature, and hence tile energy inputs (in the range of 30 kJ/tile with 0.6 MW, 6 s heating pulses). Small UFO’s can be seen and tracked by the FLIR camera in some discharges. The calibrated visible color camera (100 Hz frame rate) has also been equipped with narrow band C-III and H-alpha filters, to compare with other diagnostics, and is used for absolute particle flux determination from the limiter surface. Sometimes, but not always, hot-spots in the IR are also seen to be bright in C-III light.

  4. A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, G. A., E-mail: wurden@lanl.gov; Dunn, J. P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephey, L. A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Biedermann, C.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Gamradt, M. [Max Planck Institut für Plasma Physik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    A high-resolution imaging system, consisting of megapixel mid-IR and visible cameras along the same line of sight, has been prepared for the new W7-X stellarator and was operated during Operational Period 1.1 to view one of the five inboard graphite limiters. The radial line of sight, through a large diameter (184 mm clear aperture) uncoated sapphire window, couples a direct viewing 1344 × 784 pixel FLIR SC8303HD camera. A germanium beam-splitter sends visible light to a 1024 × 1024 pixel Allied Vision Technologies Prosilica GX1050 color camera. Both achieve sub-millimeter resolution on the 161 mm wide, inertially cooled, segmented graphite tiles. The IR and visible cameras are controlled via optical fibers over full Camera Link and dual GigE Ethernet (2 Gbit/s data rates) interfaces, respectively. While they are mounted outside the cryostat at a distance of 3.2 m from the limiter, they are close to a large magnetic trim coil and require soft iron shielding. We have taken IR data at 125 Hz to 1.25 kHz frame rates and seen that surface temperature increases in excess of 350 °C, especially on leading edges or defect hot spots. The IR camera sees heat-load stripe patterns on the limiter and has been used to infer limiter power fluxes (∼1–4.5 MW/m{sup 2}), during the ECRH heating phase. IR images have also been used calorimetrically between shots to measure equilibrated bulk tile temperature, and hence tile energy inputs (in the range of 30 kJ/tile with 0.6 MW, 6 s heating pulses). Small UFO’s can be seen and tracked by the FLIR camera in some discharges. The calibrated visible color camera (100 Hz frame rate) has also been equipped with narrow band C-III and H-alpha filters, to compare with other diagnostics, and is used for absolute particle flux determination from the limiter surface. Sometimes, but not always, hot-spots in the IR are also seen to be bright in C-III light.

  5. Presence capture cameras - a new challenge to the image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2016-04-01

    Commercial presence capture cameras are coming to the markets and a new era of visual entertainment starts to get its shape. Since the true presence capturing is still a very new technology, the real technical solutions are just passed a prototyping phase and they vary a lot. Presence capture cameras have still the same quality issues to tackle as previous phases of digital imaging but also numerous new ones. This work concentrates to the quality challenges of presence capture cameras. A camera system which can record 3D audio-visual reality as it is has to have several camera modules, several microphones and especially technology which can synchronize output of several sources to a seamless and smooth virtual reality experience. Several traditional quality features are still valid in presence capture cameras. Features like color fidelity, noise removal, resolution and dynamic range create the base of virtual reality stream quality. However, co-operation of several cameras brings a new dimension for these quality factors. Also new quality features can be validated. For example, how the camera streams should be stitched together with 3D experience without noticeable errors and how to validate the stitching? The work describes quality factors which are still valid in the presence capture cameras and defines the importance of those. Moreover, new challenges of presence capture cameras are investigated in image and video quality point of view. The work contains considerations how well current measurement methods can be used in presence capture cameras.

  6. Evaluation of mobile phone camera benchmarking using objective camera speed and image quality metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-11-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of image quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system has not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become a more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. First, the most important image quality and speed-related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and, also, novel speed metrics are identified. Second, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones on the market. The measurements are done toward application programming interface of different operating systems. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The paper defines a solution to combine different image quality and speed metrics to a single benchmarking score. A proposal of the combined benchmarking metric is evaluated using measurements of 25 mobile phone cameras on the market. The paper is a continuation of a previous benchmarking work expanded with visual noise measurement and updates of the latest mobile phone versions.

  7. Software for fast cameras and image handling on MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibaev, S.

    2008-01-01

    The rapid progress in fast imaging gives new opportunities for fusion research. The data obtained by fast cameras play an important and ever-increasing role in analysis and understanding of plasma phenomena. The fast cameras produce a huge amount of data which creates considerable problems for acquisition, analysis, and storage. We use a number of fast cameras on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). They cover several spectral ranges: broadband visible, infra-red and narrow band filtered for spectroscopic studies. These cameras are controlled by programs developed in-house. The programs provide full camera configuration and image acquisition in the MAST shot cycle. Despite the great variety of image sources, all images should be stored in a single format. This simplifies development of data handling tools and hence the data analysis. A universal file format has been developed for MAST images which supports storage in both raw and compressed forms, using either lossless or lossy compression. A number of access and conversion routines have been developed for all languages used on MAST. Two movie-style display tools have been developed-Windows native and Qt based for Linux. The camera control programs run as autonomous data acquisition units with full camera configuration set and stored locally. This allows easy porting of the code to other data acquisition systems. The software developed for MAST fast cameras has been adapted for several other tokamaks where it is in regular use

  8. An image-tube camera for cometary spectrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamadov, O.

    The paper discusses the mounting of an image tube camera. The cathode is of antimony, sodium, potassium, and cesium. The parts used for mounting are of acrylic plastic and a fabric-based laminate. A mounting design that does not include cooling is presented. The aperture ratio of the camera is 1:27. Also discussed is the way that the camera is joined to the spectrograph.

  9. Cryogenic solid Schmidt camera as a base for future wide-field IR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, Alexey N.

    2011-11-01

    Work is focused on study of capability of solid Schmidt camera to serve as a wide-field infrared lens for aircraft system with whole sphere coverage, working in 8-14 um spectral range, coupled with spherical focal array of megapixel class. Designs of 16 mm f/0.2 lens with 60 and 90 degrees sensor diagonal are presented, their image quality is compared with conventional solid design. Achromatic design with significantly improved performance, containing enclosed soft correcting lens behind protective front lens is proposed. One of the main goals of the work is to estimate benefits from curved detector arrays in 8-14 um spectral range wide-field systems. Coupling of photodetector with solid Schmidt camera by means of frustrated total internal reflection is considered, with corresponding tolerance analysis. The whole lens, except front element, is considered to be cryogenic, with solid Schmidt unit to be flown by hydrogen for improvement of bulk transmission.

  10. An evolution of image source camera attribution approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanirad, Mehdi; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Anuar, Nor Badrul

    2016-05-01

    Camera attribution plays an important role in digital image forensics by providing the evidence and distinguishing characteristics of the origin of the digital image. It allows the forensic analyser to find the possible source camera which captured the image under investigation. However, in real-world applications, these approaches have faced many challenges due to the large set of multimedia data publicly available through photo sharing and social network sites, captured with uncontrolled conditions and undergone variety of hardware and software post-processing operations. Moreover, the legal system only accepts the forensic analysis of the digital image evidence if the applied camera attribution techniques are unbiased, reliable, nondestructive and widely accepted by the experts in the field. The aim of this paper is to investigate the evolutionary trend of image source camera attribution approaches from fundamental to practice, in particular, with the application of image processing and data mining techniques. Extracting implicit knowledge from images using intrinsic image artifacts for source camera attribution requires a structured image mining process. In this paper, we attempt to provide an introductory tutorial on the image processing pipeline, to determine the general classification of the features corresponding to different components for source camera attribution. The article also reviews techniques of the source camera attribution more comprehensively in the domain of the image forensics in conjunction with the presentation of classifying ongoing developments within the specified area. The classification of the existing source camera attribution approaches is presented based on the specific parameters, such as colour image processing pipeline, hardware- and software-related artifacts and the methods to extract such artifacts. The more recent source camera attribution approaches, which have not yet gained sufficient attention among image forensics

  11. a Spatio-Spectral Camera for High Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livens, S.; Pauly, K.; Baeck, P.; Blommaert, J.; Nuyts, D.; Zender, J.; Delauré, B.

    2017-08-01

    Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600-900 nm) in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots), horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields) and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field). Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475-925 nm), and we discuss future work.

  12. A SPATIO-SPECTRAL CAMERA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Livens

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600–900 nm in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots, horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field. Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475–925 nm, and we discuss future work.

  13. Augmenting camera images for operators of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Oving, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The manual control of the camera of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can be difficult due to several factors such as 1) time delays between steering input and changes of the monitor content, 2) low update rates of the camera images and 3) lack of situation awareness due to the remote position of the

  14. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  15. NV-CMOS HD camera for day/night imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsong, T.; Tower, J.; Sudol, Thomas; Senko, T.; Chodelka, D.

    2014-06-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed a new multi-purpose day/night video camera with low-light imaging performance comparable to an image intensifier, while offering the size, weight, ruggedness, and cost advantages enabled by the use of SRI's NV-CMOS HD digital image sensor chip. The digital video output is ideal for image enhancement, sharing with others through networking, video capture for data analysis, or fusion with thermal cameras. The camera provides Camera Link output with HD/WUXGA resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels operating at 60 Hz. Windowing to smaller sizes enables operation at higher frame rates. High sensitivity is achieved through use of backside illumination, providing high Quantum Efficiency (QE) across the visible and near infrared (NIR) bands (peak QE camera, which operates from a single 5V supply. The NVCMOS HD camera provides a substantial reduction in size, weight, and power (SWaP) , ideal for SWaP-constrained day/night imaging platforms such as UAVs, ground vehicles, fixed mount surveillance, and may be reconfigured for mobile soldier operations such as night vision goggles and weapon sights. In addition the camera with the NV-CMOS HD imager is suitable for high performance digital cinematography/broadcast systems, biofluorescence/microscopy imaging, day/night security and surveillance, and other high-end applications which require HD video imaging with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The camera comes with an array of lens mounts including C-mount and F-mount. The latest test data from the NV-CMOS HD camera will be presented.

  16. Mobile phone camera benchmarking: combination of camera speed and image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-01-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. For example, ISO 15781 defines several measurements to evaluate various camera system delays. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system have not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. Firstly, the most important image quality metrics are collected from the standards and papers. Secondly, the speed related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and also novel speed metrics are identified. Thirdly, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones in the market. The measurements are done towards application programming interface of different operating system. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The result of this work gives detailed benchmarking results of mobile phone camera systems in the market. The paper defines also a proposal of combined benchmarking metrics, which includes both quality and speed parameters.

  17. Room temperature mid-IR single photon spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Spectral imaging and detection of mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths are emerging as an enabling technology of great technical and scientific interest; primarily because important chemical compounds display unique and strong mid-IR spectral fingerprints revealing valuable chemical information. Whi...... 20 % for polarized incoherent light at 3 \\mum. The proposed method is relevant for existing and new mid-IR applications like gas analysis and medical diagnostics....

  18. Bin mode estimation methods for Compton camera imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Odaka, H.; Uemura, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takeda, S.

    2014-01-01

    We study the image reconstruction problem of a Compton camera which consists of semiconductor detectors. The image reconstruction is formulated as a statistical estimation problem. We employ a bin-mode estimation (BME) and extend an existing framework to a Compton camera with multiple scatterers and absorbers. Two estimation algorithms are proposed: an accelerated EM algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and a modified EM algorithm for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Numerical simulations demonstrate the potential of the proposed methods

  19. HDR 192Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Podesta, Mark; Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR 192 Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a 192 Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases

  20. A Modified Harris Corner Detection for Breast IR Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Harris corner detectors, which depend on strong invariance and a local autocorrelation function, display poor detection performance for infrared (IR images with low contrast and nonobvious edges. In addition, feature points detected by Harris corner detectors are clustered due to the numerous nonlocal maxima. This paper proposes a modified Harris corner detector that includes two unique steps for processing IR images in order to overcome the aforementioned problems. Image contrast enhancement based on a generalized form of histogram equalization (HE combined with adjusting the intensity resolution causes false contours on IR images to acquire obvious edges. Adaptive nonmaximal suppression based on eliminating neighboring pixels avoids the clustered features. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can solve the clustering problem and successfully identify the representative feature points of IR breast images.

  1. Decoupling Intensity Radiated by the Emitter in Distance Estimation from Camera to IR Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Luna Vázquez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED. They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m.

  2. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  3. Upconversion applied for mid-IR hyperspectral image acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Sanders, Nicolai Højer

    2015-01-01

    Different schemes for upconversion mid-IR hyperspectral imaging is implemented and compared in terms of spectral coverage, spectral resolution, speed and noise. Phasematch scanning and scanning of the object within the field of view is considered....

  4. Neutron imaging system based on a video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinca, M.

    2004-01-01

    The non-destructive testing with cold, thermal, epithermal or fast neutrons is nowadays more and more useful because the world-wide level of industrial development requires considerably higher standards of quality of manufactured products and reliability of technological processes especially where any deviation from standards could result in large-scale catastrophic consequences or human loses. Thanks to their properties, easily obtained and very good discrimination of the materials that penetrate, the thermal neutrons are the most used probe. The methods involved for this technique have advanced from neutron radiography based on converter screens and radiological films to neutron radioscopy based on video cameras, that is, from static images to dynamic images. Many neutron radioscopy systems have been used in the past with various levels of success. The quality of an image depends on the quality of the neutron beam and the type of the neutron imaging system. For real time investigations there are involved tube type cameras, CCD cameras and recently CID cameras that capture the image from an appropriate scintillator through the agency of a mirror. The analog signal of the camera is then converted into digital signal by the signal processing technology included into the camera. The image acquisition card or frame grabber from a PC converts the digital signal into an image. The image is formatted and processed by image analysis software. The scanning position of the object is controlled by the computer that commands the electrical motors that move horizontally, vertically and rotate the table of the object. Based on this system, a lot of static image acquisitions, real time non-destructive investigations of dynamic processes and finally, tomographic investigations of the small objects are done in a short time. A system based on a CID camera is presented. Fundamental differences between CCD and CID cameras lie in their pixel readout structure and technique. CIDs

  5. Autofluorescence imaging of basal cell carcinoma by smartphone RGB camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Derjabo, Alexander; Ferulova, Inesa; Lange, Marta; Lihacova, Ilze; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility of smartphones for in vivo skin autofluorescence imaging has been investigated. Filtered autofluorescence images from the same tissue area were periodically captured by a smartphone RGB camera with subsequent detection of fluorescence intensity decreasing at each image pixel for further imaging the planar distribution of those values. The proposed methodology was tested clinically with 13 basal cell carcinoma and 1 atypical nevus. Several clinical cases and potential future applications of the smartphone-based technique are discussed.

  6. Depth profile measurement with lenslet images of the plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhaomin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Hongying; Qu, Weijuan; Zhao, Haimeng; Asundi, Anand; Yan, Lei

    2018-03-01

    An approach for carrying out depth profile measurement of an object with the plenoptic camera is proposed. A single plenoptic image consists of multiple lenslet images. To begin with, these images are processed directly with a refocusing technique to obtain the depth map, which does not need to align and decode the plenoptic image. Then, a linear depth calibration is applied based on the optical structure of the plenoptic camera for depth profile reconstruction. One significant improvement of the proposed method concerns the resolution of the depth map. Unlike the traditional method, our resolution is not limited by the number of microlenses inside the camera, and the depth map can be globally optimized. We validated the method with experiments on depth map reconstruction, depth calibration, and depth profile measurement, with the results indicating that the proposed approach is both efficient and accurate.

  7. High dynamic range image acquisition based on multiplex cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hairui; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua

    2018-03-01

    High dynamic image is an important technology of photoelectric information acquisition, providing higher dynamic range and more image details, and it can better reflect the real environment, light and color information. Currently, the method of high dynamic range image synthesis based on different exposure image sequences cannot adapt to the dynamic scene. It fails to overcome the effects of moving targets, resulting in the phenomenon of ghost. Therefore, a new high dynamic range image acquisition method based on multiplex cameras system was proposed. Firstly, different exposure images sequences were captured with the camera array, using the method of derivative optical flow based on color gradient to get the deviation between images, and aligned the images. Then, the high dynamic range image fusion weighting function was established by combination of inverse camera response function and deviation between images, and was applied to generated a high dynamic range image. The experiments show that the proposed method can effectively obtain high dynamic images in dynamic scene, and achieves good results.

  8. A flexible geometry Compton camera for industrial gamma ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    A design for a Compton scatter camera is proposed which is applicable to gamma ray imaging within limited access industrial sites. The camera consists of a number of single element detectors arranged in a small cluster. Coincidence circuitry enables the detectors to act as a scatter camera. Positioning the detector cluster at various locations within the site, and subsequent reconstruction of the recorded data, allows an image to be obtained. The camera design allows flexibility to cater for limited space or access simply by positioning the detectors in the optimum geometric arrangement within the space allowed. The quality of the image will be limited but imaging could still be achieved in regions which are otherwise inaccessible. Computer simulation algorithms have been written to optimize the various parameters involved, such as geometrical arrangement of the detector cluster and the positioning of the cluster within the site, and to estimate the performance of such a device. Both scintillator and semiconductor detectors have been studied. A prototype camera has been constructed which operates three small single element detectors in coincidence. It has been tested in a laboratory simulation of an industrial site. This consisted of a small room (2 m wide x 1 m deep x 2 m high) into which the only access points were two 6 cm diameter holes in a side wall. Simple images of Cs-137 sources have been produced. The work described has been done on behalf of BNFL for applications at their Sellafield reprocessing plant in the UK

  9. IR sensitivity enhancement of CMOS Image Sensor with diffractive light trapping pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Sozo; Oshiyama, Itaru; Ikeda, Harumi; Ebiko, Yoshiki; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Suguru; Oinoue, Takashi; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Iwamoto, Hayato

    2017-06-19

    We report on the IR sensitivity enhancement of back-illuminated CMOS Image Sensor (BI-CIS) with 2-dimensional diffractive inverted pyramid array structure (IPA) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and deep trench isolation (DTI). FDTD simulations of semi-infinite thick c-Si having 2D IPAs on its surface whose pitches over 400 nm shows more than 30% improvement of light absorption at λ = 850 nm and the maximum enhancement of 43% with the 540 nm pitch at the wavelength is confirmed. A prototype BI-CIS sample with pixel size of 1.2 μm square containing 400 nm pitch IPAs shows 80% sensitivity enhancement at λ = 850 nm compared to the reference sample with flat surface. This is due to diffraction with the IPA and total reflection at the pixel boundary. The NIR images taken by the demo camera equip with a C-mount lens show 75% sensitivity enhancement in the λ = 700-1200 nm wavelength range with negligible spatial resolution degradation. Light trapping CIS pixel technology promises to improve NIR sensitivity and appears to be applicable to many different image sensor applications including security camera, personal authentication, and range finding Time-of-Flight camera with IR illuminations.

  10. Applying image quality in cell phone cameras: lens distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Donald; Goma, Sergio R.; Aleksic, Milivoje

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the framework used in one of the pilot studies run under the I3A CPIQ initiative to quantify overall image quality in cell-phone cameras. The framework is based on a multivariate formalism which tries to predict overall image quality from individual image quality attributes and was validated in a CPIQ pilot program. The pilot study focuses on image quality distortions introduced in the optical path of a cell-phone camera, which may or may not be corrected in the image processing path. The assumption is that the captured image used is JPEG compressed and the cellphone camera is set to 'auto' mode. As the used framework requires that the individual attributes to be relatively perceptually orthogonal, in the pilot study, the attributes used are lens geometric distortion (LGD) and lateral chromatic aberrations (LCA). The goal of this paper is to present the framework of this pilot project starting with the definition of the individual attributes, up to their quantification in JNDs of quality, a requirement of the multivariate formalism, therefore both objective and subjective evaluations were used. A major distinction in the objective part from the 'DSC imaging world' is that the LCA/LGD distortions found in cell-phone cameras, rarely exhibit radial behavior, therefore a radial mapping/modeling cannot be used in this case.

  11. Multi-scale Adaptive Gain Control of IR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, K.

    1997-01-01

    IR imagery tends to have a higher dynamic range then typical display devices such as a CRT. Global methods such as stretching and histogram equalization improve the visibility of many images, but some information in the images stays hidden for a human operator. This paper reports about the

  12. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  13. Simulation of Thermal Processes in Metamaterial MM-to-IR Converter for MM-wave Imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagubisalo, Peter S; Paulish, Andrey G; Kuznetsov, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    The main characteristics of MM-wave image detector were simulated by means of accurate numerical modelling of thermophysical processes in a metamaterial MM-to-IR converter. The converter represents a multilayer structure consisting of an ultra thin resonant metamaterial absorber and a perfect emissive layer. The absorber consists of a dielectric self-supporting film that is metallized from both sides. A micro-pattern is fabricated from one side. Resonant absorption of the MM waves induces the converter heating that yields enhancement of IR emission from the emissive layer. IR emission is detected by IR camera. In this contribution an accurate numerical model for simulation of the thermal processes in the converter structure was created by using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulation results are in a good agreement with experimental results that validates the model. The simulation shows that the real time operation is provided for the converter thickness less than 3 micrometers and time response can be improved by decreasing of the converter thickness. The energy conversion efficiency of MM waves into IR radiation is over 80%. The converter temperature increase is a linear function of a MM-wave radiation power within three orders of the dynamic range. The blooming effect and ways of its reducing are also discussed. The model allows us to choose the ways of converter structure optimization and improvement of image detector parameters

  14. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  15. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  16. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  17. Establishing imaging sensor specifications for digital still cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-02-01

    Digital Still Cameras, DSCs, have now displaced conventional still cameras in most markets. The heart of a DSC is thought to be the imaging sensor, be it Full Frame CCD, and Interline CCD, a CMOS sensor or the newer Foveon buried photodiode sensors. There is a strong tendency by consumers to consider only the number of mega-pixels in a camera and not to consider the overall performance of the imaging system, including sharpness, artifact control, noise, color reproduction, exposure latitude and dynamic range. This paper will provide a systematic method to characterize the physical requirements of an imaging sensor and supporting system components based on the desired usage. The analysis is based on two software programs that determine the "sharpness", potential for artifacts, sensor "photographic speed", dynamic range and exposure latitude based on the physical nature of the imaging optics, sensor characteristics (including size of pixels, sensor architecture, noise characteristics, surface states that cause dark current, quantum efficiency, effective MTF, and the intrinsic full well capacity in terms of electrons per square centimeter). Examples will be given for consumer, pro-consumer, and professional camera systems. Where possible, these results will be compared to imaging system currently on the market.

  18. A compact gamma camera for biological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E L; Cella, J; Majewski, S; Popov, V; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, M S; Smith, M F; Weisenberger, A G; Welsh, R E

    2006-02-01

    A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.

  19. Imaging Asteroid 4 Vesta Using the Framing Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. Uwe; Nathues, Andreas; Coradini, Angioletta; Jaumann, Ralf; Jorda, Laurent; Li, Jian-Yang; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Mottola, Stefano; Raymond, C. A.; Schroeder, Stefan E.

    2011-01-01

    The Framing Camera (FC) onboard the Dawn spacecraft serves a dual purpose. Next to its central role as a prime science instrument it is also used for the complex navigation of the ion drive spacecraft. The CCD detector with 1024 by 1024 pixels provides the stability for a multiyear mission and its high requirements of photometric accuracy over the wavelength band from 400 to 1000 nm covered by 7 band-pass filters. Vesta will be observed from 3 orbit stages with image scales of 227, 63, and 17 m/px, respectively. The mapping of Vesta s surface with medium resolution will be only completed during the exit phase when the north pole will be illuminated. A detailed pointing strategy will cover the surface at least twice at similar phase angles to provide stereo views for reconstruction of the topography. During approach the phase function of Vesta was determined over a range of angles not accessible from earth. This is the first step in deriving the photometric function of the surface. Combining the topography based on stereo tie points with the photometry in an iterative procedure will disclose details of the surface morphology at considerably smaller scales than the pixel scale. The 7 color filters are well positioned to provide information on the spectral slope in the visible, the depth of the strong pyroxene absorption band, and their variability over the surface. Cross calibration with the VIR spectrometer that extends into the near IR will provide detailed maps of Vesta s surface mineralogy and physical properties. Georeferencing all these observation will result in a coherent and unique data set. During Dawn s approach and capture FC has already demonstrated its performance. The strong variation observed by the Hubble Space Telescope can now be correlated with surface units and features. We will report on results obtained from images taken during survey mode covering the whole illuminated surface. Vesta is a planet-like differentiated body, but its surface

  20. X-ray image intensifier camera tubes and semiconductor targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A semiconductor target for use in an image intensifier camera tube and a camera using the target are described. The semiconductor wafer for converting an electron image onto electrical signal consists mainly of a collector region, preferably n-type silicon. It has one side for receiving the electron image and an opposite side for storing charge carriers generated in the collector region by high energy electrons forming a charge image. The first side comprises a highly doped surface layer covered with a metal buffer layer permeable to the incident electrons and thick enough to dissipate some of the incident electron energy thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This layer comprises beryllium on niobium on the highly doped silicon surface zone. Low energy Kα X-ray radiation is generated in the first layer, the radiation generated in the second layer (mainly Lα radiation) is strongly absorbed in the silicon layer. A camera tube using such a target with a photocathode for converting an X-ray image into an electron image, means to project this image onto the first side of the semiconductor wafer and means to read out the charge pattern on the second side are also described. (U.K.)

  1. Effect of scatter media on small gamma camera imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ser, H. K.; Choi, Y.; Yim, K. C.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of scatter media materials and thickness, located between radioactivity and small gamma camera, on imaging characteristics was evaluated. The small gamma camera developed for breast imaging was consisted of collimator, NaI(TI) crystal (60x60x6 mm 3 ). PSPMT (position sensitive photomultiplier tube), NIMs and personal computer. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the system sensitivity with different scatter media thickness (0∼8 cm) and materials (air and acrylie) with parallel hole collimator and diverging collimator. The sensitivity and spatial resolution was measured using the small gamma camera with the same condition applied to the simulation. Counts was decreased by 10% (air) and 54% (acrylic) with the parallel hole collimator and by 35% (air) and 63% (acrylic) with the diverging collimator. Spatial resolution was decreased as increasing the thickness of scatter media. This study substantiate the importance of a gamma camera positioning and the minimization of the distance between detector and target lesion in the clinical application of a gamma camera

  2. Laser Imaging Video Camera Sees Through Fire, Fog, Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under a series of SBIR contracts with Langley Research Center, inventor Richard Billmers refined a prototype for a laser imaging camera capable of seeing through fire, fog, smoke, and other obscurants. Now, Canton, Ohio-based Laser Imaging through Obscurants (LITO) Technologies Inc. is demonstrating the technology as a perimeter security system at Glenn Research Center and planning its future use in aviation, shipping, emergency response, and other fields.

  3. Image-converter streak cameras with very high gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A new camera is described with slit scanning and very high photonic gain (G=5000). Development of the technology of tubes and microchannel plates has enabled integration of such an amplifying element in an image converter tube which does away with the couplings and the intermediary electron-photon-electron conversions of the classical converter systems having external amplification. It is thus possible to obtain equal or superior performance while retaining considerable gain for the camera, great compactness, great flexibility in use, and easy handling. (author)

  4. Gamma camera image processing and graphical analysis mutual software system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqian; Chen Yongming; Ding Ailian; Ling Zhiye; Jin Yongjie

    1992-01-01

    GCCS gamma camera image processing and graphical analysis system is a special mutual software system. It is mainly used to analyse various patient data acquired from gamma camera. This system is used on IBM PC, PC/XT or PC/AT. It consists of several parts: system management, data management, device management, program package and user programs. The system provides two kinds of user interfaces: command menu and command characters. It is easy to change and enlarge this system because it is best modularized. The user programs include almost all the clinical protocols used now

  5. Assessment of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Bjerkeli, Frode; Skaaren-Fystro, Paal

    2005-05-01

    Following the tendency of increased use of imaging sensors in military aircraft, future fighter pilots will need onboard artificial intelligence e.g. ATR for aiding them in image interpretation and target designation. The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) in Germany has developed an advanced method for automatic target recognition (ATR) which is based on adaptive neural networks. This ATR method can assist the crew of military aircraft like the Eurofighter in sensor image monitoring and thereby reduce the workload in the cockpit and increase the mission efficiency. The EADS ATR approach can be adapted for imagery of visual, infrared and SAR sensors because of the training-based classifiers of the ATR method. For the optimal adaptation of these classifiers they have to be trained with appropriate and sufficient image data. The training images must show the target objects from different aspect angles, ranges, environmental conditions, etc. Incomplete training sets lead to a degradation of classifier performance. Additionally, ground truth information i.e. scenario conditions like class type and position of targets is necessary for the optimal adaptation of the ATR method. In Summer 2003, EADS started a cooperation with Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA) from Norway. The EADS/KDA approach is to provide additional image data sets for training-based ATR through IR image simulation. The joint study aims to investigate the benefits of enhancing incomplete training sets for classifier adaptation by simulated synthetic imagery. EADS/KDA identified the requirements of a commercial-off-the-shelf IR simulation tool capable of delivering appropriate synthetic imagery for ATR development. A market study of available IR simulation tools and suppliers was performed. After that the most promising tool was benchmarked according to several criteria e.g. thermal emission model, sensor model, targets model, non-radiometric image features etc., resulting in a

  6. Measurements of temperature of the tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame using IR camera

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudau, AE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In laser pyrolysis, temperature measurement and control plays a vital role during the development of nanoparticles. Authors present the results of temperature measurements using infrared camera on a tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame used...

  7. Image-scanning measurement using video dissection cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A high speed dimensional measuring system capable of scanning a thin film network, and determining if there are conductor widths, resistor widths, or spaces not typical of the design for this product is described. The eye of the system is a conventional TV camera, although such devices as image dissector cameras or solid-state scanners may be used more often in the future. The analog signal from the TV camera is digitized for processing by the computer and is presented to the TV monitor to assist the operator in monitoring the system's operation. Movable stages are required when the field of view of the scanner is less than the size of the object. A minicomputer controls the movement of the stage, and communicates with the digitizer to select picture points that are to be processed. Communications with the system are maintained through a teletype or CRT terminal

  8. Cameras and settings for optimal image capture from UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; O'Connor, James; James, Mike R.

    2017-04-01

    Aerial image capture has become very common within the geosciences due to the increasing affordability of low payload (markets. Their application to surveying has led to many studies being undertaken using UAV imagery captured from consumer grade cameras as primary data sources. However, image quality and the principles of image capture are seldom given rigorous discussion which can lead to experiments being difficult to accurately reproduce. In this contribution we revisit the underpinning concepts behind image capture, from which the requirements for acquiring sharp, well exposed and suitable imagery are derived. This then leads to discussion of how to optimise the platform, camera, lens and imaging settings relevant to image quality planning, presenting some worked examples as a guide. Finally, we challenge the community to make their image data open for review in order to ensure confidence in the outputs/error estimates, allow reproducibility of the results and have these comparable with future studies. We recommend providing open access imagery where possible, a range of example images, and detailed metadata to rigorously describe the image capture process.

  9. Influence of Digital Camera Errors on the Photogrammetric Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sužiedelytė-Visockienė, Jūratė; Bručas, Domantas

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the calibration of digital camera Canon EOS 350D, often used for the photogrammetric 3D digitalisation and measurements of industrial and construction site objects. During the calibration data on the optical and electronic parameters, influencing the distortion of images, such as correction of the principal point, focal length of the objective, radial symmetrical and non-symmetrical distortions were obtained. The calibration was performed by means of the Tcc software implementing the polynomial of Chebichev and using a special test-field with the marks, coordinates of which are precisely known. The main task of the research - to determine how parameters of the camera calibration influence the processing of images, i. e. the creation of geometric model, the results of triangulation calculations and stereo-digitalisation. Two photogrammetric projects were created for this task. In first project the non-corrected and in the second the corrected ones, considering the optical errors of the camera obtained during the calibration, images were used. The results of analysis of the images processing is shown in the images and tables. The conclusions are given.

  10. Ectomography - a tomographic method for gamma camera imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, S.; Edholm, P.E.; Hellstroem, L.G.; Larsson, S.

    1985-01-01

    In computerised gamma camera imaging the projections are readily obtained in digital form, and the number of picture elements may be relatively few. This condition makes emission techniques suitable for ectomography - a tomographic technique for directly visualising arbitrary sections of the human body. The camera rotates around the patient to acquire different projections in a way similar to SPECT. This method differs from SPECT, however, in that the camera is placed at an angle to the rotational axis, and receives two-dimensional, rather than one-dimensional, projections. Images of body sections are reconstructed by digital filtration and combination of the acquired projections. The main advantages of ectomography - a high and uniform resolution, a low and uniform attenuation and a high signal-to-noise ratio - are obtained when imaging sections close and parallel to a body surface. The filtration eliminates signals representing details outside the section and gives the section a certain thickness. Ectomographic transverse images of a line source and of a human brain have been reconstructed. Details within the sections are correctly visualised and details outside are effectively eliminated. For comparison, the same sections have been imaged with SPECT. (author)

  11. REFLECTANCE CALIBRATION SCHEME FOR AIRBORNE FRAME CAMERA IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Beisl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The image quality of photogrammetric images is influenced by various effects from outside the camera. One effect is the scattered light from the atmosphere that lowers contrast in the images and creates a colour shift towards the blue. Another is the changing illumination during the day which results in changing image brightness within an image block. In addition, there is the so-called bidirectional reflectance of the ground (BRDF effects that is giving rise to a view and sun angle dependent brightness gradient in the image itself. To correct for the first two effects an atmospheric correction with reflectance calibration is chosen. The effects have been corrected successfully for ADS linescan sensor data by using a parametrization of the atmospheric quantities. Following Kaufman et al. the actual atmospheric condition is estimated by the brightness of a dark pixel taken from the image. The BRDF effects are corrected using a semi-empirical modelling of the brightness gradient. Both methods are now extended to frame cameras. Linescan sensors have a viewing geometry that is only dependent from the cross track view zenith angle. The difference for frame cameras now is to include the extra dimension of the view azimuth into the modelling. Since both the atmospheric correction and the BRDF correction require a model inversion with the help of image data, a different image sampling strategy is necessary which includes the azimuth angle dependence. For the atmospheric correction a sixth variable is added to the existing five variables visibility, view zenith angle, sun zenith angle, ground altitude, and flight altitude – thus multiplying the number of modelling input combinations for the offline-inversion. The parametrization has to reflect the view azimuth angle dependence. The BRDF model already contains the view azimuth dependence and is combined with a new sampling strategy.

  12. Development of IR imaging at IRnova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martijn, Henk; Asplund, Carl; Malm, Hedda; Smuk, Sergiy; Höglund, Linda; Gustafsson, Oscar; Hammar, Mattias; Hellström, Staffan

    2009-05-01

    Historically IRnova has exclusively been a company, focused on manufacturing of QWIP detectors. Nowadays, besides continuous improvements of the performance of QWIP FPAs and development of new formats IRnova is involved in development of QWIP detectors for special applications and has started the development of the next generation infrared detectors, as well. In the light of the development of new formats we validate experimentally theoretical calculations of the response of QWIPs for smaller pixel size. These results allow for the development of high performance megapixel QWIP FPA that exhibit the high uniformity and operability QWIP detectors are known for. QWIP is also being considered for space applications. The requirements on dark current and operating temperature are however much more stringent as compared to the terrestrial applications. We show ways to improve the material quality with as a result a higher detector operating temperature. IRnova is also looking at antimony-based strained superlattice material for the LWIR region together with partners at the IMAGIC centre of excellence. One of the ways to overcome the problem with surface currents is passivating overgrowth. We will report the status and results of overgrowing the detector mesas with AlGa(As)Sb in a MOVPE system. At the same centre of excellence a novel material concept is being developed for LWIR detection. This new material contains a superlattice of vertically aligned and electronically coupled InAs and GaSb quantum dots. Simulations show that it should be possible to have LWIR detection in this material. We will present the current status and report results in this research.

  13. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    Stimulated luminescence arising from naturally occurring minerals is likely to be spatially heterogeneous. Standard luminescence detection systems are unable to resolve this variability. Several research groups have attempted to use imaging photon detectors, or image intensifiers linked...... to photographic systems, in order to obtain spatially resolved data. However, the former option is extremely expensive and it is difficult to obtain quantitative data from the latter. This paper describes the use of a CCD camera for imaging both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The system...

  14. Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for Prostate Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi; Hu, Jicun; Wang, G.C.; Wilson, David; Oh, Sang; Huesman, RonaldH.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the characterization of a positron emission tomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access and to position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivity with patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rows of 20 HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 detectors in the camera. The individual detectors are angled in the transaxial plane to point towards the prostate to reduce resolution degradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified HRRT data acquisition electronics. Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our dedicated-prostate camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less background (less randoms and lower scatter fraction) and a lower cost. We have completed construction of the camera. Characterization data and reconstructed images of several phantoms are shown. Sensitivity of a point source in the center is 946 cps/mu Ci. Spatial resolution is 4 mm FWHM in the central region

  15. TRANSFORMATION ALGORITHM FOR IMAGES OBTAINED BY OMNIDIRECTIONAL CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Lazarenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omnidirectional optoelectronic systems find their application in areas where a wide viewing angle is critical. However, omnidirectional optoelectronic systems have a large distortion that makes their application more difficult. The paper compares the projection functions of traditional perspective lenses and omnidirectional wide angle fish-eye lenses with a viewing angle not less than 180°. This comparison proves that distortion models of omnidirectional cameras cannot be described as a deviation from the classic model of pinhole camera. To solve this problem, an algorithm for transforming omnidirectional images has been developed. The paper provides a brief comparison of the four calibration methods available in open source toolkits for omnidirectional optoelectronic systems. Geometrical projection model is given used for calibration of omnidirectional optical system. The algorithm consists of three basic steps. At the first step, we calculate he field of view of a virtual pinhole PTZ camera. This field of view is characterized by an array of 3D points in the object space. At the second step the array of corresponding pixels for these three-dimensional points is calculated. Then we make a calculation of the projection function that expresses the relation between a given 3D point in the object space and a corresponding pixel point. In this paper we use calibration procedure providing the projection function for calibrated instance of the camera. At the last step final image is formed pixel-by-pixel from the original omnidirectional image using calculated array of 3D points and projection function. The developed algorithm gives the possibility for obtaining an image for a part of the field of view of an omnidirectional optoelectronic system with the corrected distortion from the original omnidirectional image. The algorithm is designed for operation with the omnidirectional optoelectronic systems with both catadioptric and fish-eye lenses

  16. Automatic fog detection for public safety by using camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Roth, Martin; Wauben, Wiel

    2017-04-01

    Fog and reduced visibility have considerable impact on the performance of road, maritime, and aeronautical transportation networks. The impact ranges from minor delays to more serious congestions or unavailability of the infrastructure and can even lead to damage or loss of lives. Visibility is traditionally measured manually by meteorological observers using landmarks at known distances in the vicinity of the observation site. Nowadays, distributed cameras facilitate inspection of more locations from one remote monitoring center. The main idea is, however, still deriving the visibility or presence of fog by an operator judging the scenery and the presence of landmarks. Visibility sensors are also used, but they are rather costly and require regular maintenance. Moreover, observers, and in particular sensors, give only visibility information that is representative for a limited area. Hence the current density of visibility observations is insufficient to give detailed information on the presence of fog. Cameras are more and more deployed for surveillance and security reasons in cities and for monitoring traffic along main transportation ways. In addition to this primary use of cameras, we consider cameras as potential sensors to automatically identify low visibility conditions. The approach that we follow is to use machine learning techniques to determine the presence of fog and/or to make an estimation of the visibility. For that purpose a set of features are extracted from the camera images such as the number of edges, brightness, transmission of the image dark channel, fractal dimension. In addition to these image features, we also consider meteorological variables such as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, and dew point as additional features to feed the machine learning model. The results obtained with a training and evaluation set consisting of 10-minute sampled images for two KNMI locations over a period of 1.5 years by using decision trees methods

  17. Sweep devices for picosecond image-converter streak cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunin, B.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.; Schelev, M.Ya.; Serduchenko, J.N.; Thebault, J.

    1979-01-01

    Four different sweep devices based on microwave tubes, avalanche transistors, krytrons, and laser-triggered spark gaps are treated in detail. These control circuits are developed for picosecond image-converter cameras and generate sweep pulses providing streak speeds in the range of 10 7 to 5x10 10 cm/sec with maximum time resolution better than 10 -12 sec. Special low-jitter triggering schemes reduce the jitter to less than 5x10 -11 sec. Some problems arising in the construction and matching of the sweep devices and image-streak tube are discussed. Comparative parameters of nanosecond switching elements are presented. The results described can be used by other authors involved in streak camera development

  18. Biomedical image acquisition system using a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jara B, A.T.; Sevillano, J.; Del Carpio S, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    A gamma camera images PC acquisition board has been developed. The digital system has been described using VHDL and has been synthesized and implemented in a Altera Max7128S CPLD and two PALs 16L8. The use of programmable-logic technologies has afforded a higher scale integration and a reduction of the digital delays and also has allowed us to modify and bring up to date the entire digital design easily. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of myocardial perfusion imaging between the new high-speed gamma camera and the standard anger camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Chikamori, Taishiro; Hida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors have been recently introduced into the field of myocardial perfusion imaging. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the diagnostic performance of the CZT high-speed gamma camera (Discovery NM 530c) with that of the standard 3-head gamma camera in the same group of patients. The study group consisted of 150 consecutive patients who underwent a 1-day stress-rest 99m Tc-sestamibi or tetrofosmin imaging protocol. Image acquisition was performed first on a standard gamma camera with a 15-min scan time each for stress and for rest. All scans were immediately repeated on a CZT camera with a 5-min scan time for stress and a 3-min scan time for rest, using list mode. The correlations between the CZT camera and the standard camera for perfusion and function analyses were strong within narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Using list mode analysis, image quality for stress was rated as good or excellent in 97% of the 3-min scans, and in 100% of the ≥4-min scans. For CZT scans at rest, similarly, image quality was rated as good or excellent in 94% of the 1-min scans, and in 100% of the ≥2-min scans. The novel CZT camera provides excellent image quality, which is equivalent to standard myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography, despite a short scan time of less than half of the standard time. (author)

  20. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  1. Reducing flicker due to ambient illumination in camera captured images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwoong; Bengtson, Kurt; Li, Lisa; Allebach, Jan P.

    2013-02-01

    The flicker artifact dealt with in this paper is the scanning distortion arising when an image is captured by a digital camera using a CMOS imaging sensor with an electronic rolling shutter under strong ambient light sources powered by AC. This type of camera scans a target line-by-line in a frame. Therefore, time differences exist between the lines. This mechanism causes a captured image to be corrupted by the change of illumination. This phenomenon is called the flicker artifact. The non-content area of the captured image is used to estimate a flicker signal that is a key to being able to compensate the flicker artifact. The average signal of the non-content area taken along the scan direction has local extrema where the peaks of flicker exist. The locations of the extrema are very useful information to estimate the desired distribution of pixel intensities assuming that the flicker artifact does not exist. The flicker-reduced images compensated by our approach clearly demonstrate the reduced flicker artifact, based on visual observation.

  2. Goal-oriented rectification of camera-based document images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulos, Nikolaos; Gatos, Basilis; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Perantonis, Stavros J

    2011-04-01

    Document digitization with either flatbed scanners or camera-based systems results in document images which often suffer from warping and perspective distortions that deteriorate the performance of current OCR approaches. In this paper, we present a goal-oriented rectification methodology to compensate for undesirable document image distortions aiming to improve the OCR result. Our approach relies upon a coarse-to-fine strategy. First, a coarse rectification is accomplished with the aid of a computationally low cost transformation which addresses the projection of a curved surface to a 2-D rectangular area. The projection of the curved surface on the plane is guided only by the textual content's appearance in the document image while incorporating a transformation which does not depend on specific model primitives or camera setup parameters. Second, pose normalization is applied on the word level aiming to restore all the local distortions of the document image. Experimental results on various document images with a variety of distortions demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed rectification methodology using a consistent evaluation methodology that encounters OCR accuracy and a newly introduced measure using a semi-automatic procedure.

  3. The role of camera-bundled image management software in the consumer digital imaging value chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Milton; Mundkur, Anuradha; Balasubramanian, Ashok; Chirania, Virat

    2005-02-01

    This research was undertaken by the Convergence Center at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies (www.digital-convergence.info). Project ICONICA, the name for the research, focuses on the strategic implications of digital Images and the CONvergence of Image management and image CApture. Consumer imaging - the activity that we once called "photography" - is now recognized as in the throes of a digital transformation. At the end of 2003, market researchers estimated that about 30% of the households in the U.S. and 40% of the households in Japan owned digital cameras. In 2004, of the 86 million new cameras sold (excluding one-time use cameras), a majority (56%) were estimated to be digital cameras. Sales of photographic film, while still profitable, are declining precipitously.

  4. Dual-camera design for coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhi; Xiong, Zhiwei; Gao, Dahua; Shi, Guangming; Wu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) provides an efficient mechanism for recovering 3D spectral data from a single 2D measurement. However, since the reconstruction problem is severely underdetermined, the quality of recovered spectral data is usually limited. In this paper we propose a novel dual-camera design to improve the performance of CASSI while maintaining its snapshot advantage. Specifically, a beam splitter is placed in front of the objective lens of CASSI, which allows the same scene to be simultaneously captured by a grayscale camera. This uncoded grayscale measurement, in conjunction with the coded CASSI measurement, greatly eases the reconstruction problem and yields high-quality 3D spectral data. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. An assessment of surface emissivity variation effects on plasma uniformity analysis using IR cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Abigail; Showers, Melissa; Biewer, Theodore

    2017-10-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma device operating at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its purpose is to test plasma source and heating concepts for the planned Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX), which has the mission to test the plasma-material interactions under fusion reactor conditions. In this device material targets will be exposed to high heat fluxes (>10 MW/m2). To characterize the heat fluxes to the target a IR thermography system is used taking up to 432 frames per second videos. The data is analyzed to determine the surface temperature on the target in specific regions of interest. The IR analysis has indicated a low level of plasma uniformity; the plasma often deposits more heat to the edge of the plate than the center. An essential parameter for IR temperature calculation is the surface emissivity of the plate (stainless steel). A study has been performed to characterize the variation in the surface emissivity of the plate as its temperature changes and its surface finish is modified by plasma exposure.

  6. Image reconstruction from limited angle Compton camera data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomitani, T.; Hirasawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Compton camera is used for imaging the distributions of γ ray direction in a γ ray telescope for astrophysics and for imaging radioisotope distributions in nuclear medicine without the need for collimators. The integration of γ rays on a cone is measured with the camera, so that some sort of inversion method is needed. Parra found an analytical inversion algorithm based on spherical harmonics expansion of projection data. His algorithm is applicable to the full set of projection data. In this paper, six possible reconstruction algorithms that allow image reconstruction from projections with a finite range of scattering angles are investigated. Four algorithms have instability problems and two others are practical. However, the variance of the reconstructed image diverges in these two cases, so that window functions are introduced with which the variance becomes finite at a cost of spatial resolution. These two algorithms are compared in terms of variance. The algorithm based on the inversion of the summed back-projection is superior to the algorithm based on the inversion of the summed projection. (author)

  7. FlexISP: a flexible camera image processing framework

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Egiazarian, Karen; Kautz, Jan; Pulli, Kari; Steinberger, Markus; Tsai, Yun-Ta; Rouf, Mushfiqur; Pająk, Dawid; Reddy, Dikpal; Gallo, Orazio; Liu, Jing; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Conventional pipelines for capturing, displaying, and storing images are usually defined as a series of cascaded modules, each responsible for addressing a particular problem. While this divide-and-conquer approach offers many benefits, it also introduces a cumulative error, as each step in the pipeline only considers the output of the previous step, not the original sensor data. We propose an end-to-end system that is aware of the camera and image model, enforces natural-image priors, while jointly accounting for common image processing steps like demosaicking, denoising, deconvolution, and so forth, all directly in a given output representation (e.g., YUV, DCT). Our system is flexible and we demonstrate it on regular Bayer images as well as images from custom sensors. In all cases, we achieve large improvements in image quality and signal reconstruction compared to state-of-the-art techniques. Finally, we show that our approach is capable of very efficiently handling high-resolution images, making even mobile implementations feasible.

  8. FlexISP: a flexible camera image processing framework

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-11-19

    Conventional pipelines for capturing, displaying, and storing images are usually defined as a series of cascaded modules, each responsible for addressing a particular problem. While this divide-and-conquer approach offers many benefits, it also introduces a cumulative error, as each step in the pipeline only considers the output of the previous step, not the original sensor data. We propose an end-to-end system that is aware of the camera and image model, enforces natural-image priors, while jointly accounting for common image processing steps like demosaicking, denoising, deconvolution, and so forth, all directly in a given output representation (e.g., YUV, DCT). Our system is flexible and we demonstrate it on regular Bayer images as well as images from custom sensors. In all cases, we achieve large improvements in image quality and signal reconstruction compared to state-of-the-art techniques. Finally, we show that our approach is capable of very efficiently handling high-resolution images, making even mobile implementations feasible.

  9. Frequency identification of vibration signals using video camera image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Wu, Chia-Hung

    2012-10-16

    This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC) can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system.

  10. Frequency Identification of Vibration Signals Using Video Camera Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system.

  11. Compton camera imaging and the cone transform: a brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fatma; Kuchment, Peter; Kunyansky, Leonid

    2018-05-01

    While most of Radon transform applications to imaging involve integrations over smooth sub-manifolds of the ambient space, lately important situations have appeared where the integration surfaces are conical. Three of such applications are single scatter optical tomography, Compton camera medical imaging, and homeland security. In spite of the similar surfaces of integration, the data and the inverse problems associated with these modalities differ significantly. In this article, we present a brief overview of the mathematics arising in Compton camera imaging. In particular, the emphasis is made on the overdetermined data and flexible geometry of the detectors. For the detailed results, as well as other approaches (e.g. smaller-dimensional data or restricted geometry of detectors) the reader is directed to the relevant publications. Only a brief description and some references are provided for the single scatter optical tomography. This work was supported in part by NSF DMS grants 1211463 (the first two authors), 1211521 and 141877 (the third author), as well as a College of Science of Texas A&M University grant.

  12. Ceres Photometry and Albedo from Dawn Framing Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S. E.; Mottola, S.; Keller, H. U.; Li, J.-Y.; Matz, K.-D.; Otto, K.; Roatsch, T.; Stephan, K.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft is in orbit around dwarf planet Ceres. The onboard Framing Camera (FC) [1] is mapping the surface through a clear filter and 7 narrow-band filters at various observational geometries. Generally, Ceres' appearance in these images is affected by shadows and shading, effects which become stronger for larger solar phase angles, obscuring the intrinsic reflective properties of the surface. By means of photometric modeling we attempt to remove these effects and reconstruct the surface albedo over the full visible wavelength range. Knowledge of the albedo distribution will contribute to our understanding of the physical nature and composition of the surface.

  13. “Calibration-on-the-spot”: How to calibrate an EMCCD camera from its images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In order to count photons with a camera, the camera must be calibrated. Photon counting is necessary, e.g., to determine the precision of localization-based super-resolution microscopy. Here we present a protocol that calibrates an EMCCD camera from information contained in isolated, diffraction-......-limited spots in any image taken by the camera, thus making dedicated calibration procedures redundant by enabling calibration post festum, from images filed without calibration information....

  14. Soft x-ray imaging by a commercial solid-state television camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, I.; Koyama, K.; Tanimoto, M.; Yano, M.

    1987-01-01

    A commerical, solid-state television camera has been used to record images of soft x radiation (0.8--12 keV). The performance of the camera is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated compared with an x-ray photographic film (Kodak direct exposure film). In the application, the camera has been used to provide image patterns of x rays from laser-produced plasmas. It is demonstrated that the camera has several advantages over x-ray photographic film

  15. Monitoring combat wound healing by IR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Chris R.; Spear, Abigail M.; Gazi, Ehsan; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In recent conflicts, battlefield injuries consist largely of extensive soft injuries from blasts and high energy projectiles, including gunshot wounds. Repair of these large, traumatic wounds requires aggressive surgical treatment, including multiple surgical debridements to remove devitalised tissue and to reduce bacterial load. Identifying those patients with wound complications, such as infection and impaired healing, could greatly assist health care teams in providing the most appropriate and personalised care for combat casualties. Candidate technologies to enable this benefit include the fusion of imaging and optical spectroscopy to enable rapid identification of key markers. Hence, a novel system based on IR negative contrast imaging (NCI) is presented that employs an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a periodically-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal. The crystal operates in the shortwave and midwave IR spectral regions (ca. 1.5 - 1.9 μm and 2.4 - 3.8 μm, respectively). Wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the crystal within the pump beam. System size and complexity are minimised by the use of single element detectors and the intracavity OPO design. Images are composed by raster scanning the monochromatic beam over the scene of interest; the reflection and/or absorption of the incident radiation by target materials and their surrounding environment provide a method for spatial location. Initial results using the NCI system to characterise wound biopsies are presented here.

  16. Image reconstruction methods for the PBX-M pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, A.; Powell, E.T.; Fonck, R.J.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes two methods which have been used to reconstruct the soft x-ray emission profile of the PBX-M tokamak from the projected images recorded by the PBX-M pinhole camera. Both methods must accurately represent the shape of the reconstructed profile while also providing a degree of immunity to noise in the data. The first method is a simple least squares fit to the data. This has the advantage of being fast and small, and thus easily implemented on the PDP-11 computer used to control the video digitizer for the pinhole camera. The second method involves the application of a maximum entropy algorithm to an overdetermined system. This has the advantage of allowing the use of a default profile. This profile contains additional knowledge about the plasma shape which can be obtained from equilibrium fits to the external magnetic measurements. Additionally the reconstruction is guaranteed positive, and the fit to the data can be relaxed by specifying both the amount and distribution of noise in the image. The algorithm described has the advantage of being considerably faster, for an overdetermined system, than the usual Lagrange multiplier approach to finding the maximum entropy solution. 13 refs., 24 figs

  17. Data fusion of Landsat TM and IRS images in forest classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangxing Wang; Markus Holopainen; Eero Lukkarinen

    2000-01-01

    Data fusion of Landsat TM images and Indian Remote Sensing satellite panchromatic image (IRS-1C PAN) was studied and compared to the use of TM or IRS image only. The aim was to combine the high spatial resolution of IRS-1C PAN to the high spectral resolution of Landsat TM images using a data fusion algorithm. The ground truth of the study was based on a sample of 1,020...

  18. Astronomical Polarimetry with the RIT Polarization Imaging Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry V.; Ninkov, Zoran; Brock, Neal

    2018-06-01

    In the last decade, imaging polarimeters based on micropolarizer arrays have been developed for use in terrestrial remote sensing and metrology applications. Micropolarizer-based sensors are dramatically smaller and more mechanically robust than other polarimeters with similar spectral response and snapshot capability. To determine the suitability of these new polarimeters for astronomical applications, we developed the RIT Polarization Imaging Camera to investigate the performance of these devices, with a special attention to the low signal-to-noise regime. We characterized the device performance in the lab, by determining the relative throughput, efficiency, and orientation of every pixel, as a function of wavelength. Using the resulting pixel response model, we developed demodulation procedures for aperture photometry and imaging polarimetry observing modes. We found that, using the current calibration, RITPIC is capable of detecting polarization signals as small as ∼0.3%. The relative ease of data collection, calibration, and analysis provided by these sensors suggest than they may become an important tool for a number of astronomical targets.

  19. Planar gamma camera imaging and quantitation of Yttrium-90 bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, S.; DeNardo, G.L.; Yuan, A.

    1994-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is a promising radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy of cancer because of its energetic beta emissions. Therapeutic management requires quantitative imaging to assess the pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of the 90 Y-labeled antibody. Conventional gamma photon imaging methods cannot be easily applied to imaging of 90 Y-bremsstrahlung because of its continuous energy spectrum. The sensitivity, resolution and source-to-background signal ratio (S/B) of the detector system for 90 Y-bremsstrahlung were investigated for various collimators and energy windows in order to determine optimum conditions for quantitative imaging. After these conditions were determined, the accuracy of quantitation of 90 Y activity in an Alderson abdominal phantom was examined. When the energy-window width was increased, the benefit of increased sensitivity outweighed degradation in resolution and S/B ratio until the manufacturer's energy specifications for the collimator were exceeded. Using the same energy window, the authors improved resolution and S/B for the medium-energy (ME) collimator when compared to the low-energy, all-purpose (LEAP) collimator, and there was little additional improvement using the high-energy (HE) collimator. Camera sensitivity under tissue equivalent conditions was 4.2 times greater for the LEAP and 1.7 times greater for the ME collimators when compared to the HE collimator. Thus, the best, most practical selections were found to be the ME collimator and an energy window of 55-285 keV. When they used these optimal conditions for image acquisition, the estimation of 90 Y activity in organs and tumors was within 15% of the true activities. The results for this study suggest that reasonable accuracy can be achieved in clinical radioimmunotherapy using 90 Y-bremsstrahlung quantitation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Non-Contact Thermal Properties Measurement with Low-Power Laser and IR Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Troy L.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    As shown by the Phoenix Mars Lander's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP), contact measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity (using a modified flux-plate or line-source heat-pulse method) are constrained by a number of factors. Robotic resources must be used to place the probe, making them unavailable for other operations for the duration of the measurement. The range of placement is also limited by mobility, particularly in the case of a lander. Placement is also subject to irregularities in contact quality, resulting in non-repeatable heat transfer to the material under test. Most important from a scientific perspective, the varieties of materials which can be measured are limited to unconsolidated or weakly-cohesive regolith materials, rocks, and ices being too hard for nominal insertion strengths. Accurately measuring thermal properties in the laboratory requires significant experimental finesse, involving sample preparation, controlled and repeatable procedures, and, practically, instrumentation much more voluminous than the sample being tested (heater plates, insulation, temperature sensors). Remote measurements (infrared images from orbiting spacecraft) can reveal composite properties like thermal inertia, but suffer both from a large footprint (low spatial resolution) and convolution of the thermal properties of a potentially layered medium. In situ measurement techniques (the Phoenix TECP is the only robotic measurement of thermal properties to date) suffer from problems of placement range, placement quality, occupation of robotic resources, and the ability to only measure materials of low mechanical strength. A spacecraft needs the ability to perform a non-contact thermal properties measurement in situ. Essential components include low power consumption, leveraging of existing or highly-developed flight technologies, and mechanical simplicity. This new in situ method, by virtue of its being non-contact, bypasses all of these

  1. Capturing method for integral three-dimensional imaging using multiviewpoint robotic cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Kensuke; Arai, Jun; Mishina, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Integral three-dimensional (3-D) technology for next-generation 3-D television must be able to capture dynamic moving subjects with pan, tilt, and zoom camerawork as good as in current TV program production. We propose a capturing method for integral 3-D imaging using multiviewpoint robotic cameras. The cameras are controlled through a cooperative synchronous system composed of a master camera controlled by a camera operator and other reference cameras that are utilized for 3-D reconstruction. When the operator captures a subject using the master camera, the region reproduced by the integral 3-D display is regulated in real space according to the subject's position and view angle of the master camera. Using the cooperative control function, the reference cameras can capture images at the narrowest view angle that does not lose any part of the object region, thereby maximizing the resolution of the image. 3-D models are reconstructed by estimating the depth from complementary multiviewpoint images captured by robotic cameras arranged in a two-dimensional array. The model is converted into elemental images to generate the integral 3-D images. In experiments, we reconstructed integral 3-D images of karate players and confirmed that the proposed method satisfied the above requirements.

  2. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10 6 frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs

  3. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10{sup 6} frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs.

  4. Applying and extending ISO/TC42 digital camera resolution standards to mobile imaging products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don; Burns, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    There are no fundamental differences between today's mobile telephone cameras and consumer digital still cameras that suggest many existing ISO imaging performance standards do not apply. To the extent that they have lenses, color filter arrays, detectors, apertures, image processing, and are hand held, there really are no operational or architectural differences. Despite this, there are currently differences in the levels of imaging performance. These are driven by physical and economic constraints, and image-capture conditions. Several ISO standards for resolution, well established for digital consumer digital cameras, require care when applied to the current generation of cell phone cameras. In particular, accommodation of optical flare, shading non-uniformity and distortion are recommended. We offer proposals for the application of existing ISO imaging resolution performance standards to mobile imaging products, and suggestions for extending performance standards to the characteristic behavior of camera phones.

  5. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure

  6. Color camera computed tomography imaging spectrometer for improved spatial-spectral image accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Johnson, William R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography imaging spectrometers ("CTIS"s) having color focal plane array detectors are provided. The color FPA detector may comprise a digital color camera including a digital image sensor, such as a Foveon X3.RTM. digital image sensor or a Bayer color filter mosaic. In another embodiment, the CTIS includes a pattern imposed either directly on the object scene being imaged or at the field stop aperture. The use of a color FPA detector and the pattern improves the accuracy of the captured spatial and spectral information.

  7. SNAPSHOT SPECTRAL AND COLOR IMAGING USING A REGULAR DIGITAL CAMERA WITH A MONOCHROMATIC IMAGE SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hauser

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spectral imaging (SI refers to the acquisition of the three-dimensional (3D spectral cube of spatial and spectral data of a source object at a limited number of wavelengths in a given wavelength range. Snapshot spectral imaging (SSI refers to the instantaneous acquisition (in a single shot of the spectral cube, a process suitable for fast changing objects. Known SSI devices exhibit large total track length (TTL, weight and production costs and relatively low optical throughput. We present a simple SSI camera based on a regular digital camera with (i an added diffusing and dispersing phase-only static optical element at the entrance pupil (diffuser and (ii tailored compressed sensing (CS methods for digital processing of the diffused and dispersed (DD image recorded on the image sensor. The diffuser is designed to mix the spectral cube data spectrally and spatially and thus to enable convergence in its reconstruction by CS-based algorithms. In addition to performing SSI, this SSI camera is capable to perform color imaging using a monochromatic or gray-scale image sensor without color filter arrays.

  8. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  9. Earth elevation map production and high resolution sensing camera imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiubin; Jin, Guang; Jiang, Li; Dai, Lu; Xu, Kai

    2010-11-01

    The Earth's digital elevation which impacts space camera imaging has prepared and imaging has analysed. Based on matching error that TDI CCD integral series request of the speed of image motion, statistical experimental methods-Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the distribution histogram of Earth's elevation in image motion compensated model which includes satellite attitude changes, orbital angular rate changes, latitude, longitude and the orbital inclination changes. And then, elevation information of the earth's surface from SRTM is read. Earth elevation map which produced for aerospace electronic cameras is compressed and spliced. It can get elevation data from flash according to the shooting point of latitude and longitude. If elevation data between two data, the ways of searching data uses linear interpolation. Linear interpolation can better meet the rugged mountains and hills changing requests. At last, the deviant framework and camera controller are used to test the character of deviant angle errors, TDI CCD camera simulation system with the material point corresponding to imaging point model is used to analyze the imaging's MTF and mutual correlation similarity measure, simulation system use adding cumulation which TDI CCD imaging exceeded the corresponding pixel horizontal and vertical offset to simulate camera imaging when stability of satellite attitude changes. This process is practicality. It can effectively control the camera memory space, and meet a very good precision TDI CCD camera in the request matches the speed of image motion and imaging.

  10. Convolutional Neural Network-Based Shadow Detection in Images Using Visible Light Camera Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seop Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in intelligence surveillance camera systems have enabled more research on the detection, tracking, and recognition of humans. Such systems typically use visible light cameras and images, in which shadows make it difficult to detect and recognize the exact human area. Near-infrared (NIR light cameras and thermal cameras are used to mitigate this problem. However, such instruments require a separate NIR illuminator, or are prohibitively expensive. Existing research on shadow detection in images captured by visible light cameras have utilized object and shadow color features for detection. Unfortunately, various environmental factors such as illumination change and brightness of background cause detection to be a difficult task. To overcome this problem, we propose a convolutional neural network-based shadow detection method. Experimental results with a database built from various outdoor surveillance camera environments, and from the context-aware vision using image-based active recognition (CAVIAR open database, show that our method outperforms previous works.

  11. An Airborne Multispectral Imaging System Based on Two Consumer-Grade Cameras for Agricultural Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenghai Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and evaluation of an airborne multispectral imaging system based on two identical consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing. The cameras are equipped with a full-frame complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS sensor with 5616 × 3744 pixels. One camera captures normal color images, while the other is modified to obtain near-infrared (NIR images. The color camera is also equipped with a GPS receiver to allow geotagged images. A remote control is used to trigger both cameras simultaneously. Images are stored in 14-bit RAW and 8-bit JPEG files in CompactFlash cards. The second-order transformation was used to align the color and NIR images to achieve subpixel alignment in four-band images. The imaging system was tested under various flight and land cover conditions and optimal camera settings were determined for airborne image acquisition. Images were captured at altitudes of 305–3050 m (1000–10,000 ft and pixel sizes of 0.1–1.0 m were achieved. Four practical application examples are presented to illustrate how the imaging system was used to estimate cotton canopy cover, detect cotton root rot, and map henbit and giant reed infestations. Preliminary analysis of example images has shown that this system has potential for crop condition assessment, pest detection, and other agricultural applications.

  12. Visible, Very Near IR and Short Wave IR Hyperspectral Drone Imaging System for Agriculture and Natural Water Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, H.; Akujärvi, A.; Holmlund, C.; Ojanen, H.; Kaivosoja, J.; Nissinen, A.; Niemeläinen, O.

    2017-10-01

    The accurate determination of the quality parameters of crops requires a spectral range from 400 nm to 2500 nm (Kawamura et al., 2010, Thenkabail et al., 2002). Presently the hyperspectral imaging systems that cover this wavelength range consist of several separate hyperspectral imagers and the system weight is from 5 to 15 kg. In addition the cost of the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) cameras is high (  50 k€). VTT has previously developed compact hyperspectral imagers for drones and Cubesats for Visible and Very near Infrared (VNIR) spectral ranges (Saari et al., 2013, Mannila et al., 2013, Näsilä et al., 2016). Recently VTT has started to develop a hyperspectral imaging system that will enable imaging simultaneously in the Visible, VNIR, and SWIR spectral bands. The system can be operated from a drone, on a camera stand, or attached to a tractor. The targeted main applications of the DroneKnowledge hyperspectral system are grass, peas, and cereals. In this paper the characteristics of the built system are shortly described. The system was used for spectral measurements of wheat, several grass species and pea plants fixed to the camera mount in the test fields in Southern Finland and in the green house. The wheat, grass and pea field measurements were also carried out using the system mounted on the tractor. The work is part of the Finnish nationally funded DroneKnowledge - Towards knowledge based export of small UAS remote sensing technology project.

  13. 131I activity quantification of gamma camera planar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero, Raquel; Garcia, Hugo P.; Incio, Monica G.; Minguez, Pablo; Cardenas, Alexander; Martínez, Daniel; Lassmann, Michael

    2017-02-01

    A procedure to estimate the activity in target tissues in patients during the therapeutic administration of 131I radiopharmaceutical treatment for thyroid conditions (hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer) using a gamma camera (GC) with a high energy (HE) collimator, is proposed. Planar images are acquired for lesions of different sizes r, and at different distances d, in two HE GC systems. Defining a region of interest (ROI) on the image of size r, total counts n g are measured. Sensitivity S (cps MBq-1) in each acquisition is estimated as the product of the geometric G and the intrinsic efficiency η 0. The mean fluence of 364 keV photons arriving at the ROI per disintegration G, is calculated with the MCNPX code, simulating the entire GC and the HE collimator. Intrinsic efficiency η 0 is estimated from a calibration measurement of a plane reference source of 131I in air. Values of G and S for two GC systems—Philips Skylight and Siemens e-cam—are calculated. The total range of possible sensitivity values in thyroidal imaging in the e-cam and skylight GC measure from 7 cps MBq-1 to 35 cps MBq-1, and from 6 cps MBq-1 to 29 cps MBq-1, respectively. These sensitivity values have been verified with the SIMIND code, with good agreement between them. The results have been validated with experimental measurements in air, and in a medium with scatter and attenuation. The counts in the ROI can be produced by direct, scatter and penetration photons. The fluence value for direct photons is constant for any r and d values, but scatter and penetration photons show different values related to specific r and d values, resulting in the large sensitivity differences found. The sensitivity in thyroidal GC planar imaging is strongly dependent on uptake size, and distance from the GC. An individual value for the acquisition sensitivity of each lesion can significantly alleviate the level of uncertainty in the measurement of thyroid uptake activity for each patient.

  14. Wireless IR Image Transfer System for Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    the camera can operate between 0 and 500 C; this uniquely suites it for employment on autonomous vehicles in rugged environments. The camera is...system is suitable for used on autonomous vehicles under varying antenna orientations. • The third is the use of MDS transceivers allows the received

  15. The design and application of a multi-band IR imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijuan

    2018-02-01

    Multi-band IR imaging system has many applications in security, national defense, petroleum and gas industry, etc. So the relevant technologies are getting more and more attention in rent years. As we know, when used in missile warning and missile seeker systems, multi-band IR imaging technology has the advantage of high target recognition capability and low false alarm rate if suitable spectral bands are selected. Compared with traditional single band IR imager, multi-band IR imager can make use of spectral features in addition to space and time domain features to discriminate target from background clutters and decoys. So, one of the key work is to select the right spectral bands in which the feature difference between target and false target is evident and is well utilized. Multi-band IR imager is a useful instrument to collect multi-band IR images of target, backgrounds and decoys for spectral band selection study at low cost and with adjustable parameters and property compared with commercial imaging spectrometer. In this paper, a multi-band IR imaging system is developed which is suitable to collect 4 spectral band images of various scenes at every turn and can be expanded to other short-wave and mid-wave IR spectral bands combination by changing filter groups. The multi-band IR imaging system consists of a broad band optical system, a cryogenic InSb large array detector, a spinning filter wheel and electronic processing system. The multi-band IR imaging system's performance is tested in real data collection experiments.

  16. Gamma Camera with Image Amplifier: Application in Nuclear Medicine; Camera Gamma a Amplificateur d'Image: Application en Medecine Nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellershohn, C.; Vernejoul, P. de; Desgrez, A. [CEA, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Lequais, J.; Roux, G.; Lansiart, A. [CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    1969-05-15

    The camera described has an optical system consisting of a lead grid collimator with 649 cylindrical channels 130 mm long and 5.5 mm in diameter; a detector consisting of a mosaic of 700 NaI(Tl) crystals with an effective diameter of 5.5 mm, length 20 mm, and a distance of 7.5 mm between the axes; and a light amplification device consisting of an initial image amplifier (No. 9463 of the French Thomson-Houston Company), the photocathode of which is in optical contact with the detector and is itself optically coupled to a second, high-gain light amplifier (P 829A, from English Electric Valve). In accordance with a principle first laid down during the preceding Conference on Medical Isotope Scanning organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, this second amplifier may also be used as an electronic shutter operated by a photomultiplier which selects the light originating in the radio active source under examination. This device very effectively suppresses the background from the first amplifier tube. With reference to applications, the camera is used for two types of operation: firstly for the activation of the electronic shutter device, the rate of whose opening and shutting may reach 10 kHz; the background is almost entirely eliminated and it is possible with trace doses of conventional radionuclides to obtain images of such organs as the thyroid, liver, kidney, etc., in very short exposure times by comparison with customary scanning; secondly, by utilizing radionuclides of very short half-life with very high activities (of the order of several mCi), it is no longer necessary to effect suppression of the background whose repetition frequency is limited to 10 kHz. One can thus obtain ultrashort exposure times, e.g., about 1/20th of a second for an amount of 10 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc; such exposure times make cinematography possible. Various examples are supplied of applications making use of {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 137m}Ba and {sup 133}Xe in the field of vascular and

  17. Upconversion imager measures single mid-IR photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    the performance of today's state of the art IR detectors for the visible/near-IR region shows a striking contrast, as the latter can have dark currents in the range of 0.001 electrons per second. Demonstrated performance of waveguide upconversion techniques still show considerable dark noise, even when working...

  18. Image Mosaicking Approach for a Double-Camera System in the GaoFen2 Optical Remote Sensing Satellite Based on the Big Virtual Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yufeng; Jin, Shuying; Wang, Mi; Zhu, Ying; Dong, Zhipeng

    2017-06-20

    The linear array push broom imaging mode is widely used for high resolution optical satellites (HROS). Using double-cameras attached by a high-rigidity support along with push broom imaging is one method to enlarge the field of view while ensuring high resolution. High accuracy image mosaicking is the key factor of the geometrical quality of complete stitched satellite imagery. This paper proposes a high accuracy image mosaicking approach based on the big virtual camera (BVC) in the double-camera system on the GaoFen2 optical remote sensing satellite (GF2). A big virtual camera can be built according to the rigorous imaging model of a single camera; then, each single image strip obtained by each TDI-CCD detector can be re-projected to the virtual detector of the big virtual camera coordinate system using forward-projection and backward-projection to obtain the corresponding single virtual image. After an on-orbit calibration and relative orientation, the complete final virtual image can be obtained by stitching the single virtual images together based on their coordinate information on the big virtual detector image plane. The paper subtly uses the concept of the big virtual camera to obtain a stitched image and the corresponding high accuracy rational function model (RFM) for concurrent post processing. Experiments verified that the proposed method can achieve seamless mosaicking while maintaining the geometric accuracy.

  19. Laser line scan underwater imaging by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyi; Luo, Meixing; Song, Xiyu; Wang, Dundong; He, Ning

    2017-12-01

    This work employs the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera to acquire images in a scanning manner for laser line scan (LLS) underwater imaging to alleviate backscatter impact of seawater. Two operating features of the CMOS camera, namely the region of interest (ROI) and rolling shutter, can be utilized to perform image scan without the difficulty of translating the receiver above the target as the traditional LLS imaging systems have. By the dynamically reconfigurable ROI of an industrial CMOS camera, we evenly divided the image into five subareas along the pixel rows and then scanned them by changing the ROI region automatically under the synchronous illumination by the fun beams of the lasers. Another scanning method was explored by the rolling shutter operation of the CMOS camera. The fun beam lasers were turned on/off to illuminate the narrow zones on the target in a good correspondence to the exposure lines during the rolling procedure of the camera's electronic shutter. The frame synchronization between the image scan and the laser beam sweep may be achieved by either the strobe lighting output pulse or the external triggering pulse of the industrial camera. Comparison between the scanning and nonscanning images shows that contrast of the underwater image can be improved by our LLS imaging techniques, with higher stability and feasibility than the mechanically controlled scanning method.

  20. Fabry-Perot interferometry using an image-intensified rotating-mirror streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, W.L.; Stacy, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    A Fabry-Perot velocity interferometer system is described that uses a modified rotating mirror streak camera to recrod the dynamic fringe positions. A Los Alamos Model 72B rotating-mirror streak camera, equipped with a beryllium mirror, was modified to include a high aperture (f/2.5) relay lens and a 40-mm image-intensifier tube such that the image normally formed at the film plane of the streak camera is projected onto the intensifier tube. Fringe records for thin (0.13 mm) flyers driven by a small bridgewire detonator obtained with a Model C1155-01 Hamamatsu and Model 790 Imacon electronic streak cameras are compared with those obtained with the image-intensified rotating-mirror streak camera (I 2 RMC). Resolution comparisons indicate that the I 2 RMC gives better time resolution than either the Hamamatsu or the Imacon for total writing times of a few microseconds or longer

  1. Gamma camera image acquisition, display, and processing with the personal microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.; Pratt, J.P.; Roberts, D.R.; Johnson, T.; Feyerabend, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors evaluated the potential of a microcomputer for direct acquisition, display, and processing of gamma camera images. Boards for analog-to-digital conversion and image zooming were designed, constructed, and interfaced to the Macintosh II (Apple Computer, Cupertino, Calif). Software was written for processing of single, gated, and time series images. The system was connected to gamma cameras, and its performance was compared with that of dedicated nuclear medicine computers. Data could be acquired from gamma cameras at rates exceeding 200,000 counts per second, with spatial resolution exceeding intrinsic camera resolution. Clinical analysis could be rapidly performed. This system performed better than most dedicated nuclear medicine computers with respect to speed of data acquisition and spatial resolution of images while maintaining full compatibility with the standard image display, hard-copy, and networking formats. It could replace such dedicated systems in the near future as software is refined

  2. Relative Panoramic Camera Position Estimation for Image-Based Virtual Reality Networks in Indoor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, M.; Akano, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Image-based virtual reality (VR) is a virtual space generated with panoramic images projected onto a primitive model. In imagebased VR, realistic VR scenes can be generated with lower rendering cost, and network data can be described as relationships among VR scenes. The camera network data are generated manually or by an automated procedure using camera position and rotation data. When panoramic images are acquired in indoor environments, network data should be generated without Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) positioning data. Thus, we focused on image-based VR generation using a panoramic camera in indoor environments. We propose a methodology to automate network data generation using panoramic images for an image-based VR space. We verified and evaluated our methodology through five experiments in indoor environments, including a corridor, elevator hall, room, and stairs. We confirmed that our methodology can automatically reconstruct network data using panoramic images for image-based VR in indoor environments without GNSS position data.

  3. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare, E-mail: amilazzo@ncmir.ucsd.edu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lanman, Jason [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Klienfelder, Stuart [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Xuong, Nguyen-Huu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  4. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Moldovan, Grigore; Lanman, Jason; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C.; Klienfelder, Stuart; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Kirkland, Angus I.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2010-01-01

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  5. Characteristics of a multi-image camera on a CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Kazuhiro; Fujino, Tatsuo; Abe, Katsuhito

    1984-01-01

    A multi-imaging camera was used for obtaining a hard-copy image from an imaging device of a CT scanner. The contrast and brightness of the CRT and time exposure of the camera were the three important factors which influenced the quality of the hard-copy image. Two kinds of original test patterns were designed to examine the characteristics of the factors. One was the grayscale test pattern which was used to obtain the density curve. This curve, named the Film-CRT curve, (F-C curve) is to distinguish it from the H D curve. The other was the sharpness test pattern which was used to examine the relationship between brightness and sharpness. As a result, the slope of F-C curve became steeper with a decrease in brightness, with an increase in contrast and with increase in exposure time. Sharpness became worse with an increase in brightness. Therefore, to obtain a good hard copy image, the brightness must be set as dark as possible, and the contrast and exposure time must be controlled after due consideration is given to their characteristics. (author)

  6. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A new compact large field of view (FOV multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second.

  7. Streak camera imaging of single photons at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Markus; Ansari, Vahid; Eigner, Christof; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Donohue, John Matthew; Czerniuk, Thomas; Aßmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Streak cameras are powerful tools for temporal characterization of ultrafast light pulses, even at the single-photon level. However, the low signal-to-noise ratio in the infrared range prevents measurements on weak light sources in the telecom regime. We present an approach to circumvent this problem, utilizing an up-conversion process in periodically poled waveguides in Lithium Niobate. We convert single photons from a parametric down-conversion source in order to reach the point of maximum detection efficiency of commercially available streak cameras. We explore phase-matching configurations to apply the up-conversion scheme in real-world applications.

  8. Application of single-image camera calibration for ultrasound augmented laparoscopic visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyang; Su, He; Kang, Sukryool; Kane, Timothy D; Shekhar, Raj

    2015-03-01

    Accurate calibration of laparoscopic cameras is essential for enabling many surgical visualization and navigation technologies such as the ultrasound-augmented visualization system that we have developed for laparoscopic surgery. In addition to accuracy and robustness, there is a practical need for a fast and easy camera calibration method that can be performed on demand in the operating room (OR). Conventional camera calibration methods are not suitable for the OR use because they are lengthy and tedious. They require acquisition of multiple images of a target pattern in its entirety to produce satisfactory result. In this work, we evaluated the performance of a single-image camera calibration tool ( rdCalib ; Percieve3D, Coimbra, Portugal) featuring automatic detection of corner points in the image, whether partial or complete, of a custom target pattern. Intrinsic camera parameters of a 5-mm and a 10-mm standard Stryker ® laparoscopes obtained using rdCalib and the well-accepted OpenCV camera calibration method were compared. Target registration error (TRE) as a measure of camera calibration accuracy for our optical tracking-based AR system was also compared between the two calibration methods. Based on our experiments, the single-image camera calibration yields consistent and accurate results (mean TRE = 1.18 ± 0.35 mm for the 5-mm scope and mean TRE = 1.13 ± 0.32 mm for the 10-mm scope), which are comparable to the results obtained using the OpenCV method with 30 images. The new single-image camera calibration method is promising to be applied to our augmented reality visualization system for laparoscopic surgery.

  9. Application of single-image camera calibration for ultrasound augmented laparoscopic visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyang; Su, He; Kang, Sukryool; Kane, Timothy D.; Shekhar, Raj

    2015-03-01

    Accurate calibration of laparoscopic cameras is essential for enabling many surgical visualization and navigation technologies such as the ultrasound-augmented visualization system that we have developed for laparoscopic surgery. In addition to accuracy and robustness, there is a practical need for a fast and easy camera calibration method that can be performed on demand in the operating room (OR). Conventional camera calibration methods are not suitable for the OR use because they are lengthy and tedious. They require acquisition of multiple images of a target pattern in its entirety to produce satisfactory result. In this work, we evaluated the performance of a single-image camera calibration tool (rdCalib; Percieve3D, Coimbra, Portugal) featuring automatic detection of corner points in the image, whether partial or complete, of a custom target pattern. Intrinsic camera parameters of a 5-mm and a 10-mm standard Stryker® laparoscopes obtained using rdCalib and the well-accepted OpenCV camera calibration method were compared. Target registration error (TRE) as a measure of camera calibration accuracy for our optical tracking-based AR system was also compared between the two calibration methods. Based on our experiments, the single-image camera calibration yields consistent and accurate results (mean TRE = 1.18 ± 0.35 mm for the 5-mm scope and mean TRE = 1.13 ± 0.32 mm for the 10-mm scope), which are comparable to the results obtained using the OpenCV method with 30 images. The new single-image camera calibration method is promising to be applied to our augmented reality visualization system for laparoscopic surgery.

  10. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  11. Limited-angle imaging in positron cameras: theory and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K.C.

    1979-10-01

    The principles of operation of planar positron camera systems made up of multiwire proportional chambers as detectors and electromagnetic delay lines for coordinate readout are discussed. Gamma converters are coupled to the wire chambers to increase detection efficiency and improve spatial resolution. The conversion efficiencies of these converters are calculated and the results compare favorably to the experimentally measured values

  12. Limited-angle imaging in positron cameras: theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, K.C.

    1979-10-01

    The principles of operation of planar positron camera systems made up of multiwire proportional chambers as detectors and electromagnetic delay lines for coordinate readout are discussed. Gamma converters are coupled to the wire chambers to increase detection efficiency and improve spatial resolution. The conversion efficiencies of these converters are calculated and the results compare favorably to the experimentally measured values.

  13. Problems of thermal IR-imaging in evaluation of burn wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowakowski, A.

    2009-01-01

    Results of the research devoted to application of thermal IR-imaging in diagnostics of burn wounds are discussed. The main aim of the work was to develop an effective method for quantitative evaluation of the depth of a burn wound and for classification of regions for surgical treatment. The criterion of determination the area of the wound to be treated surgically is the time, which should not exceed three weeks for natural healing of a burn wound. Prediction that the healing process may last longer is concluded by immediate surgical intervention. We concentrate on using for this purpose QIRT - NDT TI methods (Quantitative Infra-Red Thermography - Non-Destructive Testing Thermal Imaging); especially - active dynamic thermography - ADT. In this work both, classical thermography using a high quality thermal camera as well as ADT are applied and the results of analysis are joined, allowing multimodality diagnostic approach and improved classification of burns requiring surgical treatment. Now our work in application of thermal imaging in determination of burns is continued for around 10 years, as the first publication showing our methodology was presented in 1999. In 2001, during the Thermosense conference, we have been awarded the Andronicos Kantsios Award for the work on Medical applications of model based dynamic thermography. Important reports of our experience in classical as well as ADT thermography are already published. Now we concentrate on practical aspects of the problem, trying to construct a measuring set to be operative even by not experienced staff and meeting all of necessary requirements for clinical applications. (author)

  14. Pseudo real-time coded aperture imaging system with intensified vidicon cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.S.; Berzins, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    A coded image displayed on a TV monitor was used to directly reconstruct a decoded image. Both the coded and the decoded images were viewed with intensified vidicon cameras. The coded aperture was a 15-element nonredundant pinhole array. The coding and decoding were accomplished simultaneously during the scanning of a single 16-msec TV frame

  15. Be Foil ''Filter Knee Imaging'' NSTX Plasma with Fast Soft X-ray Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.C. Stratton; S. von Goeler; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; L.E. Zakharov

    2005-01-01

    A fast soft x-ray (SXR) pinhole camera has been implemented on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This paper presents observations and describes the Be foil Filter Knee Imaging (FKI) technique for reconstructions of a m/n=1/1 mode on NSTX. The SXR camera has a wide-angle (28 o ) field of view of the plasma. The camera images nearly the entire diameter of the plasma and a comparable region in the vertical direction. SXR photons pass through a beryllium foil and are imaged by a pinhole onto a P47 scintillator deposited on a fiber optic faceplate. An electrostatic image intensifier demagnifies the visible image by 6:1 to match it to the size of the charge-coupled device (CCD) chip. A pair of lenses couples the image to the CCD chip

  16. Fast image acquisition and processing on a TV camera-based portal imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, K.; Meyer, J.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes the fast acquisition and processing of portal images directly from a TV camera-based portal imaging device (Siemens Beamview Plus trademark). This approach employs not only hard- and software included in the standard package installed by the manufacturer (in particular the frame grabber card and the Matrox(tm) Intellicam interpreter software), but also a software tool developed in-house for further processing and analysis of the images. The technical details are presented, including the source code for the Matrox trademark interpreter script that enables the image capturing process. With this method it is possible to obtain raw images directly from the frame grabber card at an acquisition rate of 15 images per second. The original configuration by the manufacturer allows the acquisition of only a few images over the course of a treatment session. The approach has a wide range of applications, such as quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam, real-time imaging, real-time verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, and generation of movies of the radiation field (fluoroscopy mode). (orig.)

  17. Temperature resolution enhancing of commercially available THz passive cameras due to computer processing of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.

    2014-06-01

    As it is well-known, application of the passive THz camera for the security problems is very promising way. It allows seeing concealed object without contact with a person and this camera is non-dangerous for a person. Efficiency of using the passive THz camera depends on its temperature resolution. This characteristic specifies possibilities of the detection of concealed object: minimal size of the object, maximal distance of the detection, image detail. One of probable ways for a quality image enhancing consists in computer processing of image. Using computer processing of the THz image of objects concealed on the human body, one may improve it many times. Consequently, the instrumental resolution of such device may be increased without any additional engineering efforts. We demonstrate new possibilities for seeing the clothes details, which raw images, produced by the THz cameras, do not allow to see. We achieve good quality of the image due to applying various spatial filters with the aim to demonstrate independence of processed images on math operations. This result demonstrates a feasibility of objects seeing. We consider images produced by THz passive cameras manufactured by Microsemi Corp., and ThruVision Corp., and Capital Normal University (Beijing, China).

  18. Method used to test the imaging consistency of binocular camera's left-right optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meiying; Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Yang, Shaodong; Zhao, Hui

    2016-09-01

    To binocular camera, the consistency of optical parameters of the left and the right optical system is an important factor that will influence the overall imaging consistency. In conventional testing procedure of optical system, there lacks specifications suitable for evaluating imaging consistency. In this paper, considering the special requirements of binocular optical imaging system, a method used to measure the imaging consistency of binocular camera is presented. Based on this method, a measurement system which is composed of an integrating sphere, a rotary table and a CMOS camera has been established. First, let the left and the right optical system capture images in normal exposure time under the same condition. Second, a contour image is obtained based on the multiple threshold segmentation result and the boundary is determined using the slope of contour lines near the pseudo-contour line. Third, the constraint of gray level based on the corresponding coordinates of left-right images is established and the imaging consistency could be evaluated through standard deviation σ of the imaging grayscale difference D (x, y) between the left and right optical system. The experiments demonstrate that the method is suitable for carrying out the imaging consistency testing for binocular camera. When the standard deviation 3σ distribution of imaging gray difference D (x, y) between the left and right optical system of the binocular camera does not exceed 5%, it is believed that the design requirements have been achieved. This method could be used effectively and paves the way for the imaging consistency testing of the binocular camera.

  19. UCXp camera imaging principle and key technologies of data post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fangyan; Li, Guoqing; Zuo, Zhengli; Liu, Jianmin; Wu, Liang; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Haitao

    2014-03-01

    The large format digital aerial camera product UCXp was introduced into the Chinese market in 2008, the image consists of 17310 columns and 11310 rows with a pixel size of 6 mm. The UCXp camera has many advantages compared with the same generation camera, with multiple lenses exposed almost at the same time and no oblique lens. The camera has a complex imaging process whose principle will be detailed in this paper. On the other hand, the UCXp image post-processing method, including data pre-processing and orthophoto production, will be emphasized in this article. Based on the data of new Beichuan County, this paper will describe the data processing and effects.

  20. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2000-01-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  1. UCXp camera imaging principle and key technologies of data post-processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fangyan; Li, Guoqing; Zuo, Zhengli; Liu, Jianmin; Wu, Liang; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The large format digital aerial camera product UCXp was introduced into the Chinese market in 2008, the image consists of 17310 columns and 11310 rows with a pixel size of 6 mm. The UCXp camera has many advantages compared with the same generation camera, with multiple lenses exposed almost at the same time and no oblique lens. The camera has a complex imaging process whose principle will be detailed in this paper. On the other hand, the UCXp image post-processing method, including data pre-processing and orthophoto production, will be emphasized in this article. Based on the data of new Beichuan County, this paper will describe the data processing and effects

  2. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Australian National Univ., Plasma Research Laboratory, Canberra (Australia)

    2000-03-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  3. Supercontinuum based mid-IR imaging spectroscopy for cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Møller, Uffe Visbech; Kubat, Irnis

    2014-01-01

    -power laser diodes, quantum cascade lasers and synchrotron radiation, have precluded mid-IR applications where the spatial coherence, broad bandwidth, high brightness and portability of a supercontinuum laser are all required. In an international collaboration in the EU project MINERVA [minerva...

  4. Matching Images to Models: Camera Calibration for 3-D Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Cheeseman. Peter C.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we described a system which recursively recovers a super-resolved three dimensional surface model from a set of images of the surface. In that paper we assumed that the camera calibration for each image was known. In this paper we solve two problems. Firstly, if an estimate of the surface is already known, the problem is to calibrate a new image relative to the existing surface model. Secondly, if no surface estimate is available, the relative camera calibration between the images in the set must be estimated. This will allow an initial surface model to be estimated. Results of both types of estimation are given.

  5. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  6. "Calibration-on-the-spot'': How to calibrate an EMCCD camera from its images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    In localization-based microscopy, super-resolution is obtained by analyzing isolated diffraction-limited spots imaged, typically, with EMCCD cameras. To compare experiments and calculate localization precision, the photon-to-signal amplification factor is needed but unknown without a calibration...... of the camera. Here we show how this can be done post festum from just a recorded image. We demonstrate this (i) theoretically, mathematically, (ii) by analyzing images recorded with an EMCCD camera, and (iii) by analyzing simulated EMCCD images for which we know the true values of parameters. In summary, our...... images during the measurement itself, and can at any later time be decoded with calibration-on-the-spot....

  7. Development of a hardware-based registration system for the multimodal medical images by USB cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Michiaki; Minato, Kotaro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iida, Hidehiro

    2009-01-01

    There are several medical imaging scanners and each modality has different aspect for visualizing inside of human body. By combining these images, diagnostic accuracy could be improved, and therefore, several attempts for multimodal image registration have been implemented. One popular approach is to use hybrid image scanners such as positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. However, these hybrid scanners are expensive and not fully available. We developed multimodal image registration system with universal serial bus (USB) cameras, which is inexpensive and applicable to any combinations of existed conventional imaging scanners. The multiple USB cameras will determine the three dimensional positions of a patient while scanning. Using information of these positions and rigid body transformation, the acquired image is registered to the common coordinate which is shared with another scanner. For each scanner, reference marker is attached on gantry of the scanner. For observing the reference marker's position by the USB cameras, the location of the USB cameras can be arbitrary. In order to validate the system, we scanned a cardiac phantom with different positions by PET and MRI scanners. Using this system, images from PET and MRI were visually aligned, and good correlations between PET and MRI images were obtained after the registration. The results suggest this system can be inexpensively used for multimodal image registrations. (author)

  8. Analysis of the development of missile-borne IR imaging detecting technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinxiang; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Today's infrared imaging guiding missiles are facing many challenges. With the development of targets' stealth, new-style IR countermeasures and penetrating technologies as well as the complexity of the operational environments, infrared imaging guiding missiles must meet the higher requirements of efficient target detection, capability of anti-interference and anti-jamming and the operational adaptability in complex, dynamic operating environments. Missileborne infrared imaging detecting systems are constrained by practical considerations like cost, size, weight and power (SWaP), and lifecycle requirements. Future-generation infrared imaging guiding missiles need to be resilient to changing operating environments and capable of doing more with fewer resources. Advanced IR imaging detecting and information exploring technologies are the key technologies that affect the future direction of IR imaging guidance missiles. Infrared imaging detecting and information exploring technologies research will support the development of more robust and efficient missile-borne infrared imaging detecting systems. Novelty IR imaging technologies, such as Infrared adaptive spectral imaging, are the key to effectively detect, recognize and track target under the complicated operating and countermeasures environments. Innovative information exploring techniques for the information of target, background and countermeasures provided by the detection system is the base for missile to recognize target and counter interference, jamming and countermeasure. Modular hardware and software development is the enabler for implementing multi-purpose, multi-function solutions. Uncooled IRFPA detectors and High-operating temperature IRFPA detectors as well as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology will support the implementing of low-cost infrared imaging guiding missiles. In this paper, the current status and features of missile-borne IR imaging detecting technologies are summarized. The key

  9. Image dynamic range test and evaluation of Gaofen-2 dual cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Gan, Fuping; Wei, Dandan

    2015-12-01

    In order to fully understand the dynamic range of Gaofen-2 satellite data and support the data processing, application and next satellites development, in this article, we evaluated the dynamic range by calculating some statistics such as maximum ,minimum, average and stand deviation of four images obtained at the same time by Gaofen-2 dual cameras in Beijing area; then the maximum ,minimum, average and stand deviation of each longitudinal overlap of PMS1,PMS2 were calculated respectively for the evaluation of each camera's dynamic range consistency; and these four statistics of each latitudinal overlap of PMS1,PMS2 were calculated respectively for the evaluation of the dynamic range consistency between PMS1 and PMS2 at last. The results suggest that there is a wide dynamic range of DN value in the image obtained by PMS1 and PMS2 which contains rich information of ground objects; in general, the consistency of dynamic range between the single camera images is in close agreement, but also a little difference, so do the dual cameras. The consistency of dynamic range between the single camera images is better than the dual cameras'.

  10. Semi-automated camera trap image processing for the detection of ungulate fence crossing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Michael; Visser, Kaitlyn; Visscher, Darcy; MacLeod, Ian; Vujnovic, Dragomir; Vujnovic, Ksenija

    2017-09-27

    Remote cameras are an increasingly important tool for ecological research. While remote camera traps collect field data with minimal human attention, the images they collect require post-processing and characterization before it can be ecologically and statistically analyzed, requiring the input of substantial time and money from researchers. The need for post-processing is due, in part, to a high incidence of non-target images. We developed a stand-alone semi-automated computer program to aid in image processing, categorization, and data reduction by employing background subtraction and histogram rules. Unlike previous work that uses video as input, our program uses still camera trap images. The program was developed for an ungulate fence crossing project and tested against an image dataset which had been previously processed by a human operator. Our program placed images into categories representing the confidence of a particular sequence of images containing a fence crossing event. This resulted in a reduction of 54.8% of images that required further human operator characterization while retaining 72.6% of the known fence crossing events. This program can provide researchers using remote camera data the ability to reduce the time and cost required for image post-processing and characterization. Further, we discuss how this procedure might be generalized to situations not specifically related to animal use of linear features.

  11. Exploring the feasibility of iris recognition for visible spectrum iris images obtained using smartphone camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trokielewicz, Mateusz; Bartuzi, Ewelina; Michowska, Katarzyna; Andrzejewska, Antonina; Selegrat, Monika

    2015-09-01

    In the age of modern, hyperconnected society that increasingly relies on mobile devices and solutions, implementing a reliable and accurate biometric system employing iris recognition presents new challenges. Typical biometric systems employing iris analysis require expensive and complicated hardware. We therefore explore an alternative way using visible spectrum iris imaging. This paper aims at answering several questions related to applying iris biometrics for images obtained in the visible spectrum using smartphone camera. Can irides be successfully and effortlessly imaged using a smartphone's built-in camera? Can existing iris recognition methods perform well when presented with such images? The main advantage of using near-infrared (NIR) illumination in dedicated iris recognition cameras is good performance almost independent of the iris color and pigmentation. Are the images obtained from smartphone's camera of sufficient quality even for the dark irides? We present experiments incorporating simple image preprocessing to find the best visibility of iris texture, followed by a performance study to assess whether iris recognition methods originally aimed at NIR iris images perform well with visible light images. To our best knowledge this is the first comprehensive analysis of iris recognition performance using a database of high-quality images collected in visible light using the smartphones flashlight together with the application of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) iris recognition methods.

  12. Determination of traffic intensity from camera images using image processing and pattern recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrübeoğlu, Mehrübe; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this project was to detect the intensity of traffic on a road at different times of the day during daytime. Although the work presented utilized images from a section of a highway, the results of this project are intended for making decisions on the type of intervention necessary on any given road at different times for traffic control, such as installation of traffic signals, duration of red, green and yellow lights at intersections, and assignment of traffic control officers near school zones or other relevant locations. In this project, directional patterns are used to detect and count the number of cars in traffic images over a fixed area of the road to determine local traffic intensity. Directional patterns are chosen because they are simple and common to almost all moving vehicles. Perspective vision effects specific to each camera orientation has to be considered, as they affect the size and direction of patterns to be recognized. In this work, a simple and fast algorithm has been developed based on horizontal directional pattern matching and perspective vision adjustment. The results of the algorithm under various conditions are presented and compared in this paper. Using the developed algorithm, the traffic intensity can accurately be determined on clear days with average sized cars. The accuracy is reduced on rainy days when the camera lens contains raindrops, when there are very long vehicles, such as trucks or tankers, in the view, and when there is very low light around dusk or dawn.

  13. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (˜0.5°C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures.

  14. Method of forming half-tone test images in the IR spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebova, L.N.; Gridin, A.S.; Denisov, V.N.; Dmitriev, I.Yu.; Mochalov, I.V.; Chebotarev, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Test charts in the form of half-tone IR images, including not only an image of the interference-producing background (the underlying earth's surface and clouds), but also the observation objects, are required for conducting bench tests on the noise immunity of modern optoelectronic equipment designed to solve observation problems under background-interference conditions. The simulation of extended half-tone IR images containing the high spatial frequencies of background formations having an appreciable dynamic range of reproducible radiances is a complex problem in technical and processing aspects. The use of phosphorus as visible-to-IR converters for the creation of IR-background simulators is shown to be possible in principle in this paper. 2 refs., 3 figs

  15. A Compton camera for spectroscopic imaging from 100 keV to 1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnhart, J.R.D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of spectroscopic imaging issues, applications, and technology is presented. Compton cameras based on solid state semiconductor detectors stands out as the best system for the nondestructive assay of special nuclear materials. A camera for this application has been designed based on an efficient specific purpose Monte Carlo code developed for this project. Preliminary experiments have been performed which demonstrate the validity of the Compton camera concept and the accuracy of the code. Based on these results, a portable prototype system is in development. Proposed future work is addressed

  16. Miniature CCD X-Ray Imaging Camera Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC-773-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mummolo, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of the project was to develop a compact, large active area, high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating X-rays. The camera head and controller needed to be capable of operation within a vacuum environment and small enough to be fielded within the small vacuum target chambers at LLNL.

  17. Line-Constrained Camera Location Estimation in Multi-Image Stereomatching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Simon; Goossens, Bart; Philips, Wilfried

    2017-08-23

    Stereomatching is an effective way of acquiring dense depth information from a scene when active measurements are not possible. So-called lightfield methods take a snapshot from many camera locations along a defined trajectory (usually uniformly linear or on a regular grid-we will assume a linear trajectory) and use this information to compute accurate depth estimates. However, they require the locations for each of the snapshots to be known: the disparity of an object between images is related to both the distance of the camera to the object and the distance between the camera positions for both images. Existing solutions use sparse feature matching for camera location estimation. In this paper, we propose a novel method that uses dense correspondences to do the same, leveraging an existing depth estimation framework to also yield the camera locations along the line. We illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique for camera location estimation both visually for the rectification of epipolar plane images and quantitatively with its effect on the resulting depth estimation. Our proposed approach yields a valid alternative for sparse techniques, while still being executed in a reasonable time on a graphics card due to its highly parallelizable nature.

  18. Periscope-camera system for visible and infrared imaging diagnostics on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Dimock, D.L.; Hayes, S.; Long, D.; Lowrence, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Young, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    An optical diagnostic consisting of a periscope which relays images of the torus interior to an array of cameras is used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to view plasma discharge phenomena and inspect vacuum vessel internal structures in both visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Three periscopes view through 20-cm-diameter fused-silica windows which are spaced around the torus midplane to provide a viewing coverage of approximately 75% of the vacuum vessel internal surface area. The periscopes have f/8 optics and motor-driven controls for focusing, magnification selection (5 0 , 20 0 , and 60 0 field of view), elevation and azimuth setting, mast rotation, filter selection, iris aperture, and viewing port selection. The four viewing ports on each periscope are equipped with multiple imaging devices which include: (1) an inspection eyepiece, (2) standard (RCA TC2900) and fast (RETICON) framing rate television cameras, (3) a PtSi CCD infrared imaging camera, (4) a 35 mm Nikon F3 still camera, or (5) a 16 mm Locam II movie camera with variable framing up to 500 fps. Operation of the periscope-camera system is controlled either locally or remotely through a computer-CAMAC interface. A description of the equipment and examples of its application are presented

  19. Periscope-camera system for visible and infrared imaging diagnostics on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Dimock, D.L.; Hayes, S.; Long, D.; Lowrance, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Young, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    An optical diagnostic consisting of a periscope which relays images of the torus interior to an array of cameras is used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to view plasma discharge phenomena and inspect the vacuum vessel internal structures in both the visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Three periscopes view through 20-cm-diam fused-silica windows which are spaced around the torus midplane to provide a viewing coverage of approximately 75% of the vacuum vessel internal surface area. The periscopes have f/8 optics and motor-driven controls for focusing, magnification selection (5 0 , 20 0 , and 60 0 field of view), elevation and azimuth setting, mast rotation, filter selection, iris aperture, and viewing port selection. The four viewing ports on each periscope are equipped with multiple imaging devices which include: (1) an inspection eyepiece, (2) standard (RCA TC2900) and fast (RETICON) framing rate television cameras, (3) a PtSi CCD infrared imaging camera, (4) a 35-mm Nikon F3 still camera, or (5) a 16-mm Locam II movie camera with variable framing rate up to 500 fps. Operation of the periscope-camera system is controlled either locally or remotely through a computer-CAMAC interface. A description of the equipment and examples of its application are presented

  20. Neptune’s zonal winds from near-IR Keck adaptive optics imaging in August 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, S.C.; De Pater, I.; Marcus, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present H-band (1.4–1.8 ?m) images of Neptune with a spatial resolution of ?0.06?, taken with the W.M. Keck II telescope using the slit-viewing camera (SCAM) of the NIRSPEC instrument backed with Adaptive Optics. Images with 60-second integration times span 4 hours each on UT 20 and 21 August,

  1. Imaging performance of a multiwire proportional-chamber positron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mandez, V.; Del Guerra, A.; Nelson, W.R.; Tam, K.C.

    1982-08-01

    A new design - fully three-dimensional - Positron Camera is presented, made of six MultiWire Proportional Chamber modules arranged to form the lateral surface of a hexagonal prism. A true coincidence rate of 56000 c/s is expected with an equal accidental rate for a 400 μCi activity uniformly distributed in a approx. 3 l water phantom. A detailed Monte Carlo program has been used to investigate the dependence of the spatial resolution on the geometrical and physical parameters. A spatial resolution of 4.8 mm FWHM has been obtained for a 18 F point-like source in a 10 cm radius water phantom. The main properties of the limited angle reconstruction algorithms are described in relation to the proposed detector geometry

  2. Enhancing swimming pool safety by the use of range-imaging cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerardyn, D.; Boulanger, S.; Kuijk, M.

    2015-05-01

    Drowning is the cause of death of 372.000 people, each year worldwide, according to the report of November 2014 of the World Health Organization.1 Currently, most swimming pools only use lifeguards to detect drowning people. In some modern swimming pools, camera-based detection systems are nowadays being integrated. However, these systems have to be mounted underwater, mostly as a replacement of the underwater lighting. In contrast, we are interested in range imaging cameras mounted on the ceiling of the swimming pool, allowing to distinguish swimmers at the surface from drowning people underwater, while keeping the large field-of-view and minimizing occlusions. However, we have to take into account that the water surface of a swimming pool is not a flat, but mostly rippled surface, and that the water is transparent for visible light, but less transparent for infrared or ultraviolet light. We investigated the use of different types of 3D cameras to detect objects underwater at different depths and with different amplitudes of surface perturbations. Specifically, we performed measurements with a commercial Time-of-Flight camera, a commercial structured-light depth camera and our own Time-of-Flight system. Our own system uses pulsed Time-of-Flight and emits light of 785 nm. The measured distances between the camera and the object are influenced through the perturbations on the water surface. Due to the timing of our Time-of-Flight camera, our system is theoretically able to minimize the influence of the reflections of a partially-reflecting surface. The combination of a post image-acquisition filter compensating for the perturbations and the use of a light source with shorter wavelengths to enlarge the depth range can improve the current commercial cameras. As a result, we can conclude that low-cost range imagers can increase swimming pool safety, by inserting a post-processing filter and the use of another light source.

  3. Automated identification of animal species in camera trap images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, X.; Wang, J.; Kays, R.; Jansen, P.A.; Wang, T.; Huang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Image sensors are increasingly being used in biodiversity monitoring, with each study generating many thousands or millions of pictures. Efficiently identifying the species captured by each image is a critical challenge for the advancement of this field. Here, we present an automated species

  4. Fast image reconstruction for Compton camera using stochastic origin ensemble approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Compton camera has been proposed as a potential imaging tool in astronomy, industry, homeland security, and medical diagnostics. Due to the inherent geometrical complexity of Compton camera data, image reconstruction of distributed sources can be ineffective and/or time-consuming when using standard techniques such as filtered backprojection or maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM). In this article, the authors demonstrate a fast reconstruction of Compton camera data using a novel stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) approach based on Markov chains. During image reconstruction, the origins of the measured events are randomly assigned to locations on conical surfaces, which are the Compton camera analogs of lines-of-responses in PET. Therefore, the image is defined as an ensemble of origin locations of all possible event origins. During the course of reconstruction, the origins of events are stochastically moved and the acceptance of the new event origin is determined by the predefined acceptance probability, which is proportional to the change in event density. For example, if the event density at the new location is higher than in the previous location, the new position is always accepted. After several iterations, the reconstructed distribution of origins converges to a quasistationary state which can be voxelized and displayed. Comparison with the list-mode ML-EM reveals that the postfiltered SOE algorithm has similar performance in terms of image quality while clearly outperforming ML-EM in relation to reconstruction time. In this study, the authors have implemented and tested a new image reconstruction algorithm for the Compton camera based on the stochastic origin ensembles with Markov chains. The algorithm uses list-mode data, is parallelizable, and can be used for any Compton camera geometry. SOE algorithm clearly outperforms list-mode ML-EM for simple Compton camera geometry in terms of reconstruction time. The difference in computational time

  5. In-vivo elemental imaging of plants using in-air submilli-PIXE camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Ishii, Keizo; Kikuchi, Yohei; Kawamura, Yu; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Ryohei; Tashiro, Kumiko; Inoue, Chihiro

    2008-01-01

    We developed a PIXE analysis system which provides spatial distribution images of elements in a region of 3x3 cm 2 with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 mm. We call this system a submilli-PIXE camera. For in-vivo imaging of plants, we combined the submilli-PIXE camera with an in-air analysis. The high-speed beam scanning and the in-air analysis also reduce the risk of damaging the plants, thus in-vivo imaging could be realized. We applied the in-air submilli-PIXE camera to phytoremediation research. Phytoremediation is a technology for cleaning metal-contaminated soils using plant physiology. To study accumulation mechanisms for heavy metals, elemental distribution in plant organ should be known as well as average concentration. Elemental images of fronds were obtained in-vivo without sample preparation. Elemental map of the fronds showed that arsenic was accumulated in the edges of Pteris vittata fronds. The in-air submilli-PIXE camera clearly shows the accumulation of arsenic in fronds. The in-air submilli-PIXE camera is an effective tool for undertaking phytoremediation research. (author)

  6. Retinal axial focusing and multi-layer imaging with a liquid crystal adaptive optics camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui-Xue; Zheng Xian-Liang; Li Da-Yu; Hu Li-Fa; Cao Zhao-Liang; Mu Quan-Quan; Xuan Li; Xia Ming-Liang

    2014-01-01

    With the help of adaptive optics (AO) technology, cellular level imaging of living human retina can be achieved. Aiming to reduce distressing feelings and to avoid potential drug induced diseases, we attempted to image retina with dilated pupil and froze accommodation without drugs. An optimized liquid crystal adaptive optics camera was adopted for retinal imaging. A novel eye stared system was used for stimulating accommodation and fixating imaging area. Illumination sources and imaging camera kept linkage for focusing and imaging different layers. Four subjects with diverse degree of myopia were imaged. Based on the optical properties of the human eye, the eye stared system reduced the defocus to less than the typical ocular depth of focus. In this way, the illumination light can be projected on certain retina layer precisely. Since that the defocus had been compensated by the eye stared system, the adopted 512 × 512 liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) corrector provided the crucial spatial fidelity to fully compensate high-order aberrations. The Strehl ratio of a subject with −8 diopter myopia was improved to 0.78, which was nearly close to diffraction-limited imaging. By finely adjusting the axial displacement of illumination sources and imaging camera, cone photoreceptors, blood vessels and nerve fiber layer were clearly imaged successfully. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  7. Effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-digital image correlation measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Bing

    2015-11-25

    In laboratory and especially non-laboratory stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) applications, the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the cameras used in the system may change slightly due to the camera warm-up effect and possible variations in ambient temperature. Because these camera parameters are generally calibrated once prior to measurements and considered to be unaltered during the whole measurement period, the changes in these parameters unavoidably induce displacement/strain errors. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements is investigated experimentally. To quantify the errors associated with camera or ambient temperature changes, surface displacements and strains of a stationary optical quartz glass plate with near-zero thermal expansion were continuously measured using a regular stereo-DIC system. The results confirm that (1) temperature variations in the cameras and ambient environment have a considerable influence on the displacements and strains measured by stereo-DIC due to the slightly altered extrinsic and intrinsic camera parameters; and (2) the corresponding displacement and strain errors correlate with temperature changes. For the specific stereo-DIC configuration used in this work, the temperature-induced strain errors were estimated to be approximately 30–50 με/°C. To minimize the adverse effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements, two simple but effective solutions are suggested.

  8. Effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-digital image correlation measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Bing; Shi, Wentao; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In laboratory and especially non-laboratory stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) applications, the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the cameras used in the system may change slightly due to the camera warm-up effect and possible variations in ambient temperature. Because these camera parameters are generally calibrated once prior to measurements and considered to be unaltered during the whole measurement period, the changes in these parameters unavoidably induce displacement/strain errors. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements is investigated experimentally. To quantify the errors associated with camera or ambient temperature changes, surface displacements and strains of a stationary optical quartz glass plate with near-zero thermal expansion were continuously measured using a regular stereo-DIC system. The results confirm that (1) temperature variations in the cameras and ambient environment have a considerable influence on the displacements and strains measured by stereo-DIC due to the slightly altered extrinsic and intrinsic camera parameters; and (2) the corresponding displacement and strain errors correlate with temperature changes. For the specific stereo-DIC configuration used in this work, the temperature-induced strain errors were estimated to be approximately 30–50 με/°C. To minimize the adverse effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements, two simple but effective solutions are suggested.

  9. Determining fast orientation changes of multi-spectral line cameras from the primary images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfeil, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Fast orientation changes of airborne and spaceborne line cameras cannot always be avoided. In such cases it is essential to measure them with high accuracy to ensure a good quality of the resulting imagery products. Several approaches exist to support the orientation measurement by using optical information received through the main objective/telescope. In this article an approach is proposed that allows the determination of non-systematic orientation changes between every captured line. It does not require any additional camera hardware or onboard processing capabilities but the payload images and a rough estimate of the camera's trajectory. The approach takes advantage of the typical geometry of multi-spectral line cameras with a set of linear sensor arrays for different spectral bands on the focal plane. First, homologous points are detected within the heavily distorted images of different spectral bands. With their help a connected network of geometrical correspondences can be built up. This network is used to calculate the orientation changes of the camera with the temporal and angular resolution of the camera. The approach was tested with an extensive set of aerial surveys covering a wide range of different conditions and achieved precise and reliable results.

  10. Radiation imaging with a new scintillator and a CMOS camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Pejchal, Jan; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, Jul (2015), C07015 ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillators * scintillation and light emission processes * image processin Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2015

  11. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, A., E-mail: daphne3h-aya@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohsuka, S. [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a {sup 137}Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources ({sup 22}Na [511 keV], {sup 137}Cs [662 keV], and {sup 54}Mn [834 keV]).

  12. From whole-body counting to imaging: The computer aided collimation gamma camera project (CACAO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Ballongue, P

    2000-07-01

    Whole-body counting is the method of choice for in vivo detection of contamination. To extend this well established method, the possible advantages of imaging radiocontaminants are examined. The use of the CACAO project is then studied. A comparison of simulated reconstructed images obtained by the CACAO project and by a conventional gamma camera used in nuclear medicine follows. Imaging a radionuclide contaminant with a geometrical sensitivity of 10{sup -2} seems possible in the near future. (author)

  13. From whole-body counting to imaging: The computer aided collimation gamma camera project (CACAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Ballongue, P.

    2000-01-01

    Whole-body counting is the method of choice for in vivo detection of contamination. To extend this well established method, the possible advantages of imaging radiocontaminants are examined. The use of the CACAO project is then studied. A comparison of simulated reconstructed images obtained by the CACAO project and by a conventional gamma camera used in nuclear medicine follows. Imaging a radionuclide contaminant with a geometrical sensitivity of 10 -2 seems possible in the near future. (author)

  14. Versatile ultrafast pump-probe imaging with high sensitivity CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril , Thomas; Klieber , Christoph; Temnov , Vasily; Huntzinger , Jean-Roch; Anane , Abdelmadjid

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A powerful imaging technique based on femtosecond time-resolved measurements with a high dynamic range, commercial CCD camera is presented. Ultrafast phenomena induced by a femtosecond laser pump are visualized through the lock-in type acquisition of images recorded by a femtosecond laser probe. This technique allows time-resolved measurements of laser excited phenomena at multiple probe wavelengths (spectrometer mode) or conventional imaging of the sample surface (ima...

  15. Camac interface for digitally recording infrared camera images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument has been built to store the digital signals from a modified imaging infrared scanner directly in a digital memory. This procedure avoids the signal-to-noise degradation and dynamic range limitations associated with successive analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversions and the analog recording method normally used to store data from the scanner. This technique also allows digital data processing methods to be applied directly to recorded data and permits processing and image reconstruction to be done using either a mainframe or a microcomputer. If a suitable computer and CAMAC-based data collection system are already available, digital storage of up to 12 scanner images can be implemented for less than $1750 in materials cost. Each image is stored as a frame of 60 x 80 eight-bit pixels, with an acquisition rate of one frame every 16.7 ms. The number of frames stored is limited only by the available memory. Initially, data processing for this equipment was done on a VAX 11-780, but images may also be displayed on the screen of a microcomputer. Software for setting the displayed gray scale, generating contour plots and false-color displays, and subtracting one image from another (e.g., background suppression) has been developed for IBM-compatible personal computers

  16. Camera Concepts for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuk Otte, Adam

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a camera that detects and records the Cherenkov-light flashes from air showers. The camera is comprised of a pixelated focal plane of blue sensitive and fast (nanosecond) photon detectors that detect the photon signal and convert it into an electrical one. The incorporation of trigger electronics and signal digitization into the camera are under study. Given the size of AGIS, the camera must be reliable, robust, and cost effective. We are investigating several directions that include innovative technologies such as Geiger-mode avalanche-photodiodes as a possible detector and switched capacitor arrays for the digitization.

  17. Ultrahigh sensitivity endoscopic camera using a new CMOS image sensor: providing with clear images under low illumination in addition to fluorescent images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hisae; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshiyuki; Fukuyo, Tsuneo; Chiba, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We developed a new ultrahigh-sensitive CMOS camera using a specific sensor that has a wide range of spectral sensitivity characteristics. The objective of this study is to present our updated endoscopic technology that has successfully integrated two innovative functions; ultrasensitive imaging as well as advanced fluorescent viewing. Two different experiments were conducted. One was carried out to evaluate the function of the ultrahigh-sensitive camera. The other was to test the availability of the newly developed sensor and its performance as a fluorescence endoscope. In both studies, the distance from the endoscopic tip to the target was varied and those endoscopic images in each setting were taken for further comparison. In the first experiment, the 3-CCD camera failed to display the clear images under low illumination, and the target was hardly seen. In contrast, the CMOS camera was able to display the targets regardless of the camera-target distance under low illumination. Under high illumination, imaging quality given by both cameras was quite alike. In the second experiment as a fluorescence endoscope, the CMOS camera was capable of clearly showing the fluorescent-activated organs. The ultrahigh sensitivity CMOS HD endoscopic camera is expected to provide us with clear images under low illumination in addition to the fluorescent images under high illumination in the field of laparoscopic surgery.

  18. Speed of sound and photoacoustic imaging with an optical camera based ultrasound detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2017-07-01

    CCD camera based optical ultrasound detection is a promising alternative approach for high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging (PAI). To fully exploit its potential and to achieve an image resolution SOS) in the image reconstruction algorithm. Hence, in the proposed work the idea and a first implementation are shown how speed of sound imaging can be added to a previously developed camera based PAI setup. The current setup provides SOS-maps with a spatial resolution of 2 mm and an accuracy of the obtained absolute SOS values of about 1%. The proposed dual-modality setup has the potential to provide highly resolved and perfectly co-registered 3D photoacoustic and SOS images.

  19. Camera sensor arrangement for crop/weed detection accuracy in agronomic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Juan; Guerrero, José Miguel; Montalvo, Martín; Emmi, Luis; Guijarro, María; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2013-04-02

    In Precision Agriculture, images coming from camera-based sensors are commonly used for weed identification and crop line detection, either to apply specific treatments or for vehicle guidance purposes. Accuracy of identification and detection is an important issue to be addressed in image processing. There are two main types of parameters affecting the accuracy of the images, namely: (a) extrinsic, related to the sensor's positioning in the tractor; (b) intrinsic, related to the sensor specifications, such as CCD resolution, focal length or iris aperture, among others. Moreover, in agricultural applications, the uncontrolled illumination, existing in outdoor environments, is also an important factor affecting the image accuracy. This paper is exclusively focused on two main issues, always with the goal to achieve the highest image accuracy in Precision Agriculture applications, making the following two main contributions: (a) camera sensor arrangement, to adjust extrinsic parameters and (b) design of strategies for controlling the adverse illumination effects.

  20. Gamma camera with an original system of scintigraphic image printing incorporated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, G.

    A new gamma camera has been developed, using Anger's Principle to localise the scintillations and incorporating the latest improvements which give a standard of efficiency at present competitive for this kind of apparatus. In the general design of the system special care was devoted to its ease of employment and above all to the production of high-quality scintigraphic images, the recording of images obtained from the gamma camera posing a problem to which a solution is proposed. This consists in storing all the constituent data of an image in a cell matrix of format similar to the scope of the object, the superficial information density of the image being represented by the cell contents. When the examination is finished a special printer supplies a 35x43 cm 2 document in colour on paper, or in black and white on radiological film, at 2:1 or 1:1 magnifications. The laws of contrast representation by the colours or shades of grey are chosen a posteriori according to the organ examined. Documents of the same quality as those so far supplied by a rectilinear scintigraph are then obtained with the gamma camera, which offers its own advantages in addition. The first images acquired in vivo with the whole system, gamma camera plus printer, are presented [fr

  1. RELATIVE PANORAMIC CAMERA POSITION ESTIMATION FOR IMAGE-BASED VIRTUAL REALITY NETWORKS IN INDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nakagawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Image-based virtual reality (VR is a virtual space generated with panoramic images projected onto a primitive model. In imagebased VR, realistic VR scenes can be generated with lower rendering cost, and network data can be described as relationships among VR scenes. The camera network data are generated manually or by an automated procedure using camera position and rotation data. When panoramic images are acquired in indoor environments, network data should be generated without Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS positioning data. Thus, we focused on image-based VR generation using a panoramic camera in indoor environments. We propose a methodology to automate network data generation using panoramic images for an image-based VR space. We verified and evaluated our methodology through five experiments in indoor environments, including a corridor, elevator hall, room, and stairs. We confirmed that our methodology can automatically reconstruct network data using panoramic images for image-based VR in indoor environments without GNSS position data.

  2. X-ray topography with scintillators coupled to image intensifiers or camera tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvais, Yves; Mathiot, Alain.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of imaging topographic figures in real time by using a thin scintillator coupled to either a high-gain image intensifier or a camera tube is investigated. The camera tube must have a high gain because of the low photon fluxes that are encountered in practice, and because of the relatively low quantum yield of thin phosphors. With conventional X-ray generators, the resolution is photon-noise limited. With more powerful generators like synchrotrons, real-time imaging appears possible, and the resolution is limited by the modulation transfer function of the image tube. Higher resolution can be reached by increasing the magnification between the screen and the image tube. When doing so, the input field is reduced and thinner phosphor screens must be used, resulting in a lower yield. Each time the magnification is doubled, the minimum required photon flux is multiplier by about 8, so that the advantages of increasing the magnification are rapidly limited, so far as real-time imaging is concerned. Because image tube resolution is mainly limited by the modulation transfer function of the phosphor for image intensifiers, and by that of the target for camera tubes, improvement of photocathode resolution can be obtained by magnifying electron optics. A zooming electron optic would permit the field and the resolution of the tube to be adapted to the observed subject. Unfortunately such tubes do not exist at present for this type of application, and in the required size

  3. Super-resolution processing for pulsed neutron imaging system using a high-speed camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Ken; Kai, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Segawa, Mariko; Mochiki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution and center-of-gravity processing improve the resolution of neutron-transmitted images. These processing methods calculate the center-of-gravity pixel or sub-pixel of the neutron point converted into light by a scintillator. The conventional neutron-transmitted image is acquired using a high-speed camera by integrating many frames when a transmitted image with one frame is not provided. It succeeds in acquiring the transmitted image and calculating a spectrum by integrating frames of the same energy. However, because a high frame rate is required for neutron resonance absorption imaging, the number of pixels of the transmitted image decreases, and the resolution decreases to the limit of the camera performance. Therefore, we attempt to improve the resolution by integrating the frames after applying super-resolution or center-of-gravity processing. The processed results indicate that center-of-gravity processing can be effective in pulsed-neutron imaging with a high-speed camera. In addition, the results show that super-resolution processing is effective indirectly. A project to develop a real-time image data processing system has begun, and this system will be used at J-PARC in JAEA. (author)

  4. A survey of images of a phantom produced by radioisotope scanners and cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A working party of the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) concerned with the assessment of performance of radioisotope-imaging equipment designed a test pattern called the Williams Phantom. The criteria and design are discussed. It consists of four 'cold' and four 'hot' areas. One Williams Phantom was sent to each radioisotope-imaging centre in Great Britain: the images produced were sent to the DHSS. The variation in image quality was large. A comprehensive sample of the images of the phantom produced on a variety of radioisotope scanners and γ cameras is presented to illustrate a number of general observations made by the working party. (U.K.)

  5. Investigation of an Autofocusing Method for Visible Aerial Cameras Based on Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the autofocusing in aerial camera, an autofocusing system is established and its characteristics such as working principle and optical-mechanical structure and focus evaluation function are investigated. The reason for defocusing in aviation camera is analyzed and several autofocusing methods along with appropriate focus evaluation functions are introduced based on the image processing techniques. The proposed autofocusing system is designed and implemented using two CMOS detectors. The experiment results showed that the proposed method met the aviation camera focusing accuracy requirement, and a maximum focusing error of less than half of the focus depth is achieved. The system designed in this paper can find the optical imaging focal plane in real-time; as such, this novel design has great potential in practical engineering, especially aerospace applications.

  6. The image camera of the 17 m diameter air Cherenkov telescope MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ostankov, A P

    2001-01-01

    The image camera of the 17 m diameter MAGIC telescope, an air Cherenkov telescope currently under construction to be installed at the Canary island La Palma, is described. The main goal of the experiment is to cover the unexplored energy window from approx 10 to approx 300 GeV in gamma-ray astrophysics. In its first phase with a classical PMT camera the MAGIC telescope is expected to reach an energy threshold of approx 30 GeV. The operational conditions, the special characteristics of the developed PMTs and their use with light concentrators, the fast signal transfer scheme using analog optical links, the trigger and DAQ organization as well as image reconstruction strategy are described. The different paths being explored towards future camera improvements, in particular the constraints in using silicon avalanche photodiodes and GaAsP hybrid photodetectors in air Cherenkov telescopes are discussed.

  7. Low-complexity camera digital signal imaging for video document projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Po-Shien

    2011-04-01

    We present high-performance and low-complexity algorithms for real-time camera imaging applications. The main functions of the proposed camera digital signal processing (DSP) involve color interpolation, white balance, adaptive binary processing, auto gain control, and edge and color enhancement for video projection systems. A series of simulations demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good image quality while keeping computation cost and memory requirements low. On the basis of the proposed algorithms, the cost-effective hardware core is developed using Verilog HDL. The prototype chip has been verified with one low-cost programmable device. The real-time camera system can achieve 1270 × 792 resolution with the combination of extra components and can demonstrate each DSP function.

  8. High image quality sub 100 picosecond gated framing camera development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Wiedwald, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    A major challenge for laser fusion is the study of the symmetry and hydrodynamic stability of imploding fuel capsules. Framed x-radiographs of 10-100 ps duration, excellent image quality, minimum geometrical distortion (< 1%), dynamic range greater than 1000, and more than 200 x 200 pixels are required for this application. Recent progress on a gated proximity focused intensifier which meets these requirements is presented

  9. Implementation of an IMU Aided Image Stacking Algorithm in a Digital Camera for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audi, Ahmad; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Meynard, Christophe; Thom, Christian

    2017-07-18

    Images acquired with a long exposure time using a camera embedded on UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) exhibit motion blur due to the erratic movements of the UAV. The aim of the present work is to be able to acquire several images with a short exposure time and use an image processing algorithm to produce a stacked image with an equivalent long exposure time. Our method is based on the feature point image registration technique. The algorithm is implemented on the light-weight IGN (Institut national de l'information géographique) camera, which has an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) sensor and an SoC (System on Chip)/FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array). To obtain the correct parameters for the resampling of the images, the proposed method accurately estimates the geometrical transformation between the first and the N -th images. Feature points are detected in the first image using the FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment Test) detector, then homologous points on other images are obtained by template matching using an initial position benefiting greatly from the presence of the IMU sensor. The SoC/FPGA in the camera is used to speed up some parts of the algorithm in order to achieve real-time performance as our ultimate objective is to exclusively write the resulting image to save bandwidth on the storage device. The paper includes a detailed description of the implemented algorithm, resource usage summary, resulting processing time, resulting images and block diagrams of the described architecture. The resulting stacked image obtained for real surveys does not seem visually impaired. An interesting by-product of this algorithm is the 3D rotation estimated by a photogrammetric method between poses, which can be used to recalibrate in real time the gyrometers of the IMU. Timing results demonstrate that the image resampling part of this algorithm is the most demanding processing task and should also be accelerated in the FPGA in future work.

  10. Implementation of an IMU Aided Image Stacking Algorithm in a Digital Camera for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Audi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Images acquired with a long exposure time using a camera embedded on UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles exhibit motion blur due to the erratic movements of the UAV. The aim of the present work is to be able to acquire several images with a short exposure time and use an image processing algorithm to produce a stacked image with an equivalent long exposure time. Our method is based on the feature point image registration technique. The algorithm is implemented on the light-weight IGN (Institut national de l’information géographique camera, which has an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit sensor and an SoC (System on Chip/FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array. To obtain the correct parameters for the resampling of the images, the proposed method accurately estimates the geometrical transformation between the first and the N-th images. Feature points are detected in the first image using the FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment Test detector, then homologous points on other images are obtained by template matching using an initial position benefiting greatly from the presence of the IMU sensor. The SoC/FPGA in the camera is used to speed up some parts of the algorithm in order to achieve real-time performance as our ultimate objective is to exclusively write the resulting image to save bandwidth on the storage device. The paper includes a detailed description of the implemented algorithm, resource usage summary, resulting processing time, resulting images and block diagrams of the described architecture. The resulting stacked image obtained for real surveys does not seem visually impaired. An interesting by-product of this algorithm is the 3D rotation estimated by a photogrammetric method between poses, which can be used to recalibrate in real time the gyrometers of the IMU. Timing results demonstrate that the image resampling part of this algorithm is the most demanding processing task and should also be accelerated in the FPGA in future work.

  11. Combined IR imaging-neural network method for the estimation of internal temperature in cooked chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Juan G.; Tao, Yang; Xin, Hongwei

    2000-11-01

    A noninvasive method for the estimation of internal temperature in chicken meat immediately following cooking is proposed. The external temperature from IR images was correlated with measured internal temperature through a multilayer neural network. To provide inputs for the network, time series experiments were conducted to obtain simultaneous observations of internal and external temperatures immediately after cooking during the cooling process. An IR camera working at the spectral band of 3.4 to 5.0 micrometers registered external temperature distributions without the interference of close-to-oven environment, while conventional thermocouples registered internal temperatures. For an internal temperature at a given time, simultaneous and lagged external temperature observations were used as the input of the neural network. Based on practical and statistical considerations, a criterion is established to reduce the nodes in the neural network input. The combined method was able to estimate internal temperature for times between 0 and 540 s within a standard error of +/- 1.01 degree(s)C, and within an error of +/- 1.07 degree(s)C for short times after cooking (3 min), with two thermograms at times t and t+30s. The method has great potential for monitoring of doneness of chicken meat in conveyor belt type cooking and can be used as a platform for similar studies in other food products.

  12. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer

  13. Searching for transits in the Wide Field Camera Transit Survey with difference-imaging light curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zendejas, Dominguez J.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R.; Birkby, J.L.; Hodgkin, S.; Kovács, G.; Pinfield, D.; Sipocz, B.; Barrado, D.; Bender, R.; Burgo, del C.; Cappetta, M.; Martín, E.; Nefs, B.; Riffeser, A.; Steele, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera Transit Survey is a pioneer program aiming at for searching extra-solar planets in the near-infrared. The images from the survey are processed by a data reduction pipeline, which uses aperture photometry to construct the light curves. We produce an alternative set of light

  14. X-ray framing cameras for > 5 keV imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landen, O.L.; Bell, P.M.; Costa, R.; Kalantar, D.H.; Bradley, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent and proposed improvements in spatial resolution, temporal resolution, contrast, and detection efficiency for x-ray framing cameras are discussed in light of present and future laser-plasma diagnostic needs. In particular, improvements in image contrast above hard x-ray background levels is demonstrated by using high aspect ratio tapered pinholes

  15. A System for Acquisition, Processing and Visualization of Image Time Series from Multiple Camera Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Melih Tanis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A system for multiple camera networks is proposed for continuous monitoring of ecosystems by processing image time series. The system is built around the Finnish Meteorological Image PROcessing Toolbox (FMIPROT, which includes data acquisition, processing and visualization from multiple camera networks. The toolbox has a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI for which only minimal computer knowledge and skills are required to use it. Images from camera networks are acquired and handled automatically according to the common communication protocols, e.g., File Transfer Protocol (FTP. Processing features include GUI based selection of the region of interest (ROI, automatic analysis chain, extraction of ROI based indices such as the green fraction index (GF, red fraction index (RF, blue fraction index (BF, green-red vegetation index (GRVI, and green excess (GEI index, as well as a custom index defined by a user-provided mathematical formula. Analysis results are visualized on interactive plots both on the GUI and hypertext markup language (HTML reports. The users can implement their own developed algorithms to extract information from digital image series for any purpose. The toolbox can also be run in non-GUI mode, which allows running series of analyses in servers unattended and scheduled. The system is demonstrated using an environmental camera network in Finland.

  16. A pin diode x-ray camera for laser fusion diagnostic imaging: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An x-ray camera has been constructed and tested for diagnostic imaging of laser fusion targets at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) of the University of Rochester. The imaging detector, developed by the Hughes Aircraft Company, is a germanium PIN diode array of 10 x 64 separate elements which are bump bonded to a silicon readout chip containing a separate low noise amplifier for each pixel element. The camera assembly consists of a pinhole alignment mechanism, liquid nitrogen cryostat with detector mount and a thin beryllium entrance window, and a shielded rack containing the analog and digital electronics for operations. This x-ray camera has been tested on the OMEGA laser target chamber, the primary laser target facility of LLE, and operated via an Ethernet link to a SUN Microsystems workstation. X-ray images of laser targets are presented. The successful operation of this particular x-ray camera is a demonstration of the viability of the hybrid detector technology for future imaging and spectroscopic applications. This work was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a project of the National Laser Users Facility (NLUF)

  17. THERMAL EFFECTS ON CAMERA FOCAL LENGTH IN MESSENGER STAR CALIBRATION AND ORBITAL IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Burmeister

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyse images taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENviorment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER spacecraft for the camera’s thermal response in the harsh thermal environment near Mercury. Specifically, we study thermally induced variations in focal length of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS. Within the several hundreds of images of star fields, the Wide Angle Camera (WAC typically captures up to 250 stars in one frame of the panchromatic channel. We measure star positions and relate these to the known star coordinates taken from the Tycho-2 catalogue. We solve for camera pointing, the focal length parameter and two non-symmetrical distortion parameters for each image. Using data from the temperature sensors on the camera focal plane we model a linear focal length function in the form of f(T = A0 + A1 T. Next, we use images from MESSENGER’s orbital mapping mission. We deal with large image blocks, typically used for the production of a high-resolution digital terrain models (DTM. We analyzed images from the combined quadrangles H03 and H07, a selected region, covered by approx. 10,600 images, in which we identified about 83,900 tiepoints. Using bundle block adjustments, we solved for the unknown coordinates of the control points, the pointing of the camera – as well as the camera’s focal length. We then fit the above linear function with respect to the focal plane temperature. As a result, we find a complex response of the camera to thermal conditions of the spacecraft. To first order, we see a linear increase by approx. 0.0107 mm per degree temperature for the Narrow-Angle Camera (NAC. This is in agreement with the observed thermal response seen in images of the panchromatic channel of the WAC. Unfortunately, further comparisons of results from the two methods, both of which use different portions of the available image data, are limited. If leaving uncorrected, these effects may pose significant difficulties in

  18. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  19. Iterative Refinement of Transmission Map for Stereo Image Defogging Using a Dual Camera Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heegwang Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the stereo imaging-based image enhancement approach has attracted increasing attention in the field of video analysis. This paper presents a dual camera-based stereo image defogging algorithm. Optical flow is first estimated from the stereo foggy image pair, and the initial disparity map is generated from the estimated optical flow. Next, an initial transmission map is generated using the initial disparity map. Atmospheric light is then estimated using the color line theory. The defogged result is finally reconstructed using the estimated transmission map and atmospheric light. The proposed method can refine the transmission map iteratively. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully remove fog without color distortion. The proposed method can be used as a pre-processing step for an outdoor video analysis system and a high-end smartphone with a dual camera system.

  20. Iterative Refinement of Transmission Map for Stereo Image Defogging Using a Dual Camera Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heegwang; Park, Jinho; Park, Hasil; Paik, Joonki

    2017-12-09

    Recently, the stereo imaging-based image enhancement approach has attracted increasing attention in the field of video analysis. This paper presents a dual camera-based stereo image defogging algorithm. Optical flow is first estimated from the stereo foggy image pair, and the initial disparity map is generated from the estimated optical flow. Next, an initial transmission map is generated using the initial disparity map. Atmospheric light is then estimated using the color line theory. The defogged result is finally reconstructed using the estimated transmission map and atmospheric light. The proposed method can refine the transmission map iteratively. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully remove fog without color distortion. The proposed method can be used as a pre-processing step for an outdoor video analysis system and a high-end smartphone with a dual camera system.

  1. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  2. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Brian W., E-mail: brian.miller@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R. [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  4. Mixel camera--a new push-broom camera concept for high spatial resolution keystone-free hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Gudrun; Fridman, Andrei

    2013-05-06

    Current high-resolution push-broom hyperspectral cameras introduce keystone errors to the captured data. Efforts to correct these errors in hardware severely limit the optical design, in particular with respect to light throughput and spatial resolution, while at the same time the residual keystone often remains large. The mixel camera solves this problem by combining a hardware component--an array of light mixing chambers--with a mathematical method that restores the hyperspectral data to its keystone-free form, based on the data that was recorded onto the sensor with large keystone. A Virtual Camera software, that was developed specifically for this purpose, was used to compare the performance of the mixel camera to traditional cameras that correct keystone in hardware. The mixel camera can collect at least four times more light than most current high-resolution hyperspectral cameras, and simulations have shown that the mixel camera will be photon-noise limited--even in bright light--with a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to traditional cameras. A prototype has been built and is being tested.

  5. The visible intensified cameras for plasma imaging in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cal, E. de la; Carralero, D.; Pablos, J.L. de; Alonso, A.; Rios, L.; Garcia Sanchez, P.; Hidalgo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Visible cameras are widely used in fusion experiments for diagnosis and for machine safety issues. They are generally used to monitor the plasma emission, but are also sensible to surface Blackbody radiation and Bremsstrahlung. Fast or high speed cameras capable of operating in the 10 5 frames per second speed range are today commercially available and offer the opportunity to plasma fusion researchers of two-dimensional (2D) imaging of fast phenomena such as turbulence, ELMs, disruptions, dust, etc. The tracking of these fast phenomena requires short exposure times down to the μ s range and the light intensity can be often near the signal to noise ratio limit especially in low plasma emission regions such as the far SOL Additionally, when using interference filters to monitor, e.g. impurity line emission, the photon flux is strongly reduced and the emission cannot be imaged at high speed. Therefore, the use of image intensifiers that amplify the light intensity onto the camera sensor can be of great help. The present work describes the use of intensifiers in the visible fast cameras of TJ-II stellarator. We have achieved spectroscopic plasma imaging of filtered impurity atomic line emission at short exposure times down to the 10 μ s range depending on atomic line and concentration. Additionally, plasma movies at velocities of 2x10 5 frames per second near the camera operation limit can be recorded with exposure times well below 1 μ s with sufficient signal to noise ratio. Although an increasing degradation of the image quality appears when raising the light amplification, an effective gain of up to two orders of magnitude of the light intensity is feasible for many applications (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. The visible intensified cameras for plasma imaging in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal, E. de la; Carralero, D.; Pablos, J.L. de; Alonso, A.; Rios, L.; Garcia Sanchez, P.; Hidalgo, C. (Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion Euratom-Ciemat, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid)

    2011-09-15

    Visible cameras are widely used in fusion experiments for diagnosis and for machine safety issues. They are generally used to monitor the plasma emission, but are also sensible to surface Blackbody radiation and Bremsstrahlung. Fast or high speed cameras capable of operating in the 10{sup 5} frames per second speed range are today commercially available and offer the opportunity to plasma fusion researchers of two-dimensional (2D) imaging of fast phenomena such as turbulence, ELMs, disruptions, dust, etc. The tracking of these fast phenomena requires short exposure times down to the {mu} s range and the light intensity can be often near the signal to noise ratio limit especially in low plasma emission regions such as the far SOL Additionally, when using interference filters to monitor, e.g. impurity line emission, the photon flux is strongly reduced and the emission cannot be imaged at high speed. Therefore, the use of image intensifiers that amplify the light intensity onto the camera sensor can be of great help. The present work describes the use of intensifiers in the visible fast cameras of TJ-II stellarator. We have achieved spectroscopic plasma imaging of filtered impurity atomic line emission at short exposure times down to the 10 {mu} s range depending on atomic line and concentration. Additionally, plasma movies at velocities of 2x10{sup 5} frames per second near the camera operation limit can be recorded with exposure times well below 1 {mu} s with sufficient signal to noise ratio. Although an increasing degradation of the image quality appears when raising the light amplification, an effective gain of up to two orders of magnitude of the light intensity is feasible for many applications (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzheng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS CMOS image sensor (CIS with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB. The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  8. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-02-08

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  9. Results with the UKIRT infrared camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mclean, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in focal plane array technology have made an immense impact on infrared astronomy. Results from the commissioning of the first infrared camera on UKIRT (the world's largest IR telescope) are presented. The camera, called IRCAM 1, employs the 62 x 58 InSb DRO array from SBRC in an otherwise general purpose system which is briefly described. Several imaging modes are possible including staring, chopping and a high-speed snapshot mode. Results to be presented include the first true high resolution images at IR wavelengths of the entire Orion nebula

  10. X-ray imaging of JET. A design study for a streak camera application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Hobby, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    A single dimensional imaging system is proposed which will image a strip of the JET plasma up to 320 times per shot with a time resolution of better than 50 μs using the bremsstrahlung X-rays. The images are obtained by means of a pinhole camera followed by an X-ray image intensifier system the output of which is in turn digitised by a photodiode array. The information is stored digitally in a fast memory and is immediately available for display or analysis. (author)

  11. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufu Qu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles’ camera (UAVs and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth–map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  12. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yufu; Huang, Jianyu; Zhang, Xuan

    2018-01-14

    In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles' camera (UAVs) and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth-map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  13. Preliminary Experience with Small Animal SPECT Imaging on Clinical Gamma Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional lack of techniques suitable for in vivo imaging has induced a great interest in molecular imaging for preclinical research. Nevertheless, its use spreads slowly due to the difficulties in justifying the high cost of the current dedicated preclinical scanners. An alternative for lowering the costs is to repurpose old clinical gamma cameras to be used for preclinical imaging. In this paper we assess the performance of a portable device, that is, working coupled to a single-head clinical gamma camera, and we present our preliminary experience in several small animal applications. Our findings, based on phantom experiments and animal studies, provided an image quality, in terms of contrast-noise trade-off, comparable to dedicated preclinical pinhole-based scanners. We feel that our portable device offers an opportunity for recycling the widespread availability of clinical gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments to be used in small animal SPECT imaging and we hope that it can contribute to spreading the use of preclinical imaging within institutions on tight budgets.

  14. Performance characteristics of a small animal PET camera for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, D.L.; Reader, A.J.; Julyan, P.J.; Zweit, J.; Jeavons, A.P.; Jones, T.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a novel type of animal PET camera, the quad High-Density Avalanche Chamber (HIDAC) was assessed for a non-rotating 16-module system. Spatial resolution was 1.0 mm, and invariant within a standard deviation ≤5%. Absolute sensitivity was 0.95%, and the scatter-background corrected sensitivity was 0.75%. The count rate capability was linear at typical activities used in animal imaging, with a 20% loss at 11.5 MBq. The camera demonstrates small regions of radiotracer uptake with excellent detail in the mouse

  15. System for whole body imaging and count profiling with a scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, E.; Cooke, M.B.D.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of and apparatus for the radionuclide imaging of the whole body of a patient using an unmodified scintillation camera which permits a patient to be continuously moved under or over the stationary camera face along one axis at a time, parallel passes being made to increase the dimension of the other axis. The system includes a unique electrical circuit which makes it possible to digitally generate new matrix coordinates by summing the coordinates of a first fixed reference frame and the coordinates of a second moving reference frame. 19 claims, 7 figures

  16. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Camera Electronics Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Bechtol, K.; Buehler, R.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Hanna, D.; Horan, D.; Humensky, B.; Karlsson, N.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R.; Otte, N.; Quinn, J.; Schroedter, M.; Swordy, S.; Wagner, R.; Wakely, S.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D.; Camera Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    AGIS, a next-generation imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) array, aims to achieve a sensitivity level of about one milliCrab for gamma-ray observations in the energy band of 50 GeV to 100 TeV. Achieving this level of performance will require on the order of 50 telescopes with perhaps as many as 1M total electronics channels. The larger scale of AGIS requires a very different approach from the currently operating IACTs, with lower-cost and lower-power electronics incorporated into camera modules designed for high reliability and easy maintenance. Here we present the concept and development status of the AGIS camera electronics.

  17. A G-APD based Camera for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Commichau, S.; Commichau, V.; Dorner, D.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; Gunten, H. von; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Koehne, J.-H.; Kraehenbuehl, T.; Kranich, D.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) for Gamma-ray astronomy are presently using photomultiplier tubes as photo sensors. Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) promise an improvement in sensitivity and, important for this application, ease of construction, operation and ruggedness. G-APDs have proven many of their features in the laboratory, but a qualified assessment of their performance in an IACT camera is best undertaken with a prototype. This paper describes the design and construction of a full-scale camera based on G-APDs realized within the FACT project (First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope).

  18. ITEM-QM solutions for EM problems in image reconstruction exemplary for the Compton Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Pauli, Josef; Anton, G

    2002-01-01

    Imaginary time expectation maximation (ITEM), a new algorithm for expectation maximization problems based on the quantum mechanics energy minimalization via imaginary (euclidian) time evolution is presented. Both (the algorithm as well as the implementation (http://www.johannes-pauli.de/item/index.html) are published under the terms of General GNU public License (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html). Due to its generality ITEM is applicable to various image reconstruction problems like CT, PET, SPECT, NMR, Compton Camera, tomosynthesis as well as any other energy minimization problem. The choice of the optimal ITEM Hamiltonian is discussed and numerical results are presented for the Compton Camera.

  19. Applications of multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation to tomography and image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. R.

    1981-06-01

    Multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation was introduced in the field of emission tomography. This collimation process simultaneously produces several images covering a limited angular range, which may then be recombined to obtain tomographic slices of the object imaged. A possible method for improving the images obtained by this technique by combining two multi-pinhole views taken 90 deg apart was investigated. Collimators were designed and built both for tomography and imaging tablet disintegration, and computer programs were written to reconstruct the images by simple backprojection and by filtered backprojection. The use of multi-pinhole collimators to image the disintegration of tablets in vivo was clearly demonstrated. Phantom tests done in vitro were capable of imaging defects as small as 5 sq mm, while images made with real tablets both in vitro and in vivo readily showed the onset and progress of the tablet disintegration.

  20. Determination of the sun area in sky camera images using radiometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.; Batlles, F.J.; Villarroel, C.; Ayala, Rosa; Burgaleta, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have developed a model for the determination of solar area on sky camera imagery. • An estimation of direct normal irradiance is given for cloudless sky. • The presented model resolves the problem of saturation of pixels in the solar area. • The model allows to identify clouds in the solar area of sky camera imagery. • Developed model has an 92% of agreement between processed and observed images. - Abstract: Due to the increasing development and expansion of solar power plants, it is necessary to have complete and absolute knowledge of all factors and occurrences that can affect the dynamics and quality of their production. The importance of clouds in the attenuation of solar radiation is a transcendental and decisive factor in the incident energy from the sun. Detecting clouds with sky cameras is a very problematic issue. The captured solar area in the images exhibits a pronounced saturation of pixels as a consequence of sunlight penetration and the appearance of various atmospheric features. The present article reports a methodology based on radiometric data that is used to determine the causes of saturation in the solar zone and its vicinity on images from a TSI-880 model sky camera. The correct method identifies the presence or absence of clouds in the saturated zone with 92% success

  1. Slit-Slat Collimator Equipped Gamma Camera for Whole-Mouse SPECT-CT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liji; Peter, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    A slit-slat collimator is developed for a gamma camera intended for small-animal imaging (mice). The tungsten housing of a roof-shaped collimator forms a slit opening, and the slats are made of lead foils separated by sparse polyurethane material. Alignment of the collimator with the camera's pixelated crystal is performed by adjusting a micrometer screw while monitoring a Co-57 point source for maximum signal intensity. For SPECT, the collimator forms a cylindrical field-of-view enabling whole mouse imaging with transaxial magnification and constant on-axis sensitivity over the entire axial direction. As the gamma camera is part of a multimodal imaging system incorporating also x-ray CT, five parameters corresponding to the geometric displacements of the collimator as well as to the mechanical co-alignment between the gamma camera and the CT subsystem are estimated by means of bimodal calibration sources. To illustrate the performance of the slit-slat collimator and to compare its performance to a single pinhole collimator, a Derenzo phantom study is performed. Transaxial resolution along the entire long axis is comparable to a pinhole collimator of same pinhole diameter. Axial resolution of the slit-slat collimator is comparable to that of a parallel beam collimator. Additionally, data from an in-vivo mouse study are presented.

  2. Infrared Imaging for Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles; Hazzard, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    Based on detecting long-wavelength infrared (IR) radiation emitted by the subject, IR imaging shows temperature distribution instantaneously and heat flow dynamically. As a picture is worth a thousand words, an IR camera has great potential in teaching heat transfer, which is otherwise invisible. The idea of using IR imaging in teaching was first…

  3. TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera-II on the 3.6 m Devasthal Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Sharma, S.; Pandey, A. K.; Kumar, Brijesh; Ghosh, Arpan; Ninan, J. P.; Naik, M. B.; D’Costa, S. L. A.; Poojary, S. S.; Sandimani, P. R.; Shah, H.; Krishna Reddy, B.; Pandey, S. B.; Chand, H.

    Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) Near Infrared Imaging Camera-II (TIRCAM2) is a closed-cycle Helium cryo-cooled imaging camera equipped with a Raytheon 512×512 pixels InSb Aladdin III Quadrant focal plane array (FPA) having sensitivity to photons in the 1-5μm wavelength band. In this paper, we present the performance of the camera on the newly installed 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) based on the calibration observations carried out during 2017 May 11-14 and 2017 October 7-31. After the preliminary characterization, the camera has been released to the Indian and Belgian astronomical community for science observations since 2017 May. The camera offers a field-of-view (FoV) of ˜86.5‧‧×86.5‧‧ on the DOT with a pixel scale of 0.169‧‧. The seeing at the telescope site in the near-infrared (NIR) bands is typically sub-arcsecond with the best seeing of ˜0.45‧‧ realized in the NIR K-band on 2017 October 16. The camera is found to be capable of deep observations in the J, H and K bands comparable to other 4m class telescopes available world-wide. Another highlight of this camera is the observational capability for sources up to Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W1-band (3.4μm) magnitudes of 9.2 in the narrow L-band (nbL; λcen˜ 3.59μm). Hence, the camera could be a good complementary instrument to observe the bright nbL-band sources that are saturated in the Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) ([3.6] ≲ 7.92 mag) and the WISE W1-band ([3.4] ≲ 8.1 mag). Sources with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 3.3μm are also detected. Details of the observations and estimated parameters are presented in this paper.

  4. New knowledge about the bremsstrahlung image of strontium-89 with the scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Hiroto; Hirase, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Strontium-89 ( 89 Sr) chloride has been used to treat metastases in bone. A method to visualize the distribution of 89 Sr chloride with a scintillation camera was developed in 1996. Studies using bremsstrahlung imaging have shown that 89 Sr accumulates in bone and that the bremsstrahlung generated from biological tissue surrounding bone does not exceed 30 keV. However, it was not clear how low-energy bremsstrahlung from bone can produce peak energy levels of around 75 keV. We speculate that a different (unidentified) factor is involved. The energy spectrum of an 89 Sr source was acquired with a scintillation camera with or without a low-to-medium-energy general-purpose collimator. The energy window was set at 20-650 keV for 4 windows. A 50-mm thick acrylic block was placed between the scintillation camera and the 89 Sr source to exclude the effects of bremsstrahlung. The energy spectrum of 89 Sr covered with lead was acquired using the scintillation camera without a collimator. With the collimator the energy spectrum curve was similar to that without the 50 mm of acrylic. The energy spectrum curve showed peaks at about 75, 170, and 520 keV. Without the collimator the energy spectrum showed a similar curve but no peak at 75 keV peak. The curve was similar to that obtained with the scintillation camera and the collimator; however, the curve obtained when the 89 Sr source had been placed in a lead container was similar to that obtained when the source was unshielded, and the collimator was not attached to the scintillation camera. If bremsstrahlung of 89 Sr produces an image, a low-energy spectrum region should decrease when acrylic is placed between the 89 Sr source and the scintillation camera. However, similar curves were obtained both with the acrylic in place and without the acrylic. Therefore, we believe that the radiation detected by the scintillation camera was not bremsstrahlung due to the beta rays of 89 Sr. Most 89 Sr preparations are contaminated by 85 Sr

  5. Computational imaging with multi-camera time-of-flight systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shrestha, Shikhar

    2016-07-11

    Depth cameras are a ubiquitous technology used in a wide range of applications, including robotic and machine vision, human computer interaction, autonomous vehicles as well as augmented and virtual reality. In this paper, we explore the design and applications of phased multi-camera time-of-flight (ToF) systems. We develop a reproducible hardware system that allows for the exposure times and waveforms of up to three cameras to be synchronized. Using this system, we analyze waveform interference between multiple light sources in ToF applications and propose simple solutions to this problem. Building on the concept of orthogonal frequency design, we demonstrate state-of-the-art results for instantaneous radial velocity capture via Doppler time-of-flight imaging and we explore new directions for optically probing global illumination, for example by de-scattering dynamic scenes and by non-line-of-sight motion detection via frequency gating. © 2016 ACM.

  6. Remote classification from an airborne camera using image super-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Matthew; Katsaggelos, Aggelos

    2017-02-01

    The image processing technique known as super-resolution (SR), which attempts to increase the effective pixel sampling density of a digital imager, has gained rapid popularity over the last decade. The majority of literature focuses on its ability to provide results that are visually pleasing to a human observer. In this paper, we instead examine the ability of SR to improve the resolution-critical capability of an imaging system to perform a classification task from a remote location, specifically from an airborne camera. In order to focus the scope of the study, we address and quantify results for the narrow case of text classification. However, we expect the results generalize to a large set of related, remote classification tasks. We generate theoretical results through simulation, which are corroborated by experiments with a camera mounted on a DJI Phantom 3 quadcopter.

  7. SINGLE IMAGE CAMERA CALIBRATION IN CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR SOLDER JOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Printed Circuit Boards (PCB play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  8. Camera-Based Lock-in and Heterodyne Carrierographic Photoluminescence Imaging of Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Q. M.; Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.

    2015-06-01

    Carrierographic (spectrally gated photoluminescence) imaging of a crystalline silicon wafer using an InGaAs camera and two spread super-bandgap illumination laser beams is introduced in both low-frequency lock-in and high-frequency heterodyne modes. Lock-in carrierographic images of the wafer up to 400 Hz modulation frequency are presented. To overcome the frame rate and exposure time limitations of the camera, a heterodyne method is employed for high-frequency carrierographic imaging which results in high-resolution near-subsurface information. The feasibility of the method is guaranteed by the typical superlinearity behavior of photoluminescence, which allows one to construct a slow enough beat frequency component from nonlinear mixing of two high frequencies. Intensity-scan measurements were carried out with a conventional single-element InGaAs detector photocarrier radiometry system, and the nonlinearity exponent of the wafer was found to be around 1.7. Heterodyne images of the wafer up to 4 kHz have been obtained and qualitatively analyzed. With the help of the complementary lock-in and heterodyne modes, camera-based carrierographic imaging in a wide frequency range has been realized for fundamental research and industrial applications toward in-line nondestructive testing of semiconductor materials and devices.

  9. Convolutional Neural Network-Based Human Detection in Nighttime Images Using Visible Light Camera Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Hong, Hyung Gil; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-05-08

    Because intelligent surveillance systems have recently undergone rapid growth, research on accurately detecting humans in videos captured at a long distance is growing in importance. The existing research using visible light cameras has mainly focused on methods of human detection for daytime hours when there is outside light, but human detection during nighttime hours when there is no outside light is difficult. Thus, methods that employ additional near-infrared (NIR) illuminators and NIR cameras or thermal cameras have been used. However, in the case of NIR illuminators, there are limitations in terms of the illumination angle and distance. There are also difficulties because the illuminator power must be adaptively adjusted depending on whether the object is close or far away. In the case of thermal cameras, their cost is still high, which makes it difficult to install and use them in a variety of places. Because of this, research has been conducted on nighttime human detection using visible light cameras, but this has focused on objects at a short distance in an indoor environment or the use of video-based methods to capture multiple images and process them, which causes problems related to the increase in the processing time. To resolve these problems, this paper presents a method that uses a single image captured at night on a visible light camera to detect humans in a variety of environments based on a convolutional neural network. Experimental results using a self-constructed Dongguk night-time human detection database (DNHD-DB1) and two open databases (Korea advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST) and computer vision center (CVC) databases), as well as high-accuracy human detection in a variety of environments, show that the method has excellent performance compared to existing methods.

  10. Convolutional Neural Network-Based Human Detection in Nighttime Images Using Visible Light Camera Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hyun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Because intelligent surveillance systems have recently undergone rapid growth, research on accurately detecting humans in videos captured at a long distance is growing in importance. The existing research using visible light cameras has mainly focused on methods of human detection for daytime hours when there is outside light, but human detection during nighttime hours when there is no outside light is difficult. Thus, methods that employ additional near-infrared (NIR illuminators and NIR cameras or thermal cameras have been used. However, in the case of NIR illuminators, there are limitations in terms of the illumination angle and distance. There are also difficulties because the illuminator power must be adaptively adjusted depending on whether the object is close or far away. In the case of thermal cameras, their cost is still high, which makes it difficult to install and use them in a variety of places. Because of this, research has been conducted on nighttime human detection using visible light cameras, but this has focused on objects at a short distance in an indoor environment or the use of video-based methods to capture multiple images and process them, which causes problems related to the increase in the processing time. To resolve these problems, this paper presents a method that uses a single image captured at night on a visible light camera to detect humans in a variety of environments based on a convolutional neural network. Experimental results using a self-constructed Dongguk night-time human detection database (DNHD-DB1 and two open databases (Korea advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST and computer vision center (CVC databases, as well as high-accuracy human detection in a variety of environments, show that the method has excellent performance compared to existing methods.

  11. SU-E-E-06: Teaching About the Gamma Camera and Ultrasound Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, M; Spiro, A [Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vogel, R [Iowa Doppler Products, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Donaldson, N; Gosselin, C [Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Instructional modules on applications of physics in medicine are being developed. The target audience consists of students who have had an introductory undergraduate physics course. This presentation will concentrate on an active learning approach to teach the principles of the gamma camera. There will also be a description of an apparatus to teach ultrasound imaging. Methods: Since a real gamma camera is not feasible in the undergraduate classroom, we have developed two types of optical apparatus that teach the main principles. To understand the collimator, LEDS mimic gamma emitters in the body, and the photons pass through an array of tubes. The distance, spacing, diameter, and length of the tubes can be varied to understand the effect upon the resolution of the image. To determine the positions of the gamma emitters, a second apparatus uses a movable green laser, fluorescent plastic in lieu of the scintillation crystal, acrylic rods that mimic the PMTs, and a photodetector to measure the intensity. The position of the laser is calculated with a centroid algorithm.To teach the principles of ultrasound imaging, we are using the sound head and pulser box of an educational product, variable gain amplifier, rotation table, digital oscilloscope, Matlab software, and phantoms. Results: Gamma camera curriculum materials have been implemented in the classroom at Loyola in 2014 and 2015. Written work shows good knowledge retention and a more complete understanding of the material. Preliminary ultrasound imaging materials were run in 2015. Conclusion: Active learning methods add another dimension to descriptions in textbooks and are effective in keeping the students engaged during class time. The teaching apparatus for the gamma camera and ultrasound imaging can be expanded to include more cases, and could potentially improve students’ understanding of artifacts and distortions in the images.

  12. SU-E-E-06: Teaching About the Gamma Camera and Ultrasound Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M; Spiro, A; Vogel, R; Donaldson, N; Gosselin, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Instructional modules on applications of physics in medicine are being developed. The target audience consists of students who have had an introductory undergraduate physics course. This presentation will concentrate on an active learning approach to teach the principles of the gamma camera. There will also be a description of an apparatus to teach ultrasound imaging. Methods: Since a real gamma camera is not feasible in the undergraduate classroom, we have developed two types of optical apparatus that teach the main principles. To understand the collimator, LEDS mimic gamma emitters in the body, and the photons pass through an array of tubes. The distance, spacing, diameter, and length of the tubes can be varied to understand the effect upon the resolution of the image. To determine the positions of the gamma emitters, a second apparatus uses a movable green laser, fluorescent plastic in lieu of the scintillation crystal, acrylic rods that mimic the PMTs, and a photodetector to measure the intensity. The position of the laser is calculated with a centroid algorithm.To teach the principles of ultrasound imaging, we are using the sound head and pulser box of an educational product, variable gain amplifier, rotation table, digital oscilloscope, Matlab software, and phantoms. Results: Gamma camera curriculum materials have been implemented in the classroom at Loyola in 2014 and 2015. Written work shows good knowledge retention and a more complete understanding of the material. Preliminary ultrasound imaging materials were run in 2015. Conclusion: Active learning methods add another dimension to descriptions in textbooks and are effective in keeping the students engaged during class time. The teaching apparatus for the gamma camera and ultrasound imaging can be expanded to include more cases, and could potentially improve students’ understanding of artifacts and distortions in the images

  13. Camera selection for real-time in vivo radiation treatment verification systems using Cherenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W; Gladstone, David J

    2015-02-01

    To identify achievable camera performance and hardware needs in a clinical Cherenkov imaging system for real-time, in vivo monitoring of the surface beam profile on patients, as novel visual information, documentation, and possible treatment verification for clinicians. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), charge-coupled device (CCD), intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and electron multiplying-intensified charge coupled device (EM-ICCD) cameras were investigated to determine Cherenkov imaging performance in a clinical radiotherapy setting, with one emphasis on the maximum supportable frame rate. Where possible, the image intensifier was synchronized using a pulse signal from the Linac in order to image with room lighting conditions comparable to patient treatment scenarios. A solid water phantom irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam was imaged by the cameras to evaluate the maximum frame rate for adequate Cherenkov detection. Adequate detection was defined as an average electron count in the background-subtracted Cherenkov image region of interest in excess of 0.5% (327 counts) of the 16-bit maximum electron count value. Additionally, an ICCD and an EM-ICCD were each used clinically to image two patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy to compare clinical advantages and limitations of each system. Intensifier-coupled cameras were required for imaging Cherenkov emission on the phantom surface with ambient room lighting; standalone CMOS and CCD cameras were not viable. The EM-ICCD was able to collect images from a single Linac pulse delivering less than 0.05 cGy of dose at 30 frames/s (fps) and pixel resolution of 512 × 512, compared to an ICCD which was limited to 4.7 fps at 1024 × 1024 resolution. An intensifier with higher quantum efficiency at the entrance photocathode in the red wavelengths [30% quantum efficiency (QE) vs previous 19%] promises at least 8.6 fps at a resolution of 1024 × 1024 and lower monetary cost than the EM-ICCD. The

  14. Hyperspectral imaging using a color camera and its application for pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Gamble, Gary

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the results of a feasibility study for the development of a hyperspectral image recovery (reconstruction) technique using a RGB color camera and regression analysis in order to detect and classify colonies of foodborne pathogens. The target bacterial pathogens were the six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) grown in Petri dishes of Rainbow agar. The purpose of the feasibility study was to evaluate whether a DSLR camera (Nikon D700) could be used to predict hyperspectral images in the wavelength range from 400 to 1,000 nm and even to predict the types of pathogens using a hyperspectral STEC classification algorithm that was previously developed. Unlike many other studies using color charts with known and noise-free spectra for training reconstruction models, this work used hyperspectral and color images, separately measured by a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer and the DSLR color camera. The color images were calibrated (i.e. normalized) to relative reflectance, subsampled and spatially registered to match with counterpart pixels in hyperspectral images that were also calibrated to relative reflectance. Polynomial multivariate least-squares regression (PMLR) was previously developed with simulated color images. In this study, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was also evaluated as a spectral recovery technique to minimize multicollinearity and overfitting. The two spectral recovery models (PMLR and PLSR) and their parameters were evaluated by cross-validation. The QR decomposition was used to find a numerically more stable solution of the regression equation. The preliminary results showed that PLSR was more effective especially with higher order polynomial regressions than PMLR. The best classification accuracy measured with an independent test set was about 90%. The results suggest the potential of cost-effective color imaging using hyperspectral image

  15. Color Segmentation Approach of Infrared Thermography Camera Image for Automatic Fault Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Hari Nugroho; Ari Satmoko; Budhi Cynthia Dewi

    2007-01-01

    Predictive maintenance based on fault diagnosis becomes very important in current days to assure the availability and reliability of a system. The main purpose of this research is to configure a computer software for automatic fault diagnosis based on image model acquired from infrared thermography camera using color segmentation approach. This technique detects hot spots in equipment of the plants. Image acquired from camera is first converted to RGB (Red, Green, Blue) image model and then converted to CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Key for Black) image model. Assume that the yellow color in the image represented the hot spot in the equipment, the CMYK image model is then diagnosed using color segmentation model to estimate the fault. The software is configured utilizing Borland Delphi 7.0 computer programming language. The performance is then tested for 10 input infrared thermography images. The experimental result shows that the software capable to detect the faulty automatically with performance value of 80 % from 10 sheets of image input. (author)

  16. Image features dependant correlation-weighting function for efficient PRNU based source camera identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Mayank; Gupta, Bhupendra

    2018-04-01

    For source camera identification (SCI), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU) has been widely used as the fingerprint of the camera. The PRNU is extracted from the image by applying a de-noising filter then taking the difference between the original image and the de-noised image. However, it is observed that intensity-based features and high-frequency details (edges and texture) of the image, effect quality of the extracted PRNU. This effects correlation calculation and creates problems in SCI. For solving this problem, we propose a weighting function based on image features. We have experimentally identified image features (intensity and high-frequency contents) effect on the estimated PRNU, and then develop a weighting function which gives higher weights to image regions which give reliable PRNU and at the same point it gives comparatively less weights to the image regions which do not give reliable PRNU. Experimental results show that the proposed weighting function is able to improve the accuracy of SCI up to a great extent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of dark current images of a CMOS camera during gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Náfrádi, Gábor, E-mail: nafradi@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Czifrus, Szabolcs, E-mail: czifrus@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kocsis, Gábor, E-mail: kocsis.gabor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Pór, Gábor, E-mail: por@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Szepesi, Tamás, E-mail: szepesi.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, Sándor, E-mail: zoletnik.sandor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation tolerance of a fast framing CMOS camera EDICAM examined. • We estimate the expected gamma dose and spectrum of EDICAM with MCNP. • We irradiate EDICAM by 23.5 Gy in 70 min in a fission rector. • Dose rate normalised average brightness of frames grows linearly with the dose. • Dose normalised average brightness of frames follows the dose rate time evolution. -- Abstract: We report on the behaviour of the dark current images of the Event Detection Intelligent Camera (EDICAM) when placed into an irradiation field of gamma rays. EDICAM is an intelligent fast framing CMOS camera operating in the visible spectral range, which is designed for the video diagnostic system of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out in order to estimate the expected gamma spectrum and dose for an entire year of operation in W7-X. EDICAM was irradiated in a pure gamma field in the Training Reactor of BME with a dose of approximately 23.5 Gy in 1.16 h. During the irradiation, numerous frame series were taken with the camera with exposure times 20 μs, 50 μs, 100 μs, 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms. EDICAM withstood the irradiation, but suffered some dynamic range degradation. The behaviour of the dark current images during irradiation is described in detail. We found that the average brightness of dark current images depends on the total ionising dose that the camera is exposed to and the dose rate as well as on the applied exposure times.

  18. Innovative monolithic detector for tri-spectral (THz, IR, Vis) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocas, S.; Perenzoni, M.; Massari, N.; Simoens, F.; Meilhan, J.; Rabaud, W.; Martin, S.; Delplanque, B.; Imperinetti, P.; Goudon, V.; Vialle, C.; Arnaud, A.

    2012-10-01

    Fusion of multispectral images has been explored for many years for security and used in a number of commercial products. CEA-Leti and FBK have developed an innovative sensor technology that gathers monolithically on a unique focal plane arrays, pixels sensitive to radiation in three spectral ranges that are terahertz (THz), infrared (IR) and visible. This technology benefits of many assets for volume market: compactness, full CMOS compatibility on 200mm wafers, advanced functions of the CMOS read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and operation at room temperature. The ROIC houses visible APS diodes while IR and THz detections are carried out by microbolometers collectively processed above the CMOS substrate. Standard IR bolometric microbridges (160x160 pixels) are surrounding antenna-coupled bolometers (32X32 pixels) built on a resonant cavity customized to THz sensing. This paper presents the different technological challenges achieved in this development and first electrical and sensitivity experimental tests.

  19. Full image-processing pipeline in field-programmable gate array for a small endoscopic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Sheikh Shanawaz; Sousa, L. Natércia; Ferreira, Nuno Fábio; Sousa, Ricardo M.; Santos, Joao; Wäny, Martin; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopy is an imaging procedure used for diagnosis as well as for some surgical purposes. The camera used for the endoscopy should be small and able to produce a good quality image or video, to reduce discomfort of the patients, and to increase the efficiency of the medical team. To achieve these fundamental goals, a small endoscopy camera with a footprint of 1 mm×1 mm×1.65 mm is used. Due to the physical properties of the sensors and human vision system limitations, different image-processing algorithms, such as noise reduction, demosaicking, and gamma correction, among others, are needed to faithfully reproduce the image or video. A full image-processing pipeline is implemented using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to accomplish a high frame rate of 60 fps with minimum processing delay. Along with this, a viewer has also been developed to display and control the image-processing pipeline. The control and data transfer are done by a USB 3.0 end point in the computer. The full developed system achieves real-time processing of the image and fits in a Xilinx Spartan-6LX150 FPGA.

  20. LOCAL BINARIZATION FOR DOCUMENT IMAGES CAPTURED BY CAMERAS WITH DECISION TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Jawas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Character recognition in a document image captured by a digital camera requires a good binary image as the input for the separation the text from the background. Global binarization method does not provide such good separation because of the problem of uneven levels of lighting in images captured by cameras. Local binarization method overcomes the problem but requires a method to partition the large image into local windows properly. In this paper, we propose a local binariation method with dynamic image partitioning using integral image and decision tree for the binarization decision. The integral image is used to estimate the number of line in the document image. The number of line in the document image is used to devide the document into local windows. The decision tree makes a decision for threshold in every local window. The result shows that the proposed method can separate the text from the background better than using global thresholding with the best OCR result of the binarized image is 99.4%. Pengenalan karakter pada sebuah dokumen citra yang diambil menggunakan kamera digital membutuhkan citra yang terbinerisasi dengan baik untuk memisahkan antara teks dengan background. Metode binarisasi global tidak memberikan hasil pemisahan yang bagus karena permasalahan tingkat pencahayaan yang tidak seimbang pada citra hasil kamera digital. Metode binarisasi lokal dapat mengatasi permasalahan tersebut namun metode tersebut membutuhkan metode untuk membagi citra ke dalam bagian-bagian window lokal. Pada paper ini diusulkan sebuah metode binarisasi lokal dengan pembagian citra secara dinamis menggunakan integral image dan decision tree untuk keputusan binarisasi lokalnya. Integral image digunakan untuk mengestimasi jumlah baris teks dalam dokumen citra. Jumlah baris tersebut kemudian digunakan untuk membagi citra dokumen ke dalam window lokal. Keputusan nilai threshold untuk setiap window lokal ditentukan dengan decisiontree. Hasilnya menunjukkan

  1. Value of coincidence gamma camera PET for diagnosing head and neck tumors: functional imaging and image coregistration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Hahn, K.

    2001-01-01

    54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors (30 m, 24 f, age: 32-67 years) were examined using dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first (Siemens ECAT Exact HR+) followed by a scan on the coincidence gamma camera PET (Picker Prism 2000 XP-PCD, Marconi Axis g-PET 2 AZ). Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, coincidence gamma camera PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Marconi MX 8000). Image coregistration was performed on an Odyssey workstation (Marconi). All findings have been verified by the gold standard histology or in case of negative histology by follow-up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using coincidence gamma camera PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with coincidence gamma camera PET and in 15/18 with CT. False-positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and hybrid PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastatic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with coincidence gamma camera PET elsewhere in the body (lung: n = 7, bone: n = 3, liver: n = 1). Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. (orig.) [de

  2. 2-D image diagnostic technique for edge turbulence using fast cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, N.; Mizuuchi, T.; Feng, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Fast cameras are powerful tool to visualize the edge turbulence in peripheral plasmas. Under Bi-directional collaborations recently in Heliotron J and GAMMA10 filamentary structures along the magnetic field line were firstly observed with GPI (gas puff imaging) by fast camera. In both machines the filamentary structures had similar stripe pattern in the images and simultaneous measurements of the ion saturation current by electrostatic probes show that the filamentary structures were relatively higher electron density/temperature regions in peripheral plasmas. It is not sufficient to conclude both filamentary structures are the same, however, these phenomena were thought to be related to the energy confinement. Thus the physics mechanism should be solved in the near future. (author)

  3. Optical character recognition of camera-captured images based on phase features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Escobar, Julia; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays most of digital information is obtained using mobile devices specially smartphones. In particular, it brings the opportunity for optical character recognition in camera-captured images. For this reason many recognition applications have been recently developed such as recognition of license plates, business cards, receipts and street signal; document classification, augmented reality, language translator and so on. Camera-captured images are usually affected by geometric distortions, nonuniform illumination, shadow, noise, which make difficult the recognition task with existing systems. It is well known that the Fourier phase contains a lot of important information regardless of the Fourier magnitude. So, in this work we propose a phase-based recognition system exploiting phase-congruency features for illumination/scale invariance. The performance of the proposed system is tested in terms of miss classifications and false alarms with the help of computer simulation.

  4. A curve fitting method for extrinsic camera calibration from a single image of a cylindrical object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, A W; Zagar, B G

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the process of optical steel coil quality assurance is to measure the proportions of width and radius of steel coils as well as the relative position and orientation of the camera. This work attempts to estimate these extrinsic parameters from single images by using the cylindrical coil itself as the calibration target. Therefore, an adaptive least-squares algorithm is applied to fit parametrized curves to the detected true coil outline in the acquisition. The employed model allows for strictly separating the intrinsic and the extrinsic parameters. Thus, the intrinsic camera parameters can be calibrated beforehand using available calibration software. Furthermore, a way to segment the true coil outline in the acquired images is motivated. The proposed optimization method yields highly accurate results and can be generalized even to measure other solids which cannot be characterized by the identification of simple geometric primitives. (paper)

  5. A curve fitting method for extrinsic camera calibration from a single image of a cylindrical object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, A. W.; Zagar, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    An important step in the process of optical steel coil quality assurance is to measure the proportions of width and radius of steel coils as well as the relative position and orientation of the camera. This work attempts to estimate these extrinsic parameters from single images by using the cylindrical coil itself as the calibration target. Therefore, an adaptive least-squares algorithm is applied to fit parametrized curves to the detected true coil outline in the acquisition. The employed model allows for strictly separating the intrinsic and the extrinsic parameters. Thus, the intrinsic camera parameters can be calibrated beforehand using available calibration software. Furthermore, a way to segment the true coil outline in the acquired images is motivated. The proposed optimization method yields highly accurate results and can be generalized even to measure other solids which cannot be characterized by the identification of simple geometric primitives.

  6. Technique for improving the quality of images from digital cameras using ink-jet printers and smoothed RGB transfer curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Nitin; Grim, John F.; O'Hara, James E.

    1998-04-01

    The digital camera market is growing at an explosive rate. At the same time, the quality of photographs printed on ink- jet printers continues to improve. Most of the consumer cameras are designed with the monitor as the target output device and ont the printer. When a user is printing his images from a camera, he/she needs to optimize the camera and printer combination in order to maximize image quality. We describe the details of one such method for improving image quality using a AGFA digital camera and an ink jet printer combination. Using Adobe PhotoShop, we generated optimum red, green and blue transfer curves that match the scene content to the printers output capabilities. Application of these curves to the original digital image resulted in a print with more shadow detail, no loss of highlight detail, a smoother tone scale, and more saturated colors. The image also exhibited an improved tonal scale and visually more pleasing images than those captured and printed without any 'correction'. While we report the results for one camera-printer combination we tested this technique on numbers digital cameras and printer combinations and in each case produced a better looking image. We also discuss the problems we encountered in implementing this technique.

  7. Exploration of the Infrared Sensitivity for a ZnSe Electrode of an IR Image Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, H. Hilal

    2018-05-01

    Significant improvement has been carried out in the field of the II-VI group semiconductor device technology. Semiconductors based on the II-VI group are attractive due to their alternative uses for thermal imaging systems and photonic applications. This study focuses on experimental work on the optical, electrical and structural characterization of an infrared (IR) photodetector zinc selenide (ZnSe). In addition, the IR sensitivity of the ZnSe has primarily been investigated by exploiting the IR responses of the material for various gas pressures, p, and interelectrode distances, d, in the IR converter. The experimental findings include the results of plasma current and plasma discharge emission under various illumination conditions in the IR region. The electron density distributions inside the gas discharge gap have also been simulated in two-dimensional media. Experimentally, the current-voltage, current-time, and discharge light emission plots are produced for a wide experimental parameter range. Consequently, the structural and optical properties have been studied through atomic force microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy techniques to obtain a comprehensive knowledge of the material.

  8. Geiger-mode APD camera system for single-photon 3D LADAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Mark; Itzler, Mark A.; Chen, Jim; Owens, Mark; Patel, Ketan; Jiang, Xudong; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Rangwala, Sabbir

    2012-06-01

    The unparalleled sensitivity of 3D LADAR imaging sensors based on single photon detection provides substantial benefits for imaging at long stand-off distances and minimizing laser pulse energy requirements. To obtain 3D LADAR images with single photon sensitivity, we have demonstrated focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InGaAsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GmAPDs) optimized for use at either 1.06 μm or 1.55 μm. These state-of-the-art FPAs exhibit excellent pixel-level performance and the capability for 100% pixel yield on a 32 x 32 format. To realize the full potential of these FPAs, we have recently developed an integrated camera system providing turnkey operation based on FPGA control. This system implementation enables the extremely high frame-rate capability of the GmAPD FPA, and frame rates in excess of 250 kHz (for 0.4 μs range gates) can be accommodated using an industry-standard CameraLink interface in full configuration. Real-time data streaming for continuous acquisition of 2 μs range gate point cloud data with 13-bit time-stamp resolution at 186 kHz frame rates has been established using multiple solid-state storage drives. Range gate durations spanning 4 ns to 10 μs provide broad operational flexibility. The camera also provides real-time signal processing in the form of multi-frame gray-scale contrast images and single-frame time-stamp histograms, and automated bias control has been implemented to maintain a constant photon detection efficiency in the presence of ambient temperature changes. A comprehensive graphical user interface has been developed to provide complete camera control using a simple serial command set, and this command set supports highly flexible end-user customization.

  9. An Imaging Camera for Biomedical Application Based on Compton Scattering of Gamma Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we present the R&D of a Compton Camera (CC) for small object imaging. The CC concept requires two detectors to obtain the incoming direction of the gamma ray. This approach, sometimes named ``Electronic Collimation,'' differs from the usual technique that employs collimators for physically selecting gamma-rays of a given direction. This solution offers the advantage of much greater sensitivity and hence smaller doses. We propose a novel design, which uses two simila...

  10. Portable retinal imaging for eye disease screening using a consumer-grade digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Larichev, Andrey; Zamora, Gilberto; Soliz, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The development of affordable means to image the retina is an important step toward the implementation of eye disease screening programs. In this paper we present the i-RxCam, a low-cost, hand-held, retinal camera for widespread applications such as tele-retinal screening for eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, and age-related ocular diseases. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities. The i-RxCam uses a Nikon D3100 digital camera body. The camera has a CMOS sensor with 14.8 million pixels. We use a 50mm focal lens that gives a retinal field of view of 45 degrees. The internal autofocus can compensate for about 2D (diopters) of focusing error. The light source is an LED produced by Philips with a linear emitting area that is transformed using a light pipe to the optimal shape at the eye pupil, an annulus. To eliminate corneal reflex we use a polarization technique in which the light passes through a nano-wire polarizer plate. This is a novel type of polarizer featuring high polarization separation (contrast ratio of more than 1000) and very large acceptance angle (>45 degrees). The i-RxCam approach will yield a significantly more economical retinal imaging device that would allow mass screening of the at-risk population.

  11. An alternate way for image documentation in gamma camera processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.

    1980-01-01

    For documentation of images and curves generated by a gamma camera processing system a film exposure tool from a CT system was linked to the video monitor by use of a resistance bridge. The machine has a stock capacity of 100 plane films. For advantage there is no need for an interface, the complete information on the monitor is transferred to the plane film and compared to software controlled data output on printer or plotter the device is tremendously time saving. (orig.) [de

  12. Implementation of an image acquisition and processing system based on FlexRIO, CameraLink and areaDetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquembri, S.; Ruiz, M. [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Barrera, E., E-mail: eduardo.barrera@upm.es [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Sanz, D.; Bustos, A. [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Castro, R.; Vega, J. [National Fusion Laboratory, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The system presented acquires and process images from any CameraLink compliant camera. • The frame grabber implanted with FlexRIO technology have image time stamping and preprocessing capabilities. • The system is integrated into EPICS using areaDetector for a flexible configuration of image the acquisition and processing chain. • Is fully compatible with the architecture of the ITER Fast Controllers. - Abstract: Image processing systems are commonly used in current physics experiments, such as nuclear fusion experiments. These experiments usually require multiple cameras with different resolutions, framerates and, frequently, different software drivers. The integration of heterogeneous types of cameras without a unified hardware and software interface increases the complexity of the acquisition system. This paper presents the implementation of a distributed image acquisition and processing system for CameraLink cameras. This system implements a camera frame grabber using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), a reconfigurable hardware platform that allows for image acquisition and real-time preprocessing. The frame grabber is integrated into Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) using the areaDetector EPICS software module, which offers a common interface shared among tens of cameras to configure the image acquisition and process these images in a distributed control system. The use of areaDetector also allows the image processing to be parallelized and concatenated using: multiple computers; areaDetector plugins; and the areaDetector standard type for data, NDArrays. The architecture developed is fully compatible with ITER Fast Controllers and the entire system has been validated using a camera hardware simulator that stream videos from fusion experiment databases.

  13. Intercomparison of SO2 camera systems for imaging volcanic gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Campion, Robin; Mori, Toshiya; Smekens, Jean-François; Stebel, Kerstin; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Burton, Mike; Platt, Ulrich; Prata, Fred

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems are increasingly being used to image volcanic gas plumes. The ability to derive SO2 emission rates directly from the acquired imagery at high time resolution allows volcanic process studies that incorporate other high time-resolution datasets. Though the general principles behind the SO2 camera have remained the same for a number of years, recent advances in CCD technology and an improved understanding of the physics behind the measurements have driven a continuous evolution of the camera systems. Here we present an intercomparison of seven different SO2 cameras. In the first part of the experiment, the various technical designs are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of individual design options are considered. Though the ideal design was found to be dependent on the specific application, a number of general recommendations are made. Next, a time series of images recorded by all instruments at Stromboli Volcano (Italy) is compared. All instruments were easily able to capture SO2 clouds emitted from the summit vents. Quantitative comparison of the SO2 load in an individual cloud yielded an intra-instrument precision of about 12%. From the imagery, emission rates were then derived according to each group's standard retrieval process. A daily average SO2 emission rate of 61 ± 10 t/d was calculated. Due to differences in spatial integration methods and plume velocity determination, the time-dependent progression of SO2 emissions varied significantly among the individual systems. However, integration over distinct degassing events yielded comparable SO2 masses. Based on the intercomparison data, we find an approximate 1-sigma precision of 20% for the emission rates derived from the various SO2 cameras. Though it may still be improved in the future, this is currently within the typical accuracy of the measurement and is considered sufficient for most applications.

  14. Intercomparison of SO2 camera systems for imaging volcanic gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Campion, Robin; Mori, Toshiya; Smekens, Jean-Francois; Stebel, Kerstin; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Burton, Mike; Platt, Ulrich; Prata, Fred

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems are increasingly being used to image volcanic gas plumes. The ability to derive SO2 emission rates directly from the acquired imagery at high time resolution allows volcanic process studies that incorporate other high time-resolution datasets. Though the general principles behind the SO2 camera have remained the same for a number of years, recent advances in CCD technology and an improved understanding of the physics behind the measurements have driven a continuous evolution of the camera systems. Here we present an intercomparison of seven different SO2 cameras. In the first part of the experiment, the various technical designs are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of individual design options are considered. Though the ideal design was found to be dependent on the specific application, a number of general recommendations are made. Next, a time series of images recorded by all instruments at Stromboli Volcano (Italy) is compared. All instruments were easily able to capture SO2 clouds emitted from the summit vents. Quantitative comparison of the SO2 load in an individual cloud yielded an intra-instrument precision of about 12%. From the imagery, emission rates were then derived according to each group's standard retrieval process. A daily average SO2 emission rate of 61 ± 10 t/d was calculated. Due to differences in spatial integration methods and plume velocity determination, the time-dependent progression of SO2 emissions varied significantly among the individual systems. However, integration over distinct degassing events yielded comparable SO2 masses. Based on the intercomparison data, we find an approximate 1-sigma precision of 20% for the emission rates derived from the various SO2 cameras. Though it may still be improved in the future, this is currently within the typical accuracy of the measurement and is considered sufficient for most applications.

  15. Compact CdZnTe-Based Gamma Camera For Prostate Cancer Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Y.; Lall, T.; Tsui, B.; Yu, J.; Mahler, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Vaska, P.; DeGeronimo, G.; O'Connor, P.; Meinken, G.; Joyal, J.; Barrett, J.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Yang, G.; Pomper, M.; Cho, S.; Weisman, K.; Seo, Y.; Babich, J.; LaFrance, N.; James, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera

  16. Detector design issues for compact nuclear emission cameras dedicated to breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    Certain gamma ray and positron emitting radiotracers have shown great promise for use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Unfortunately, standard nuclear emission cameras (SPECT, PET) found in the clinic are not practical for breast imaging of these emissions due to inadequate spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity, large and awkward size, and relatively high cost per study. High spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity are needed for good lesion detectability. Due to these limitations of standard cameras, there has been recent research into the development of small, compact nuclear emission imagers dedicated for close-proximity breast imaging. The small detector head size means a variety of exotic detectors or collimators may be implemented to improve spatial and energy resolution and sensitivity performances at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we will present some of the compact gamma ray and annihilation photon imaging detector designs that have been proposed and/or developed for dedicated breast imaging. We will review the physics and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various detector configurations. Finally we will estimate the fundamental spatial resolution potential available with close-proximity nuclear emission imaging and discuss how one may approach those limits through proper detector design

  17. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mast cameras and Descent imager: Investigation and instrument descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Michal C.; Ravine, Michael A.; Caplinger, Michael A.; Tony Ghaemi, F.; Schaffner, Jacob A.; Maki, Justin N.; Bell, James F.; Cameron, James F.; Dietrich, William E.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Edwards, Laurence J.; Garvin, James B.; Hallet, Bernard; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Heydari, Ezat; Kah, Linda C.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Minitti, Michelle E.; Olson, Timothy S.; Parker, Timothy J.; Rowland, Scott K.; Schieber, Juergen; Sletten, Ron; Sullivan, Robert J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Aileen Yingst, R.; Duston, Brian M.; McNair, Sean; Jensen, Elsa H.

    2017-08-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mast camera and Descent Imager investigations were designed, built, and operated by Malin Space Science Systems of San Diego, CA. They share common electronics and focal plane designs but have different optics. There are two Mastcams of dissimilar focal length. The Mastcam-34 has an f/8, 34 mm focal length lens, and the M-100 an f/10, 100 mm focal length lens. The M-34 field of view is about 20° × 15° with an instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of 218 μrad; the M-100 field of view (FOV) is 6.8° × 5.1° with an IFOV of 74 μrad. The M-34 can focus from 0.5 m to infinity, and the M-100 from 1.6 m to infinity. All three cameras can acquire color images through a Bayer color filter array, and the Mastcams can also acquire images through seven science filters. Images are ≤1600 pixels wide by 1200 pixels tall. The Mastcams, mounted on the 2 m tall Remote Sensing Mast, have a 360° azimuth and 180° elevation field of regard. Mars Descent Imager is fixed-mounted to the bottom left front side of the rover at 66 cm above the surface. Its fixed focus lens is in focus from 2 m to infinity, but out of focus at 66 cm. The f/3 lens has a FOV of 70° by 52° across and along the direction of motion, with an IFOV of 0.76 mrad. All cameras can acquire video at 4 frames/second for full frames or 720p HD at 6 fps. Images can be processed using lossy Joint Photographic Experts Group and predictive lossless compression.

  18. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a collimation system for a gamma camera for use in nuclear medicine is described. When used with a 2-dimensional position sensitive radiation detector, the novel system can produce superior images than conventional cameras. The optimal thickness and positions of the collimators are derived mathematically. (U.K.)

  19. Application of real-time single camera SLAM technology for image-guided targeting in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yau-Zen; Hou, Jung-Fu; Tsao, Yi Hsiang; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an application of augmented reality technology for targeting tumors or anatomical structures inside the skull. The application is a combination of the technologies of MonoSLAM (Single Camera Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) and computer graphics. A stereo vision system is developed to construct geometric data of human face for registration with CT images. Reliability and accuracy of the application is enhanced by the use of fiduciary markers fixed to the skull. The MonoSLAM keeps track of the current location of the camera with respect to an augmented reality (AR) marker using the extended Kalman filter. The fiduciary markers provide reference when the AR marker is invisible to the camera. Relationship between the markers on the face and the augmented reality marker is obtained by a registration procedure by the stereo vision system and is updated on-line. A commercially available Android based tablet PC equipped with a 320×240 front-facing camera was used for implementation. The system is able to provide a live view of the patient overlaid by the solid models of tumors or anatomical structures, as well as the missing part of the tool inside the skull.

  20. Studies on a silicon-photomultiplier-based camera for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, C.; Corti, D.; De Angelis, A.; Doro, M.; Manea, C.; Mariotti, M.; Rando, R.; Reichardt, I.; Tescaro, D.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) represent a class of instruments which are dedicated to the ground-based observation of cosmic VHE gamma ray emission based on the detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced in the interaction of gamma rays with the Earth atmosphere. One of the key elements of such instruments is a pixelized focal-plane camera consisting of photodetectors. To date, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have been the common choice given their high photon detection efficiency (PDE) and fast time response. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as an alternative. This rapidly evolving technology has strong potential to become superior to that based on PMTs in terms of PDE, which would further improve the sensitivity of IACTs, and see a price reduction per square millimeter of detector area. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the focal-plane cameras of the MAGIC telescopes to probe this technology for IACTs with large focal plane cameras of an area of few square meters. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall MAGIC camera design using ray tracing simulations. We further present a comparative study of the overall light throughput based on Monte Carlo simulations and considering the properties of the major hardware elements of an IACT.

  1. Multi-exposure high dynamic range image synthesis with camera shake correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xudong; Chen, Yongfu; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2017-10-01

    Machine vision plays an important part in industrial online inspection. Owing to the nonuniform illuminance conditions and variable working distances, the captured image tends to be over-exposed or under-exposed. As a result, when processing the image such as crack inspection, the algorithm complexity and computing time increase. Multiexposure high dynamic range (HDR) image synthesis is used to improve the quality of the captured image, whose dynamic range is limited. Inevitably, camera shake will result in ghost effect, which blurs the synthesis image to some extent. However, existed exposure fusion algorithms assume that the input images are either perfectly aligned or captured in the same scene. These assumptions limit the application. At present, widely used registration based on Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is usually time consuming. In order to rapidly obtain a high quality HDR image without ghost effect, we come up with an efficient Low Dynamic Range (LDR) images capturing approach and propose a registration method based on ORiented Brief (ORB) and histogram equalization which can eliminate the illumination differences between the LDR images. The fusion is performed after alignment. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to illumination changes and local geometric distortion. Comparing with other exposure fusion methods, our method is more efficient and can produce HDR images without ghost effect by registering and fusing four multi-exposure images.

  2. Electron-tracking Compton gamma-ray camera for small animal and phantom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabuki, Shigeto, E-mail: kabuki@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j [Department of Physics, Gradulate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Hiroo [Department of Patho-functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Michiaki [Department of Physics, Gradulate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawashima, Hidekazu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ueda, Masashi [Radioisotopes Research Labaoratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kubo, Atsushi; Kunieda, Etuso; Nakahara, Tadaki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kohara, Ryota; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Shirahata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Etsuji [Application Development Office, Hitachi Medical Corporation, Chiba 277-0804 (Japan); Ogawa, Koichi [Department of Electronic Informatics, Faculty of Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for medical use. Our ETCC has a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300 keV) and wide field of view (3 sr), and thus has potential for advanced medical use. To evaluate the ETCC, we imaged the head (brain) and bladder of mice that had been administered with F-18-FDG. We also imaged the head and thyroid gland of mice using double tracers of F-18-FDG and I-131 ions.

  3. A gamma camera count rate saturation correction method for whole-body planar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Baechler, Sébastien; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Prideaux, Andrew R.; Esaias, Caroline E.; Reinhardt, Melvin; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Sgouros, George

    2010-02-01

    Whole-body (WB) planar imaging has long been one of the staple methods of dosimetry, and its quantification has been formalized by the MIRD Committee in pamphlet no 16. One of the issues not specifically addressed in the formalism occurs when the count rates reaching the detector are sufficiently high to result in camera count saturation. Camera dead-time effects have been extensively studied, but all of the developed correction methods assume static acquisitions. However, during WB planar (sweep) imaging, a variable amount of imaged activity exists in the detector's field of view as a function of time and therefore the camera saturation is time dependent. A new time-dependent algorithm was developed to correct for dead-time effects during WB planar acquisitions that accounts for relative motion between detector heads and imaged object. Static camera dead-time parameters were acquired by imaging decaying activity in a phantom and obtaining a saturation curve. Using these parameters, an iterative algorithm akin to Newton's method was developed, which takes into account the variable count rate seen by the detector as a function of time. The algorithm was tested on simulated data as well as on a whole-body scan of high activity Samarium-153 in an ellipsoid phantom. A complete set of parameters from unsaturated phantom data necessary for count rate to activity conversion was also obtained, including build-up and attenuation coefficients, in order to convert corrected count rate values to activity. The algorithm proved successful in accounting for motion- and time-dependent saturation effects in both the simulated and measured data and converged to any desired degree of precision. The clearance half-life calculated from the ellipsoid phantom data was calculated to be 45.1 h after dead-time correction and 51.4 h with no correction; the physical decay half-life of Samarium-153 is 46.3 h. Accurate WB planar dosimetry of high activities relies on successfully compensating

  4. Development of a Portable 3CCD Camera System for Multispectral Imaging of Biological Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoyoung; Park, Soo Hyun; Noh, Sang Ha; Lim, Jongguk; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the need for imaging devices capable of multispectral imaging beyond the visible region, to allow for quality and safety evaluations of agricultural commodities. Conventional multispectral imaging devices lack flexibility in spectral waveband selectivity for such applications. In this paper, a recently developed portable 3CCD camera with significant improvements over existing imaging devices is presented. A beam-splitter prism assembly for 3CCD was designed to accommodate three interference filters that can be easily changed for application-specific multispectral waveband selection in the 400 to 1000 nm region. We also designed and integrated electronic components on printed circuit boards with firmware programming, enabling parallel processing, synchronization, and independent control of the three CCD sensors, to ensure the transfer of data without significant delay or data loss due to buffering. The system can stream 30 frames (3-waveband images in each frame) per second. The potential utility of the 3CCD camera system was demonstrated in the laboratory for detecting defect spots on apples. PMID:25350510

  5. Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging in large tissue volumes using a gain-modulated ICCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Eppstein, Margaret J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Theru, Sangeeta; Thompson, Alan B; Gurfinkel, Michael; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2003-01-01

    A novel image-intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) imaging system has been developed to perform 3D fluorescence tomographic imaging in the frequency-domain using near-infrared contrast agents. The imager is unique since it (i) employs a large tissue-mimicking phantom, which is shaped and sized to resemble a female breast and part of the extended chest-wall region, and (ii) enables rapid data acquisition in the frequency-domain by using a gain-modulated ICCD camera. Diffusion model predictions are compared to experimental measurements using two different referencing schemes under two different experimental conditions of perfect and imperfect uptake of fluorescent agent into a target. From these experimental measurements, three-dimensional images of fluorescent absorption were reconstructed using a computationally efficient variant of the approximate extended Kalman filter algorithm. The current work represents the first time that 3D fluorescence-enhanced optical tomographic reconstructions have been achieved from experimental measurements of the time-dependent light propagation on a clinically relevant breast-shaped tissue phantom using a gain-modulated ICCD camera

  6. A Physical Model-based Correction for Charge Traps in the Hubble Space Telescope ’s Wide Field Camera 3 Near-IR Detector and Its Applications to Transiting Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yifan; Apai, Dániel; Schneider, Glenn [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lew, Ben W. P., E-mail: yzhou@as.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Science/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1640 E. University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-IR channel is extensively used in time-resolved observations, especially for transiting exoplanet spectroscopy as well as brown dwarf and directly imaged exoplanet rotational phase mapping. The ramp effect is the dominant source of systematics in the WFC3 for time-resolved observations, which limits its photometric precision. Current mitigation strategies are based on empirical fits and require additional orbits to help the telescope reach a thermal equilibrium . We show that the ramp-effect profiles can be explained and corrected with high fidelity using charge trapping theories. We also present a model for this process that can be used to predict and to correct charge trap systematics. Our model is based on a very small number of parameters that are intrinsic to the detector. We find that these parameters are very stable between the different data sets, and we provide best-fit values. Our model is tested with more than 120 orbits (∼40 visits) of WFC3 observations and is proved to be able to provide near photon noise limited corrections for observations made with both staring and scanning modes of transiting exoplanets as well as for starting-mode observations of brown dwarfs. After our model correction, the light curve of the first orbit in each visit has the same photometric precision as subsequent orbits, so data from the first orbit no longer need to be discarded. Near-IR arrays with the same physical characteristics (e.g., JWST/NIRCam ) may also benefit from the extension of this model if similar systematic profiles are observed.

  7. 200 ps FWHM and 100 MHz repetition rate ultrafast gated camera for optical medical functional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhring, Wilfried; Poulet, Patrick; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Zint, Virginie; Nouizi, Farouk; Dubois, Benoit; Hirschi, Werner

    2012-04-01

    The paper describes the realization of a complete optical imaging device to clinical applications like brain functional imaging by time-resolved, spectroscopic diffuse optical tomography. The entire instrument is assembled in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The resulting light pulses, at four wavelengths, are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera; there are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The very core of the intensified camera system is the image intensifier tube and its associated electrical pulse generator. The ultrafast generator produces 50 V pulses, at a repetition rate of 100 MHz and a width corresponding to the 200 ps requested gate. The photocathode and the Micro-Channel-Plate of the intensifier have been specially designed to enhance the electromagnetic wave propagation and reduce the power loss and heat that are prejudicial to the quality of the image. The whole instrumentation system is controlled by an FPGA based module. The timing of the light pulses and the photocathode gating is precisely adjustable with a step of 9 ps. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications.

  8. Modulation transfer function cascade model for a sampled IR imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, L; Cardone, G

    1991-05-01

    The performance of the infrared scanning radiometer (IRSR) is strongly stressed in convective heat transfer applications where high spatial frequencies in the signal that describes the thermal image are present. The need to characterize more deeply the system spatial resolution has led to the formulation of a cascade model for the evaluation of the actual modulation transfer function of a sampled IR imaging system. The model can yield both the aliasing band and the averaged modulation response for a general sampling subsystem. For a line scan imaging system, which is the case of a typical IRSR, a rule of thumb that states whether the combined sampling-imaging system is either imaging-dependent or sampling-dependent is proposed. The model is tested by comparing it with other noncascade models as well as by ad hoc measurements performed on a commercial digitized IRSR.

  9. The use of a sky camera for solar radiation estimation based on digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Montesinos, J.; Batlles, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The necessary search for a more sustainable global future means using renewable energy sources to generate pollutant-free electricity. CSP (Concentrated solar power) and PV (photovoltaic) plants are the systems most in demand for electricity production using solar radiation as the energy source. The main factors affecting final electricity generation in these plants are, among others, atmospheric conditions; therefore, knowing whether there will be any change in the solar radiation hitting the plant's solar field is of fundamental importance to CSP and PV plant operators in adapting the plant's operation mode to these fluctuations. Consequently, the most useful technology must involve the study of atmospheric conditions. This is the case for sky cameras, an emerging technology that allows one to gather sky information with optimal spatial and temporal resolution. Hence, in this work, a solar radiation estimation using sky camera images is presented for all sky conditions, where beam, diffuse and global solar radiation components are estimated in real-time as a novel way to evaluate the solar resource from a terrestrial viewpoint. - Highlights: • Using a sky camera, the solar resource has been estimated for one minute periods. • The sky images have been processed to estimate the solar radiation at pixel level. • The three radiation components have been estimated under all sky conditions. • Results have been presented for cloudless, partially-cloudy and overcast conditions. • For beam and global radiation, the nRMSE value is of about 11% under overcast skies.

  10. Quantitation of images from a multiwire camera for autoradiography of tritium-labelled substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockett, S.J.; Ramsden, D.B.; Bradwell, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has been shown that tritium-labelled substances in two-dimensional systems can be quantitated using a multiwire camera. Its accuracy has now been improved by correcting results for non-uniformity of response over the detection area. Uniformity was assessed by imaging plates of nominally uniform activity. The results were then used to correct images from plates containing tritium-labelled proteins using a computer program. Errors were reduced from 11.3 (+ -6.1) to 7.7 (+ - 2.8)% for standard sources and from 6.2 (+ - 1.8) to 1.9 (+ -0.6)% for a plate containing the labelled proteins. The conducting carbon layer covering the plate absorbed 36 (+ - 3)% of the tritium beta radiation and was estimated to be 85 nm in thickness. Quantitation of the labelled proteins by the camera gave a good correlation with protein content (chi-squared: 30-40%). The activities of the protein samples were measured to an accuracy of 10% by comparison with standard sources. These results indicate useful quantitation of tritiated compounds in two-dimensional media using the multiwire camera. (author)

  11. An energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera design for in vivo medical imaging of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohe, R.C.; Valentine, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    A Compton scatter camera (CSC) design is proposed for imaging radioisotopes used as biotracers. A clinical version may increase sensitivity by a factor of over 100, while maintaining or improving spatial resolution, as compared with existing Anger cameras that use lead collimators. This novel approach is based on using energy subtraction (ΔE = E 0 - E SC , where E 0 , ΔE, and E SC are the energy of the emitted gamma ray, the energy deposited by the initial Compton scatter, and the energy of the Compton scattered photon) to determine the amount of energy deposited in the primary system. The energy subtraction approach allows the requirement of high energy resolution to be placed on a secondary detector system instead of the primary detector system. Requiring primary system high energy resolution has significantly limited previous CSC designs for medical imaging applications. Furthermore, this approach is dependent on optimizing the camera design for data acquisition of gamma rays that undergo only one Compton scatter in a low-Z primary detector system followed by a total absorption of the Compton scattered photon in a high-Z secondary detector system. The proposed approach allows for a more compact primary detector system, a more simplified pulse processing interface, and a much less complicated detector cooling scheme as compared with previous CSC designs. Analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation results for some specific detector materials and geometries are presented

  12. IMAGE CAPTURE WITH SYNCHRONIZED MULTIPLE-CAMERAS FOR EXTRACTION OF ACCURATE GEOMETRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koehl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a project of recording and modelling tunnels, traffic circles and roads from multiple sensors. The aim is the representation and the accurate 3D modelling of a selection of road infrastructures as dense point clouds in order to extract profiles and metrics from it. Indeed, these models will be used for the sizing of infrastructures in order to simulate exceptional convoy truck routes. The objective is to extract directly from the point clouds the heights, widths and lengths of bridges and tunnels, the diameter of gyrating and to highlight potential obstacles for a convoy. Light, mobile and fast acquisition approaches based on images and videos from a set of synchronized sensors have been tested in order to obtain useable point clouds. The presented solution is based on a combination of multiple low-cost cameras designed on an on-boarded device allowing dynamic captures. The experimental device containing GoPro Hero4 cameras has been set up and used for tests in static or mobile acquisitions. That way, various configurations have been tested by using multiple synchronized cameras. These configurations are discussed in order to highlight the best operational configuration according to the shape of the acquired objects. As the precise calibration of each sensor and its optics are major factors in the process of creation of accurate dense point clouds, and in order to reach the best quality available from such cameras, the estimation of the internal parameters of fisheye lenses of the cameras has been processed. Reference measures were also realized by using a 3D TLS (Faro Focus 3D to allow the accuracy assessment.

  13. Image Capture with Synchronized Multiple-Cameras for Extraction of Accurate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M.; Delacourt, T.; Boutry, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a project of recording and modelling tunnels, traffic circles and roads from multiple sensors. The aim is the representation and the accurate 3D modelling of a selection of road infrastructures as dense point clouds in order to extract profiles and metrics from it. Indeed, these models will be used for the sizing of infrastructures in order to simulate exceptional convoy truck routes. The objective is to extract directly from the point clouds the heights, widths and lengths of bridges and tunnels, the diameter of gyrating and to highlight potential obstacles for a convoy. Light, mobile and fast acquisition approaches based on images and videos from a set of synchronized sensors have been tested in order to obtain useable point clouds. The presented solution is based on a combination of multiple low-cost cameras designed on an on-boarded device allowing dynamic captures. The experimental device containing GoPro Hero4 cameras has been set up and used for tests in static or mobile acquisitions. That way, various configurations have been tested by using multiple synchronized cameras. These configurations are discussed in order to highlight the best operational configuration according to the shape of the acquired objects. As the precise calibration of each sensor and its optics are major factors in the process of creation of accurate dense point clouds, and in order to reach the best quality available from such cameras, the estimation of the internal parameters of fisheye lenses of the cameras has been processed. Reference measures were also realized by using a 3D TLS (Faro Focus 3D) to allow the accuracy assessment.

  14. Time-of-flight camera via a single-pixel correlation image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Dai, Huidong; Ye, Ling; Gu, Guohua

    2018-04-01

    A time-of-flight imager based on single-pixel correlation image sensors is proposed for noise-free depth map acquisition in presence of ambient light. Digital micro-mirror device and time-modulated IR-laser provide spatial and temporal illumination on the unknown object. Compressed sensing and ‘four bucket principle’ method are combined to reconstruct the depth map from a sequence of measurements at a low sampling rate. Second-order correlation transform is also introduced to reduce the noise from the detector itself and direct ambient light. Computer simulations are presented to validate the computational models and improvement of reconstructions.

  15. High performance gel imaging with a commercial single lens reflex camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodan, J.; Corbett, R.; Wye, N.; Schein, J. E.; Marra, M. A.; Coope, R. J. N.

    2011-03-01

    A high performance gel imaging system was constructed using a digital single lens reflex camera with epi-illumination to image 19 × 23 cm agarose gels with up to 10,000 DNA bands each. It was found to give equivalent performance to a laser scanner in this high throughput DNA fingerprinting application using the fluorophore SYBR Green®. The specificity and sensitivity of the imager and scanner were within 1% using the same band identification software. Low and high cost color filters were also compared and it was found that with care, good results could be obtained with inexpensive dyed acrylic filters in combination with more costly dielectric interference filters, but that very poor combinations were also possible. Methods for determining resolution, dynamic range, and optical efficiency for imagers are also proposed to facilitate comparison between systems.

  16. Evaluation of different physical parameters that affect the clinical image quality for gamma camera by using different radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, F.A.; Ziada, G.; Hejazy, M.A.; Khalil, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Some scintillation camera manufactures adhere to standard code of performance specification established by National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA). Items such as differential and integral uniformity, spatial resolution energy resolution, etc. are all calculated with reproducible methodology that allows the user reliable technique for creation of these standards to avoid any lack of clinical service that may violate the ethics of patient care. Because 99m Tc is the most frequently used radionuclide in nuclear medicine, many clinics perform the daily uniformity and weekly resolution checks using this radionuclide. But when other commonly used radionuclide such as Tl-201,Ga-67 and I-131 are used, no standardized quality control is performed. So in these study we perform to evaluate the response of ADAC(digital) gamma camera and SELO(analogue) gamma camera to four radionuclide (Tl-201,Ga-67, I-131, and 99m Tc) flood image acquired using different non-uniformity correction tables. In the planer study uniformity and resolution images were obtained using ADAC and SELO cameras, linearity was obtained only by ADAC camera, while in the SPECT study uniformity and contrast images were obtained using ADAC camera only. The response for using different non-uniformity correction tables acquired using different isotopes was different from gamma camera model to another. We can conclude that the most of the gamma camera quality control parameters (uniformity, resolution and contrast) are influenced by variation in the correction tables, while other parameters not affected by this variation like linearity. (author)

  17. Multiwire proportional gamma camera for imaging /sup 99/Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J E; Connolly, J F [Science Research Council, Chilton (UK). Rutherford Lab.

    1978-05-01

    A gamma camera made of multiple multiwire proportional chambers with thin converter foils has been evaluated for clinical application. Results are presented from a small prototype (10 cm x 10 cm) showing good imaging of /sup 99/Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions and confirming the predictions of the theory regarding quantum efficiency and spatial resolution. The technique is especially aimed at creating a gamma camera with an active area > approximately 3 1m/sup 2/, a quantum efficiency of 15% and a spatial resolution approximately 3 mm, whole body scanning and tomographic applications. The results generated by the current prototype indicate that the above requirements can be met using relatively cheap mass production techniques from the electronics industry. This apparatus is covered by patent application number 26595/77.

  18. A multiwire proportional gamma camera for imaging 99Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera made of multiple multiwire proportional chambers with thin converter foils has been evaluated for clinical application. Results are presented from a small prototype (10 cm x 10 cm) showing good imaging of 99 Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions and confirming the predictions of the theory regarding quantum efficiency and spatial resolution. The technique is especially aimed at creating a gamma camera with an active area > approximately 3 1m 2 , a quantum efficiency of 15% and a spatial resolution approximately 3 mm, whole body scanning and tomographic applications. The results generated by the current prototype indicate that the above requirements can be met using relatively cheap mass production techniques from the electronics industry. This apparatus is covered by patent application number 26595/77. (author)

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of Scintillation Camera Imaging Characteristics of Isotopes Used in Liver Radioembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes Franciscus Wilhelmus; Dam, Alida Johanna; de Jong, Hugo Wilhelmus Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Scintillation camera imaging is used for treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry in liver radioembolization (RE). In yttrium-90 (90Y) RE, scintigraphic images of technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for treatment planning, while 90Y Bremsstrahlung images are used for post-treatment dosimetry. In holmium-166 (166Ho) RE, scintigraphic images of 166Ho can be used for both treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate and compare the imaging characteristics of these three isotopes, in order that imaging protocols can be optimized and RE studies with varying isotopes can be compared. Methodology/Principal Findings Phantom experiments were performed in line with NEMA guidelines to assess the spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate linearity, and contrast recovery of 99mTc, 90Y and 166Ho. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain detailed information about the history of detected photons. The results showed that the use of a broad energy window and the high-energy collimator gave optimal combination of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and primary photon fraction for 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging, although differences with the medium-energy collimator were small. For 166Ho, the high-energy collimator also slightly outperformed the medium-energy collimator. In comparison with 99mTc, the image quality of both 90Y and 166Ho is degraded by a lower spatial resolution, a lower sensitivity, and larger scatter and collimator penetration fractions. Conclusions/Significance The quantitative evaluation of the scintillation camera characteristics presented in this study helps to optimize acquisition parameters and supports future analysis of clinical comparisons between RE studies. PMID:22073149

  20. Hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilization of a waterproof, high-definition video camera case for intraoperative imaging in veterinary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Christopher A; Royal, Kenneth D; Moore, Brandon; Jacob, Megan

    2018-06-13

    To evaluate the safety and usability of a wearable, waterproof high-definition camera/case for acquisition of surgical images by sterile personnel. An in vitro study to test the efficacy of biodecontamination of camera cases. Usability for intraoperative image acquisition was assessed in clinical procedures. Two waterproof GoPro Hero4 Silver camera cases were inoculated by immersion in media containing Staphylococcus pseudointermedius or Escherichia coli at ≥5.50E+07 colony forming units/mL. Cases were biodecontaminated by manual washing and hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilization. Cultures were obtained by swab and by immersion in enrichment broth before and after each contamination/decontamination cycle (n = 4). The cameras were then applied by a surgeon in clinical procedures by using either a headband or handheld mode and were assessed for usability according to 5 user characteristics. Cultures of all poststerilization swabs were negative. One of 8 cultures was positive in enrichment broth, consistent with a low level of contamination in 1 sample. Usability of the camera was considered poor in headband mode, with limited battery life, inability to control camera functions, and lack of zoom function affecting image quality. Handheld operation of the camera by the primary surgeon improved usability, allowing close-up still and video intraoperative image acquisition. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of this camera case was considered effective for biodecontamination. Handheld operation improved usability for intraoperative image acquisition. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization and thorough manual washing of a waterproof camera may provide cost effective intraoperative image acquisition for documentation purposes. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. PAVEMENT DISTRESS DETECTION WITH PICUCHA METHODOLOGY FOR AREA-SCAN CAMERAS AND DARK IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reus Salini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The PICture Unsupervised Classification with Human Analysis (PICUCHA refers to a hybrid human-artificial intelligence methodology for pavement distresses assessment. It combines the human flexibility to recognize patterns and features in images with the neural network ability to expand such recognition to large volumes of images. In this study, the PICUCHA performance was tested with images taken with area-scan cameras and flash light illumination over a pavement with dark textures. These images are particularly challenging for the analysis because of the lens distortion and non-homogeneous illumination, generating artificial joints that happened at random positions inside the image cells. The chosen images were previously analyzed by other software without success because of the dark coluor. The PICUCHA algorithms could analyze the images with no noticeable problem and without any image pre-processing, such as contrast or brightness adjustments. Because of the special procedure used by the pavement engineer for the key patterns description, the distresses detection accuracy of the PICUCHA for the particular image set could reach 100%.

  2. Relationship between image quality and changes in spatial resolution for the gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hozumi; Kishimoto, Kenji; Shimonishi, Yoshihiro; Ohmura, Masahiro; Kosakai, Kazuhisa; Hamada, Kunio; Ochi, Hironobu.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine quantitatively the relationship between visual image quality and degradation in spatial resolution for a gamma camera by the increase in distance from collimator. The relationship between the proportion (p) of images identified the difference of image quality and the difference (δFWHM) in FWHM between paired images was showed in a sigmoid curve. Using Dendy's method, minimum level to be correctly identified the difference of image quality on three out of four occasions (p=0.75) was corresponded to 0.4 mm in δFWHM. Using fuzzy theory, the level to be identified the difference of image quality was examind under various conditions. The truth-value of fuzzy sets-degraded or slightly degraded and not-degraded in image quality between paired images-was gained the peak at 0.5 mm of δFWHM. It was founded that changes of 0.4-0.5 mm in FWHM-corresponding about 2 cm distance from collimator-could be sufficiently identified in the difference of image quality. (author)

  3. Applications of multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation to tomography and image enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Recently, multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation has been introduced in the field of emission tomography. This collimation process simultaneously produces several images covering a limited angular range, which may then be recombined to obtain tomographic slices of the object imaged. This study has investigated a possible method for improving the images obtained by this technique by two multi-pinhole views taken 90 0 apart. During the course of this work, multi-pinhole collimation was also applied to in vivo imaging of the disintegration of tablets. Collimmators were designed and built both for tomography and imaging tablet disintegration, and computer programs were written to reconstruct the images by simple backprojection and by filtered backprojection. The use of multi-pinhole collimators to image the disintegration of tablets in vivo was clearly demonstrated. Phantom tests done in vitro were capable of imaging defects as small as 5 mm 2 , while images made with real tablets both in vitro and in vivo readily showed the onset and progress of the tablet disintegration. Further experiments are planned using this technique to measure gastric emptying times disintegration times of various tablet formulations. Limitations of multi-pinhole technique included problems such as limited ranges of viewing and artifacts introduced due to incomplete sampling

  4. ORIS: the Oak Ridge Imaging System program listings. [Nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. R.; Dougherty, J. M.

    1978-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Imaging System (ORIS) is a general purpose access, storage, processing and display system for nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera. This volume contains listings of the PDP-8/E version of ORIS Version 2. The system is designed to run under the Digital Equipment Corporation's OS/8 monitor in 16K or more words of core. System and image file mass storage is on RK8E disk; longer-time image file storage is provided on DECtape. Another version of this program exists for use with the RF08 disk, and a more limited version is for DECtape only. This latter version is intended for non-medical imaging.

  5. [F18]-FDG imaging of experimental animal tumours using a hybrid gamma-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausson, S.; Maurel, G.; Kerrou, K.; Montravers, F.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J.N.; Fredelizi, D.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical studies. This technology permits detection of compounds labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and in particular, [F18]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([F18]-FDG).[F18]-FDG uptake and accumulation is generally related to malignancy; some recent works have suggested the usefulness of PET camera dedicated to small laboratory animals (micro-PET). Our study dealt with the feasibility of [F18]-FDG imaging of malignant tumours in animal models by means of an hybrid camera dedicated for human scintigraphy. We evaluated the ability of coincidence detection emission tomography (CDET) using this hybrid camera to visualize in vivo subcutaneous tumours grafted to mice or rats. P815 murine mastocytoma grafted in syngeneic DBA/2 mice resulted with foci of very high FDG uptake. Tumours with a diameter of only 3 mm were clearly visualized. Medullary thyroid cancer provoked by rMTC 6/23 and CA77 lines in syngeneic Wag/Rij rat was also detected. The differentiated CA77 tumours exhibited avidity for [F18]-FDG and a tumour, which was just palpable (diameter lower than 2 mm), was identified. In conclusion, CDET-FDG is a non-invasive imaging tool which can be used to follow grafted tumours in the small laboratory animal, even when their size is smaller than 1 cm. It has the potential to evaluate experimental anticancer treatments in small series of animals by individual follow-up. It offers the opportunity to develop experimental PET research within a nuclear medicine or biophysics department, the shift to a dedicated micro-PET device being subsequently necessary. It is indeed compulsory to strictly follow the rules for non contamination and disinfection of the hybrid camera. (authors)

  6. Effect of cyclosporin A administration on the biodistribution and multipinhole {mu}SPECT imaging of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in rodent brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanckaert, P.; Burvenich, I.; Bruyne, S. de; Moerman, L.; Wyffels, L.; Vos, F. de [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Gent (Belgium); Staelens, S. [Ghent University - IBBT, MEDISIP, Faculty of Engineering, Gent (Belgium)

    2009-03-15

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an efflux protein found amongst other locations in the blood-brain barrier. It is important to investigate the effect of Pgp modulation on clinically used brain tracers, because brain uptake of the tracer can be altered by blocking of the Pgp efflux transporter. The function of Pgp can be blocked with cyclosporin A. We investigated the effect of cyclosporin A administration on the biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in rodents, and the effect of Pgp blocking on the quality of multipinhole {mu}SPECT imaging with [{sup 123}I]R91150. The influence of increasing doses of cyclosporin A on the brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 was investigated in NMRI mice. A biodistribution study with [{sup 123}I]R91150 was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with cyclosporin A and not pretreated. Brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 after cyclosporin A injection was compared to the brain uptake in untreated animals, and a displacement study with ketanserin was performed in both groups. A multipinhole {mu}SPECT brain imaging study was also performed using a Milabs U-SPECT-II camera in male Sprague-Dawley rats. To exclude the effect of possible metabolites, a metabolite study was also performed. At the highest cyclosporin A dose (50 mg/kg), a sevenfold increase in brain radioactivity concentration was observed in NMRI mice. Also, a dose-response relationship was established between the dose of cyclosporin A and the brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in mice. Compared to the control group, a five-fold increase in [{sup 123}I]R91150 radioactivity concentration was observed in the brain of Sprague-Dawley rats after cyclosporin A treatment (50 mg/kg). Radioactivity concentration in the frontal cortex increased from 0.24{+-}0.0092 to 1.58{+-}0.097% injected dose per gram of tissue after treatment with cyclosporin A (at the 1-h time-point). Blood radioactivity concentrations did not increase to the same extent. The cortical activity was displaced by

  7. Investigating Image Formation with a Camera Obscura: a Study in Initial Primary Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Franco, Granada; Criado, Ana María; García-Carmona, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative study aimed at determining the effectiveness of the camera obscura as a didactic tool to understand image formation (i.e., how it is possible to see objects and how their image is formed on the retina, and what the image formed on the retina is like compared to the object observed) in a context of scientific inquiry. The study involved 104 prospective primary teachers (PPTs) who were being trained in science teaching. To assess the effectiveness of this tool, an open questionnaire was applied before (pre-test) and after (post-test) the educational intervention. The data were analyzed by combining methods of inter- and intra-rater analysis. The results showed that more than half of the PPTs advanced in their ideas towards the desirable level of knowledge in relation to the phenomena studied. The conclusion reached is that the camera obscura, used in a context of scientific inquiry, is a useful tool for PPTs to improve their knowledge about image formation and experience in the first person an authentic scientific inquiry during their teacher training.

  8. Tomographic Small-Animal Imaging Using a High-Resolution Semiconductor Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastis, GA; Wu, MC; Balzer, SJ; Wilson, DW; Furenlid, LR; Stevenson, G; Barber, HB; Barrett, HH; Woolfenden, JM; Kelly, P; Appleby, M

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a high-resolution, compact semiconductor camera for nuclear medicine applications. The modular unit has been used to obtain tomographic images of phantoms and mice. The system consists of a 64 x 64 CdZnTe detector array and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator mounted inside a 17 cm x 5.3 cm x 3.7 cm tungsten-aluminum housing. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab of CdZnTe connected to a 64 x 64 multiplexer readout via indium-bump bonding. The collimator is 7 mm thick, with a 0.38 mm pitch that matches the detector pixel pitch. We obtained a series of projections by rotating the object in front of the camera. The axis of rotation was vertical and about 1.5 cm away from the collimator face. Mouse holders were made out of acrylic plastic tubing to facilitate rotation and the administration of gas anesthetic. Acquisition times were varied from 60 sec to 90 sec per image for a total of 60 projections at an equal spacing of 6 degrees between projections. We present tomographic images of a line phantom and mouse bone scan and assess the properties of the system. The reconstructed images demonstrate spatial resolution on the order of 1–2 mm. PMID:26568676

  9. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  10. Real-time near IR (1310 nm) imaging of CO2 laser ablation of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2008-02-18

    The high-transparency of dental enamel in the near-IR (NIR) can be exploited for real-time imaging of ablation crater formation during drilling with lasers. NIR images were acquired with an InGaAs focal plane array and a NIR zoom microscope during drilling incisions in human enamel samples with a lambda=9.3-microm CO(2) laser operating at repetition rates of 50-300-Hz with and without a water spray. Crack formation, dehydration and thermal changes were observed during ablation. These initial images demonstrate the potential of NIR imaging to monitor laser-ablation events in real-time to provide information about the mechanism of ablation and to evaluate the potential for peripheral thermal and mechanical damage.

  11. Airborne imaging for heritage documentation using the Fotokite tethered flying camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Geert; Lupashin, Sergei; Briese, Christian; Doneus, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Since the beginning of aerial photography, researchers used all kinds of devices (from pigeons, kites, poles, and balloons to rockets) to take still cameras aloft and remotely gather aerial imagery. To date, many of these unmanned devices are still used for what has been referred to as Low-Altitude Aerial Photography or LAAP. In addition to these more traditional camera platforms, radio-controlled (multi-)copter platforms have recently added a new aspect to LAAP. Although model airplanes have been around for several decades, the decreasing cost, increasing functionality and stability of ready-to-fly multi-copter systems has proliferated their use among non-hobbyists. As such, they became a very popular tool for aerial imaging. The overwhelming amount of currently available brands and types (heli-, dual-, tri-, quad-, hexa-, octo-, dodeca-, deca-hexa and deca-octocopters), together with the wide variety of navigation options (e.g. altitude and position hold, waypoint flight) and camera mounts indicate that these platforms are here to stay for some time. Given the multitude of still camera types and the image quality they are currently capable of, endless combinations of low- and high-cost LAAP solutions are available. In addition, LAAP allows for the exploitation of new imaging techniques, as it is often only a matter of lifting the appropriate device (e.g. video cameras, thermal frame imagers, hyperspectral line sensors). Archaeologists were among the first to adopt this technology, as it provided them with a means to easily acquire essential data from a unique point of view, whether for simple illustration purposes of standing historic structures or to compute three-dimensional (3D) models and orthophotographs from excavation areas. However, even very cheap multi-copters models require certain skills to pilot them safely. Additionally, malfunction or overconfidence might lift these devices to altitudes where they can interfere with manned aircrafts. As such, the

  12. MEMS-based thermally-actuated image stabilizer for cellular phone camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Ying; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2012-01-01

    This work develops an image stabilizer (IS) that is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology and is designed to counteract the vibrations when human using cellular phone cameras. The proposed IS has dimensions of 8.8 × 8.8 × 0.3 mm 3 and is strong enough to suspend an image sensor. The processes that is utilized to fabricate the IS includes inductive coupled plasma (ICP) processes, reactive ion etching (RIE) processes and the flip-chip bonding method. The IS is designed to enable the electrical signals from the suspended image sensor to be successfully emitted out using signal output beams, and the maximum actuating distance of the stage exceeds 24.835 µm when the driving current is 155 mA. Depending on integration of MEMS device and designed controller, the proposed IS can decrease the hand tremor by 72.5%. (paper)

  13. Design of a smartphone-camera-based fluorescence imaging system for the detection of oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, Ross

    Shown is the design of the Smartphone Oral Cancer Detection System (SOCeeDS). The SOCeeDS attaches to a smartphone and utilizes its embedded imaging optics and sensors to capture images of the oral cavity to detect oral cancer. Violet illumination sources excite the oral tissues to induce fluorescence. Images are captured with the smartphone's onboard camera. Areas where the tissues of the oral cavity are darkened signify an absence of fluorescence signal, indicating breakdown in tissue structure brought by precancerous or cancerous conditions. With this data the patient can seek further testing and diagnosis as needed. Proliferation of this device will allow communities with limited access to healthcare professionals a tool to detect cancer in its early stages, increasing the likelihood of cancer reversal.

  14. An improved trigger-generation scheme for Cerenkov imaging cameras [Paper No.: I5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Tickoo, A.K.; Kaul, I.K.; Koul, R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved trigger-generation scheme for TeV gamma-ray imaging telescopes is proposed. Based on a memory-based majority coincidence circuit, this scheme involves deriving 3-pixel nearest-neighbor coincidences as against the conventional approach of generating prompt coincidence from any 2 pixel of the imaging-camera. As such the new method discriminates against shot-noise-generated triggers, and perhaps, to some extent against background cosmic-ray events also, without compromising on the telescope response to events of γ-ray origin. The net effect is that a Whipple-like imaging system can be operated with a comparatively higher sensitivity than what is possible at present. In addition, a suitably scaled-up value of the chance-trigger rate can be independently derived, thereby making it possible to use this parameter reliably for keeping a log of the 'health' of the experimental system. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs

  15. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations. We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%. This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The advantages of ASCs, compared to the space-born imagers, are

  16. Accurate measurement of imaging photoplethysmographic signals based camera using weighted average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zongguang; Kong, Lingqin; Zhao, Yuejin; Sun, Huijuan; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Lingling; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Rongji

    2018-01-01

    Imaging Photoplethysmography (IPPG) is an emerging technique for the extraction of vital signs of human being using video recordings. IPPG technology with its advantages like non-contact measurement, low cost and easy operation has become one research hot spot in the field of biomedicine. However, the noise disturbance caused by non-microarterial area cannot be removed because of the uneven distribution of micro-arterial, different signal strength of each region, which results in a low signal noise ratio of IPPG signals and low accuracy of heart rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improving the signal noise ratio of camera-based IPPG signals of each sub-region of the face using a weighted average. Firstly, we obtain the region of interest (ROI) of a subject's face based camera. Secondly, each region of interest is tracked and feature-based matched in each frame of the video. Each tracked region of face is divided into 60x60 pixel block. Thirdly, the weights of PPG signal of each sub-region are calculated, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of each sub-region. Finally, we combine the IPPG signal from all the tracked ROI using weighted average. Compared with the existing approaches, the result shows that the proposed method takes modest but significant effects on improvement of signal noise ratio of camera-based PPG estimated and accuracy of heart rate measurement.

  17. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  18. Gabor zone-plate apertures for imaging with the mercuric iodide gamma-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Meyyappan, A; Cai, A; Wade, G [California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1990-12-20

    Gabor zone-plate (GZP) apertures have been developed for use in EG and G EM's mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma-ray camera. The purpose of such an aperture is to increase efficiency, while maintaining good resolution. The GZP is similar to the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) but it has continuous transitions between opaque and transparent regions. Because there are no sharp transitions in the transmission, the inherent interference noise in GZP imaging is lower than that in FZP imaging. GZP parameters were chosen by considering the effects of constraints such as detector pixel size, number of pixels, minimum field of view required, maximum angle of incidence tolerated, and the Nyquist criterion for the minimum sampling rate. As a result an aperture was designed and fabricated with eight zones and a diameter of 3 cm. Lead was chosen as the aperture medium due to its high attenuation coefficient. Experimental data were obtained from the camera with the above GZP aperture. The point-spread function was determined and compared to the calculated response. Excellent agreement was obtained. The reconstruction process involves simulating, by computer, planar-wave illumination of a scaled transparency of the image and recording the intensity pattern at the focal plane. (orig.).

  19. Gamma camera imaging of bilateral adrenocartical hyperplasia and adrenal tumors in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulnix, J.A.; Van den Brom, W.E.; Lubberink, A.A.; de Bruijne, J.J.; Rijnberk, A.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma camera imaging of the adrenal glands was done in 8 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and 4 normal dogs given intravenous injections of 131I-19-iodocholesterol. In normal dogs, both adrenal glands could be visualized separately, and there was no difficulty in distinguishing among the images of normal glands, hyperplastic glands, and functional adrenal tumors. In addition, gamma camera imaging enabled the correct surgical site to be selected for removal of adrenal tumors. Hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed in 8 dogs by evaluation of urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroid (OHCS) excretion rates, urinary 17-OHCS and plasma 11 beta-OHCS responses to dexamethasone suppression of endogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion, and plasma 11 beta-OHCS response to intravenous administration of ACTH. Base line 17-OHCS excretion increased in 5 of the 8 dogs. Plasma 11 beta-OHCS concentrations were not decreased by dexamethasone administration in the 4 dogs subsequently found to have adrenal tumors; however, there was an exaggerated increase in plasma 11 beta-OHCS concentration after administration of ACTH in 3 of the 4 dogs which had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia

  20. Mid-infrared multi-wavelength imaging of Ophiuchus IRS 48 transitional disk†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mitsuhiko; Okada, Kazushi; Miyata, Takashi; Mulders, Gijs D.; Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Kamizuka, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Yamashita, Takuya; Onaka, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Transitional disks around the Herbig Ae/Be stars are fascinating targets in the contexts of disk evolution and planet formation. Oph IRS 48 is one of such Herbig Ae stars, which shows an inner dust cavity and azimuthally lopsided large dust distribution. We present new images of Oph IRS 48 at eight mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths from 8.59 to 24.6 μm taken with COMICS mounted on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The N-band (7 to 13 μm) images show that the flux distribution is centrally peaked with a slight spatial extent, while the Q-band (17 to 25 μm) images show asymmetric double peaks (east and west). Using 18.8- and 24.6 μm images, we derived the dust temperature at both east and west peaks to be 135 ± 22 K. Thus, the asymmetry may not be attributed to a difference in the temperature. Comparing our results with previous modeling works, we conclude that the inner disk is aligned to the outer disk. A shadow cast by the optically thick inner disk has a great influence on the morphology of MIR thermal emission from the outer disk.

  1. Mid-infrared multi-wavelength imaging of Ophiuchus IRS 48 transitional disk†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mitsuhiko; Okada, Kazushi; Miyata, Takashi; Mulders, Gijs D.; Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Kamizuka, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Yamashita, Takuya; Onaka, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    Transitional disks around the Herbig Ae/Be stars are fascinating targets in the contexts of disk evolution and planet formation. Oph IRS 48 is one of such Herbig Ae stars, which shows an inner dust cavity and azimuthally lopsided large dust distribution. We present new images of Oph IRS 48 at eight mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths from 8.59 to 24.6 μm taken with COMICS mounted on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The N-band (7 to 13 μm) images show that the flux distribution is centrally peaked with a slight spatial extent, while the Q-band (17 to 25 μm) images show asymmetric double peaks (east and west). Using 18.8- and 24.6 μm images, we derived the dust temperature at both east and west peaks to be 135 ± 22 K. Thus, the asymmetry may not be attributed to a difference in the temperature. Comparing our results with previous modeling works, we conclude that the inner disk is aligned to the outer disk. A shadow cast by the optically thick inner disk has a great influence on the morphology of MIR thermal emission from the outer disk.

  2. First experience with THE AUTOLAP™ SYSTEM: an image-based robotic camera steering device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Paul J M; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Brenkman, Hylke J; Szold, Amir; Forgione, Antonello; Schreuder, Henk W R; Consten, Esther C J; Draaisma, Werner A; Verheijen, Paul M; Ruurda, Jelle P; Kaufman, Yuval

    2018-05-01

    Robotic camera holders for endoscopic surgery have been available for 20 years but market penetration is low. The current camera holders are controlled by voice, joystick, eyeball tracking, or head movements, and this type of steering has proven to be successful but excessive disturbance of surgical workflow has blocked widespread introduction. The Autolap™ system (MST, Israel) uses a radically different steering concept based on image analysis. This may improve acceptance by smooth, interactive, and fast steering. These two studies were conducted to prove safe and efficient performance of the core technology. A total of 66 various laparoscopic procedures were performed with the AutoLap™ by nine experienced surgeons, in two multi-center studies; 41 cholecystectomies, 13 fundoplications including hiatal hernia repair, 4 endometriosis surgeries, 2 inguinal hernia repairs, and 6 (bilateral) salpingo-oophorectomies. The use of the AutoLap™ system was evaluated in terms of safety, image stability, setup and procedural time, accuracy of imaged-based movements, and user satisfaction. Surgical procedures were completed with the AutoLap™ system in 64 cases (97%). The mean overall setup time of the AutoLap™ system was 4 min (04:08 ± 0.10). Procedure times were not prolonged due to the use of the system when compared to literature average. The reported user satisfaction was 3.85 and 3.96 on a scale of 1 to 5 in two studies. More than 90% of the image-based movements were accurate. No system-related adverse events were recorded while using the system. Safe and efficient use of the core technology of the AutoLap™ system was demonstrated with high image stability and good surgeon satisfaction. The results support further clinical studies that will focus on usability, improved ergonomics and additional image-based features.

  3. The use of consumer depth cameras for 3D surface imaging of people with obesity: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, J S; Clarkson, S; Flint, S W; Simpson, C; Broom, D R

    2018-05-21

    Three dimensional (3D) surface imaging is a viable alternative to traditional body morphology measures, but the feasibility of using this technique with people with obesity has not been fully established. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the validity, repeatability and acceptability of a consumer depth camera 3D surface imaging system in imaging people with obesity. The concurrent validity of the depth camera based system was investigated by comparing measures of mid-trunk volume to a gold-standard. The repeatability and acceptability of the depth camera system was assessed in people with obesity at a clinic. There was evidence of a fixed systematic difference between the depth camera system and the gold standard but excellent correlation between volume estimates (r 2 =0.997), with little evidence of proportional bias. The depth camera system was highly repeatable - low typical error (0.192L), high intraclass correlation coefficient (>0.999) and low technical error of measurement (0.64%). Depth camera based 3D surface imaging was also acceptable to people with obesity. It is feasible (valid, repeatable and acceptable) to use a low cost, flexible 3D surface imaging system to monitor the body size and shape of people with obesity in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2018 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computer assisted collimation gamma camera: A new approach to imaging contaminated tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartuccio, M.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Begot, S.; Jeanguillaume, C.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement systems with the capability of imaging tissues contaminated with radioactive materials would find relevant applications in medical physics research and possibly in health physics. The latter in particular depends critically on the performance achieved for sensitivity and spatial resolution. An original approach of computer assisted collimation gamma camera (French acronym CACAO) which could meet suitable characteristics has been proposed elsewhere. CACAO requires detectors with high spatial resolution. The present work was aimed at investigating the application of the CACAO principle on a laboratory testing bench using silicon detectors made of small pixels. (author)

  5. Computer assisted collimation gamma camera: A new approach to imaging contaminated tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quartuccio, M.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Begot, S.; Jeanguillaume, C

    2000-07-01

    Measurement systems with the capability of imaging tissues contaminated with radioactive materials would find relevant applications in medical physics research and possibly in health physics. The latter in particular depends critically on the performance achieved for sensitivity and spatial resolution. An original approach of computer assisted collimation gamma camera (French acronym CACAO) which could meet suitable characteristics has been proposed elsewhere. CACAO requires detectors with high spatial resolution. The present work was aimed at investigating the application of the CACAO principle on a laboratory testing bench using silicon detectors made of small pixels. (author)

  6. Using a Thermal Imaging Camera to Locate Perforators on the Lower Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P. Paul

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the lower limb presents a complex problem after skin cancer surgery, as proximity of skin and bone present vascular and technical challenges. Studies on vascular anatomy have confirmed that the vascular plane on the lower limb lies deep to the deep fascia. Yet, many flaps are routinely raised superficial to this plane and therefore flap failure rates in the lower limb are high. Fascio-cutaneous flaps based on perforators offer a better cosmetic alternative to skin grafts. In this paper, we detail use of a thermal imaging camera to identify perforator ‘compartments’ that can help in designing such flaps.

  7. Reconstruction of recycling flux from synthetic camera images, evaluated for the Wendelstein 7-X startup limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, H.; Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Stephey, L.; Reiter, D.; Börner, P.; The W7-X Team

    2017-12-01

    The interpretation of spectroscopic measurements in the edge region of high-temperature plasmas can be guided by modeling with the EMC3-EIRENE code. A versatile synthetic diagnostic module, initially developed for the generation of synthetic camera images, has been extended for the evaluation of the inverse problem in which the observable photon flux is related back to the originating particle flux (recycling). An application of this synthetic diagnostic to the startup phase (inboard) limiter in Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is presented, and reconstruction of recycling from synthetic observation of \\renewcommand{\

  8. Mid-IR Imaging of Orion BN/KL: Modeling of Physical Conditions and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, Daniel; Varosi, Frank; Dwek, Eli; Danchi, William C.; Tan, Jonathan; Okumura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We have modeled two mid-infrared imaging photometry data sets to determine the spatial distribution of physical conditions in the BN/KL (Becklin-Neugebauer / Kleinmann-Low) infrared complex. We observed the BN/KL region using the 10-meter Keck I telescope and the LWS (Living With a Star) in the direct imaging mode, over a 13 inch by 19 inch field . We also modeled images obtained with COMICS (Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer, Kataza et al. 2000) at the 8.2-meter SUBARU telescope, over a total field of view [which] is 31 inches by 41 inches in a total of nine bands: 7.8, 8.8, 9.7, 10.5, 11.7, 12.4, 18.5, 20.8 and 24.8 microns with 1-micron bandwidth interference filters.

  9. X-ray image intensifier tube and radiographic camera incorporating same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray sensitive image intensifier tube is described. It has an input window comprising at least one of iron, chromium and nickel for receiving an X-ray image. There is a flat scintillator screen adjacent for converting the X-ray image into a light pattern image. Adjacent to this is a flat photocathode layer for emitting photoelectrons in a pattern corresponding to the light pattern image. Parallel to this and spaced from it is a flat phosphor display screen. Electrostatic voltage is applied to the display screen and the photocathode layer to create an electric field between them to accelerate the photoelectrons towards the display screen. The paths of such parallel straight trajectories are governed solely by the electrostatic voltage applied, the image at the display screen being substantially equal in size to that of the X-ray image received at the input window. The tube envelope is preferably metallic to enable the basic components to be kept at a neutral potential and avoid spurious emissions. A radiographic camera with such an intensifier tube is also described. (U.K.)

  10. PCA-based spatially adaptive denoising of CFA images for single-sensor digital cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Lukac, Rastislav; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, David

    2009-04-01

    Single-sensor digital color cameras use a process called color demosiacking to produce full color images from the data captured by a color filter array (CAF). The quality of demosiacked images is degraded due to the sensor noise introduced during the image acquisition process. The conventional solution to combating CFA sensor noise is demosiacking first, followed by a separate denoising processing. This strategy will generate many noise-caused color artifacts in the demosiacking process, which are hard to remove in the denoising process. Few denoising schemes that work directly on the CFA images have been presented because of the difficulties arisen from the red, green and blue interlaced mosaic pattern, yet a well-designed "denoising first and demosiacking later" scheme can have advantages such as less noise-caused color artifacts and cost-effective implementation. This paper presents a principle component analysis (PCA)-based spatially-adaptive denoising algorithm, which works directly on the CFA data using a supporting window to analyze the local image statistics. By exploiting the spatial and spectral correlations existing in the CFA image, the proposed method can effectively suppress noise while preserving color edges and details. Experiments using both simulated and real CFA images indicate that the proposed scheme outperforms many existing approaches, including those sophisticated demosiacking and denoising schemes, in terms of both objective measurement and visual evaluation.

  11. Video-rate or high-precision: a flexible range imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Cree, Michael J.; Carnegie, Dale A.; Payne, Andrew D.; Conroy, Richard M.; Godbaz, John P.; Jongenelen, Adrian P. P.

    2008-02-01

    A range imaging camera produces an output similar to a digital photograph, but every pixel in the image contains distance information as well as intensity. This is useful for measuring the shape, size and location of objects in a scene, hence is well suited to certain machine vision applications. Previously we demonstrated a heterodyne range imaging system operating in a relatively high resolution (512-by-512) pixels and high precision (0.4 mm best case) configuration, but with a slow measurement rate (one every 10 s). Although this high precision range imaging is useful for some applications, the low acquisition speed is limiting in many situations. The system's frame rate and length of acquisition is fully configurable in software, which means the measurement rate can be increased by compromising precision and image resolution. In this paper we demonstrate the flexibility of our range imaging system by showing examples of high precision ranging at slow acquisition speeds and video-rate ranging with reduced ranging precision and image resolution. We also show that the heterodyne approach and the use of more than four samples per beat cycle provides better linearity than the traditional homodyne quadrature detection approach. Finally, we comment on practical issues of frame rate and beat signal frequency selection.

  12. Using the standard deviation of a region of interest in an image to estimate camera to emitter distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-García, Angel E; Lazaro, José Luis; Infante, Arturo; Fernández, Pedro; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Espinoza, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a camera to infrared diode (IRED) distance estimation problem was analyzed. The main objective was to define an alternative to measures depth only using the information extracted from pixel grey levels of the IRED image to estimate the distance between the camera and the IRED. In this paper, the standard deviation of the pixel grey level in the region of interest containing the IRED image is proposed as an empirical parameter to define a model for estimating camera to emitter distance. This model includes the camera exposure time, IRED radiant intensity and the distance between the camera and the IRED. An expression for the standard deviation model related to these magnitudes was also derived and calibrated using different images taken under different conditions. From this analysis, we determined the optimum parameters to ensure the best accuracy provided by this alternative. Once the model calibration had been carried out, a differential method to estimate the distance between the camera and the IRED was defined and applied, considering that the camera was aligned with the IRED. The results indicate that this method represents a useful alternative for determining the depth information.

  13. Using the Standard Deviation of a Region of Interest in an Image to Estimate Camera to Emitter Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a camera to infrared diode (IRED distance estimation problem was analyzed. The main objective was to define an alternative to measures depth only using the information extracted from pixel grey levels of the IRED image to estimate the distance between the camera and the IRED. In this paper, the standard deviation of the pixel grey level in the region of interest containing the IRED image is proposed as an empirical parameter to define a model for estimating camera to emitter distance. This model includes the camera exposure time, IRED radiant intensity and the distance between the camera and the IRED. An expression for the standard deviation model related to these magnitudes was also derived and calibrated using different images taken under different conditions. From this analysis, we determined the optimum parameters to ensure the best accuracy provided by this alternative. Once the model calibration had been carried out, a differential method to estimate the distance between the camera and the IRED was defined and applied, considering that the camera was aligned with the IRED. The results indicate that this method represents a useful alternative for determining the depth information.

  14. Minimal Camera Networks for 3D Image Based Modeling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue “Lamassu”. Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  15. Minimal camera networks for 3D image based modeling of cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-03-25

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue "Lamassu". Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm.

  16. Emission computed tomography using rotating gamma cameras for stress 201Tl myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Taguchi, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of emission computed tomography (ECT) for stress 201 Tl myocardial imaging to localize coronary artery disease (CAD) in comparison with planar (PL) images. In a series of 14 normal subjects and 53 patients with CAD proved coronary arteriography, ECT and PL imaging were performed successively. ECT data were collected for 90 projections in a 64 x 64 matrix form with a total aquisition time of 6 munutes over 180 0 of opposed dual cameras ratation and tomographic sections oriented perpendicular and parallel to the long axis of left ventricle were reconstructed. PL images were obtained for left lateral, left anterior oblique (30 0 and 45 0 ) and anterior projections. Both ECT and PL myocardial images were divided into 8 segments and segmental analysis was performed by visual interpretation. The ECT images remarkably increased sensitivity over the PL images in left anterior descending (LAD) artery (from 56% to 76%), right coronary artery (RCA) (from 50% to 96%), and circumflex artery (CX) (from 56% to 69%) lesions. The specificity for ECT images, as compared with PL images, was higher in LAD (88% against 85%) but slightly lower in RCA (70% ag ainst 72%) and CX (84% against 88%). Overall accuracy, therefore, was improved in LAD (from 67% to 81%) and RCA (from 64% to 79%) but equal in CX (81%). We conclude that stress 201 Tl ECT imaging result in a remarkable improvement in the localization of CAD, especially in patients with RCA lesions and multi-vessel disease. (author)

  17. Real-time near-IR imaging of laser-ablation crater evolution in dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    We have shown that the enamel of the tooth is almost completely transparent near 1310-nm in the near-infrared and that near-IR (NIR) imaging has considerable potential for the optical discrimination of sound and demineralized tissue and for observing defects in the interior of the tooth. Lasers are now routinely used for many applications in dentistry including the ablation of dental caries. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that real-time NIR imaging can be used to monitor laser-ablation under varying conditions to assess peripheral thermal and transient-stress induced damage and to measure the rate and efficiency of ablation. Moreover, NIR imaging may have considerable potential for monitoring the removal of demineralized areas of the tooth during cavity preparations. Sound human tooth sections of approximately 3-mm thickness were irradiated by a CO II laser under varying conditions with and without a water spray. The incision area in the interior of each sample was imaged using a tungsten-halogen lamp with band-pass filter centered at 131--nm combined with an InGaAs focal plane array with a NIR zoom microscope in transillumination. Due to the high transparency of enamel at 1310-nm, laser-incisions were clearly visible to the dentin-enamel junction and crack formation, dehydration and irreversible thermal changes were observed during ablation. This study showed that there is great potential for near-IR imaging to monitor laser-ablation events in real-time to: assess safe laser operating parameters by imaging thermal and stress-induced damage, elaborate the mechanisms involved in ablation such as dehydration, and monitor the removal of demineralized enamel.

  18. IR-to-visible image upconverter under nonlinear crystal thermal gradient operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Fernández-Pousa, C R; Capmany, J

    2018-01-22

    In this work we study the enhancement of the field-of-view of an infrared image up-converter by means of a thermal gradient in a PPLN crystal. Our work focuses on compact upconverters, in which both a short PPLN crystal length and high numerical aperture lenses are employed. We found a qualitative increase in both wavelength and angular tolerances, compared to a constant temperature upconverter, which makes it necessary a correct IR wavelength allocation in order to effectively increase the up-converted area.

  19. Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with a solid-state dedicated cardiac camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kacperski, Krzysztof; Hain, Sharon; Van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F; Erlandsson, Kjell; Sharir, Tali; Roth, Nathaniel; Waddington, Wendy A; Berman, Daniel S; Ell, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Of 27 consecutive patients recruited, 24 (64.5+/-11.8 years of age, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of (201)Tl (rest) and 250 MBq (99m)Tc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest are 21 min and 16 min, respectively. Rest (201)Tl for 6 min and simultaneous DR 15-min list mode gated scans were performed on a D-SPECT cardiac scanner. In 11 patients DR D-SPECT was performed first and in 13 patients conventional stress (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging was performed followed by DR D-SPECT. The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spill-over and scatter correction method. DR D-SPECT images were compared with rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a five-point scale (0 normal, 4 absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores. Image quality was assessed on a four-point scale (1 poor, 4 very good) and gut activity was assessed on a four-point scale (0 none, 3 high). Conventional MPI studies were abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI showed 113 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 93 abnormal segments. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT showed 45 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 48 abnormal segments. The summed stress and rest scores on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT were highly correlated (r=0.9790 and 0.9694, respectively). The summed scores of rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and DR-DSPECT were also highly correlated (r=0.9968, pstress perfusion defects were significantly larger on stress DR D-SPECT images, and five of these patients were imaged earlier by D-SPECT than by conventional SPECT. Fast and high-quality simultaneous DR MPI is feasible with D-SPECT in a

  20. A 3D HIDAC-PET camera with sub-millimeter resolution for imaging small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeavons, A.P.; Chandler, R.A.; Dettmar, C.A.R.

    1999-01-01

    A HIDAC-PET camera consisting essentially of 5 million 0.5 mm gas avalanching detectors has been constructed for small-animal imaging. The particular HIDAC advantage--a high 3D spatial resolution--has been improved to 0.95 mm fwhm and to 0.7 mm fwhm when reconstructing with 3D-OSEM methods incorporating resolution recovery. A depth-of-interaction resolution of 2.5 mm is implicit, due to the laminar construction. Scatter-corrected sensitivity, at 8.9 cps/kBq (i.e. 0.9%) from a central point source, or 7.2 cps/kBq (543 cps/kBq/cm 3 ) from a distributed (40 mm diameter, 60 mm long) source is now much higher than previous, and other, work. A field-of-view of 100 mm (adjustable to 200 mm) diameter by 210 mm axially permits whole-body imaging of small animals, containing typically 4MBqs of activity, at 40 kcps of which 16% are random coincidences, with a typical scatter fraction of 44%. Throughout the field-of-view there are no positional distortions and relative quantitation is uniform to ± 3.5%, but some variation of spatial resolution is found. The performance demonstrates that HIDAC technology is quite appropriate for small-animal PET cameras

  1. Wall temperature measurements using a thermal imaging camera with temperature-dependent emissivity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaid, Chloe; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is presented whereby the relationship between temperature and emissivity for fused quartz has been used to correct the temperature values of a quartz impingement plate detected by an SC3000 thermal imaging camera. The methodology uses an iterative method using the initial temperature (obtained by assuming a constant emissivity) to find the emissivity values which are then put into the thermal imaging software and used to find the subsequent temperatures, which are used to find the emissivities, and so on until converged. This method is used for a quartz impingement plate that has been heated under various flame conditions, and the results are compared. Radiation losses from the plate are also calculated, and it is shown that even a slight change in temperature greatly affects the radiation loss. It is a general methodology that can be used for any wall material whose emissivity is a function of temperature

  2. Firefly: A HOT camera core for thermal imagers with enhanced functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillans, Luke; Harmer, Jack; Edwards, Tim

    2015-06-01

    Raising the operating temperature of mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors from 80K to above 160K creates new applications for high performance infrared imagers by vastly reducing the size, weight and power consumption of the integrated cryogenic cooler. Realizing the benefits of Higher Operating Temperature (HOT) requires a new kind of infrared camera core with the flexibility to address emerging applications in handheld, weapon mounted and UAV markets. This paper discusses the Firefly core developed to address these needs by Selex ES in Southampton UK. Firefly represents a fundamental redesign of the infrared signal chain reducing power consumption and providing compatibility with low cost, low power Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) computing technology. This paper describes key innovations in this signal chain: a ROIC purpose built to minimize power consumption in the proximity electronics, GPU based image processing of infrared video, and a software customisable infrared core which can communicate wirelessly with other Battlespace systems.

  3. High-resolution Ceres Low Altitude Mapping Orbit Atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-06-01

    The Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) acquired over 31,300 clear filter images of Ceres with a resolution of about 35 m/pxl during the eleven cycles in the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phase between December 16 2015 and August 8 2016. We ortho-rectified the images from the first four cycles and produced a global, high-resolution, uncontrolled photomosaic of Ceres. This global mosaic is the basis for a high-resolution Ceres atlas that consists of 62 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:250,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The full atlas is available to the public through the Dawn Geographical Information System (GIS) web page [http://dawngis.dlr.de/atlas] and will become available through the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) (http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/).

  4. Efficient High-Dimensional Entanglement Imaging with a Compressive-Sensing Double-Pixel Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Howland

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We implement a double-pixel compressive-sensing camera to efficiently characterize, at high resolution, the spatially entangled fields that are produced by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. This technique leverages sparsity in spatial correlations between entangled photons to improve acquisition times over raster scanning by a scaling factor up to n^{2}/log⁡(n for n-dimensional images. We image at resolutions up to 1024 dimensions per detector and demonstrate a channel capacity of 8.4 bits per photon. By comparing the entangled photons’ classical mutual information in conjugate bases, we violate an entropic Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen separability criterion for all measured resolutions. More broadly, our result indicates that compressive sensing can be especially effective for higher-order measurements on correlated systems.

  5. Semi-intelligent trigger-generation scheme for Cherenkov light imaging cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Tickoo, A.K.; Koul, R.; Kaul, I.K.

    1994-01-01

    We propose here an improved trigger-generation scheme for TeV gamma-ray imaging telescopes. Based on a memory-based Majority Coincidence Circuit, this scheme involves deriving two-or three-pixel nearest-neighbour coincidences as against the conventional approach of generating prompt coincidences using any two photomultiplier detector pixels of an imaging-camera. As such, the new method can discriminate better against shot-noise-generated triggers and, to a significant extent, also against cosmic-ray and local-muon-generated background events, without compromising on the telescope response to events of γ-ray origin. An optional feature of the proposed scheme is that a suitably scaled-up value of the chance-trigger rate can be independently derived, thereby making it possible to use this parameter reliably for keeping a log of the ''health'' of the experimental system. (orig.)

  6. Semi-intelligent trigger-generation scheme for Cherenkov light imaging cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, C. L.; Tickoo, A. K.; Koul, R.; Kaul, I. K.

    1994-02-01

    We propose here an improved trigger-generation scheme for TeV gamma-ray imaging telescopes. Based on a memory-based Majority Coincidence Circuit, this scheme involves deriving two- or three-pixel nearest-neighbour coincidences as against the conventional approach of generating prompt coincidences using any two photomultiplier detector pixels of an imaging-camera. As such, the new method can discriminate better against shot-noise-generated triggers and, to a significant extent, also against cosmic-ray and local-muon-generated background events, without compromising on the telescope response to events of γ-ray origin. An optional feature of the proposed scheme is that a suitably scaled-up value of the chance-trigger rate can be independently derived, thereby making it possible to use this parameter reliably for keeping a log of the ``health'' of the experimental system.

  7. FT-IR imaging for quantitative determination of liver fat content in non-alcoholic fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, K; Maslak, E; Chlopicki, S; Baranska, M

    2015-08-07

    In this work we apply FT-IR imaging of large areas of liver tissue cross-section samples (∼5 cm × 5 cm) for quantitative assessment of steatosis in murine model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver (NAFLD). We quantified the area of liver tissue occupied by lipid droplets (LDs) by FT-IR imaging and Oil Red O (ORO) staining for comparison. Two alternative FT-IR based approaches are presented. The first, straightforward method, was based on average spectra from tissues and provided values of the fat content by using a PLS regression model and the reference method. The second one – the chemometric-based method – enabled us to determine the values of the fat content, independently of the reference method by means of k-means cluster (KMC) analysis. In summary, FT-IR images of large size liver sections may prove to be useful for quantifying liver steatosis without the need of tissue staining.

  8. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Applications of a Ga-68/Ge-68 generator system to brain imaging using a multiwire proportional chamber positron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattner, R.S.; Lim, C.B.; Swann, S.J.; Kaufman, L.; Chu, D.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1976-01-01

    A Ge-68/Ga-68 generator system has been applied to brain imaging in conjunction with a novel coincidence detection based positron camera. The camera consists of two opposed large area multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) detectors interfaced to multichannel lead converter plates. Event localization is effected of delay lines. Ten patients with brain lesions have been studied 1-2 hours after the administration of Ga-68 formulated as DTPA. The images were compared to conventional brain scans, and to x-ray section scans (CAT). The positron studies have shown significant mitigation of confusing superficial activity resulting from craniotomy compared to conventional brain scans. Central necrosis of lesions observed in positron images, but not in the conventional scans has been confirmed in CAT. The economy of MWPC positron cameras combined with the ideal characteristics of the Ge-68/Ga-68 generator promise a cost efficient imaging system for the future

  10. Color blending based on viewpoint and surface normal for generating images from any viewpoint using multiple cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Genda, Daisuke; Yamane, Ryo; Shakunaga, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    A color blending method for generating a high quality image of human motion is presented. The 3D (three-dimensional) human shape is reconstructed by volume intersection and expressed as a set of voxels. As each voxel is observed as different colors from different cameras, voxel color needs to be assigned appropriately from several colors. We present a color blending method, which calculates voxel color from a linear combination of the colors observed by multiple cameras. The weightings in the...

  11. Crop Classification and LAI Estimation Using Original and Resolution-Reduced Images from Two Consumer-Grade Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumer-grade cameras are being increasingly used for remote sensing applications in recent years. However, the performance of this type of cameras has not been systematically tested and well documented in the literature. The objective of this research was to evaluate the performance of original and resolution-reduced images taken from two consumer-grade cameras, a RGB camera and a modified near-infrared (NIR camera, for crop identification and leaf area index (LAI estimation. Airborne RGB and NIR images taken over a 6.5-square-km cropping area were mosaicked and aligned to create a four-band mosaic with a spatial resolution of 0.4 m. The spatial resolution of the mosaic was then reduced to 1, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 30 m for comparison. Six supervised classifiers were applied to the RGB images and the four-band images for crop identification, and 10 vegetation indices (VIs derived from the images were related to ground-measured LAI. Accuracy assessment showed that maximum likelihood applied to the 0.4-m images achieved an overall accuracy of 83.3% for the RGB image and 90.4% for the four-band image. Regression analysis showed that the 10 VIs explained 58.7% to 83.1% of the variability in LAI. Moreover, spatial resolutions at 0.4, 1, 2 and 4 m achieved better classification results for both crop identification and LAI prediction than the coarser spatial resolutions at 10, 15 and 30 m. The results from this study indicate that imagery from consumer-grade cameras can be a useful data source for crop identification and canopy cover estimation.

  12. Surface enhanced imaging and IR spectroscopy of the biological cells on the nanostructured gold film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I. Dovbeshko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available New approach for optical imaging, structural study and cell cultivation based on the effect of the enhancement of optical signals from biomolecules and biological cells near nanostructured rough gold surface is proposed. The surface enhanced IR absorption (SEIRA spectroscopy and confocal microscopy experiments were made using the culture of SPEV (porcine embryonic kidney epithelium transplantable line and fibroblast cells, cultivated and/or adsorbed on the gold substrate. The SEIRA spectra registered from monolayer of the SPEV cells cultivated on the rough gold showed a low frequency shift of about 2 to 7 cm 1 for the most characteristic IR vibrations, compared with those adsorbed from suspension on the same substrate. An enhancement factor of 15…30 was obtained for different molecular vibrations. The confocal microscopy contrast images of the SPEV cells on rough gold substrate were obtained in laser fluorescence mode. This approach opens new possibilities for visualization of the living cells in vivo without staining. The fluorescence of the rough gold surfaces and effects responsible for our findings have been discussed.

  13. Near-IR Spectral Imaging of Semiconductor Absorption Sites in Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Samson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We derive spectral maps of absorption sites in integrated circuits (ICs by varying the wavelength of the optical probe within the near-IR range. This method has allowed us to improve the contrast of the acquired images by revealing structures that have a different optical absorption from neighboring sites. A false color composite image from those acquired at different wavelengths is generated from which the response of each semiconductor structure can be deduced. With the aid of the spectral maps, nonuniform absorption was also observed in a semiconductor structure located near an electrical overstress defect. This method may prove important in failure analysis of ICs by uncovering areas exhibiting anomalous absorption, which could improve localization of defective edifices in the semiconductor parts of the microchip

  14. SU-C-18A-02: Image-Based Camera Tracking: Towards Registration of Endoscopic Video to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, S; Rao, A; Wendt, R; Castillo, R; Court, L; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Endoscopic examinations are routinely performed on head and neck and esophageal cancer patients. However, these images are underutilized for radiation therapy because there is currently no way to register them to a CT of the patient. The purpose of this work is to develop a method to track the motion of an endoscope within a structure using images from standard clinical equipment. This method will be incorporated into a broader endoscopy/CT registration framework. Methods: We developed a software algorithm to track the motion of an endoscope within an arbitrary structure. We computed frame-to-frame rotation and translation of the camera by tracking surface points across the video sequence and utilizing two-camera epipolar geometry. The resulting 3D camera path was used to recover the surrounding structure via triangulation methods. We tested this algorithm on a rigid cylindrical phantom with a pattern spray-painted on the inside. We did not constrain the motion of the endoscope while recording, and we did not constrain our measurements using the known structure of the phantom. Results: Our software algorithm can successfully track the general motion of the endoscope as it moves through the phantom. However, our preliminary data do not show a high degree of accuracy in the triangulation of 3D point locations. More rigorous data will be presented at the annual meeting. Conclusion: Image-based camera tracking is a promising method for endoscopy/CT image registration, and it requires only standard clinical equipment. It is one of two major components needed to achieve endoscopy/CT registration, the second of which is tying the camera path to absolute patient geometry. In addition to this second component, future work will focus on validating our camera tracking algorithm in the presence of clinical imaging features such as patient motion, erratic camera motion, and dynamic scene illumination

  15. The clinical impact of a combined gamma camera/CT imaging system on somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillel, P.G.; Beek, E.J.R. van; Taylor, C.; Lorenz, E.; Bax, N.D.S.; Prakash, V.; Tindale, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: With a combined gamma camera/CT imaging system, CT images are obtained which are inherently registered to the emission images and can be used for the attenuation correction of SPECT and for mapping the functional information from these nuclear medicine tomograms onto anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of SPECT/CT using such a system for somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) of neuroendocrine tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SPECT/CT imaging with 111 In-Pentetreotide was performed on 29 consecutive patients, the majority of whom had carcinoid disease. All SPECT images were first reported in isolation and then re-reported with the addition of the CT images for functional anatomical mapping (FAM). RESULTS: Fifteen of the 29 SPECT images were reported as abnormal, and in 11 of these abnormal images (73%) FAM was found to either establish a previously unknown location (7/11) or change the location (4/11) of at least one lesion. The revised location could be independently confirmed in 64% of these cases. Confirmation of location was not possible in the other patients due to either a lack of other relevant investigations, or the fact that lesions seen in the SPECT images were not apparent in the other investigations. FAM affected patient management in 64% of the cases where the additional anatomical information caused a change in the reported location of lesions. CONCLUSION: These results imply that FAM can improve the reporting accuracy for SPECT SRI with significant impact on patient management

  16. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum.

  17. MicrOmega IR: a new infrared hyperspectral imaging microscope or in situ analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitua, Leroi; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Berthé, Michel

    2017-11-01

    MicrOmega IR is an ultra miniaturized Near Infrared hyperspectral microscope for in situ analysis of samples. It is designed to be implemented on board space planetary vehicles (lander and/or rovers). It acquires images of samples typically some 5 mm in width with a spatial sampling of 20 μm. On each pixel, MicrOmega acquires the spectrum in the spectral range 0.9 - 2.6 μm, with a possibility to extend the sensibility up to 4 μm. The spectrum will be measured in up to 300 contiguous spectral channels (600 in the extended range): given the diagnostic spectral features present in this domain, it provides the composition of each spatially resolved constituent. MicrOmega has thus the potential to identify: minerals, such as pyroxene and olivine, ferric oxides, hydrated phases such as phyllosilicates, sulfates and carbonates, ices and organics. The composition of the various phases within a given sample is a critical record of its formation and evolution. Coupled to the mapping information, it provides unique clues to describe the history of the parent body. In particular, the capability to identify hydrated grains and to characterize their adjacent phases has a huge potential in the search for potential bio-relics in Martian samples. This purely non destructive characterization enables further analyses (e.g. through mass spectrometry) to be performed, and/or to contribute to sample selection to return to Earth. MicrOmega IR is coupled to a visible microscope: MicrOmega VIS. Thus, the MicrOmega instrument is developed by an international consortium: IAS (Orsay, France), LESIA (Meudon, France), CBM (Orléans, France), University Of Bern (Bern, Switzerland), IKI (Moscow, Russia). This instrument (MicrOmega IR, MicrOmega VIS and the electronics) is selected for the ESA Exomars mission (launch scheduled for 2013). MicrOmega IR will be used in a reduced spectral range (0.9 - 2.6 μm), due to power, mass and thermal constraints: however, most minerals and other

  18. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2012-01-01

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  19. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  20. SU-F-J-140: Using Handheld Stereo Depth Cameras to Extend Medical Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Yu, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A correct body contour is essential for the accuracy of dose calculation in radiation therapy. While modern medical imaging technologies provide highly accurate representations of body contours, there are times when a patient’s anatomy cannot be fully captured or there is a lack of easy access to CT/MRI scanning. Recently, handheld cameras have emerged that are capable of performing three dimensional (3D) scans of patient surface anatomy. By combining 3D camera and medical imaging data, the patient’s surface contour can be fully captured. Methods: A proof-of-concept system matches a patient surface model, created using a handheld stereo depth camera (DC), to the available areas of a body contour segmented from a CT scan. The matched surface contour is then converted to a DICOM structure and added to the CT dataset to provide additional contour information. In order to evaluate the system, a 3D model of a patient was created by segmenting the body contour with a treatment planning system (TPS) and fabricated with a 3D printer. A DC and associated software were used to create a 3D scan of the printed phantom. The surface created by the camera was then registered to a CT model that had been cropped to simulate missing scan data. The aligned surface was then imported into the TPS and compared with the originally segmented contour. Results: The RMS error for the alignment between the camera and cropped CT models was 2.26 mm. Mean distance between the aligned camera surface and ground truth model was −1.23 +/−2.47 mm. Maximum deviations were < 1 cm and occurred in areas of high concavity or where anatomy was close to the couch. Conclusion: The proof-of-concept study shows an accurate, easy and affordable method to extend medical imaging for radiation therapy planning using 3D cameras without additional radiation. Intel provided the camera hardware used in this study.

  1. Similarity maps and hierarchical clustering for annotating FT-IR spectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiaoyong; Yang, Chen; Großerüschkamp, Frederik; Kallenbach-Thieltges, Angela; Serocka, Peter; Gerwert, Klaus; Mosig, Axel

    2013-11-20

    Unsupervised segmentation of multi-spectral images plays an important role in annotating infrared microscopic images and is an essential step in label-free spectral histopathology. In this context, diverse clustering approaches have been utilized and evaluated in order to achieve segmentations of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microscopic images that agree with histopathological characterization. We introduce so-called interactive similarity maps as an alternative annotation strategy for annotating infrared microscopic images. We demonstrate that segmentations obtained from interactive similarity maps lead to similarly accurate segmentations as segmentations obtained from conventionally used hierarchical clustering approaches. In order to perform this comparison on quantitative grounds, we provide a scheme that allows to identify non-horizontal cuts in dendrograms. This yields a validation scheme for hierarchical clustering approaches commonly used in infrared microscopy. We demonstrate that interactive similarity maps may identify more accurate segmentations than hierarchical clustering based approaches, and thus are a viable and due to their interactive nature attractive alternative to hierarchical clustering. Our validation scheme furthermore shows that performance of hierarchical two-means is comparable to the traditionally used Ward's clustering. As the former is much more efficient in time and memory, our results suggest another less resource demanding alternative for annotating large spectral images.

  2. Construction of a frameless camera-based stereotactic neuronavigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, A; Algorri, M E

    2004-01-01

    We built an infrared vision system to be used as the real time 3D motion sensor in a prototype low cost, high precision, frameless neuronavigator. The objective of the prototype is to develop accessible technology for increased availability of neuronavigation systems in research labs and small clinics and hospitals. We present our choice of technology including camera and IR emitter characteristics. We describe the methodology for setting up the 3D motion sensor, from the arrangement of the cameras and the IR emitters on surgical instruments, to triangulation equations from stereo camera pairs, high bandwidth computer communication with the cameras and real time image processing algorithms. We briefly cover the issues of camera calibration and characterization. Although our performance results do not yet fully meet the high precision, real time requirements of neuronavigation systems we describe the current improvements being made to the 3D motion sensor that will make it suitable for surgical applications.

  3. Using Deep Learning Algorithm to Enhance Image-review Software for Surveillance Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yonggang

    2018-05-07

    We propose the development of proven deep learning algorithms to flag objects and events of interest in Next Generation Surveillance System (NGSS) surveillance to make IAEA image review more efficient. Video surveillance is one of the core monitoring technologies used by the IAEA Department of Safeguards when implementing safeguards at nuclear facilities worldwide. The current image review software GARS has limited automated functions, such as scene-change detection, black image detection and missing scene analysis, but struggles with highly cluttered backgrounds. A cutting-edge algorithm to be developed in this project will enable efficient and effective searches in images and video streams by identifying and tracking safeguards relevant objects and detect anomalies in their vicinity. In this project, we will develop the algorithm, test it with the IAEA surveillance cameras and data sets collected at simulated nuclear facilities at BNL and SNL, and implement it in a software program for potential integration into the IAEA’s IRAP (Integrated Review and Analysis Program).

  4. Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kundracik, František

    2015-10-01

    The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405-3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.

  5. Characterization of a novel miniaturized burst-mode infrared laser system for IR-MALDESI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Måns; Manni, Jeffrey; Nazari, Milad; Bokhart, Mark; Muddiman, David C

    2018-03-01

    Laser systems are widely used in mass spectrometry as sample probes and ionization sources. Mid-infrared lasers are particularly suitable for analysis of high water content samples such as animal and plant tissues, using water as a resonantly excited sacrificial matrix. Commercially available mid-IR lasers have historically been bulky and expensive due to cooling requirements. This work presents a novel air-cooled miniature mid-IR laser with adjustable burst-mode output and details an evaluation of its performance for mass spectrometry imaging. The miniature laser was found capable of generating sufficient energy for complete ablation of animal tissue in the context of an IR-MALDESI experiment with exogenously added ice matrix, yielding several hundred confident metabolite identifications. Graphical abstract The use of a novel miniature 2.94 μm burst-mode laser in IR-MALDESI allows for rapid and sensitive mass spectrometry imaging of a whole mouse.

  6. An accelerated threshold-based back-projection algorithm for Compton camera image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, Daniel W.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compton camera imaging (CCI) systems are currently under investigation for radiotherapy dose reconstruction and verification. The ability of such a system to provide real-time images during dose delivery will be limited by the computational speed of the image reconstruction algorithm. In this work, the authors present a fast and simple method by which to generate an initial back-projected image from acquired CCI data, suitable for use in a filtered back-projection algorithm or as a starting point for iterative reconstruction algorithms, and compare its performance to the current state of the art. Methods: Each detector event in a CCI system describes a conical surface that includes the true point of origin of the detected photon. Numerical image reconstruction algorithms require, as a first step, the back-projection of each of these conical surfaces into an image space. The algorithm presented here first generates a solution matrix for each slice of the image space by solving the intersection of the conical surface with the image plane. Each element of the solution matrix is proportional to the distance of the corresponding voxel from the true intersection curve. A threshold function was developed to extract those pixels sufficiently close to the true intersection to generate a binary intersection curve. This process is repeated for each image plane for each CCI detector event, resulting in a three-dimensional back-projection image. The performance of this algorithm was tested against a marching algorithm known for speed and accuracy. Results: The threshold-based algorithm was found to be approximately four times faster than the current state of the art with minimal deficit to image quality, arising from the fact that a generically applicable threshold function cannot provide perfect results in all situations. The algorithm fails to extract a complete intersection curve in image slices near the detector surface for detector event cones having axes nearly

  7. Research on auto-calibration technology of the image plane's center of 360-degree and all round looking camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Xu, Xiping

    2015-10-01

    The 360-degree and all round looking camera, as its characteristics of suitable for automatic analysis and judgment on the ambient environment of the carrier by image recognition algorithm, is usually applied to opto-electronic radar of robots and smart cars. In order to ensure the stability and consistency of image processing results of mass production, it is necessary to make sure the centers of image planes of different cameras are coincident, which requires to calibrate the position of the image plane's center. The traditional mechanical calibration method and electronic adjusting mode of inputting the offsets manually, both exist the problem of relying on human eyes, inefficiency and large range of error distribution. In this paper, an approach of auto- calibration of the image plane of this camera is presented. The imaging of the 360-degree and all round looking camera is a ring-shaped image consisting of two concentric circles, the center of the image is a smaller circle and the outside is a bigger circle. The realization of the technology is just to exploit the above characteristics. Recognizing the two circles through HOUGH TRANSFORM algorithm and calculating the center position, we can get the accurate center of image, that the deviation of the central location of the optic axis and image sensor. The program will set up the image sensor chip through I2C bus automatically, we can adjusting the center of the image plane automatically and accurately. The technique has been applied to practice, promotes productivity and guarantees the consistent quality of products.

  8. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Camera Electronics Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, H.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Ong, R.; Swordy, S.; Wagner, R.; Williams, D.

    2008-04-01

    AGIS, a next generation of atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays, aims to achieve a sensitivity level of a milliCrab for gamma-ray observations in the energy band of 40 GeV to 100 TeV. Such improvement requires cost reduction of individual components with high reliability in order to equip the order of 100 telescopes necessary to achieve the sensitivity goal. We are exploring several design concepts to reduce the cost of camera electronics while improving their performance. These design concepts include systems based on multi-channel waveform sampling ASIC optimized for AGIS, a system based on IIT (image intensifier tube) for large channel (order of 1 million channels) readout as well as a multiplexed FADC system based on the current VERITAS readout design. Here we present trade-off in the studies of these design concepts.

  9. Experimental comparison of the high-speed imaging performance of an EM-CCD and sCMOS camera in a dynamic live-cell imaging test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope T Beier

    Full Text Available The study of living cells may require advanced imaging techniques to track weak and rapidly changing signals. Fundamental to this need is the recent advancement in camera technology. Two camera types, specifically sCMOS and EM-CCD, promise both high signal-to-noise and high speed (>100 fps, leaving researchers with a critical decision when determining the best technology for their application. In this article, we compare two cameras using a live-cell imaging test case in which small changes in cellular fluorescence must be rapidly detected with high spatial resolution. The EM-CCD maintained an advantage of being able to acquire discernible images with a lower number of photons due to its EM-enhancement. However, if high-resolution images at speeds approaching or exceeding 1000 fps are desired, the flexibility of the full-frame imaging capabilities of sCMOS is superior.

  10. Contributed Review: Camera-limits for wide-field magnetic resonance imaging with a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Karadas, Mürsel; Huck, Alexander; Osterkamp, Christian; Jankuhn, Steffen; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2018-03-01

    Sensitive, real-time optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond relies on accurate imaging of small (≪10-2), fractional fluorescence changes across the diamond sample. We discuss the limitations on magnetic field sensitivity resulting from the limited number of photoelectrons that a camera can record in a given time. Several types of camera sensors are analyzed, and the smallest measurable magnetic field change is estimated for each type. We show that most common sensors are of a limited use in such applications, while certain highly specific cameras allow achieving nanotesla-level sensitivity in 1 s of a combined exposure. Finally, we demonstrate the results obtained with a lock-in camera that paves the way for real-time, wide-field magnetometry at the nanotesla level and with a micrometer resolution.

  11. Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with a solid-state dedicated cardiac camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kacperski, Krzysztof; Hain, Sharon; Van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Waddington, Wendy A.; Ell, Peter J.; Sharir, Tali; Roth, Nathaniel; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Of 27 consecutive patients recruited, 24 (64.5±11.8 years of age, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of 201 Tl (rest) and 250 MBq 99m Tc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest are 21 min and 16 min, respectively. Rest 201 Tl for 6 min and simultaneous DR 15-min list mode gated scans were performed on a D-SPECT cardiac scanner. In 11 patients DR D-SPECT was performed first and in 13 patients conventional stress 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging was performed followed by DR D-SPECT. The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spill-over and scatter correction method. DR D-SPECT images were compared with rest 201 Tl D-SPECT and with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a five-point scale (0 normal, 4 absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores. Image quality was assessed on a four-point scale (1 poor, 4 very good) and gut activity was assessed on a four-point scale (0 none, 3 high). Conventional MPI studies were abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI showed 113 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 93 abnormal segments. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT showed 45 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 48 abnormal segments. The summed stress and rest scores on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT were highly correlated (r=0.9790 and 0.9694, respectively). The summed scores of rest 201 Tl D-SPECT and DR-DSPECT were also highly correlated (r=0.9968, p 201 Tl D-SPECT acquisition. (orig.)

  12. Image transmission in mid-IR using a solid state laser pumped optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Kratovil, Pat; Magee, James R.

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, image transmission using a mid-wave IR (MWIR) optical transceiver based free-space data link under low visibility conditions is presented. The all-solid-state MWIR transceiver primarily consisted of a passively Q-switched, short-pulsed Nd:YAG laser pumping a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) based optical parametric oscillator and a Dember effect detector. The MILES transceiver generates pulse position waveforms. The optical data link consisting of transmitter drive electronics, pulse conditioning electronics and a computer generating pulses compatible with the 2400-baud rate RS232 receiver was utilized. Data formatting and RS232 transmission and reception were achieved using a computer. Data formatting transformed an arbitrary image file format compatible with the basic operation of pump laser. Images were transmitted at a date rate of 2400 kbits/sec with 16 bits/pixel. Test images consisting of 50X40 pixels and 100X80 pixels were transmitted through free-space filled with light fog up to 120 ft. Besides optical parametric oscillators, the proposed concept can be extended to optical parametric amplifiers, Raman lasers and other nonlinear optical devices to achieve multi-functionality.

  13. Mid-IR hyperspectral imaging for label-free histopathology and cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, M.; Brandstrup Morrish, R.; Huot, L.; Meng, L.; Junaid, S.; Tomko, J.; Lloyd, G. R.; Masselink, W. T.; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, P.; Pedersen, C.; Palombo, F.; Stone, N.

    2018-02-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging has emerged as a valuable tool to investigate biological samples, such as tissue histological sections and cell cultures, by providing non-destructive chemical specificity without recourse to labels. While feasibility studies have shown the capabilities of MIR imaging approaches to address key biological and clinical questions, these techniques are still far from being deployable by non-expert users. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art of MIR technologies and give an overview on technical innovations and developments with the potential to make MIR imaging systems more readily available to a larger community. The most promising developments over the last few years are discussed here. They include improvements in MIR light sources with the availability of quantum cascade lasers and supercontinuum IR sources as well as the recently developed upconversion scheme to improve the detection of MIR radiation. These technical advances can substantially speed up data acquisition of multispectral or hyperspectral datasets thus providing the end user with vast amounts of data when imaging whole tissue areas of many mm2. Therefore, effective data analysis is of tremendous importance, and progress in method development is discussed with respect to the specific biomedical context.

  14. FT-IR spectroscopic imaging of reactions in multiphase flow in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2012-05-01

    Rapid, in situ, and label-free chemical analysis in microfluidic devices is highly desirable. FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has previously been shown to be a powerful tool to visualize the distribution of different chemicals in flows in a microfluidic device at near video rate imaging speed without tracers or dyes. This paper demonstrates the possibility of using this imaging technology to capture the chemical information of all reactants and products at different points in time and space in a two-phase system. Differences in the rates of chemical reactions in laminar flow and segmented flow systems are also compared. Neutralization of benzoic acid in decanol with disodium phosphate in water has been used as the model reaction. Quantitative information, such as concentration profiles of reactant and products, can be extracted from the imaging data. The same feed flow rate was used in both the laminar flow and segmented flow systems. The laminar flow pattern was achieved using a plain wide T-junction, whereas the segmented flow was achieved by introducing a narrowed section and a nozzle at the T-junction. The results show that the reaction rate is limited by diffusion and is much slower with the laminar flow pattern, whereas the reaction is completed more quickly in the segmented flow due to better mixing.

  15. Optimal energy window setting depending on the energy resolution for radionuclides used in gamma camera imaging. Planar imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Arao, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Masaaki; Takaki, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether the optimal energy window (EW) setting depending on an energy resolution of a gamma camera, which we previously proposed, is valid on planar scintigraphic imaging using Tl-201, Ga-67, Tc-99m, and I-123. Image acquisitions for line sources and paper sheet phantoms containing each radionuclide were performed in air and with scattering materials. For the six photopeaks excluding the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays' one, the conventional 20%-width energy window (EW20%) setting and the optimal energy window (optimal EW) setting (15%-width below 100 keV and 13%-width above 100 keV) were compared. For the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays' photopeak, the conventional on-peak EW20% setting was compared with the off-peak EW setting (73 keV-25%) and the wider off-peak EW setting (77 keV-29%). Image-count ratio (defined as the ratio of the image counts obtained with an EW and the total image counts obtained with the EW covered the whole photopeak for a line source in air), image quality, spatial resolutions (full width half maximum (FWHM) and full width tenth maximum (FWTM) values), count-profile curves, and defect-contrast values were compared between the conventional EW setting and the optimal EW setting. Except for the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays, the image-count ratios were 94-99% for the EW20% setting, but 78-89% for the optimal EW setting. However, the optimal EW setting reduced scatter fraction (defined as the scattered-to-primary counts ratio) effectively, as compared with the EW20% setting. Consequently, all the images with the optimal EW setting gave better image quality than ones with the EW20% setting. For the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays, the off-peak EW setting showed great improvement in image quality in comparison with the EW20% setting and the wider off-peak EW setting gave the best results. In conclusion, from our planar imaging study it was shown that although the optimal EW setting proposed by us gives less image-count ratio by

  16. Multiband CCD Image Compression for Space Camera with Large Field of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Space multiband CCD camera compression encoder requires low-complexity, high-robustness, and high-performance because of its captured images information being very precious and also because it is usually working on the satellite where the resources, such as power, memory, and processing capacity, are limited. However, the traditional compression approaches, such as JPEG2000, 3D transforms, and PCA, have the high-complexity. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems-Image Data Compression (CCSDS-IDC algorithm decreases the average PSNR by 2 dB compared with JPEG2000. In this paper, we proposed a low-complexity compression algorithm based on deep coupling algorithm among posttransform in wavelet domain, compressive sensing, and distributed source coding. In our algorithm, we integrate three low-complexity and high-performance approaches in a deeply coupled manner to remove the spatial redundant, spectral redundant, and bit information redundancy. Experimental results on multiband CCD images show that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms the traditional approaches.

  17. 3D tomographic imaging with the γ-eye planar scintigraphic gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, H.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G. K.; Simcox, A.; Tsoumpas, C.

    2017-11-01

    γ-eye is a desktop planar scintigraphic gamma camera (100 mm × 50 mm field of view) designed by BET Solutions as an affordable tool for dynamic, whole body, small-animal imaging. This investigation tests the viability of using γ-eye for the collection of tomographic data for 3D SPECT reconstruction. Two software packages, QSPECT and STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction), have been compared. Reconstructions have been performed using QSPECT’s implementation of the OSEM algorithm and STIR’s OSMAPOSL (Ordered Subset Maximum A Posteriori One Step Late) and OSSPS (Ordered Subsets Separable Paraboloidal Surrogate) algorithms. Reconstructed images of phantom and mouse data have been assessed in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity to varying activity levels and uniformity. The effect of varying the number of iterations, the voxel size (1.25 mm default voxel size reduced to 0.625 mm and 0.3125 mm), the point spread function correction and the weight of prior terms were explored. While QSPECT demonstrated faster reconstructions, STIR outperformed it in terms of resolution (as low as 1 mm versus 3 mm), particularly when smaller voxel sizes were used, and in terms of uniformity, particularly when prior terms were used. Little difference in terms of sensitivity was seen throughout.

  18. INFLUENCE OF THE VIEWING GEOMETRY WITHIN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES RETRIEVED FROM UAV SNAPSHOT CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aasen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral data has great potential for vegetation parameter retrieval. However, due to angular effects resulting from different sun-surface-sensor geometries, objects might appear differently depending on the position of an object within the field of view of a sensor. Recently, lightweight snapshot cameras have been introduced, which capture hyperspectral information in two spatial and one spectral dimension and can be mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles. This study investigates the influence of the different viewing geometries within an image on the apparent hyperspectral reflection retrieved by these sensors. Additionally, it is evaluated how hyperspectral vegetation indices like the NDVI are effected by the angular effects within a single image and if the viewing geometry influences the apparent heterogeneity with an area of interest. The study is carried out for a barley canopy at booting stage. The results show significant influences of the position of the area of interest within the image. The red region of the spectrum is more influenced by the position than the near infrared. The ability of the NDVI to compensate these effects was limited to the capturing positions close to nadir. The apparent heterogeneity of the area of interest is the highest close to a nadir.

  19. Examination of the semi-automatic calculation technique of vegetation cover rate by digital camera images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemine, S.; Rikimaru, A.; Takahashi, K.

    The rice is one of the staple foods in the world High quality rice production requires periodically collecting rice growth data to control the growth of rice The height of plant the number of stem the color of leaf is well known parameters to indicate rice growth Rice growth diagnosis method based on these parameters is used operationally in Japan although collecting these parameters by field survey needs a lot of labor and time Recently a laborsaving method for rice growth diagnosis is proposed which is based on vegetation cover rate of rice Vegetation cover rate of rice is calculated based on discriminating rice plant areas in a digital camera image which is photographed in nadir direction Discrimination of rice plant areas in the image was done by the automatic binarization processing However in the case of vegetation cover rate calculation method depending on the automatic binarization process there is a possibility to decrease vegetation cover rate against growth of rice In this paper a calculation method of vegetation cover rate was proposed which based on the automatic binarization process and referred to the growth hysteresis information For several images obtained by field survey during rice growing season vegetation cover rate was calculated by the conventional automatic binarization processing and the proposed method respectively And vegetation cover rate of both methods was compared with reference value obtained by visual interpretation As a result of comparison the accuracy of discriminating rice plant areas was increased by the proposed

  20. Human Detection Based on the Generation of a Background Image by Using a Far-Infrared Light Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Som Jeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction

  1. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2003-12-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mmx166 mmx65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mmx44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV (99mTc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56 +/- 0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and facilitating

  2. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Nippon Dental University School of Dentistry at Niigata, 1-8 Hamaura-cho, 951-8580, Niigata (Japan); Sakahara, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi [Acrorad Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar [Integrated Detector and Electronics A.S (IDE AS), Hovik (Norway)

    2003-12-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV ({sup 99m}Tc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56{+-}0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and

  3. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Sakahara, Harumi; Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2003-01-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV ( 99m Tc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56±0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and facilitating

  4. Automated Registration of Images from Multiple Bands of Resourcesat-2 Liss-4 camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhadevi, P. V.; Solanki, S. S.; Jyothi, M. V.; Varadan, G.

    2014-11-01

    Continuous and automated co-registration and geo-tagging of images from multiple bands of Liss-4 camera is one of the interesting challenges of Resourcesat-2 data processing. Three arrays of the Liss-4 camera are physically separated in the focal plane in alongtrack direction. Thus, same line on the ground will be imaged by extreme bands with a time interval of as much as 2.1 seconds. During this time, the satellite would have covered a distance of about 14 km on the ground and the earth would have rotated through an angle of 30". A yaw steering is done to compensate the earth rotation effects, thus ensuring a first level registration between the bands. But this will not do a perfect co-registration because of the attitude fluctuations, satellite movement, terrain topography, PSM steering and small variations in the angular placement of the CCD lines (from the pre-launch values) in the focal plane. This paper describes an algorithm based on the viewing geometry of the satellite to do an automatic band to band registration of Liss-4 MX image of Resourcesat-2 in Level 1A. The algorithm is using the principles of photogrammetric collinearity equations. The model employs an orbit trajectory and attitude fitting with polynomials. Then, a direct geo-referencing with a global DEM with which every pixel in the middle band is mapped to a particular position on the surface of the earth with the given attitude. Attitude is estimated by interpolating measurement data obtained from star sensors and gyros, which are sampled at low frequency. When the sampling rate of attitude information is low compared to the frequency of jitter or micro-vibration, images processed by geometric correction suffer from distortion. Therefore, a set of conjugate points are identified between the bands to perform a relative attitude error estimation and correction which will ensure the internal accuracy and co-registration of bands. Accurate calculation of the exterior orientation parameters with

  5. Robust and adaptive band-to-band image transform of UAS miniature multi-lens multispectral camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhan, Jyun-Ping; Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Haala, Norbert

    2018-03-01

    Utilizing miniature multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) cameras by mounting them on an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) has the benefits of convenience and flexibility to collect remote sensing imagery for precision agriculture, vegetation monitoring, and environment investigation applications. Most miniature MS cameras adopt a multi-lens structure to record discrete MS bands of visible and invisible information. The differences in lens distortion, mounting positions, and viewing angles among lenses mean that the acquired original MS images have significant band misregistration errors. We have developed a Robust and Adaptive Band-to-Band Image Transform (RABBIT) method for dealing with the band co-registration of various types of miniature multi-lens multispectral cameras (Mini-MSCs) to obtain band co-registered MS imagery for remote sensing applications. The RABBIT utilizes modified projective transformation (MPT) to transfer the multiple image geometry of a multi-lens imaging system to one sensor geometry, and combines this with a robust and adaptive correction (RAC) procedure to correct several systematic errors and to obtain sub-pixel accuracy. This study applies three state-of-the-art Mini-MSCs to evaluate the RABBIT method's performance, specifically the Tetracam Miniature Multiple Camera Array (MiniMCA), Micasense RedEdge, and Parrot Sequoia. Six MS datasets acquired at different target distances and dates, and locations are also applied to prove its reliability and applicability. Results prove that RABBIT is feasible for different types of Mini-MSCs with accurate, robust, and rapid image processing efficiency.

  6. Attempts of Thermal Imaging Camera Usage in Estimations of the Convective Heat Loss From a Vertical Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denda Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method for determining heat transfer coefficients using a gradient method has been developed. To verify accuracy of the proposed method vertical isothermal heating plate with natural convection mechanism has been examined. This configuration was deliberately chosen, because of the fact that such case is historically the earliest and most thoroughly studied and its rich scientific documentation – the most reliable. New method is based on temperature field visualization made in perpendicular plane to the heating surface of the plate using infrared camera. Because the camera does not record temperature of air itself but the surface only, therefore plastic mesh with low thermal conductivity has been used as a detector. Temperature of each mesh cell, placed perpendicular to the vertical heating surface and rinsed with convection stream of heated air could be already recorded by infrared camera. In the same time using IR camera surface of heating plate has been measured. By numerical processing of the results matrix temperature gradient on the surface ∂T/∂x │ x=0, local heat transfer coefficients αy, and local values of Nusselt number Nuy, can be calculated. After integration the average Nusselt number for entire plate can be calculated. Obtained relation characteristic numbers Nu = 0.647 Ra 0.236 (R2 = 0.943, has a good correlation with literature reports and proves usefulness of the method.

  7. Wide-band IR imaging in the NIR-MIR-FIR regions for in situ analysis of frescoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Pezzati, L.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.; Di Biase, R.; Mariotti, P. I.; Frosinini, C.

    2011-06-01

    Imaging methods offer several advantages in the field of conservation allowing to perform non-invasive inspection of works of art. In particular, non-invasive techniques based on imaging in different infrared (IR) regions are widely used for the investigation of paintings. Using radiation beyond the visible range, different characteristics of the inspected artwork may be revealed according to the bandwidth acquired. In this paper we present the recent results of a joint project among the two research institutes DIMEG and CNR-INO, and the restoration facility Opificio delle Pietre Dure, concerning the wide-band integration of IR imaging techniques, in the spectral ranges NIR 0.8-2.5 μm, MIR 3-5 μm, and FIR 8-12 μm, for in situ analysis of artworks. A joint, multi-mode use of reflection and thermal bands is proposed for the diagnostics of mural paintings, and it is demonstrated to be an effective tool in inspecting the layered structure. High resolution IR reflectography and, to a greater extent, IR imaging in the 3-5 μm band, are effectively used to characterize the superficial layer of the fresco and to analyze the stratigraphy of different pictorial layers. IR thermography in the 8-12 μm band is used to characterize the support deep structure. The integration of all the data provides a multi- layered and multi-spectral representation of the fresco that yields a comprehensive analysis.

  8. Near-IR Two-Photon Fluorescent Sensor for K(+) Imaging in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D

    2015-08-19

    A new two-photon excited fluorescent K(+) sensor is reported. The sensor comprises three moieties, a highly selective K(+) chelator as the K(+) recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (>52-fold) in detecting K(+) over other physiological metal cations. Upon binding K(+), the sensor switches from nonfluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K(+) sensing in living cells.

  9. Resolved spectrophotometric properties of the Ceres surface from Dawn Framing Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S. E.; Mottola, S.; Carsenty, U.; Ciarniello, M.; Jaumann, R.; Li, J.-Y.; Longobardo, A.; Palmer, E.; Pieters, C.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-05-01

    We present a global spectrophotometric characterization of the Ceres surface using Dawn Framing Camera (FC) images. We identify the photometric model that yields the best results for photometrically correcting images. Corrected FC images acquired on approach to Ceres were assembled into global maps of albedo and color. Generally, albedo and color variations on Ceres are muted. The albedo map is dominated by a large, circular feature in Vendimia Planitia, known from HST images (Li et al., 2006), and dotted by smaller bright features mostly associated with fresh-looking craters. The dominant color variation over the surface is represented by the presence of "blue" material in and around such craters, which has a negative spectral slope over the visible wavelength range when compared to average terrain. We also mapped variations of the phase curve by employing an exponential photometric model, a technique previously applied to asteroid Vesta (Schröder et al., 2013b). The surface of Ceres scatters light differently from Vesta in the sense that the ejecta of several fresh-looking craters may be physically smooth rather than rough. High albedo, blue color, and physical smoothness all appear to be indicators of youth. The blue color may result from the desiccation of ejected material that is similar to the phyllosilicates/water ice mixtures in the experiments of Poch et al. (2016). The physical smoothness of some blue terrains would be consistent with an initially liquid condition, perhaps as a consequence of impact melting of subsurface water ice. We find red terrain (positive spectral slope) near Ernutet crater, where De Sanctis et al. (2017) detected organic material. The spectrophotometric properties of the large Vendimia Planitia feature suggest it is a palimpsest, consistent with the Marchi et al. (2016) impact basin hypothesis. The central bright area in Occator crater, Cerealia Facula, is the brightest on Ceres with an average visual normal albedo of about 0.6 at

  10. Temperature measurements on fast-rotating objects using a thermographic camera with an optomechanical image derotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Bettina; Pape, Christian; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Increasing requirements concerning the quality and lifetime of machine components in industrial and automotive applications require comprehensive investigations of the components in conditions close to the application. Irregularities in heating of mechanical parts reveal regions with increased loading of pressure, draft or friction. In the long run this leads to damage and total failure of the machine. Thermographic measurements of rotating objects, e.g., rolling bearings, brakes, and clutches provide an approach to investigate those defects. However, it is challenging to measure fast-rotating objects accurately. Currently one contact-free approach is performing stroboscopic measurements using an infrared sensor. The data acquisition is triggered so that the image is taken once per revolution. This leads to a huge loss of information on the majority of the movement and to motion blur. The objective of this research is showing the potential of using an optomechanical image derotator together with a thermographic camera. The derotator follows the rotation of the measurement object so that quasi-stationary thermal images during motion can be acquired by the infrared sensor. Unlike conventional derotators which use a glass prism to achieve this effect, the derotator within this work is equipped with a sophisticated reflector assembly. These reflectors are made of aluminum to transfer infrared radiation emitted by the rotating object. Because of the resulting stationary thermal image, the operation can be monitored continuously even for fast-rotating objects. The field of view can also be set to a small off-axis region of interest which then can be investigated with higher resolution or frame rate. To depict the potential of this approach, thermographic measurements on a rolling bearings in different operating states are presented.

  11. Wide-Field Imaging of Omega Centauri with the Advanced Camera for Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, D.; Dorfman, J. L.; Cool, A. M.; Anderson, J.; Bailyn, C. D.; Edmonds, P. D.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    We present initial results of a wide-field imaging study of the globular cluster Omega Cen (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). We have obtained a mosaic of 3x3 pointings of the cluster using the HST/ACS Wide Field Camera covering approximately 10' x 10', roughly out to the cluster's half-mass radius. Using F435W (B435), F625W (R625) and F658N (H-alpha) filters, we are searching for optical counterparts of Chandra X-ray sources and studying the cluster's stellar populations. Here we report the discovery of an optical counterpart to the X-ray source identified by Rutledge et al. (2002) as a possible quiescent neutron star on the basis of its X-ray spectrum. The star's magnitude and color (R625 = 24.4, B435-R625 = 1.5) place it more than 1.5 magnitudes to the blue side of the main sequence. Through the H-alpha filter it is about 1.3 magnitudes brighter than cluster stars of comparable R625 magnitude. The blue color and H-alpha excess suggest the presence of an accretion disk, implying that the neutron star is a member of a quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. The object's faint absolute magnitude (M625 ˜ 10.6, M435 ˜ 11.8) implies that the system contains an unusually weak disk and that the companion, if it is a main-sequence star, is of very low mass (ACS study. This work is supported by NASA grant GO-9442 from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  12. Factors affecting the repeatability of gamma camera calibration for quantitative imaging applications using a sealed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anizan, N; Wahl, R L; Frey, E C; Wang, H; Zhou, X C

    2015-01-01

    Several applications in nuclear medicine require absolute activity quantification of single photon emission computed tomography images. Obtaining a repeatable calibration factor that converts voxel values to activity units is essential for these applications. Because source preparation and measurement of the source activity using a radionuclide activity meter are potential sources of variability, this work investigated instrumentation and acquisition factors affecting repeatability using planar acquisition of sealed sources. The calibration factor was calculated for different acquisition and geometry conditions to evaluate the effect of the source size, lateral position of the source in the camera field-of-view (FOV), source-to-camera distance (SCD), and variability over time using sealed Ba-133 sources. A small region of interest (ROI) based on the source dimensions and collimator resolution was investigated to decrease the background effect. A statistical analysis with a mixed-effects model was used to evaluate quantitatively the effect of each variable on the global calibration factor variability. A variation of 1 cm in the measurement of the SCD from the assumed distance of 17 cm led to a variation of 1–2% in the calibration factor measurement using a small disc source (0.4 cm diameter) and less than 1% with a larger rod source (2.9 cm diameter). The lateral position of the source in the FOV and the variability over time had small impacts on calibration factor variability. The residual error component was well estimated by Poisson noise. Repeatability of better than 1% in a calibration factor measurement using a planar acquisition of a sealed source can be reasonably achieved. The best reproducibility was obtained with the largest source with a count rate much higher than the average background in the ROI, and when the SCD was positioned within 5 mm of the desired position. In this case, calibration source variability was limited by the quantum

  13. Development of a Compton camera for prompt-gamma medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawood, S.; Thirolf, P. G.; Miani, A.; Böhmer, M.; Dedes, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Lang, C.; Liprandi, S.; Maier, L.; Marinšek, T.; Mayerhofer, M.; Schaart, D. R.; Lozano, I. Valencia; Parodi, K.

    2017-11-01

    A Compton camera-based detector system for photon detection from nuclear reactions induced by proton (or heavier ion) beams is under development at LMU Munich, targeting the online range verification of the particle beam in hadron therapy via prompt-gamma imaging. The detector is designed to be capable to reconstruct the photon source origin not only from the Compton scattering kinematics of the primary photon, but also to allow for tracking of the secondary Compton-scattered electrons, thus enabling a γ-source reconstruction also from incompletely absorbed photon events. The Compton camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT acting as absorber, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors as scatterers. The detector components have been characterized both under offline and online conditions. The LaBr3:Ce crystal exhibits an excellent time and energy resolution. Using intense collimated 137Cs and 60Co sources, the monolithic scintillator was scanned on a fine 2D grid to generate a reference library of light amplitude distributions that allows for reconstructing the photon interaction position using a k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN) algorithm. Systematic studies were performed to investigate the performance of the reconstruction algorithm, revealing an improvement of the spatial resolution with increasing photon energy to an optimum value of 3.7(1)mm at 1.33 MeV, achieved with the Categorical Average Pattern (CAP) modification of the k-NN algorithm.

  14. Solar irradiance forecasting at one-minute intervals for different sky conditions using sky camera images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Montesinos, J.; Batlles, F.J.; Portillo, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solar resource has been predicted for three hours at 1-min intervals. • Digital image levels and cloud motion vectors are joint for irradiance forecasting. • The three radiation components have been predicted under different sky conditions. • Diffuse and global radiation has an nRMSE value around 10% in all sky conditions. • Beam irradiance is predicted with an nRMSE value of about 15% in overcast skies. - Abstract: In the search for new techniques to predict atmospheric features that might be useful to solar power plant operators, we have carried out solar irradiance forecasting using emerging sky camera technology. Digital image levels are converted into irradiances and then the maximum cross-correlation method is applied to obtain future predictions. This methodology is a step forward in the study of the solar resource, essential to solar plant operators in adapting a plant’s operating procedures to atmospheric conditions and to improve electricity generation. The results are set out using different statistical parameters, in which beam, diffuse and global irradiances give a constant normalized root-mean-square error value over the time interval for all sky conditions. The average measure is 25.44% for beam irradiance; 11.60% for diffuse irradiance and 11.17% for global irradiance.

  15. The review of myocardial positron emission computed tomography and positron imaging by gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtake, Tohru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    To measure myocardial blood flow, Nitrogen-13 ammonia, Oxygen-15 water, Rubidium-82 and et al. are used. Each has merit and demerit. By measuring myocardial coronary flow reserve, the decrease of flow reserve during dipyridamole in patients with hypercholesterolemia or diabetes mellitus without significant coronary stenosis was observed. The possibility of early detection of atherosclerosis was showed. As to myocardial metabolism, glucose metabolism is measured by Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and it is considered as useful for the evaluation of myocardial viability. We are using FDG to evaluate insulin resistance during insulin clamp in patients with diabetes mellitus by measuring glucose utilization rate of myocardium and skeletal muscle. FFA metabolism has been measured by {sup 11}C-palmitate, but absolute quantification has not been performed. Recently the method for absolute quantification was reported, and new radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FTHA was reported. Oxygen metabolism has been estimated by {sup 11}C-acetate. Myocardial viability, cardiac efficiency was evaluated by oxygen metabolism. As to receptor or sympathetic nerve end, cardiac insufficiency or cardiac transplantation was evaluated. Imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceutical by gamma camera has been performed. Collimator method is clinically useful for cardiac imaging of viability study. (author). 54 refs.

  16. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kohara, Ryota [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0804 (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi [Department of Radiography, Keio University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nakahara, Tadaki [Department of Radiography, Keio University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shirahata, Takashi [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0804 (Japan); Takada, Atsushi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tanimori, Toru [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: tanimori@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ueno, Kazuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber ({mu}-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this {mu}-TPC (10x10x8 cm{sup 3}) and the 6x6x13 mm{sup 3} GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the {mu}-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6 deg. (FWHM) at 364 keV of {sup 131}I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of {sup 131}I.

  17. UVUDF: Ultraviolet Imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with Wide-Field Camera 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Kurczynski, Peter; Bond, Nicholas A.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Atek, Hakim; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Colbert, James W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gronwall, Caryl; Hanish, Daniel J.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; de Mello, Duilia F.; Ravindranath, Swara; Ryan, Russell E.; Siana, Brian D.; Scarlata, Claudia; Soto, Emmaris; Voyer, Elysse N.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are #12534.

  18. 4 Vesta in Color: High Resolution Mapping from Dawn Framing Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V.; LeCorre, L.; Nathues, A.; Sierks, H.; Christensen, U.; Hoffmann, M.; Schroeder, S. E.; Vincent, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.; Denevi, B. W.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Rotational surface variations on asteroid 4 Vesta have been known from ground-based and HST observations, and they have been interpreted as evidence of compositional diversity. NASA s Dawn mission entered orbit around Vesta on July 16, 2011 for a year-long global characterization. The framing cameras (FC) onboard the Dawn spacecraft will image the asteroid in one clear (broad) and seven narrow band filters covering the wavelength range between 0.4-1.0 microns. We present color mapping results from the Dawn FC observations of Vesta obtained during Survey orbit (approx.3000 km) and High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) (approx.950 km). Our aim is to create global color maps of Vesta using multi spectral FC images to identify the spatial extent of compositional units and link them with other available data sets to extract the basic mineralogy. While the VIR spectrometer onboard Dawn has higher spectral resolution (864 channels) allowing precise mineralogical assessment of Vesta s surface, the FC has three times higher spatial resolution in any given orbital phase. In an effort to extract maximum information from FC data we have developed algorithms using laboratory spectra of pyroxenes and HED meteorites to derive parameters associated with the 1-micron absorption band wing. These parameters will help map the global distribution of compositionally related units on Vesta s surface. Interpretation of these units will involve the integration of FC and VIR data.

  19. Performance Evaluations and Quality Validation System for Optical Gas Imaging Cameras That Visualize Fugitive Hydrocarbon Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical gas imaging (OGI) cameras have the unique ability to exploit the electromagnetic properties of fugitive chemical vapors to make invisible gases visible. This ability is extremely useful for industrial facilities trying to mitigate product losses from escaping gas and fac...

  20. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  1. Assessing the Crop-Water Status in Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill. Trees via Thermal Imaging Camera Connected to Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Francisco García-Tejero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Different tools are being implemented in order to improve the water management in agricultural irrigated areas of semiarid environments. Thermography has been progressively introduced as a promising technique for irrigation scheduling and the assessing of crop-water status, especially when deficit irrigation is being implemented. However, an important limitation is related to the cost of the actual cameras, this being a severe limitation to its practical usage by farmers and technicians. This work evaluates the potential and the robustness of a thermal imaging camera that is connected to smartphone (Flir One recently developed by Flir Systems Inc. as a first step to assess the crop water status. The trial was developed in mature almond (Prunus dulcis Mill. trees that are subjected to different irrigation treatments. Thermal information obtained by the Flir One camera was deal with the thermal information obtained with a conventional Thermal Camera (Flir SC660 with a high resolution, and subsequently, confronted with other related plant physiological parameters (leaf water potential, Ψleaf, and stomatal conductance, gs. Thermal imaging camera connected to smartphone provided useful information in estimating the crop-water status in almond trees, being a potential promising tool to accelerate the monitoring process and thereby enhance water-stress management of almond orchards.

  2. Assessing the Crop-Water Status in Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Trees via Thermal Imaging Camera Connected to Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tejero, Iván Francisco; Ortega-Arévalo, Carlos José; Iglesias-Contreras, Manuel; Moreno, José Manuel; Souza, Luciene; Tavira, Simón Cuadros; Durán-Zuazo, Víctor Hugo

    2018-03-31

    Different tools are being implemented in order to improve the water management in agricultural irrigated areas of semiarid environments. Thermography has been progressively introduced as a promising technique for irrigation scheduling and the assessing of crop-water status, especially when deficit irrigation is being implemented. However, an important limitation is related to the cost of the actual cameras, this being a severe limitation to its practical usage by farmers and technicians. This work evaluates the potential and the robustness of a thermal imaging camera that is connected to smartphone (Flir One) recently developed by Flir Systems Inc. as a first step to assess the crop water status. The trial was developed in mature almond ( Prunus dulcis Mill.) trees that are subjected to different irrigation treatments. Thermal information obtained by the Flir One camera was deal with the thermal information obtained with a conventional Thermal Camera (Flir SC660) with a high resolution, and subsequently, confronted with other related plant physiological parameters (leaf water potential, Ψ leaf , and stomatal conductance, g s ). Thermal imaging camera connected to smartphone provided useful information in estimating the crop-water status in almond trees, being a potential promising tool to accelerate the monitoring process and thereby enhance water-stress management of almond orchards.

  3. First demonstration of real-time gamma imaging by using a handheld Compton camera for particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taya, T., E-mail: taka48138@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Koide, A. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishio, T. [Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3, Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima (Japan); Kabuki, S. [School of Medicine, Tokai University, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Inaniwa, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-21

    The use of real-time gamma imaging for cancer treatment in particle therapy is expected to improve the accuracy of the treatment beam delivery. In this study, we demonstrated the imaging of gamma rays generated by the nuclear interactions during proton irradiation, using a handheld Compton camera (14 cm×15 cm×16 cm, 2.5 kg) based on scintillation detectors. The angular resolution of this Compton camera is ∼8° at full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a {sup 137}Cs source. We measured the energy spectra of the gamma rays using a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and photomultiplier tube, and using the handheld Compton camera, performed image reconstruction when using a 70 MeV proton beam to irradiate a water, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. In the energy spectra of all three phantoms, we found an obvious peak at 511 keV, which was derived from annihilation gamma rays, and in the energy spectrum of the PMMA phantom, we found another peak at 718 keV, which contains some of the prompt gamma rays produced from {sup 10}B. Therefore, we evaluated the peak positions of the projection from the reconstructed images of the PMMA phantom. The differences between the peak positions and the Bragg peak position calculated using simulation are 7 mm±2 mm and 3 mm±8 mm, respectively. Although we could quickly acquire online gamma imaging of both of the energy ranges during proton irradiation, we cannot arrive at a clear conclusion that prompt gamma rays sufficiently trace the Bragg peak from these results because of the uncertainty given by the spatial resolution of the Compton camera. We will develop a high-resolution Compton camera in the near future for further study. - Highlights: • Gamma imaging during proton irradiation by a handheld Compton camera is demonstrated. • We were able to acquire the online gamma-ray images quickly. • We are developing a high resolution Compton camera for range verification.

  4. Radiation camera exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, R.J.; Yarsawich, M.; Wolczek, W.

    1976-01-01

    A system and method for governing the exposure of an image generated by a radiation camera to an image sensing camera is disclosed. The exposure is terminated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined quantity of radiation, defining a radiation density, occurring in a predetermined area. An index is produced which represents the value of that quantity of radiation whose accumulation causes the exposure termination. The value of the predetermined radiation quantity represented by the index is sensed so that the radiation camera image intensity can be calibrated to compensate for changes in exposure amounts due to desired variations in radiation density of the exposure, to maintain the detectability of the image by the image sensing camera notwithstanding such variations. Provision is also made for calibrating the image intensity in accordance with the sensitivity of the image sensing camera, and for locating the index for maintaining its detectability and causing the proper centering of the radiation camera image

  5. Using a high-speed movie camera to evaluate slice dropping in clinical image interpretation with stack mode viewers.

    OpenAIRE

    Yakami, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Yanagisawa, Morio; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Takeshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify objectively the rate of slice omission during paging on picture archiving and communication system (PACS) viewers by recording the images shown on the computer displays of these viewers with a high-speed movie camera. This study was approved by the institutional review board. A sequential number from 1 to 250 was superimposed on each slice of a series of clinical Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) data. The slices were displayed using ...

  6. A compact 16-module camera using 64-pixel CsI(Tl)/Si p-i-n photodiode imaging modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, W.-S.; Gruber, G. J.; Moses, W. W.; Derenzo, S. E.; Holland, S. E.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Krieger, B.; Mandelli, E.; Meddeler, G.; Wang, N. W.; Witt, E. K.

    2002-10-01

    We present a compact, configurable scintillation camera employing a maximum of 16 individual 64-pixel imaging modules resulting in a 1024-pixel camera covering an area of 9.6 cm/spl times/9.6 cm. The 64-pixel imaging module consists of optically isolated 3 mm/spl times/3 mm/spl times/5 mm CsI(Tl) crystals coupled to a custom array of Si p-i-n photodiodes read out by a custom integrated circuit (IC). Each imaging module plugs into a readout motherboard that controls the modules and interfaces with a data acquisition card inside a computer. For a given event, the motherboard employs a custom winner-take-all IC to identify the module with the largest analog output and to enable the output address bits of the corresponding module's readout IC. These address bits identify the "winner" pixel within the "winner" module. The peak of the largest analog signal is found and held using a peak detect circuit, after which it is acquired by an analog-to-digital converter on the data acquisition card. The camera is currently operated with four imaging modules in order to characterize its performance. At room temperature, the camera demonstrates an average energy resolution of 13.4% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the 140-keV emissions of /sup 99m/Tc. The system spatial resolution is measured using a capillary tube with an inner diameter of 0.7 mm and located 10 cm from the face of the collimator. Images of the line source in air exhibit average system spatial resolutions of 8.7- and 11.2-mm FWHM when using an all-purpose and high-sensitivity parallel hexagonal holes collimator, respectively. These values do not change significantly when an acrylic scattering block is placed between the line source and the camera.

  7. Effects of use of the lodine contrast medium on gamma camera imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyo, Sung Jae; Cho, Yun Ho [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Inha University hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Effects of Gamma camera imaging on gamma ray counting rates as a function of use and density of the iodine contrast medium currently in primary use for clinics, and changes in gamma ray counting rates as a function of the contrast medium status upon attenuation correction using a CT absorption coefficientin an SPECT/CT attenuation correction will be considered herein. For experimental materials used 99mTcO4 370 MBq and Pamiray 370 mg, Iomeron 350 mg, Visipaque 320 mg, Bonorex 300 mg of iodine contrast medium. For image acquisition, planar imaging was consecutively filmed for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 min, respectively, 30 min after administration of 99mTcO4. while 60 views were filmed per frame for 20 min at 55 min for the SPECT/CT imaging. In planar imaging, the gamma ray counting rates as a function of filming time were reduced showing a statistically significant difference when mixed according to the type of contrast medium density rather than when the radioactive isotope 99mTcO4 and the saline solution were mixed. In the tomography for mixing of the radioactive isotope 99mTcO4 and saline solution, the mean counting rate without correction by the CT absorption coefficient is 182±26 counts, while the counting rate with correction by the CT absorption coefficient is 531.3±34 counts. In the tomography for mixing of the radioactive isotope 99mTcO4 and the saline solution with the contrast medium, the mean values before attenuation correction by CT absorption coefficient were 166±29, 158.3±17, 154±36, and 150±33 counts depending on the densities of the contrast medium, while the mean values after attenuation correction were 515±03, 503±10, 496±31, and 488.7±33 counts, showing significant differences in both cases when comparatively evaluated with the imaging for no mixing of the contrast medium. Iodine contrast medium affects the rate of gamma ray. Therefore, You should always be preceded before another test on the day of diagnosis.

  8. Digital camera image analysis of faeces in detection of cholestatic jaundice in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinyanut, Parinya; Bandisak, Tai; Chiengkriwate, Piyawan; Tanthanuch, Sawit; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Stool colour assessment is a screening method for biliary tract obstruction in infants. This study is aimed to be a proof of concept work of digital photograph image analysis of stool colour compared to colour grading by a colour card, and the stool bilirubin level test. The total bilirubin (TB) level contents in stool samples from 17 infants aged less than 1 year, seven with confirmed cholestatic jaundice and ten healthy subjects was measured, and outcome correlated with the physical colour of the stool. The seven infants with cholestasis included 6 cases of biliary atresia and 1 case of pancreatic mass. All pre-operative stool samples in these cases were indicated as grade 1 on the stool card (stool colour in healthy infants ranges from 4 to 6). The average stool TB in the pale stool group was 43.07 μg/g compared to 101.78 μg/g in the non-pale stool group. Of the 3 colour channels assessed in the digital photographs, the blue and green light were best able to discriminate accurately between the pre-operative stool samples from infants with cholestasis and the samples from the healthy controls. With red, green, and blue (RGB) image analysis using wave level as the ANN input, the system predicts the stool TB with a relationship coefficient of 0.96, compared to 0.61 when stool colour card grading was used. Input from digital camera images of stool had a higher predictive capability compared to the standard stool colour card, indicating using digital photographs may be a useful tool for detection of cholestasis in infants.

  9. Digital camera image analysis of faeces in detection of cholestatic jaundice in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Parinyanut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stool colour assessment is a screening method for biliary tract obstruction in infants. This study is aimed to be a proof of concept work of digital photograph image analysis of stool colour compared to colour grading by a colour card, and the stool bilirubin level test. Materials and Methods: The total bilirubin (TB level contents in stool samples from 17 infants aged less than 1 year, seven with confirmed cholestatic jaundice and ten healthy subjects was measured, and outcome correlated with the physical colour of the stool. Results: The seven infants with cholestasis included 6 cases of biliary atresia and 1 case of pancreatic mass. All pre-operative stool samples in these cases were indicated as grade 1 on the stool card (stool colour in healthy infants ranges from 4 to 6. The average stool TB in the pale stool group was 43.07 μg/g compared to 101.78 μg/g in the non-pale stool group. Of the 3 colour channels assessed in the digital photographs, the blue and green light were best able to discriminate accurately between the pre-operative stool samples from infants with cholestasis and the samples from the healthy controls. With red, green, and blue (RGB image analysis using wave level as the ANN input, the system predicts the stool TB with a relationship coefficient of 0.96, compared to 0.61 when stool colour card grading was used. Conclusion: Input from digital camera images of stool had a higher predictive capability compared to the standard stool colour card, indicating using digital photographs may be a useful tool for detection of cholestasis in infants.

  10. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, F.; Golnik, C.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu2SiO5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  11. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso-González, F; Golnik, C; Berthel, M; Dreyer, A; Enghardt, W; Kormoll, T; Rohling, H; Pausch, G; Fiedler, F; Heidel, K; Schöne, S; Schwengner, R; Wagner, A

    2014-01-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu 2 SiO 5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  12. Development of an omnidirectional gamma-ray imaging Compton camera for low-radiation-level environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takara; Enomoto, Ryoji; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kagaya, Mika; Fukushi, Masahiro; Kano, Daisuke; Satoh, Wataru; Takeda, Tohoru; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Tanaka, Souichi; Uchida, Tomohisa; Wada, Kiyoto; Wakamatsu, Ryo

    2018-02-01

    We have developed an omnidirectional gamma-ray imaging Compton camera for environmental monitoring at low levels of radiation. The camera consisted of only six CsI(Tl) scintillator cubes of 3.5 cm, each of which was readout by super-bialkali photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). Our camera enables the visualization of the position of gamma-ray sources in all directions (∼4π sr) over a wide energy range between 300 and 1400 keV. The angular resolution (σ) was found to be ∼11°, which was realized using an image-sharpening technique. A high detection efficiency of 18 cps/(µSv/h) for 511 keV (1.6 cps/MBq at 1 m) was achieved, indicating the capability of this camera to visualize hotspots in areas with low-radiation-level contamination from the order of µSv/h to natural background levels. Our proposed technique can be easily used as a low-radiation-level imaging monitor in radiation control areas, such as medical and accelerator facilities.

  13. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  14. The study of error for analysis in dynamic image from the error of count rates in Nal (Tl) scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Joo Young; Kang, Chun Goo; Kim, Jung Yul; Oh, Ki Baek; Kim, Jae Sam; Park, Hoon Hee

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of T 1/2 upon count rates in the analysis of dynamic scan using NaI (Tl) scintillation camera, and suggest a new quality control method with this effects. We producted a point source with '9 9m TcO 4 - of 18.5 to 185 MBq in the 2 mL syringes, and acquired 30 frames of dynamic images with 10 to 60 seconds each using Infinia gamma camera (GE, USA). In the second experiment, 90 frames of dynamic images were acquired from 74 MBq point source by 5 gamma cameras (Infinia 2, Forte 2, Argus 1). There were not significant differences in average count rates of the sources with 18.5 to 92.5 MBq in the analysis of 10 to 60 seconds/frame with 10 seconds interval in the first experiment (p>0.05). But there were significantly low average count rates with the sources over 111 MBq activity at 60 seconds/frame (p<0.01). According to the second analysis results of linear regression by count rates of 5 gamma cameras those were acquired during 90 minutes, counting efficiency of fourth gamma camera was most low as 0.0064%, and gradient and coefficient of variation was high as 0.0042 and 0.229 each. We could not find abnormal fluctuation in χ 2 test with count rates (p>0.02), and we could find the homogeneity of variance in Levene's F-test among the gamma cameras (p>0.05). At the correlation analysis, there was only correlation between counting efficiency and gradient as significant negative correlation (r=-0.90, p<0.05). Lastly, according to the results of calculation of T 1/2 error from change of gradient with -0.25% to +0.25%, if T 1/2 is relatively long, or gradient is high, the error increase relationally. When estimate the value of 4th camera which has highest gradient from the above mentioned result, we could not see T 1/2 error within 60 minutes at that value. In conclusion, it is necessary for the scintillation gamma camera in medical field to manage hard for the quality of radiation measurement. Especially, we found a

  15. Ultraviolet Imaging with Low Cost Smartphone Sensors: Development and Application of a Raspberry Pi-Based UV Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wilkes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the modification of a low cost sensor, designed for the smartphone camera market, to develop an ultraviolet (UV camera system. This was achieved via adaptation of Raspberry Pi cameras, which are based on back-illuminated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS sensors, and we demonstrated the utility of these devices for applications at wavelengths as low as 310 nm, by remotely sensing power station smokestack emissions in this spectral region. Given the very low cost of these units, ≈ USD 25, they are suitable for widespread proliferation in a variety of UV imaging applications, e.g., in atmospheric science, volcanology, forensics and surface smoothness measurements.

  16. Development of a time-of-flight Compton camera prototype for online control of ion therapy and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Hadron-therapy is one of the modalities available for treating cancer. This modality uses light ions (protons, carbon ions) to destroy cancer cells. Such particles have a ballistic accuracy thanks to their quasi-rectilinear trajectory, their path and the finished profile maximum dose in the end. Compared to conventional radiotherapy, this allows to spare the healthy tissue located adjacent downstream and upstream of the tumor. One of this modality's quality assurance challenges is to control the positioning of the dose deposited by ions in the patient. One possibility to perform this control is to detect the prompt gammas emitted during nuclear reactions induced along the ion path in the patient. A Compton camera prototype, theoretically allowing to maximize the detection efficiency of the prompt gammas, is being developed under a regional collaboration. This camera was the main focus of my thesis, and particularly the following points: i) studying, throughout Monte Carlo simulations, the operation of the prototype in construction, particularly with respect to the expected counting rates on the different types of accelerators in hadron-therapy ii) conducting simulation studies on the use of this camera in clinical imaging, iii) characterising the silicon detectors (scatterer) iv) confronting Geant4 simulations on the camera's response with measurements on the beam with the help of a demonstrator. As a result, the Compton camera prototype developed makes a control of the localization of the dose deposition in proton therapy to the scale of a spot possible, provided that the intensity of the clinical proton beam is reduced by a factor 200 (intensity of 10 8 protons/s). An application of the Compton camera in nuclear medicine seems to be attainable with the use of radioisotopes of an energy greater than 300 keV. These initial results must be confirmed by more realistic simulations (homogeneous and heterogeneous PMMA targets). Tests with the progressive

  17. Uncertainties in cloud phase and optical thickness retrievals from the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerry; Yang, Yuekui; Platnick, Steven

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the expected uncertainties of a single channel cloud optical thickness (COT) retrieval technique, as well as a simple cloud temperature threshold based thermodynamic phase approach, in support of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission. DSCOVR cloud products will be derived from Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) observations in the ultraviolet and visible spectra. Since EPIC is not equipped with a spectral channel in the shortwave or mid-wave infrared that is sensitive to cloud effective radius (CER), COT will be inferred from a single visible channel with the assumption of appropriate CER values for liquid and ice phase clouds. One month of Aqua MODIS daytime granules from April 2005 is selected for investigating cloud phase sensitivity, and a subset of these granules that has similar EPIC sun-view geometry is selected for investigating COT uncertainties. EPIC COT retrievals are simulated with the same algorithm as the operational MODIS cloud products (MOD06), except using fixed phase-dependent CER values. Uncertainty estimates are derived by comparing the single channel COT retrievals with the baseline bi-spectral MODIS retrievals. Results show that a single channel COT retrieval is feasible for EPIC. For ice clouds, single channel retrieval errors are minimal (clouds the error is mostly limited to within 10%, although for thin clouds (COT cloud masking and cloud temperature retrievals are not considered in this study. PMID:29619116

  18. The reliability and validity of a three-camera foot image system for obtaining foot anthropometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Damien; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Hunt, Adrienne; Smith, Richard

    2010-08-01

    The purpose was to develop a foot image capture and measurement system with web cameras (the 3-FIS) to provide reliable and valid foot anthropometric measures with efficiency comparable to that of the conventional method of using a handheld anthropometer. Eleven foot measures were obtained from 10 subjects using both methods. Reliability of each method was determined over 3 consecutive days using the intraclass correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE). Reliability was excellent for both the 3-FIS and the handheld anthropometer for the same 10 variables, and good for the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint height. The RMSE values over 3 days ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 mm for the handheld anthropometer, and from 0.8 to 3.6 mm for the 3-FIS. The RMSE values between the 3-FIS and the handheld anthropometer were between 2.3 and 7.4 mm. The 3-FIS required less time to collect and obtain the final variables than the handheld anthropometer. The 3-FIS provided accurate and reproducible results for each of the foot variables and in less time than the conventional approach of a handheld anthropometer.

  19. Determining Sala mango qualities with the use of RGB images captured by a mobile phone camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Ommi Kalsom Mardziah; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2015-04-01

    Sala mango (Mangifera indicia) is one of the Malaysia's most popular tropical fruits that are widely marketed within the country. The degrees of ripeness of mangoes have conventionally been evaluated manually on the basis of color parameters, but a simple non-destructive technique using the Samsung Galaxy Note 1 mobile phone camera is introduced to replace the destructive technique. In this research, color parameters in terms of RGB values acquired using the ENVI software system were linked to detect Sala mango quality parameters. The features of mango were extracted from the acquired images and then used to classify of fruit skin color, which relates to the stages of ripening. A multivariate analysis method, multiple linear regression, was employed with the purpose of using RGB color parameters to estimate the pH, soluble solids content (SSC), and firmness. The relationship between these qualities parameters of Sala mango and its mean pixel values in the RGB system is analyzed. Findings show that pH yields the highest accuracy with a correlation coefficient R = 0.913 and root mean square of error RMSE = 0.166 pH. Meanwhile, firmness has R = 0.875 and RMSE = 1.392 kgf, whereas soluble solid content has the lowest accuracy with R = 0.814 and RMSE = 1.218°Brix with the correlation between color parameters. Therefore, this non-invasive method can be used to determine the quality attributes of mangoes.

  20. Observation of interaction of shock wave with gas bubble by image converter camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, M.; Tada, M.; Tsuji, T.; Isuzugawa, Kohji

    1995-05-01

    When a spark discharge occurs at the first focal point of a semiellipsoid or a reflector located in water, a spherical shock wave is produced. A part of the wave spreads without reflecting on the reflector and is called direct wave in this paper. Another part reflects on the semiellipsoid and converges near the second focal point, that is named the focusing wave, and locally produces a high pressure. This phenomenon is applied to disintegrators of kidney stone. But it is concerned that cavitation bubbles induced in the body by the expansion wave following the focusing wave will injure human tissue around kidney stone. In this paper, in order to examine what happens when shock waves strike bubbles on human tissue, the aspect that an air bubble is truck by the spherical shock wave or its behavior is visualized by the schlieren system and its photographs are taken using an image converter camera. Besides,the variation of the pressure amplitude caused by the shock wave and the flow of water around the bubble is measured with a pressure probe.

  1. X-ray fluorescence camera for imaging of iodine media in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is useful for measuring density distributions of contrast media in vivo. An XRF camera was developed for carrying out mapping for iodine-based contrast media used in medical angiography. Objects are exposed by an X-ray beam from a cerium target. Cerium K-series X-rays are absorbed effectively by iodine media in objects, and iodine fluorescence is produced from the objects. Next, iodine Kalpha fluorescence is selected out by use of a 58-microm-thick stannum filter and is detected by a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. The Kalpha rays are discriminated out by a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. The objects are moved and scanned by an x-y stage in conjunction with a two-stage controller, and X-ray images obtained by iodine mapping are shown on a personal computer monitor. The scan pitch of the x and y axes was 2.5 mm, and the photon counting time per mapping point was 2.0 s. We carried out iodine mapping of non-living animals (phantoms), and iodine Kalpha fluorescence was produced from weakly remaining iodine elements in a rabbit skin cancer.

  2. Methodology for automatic process of the fired ceramic tile's internal defect using IR images and artificial neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Roberto Márcio de; Eduardo, Alexandre Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In the ceramic industry, rarely testing systems were employed to on-line detect the presence of defects in ceramic tiles. This paper is concerned with the problem of automatic inspection of ceramic tiles using Infrared Images and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The performance of the technique has been evaluated theoretically and experimentally from laboratory and on line tile samples. It has been performed system for IR image processing and, utilizing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), det...

  3. The Compton Camera - medical imaging with higher sensitivity Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Camera reconstructs the origin of Compton-scattered X-rays using electronic collimation with Silicon pad detectors instead of the heavy conventional lead collimators in Anger cameras - reaching up to 200 times better sensitivity and a factor two improvement in resolution. Possible applications are in cancer diagnosis, neurology neurobiology, and cardiology.

  4. UVUDF: Ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble ultra deep field with wide-field camera 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Colbert, James W.; Hanish, Daniel J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; De Mello, Duilia F. [Laboratory for Observational Cosmology, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Gronwall, Caryl [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ravindranath, Swara, E-mail: hit@ipac.caltech.edu [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); and others

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (2) probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (3) examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ∼ 2-3; (4) greatly improve the reliability of photometric redshift estimates; and (5) measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at z ∼ 1-3. In this overview paper, we describe the survey details and data reduction challenges, including both the necessity of specialized calibrations and the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. We provide a stark demonstration of the effects of charge transfer inefficiency on resultant data products, which when uncorrected, result in uncertain photometry, elongation of morphology in the readout direction, and loss of faint sources far from the readout. We agree with the STScI recommendation that future UVIS observations that require very sensitive measurements use the instrument's capability to add background light through a 'post-flash'. Preliminary results on number counts of UV-selected galaxies and morphology of galaxies at z ∼ 1 are presented. We find that the number density of UV dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch.

  5. Near-IR imaging of thermal changes in enamel during laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Linn H.; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this work was to observe the various thermal-induced optical changes that occur in the near-infrared (NIR) during drilling in dentin and enamel with the laser and the high-speed dental handpiece. Tooth sections of ~ 3 mm-thickness were prepared from extracted human incisors (N=60). Samples were ablated with a mechanically scanned CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 9.3-μm, a 300-Hz laser pulse repetition rate, and a laser pulse duration of 10-20 μs. An InGaAs imaging camera was used to acquire real-time NIR images at 1300-nm of thermal and mechanical changes (cracks). Enamel was rapidly removed by the CO2 laser without peripheral thermal damage by mechanically scanning the laser beam while a water spray was used to cool the sample. Comparison of the peripheral thermal and mechanical changes produced while cutting with the laser and the high-speed hand-piece suggest that enamel and dentin can be removed at high speed by the CO2 laser without excessive peripheral thermal or mechanical damage. Only 2 of the 15 samples ablated with the laser showed the formation of small cracks while 9 out of 15 samples exhibited crack formation with the dental hand-piece. The first indication of thermal change is a decrease in transparency due to loss of the mobile water from pores in the enamel which increase lightscattering. To test the hypothesis that peripheral thermal changes were caused by loss of mobile water in the enamel, thermal changes were intentionally induced by heating the surface. The mean attenuation coefficient of enamel increased significantly from 2.12 +/- 0.82 to 5.08 +/- 0.98 with loss of mobile water due to heating.

  6. 3D FT-IR imaging spectroscopy of phase-separation in a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(L-lactic acid) blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriam Unger; Julia Sedlmair; Heinz W. Siesler; Carol Hirschmugl; Barbara Illman

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, 3D FT-IR spectroscopic imaging measurements were applied to study the phase separation of a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) (50:50 wt.%) polymer blend film. While in 2D projection imaging the z-dependent information is overlapped, thereby complicating the analysis, FT-IR spectro-micro-tomography,...

  7. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Gregory J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm3 in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera.

  8. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm 3 in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera

  9. Quality control in dual head γ-cameras: comparison between methods and software s used for image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl E, A.; Fornasier, M. R.; De Denaro, M.; Sulieman, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Bradley, D.

    2017-10-01

    Patient radiation dose and image quality are the main issues in nuclear medicine (Nm) procedures. Currently, many protocols are used for image acquisition and analysis of quality control (Qc) tests. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema) methods and protocols are widely accepted method used for providing accurate description, measurement and reporting of γ-camera performance parameters. However, no standard software is available for image analysis. The aim os this study was to compare between the vendor Qc software analysis and three software from different developers downloaded free from internet; NMQC, Nm Tool kit and ImageJ-Nm Tool kit software. The three software are used for image analysis of some Qc tests for γ-cameras based on Nema protocols including non-uniformity evaluation. Ten non-uniformity Qc images were taken from dual head γ-camera (Siemens Symbia) installed in Trieste general hospital (Italy), and analyzed. Excel analysis was used as baseline calculation of the non-uniformity test according Nema procedures. The results of the non-uniformity analysis showed good agreement between the three independent software and excel calculation (the average differences were 0.3%, 2.9%, 1.3% and 1.6% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively), while significant difference was detected on the analysis of the company Qc software with compare to the excel analysis (the average differences were 14.6%, 20.7%, 25.7% and 31.9% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively). NMQC software was the best in comparison with the excel calculations. The variation in the results is due to different pixel sizes used for analysis in the three software and the γ-camera Qc software. Therefore, is important to perform the tests by the vendor Qc software as well as by independent analysis to understand the differences between the values. Moreover, the medical physicist should know

  10. Quality control in dual head γ-cameras: comparison between methods and software s used for image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayl E, A. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Safety Institute, Khartoum (Sudan); Fornasier, M. R.; De Denaro, M. [Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste, Medical Physics Department, Via Giovanni Sai 7, 34128 Trieste (Italy); Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O. Box 422, 11942 Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia); Alkhorayef, M.; Bradley, D., E-mail: abdwsh10@hotmail.com [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2-7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Patient radiation dose and image quality are the main issues in nuclear medicine (Nm) procedures. Currently, many protocols are used for image acquisition and analysis of quality control (Qc) tests. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema) methods and protocols are widely accepted method used for providing accurate description, measurement and reporting of γ-camera performance parameters. However, no standard software is available for image analysis. The aim os this study was to compare between the vendor Qc software analysis and three software from different developers downloaded free from internet; NMQC, Nm Tool kit and ImageJ-Nm Tool kit software. The three software are used for image analysis of some Qc tests for γ-cameras based on Nema protocols including non-uniformity evaluation. Ten non-uniformity Qc images were taken from dual head γ-camera (Siemens Symbia) installed in Trieste general hospital (Italy), and analyzed. Excel analysis was used as baseline calculation of the non-uniformity test according Nema procedures. The results of the non-uniformity analysis showed good agreement between the three independent software and excel calculation (the average differences were 0.3%, 2.9%, 1.3% and 1.6% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively), while significant difference was detected on the analysis of the company Qc software with compare to the excel analysis (the average differences were 14.6%, 20.7%, 25.7% and 31.9% for UFOV integral, UFOV differential, CFOV integral and CFOV differential respectively). NMQC software was the best in comparison with the excel calculations. The variation in the results is due to different pixel sizes used for analysis in the three software and the γ-camera Qc software. Therefore, is important to perform the tests by the vendor Qc software as well as by independent analysis to understand the differences between the values. Moreover, the medical physicist should know

  11. The HURRA filter: An easy method to eliminate collimator artifacts in high-energy gamma camera images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, H; Barquero, R

    The correct determination and delineation of tumor/organ size is crucial in 2-D imaging in 131 I therapy. These images are usually obtained using a system composed of a Gamma camera and high-energy collimator, although the system can produce artifacts in the image. This article analyses these artifacts and describes a correction filter that can eliminate those collimator artifacts. Using free software, ImageJ, a central profile in the image is obtained and analyzed. Two components can be seen in the fluctuation of the profile: one associated with the stochastic nature of the radiation, plus electronic noise and the other periodically across the position in space due to the collimator. These frequencies are analytically obtained and compared with the frequencies in the Fourier transform of the profile. A specially developed filter removes the artifacts in the 2D Fourier transform of the DICOM image. This filter is tested using a 15-cm-diameter Petri dish with 131 I radioactive water (big object size) image, a 131 I clinical pill (small object size) image, and an image of the remainder of the lesion of two patients treated with 3.7GBq (100mCi), and 4.44GBq (120mCi) of 131 I, respectively, after thyroidectomy. The artifact is due to the hexagonal periodic structure of the collimator. The use of the filter on large-sized images reduces the fluctuation by 5.8-3.5%. In small-sized images, the FWHM can be determined in the filtered image, while this is impossible in the unfiltered image. The definition of tumor boundary and the visualization of the activity distribution inside patient lesions improve drastically when the filter is applied to the corresponding images obtained with HE gamma camera. The HURRA filter removes the artifact of high-energy collimator artifacts in planar images obtained with a Gamma camera without reducing the image resolution. It can be applied in any study of patient quantification because the number of counts remains invariant. The filter makes

  12. High-performance dual-speed CCD camera system for scientific imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Raymond W.

    1996-03-01

    Traditionally, scientific camera systems were partitioned with a `camera head' containing the CCD and its support circuitry and a camera controller, which provided analog to digital conversion, timing, control, computer interfacing, and power. A new, unitized high performance scientific CCD camera with dual speed readout at 1 X 106 or 5 X 106 pixels per second, 12 bit digital gray scale, high performance thermoelectric cooling, and built in composite video output is described. This camera provides all digital, analog, and cooling functions in a single compact unit. The new system incorporates the A/C converter, timing, control and computer interfacing in the camera, with the power supply remaining a separate remote unit. A 100 Mbyte/second serial link transfers data over copper or fiber media to a variety of host computers, including Sun, SGI, SCSI, PCI, EISA, and Apple Macintosh. Having all the digital and analog functions in the camera made it possible to modify this system for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for use on a remote controlled submersible vehicle. The oceanographic version achieves 16 bit dynamic range at 1.5 X 105 pixels/second, can be operated at depths of 3 kilometers, and transfers data to the surface via a real time fiber optic link.

  13. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-07-11

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild-moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex(©) camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1-3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  14. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantisani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK, considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild−moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex© camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1–3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits

  15. Cerebral imaging using 68Ga DTPA and the U.C.S.F. multiwire proportional chamber positron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattner, R.S.; Lim, C.B.; Swann, S.J.; Kaufman, L.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Chu, D.; Huberty, J.P.; Price, D.C.; Wilson, C.B.

    1975-12-01

    A multiwire proportional chamber positron camera consisting of four 48 x 48 cm 2 detectors linked to a small digital computer has been designed, constructed, and characterized. Initial clinical application to brain imaging using 68 Ga DTPA in 10 patients with brain tumors is described. Tomographic image reconstruction is accomplished by an algorithm determining the intersection of the annihilation photon paths in planes of interest. Final image processing utilizes uniformity correction, simple thresholding, and smoothing. The positron brain images were compared to conventional scintillation brain scans and x-ray computerized axial tomograms (CAT) in each case. The positron studies have shown significant mitigation of confusing superficial activity resulting from craniotomy in comparison to conventional brain scans. Central necrosis of lesions observed in the positron images, but not in the conventional scans, has been confirmed in CAT. Modifications of the camera are being implemented to improve image quality, and these changes combined with the tomography inherent in the positron scans are anticipated to result in images superior in information content to conventional brain scans

  16. SU-C-207A-03: Development of Proton CT Imaging System Using Thick Scintillator and CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S; Uesaka, M [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, T; Tsuneda, M [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsushita, K [Rikkyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Kabuki, S [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the treatment planning of proton therapy, Water Equivalent Length (WEL), which is the parameter for the calculation of dose and the range of proton, is derived by X-ray CT (xCT) image and xCT-WEL conversion. However, about a few percent error in the accuracy of proton range calculation through this conversion has been reported. The purpose of this study is to construct a proton CT (pCT) imaging system for an evaluation of the error. Methods: The pCT imaging system was constructed with a thick scintillator and a cooled CCD camera, which acquires the two-dimensional image of integrated value of the scintillation light toward the beam direction. The pCT image is reconstructed by FBP method using a correction between the light intensity and residual range of proton beam. An experiment for the demonstration of this system was performed with 70-MeV proton beam provided by NIRS cyclotron. The pCT image of several objects reconstructed from the experimental data was evaluated quantitatively. Results: Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were reconstructed experimentally. A finestructure of approximately 1 mm was clearly observed. The position resolution of pCT image was almost the same as that of xCT image. And the error of proton CT pixel value was up to 4%. The deterioration of image quality was caused mainly by the effect of multiple Coulomb scattering. Conclusion: We designed and constructed the pCT imaging system using a thick scintillator and a CCD camera. And the system was evaluated with the experiment by use of 70-MeV proton beam. Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were acquired by the system. This work was supported by JST SENTAN Grant Number 13A1101 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H04912.

  17. Scintillating camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasbloem, H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a scintillating camera and in particular to an apparatus for determining the position coordinates of a light pulse emitting point on the anode of an image intensifier tube which forms part of a scintillating camera, comprising at least three photomultipliers which are positioned to receive light emitted by the anode screen on their photocathodes, circuit means for processing the output voltages of the photomultipliers to derive voltages that are representative of the position coordinates; a pulse-height discriminator circuit adapted to be fed with the sum voltage of the output voltages of the photomultipliers for gating the output of the processing circuit when the amplitude of the sum voltage of the output voltages of the photomultipliers lies in a predetermined amplitude range, and means for compensating the distortion introduced in the image on the anode screen

  18. Progress towards a semiconductor Compton camera for prompt gamma imaging during proton beam therapy for range and dose verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A.; Baker, C.; Boston, H.; Chung, S.; Judson, D. S.; Kacperek, A.; Le Crom, B.; Moss, R.; Royle, G.; Speller, R.; Boston, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to test a new semiconductor Compton camera for prompt gamma imaging. Our device is composed of three active layers: a Si(Li) detector as a scatterer and two high purity Germanium detectors as absorbers of high-energy gamma rays. We performed Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 toolkit to characterise the expected gamma field during proton beam therapy and have made experimental measurements of the gamma spectrum with a 60 MeV passive scattering beam irradiating a phantom. In this proceeding, we describe the status of the Compton camera and present the first preliminary measurements with radioactive sources and their corresponding reconstructed images.

  19. Computational imaging with multi-camera time-of-flight systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shrestha, Shikhar; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Depth cameras are a ubiquitous technology used in a wide range of applications, including robotic and machine vision, human computer interaction, autonomous vehicles as well as augmented and virtual reality. In this paper, we explore the design

  20. Uncertainties in cloud phase and optical thickness retrievals from the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerry; Yang, Yuekui; Platnick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the expected uncertainties of a single channel cloud optical thickness (COT) retrieval technique, as well as a simple cloud temperature threshold based thermodynamic phase approach, in support of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission. DSCOVR cloud products will be derived from Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) observations in the ultraviolet and visible spectra. Since EPIC is not equipped with a spectral channel in the shortwave or mid-wave infrared that is sensitive to cloud effective radius (CER), COT will be inferred from a single visible channel with the assumption of appropriate CER values for liquid and ice phase clouds. One month of Aqua MODIS daytime granules from April 2005 is selected for investigating cloud phase sensitivity, and a subset of these granules that has similar EPIC sun-view geometry is selected for investigating COT uncertainties. EPIC COT retrievals are simulated with the same algorithm as the operational MODIS cloud products (MOD06), except using fixed phase-dependent CER values. Uncertainty estimates are derived by comparing the single channel COT retrievals with the baseline bi-spectral MODIS retrievals. Results show that a single channel COT retrieval is feasible for EPIC. For ice clouds, single channel retrieval errors are minimal (< 2%) due to the particle size insensitivity of the assumed ice crystal (i.e., severely roughened aggregate of hexagonal columns) scattering properties at visible wavelengths, while for liquid clouds the error is mostly limited to within 10%, although for thin clouds (COT < 2) the error can be higher. Potential uncertainties in EPIC cloud masking and cloud temperature retrievals are not considered in this study.

  1. A double photomultiplier Compton camera and its readout system for mice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino [Physics Department Galileo Galilei, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy) and INFN Padova, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy); Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn [Physics Department Galileo Galilei, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy) and INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Baldazzi, Giuseppe [Physics Department, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127, Italy and INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Bello, Michele [INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Uzunov, Nikolay [Department of Natural Sciences, Shumen University, 115 Universitetska str., Shumen 9712, Bulgaria and INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Di Domenico, Giovanni [Physics Department, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, Ferrara 44122 (Italy) and INFN Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, Ferrara 44122 (Italy)

    2013-04-19

    We have designed a Compton Camera (CC) to image the bio-distribution of gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in mice. A CC employs the 'electronic collimation', i.e. a technique that traces the gamma-rays instead of selecting them with physical lead or tungsten collimators. To perform such a task, a CC measures the parameters of the Compton interaction that occurs in the device itself. At least two detectors are required: one (tracker), where the primary gamma undergoes a Compton interaction and a second one (calorimeter), in which the scattered gamma is completely absorbed. Eventually the polar angle and hence a 'cone' of possible incident directions are obtained (event with 'incomplete geometry'). Different solutions for the two detectors are proposed in the literature: our design foresees two similar Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PMT, Hamamatsu H8500). Each PMT has 64 output channels that are reduced to 4 using a charge multiplexed readout system, i.e. a Series Charge Multiplexing net of resistors. Triggering of the system is provided by the coincidence of fast signals extracted at the last dynode of the PMTs. Assets are the low cost and the simplicity of design and operation, having just one type of device; among drawbacks there is a lower resolution with respect to more sophisticated trackers and full 64 channels Readout. This paper does compare our design of our two-Hamamatsu CC to other solutions and shows how the spatial and energy accuracy is suitable for the inspection of radioactivity in mice.

  2. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, K.H.; Kotschak, O.; Conrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera with a simplified setup as compared with the state of engineering is described permitting, apart from good localization, also energy discrimination. Behind the usual vacuum image amplifier a multiwire proportional chamber filled with trifluorine bromium methane is connected in series. Localizing of the signals is achieved by a delay line, energy determination by means of a pulse height discriminator. With the aid of drawings and circuit diagrams, the setup and mode of operation are explained. (ORU) [de

  3. Strategic options towards an affordable high-performance infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, Patrick; Mizuno, Genki; Dutta, Achyut K.; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2016-05-01

    The promise of infrared (IR) imaging attaining low-cost akin to CMOS sensors success has been hampered by the inability to achieve cost advantages that are necessary for crossover from military and industrial applications into the consumer and mass-scale commercial realm despite well documented advantages. Banpil Photonics is developing affordable IR cameras by adopting new strategies to speed-up the decline of the IR camera cost curve. We present a new short-wave IR (SWIR) camera; 640x512 pixel InGaAs uncooled system that is high sensitivity low noise ( 500 frames per second (FPS)) at full resolution, and low power consumption (market adoption by not only demonstrating high-performance IR imaging capability value add demanded by military and industrial application, but also illuminates a path towards justifiable price points essential for consumer facing application industries such as automotive, medical, and security imaging adoption. Among the strategic options presented include new sensor manufacturing technologies that scale favorably towards automation, multi-focal plane array compatible readout electronics, and dense or ultra-small pixel pitch devices.

  4. Self-luminous event photography with the Marco M-4 image converter camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.O.

    1980-02-01

    The camera system is shown to be applicable to selfluminous events, such as the flasher-gap-enhanced shock waves which are depicted. Successive photographs of the detonation wavefront progressing across disc of high explosive (PBX 9404) are used for the determination of detonation velocity. Time intervals between film exposures for the four individual camera heads are easily measured and may extend from a few nanoseconds to ten milliseconds

  5. A new method for elimination of artifacts produced by collimator septum effect in gamma-camera images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Isao; Onai, Yoshio; Tomaru, Teizo; Irifune, Toraji; Kakegawa, Makoto.

    1978-01-01

    Collimator artifacts may be present within the images produced by collimators whose septal width approaches the inherent resolution of the gamma-camera system. As the inherent resolution of the gamma-camera is improved, collimator artifacts become more prominent. The purpose of this study is to eliminate collimator artifacts from gamma-camera images. To eliminate the septum effect produced by high-energy parallel-hole collimators with thick septa, the following method was used: X and Y signals from the detector are made to ride on the triangular waves changing periodically, and resultant position signals obtained by this processing are applied to the corresponding deflection circuits in the CRT display. The oscillation amplitude of processed position signals can be regulated by the frequency and amplitude of the triangular waves. Regulation of the oscillation amplitude of position signals, which would produce maximum reduction of collimator artifacts, was to approach the spatial frequency responses of the overall processed line spread functions obtained experimentally to those of the Gaussian functions with FWHM equal to the geometric resolution calculated from the equation given by Gerber and Miller. In images of a pancreas phantom containing 131 I, collimator artifacts were clearly seen in the unprocessed case, but were eliminated in the processed case. (auth.)

  6. Temporal Imaging CeBr3 Compton Camera: A New Concept for Nuclear Decommissioning and Nuclear Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, A.; Snoussi, H.; Magalhaes, L. Rodrigues de; Hmissi, M. Z.; Zafiarifety, C. Tata; Tadonkeng, G. Zeufack; Morel, C.

    2018-01-01

    During nuclear decommissioning or waste management operations, a camera that could make an image of the contamination field and identify and quantify the contaminants would be a great progress. Compton cameras have been proposed, but their limited efficiency for high energy gamma rays and their cost have severely limited their application. Our objective is to promote a Compton camera for the energy range (200 keV - 2 MeV) that uses fast scintillating crystals and a new concept for locating scintillation event: Temporal Imaging. Temporal Imaging uses monolithic plates of fast scintillators and measures photons time of arrival distribution in order to locate each gamma ray with a high precision in space (X,Y,Z), time (T) and energy (E). This provides a native estimation of the depth of interaction (Z) of every detected gamma ray. This also allows a time correction for the propagation time of scintillation photons inside the crystal, therefore resulting in excellent time resolution. The high temporal resolution of the system makes it possible to veto quite efficiently background by using narrow time coincidence (system is better than 1 nSv/h in a 60 s acquisition with a 22Na source. The project TEMPORAL is funded by the ANDRA/PAI under the grant No. RTSCNADAA160019.

  7. Automated jitter correction for IR image processing to assess the quality of W7-X high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H; De Marne, P; Herrmann, A; Boeswirth, B; Schindler, T; Smirnow, M

    2009-01-01

    An automated IR image processing method was developed to evaluate the surface temperature distribution of cyclically loaded high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components. IPP Garching will perform the HHF testing of a high percentage of the series production of the WENDELSTEIN 7-X (W7-X) divertor targets to minimize the number of undiscovered uncertainties in the finally installed components. The HHF tests will be performed as quality assurance (QA) complementary to the non-destructive examination (NDE) methods used during the manufacturing. The IR analysis of an HHF-loaded component detects growing debonding of the plasma facing material, made of carbon fibre composite (CFC), after a few thermal cycles. In the case of the prototype testing, the IR data was processed manually. However, a QA method requires a reliable, reproducible and efficient automated procedure. Using the example of the HHF testing of W7-X pre-series target elements, the paper describes the developed automated IR image processing method. The algorithm is based on an iterative two-step correlation analysis with an individually defined reference pattern for the determination of the jitter.

  8. 4-mm-diameter three-dimensional imaging endoscope with steerable camera for minimally invasive surgery (3-D-MARVEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sam Y; Korniski, Ronald J; Shearn, Michael; Manohara, Harish M; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging (stereo imaging) by endoscopes in minimally invasive surgery, especially in space-constrained applications such as brain surgery, is one of the most desired capabilities. Such capability exists at larger than 4-mm overall diameters. We report the development of a stereo imaging endoscope of 4-mm maximum diameter, called Multiangle, Rear-Viewing Endoscopic Tool (MARVEL) that uses a single-lens system with complementary multibandpass filter (CMBF) technology to achieve 3-D imaging. In addition, the system is endowed with the capability to pan from side-to-side over an angle of [Formula: see text], which is another unique aspect of MARVEL for such a class of endoscopes. The design and construction of a single-lens, CMBF aperture camera with integrated illumination to generate 3-D images, and the actuation mechanism built into it is summarized.

  9. Multi-imaging adaptive concept for IR and submillimeter space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Victor P.

    1995-06-01

    Nontraditional IR and submillimeter spaceborne telescope concept basing on blind-type parabolic multi-ring mirror is proposed and discussed. Preliminary results for optimization of mirror parameters by means of computer simulation are presented.

  10. Breast-specific gamma-imaging: molecular imaging of the breast using 99mTc-sestamibi and a small-field-of-view gamma-camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A; Phan, Trinh D; Blanchard, Deborah A; Miley, Abbe

    2009-12-01

    Breast-specific gamma-imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging, is breast scintigraphy using a small-field-of-view gamma-camera and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. There are many different types of breast cancer, and many have characteristics making them challenging to detect by mammography and ultrasound. BSGI is a cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific technique that complements other imaging modalities currently being used to identify malignant lesions in the breast. Using the current Society of Nuclear Medicine guidelines for breast scintigraphy, Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital began conducting BSGI, breast scintigraphy with a breast-optimized gamma-camera. In our experience, optimal imaging has been conducted in the Breast Center by a nuclear medicine technologist. In addition, the breast radiologists read the BSGI images in correlation with the mammograms, ultrasounds, and other imaging studies performed. By modifying the current Society of Nuclear Medicine protocol to adapt it to the practice of breast scintigraphy with these new systems and by providing image interpretation in conjunction with the other breast imaging studies, our center has found BSGI to be a valuable adjunctive procedure in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The development of a small-field-of-view gamma-camera, designed to optimize breast imaging, has resulted in improved detection capabilities, particularly for lesions less than 1 cm. Our experience with this procedure has proven to aid in the clinical work-up of many of our breast patients. After reading this article, the reader should understand the history of breast scintigraphy, the pharmaceutical used, patient preparation and positioning, imaging protocol guidelines, clinical indications, and the role of breast scintigraphy in breast cancer diagnosis.

  11. Design and evaluation of a high-performance charge coupled device camera for astronomical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Guan, Yong; Zhang, Weigong; Pan, Wei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The Space Solar Telescope (SST) is the first Chinese space astronomy mission. This paper introduces the design of a high-performance 2K × 2K charge coupled device (CCD) camera that is an important payload in the Space Solar Telescope. The camera is composed of an analogue system and a digital embedded system. The analogue system is first discussed in detail, including the power and bias voltage supply circuit, power protection unit, CCD clock driver circuit, 16 bit A/D converter and low-noise amplifier circuit. The digital embedded system integrated with an NIOS II soft-core processor serves as the control and data acquisition system of the camera. In addition, research on evaluation methods for CCDs was carried out to evaluate the performance of the TH7899 CCD camera in relation to the requirements of the SST project. We present the evaluation results, including readout noise, linearity, quantum efficiency, dark current, full-well capacity, charge transfer efficiency and gain. The results show that this high-performance CCD camera can satisfy the specifications of the SST project

  12. Design of a Compton camera for 3D prompt-{gamma} imaging during ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roellinghoff, F., E-mail: roelling@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Richard, M.-H., E-mail: mrichard@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Henriquet, P.; Le Foulher, F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Letang, J.M. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Montarou, G. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont-F. University (France); Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Walenta, A.H. [Uni-Siegen, FB Physik, Emmy-Noether Campus, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    We investigate, by means of Geant4 simulations, a real-time method to control the position of the Bragg peak during ion therapy, based on a Compton camera in combination with a beam tagging device (hodoscope) in order to detect the prompt gamma emitted during nuclear fragmentation. The proposed set-up consists of a stack of 2 mm thick silicon strip detectors and a LYSO absorber detector. The {gamma} emission points are reconstructed analytically by intersecting the ion trajectories given by the beam hodoscope and the Compton cones given by the camera. The camera response to a polychromatic point source in air is analyzed with regard to both spatial resolution and detection efficiency. Various geometrical configurations of the camera have been tested. In the proposed configuration, for a typical polychromatic photon point source, the spatial resolution of the camera is about 8.3 mm FWHM and the detection efficiency 2.5x10{sup -4} (reconstructable photons/emitted photons in 4{pi}). Finally, the clinical applicability of our system is considered and possible starting points for further developments of a prototype are discussed.

  13. Identification of urushi coated films taken from ancient Buddha images by using PIXE, FT-IR, and organic elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagemori, N.; Umemura, K.; Yoshimura, T.; Inoue, M.; Kawai, S.; Yano, K.; Sera, K.; Futatsugawa, S.; Nakamura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Six types of samples including urushi, urushi tree and black coating films taken from ancient Buddha images were examined by analyses of PIXE, organic element and FT-IR to identify with urushi or another material. Based on the results of three analytical experiments above mentioned, the coating materials aging over hundreds of years were identified with weathered urushi films mixed with other material. Further investigation may reveal the urushi coating techniques used in the past. (author)

  14. Perceptual evaluation of different image fusion schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; IJspeert, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    Human perceptual performance was tested with images of nighttime outdoor scenes. The scenes were registered both with a dual band (visual and near infrared) image intensified low-light CCD camera (DII) and with a thermal middle wavelength band (3-5 μm) infrared (IR) camera. Fused imagery was

  15. Perceptual evaluation of different image fusion schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Franken, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Human scene recognition performance was tested with images of night-time outdoor scenes. The scenes were registered both with a dual band (visual and near infrared) image intensified low-light CCD camera (DII) and with a thermal middle wavelength band (3–5 mm) infrared (IR) camera. Fused imagery was

  16. Monitoring of oil leakage from a ship propulsion system using IR camera and wavelet analysis for prevention of health and ecology risks and engine faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soda, J.; Beros, S. [University of Split (Croatia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture; Antonic, R.; Vujovic, I. [University of Split (Croatia) Maritime Faculty; Kuzmanic, I.

    2009-03-15

    It is a well known fact that oil leakage from ship diesel engines is harmful both for the environment and the ship engine and therefore has to be observed and alarmed. The present paper proposes a system for overcoming described problems by installing a computer vision system. The used algorithm of pattern recognition system is based on the use of wavelet structures. Additionally, one of the problems in the system is the compensation of camera movements due to engine vibration. The compensation part of the computer vision solution is used to improve position determination. The position determination is improved more that 300 % when using farras wavelets. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. X-ray diagnostic device with an X-ray image amplifier, whose output image is fed into a movie camera, as well as a brightness control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, H

    1978-02-09

    The X-ray relief appearing behind a patient is immediately or with amplificating foils converted into a latent film image. By using a X-ray image amplifier the X-ray relief is then converted into a reduced and brighter optical image and fed into a photographic or movie camera and shot. To avoid a reduction in the image quality by quantum noise and a too large patient and physician dose a brightness control is provided for the X-ray diagnostic device. The control only dims as far as a brightness per image is produced that avoids quantum noise. On the other side it opens more by strongly beam absorbing patients or a smaller imaging ratio of the X-ray image amplifier to obtain a desired irradiation.

  18. X-ray diagnostic device with an X-ray image amplifier, whose output image is fed into a movie camera, as well as a brightness control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray relief appearing behind a patient is immediately or with amplificating foils converted into a latent film image. By using a X-ray image amplifier the X-ray relief is then converted into a reduced and brighter optical image and fed into a photographic or movie camera and shot. To avoid a reduction in the image quality by quantum noise and a too large patient and physician dose a brightness control is provided for the X-ray diagnostic device. The control only dims as far as a brightness per image is produced that avoids quantum noise. On the other side it opens more by strongly beam absorbing patients or a smaller imaging ratio of the X-ray image amplifier to obtain a desired irradiation. (DG) [de

  19. Using a high-speed movie camera to evaluate slice dropping in clinical image interpretation with stack mode viewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakami, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Yanagisawa, Morio; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Takeshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify objectively the rate of slice omission during paging on picture archiving and communication system (PACS) viewers by recording the images shown on the computer displays of these viewers with a high-speed movie camera. This study was approved by the institutional review board. A sequential number from 1 to 250 was superimposed on each slice of a series of clinical Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) data. The slices were displayed using several DICOM viewers, including in-house developed freeware and clinical PACS viewers. The freeware viewer and one of the clinical PACS viewers included functions to prevent slice dropping. The series was displayed in stack mode and paged in both automatic and manual paging modes. The display was recorded with a high-speed movie camera and played back at a slow speed to check whether slices were dropped. The paging speeds were also measured. With a paging speed faster than half the refresh rate of the display, some viewers dropped up to 52.4 % of the slices, while other well-designed viewers did not, if used with the correct settings. Slice dropping during paging was objectively confirmed using a high-speed movie camera. To prevent slice dropping, the viewer must be specially designed for the purpose and must be used with the correct settings, or the paging speed must be slower than half of the display refresh rate.

  20. A sniffer-camera for imaging of ethanol vaporization from wine: the effect of wine glass shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Takahiro; Iitani, Kenta; Wang, Xin; Kajiro, Takumi; Toma, Koji; Yano, Kazuyoshi; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-04-21

    A two-dimensional imaging system (Sniffer-camera) for visualizing the concentration distribution of ethanol vapor emitting from wine in a wine glass has been developed. This system provides image information of ethanol vapor concentration using chemiluminescence (CL) from an enzyme-immobilized mesh. This system measures ethanol vapor concentration as CL intensities from luminol reactions induced by alcohol oxidase and a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-luminol-hydrogen peroxide system. Conversion of ethanol distribution and concentration to two-dimensional CL was conducted using an enzyme-immobilized mesh containing an alcohol oxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and luminol solution. The temporal changes in CL were detected using an electron multiplier (EM)-CCD camera and analyzed. We selected three types of glasses-a wine glass, a cocktail glass, and a straight glass-to determine the differences in ethanol emission caused by the shape effects of the glass. The emission measurements of ethanol vapor from wine in each glass were successfully visualized, with pixel intensity reflecting ethanol concentration. Of note, a characteristic ring shape attributed to high alcohol concentration appeared near the rim of the wine glass containing 13 °C wine. Thus, the alcohol concentration in the center of the wine glass was comparatively lower. The Sniffer-camera was demonstrated to be sufficiently useful for non-destructive ethanol measurement for the assessment of food characteristics.

  1. Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurements using stereo-digital image correlation and a single color high-speed camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurement using stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) technique and a single high-speed color camera is proposed. With the aid of a skillfully designed pseudo stereo-imaging apparatus, color images of a test object surface, composed of blue and red channel images from two different optical paths, are recorded by a high-speed color CMOS camera. The recorded color images can be separated into red and blue channel sub-images using a simple but effective color crosstalk correction method. These separated blue and red channel sub-images are processed by regular stereo-DIC method to retrieve full-field 3D shape and deformation on the test object surface. Compared with existing two-camera high-speed stereo-DIC or four-mirror-adapter-assisted singe-camera high-speed stereo-DIC, the proposed single-camera high-speed stereo-DIC technique offers prominent advantages of full-frame measurements using a single high-speed camera but without sacrificing its spatial resolution. Two real experiments, including shape measurement of a curved surface and vibration measurement of a Chinese double-side drum, demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique.

  2. 'SIMPLE' - a novel concept of an imaging camera for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenc, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A novel concept of a large camera for space applications is proposed. It comprises extremely light and inexpensive construction, and very high photon detection efficiency. The essential point of the concept is the evasion of any vacuum-sealing constructional elements, and the exploitation of vacuum in space. This concept was developed particularly for the next-generation experiments aimed to detect extensive air showers in the atmosphere, initiated by extreme energy cosmic rays (like the EUSO experiment). The SIMPLE camera, as well as its launch, should be much less expensive than the previously considered options

  3. Advanced Camera Image Cropping Approach for CNN-Based End-to-End Controls on Sustainable Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsick Sung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on deep learning has been applied to a diversity of fields. In particular, numerous studies have been conducted on self-driving vehicles using end-to-end approaches based on images captured by a single camera. End-to-end controls learn the output vectors of output devices directly from the input vectors of available input devices. In other words, an end-to-end approach learns not by analyzing the meaning of input vectors, but by extracting optimal output vectors based on input vectors. Generally, when end-to-end control is applied to self-driving vehicles, the steering wheel and pedals are controlled autonomously by learning from the images captured by a camera. However, high-resolution images captured from a car cannot be directly used as inputs to Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs owing to memory limitations; the image size needs to be efficiently reduced. Therefore, it is necessary to extract features from captured images automatically and to generate input images by merging the parts of the images that contain the extracted features. This paper proposes a learning method for end-to-end control that generates input images for CNNs by extracting road parts from input images, identifying the edges of the extracted road parts, and merging the parts of the images that contain the detected edges. In addition, a CNN model for end-to-end control is introduced. Experiments involving the Open Racing Car Simulator (TORCS, a sustainable computing environment for cars, confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method for self-driving by comparing the accumulated difference in the angle of the steering wheel in the images generated by it with those of resized images containing the entire captured area and cropped images containing only a part of the captured area. The results showed that the proposed method reduced the accumulated difference by 0.839% and 0.850% compared to those yielded by the resized images and cropped images

  4. Coaxial fundus camera for opthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Luciana; Castro, Guilherme; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2015-09-01

    A Fundus Camera for ophthalmology is a high definition device which needs to meet low light illumination of the human retina, high resolution in the retina and reflection free image1. Those constraints make its optical design very sophisticated, but the most difficult to comply with is the reflection free illumination and the final alignment due to the high number of non coaxial optical components in the system. Reflection of the illumination, both in the objective and at the cornea, mask image quality, and a poor alignment make the sophisticated optical design useless. In this work we developed a totally axial optical system for a non-midriatic Fundus Camera. The illumination is performed by a LED ring, coaxial with the optical system and composed of IR of visible LEDs. The illumination ring is projected by the objective lens in the cornea. The Objective, LED illuminator, CCD lens are coaxial making the final alignment easily to perform. The CCD + capture lens module is a CCTV camera with autofocus and Zoom built in, added to a 175 mm focal length doublet corrected for infinity, making the system easily operated and very compact.

  5. Nonintrusive iris image acquisition system based on a pan-tilt-zoom camera and light stripe projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soweon; Jung, Ho Gi; Park, Kang Ryoung; Kim, Jaihie

    2009-03-01

    Although iris recognition is one of the most accurate biometric technologies, it has not yet been widely used in practical applications. This is mainly due to user inconvenience during the image acquisition phase. Specifically, users try to adjust their eye position within small capture volume at a close distance from the system. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel iris image acquisition system that provides users with unconstrained environments: a large operating range, enabling movement from standing posture, and capturing good-quality iris images in an acceptable time. The proposed system has the following three contributions compared with previous works: (1) the capture volume is significantly increased by using a pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera guided by a light stripe projection, (2) the iris location in the large capture volume is found fast due to 1-D vertical face searching from the user's horizontal position obtained by the light stripe projection, and (3) zooming and focusing on the user's irises at a distance are accurate and fast using the estimated 3-D position of a face by the light stripe projection and the PTZ camera. Experimental results show that the proposed system can capture good-quality iris images in 2.479 s on average at a distance of 1.5 to 3 m, while allowing a limited amount of movement by the user.

  6. Microcomputer-based artificial vision support system for real-time image processing for camera-driven visual prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Wolfgang; You, Cindy X.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to predict exactly what blind subjects with camera-driven visual prostheses (e.g., retinal implants) can perceive. Thus, it is prudent to offer them a wide variety of image processing filters and the capability to engage these filters repeatedly in any user-defined order to enhance their visual perception. To attain true portability, we employ a commercial off-the-shelf battery-powered general purpose Linux microprocessor platform to create the microcomputer-based artificial vision support system (μAVS2) for real-time image processing. Truly standalone, μAVS2 is smaller than a deck of playing cards, lightweight, fast, and equipped with USB, RS-232 and Ethernet interfaces. Image processing filters on μAVS2 operate in a user-defined linear sequential-loop fashion, resulting in vastly reduced memory and CPU requirements during execution. μAVS2 imports raw video frames from a USB or IP camera, performs image processing, and issues the processed data over an outbound Internet TCP/IP or RS-232 connection to the visual prosthesis system. Hence, μAVS2 affords users of current and future visual prostheses independent mobility and the capability to customize the visual perception generated. Additionally, μAVS2 can easily be reconfigured for other prosthetic systems. Testing of μAVS2 with actual retinal implant carriers is envisioned in the near future.

  7. The effect of acquisition interval and spatial resolution on dynamic cardiac imaging with a stationary SPECT camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J; Maddula, R; Clackdoyle, R; DiBella, E; Fu, Z

    2007-01-01

    The current SPECT scanning paradigm that acquires images by slow rotation of multiple detectors in body-contoured orbits around the patient is not suited to the rapid collection of tomographically complete data. During rapid image acquisition, mechanical and patient safety constraints limit the detector orbit to circular paths at increased distances from the patient, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We consider a novel dynamic rotating slant-hole (DyRoSH) SPECT camera that can collect full tomographic data every 2 s, employing three stationary detectors mounted with slant-hole collimators that rotate at 30 rpm. Because the detectors are stationary, they can be placed much closer to the patient than is possible with conventional SPECT systems. We propose that the decoupling of the detector position from the mechanics of rapid image acquisition offers an additional degree of freedom which can be used to improve accuracy in measured kinetic parameter estimates. With simulations and list-mode reconstructions, we consider the effects of different acquisition intervals on dynamic cardiac imaging, comparing a conventional three detector SPECT system with the proposed DyRoSH SPECT system. Kinetic parameters of a two-compartment model of myocardial perfusion for technetium-99m-teboroxime were estimated. When compared to a conventional SPECT scanner for the same acquisition periods, the proposed DyRoSH system shows equivalent or reduced bias or standard deviation values for the kinetic parameter estimates. The DyRoSH camera with a 2 s acquisition period does not show any improvement compared to a DyRoSH camera with a 10 s acquisition period

  8. The effect of acquisition interval and spatial resolution on dynamic cardiac imaging with a stationary SPECT camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J.; Maddula, R.; Clackdoyle, R.; Di Bella, E.; Fu, Z.

    2007-08-01

    The current SPECT scanning paradigm that acquires images by slow rotation of multiple detectors in body-contoured orbits around the patient is not suited to the rapid collection of tomographically complete data. During rapid image acquisition, mechanical and patient safety constraints limit the detector orbit to circular paths at increased distances from the patient, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We consider a novel dynamic rotating slant-hole (DyRoSH) SPECT camera that can collect full tomographic data every 2 s, employing three stationary detectors mounted with slant-hole collimators that rotate at 30 rpm. Because the detectors are stationary, they can be placed much closer to the patient than is possible with conventional SPECT systems. We propose that the decoupling of the detector position from the mechanics of rapid image acquisition offers an additional degree of freedom which can be used to improve accuracy in measured kinetic parameter estimates. With simulations and list-mode reconstructions, we consider the effects of different acquisition intervals on dynamic cardiac imaging, comparing a conventional three detector SPECT system with the proposed DyRoSH SPECT system. Kinetic parameters of a two-compartment model of myocardial perfusion for technetium-99m-teboroxime were estimated. When compared to a conventional SPECT scanner for the same acquisition periods, the proposed DyRoSH system shows equivalent or reduced bias or standard deviation values for the kinetic parameter estimates. The DyRoSH camera with a 2 s acquisition period does not show any improvement compared to a DyRoSH camera with a 10 s acquisition period.

  9. Identification of {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, William F; Chaney, Edward L; Coggins, James M

    1995-07-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: {sup 192}Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as{sup 192} Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing {sup 192}Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in

  10. Identification of 192Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, William F.; Chaney, Edward L.; Coggins, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual 192 Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone