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Sample records for ipirg-2 simulated seismic

  1. IPIRG-2 task 1 - pipe system experiments with circumferential cracks in straight-pipe locations. Final report, September 1991--November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Marschall, C.; Rudland, D. [and others

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results from Task 1 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The IPIRG-2 program is an international group program managed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) and funded by a consortium of organizations from 15 nations including: Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Lithuania, Republic of China, Slovak Republic, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The objective of the program was to build on the results of the IPIRG-1 and other related programs by extending the state-of-the-art in pipe fracture technology through the development of data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of nuclear power plant piping systems that contain defects. The IPIRG-2 program included five main tasks: Task 1 - Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds Task 2 - Fracture of Flawed Fittings Task 3 - Cyclic and Dynamic Load Effects on Fracture Toughness Task 4 - Resolution of Issues From IPIRG-1 and Related Programs Task 5 - Information Exchange Seminars and Workshops, and Program Management. The scope of this report is to present the results from the experiments and analyses associated with Task 1 (Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds). The rationale and objectives of this task are discussed after a brief review of experimental data which existed after the IPIRG-1 program.

  2. On comparison of simulated and observed seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Linkov, Aleksandr M; Zoubkov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation of seismicity has been successfully developed and used for the two last decades. Presently, the general theory of modeling and the progress in computational techniques provide wide options for simulation of seismic and aseismic events with various source mechanisms accounting for blocky structure of rock mass, inclusions, faults, cracks, complicated contact conditions and various mechanical properties of rock. Meanwhile, in practical applications, the input data are limited and uncertain. The data on observed seismicity are also often limited with a few parameters, like coordinates and time. The paper aims to agree the input and output data, used in and provided by numerical simulations, with uncertain and limited data of direct observations. For the input parameters, we suggest their minimal set, which complies with commonly available data. For output seismic parameters, we distinguish three major groups, which are provided by field observations. The first group includes the common (mini...

  3. Improving Reservoir Simulation using Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsa, Amir

    The principal premise of this thesis is that the ambiguities of reservoir simulation can be and should be reduced by using time-lapse seismic data. Such data can be considered as a sort of reservoir dynamic data, with distinctive features compared to the typical reservoir production data. While well production data are sparse in space and dense in time, 4D timelapse seismic can be utilized to fill the spatial data gaps between wells. This provides an opportunity to constrain reservoir dynamic behaviour not only at well locations but also between them by honoring time lapse response of the reservoir. This means that seismic assisted history matching should involve a simultaneous minimization of the mismatch between all types of measured and simulated data including seismic data. This thesis is an effort to discuss critical aspects of integrating 4D time-lapse data in reservoir simulation and history matching. I have illustrated a detailed scheme of seismic assisted history matching with implications on real data, to emphasize the extra value that seismic data can bring into the conventional reservoir history matching. This goal was followed by developing a software application to assess the feasibility of the theory at industrial scales. In addition to the conventional oils, a significant effort has been devoted to extend the scope of the work to viscoelastic heavy oils and their fluid substitution models in thermal cases. I also studied the production/injection induced stresses impacts on anisotropic velocity variations, using coupled geomechanical-flow simulations. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  4. Numerical earthquake simulations for seismic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Sokolov, Vladimir; Soloviev, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive seismic hazard assessment can contribute to earthquake preparedness and preventive measures aimed to reduce impacts of earthquakes, especially in the view of growing population and increasing vulnerability and exposure. Realistic earthquake simulations coupled with a seismic hazard analysis can provide better assessments of potential ground shaking due to large earthquakes. We present a model of block-and-fault dynamics, which simulates earthquakes in response to lithosphere movements and allows for studying the influence of fault network properties on seismic patterns. Using case studies (e.g., the Tibet-Himalayan region and the Caucasian region), we analyse the model's performance in terms of reproduction of basic features of the observed seismicity, such as the frequency-magnitude relationship, clustering of earthquakes, occurrences of large events, fault slip rates, and earthquake mechanisms. We examine a new approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, which is based on instrumentally recorded, historical and simulated earthquakes. Based on predicted and observed peak ground acceleration values, we show that the hazard level associated with large events significantly increases if the long record of simulated seismicity is considered in the hazard assessment.

  5. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  6. Mitigating Induced Seismicity Through Active Pressure Management in Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, K.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; White, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent upturn of seismicity rates in the Central and Eastern United States and Canada has been attributed to industrial operations such as waste-water disposal, hydraulic fracturing, and subsurface carbon storage. We couple the 3D, physics-based earthquake simulator, RSQSim, to a reservoir model to investigate the space-time characteristics of earthquakes induced by pore-fluid pressure increases and/or poroelastic stresses during injection. RSQSim employs rate-state friction, which gives rise to spatiotemporal earthquake clustering. The simulator generates long catalogs of seismicity based on stress changes due to fault interaction and external stress perturbations with great computational efficiency, allowing for multiple simulations to systematically explore the parameters that control induced seismicity. These simulations provide physics-based statistical data that may contribute to the formalization of optimal injection operations designed to minimize risk of seismicity at a given industrial site. Industrial operators may modify injection rates as an active seismicity mitigation tool to either reduce the total number of earthquakes or attempt to reduce the likelihood of future large events. To explore the efficacy of this approach, we use RSQSim to explore how sequences of induced earthquakes respond to changes in injection schedule. We simulate induced seismicity on a single optimally oriented fault with fractally distributed initial shear stresses and compare results from models with/without along-strike fault permeability and poroelastic stress changes. We investigate the seismic response to several injection schedules that lie between two end-member scenarios, 1) constant injection at low rates, and 2) periodic injection at high rates. We evaluate the cumulative number of events, total seismic moment release, and the spatio-temporal characteristics of seismicity including the time/location of the next large event after adjusting injection rates

  7. Probabilistic seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area based on seismicity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding how fault systems evolve in time under a relevant set of governing physical laws is a needed critical step towards reliable earthquake forecasting. We can address issues relevant to probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (e.g. recurrence time, coefficient of variation, probability of multi-segment rupture) with numerical simulations of seismicity. A seismicity simulator essentially provides a means of tracking the increasing tectonic stress as it loads the faults and determines how stress is redistributed among the network faults as the result of an earthquake. I implement a seismicity simulator that includes the effects of: (1) tectonic loading of a plate boundary zone; (2) static stress transfer; (3) viscoelasticity of the ductile lower crust and mantle; (4) length- and depth-dependent fault slip. I apply it to a network of multiple interacting faults in the San Francisco Bay area. Earthquake initiation, propagation, and termination are governed by a cascade model using a Coulomb failure function. 30000 years of simulated seismicity yield probability density functions of inter-event times on all major faults at practically a continuum of magnitude thresholds. At a threshold of M6.5, reasonable combinations of controlling parameters yield mean inter-event times of ~ 140 years for the southern Hayward and Rodgers Creek faults and ~ 250 years for the northern Hayward and northern Calaveras faults. To help interpret simulation results I explore systematic covariations among mean characteristic magnitude, coefficient of variation (typical values are 0.4 to 0.6), degree of dynamic overshoot, and mantle viscosity.

  8. A fault and seismicity based composite simulation in northern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Yıkılmaz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We generate synthetic catalogs of seismicity in northern California using a composite simulation. The basis of the simulation is the fault based "Virtual California" (VC earthquake simulator. Back-slip velocities and mean recurrence intervals are specified on model strike-slip faults. A catalog of characteristic earthquakes is generated for a period of 100 000 yr. These earthquakes are predominantly in the range M = 6 to M = 8, but do not follow Gutenberg-Richter (GR scaling at lower magnitudes. In order to model seismicity on unmapped faults we introduce background seismicity which occurs randomly in time with GR scaling and is spatially associated with the VC model faults. These earthquakes fill in the GR scaling down to M = 4 (the smallest earthquakes modeled. The rate of background seismicity is constrained by the observed rate of occurrence of M > 4 earthquakes in northern California. These earthquakes are then used to drive the BASS (branching aftershock sequence model of aftershock occurrence. The BASS model is the self-similar limit of the ETAS (epidemic type aftershock sequence model. Families of aftershocks are generated following each Virtual California and background main shock. In the simulations the rate of occurrence of aftershocks is essentially equal to the rate of occurrence of main shocks in the magnitude range 4 < M < 7. We generate frequency-magnitude and recurrence interval statistics both regionally and fault specific. We compare our modeled rates of seismicity and spatial variability with observations.

  9. Petascale computation of multi-physics seismic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Ulrich, Thomas; Wollherr, Stephanie; Duru, Kenneth C.

    2017-04-01

    Capturing the observed complexity of earthquake sources in concurrence with seismic wave propagation simulations is an inherently multi-scale, multi-physics problem. In this presentation, we present simulations of earthquake scenarios resolving high-detail dynamic rupture evolution and high frequency ground motion. The simulations combine a multitude of representations of model complexity; such as non-linear fault friction, thermal and fluid effects, heterogeneous fault stress and fault strength initial conditions, fault curvature and roughness, on- and off-fault non-elastic failure to capture dynamic rupture behavior at the source; and seismic wave attenuation, 3D subsurface structure and bathymetry impacting seismic wave propagation. Performing such scenarios at the necessary spatio-temporal resolution requires highly optimized and massively parallel simulation tools which can efficiently exploit HPC facilities. Our up to multi-PetaFLOP simulations are performed with SeisSol (www.seissol.org), an open-source software package based on an ADER-Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme solving the seismic wave equations in velocity-stress formulation in elastic, viscoelastic, and viscoplastic media with high-order accuracy in time and space. Our flux-based implementation of frictional failure remains free of spurious oscillations. Tetrahedral unstructured meshes allow for complicated model geometry. SeisSol has been optimized on all software levels, including: assembler-level DG kernels which obtain 50% peak performance on some of the largest supercomputers worldwide; an overlapping MPI-OpenMP parallelization shadowing the multiphysics computations; usage of local time stepping; parallel input and output schemes and direct interfaces to community standard data formats. All these factors enable aim to minimise the time-to-solution. The results presented highlight the fact that modern numerical methods and hardware-aware optimization for modern supercomputers are essential

  10. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Utilizing Physics-Based Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S.; Foxall, W.; Savy, J. B.; Hutchings, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Risk associated with induced seismicity is a significant factor in the design, permitting and operation of enhanced geothermal, geological CO2 sequestration, wastewater disposal, and other fluid injection projects. The conventional probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) approach provides a framework for estimation of induced seismicity hazard but requires adaptation to address the particular occurrence characteristics of induced earthquakes and to estimation of the ground motions they generate. The assumption often made in conventional PSHA of Poissonian earthquake occurrence in both space and time is clearly violated by seismicity induced by an evolving pore pressure field. Our project focuses on analyzing hazard at the pre-injection design and permitting stage, before an induced earthquake catalog can be recorded. In order to accommodate the commensurate lack of pre-existing data, we have adopted a numerical physics-based approach to synthesizing and estimating earthquake frequency-magnitude distributions. Induced earthquake sequences are generated using the program RSQSIM (Dieterich and Richards-Dinger, PAGEOPH, 2010) augmented to simulate pressure-induced shear failure on faults and fractures embedded in a 3D geological structure under steady-state tectonic shear loading. The model uses available site-specific data on rock properties and in-situ stress, and generic values of frictional properties appropriate to the shallow reservoir depths at which induced events usually occur. The space- and time-evolving pore pressure field is coupled into the simulation from a multi-phase flow model. In addition to potentially damaging ground motions, induced seismicity poses a risk of perceived nuisance in nearby communities caused by relatively frequent, low magnitude earthquakes. Including these shallow local earthquakes in the hazard analysis requires extending the magnitude range considered to as low as M2 and the frequency band to include the short

  11. Numerical simulation of seismic survey in coal mine roadway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.; Li, G.; Cheng, J. [Chang' an University, Xi' an (China). College of Geological Engineering and Geomatics

    2008-11-15

    With the staggered-grid high order finite difference wave field simulation method, the elastic wave field caused by explosives with a point source in a coal mine roadway was simulated and different type of waves in the wave field were distinguished. Comparing all three spatial components of the propagation of the waves caused by explosives on or under the roadway at different depths, this indicates that: on the roadway base, the reverberation caused by the top and bottom of the roadway (multiple reflection on the top and bottom of the roadway) is the main disturbing wave in the roadway seismic survey which will seriously disturb the reflection of the deep place coal bed underneath the roadway; at a depth of several metres under the roadway basal bottom boundary, the reverberation disturbing wave is greatly reduced and the reflection caused by deeper coal bed can be clearly detected; high signal-to-noise ratio data can be found with the Y component detector because of the propagation of SH waves; high resolution of seismic data is possible in a roadway. In the model, a cavity 3 metres high and 4 metres wide can be detected underneath the roadway. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Simulating the seismic behaviour of soil slopes and embankments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Yiannis; Psarropoulos, Prodromos

    2010-01-01

    In the current study the clarification of the main assumptions, related to the two most commonly used methods of seismic slope stability analysis (pseudostatic and permanent deformation) is attempted. The seismic permanent displacements and the corresponding seismic coefficients were determined via...... parametric dynamic numerical analyses taking into account not only the main parameters dominating the seismic slope stability, but also the inherent assumptions of the applied approaches that affect the obtained results. The investigation conclude to a realistic procedure for seismic slope stability...

  13. Simulating the seismic behaviour of soil slopes and embankments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Yiannis; Psarropoulos, Prodromos

    2010-01-01

    In the current study the clarification of the main assumptions, related to the two most commonly used methods of seismic slope stability analysis (pseudostatic and permanent deformation) is attempted. The seismic permanent displacements and the corresponding seismic coefficients were determined via...... parametric dynamic numerical analyses taking into account not only the main parameters dominating the seismic slope stability, but also the inherent assumptions of the applied approaches that affect the obtained results. The investigation conclude to a realistic procedure for seismic slope stability...

  14. Frictional behavior of experimental faults during a simulated seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Elena; Nielsen, Stefan; Violay, Marie; Di Felice, Fabio; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory friction studies of earthquake mechanics aim at understanding complex phenomena either driving or characterizing the seismic cycle. Previous experiments were mainly conducted on bi-axial machines imposing velocity steps conditions, where slip and slip-rate are usually less than 10 mm and 1 mm/s, respectively. However, earthquake nucleation on natural faults results from the combination of the frictional response of fault materials and wall rock stiffness with complex loading conditions. We propose an alternative experimental approach which consists in imposing a step-wise increase in the shear stress on an experimental fault under constant normal stress. This experimental configuration allows us to investigate the relevance of spontaneous fault surface reworking in (1) driving frictional instabilities, (2) promoting the diversity of slip events including the eventual runaway, and (3) ruling weakening and re-strengthening processes during the seismic cycle. Using a rotary shear apparatus (SHIVA, INGV, Rome) with an on-purpose designed control system, the shear stress acting on a simulated fault can be increased step-wise while both slip and slip-rate are allowed to evolve spontaneously (the slip is namely infinite) to accommodate the new state of stress. This unconventional procedure, which we term "shear stress-step loading", simulates how faults react to either a remote tectonic loading or a sudden seismic or strain event taking place in the vicinity of a fault patch. Our experiments show that the spontaneous slip evolution results in velocity pulses whose shape and occurrence rate are controlled by the lithology and the state of stress. With increasing shear stress and cumulative slip, the experimental fault exhibits three frictional behaviors: (1) stable behavior or individual slip pulses up to few cm/s for few mm of slip in concomitance to the step-wise increase in shear stress; (2) unstable oscillatory slip or continuous slip but with abrupt changes

  15. Basin Structure and Numerical Simulation for the Mechanisms of Seismic Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhixin; XU Jiren

    2004-01-01

    In the present study seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media is numerically simulated by using the pseudospectral method with the staggered grid RFFT differentiation in order to clarify the cause for the complicated distribution characteristics of strong ground motion in regions with basin structure. The results show that the maximum amplitudes of simulated ground acceleration waveforms are closely related to the basin structure. Interference of seismic waves in the basin strongly affects the distribution of maximum seismic waveforms, which may result in peak disasters during earthquakes. Peak disasters might be away from basin boundaries or earthquake faults. Seismic energy transmitted into the basin from the bedrock can hardly penetrate the bottom of the basin and then travel back into the bedrock region.The seismic energy is absorbed by basin media, and transferred into the kinematical energy of seismic waves with great amplitude in the basin. Seismic waves between basins may result in serious damage to buildings over the basin. This is significant for aseismatic research. Geological surveys in and around urban areas would benefit aseismatic research and mitigation of seismic disasters of a city. Such geological surveys should involve seismic velocity structure in the media above the bedrock besides such subjects as active faults and geological structure.

  16. Implicit finite-difference simulations of seismic wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new finite-difference modeling method, implicit both in space and in time, for the scalar wave equation. We use a three-level implicit splitting time integration method for the temporal derivative and implicit finite-difference operators of arbitrary order for the spatial derivatives. Both the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators require solving systems of linear equations. We show that it is possible to merge these two sets of linear systems, one from implicit temporal discretizations and the other from implicit spatial discretizations, to reduce the amount of computations to develop a highly efficient and accurate seismic modeling algorithm. We give the complete derivations of the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the scalar wave equation. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on grid dispersions of this new implicit modeling method. We show that implicit spatial finite-difference operators greatly improve the accuracy of the implicit splitting time integration simulation results with only a slight increase in computational time, compared with explicit spatial finite-difference operators. We further verify this conclusion by both 2D and 3D numerical examples. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. MPM dynamic simulation of a seismically induced sliding mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moormann, C.; Hamad, F.

    2015-09-01

    In some geotechnical applications, material can undergo large displacement combined with excessive deformation; e.g. the sliding mass problem. Owing to the limitations of classical Lagrangian and Eulerian finite element methods to model these problems, the Material Point Method (MPM) has been developed about two decades ago to cope with the large deformation. In MPM, the continuum field is represented by Lagrangian material points (particles), which can move through a fixed background of a computational mesh. Therefore, it can be seen as a mesh-based method formulated in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian description. Although MPM represents the continuum by material points, solution is performed on the computational mesh. Thus, imposing boundary conditions is not aligned with the material representation. In this paper, a non-zero kinematic condition is introduced where an additional set of particles is incorporated, which tracks the moving boundary by carrying the time- dependent boundary evolution. Furthermore, the material point method has been adopted to simulate the progressive failure of a sliding granular slope triggered by a seismic excitation. In order to represent the topographical bottom of the sliding mass, on which the seismic motion is applied, a rigid boundary is implemented by introducing an additional set of particles. A frictional contact algorithm is defined between the boundary and the descending mass, which allows sliding and rolling with friction. The traction due to contact is incorporated into the discretised momentum equation as an external force where the solution of this equation is performed separately for each body in contact. Defining the local coordinate system accurately in this algorithm is essential to avoid interpenetration. Thus, a two-dimensional triangular discretisation is utilised within the three-dimensional tetrahedral elements to track the surface progression of each body in contact. Complying with other continuum models

  18. Numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in complex media by convolutional differentiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-fu; LI Xiao-fan

    2008-01-01

    We apply the forward modeling algorithm constituted by the convolutional Forsyte polynomial differentiator pro- posed by former worker to seismic wave simulation of complex heterogeneous media and compare the efficiency and accuracy between this method and other seismic simulation methods such as finite difference and pseudospec- tral method. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the algorithm constituted by convolutional Forsyte polyno- mial differentiator has high efficiency and accuracy and needs less computational resources, so it is a numerical modeling method with much potential.

  19. Scram simulation of a control rod drive mechanism of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shinohara, Yoshikazu; Ichinoo, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Eiji; Nambu, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Tomonori.

    1987-03-01

    Control rod drop verification experiments of Mitsubishi pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions are performed to confirm the insertion function of control rods into the core. To evaluate these tests, computer simulations are performed. The scram time of control rods under seismic conditions was confirmed to meet the scram function. The behavior of the dropping control rods and the scram time obtained by the computer simulation show a very good correspondence with the results of verification experiments.

  20. Numerical simulation of roadbed slope under seismic action in permafrost regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingYu Liu; JianKun Liu; ZhongQin Su; Li Liu; Min Xie

    2013-01-01

    The deformation and strength characteristics of roadbed slope under seismic loading in permafrost regions are simulated numerically. The seismic response of roadbed at different positions and inclinations of a slope section was analyzed. Results show that, roadbed slope damage is mainly led by lateral displacement, and the deformation gradually decreases with increasing depth;roadbed and foundation displacement and plastic strain increases with the magnitude of slope angle, hence the roadbed safety factor will be reduced.

  1. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  2. Large Subduction Earthquake Simulations using Finite Source Modeling and the Offshore-Onshore Ambient Seismic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, L.; Miyake, H.; Koketsu, K.

    2016-12-01

    Large subduction earthquakes have the potential to generate strong long-period ground motions. The ambient seismic field, also called seismic noise, contains information about the elastic response of the Earth between two seismic stations that can be retrieved using seismic interferometry. The DONET1 network, which is composed of 20 offshore stations, has been deployed atop the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, to continuously monitor the seismotectonic activity in this highly seismically active region. The surrounding onshore area is covered by hundreds of seismic stations, which are operated the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), with a spacing of 15-20 km. We retrieve offshore-onshore Green's functions from the ambient seismic field using the deconvolution technique and use them to simulate the long-period ground motions of moderate subduction earthquakes that occurred at shallow depth. We extend the point source method, which is appropriate for moderate events, to finite source modeling to simulate the long-period ground motions of large Mw 7 class earthquake scenarios. The source models are constructed using scaling relations between moderate and large earthquakes to discretize the fault plane of the large hypothetical events into subfaults. Offshore-onshore Green's functions are spatially interpolated over the fault plane to obtain one Green's function for each subfault. The interpolated Green's functions are finally summed up considering different rupture velocities. Results show that this technique can provide additional information about earthquake ground motions that can be used with the existing physics-based simulations to improve seismic hazard assessment.

  3. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  4. Application of Numerical Simulation and Vibration Measurements for Seismic Damage Assessment of Railway Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehan, Fumiaki; Meguro, Kimiro

    In this study, the authors discuss methods to assess the future/actual damage to RC structures by using numerical simulations and vibration measurements. First, the applicability of the Applied Element Method (AEM) is examined as an assessment tool for the seismic performance of RC structures with/without retrofit. Cyclic loading tests and seismic response of RC structures are simulated. Next, a method to improve the accuracy of vibration diagnoses of earthquake damaged RC structures is discussed by using damage assessment criteria calculated with the AEM. The AEM could simulate the damage behavior of RC columns, jacketed RC columns and an actual railway viaduct. The change of natural frequencies due to damage to RC columns and an actual railway viaduct with steel jacket were also correctly estimated. Seismic performance check of structures and development of assessment criteria for damage inspection can be effectively done by the AEM.

  5. Propagation simulation and attenuation law analysis of seismic wave in elastoplastic tunnel rock medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tong-bin; LI Jian-gong; XIAO Ya-xun; CHENG Guo-qiang

    2007-01-01

    The energy caused by the dynamic impact in mining engineering forth release and spread by the way of seismic waves, monitoring is an effective way for forecasting mine dynamical disasters, such as rockburst and coal and gas outburst. Three-dimensional dynamic model was built to simulate the propagating progress of seismic waves in the elastoplastic tunnel rock and analyzed the propagating law of perturbation acceleration around tunnel, based on the finite element dynamic analysis software ANSYS/LS-DYNA.The simulation results indicate that: (1) The propagation attenuation of seismic wave is a negative index relationship; (2) The acceleration amplitude of seismic wave decays rapidly in near-field and decays slowly in far-field; (3) When the perturbation is generated in the dead ahead of tunnel, the acceleration of seismic wave become smaller and smaller away from the roadway-rib;(4) The elastic and plastic stress state of tunnel rock is also an important factor for propagation process of wave, the energy of seismic wave is mainly consumed for geometric spreading and plastic deformation in propagation in the elastoplastic medium model.

  6. Velocity adjustable TMD and numerical simulation of seismic performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Li; Zhou Xiyuan; Yan Weiming

    2007-01-01

    A new type of velocity adjustable tuned mass damper (TMD) consisting of impulse generators and clutches is presented. The force impulse is generated by a joining operation of electromagnets and springs and MR dampers are used as clutches. Rules for velocity adjustment are established according to the working mechanism of TMD. The analysis program is developed on a VB platform. Seismic response of SDOF structures with both passive TMD and velocity adjustable TMD are analyzed. The results show that (1) the control effectiveness of passive TMDs is usually unstable; (2) the control effectiveness of the proposed semi-active TMDs is much better than passive TMDs under typical seismic ground motions; and (3) unlike the passive TMD system, the proposed velocity adjustable TMDs exhibit good control effectiveness even when the primary structure performance becomes inelastic during severe earthquakes.

  7. SNES - Seismic Network Evaluation through Simulation: an application to the Italian RSNC-INGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Luzio, Dario; D'Anna, Giuseppe; Mangano, Giorgio; Messina, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    In this work we present a new method to evaluate the location performance of a seismic network through earthquakes simulation (SNES - Seismic Networks Evaluation through Simulation). To be applied, the SNES method require: P and S velocity models, seismic attenuation law, seismic stations positions and their experimental noise spectra and, finally, an empirical law that link the variance of the residual times of a station to the hypocenter position. This method allow to map the confidence interval estimates of the hypocentral parameters as function of magnitude, focus depth and confidence level. The simulation was carried out assuming that the epicentres of synthetic earthquakes are located in the knots of a square grid which was covering the investigated area. For each synthetic earthquake, the seismic spectrum was calculated in every station to determine the local Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR): the set of active stations in the location procedure and the relative azimuthal gap was determined by a threshold value of this parameter. Finally, the covariance matrix of synthetic data and the partial derivatives of the model were determined and used to estimate the covariance matrix of the hypocentral parameters. This method was applied to the Italian RSNC-INGV to evaluate its location performance, with a 95% confidence level. This simulation was carried out for small magnitude earthquakes (1.5simulation allowed to highlight some zones of the Italian peninsula and its surrounding seas that need an improvement of the seismic network. We show how the Ocean Bottom Seismometers can play an important role in this network improvement.

  8. Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kham, Marc; Bouden-Romdhane, Nejla

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at the analysis of seismic wave amplification in a deep alluvial basin in the city of Tunis in Tunisia. This sedimentary basin is 3000m wide and 350m deep. Since the seismic hazard is significant in this area, the depth of the basin and the strong impedance ratio raise the need for an accurate estimation of seismic motion amplification. Various experimental investigations were performed in previous studies to characterize site effects. The Boundary Element Method is considered herein to assess the parameter sensitivity of the amplification process and analyse the prevailing phenomena. The various frequencies of maximum amplification are correctly estimated by the BEM simulations. The maximum amplification level observed in the field is also well retrieved by the numerical simulations but, due to the sensitivity of the location of maximum amplification in space, the overall maximum amplification has to be considered. The influence of the wave-field incidence and material damping is also discuss...

  9. Frictional Behavior and Slip Localization in Simulated Faults of Halite at Sub-seismic to Seismic Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ree, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2007-12-01

    Halite exhibits deformation behavior ranging from brittle to plastic at room temperature and at low pressures, and has been used to simulate deformation processes of the brittle-ductile transition zone. However, previous experiments on halite were performed at very low slip rates (10-9-10-3 m/s), requiring friction data at seismic slip rates for a more complete assessment of the applicability of the experimental results to natural earthquakes. We conducted friction experiments on halite at slip rate of 0.02-1.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.8- 10.0 MPa using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. A thin layer (0.6-1.0 mm thick) of halite gouge was inserted between precut rock cylinders jacketed with Teflon sleeve. We found that mechanical behavior and deformation processes of halite gouge are remarkably different depending on slip rate and that frictional melting and dislocation creep can occur simultaneously at seismic slip rates. At sub-seismic slip rates of 0.02 to 0.05 m/sec, peak friction (μp = 0.76-0.85) was followed by steady-state friction (μss = 0.35-0.37). Gouge layer consists of a thin slip localization zone at the halite gouge-rock contact and a thick low slip-rate zone. The low slip-rate zone shows evidence for cataclastic flow with angular fragments set in a fine matrix. In contrast, the slip localization zone consists of very fine gouge with some remnants of fragments. At seismic slip rates of 0.1 to 1.3 m/sec, μp (0.64-0.99) was followed by μss (0.36-0.03). μss decreases with increasing slip rate. The shear zone consists of a thin slip localization zone at the halite gouge-rock contact and a thick low slip-rate zone. The low slip-rate zone consists of polycrystalline halite ribbons highly elongated obliquely to shear zone boundary and the oblique foliation is dragged into the thin slip localization zone. Each ribbon is also defined as a lattice preferred orientation domain by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Individual

  10. Numerical simulation on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion in rigid-pile composite foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaolei; Li, Yaokun; Ji, Jing; Ying, Junhao; Li, Weichen; Dai, Baicheng

    2016-06-01

    In order to quantitatively study the seismic absorption effect of the cushion on a superstructure, a numerical simulation and parametric study are carried out on the overall FEA model of a rigid-pile composite foundation in ABAQUS. A simulation of a shaking table test on a rigid mass block is first completed with ABAQUS and EERA, and the effectiveness of the Drucker-Prager constitutive model and the finite-infinite element coupling method is proved. Dynamic time-history analysis of the overall model under frequent and rare earthquakes is carried out using seismic waves from the El Centro, Kobe, and Bonds earthquakes. The different responses of rigid-pile composite foundations and pile-raft foundations are discussed. Furthermore, the influence of thickness and modulus of cushion, and ground acceleration on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion are analyzed. The results show that: 1) the seismic absorption effect of a cushion is good under rare earthquakes, with an absorption ratio of about 0.85; and 2) the seismic absorption effect is strongly affected by cushion thickness and ground acceleration.

  11. High-fidelity simulation capability for virtual testing of seismic and acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Moran, Mark L.; Ketcham, Stephen A.; Lacombe, James; Anderson, Thomas S.; Symons, Neill P.; Aldridge, David F.; Marlin, David H.; Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes development and application of a high-fidelity, seismic/acoustic simulation capability for battlefield sensors. The purpose is to provide simulated sensor data so realistic that they cannot be distinguished by experts from actual field data. This emerging capability provides rapid, low-cost trade studies of unattended ground sensor network configurations, data processing and fusion strategies, and signatures emitted by prototype vehicles. There are three essential components to the modeling: (1) detailed mechanical signature models for vehicles and walkers, (2) high-resolution characterization of the subsurface and atmospheric environments, and (3) state-of-the-art seismic/acoustic models for propagating moving-vehicle signatures through realistic, complex environments. With regard to the first of these components, dynamic models of wheeled and tracked vehicles have been developed to generate ground force inputs to seismic propagation models. Vehicle models range from simple, 2D representations to highly detailed, 3D representations of entire linked-track suspension systems. Similarly detailed models of acoustic emissions from vehicle engines are under development. The propagation calculations for both the seismics and acoustics are based on finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) methodologies capable of handling complex environmental features such as heterogeneous geologies, urban structures, surface vegetation, and dynamic atmospheric turbulence. Any number of dynamic sources and virtual sensors may be incorporated into the FDTD model. The computational demands of 3D FDTD simulation over tactical distances require massively parallel computers. Several example calculations of seismic/acoustic wave propagation through complex atmospheric and terrain environments are shown.

  12. The character and amplitude of 'discontinuous' bottom-simulating reflections in marine seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Cook, Ann E.; Sawyer, Derek E.; Küçük, H. Mert; Goldberg, David S.

    2017-02-01

    Bottom-simulating reflections (BSRs) identified in seismic data are well documented; and are commonly interpreted to indicate the presence of gas hydrates along continental margins, as well as to estimate regional volumes of gas hydrate. A BSR is defined as a reflection that sub-parallels the seafloor but is opposite in polarity and cross-cuts dipping sedimentary strata. BSRs form as a result of a strong negative acoustic impedance contrast. BSRs, however, are a diverse seismic phenomena that manifest in strikingly contrasting ways in different geological settings, and in different seismic data types. We investigate the characteristics of BSRs, using conventional and high resolution, 2D and 3D seismic data sets in three locations: the Terrebonne and Orca Basins in the Gulf of Mexico, and Blake Ridge on the US Atlantic Margin. The acquisition geometry and frequency content of the seismic data significantly impact the resultant character of BSRs, as observed with depth and amplitude maps of the BSRs. Furthermore, our amplitude maps reinforce the concept that the BSR represents a zone, over which the transition from hydrate to free gas occurs, as opposed to the conventional model of the BSR occurring at a single interface. Our results show that a BSR can be mapped in three dimensions but it is not spatially continuous, at least not at the basin scale. Rather, a BSR manifests itself as a discontinuous, or patchy, reflection and only at local scales is it continuous. We suggest the discontinuous nature of BSRs is the result of variable saturation and distribution of free gas and hydrate, acquisition geometry and frequency content of the recorded seismic data. The commonly accepted definition of a BSR should be broadened with careful consideration of these factors, to represent the uppermost extent of enhanced amplitude at the shallowest occurrence of free gas trapped by overlying hydrate-bearing sediments.

  13. Numerical simulation of co-seismic deformation of 2011 Japan Mw9. 0 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Keliang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Co-seismic displacements associated with the Mw9. 0 earthquake on March 11, 2011 in Japan are numerically simulated on the basis of a finite-fault dislocation model with PSGRN/PSCMP software. Compared with the inland GPS observation, 90% of the computed eastward, northward and vertical displacements have residuals less than 0.10 m, suggesting that the simulated results can be, to certain extent, used to demonstrate the co-seismic deformation in the near field. In this model, the maximum eastward displacement increases from 6 m along the coast to 30 m near the epicenter, where the maximum southward displacement is 13 m. The three-dimensional display shows that the vertical displacement reaches a maximum uplift of 14.3 m, which is comparable to the tsunami height in the near-trench region. The maximum subsidence is 5.3 m.

  14. Numerical simulation of tectonic plates motion and seismic process in Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peryshkin, A. Yu., E-mail: alexb700@yandex.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Makarov, P. V., E-mail: bacardi@ispms.ru; Eremin, M. O., E-mail: bacardi@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    An evolutionary approach proposed in [1, 2] combining the achievements of traditional macroscopic theory of solid mechanics and basic ideas of nonlinear dynamics is applied in a numerical simulation of present-day tectonic plates motion and seismic process in Central Asia. Relative values of strength parameters of rigid blocks with respect to the soft zones were characterized by the δ parameter that was varied in the numerical experiments within δ = 1.1–1.8 for different groups of the zonal-block divisibility. In general, the numerical simulations of tectonic block motion and accompanying seismic process in the model geomedium indicate that the numerical solutions of the solid mechanics equations characterize its deformation as a typical behavior of a nonlinear dynamic system under conditions of self-organized criticality.

  15. Static and simulated seismic testing of the TRG-7 through -16 shear wall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Dove, R.C. (Dove (R.C.), Del Norte, CO (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Results from the static, simulated seismic base excitation, and experimental modal analysis tests performed on the TRG-7 through -16 structures are reported. These results were used to establish the scalability of static and dynamic response measured on small structural models to the dynamic response of conventional concrete structures. In addition, these tests provided information concerning cumulative damage effects that occur in concrete structures when they are subjected to different dynamic load sequences. In contrast to previous results obtained in the early part of this program, TRG-7 through -16 responded to simulated seismic excitations with theoretical stiffness values until peak nominal base shear stress levels of 150 psi were reached. A summary of all experimental data obtained during this program is provided. 23 refs., 47 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Simulation of a World-Wide Seismic Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-31

    APPROACHES DESIGN PARAMETERS BY FACILITY AND ELEMENT SUMMARY OF ANALYSIS ELEMENTS DETECTION TRUTH TABLE TIMING ERROR DIAGNOSTIC SUMMARY OF THE RSE ...storage element ( RSE ), and the data collection processor (DCP). The simulator functions as follows; • Earth model imputs are converted to...detection bulletins by the SDP • Detection bulletins from the SDP are written on the RSE and stored for pickup by the communications processor • Incoming

  17. Joint Optimization of Vertical Component Gravity and Seismic P-wave First Arrivals by Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Basler-Reeder, K.; Kent, G. M.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous joint seismic-gravity optimization improves P-wave velocity models in areas with sharp lateral velocity contrasts. Optimization is achieved using simulated annealing, a metaheuristic global optimization algorithm that does not require an accurate initial model. Balancing the seismic-gravity objective function is accomplished by a novel approach based on analysis of Pareto charts. Gravity modeling uses a newly developed convolution algorithm, while seismic modeling utilizes the highly efficient Vidale eikonal equation traveltime generation technique. Synthetic tests show that joint optimization improves velocity model accuracy and provides velocity control below the deepest headwave raypath. Detailed first arrival picking followed by trial velocity modeling remediates inconsistent data. We use a set of highly refined first arrival picks to compare results of a convergent joint seismic-gravity optimization to the Plotrefa™ and SeisOpt® Pro™ velocity modeling packages. Plotrefa™ uses a nonlinear least squares approach that is initial model dependent and produces shallow velocity artifacts. SeisOpt® Pro™ utilizes the simulated annealing algorithm and is limited to depths above the deepest raypath. Joint optimization increases the depth of constrained velocities, improving reflector coherency at depth. Kirchoff prestack depth migrations reveal that joint optimization ameliorates shallow velocity artifacts caused by limitations in refraction ray coverage. Seismic and gravity data from the San Emidio Geothermal field of the northwest Basin and Range province demonstrate that joint optimization changes interpretation outcomes. The prior shallow-valley interpretation gives way to a deep valley model, while shallow antiformal reflectors that could have been interpreted as antiformal folds are flattened. Furthermore, joint optimization provides a clearer image of the rangefront fault. This technique can readily be applied to existing datasets and could

  18. An Earthquake Source Ontology for Seismic Hazard Analysis and Ground Motion Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechar, J. D.; Jordan, T. H.; Gil, Y.; Ratnakar, V.

    2005-12-01

    Representation of the earthquake source is an important element in seismic hazard analysis and earthquake simulations. Source models span a range of conceptual complexity - from simple time-independent point sources to extended fault slip distributions. Further computational complexity arises because the seismological community has established so many source description formats and variations thereof; what this means is that conceptually equivalent source models are often expressed in different ways. Despite the resultant practical difficulties, there exists a rich semantic vocabulary for working with earthquake sources. For these reasons, we feel it is appropriate to create a semantic model of earthquake sources using an ontology, a computer science tool from the field of knowledge representation. Unlike the domain of most ontology work to date, earthquake sources can be described by a very precise mathematical framework. Another uniqueness associated with developing such an ontology is that earthquake sources are often used as computational objects. A seismologist generally wants more than to simply construct a source and have it be well-formed and properly described; additionally, the source will be used for performing calculations. Representation and manipulation of complex mathematical objects presents a challenge to the ontology development community. In order to enable simulations involving many different types of source models, we have completed preliminary development of a seismic point source ontology. The use of an ontology to represent knowledge provides machine interpretability and the ability to validate logical consistency and completeness. Our ontology, encoded using the OWL Web Ontology Language - a standard from the World Wide Web Consortium, contains the conceptual definitions and relationships necessary for source translation services. For example, specification of strike, dip, rake, and seismic moment will automatically translate into a double

  19. Accuracy of three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis in time domain using nonlinear numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fayun; Chen, Haibing; Huang, Maosong

    2017-07-01

    To provide appropriate uses of nonlinear ground response analysis for engineering practice, a three-dimensional soil column with a distributed mass system and a time domain numerical analysis were implemented on the OpenSees simulation platform. The standard mesh of a three-dimensional soil column was suggested to be satisfied with the specified maximum frequency. The layered soil column was divided into multiple sub-soils with a different viscous damping matrix according to the shear velocities as the soil properties were significantly different. It was necessary to use a combination of other one-dimensional or three-dimensional nonlinear seismic ground analysis programs to confirm the applicability of nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures in soft soil or for strong earthquakes. The accuracy of the three-dimensional soil column finite element method was verified by dynamic centrifuge model testing under different peak accelerations of the earthquake. As a result, nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures were improved in this study. The accuracy and efficiency of the three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis can be adapted to the requirements of engineering practice.

  20. Spatial Verification of Earthquake Simulators Using Self-Consistent Metrics for Off-Fault Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. M.; Yoder, M. R.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    We address the problem of verifying the self-consistency of earthquake simulators with the data from which their parameters are drawn. Earthquake simulators are a class of computational simulations which attempt to mirror the topological complexity of the earthquake fault system on which the earthquakes occur. In addition, the physics of friction and elastic interactions between fault elements can be included in these simulations as well. In general, the parameters are adjusted so that natural earthquake sequences are matched in their scaling properties in an optimal way. Generally, these parameters choices are based on paleoseismic data extending over many hundreds and thousands of years. However, one of the problems encountered is the verification of the simulations applied to current earthquake seismicity. It is this problem, for which no currently accepted solution has been proposed, that is the objective of the present paper. Physically-based earthquake simulators allow the generation of many thousands of years of simulated seismicity, allowing for robust capture of statistical properties of large, damaging earthquakes that have long recurrence time scales for observation. Following past simulator and forecast model verification efforts, we approach the challenges in spatial forecast verification fo simulators; namely, that simulator output events are confined to the modeled faults, while observed earthquakes often occur off of known faults. We present two methods for overcoming this discrepancy: a simplistic approach whereby observed earthquakes are shifted to the nearest fault element and a variation of the Epidemic-type aftershock (ETAS) model, which smears the simulator catalog seismicity over the entire test region. To test these methods, a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) plot was produced by comparing the rate maps to observed m>6.0 earthquakes since 1980. We found that the nearest-neighbor mapping produced poor forecasts, while the modified ETAS

  1. Physical Modeling and Analysis of Seismic Data from a Simulated Fractured Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Faranak

    This thesis studies the physical seismic modeling of a simulated fractured medium to examine variations of seismic reflection amplitudes with source-receiver offset and azimuth (AVAZ). The intent is to extract information about the fracture orientation and magnitude of the anisotropy of a naturally fractured medium. The simulated fractured medium is constructed from phenolic LE-grade material which exhibits orthorhombic symmetry. For initial characterization of the phenolic model, its elastic stiffness coefficients were determined from group velocities. The group velocities along various directions were obtained from three-component physical model transmission data. The phenolic model approximates a weakly anisotropic layer with horizontal transverse isotropy (HTI). Three-dimensional (3D) physical model reflection data were acquired over a model consisting of the simulated fractured layer sandwiched between two isotropic plexiglas layers submerged in water. Interference between primary and ghost events was avoided with a careful 3D seismic survey design. After deterministic amplitude corrections, including a correction for the directivity effect of the physical model transducers, reflection amplitudes agreed with the amplitudes predicted by the Zoeppritz equations, confirming the suitability of the 3D physical model data for a quantitative amplitude analysis. Linear AVAZ inversions for the fracture orientation and HTI anisotropic parameters (including shear-wave splitting parameter) were performed on P-wave reflection amplitudes from the top of the simulated fractured medium. Sensitivity analysis of the inversions results, including variations of the background velocity model and maximum incident angle used, confirms the accuracy of the amplitude analysis. The results reveal that the amplitude analysis of the P-wave data alone allows for extraction the information about the shear-wave anisotropy confined in the P-wave multi-offset and multi-azimuth amplitude data

  2. Scalable parallel programming for high performance seismic simulation on petascale heterogeneous supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun

    The 1994 Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles, California, killed 57 people, injured over 8,700 and caused an estimated $20 billion in damage. Petascale simulations are needed in California and elsewhere to provide society with a better understanding of the rupture and wave dynamics of the largest earthquakes at shaking frequencies required to engineer safe structures. As the heterogeneous supercomputing infrastructures are becoming more common, numerical developments in earthquake system research are particularly challenged by the dependence on the accelerator elements to enable "the Big One" simulations with higher frequency and finer resolution. Reducing time to solution and power consumption are two primary focus area today for the enabling technology of fault rupture dynamics and seismic wave propagation in realistic 3D models of the crust's heterogeneous structure. This dissertation presents scalable parallel programming techniques for high performance seismic simulation running on petascale heterogeneous supercomputers. A real world earthquake simulation code, AWP-ODC, one of the most advanced earthquake codes to date, was chosen as the base code in this research, and the testbed is based on Titan at Oak Ridge National Laboraratory, the world's largest hetergeneous supercomputer. The research work is primarily related to architecture study, computation performance tuning and software system scalability. An earthquake simulation workflow has also been developed to support the efficient production sets of simulations. The highlights of the technical development are an aggressive performance optimization focusing on data locality and a notable data communication model that hides the data communication latency. This development results in the optimal computation efficiency and throughput for the 13-point stencil code on heterogeneous systems, which can be extended to general high-order stencil codes. Started from scratch, the hybrid CPU/GPU version of AWP

  3. Seismic Source Characteristics of Nuclear and Chemical Explosions in Granite from Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heming; Rodgers, Arthur J.; Lomov, Ilya N.; Vorobiev, Oleg Y.

    2014-03-01

    Seismic source characteristics of low-yield (0.5-5 kt) underground explosions are inferred from hydrodynamic simulations using a granite material model on high-performance (parallel) computers. We use a non-linear rheological model for granite calibrated to historical near-field nuclear test data. Equivalent elastic P-wave source spectra are derived from the simulated hydrodynamic response using reduced velocity potentials. Source spectra and parameters are compared with the models of M ueller and M urphy (Bull Seism Soc Am 61:1675-1692, 1971, hereafter MM71) and D enny and J ohnson (Explosion source phenomenology, pp 1-24, 1991, hereafter DJ91). The source spectra inferred from the simulations of different yields at normal scaled depth-of-burial (SDOB) match the MM71 spectra reasonably well. For normally buried nuclear explosions, seismic moments are larger for the hydrodynamic simulations than MM71 (by 25 %) and for DJ91 (by over a factor of 2), however, the scaling of moment with yield across this low-yield range is consistent for our calculations and the two models. Spectra from our simulations show higher corner frequencies at the lower end of the 0.5-5.0 kt yield range and stronger variation with yield than the MM71 and DJ91 models predict. The spectra from our simulations have additional energy above the corner frequency, probably related to non-linear near-source effects, but at high frequencies the spectral slopes agree with the f -2 predictions of MM71. Simulations of nuclear explosions for a range of SDOB from 0.5 to 3.9 show stronger variations in the seismic moment than predicted by the MM71 and DJ91 models. Chemical explosions are found to generate higher moments by a factor of about two compared to nuclear explosions of the same yield in granite and at normal depth-of-burial, broadly consistent with comparisons of nuclear and chemical shots at the US Nevada Test Site (D enny, Proceeding of symposium on the non-proliferation experiment, Rockville

  4. Fractal properties and simulation of micro-seismicity for seismic hazard analysis: a comparison of North Anatolian and San Andreas Fault Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naside Ozer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed statistical properties of earthquakes in western Anatolia as well as the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ in terms of spatio-temporal variations of fractal dimensions, p- and b-values. During statistically homogeneous periods characterized by closer fractal dimension values, we propose that occurrence of relatively larger shocks (M >= 5.0 is unlikely. Decreases in seismic activity in such intervals result in spatial b-value distributions that are primarily stable. Fractal dimensions decrease with time in proportion to increasing seismicity. Conversely, no spatiotemporal patterns were observed for p-value changes. In order to evaluate failure probabilities and simulate earthquake occurrence in the western NAFZ, we applied a modified version of the renormalization group method. Assuming an increase in small earthquakes is indicative of larger shocks, we apply the mentioned model to micro-seismic (M<= 3.0 activity, and test our results using San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ data. We propose that fractal dimension is a direct indicator of material heterogeneity and strength. Results from a model suggest simulated and observed earthquake occurrences are coherent, and may be used for seismic hazard estimation on creeping strike-slip fault zones.

  5. Seismic triggering of landslides. Part B: Simulation of dynamic failure processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-B. Havenith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available From field observations it is possible to establish correlations between geological conditions and landslide occurrence. However, in general, it is difficult to assess the affect of individual factors on slope instability because of their mutual interaction. In addition, the dynamic effect of propagating seismic waves significantly increases the complexity of the slope stability problem. Wave diffraction, reflection and focusing effects are dependent on local geological conditions and make it difficult to analyse dynamic sliding mechanisms using field observations alone. As a consequence, in order to examine the influence of various geological and seismic factors on slope movements, it is often necessary to produce numerical models. This paper describes the results of such models as applied to two case studies in Kyrgyzstan: the Ananevo rockslide, located in granite, and the Suusamyr debris slump-flow, situated within soft sediments (see Part A: Havenith et al., 2003. Discrete element modelling (UDEC, adapted both to the discontinuous character of fractured rock and to the heterogeneity of layered mediums, was used. This permitted simulation of deformation mechanisms, including seismically induced bending, block tilting, and slip. Particular attention was paid to the interaction between deformation mechanisms, site-specific amplification effects, and subsurface structure.

  6. Hypocenter determination using simulated annealing, updated 1D seismic velocity model and focal mechanism analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Akhmad Fanani; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Sule, Rachmat; Juanda, Aditya Abdurrahman

    2013-09-01

    Hypocenter determination of micro-earthquakes of Mount "X-1" geothermal field has been conducted using simulated annealing and guided error search method using a 1D seismic velocity model. In order to speed up the hypocenter determination process a three-circle intersection method has been used to guide the simulated annealing and guided error search process. We used P and S arrival time's microseismic data. In the simulated annealing and guided error search processes, the minimum travel time from a source to a receiver has been calculated by employing ray tracing with shooting method. The resulting hypocenters from the above process occurred at depths of 3-4 km below mean sea level. These hypocenter distributions are correlated with previous study which was concluded that the most active microseismic area in which the site of many fractures and also vertical circulation place. Later on, resulting hypocenters location was used as input to determine 1-D seismic velocity using joint hypocenter determination method. The results of VELEST indicate show low Vp/Vs ratio value at depths of 3-4 km. Our interpretation is this anomaly may be related to a rock layer which is saturated by vapor (gas or steam). Another feature is high Vp/Vs ratio value at depths of 1-3 km that may related to a rock layer which is saturated by fluid or partial melting. We also analyze the focal mechanism of microseismic using ISOLA method to determine the source characteristic of this event.

  7. A Coupled Multiphysics Approach for Simulating Induced Seismicity, Ground Acceleration and Structural Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorney, Robert; Coleman, Justin; Wilkins, Amdrew; Huang, Hai; Veeraraghavan, Swetha; Xia, Yidong; Permann, Cody

    2017-04-01

    Numerical modeling has played an important role in understanding the behavior of coupled subsurface thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes associated with a number of energy and environmental applications since as early as the 1970s. While the ability to rigorously describe all key tightly coupled controlling physics still remains a challenge, there have been significant advances in recent decades. These advances are related primarily to the exponential growth of computational power, the development of more accurate equations of state, improvements in the ability to represent heterogeneity and reservoir geometry, and more robust nonlinear solution schemes. The work described in this paper documents the development and linkage of several fully-coupled and fully-implicit modeling tools. These tools simulate: (1) the dynamics of fluid flow, heat transport, and quasi-static rock mechanics; (2) seismic wave propagation from the sources of energy release through heterogeneous material; and (3) the soil-structural damage resulting from ground acceleration. These tools are developed in Idaho National Laboratory's parallel Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment, and are integrated together using a global implicit approach. The governing equations are presented, the numerical approach for simultaneously solving and coupling the three coupling physics tools is discussed, and the data input and output methodology is outlined. An example is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the coupled multiphysics approach. The example involves simulating a system conceptually similar to the geothermal development in Basel Switzerland, and the resultant induced seismicity, ground motion and structural damage is predicted.

  8. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models

    KAUST Repository

    van Dinther, Y.

    2013-04-01

    The physics governing the seismic cycle at seismically active subduction zones remains poorly understood due to restricted direct observations in time and space. To investigate subduction zone dynamics and associated interplate seismicity, we validate a continuum, visco-elasto-plastic numerical model with a new laboratory approach (Paper 1). The analogous laboratory setup includes a visco-elastic gelatin wedge underthrusted by a rigid plate with defined velocity-weakening and -strengthening regions. Our geodynamic simulation approach includes velocity-weakening friction to spontaneously generate a series of fast frictional instabilities that correspond to analog earthquakes. A match between numerical and laboratory source parameters is obtained when velocity-strengthening is applied in the aseismic regions to stabilize the rupture. Spontaneous evolution of absolute stresses leads to nucleation by coalescence of neighboring patches, mainly occurring at evolving asperities near the seismogenic zone limits. Consequently, a crack-, or occasionally even pulse-like, rupture propagates toward the opposite side of the seismogenic zone by increasing stresses ahead of its rupture front, until it arrests on a barrier. The resulting surface displacements qualitatively agree with geodetic observations and show landward and, from near the downdip limit, upward interseismic motions. These are rebound and reversed coseismically. This slip increases adjacent stresses, which are relaxed postseismically by afterslip and thereby produce persistent seaward motions. The wide range of observed physical phenomena, including back-propagation and repeated slip, and the agreement with laboratory results demonstrate that visco-elasto-plastic geodynamic models with rate-dependent friction form a new tool that can greatly contribute to our understanding of the seismic cycle at subduction zones.

  9. The Seismic Sources of the 2009 Samoa Earthquake from Tsunami Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P.-Y.; Chao, B. F.; Chang, E. T.-Y.; Wu, T.-R.

    2012-04-01

    A big earthquake occurred in the Samoa-Tonga region on September 29, 2009, as the Pacific plate subducts westward beneath the Australia plate along the Tonga trench. The earthquake was recognized as a multiple-source event, but two distinct sets of rupture solutions have been presented: Deducing only from the seismic data, Lay et al. (2010) resolved this instance as an initiation of an intraplate normal faulting (Mw8.1) triggering the two underthrusting subevents (both in Mw7.8); whereas Beaven et al. (2010) presented that the normal fault (Mw7.9) was triggered by the slow thrusting of the interplate motion (Mw8.0), determined from various types of data including tsunami waves. Here, we explore whether and how much the simulations of tsunamis can help discriminating the seismic source solutions. The program COMCOT is used to model the tsunami waves and propagation. The simulated waveforms are compared with the actual observations from three ocean bottom pressure recorders of DART project (Deep-ocean Assessment Reporting of Tsunamis, developed by NOAA). We apply the two afore-mentioned rupture models to determine the respective initial conditions and the radial spreading of the tsunami waves. According to the tsunami waveform simulation, the tsunami waves are the sea-surface perturbation provoked by the large normal fault and the relatively minor thrusts, but in varied weightings of normal-to-thrust mechanism at different DART stations. Simulating with two rupture models for the normal fault provided by Lay et al., it favors the geometry of the normal fault of dipping to northeast, reverse to the commonly thought trench-ward image. This is consistent with the one determined by Beaven et al. Based on our experience, a detailed rupture description can draw a better approximation in tsunami simulation. However, the tsunami simulation cannot discriminate the variation of source mechanisms in the sense that the seismic source time functions processing within one or two

  10. Numerical simulation analysis on Wenchuan seismic strong motion in Hanyuan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Gao, M.; Guo, J.; Li, Z.; Li, T.

    2015-12-01

    69227 deaths, 374643 injured, 17923 people missing, direct economic losses 845.1 billion, and a large number houses collapse were caused by Wenchuan Ms8 earthquake in Sichuan Province on May 12, 2008, how to reproduce characteristics of its strong ground motion and predict its intensity distribution, which have important role to mitigate disaster of similar giant earthquake in the future. Taking Yunnan-Sichuan Province, Wenchuan town, Chengdu city, Chengdu basin and its vicinity as the research area, on the basis of the available three-dimensional velocity structure model and newly topography data results from ChinaArray of Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, 2 type complex source rupture process models with the global and local source parameters are established, we simulated the seismic wave propagation of Wenchuan Ms8 earthquake throughout the whole three-dimensional region by the GMS discrete grid finite-difference techniques with Cerjan absorbing boundary conditions, and obtained the seismic intensity distribution in this region through analyzing 50×50 stations data (simulated ground motion output station). The simulated results indicated that: (1)Simulated Wenchuan earthquake ground motion (PGA) response and the main characteristics of the response spectrum are very similar to those of the real Wenchuan earthquake records. (2)Wenchuan earthquake ground motion (PGA) and the response spectra of the Plain are much greater than that of the left Mountain area because of the low velocity of the shallow surface media and the basin effect of the Chengdu basin structure. Simultaneously, (3) the source rupture process (inversion) with far-field P-wave, GPS data and InSAR information and the Longmenshan Front Fault (source rupture process) are taken into consideration in GMS numerical simulation, significantly different waveform and frequency component of the ground motion are obtained, though the strong motion waveform is distinct asymmetric

  11. Frequency and distance changes in the apparent P-wave radiation pattern: effects of seismic wave scattering in the crust inferred from dense seismic observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Manabu; Takemura, Shunsuke; Yoshimoto, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Frequency and distance changes in the apparent P-wave radiation pattern (0.75-12 Hz) are investigated using velocity seismograms of shallow strike-slip earthquakes occurring in Chugoku region, southwestern Japan. Data from a dense seismic monitoring network revealed that the four-lobe apparent P-wave radiation pattern was gradually distorted with increasing frequency and propagation distance. Observed features suggest that seismic wave scattering due to small-scale velocity heterogeneity in the crust may be a major cause of this distortion. The effects of seismic wave scattering on apparent P-wave radiation pattern were investigated via 3-D finite difference simulation of seismic wave propagation. Our simulations demonstrated that the scattering of seismic waves modified the apparent P-wave radiation pattern from the original four-lobe shape, and that the small-scale velocity heterogeneity, characterized by the von Kármán-type power spectral density function with correlation distance of 1 km, root-mean-square value of 0.03 and decay rate parameter of 0.5, might be adequate for modelling crustal heterogeneity in the target region. It was also found that the scattering attenuation of P wave expected from this heterogeneity is significantly smaller than the apparent P-wave attenuation and S-wave scattering attenuation reported by Multiple Lapse Time Window Analysis of previous studies in Japan. These results might imply that scattering attenuation is not the dominant mechanism of P-wave attenuation in the crust of Chugoku region.

  12. Fast 3D seismic wave simulations of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy earthquake for visual communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Casarotti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first application of the fast reacting framework for 3D simulations of seismic wave propagation generated by earthquakes in the Italian region with magnitude Mw 5. The driven motivation is to offer a visualization of the natural phenomenon to the general public but also to provide preliminary modeling to expert and civil protection operators. We report here a description of this framework during the emergency of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy Earthquake, a discussion on the accuracy of the simulation for this seismic event and a preliminary critical analysis of the visualization structure and of the reaction of the public.

  13. Using a physics-based earthquake simulator to evaluate seismic hazard in NW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaverdian, A.; Zafarani, H.; Rahimian, M.

    2016-07-01

    NW Iran is a region of active deformation in the Eurasia-Arabia collision zone. This high strain field has caused intensive faulting accompanied by several major (M > 6.5) earthquakes as it is evident from historical records. Whereas seismic data (i.e. instrumental and historical catalogues) are either short, or inaccurate and inhomogeneous, physics-based long-term simulations are beneficial to better assess seismic hazard. In this study, a deterministic seismicity model, which consists of major active faults, is first constructed, and used to generate a synthetic catalogue of large-magnitude (M > 5.5) earthquakes. The frequency-magnitude distribution of the synthetic earthquake catalogue, which is based on the physical characteristic and slip rate of the mapped faults, is consistent with the empirical distribution evaluated using record of instrumental and historical events. The obtained results are also in accordance with palaeoseismic studies and other independent kinematic deformation models of the Iranian Plateau. Using the synthetic catalogue, characteristic magnitude for all 16 active faults in the study area is determined. Magnitude and epicentre of these earthquakes are comparable with the historical records. Large earthquake recurrence times and their variations are evaluated, either for an individual fault or for the region as a whole. Goodness-of-fitness tests revealed that recurrence times can be well described by the Weibull distribution. Time-dependent conditional probabilities for large earthquakes in the study area are also estimated for different time intervals. The resulting synthetic catalogue can be utilized as a useful data set for hazard and risk assessment instead of short, incomplete and inhomogeneous available catalogues.

  14. Advanced seismic imaging technology. Data acquisition (computer simulation of elastic wave propagation); Koseido imaging gijutsu. Data shutoku gijutsu (danseiha simulation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuru, T. [Tech. Research Center, Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-11-10

    Development of software was examined for the purpose of making basic data for an advanced seismic imaging technology by obtaining a seismic exploration data from a complicated underground structural model through a numerical simulation. The result in fiscal 1994 was as follows. A dimensional division difference calculus is superior in the stability and accuracy of numerical calculation and capable of calculating by dividing into one dimensional differences. Attenuation items were added which were due to medium absorbing effect by Maxwell viscoelastic model, and simultaneously a function was added which was capable of dealing with the multi focuses and a group installation of geophones. A pseudospectral method is a kind of difference calculus for numerically solving a partial differential equation, and capable of dividing an underground structural model in lattice and calculating the field on the lattice point. The space direction is differentiated by calculating Fourier series without difference approximation; and, therefore, the number of lattice may be reduced to 2 for the maximum wave length; namely, a lattice interval may be coarsened to reduce calculation time. An improvement was made on the parallel calculation part of the program for two-dimensional analysis developed in the preceding fiscal year, enabling reduction in the calculation time. 4 figs.

  15. The VERCE Science Gateway: Enabling User Friendly HPC Seismic Wave Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarotti, E.; Spinuso, A.; Matser, J.; Leong, S. H.; Magnoni, F.; Krause, A.; Garcia, C. R.; Muraleedharan, V.; Krischer, L.; Anthes, C.

    2014-12-01

    The EU-funded project VERCE (Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community in Europe) aims to deploy technologies which satisfy the HPC and data-intensive requirements of modern seismology.As a result of VERCE official collaboration with the EU project SCI-BUS, access to computational resources, like local clusters and international infrastructures (EGI and PRACE), is made homogeneous and integrated within a dedicated science gateway based on the gUSE framework. In this presentation we give a detailed overview on the progress achieved with the developments of the VERCE Science Gateway, according to a use-case driven implementation strategy. More specifically, we show how the computational technologies and data services have been integrated within a tool for Seismic Forward Modelling, whose objective is to offer the possibility to performsimulations of seismic waves as a service to the seismological community.We will introduce the interactive components of the OGC map based web interface and how it supports the user with setting up the simulation. We will go through the selection of input data, which are either fetched from federated seismological web services, adopting community standards, or provided by the users themselves by accessing their own document data store. The HPC scientific codes can be selected from a number of waveform simulators, currently available to the seismological community as batch tools or with limited configuration capabilities in their interactive online versions.The results will be staged out via a secure GridFTP transfer to a VERCE data layer managed by iRODS. The provenance information of the simulation will be automatically cataloged by the data layer via NoSQL techonologies.Finally, we will show the example of how the visualisation output of the gateway could be enhanced by the connection with immersive projection technology at the Virtual Reality and Visualisation Centre of Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ).

  16. Tsunami Simulation by Tuned Seismic Source Inversion for the Great 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhin, A.; Yoshida, K.; Miyakoshi, K.; Irikura, K.

    2017-08-01

    Seismic and tsunami waves were the most destructive phenomena during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Here we ask whether the same source model can be used to obtain equally good simulations of the observed strong ground motions and the tsunami waves. If so, we could use the same source modeling technique for predictions of both tsunami waves and strong ground motions. Long-period (20-200 s) strong ground motion data were inverted to determine the rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The inverted slip distribution shows that large-slip area was extended around 150 km to north and 120 km to south from hypocenter and stretched between hypocenter and the trench. We estimated two slip models: without and with additional constraints. The first relatively rough slip model reproduced short-period tsunami wave (4-5 min). Due to better constraint by data of other kind and being relatively smooth the second model reproduces long-period tsunami wave (15-25 min), as well as keeps good fit of the short-period tsunami, although short-period tsunami becomes underestimated. We used a fully nonlinear Boussinesq water wave model to model tsunami propagation, and used the results to tune the slip model. Finally, we developed a tuned slip model that combines the features of both the first and the second slip models and reproduced both the short- and long-period tsunami waves, while maintaining good fit of the seismic waveforms.

  17. Simulating migrated seismic data by filtering an earth model: A MATLAB® implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxopeus, G.; Thorbecke, J.; Petersen, S.; Wapenaar, K.; Slob, E.

    2010-02-01

    An earth model is used in a collaborative environment in which some members provide information for its construction and others utilize the result. Validating an earth model by simulating a migration image is an important step. However, the high computational cost of generating 3D synthetic data, followed by the process of migration, limits the number of scenarios that can be validated. To overcome this computational cost, a novel strategy is used where a migration image is simulated by filtering a model with a spatial resolution filter. One of the key properties of this approach is that the model that describes a target-zone is decoupled from the macro-velocity model that is used to compute the spatial resolution filters. Consequently, different models can be filtered with the same resolution filter. For a horizontally layered medium, the Gazdag phase-shift operators are used to construct a common-offset spatial resolution filter to simulate the phase of 2D primary reflection data. To approximate a spatial resolution filter in a laterally variant medium, ray trace information is used as an illumination constraint. Additionally, the influence of seismic uncertainties on the shape of a spatial resolution filter and the resulting migration image are simulated. These filters enhance an iterative earth modeling approach.

  18. Evaluation of Seismic Rupture Models for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Using Tsunami Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Da Chiou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing a realistic, three-dimensional rupture model of the large offshore earthquake is difficult to accomplish directly through band-limited ground-motion observations. A potential indirect method is using a tsunami simulation to verify the rupture model in reverse because the initial conditions of the associated tsunamis are caused by a coseismic seafloor displacement correlating to the rupture pattern along the main faulting. In this study, five well-developed rupture models for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake were adopted to evaluate differences in simulated tsunamis and various rupture asperities. The leading wave of the simulated tsunamis triggered by the seafloor displacement in Yamazaki et al. (2011 model resulted in the smallest root-mean-squared difference (~0.082 m on average from the records of the eight DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis stations. This indicates that the main seismic rupture during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake should occur in a large shallow slip in a narrow range adjacent to the Japan trench. This study also quantified the influences of ocean stratification and tides which are normally overlooked in tsunami simulations. The discrepancy between the simulations with and without stratification was less than 5% of the first peak wave height at the eight DART stations. The simulations, run with and without the presence of tides, resulted in a ~1% discrepancy in the height of the leading wave. Because simulations accounting for tides and stratification are time-consuming and their influences are negligible, particularly in the first tsunami wave, the two factors can be ignored in a tsunami prediction for practical purposes.

  19. A web-based platform for simulating seismic wave propagation in 3D shallow Earth models with DEM surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Realistic shallow seismic wave propagation simulation is an important tool for studying induced seismicity (e.g., during geothermal energy development). However over a long time, there is a significant problem which constrains computational seismologists from performing a successful simulation conveniently: pre-processing. Conventional pre-processing has often turned out to be inefficient and unrobust because of the miscellaneous operations, considerable complexity and insufficiency of available tools. An integrated web-based platform for shallow seismic wave propagation simulation has been built. It is aiming at providing a user-friendly pre-processing solution, and cloud-based simulation abilities. The main features of the platform for the user include: revised digital elevation model (DEM) retrieving and processing mechanism; generation of multi-layered 3D shallow Earth model geometry (the computational domain) with user specified surface topography based on the DEM; visualization of the geometry before the simulation; a pipeline from geometry to fully customizable hexahedral element mesh generation; customization and running the simulation on our HPC; post-processing and retrieval of the results over cloud. Regarding the computational aspect, currently the widely accepted specfem3D is chosen as the computational package; packages using different types of elements can be integrated as well in the future. According to our trial simulation experiments, this web-based platform has produced accurate waveforms while significantly simplifying and enhancing the pre-processing and improving the simulation success rate.

  20. Seismic and Tsunami Waveform Simulation based on Dynamic Rupture Scenarios: Anticipated Nankai-Tonankai Earthquakes, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T.; Fukuyama, E.; Kim, S.

    2016-12-01

    Rupture scenarios of anticipated huge earthquakes based on earthquake physics and observational records should be useful for the hazard evaluation of future disastrous earthquakes. Hok et al. (2011, JGR) proposed possible dynamic rupture scenarios of anticipated Nankai-Tonankai huge earthquakes, southwest Japan using estimated slip deficit distribution and an appropriate fault friction law. These scenarios are quite useful to study the details of the wave propagation as well as potential earthquake and tsunami hazard (e.g. Kim et al. 2016, EPS). The objective in this study is to synthesize seismic and tsunami waveforms of the anticipated huge earthquakes, which could be useful for the future hazard assessment. We propose a method of synthesizing the waveforms, in particular, in the region of offshore focal area where seismic waves, ocean acoustic waves, and tsunamis simultaneously exist, which makes the wavefield very complicated. We calculated the seismic and tsunami waveforms caused by a dynamic rupture of huge earthquakes (Mw 8.5) southwestern Japan. There are two kinds of tsunami observations: ocean bottom pressure gauges detect tsunami as pressure change at the sea bottom and GPS tsunami gauges measure tsunami as vertical displacement at the sea surface. Our simulation results indicated that both tsunami records are significantly contaminated by seismic waves in a few minutes after the earthquake occurrence. The tsunami and seismic waves have different excitation mechanisms: seismic wave excitation strongly depends on the time scale of the rupture (moment rate), while tsunami excitation is determined by the static parameters (fault geometry and seismic moment). Therefore, for a reliable tsunami prediction, it is important to analyze observed tsunami records excluding the seismic waves that behave like tsunami near the source area.

  1. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsa, Vadim, E-mail: lisitsavv@ipgg.sbras.ru [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tcheverda, Vladimir [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kazakh–British Technical University, Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Botter, Charlotte [University of Stavanger (Norway)

    2016-04-15

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  2. The VERCE Science Gateway: enabling user friendly seismic waves simulations across European HPC infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Krause, Amy; Ramos Garcia, Clàudia; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Klampanos, Iraklis A.; Frobert, Laurent; Krischer, Lion; Trani, Luca; David, Mario; Leong, Siew Hoon; Muraleedharan, Visakh

    2014-05-01

    The EU-funded project VERCE (Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community in Europe) aims to deploy technologies which satisfy the HPC and data-intensive requirements of modern seismology. As a result of VERCE's official collaboration with the EU project SCI-BUS, access to computational resources, like local clusters and international infrastructures (EGI and PRACE), is made homogeneous and integrated within a dedicated science gateway based on the gUSE framework. In this presentation we give a detailed overview on the progress achieved with the developments of the VERCE Science Gateway, according to a use-case driven implementation strategy. More specifically, we show how the computational technologies and data services have been integrated within a tool for Seismic Forward Modelling, whose objective is to offer the possibility to perform simulations of seismic waves as a service to the seismological community. We will introduce the interactive components of the OGC map based web interface and how it supports the user with setting up the simulation. We will go through the selection of input data, which are either fetched from federated seismological web services, adopting community standards, or provided by the users themselves by accessing their own document data store. The HPC scientific codes can be selected from a number of waveform simulators, currently available to the seismological community as batch tools or with limited configuration capabilities in their interactive online versions. The results will be staged out from the HPC via a secure GridFTP transfer to a VERCE data layer managed by iRODS. The provenance information of the simulation will be automatically cataloged by the data layer via NoSQL techonologies. We will try to demonstrate how data access, validation and visualisation can be supported by a general purpose provenance framework which, besides common provenance concepts imported from the OPM and the W3C-PROV initiatives, also offers

  3. Estimating tectonic history through basin simulation-enhanced seismic inversion: geoinfomatics for sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Kush; Tuncay, Kagan; Hubbard, Kyle; Comer, John; Ortoleva, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A data assimilation approach is demonstrated whereby seismic inversion is both automated and enhanced using a comprehensive numerical sedimentary basin simulator to study the physics and chemistry of sedimentary basin processes in response to geothermal gradient in much greater detail than previously attempted. The approach not only reduces costs by integrating the basin analysis and seismic inversion activities to understand the sedimentary basin evolution with respect to geodynamic parameters-but the technique also has the potential for serving as a geoinfomatics platform for understanding various physical and chemical processes operating at different scales within a sedimentary basin. Tectonic history has a first-order effect on the physical and chemical processes that govern the evolution of sedimentary basins. We demonstrate how such tectonic parameters may be estimated by minimizing the difference between observed seismic reflection data and synthetic ones constructed from the output of a reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) basin model. We demonstrate the method by reconstructing the geothermal gradient. As thermal history strongly affects the rate of RTM processes operating in a sedimentary basin, variations in geothermal gradient history alter the present-day fluid pressure, effective stress, porosity, fracture statistics and hydrocarbon distribution. All these properties, in turn, affect the mechanical wave velocity and sediment density profiles for a sedimentary basin. The present-day state of the sedimentary basin is imaged by reflection seismology data to a high degree of resolution, but it does not give any indication of the processes that contributed to the evolution of the basin or causes for heterogeneities within the basin that are being imaged. Using texture and fluid properties predicted by our Basin RTM simulator, we generate synthetic seismograms. Linear correlation using power spectra as an error measure and an efficient quadratic

  4. Simulation of seismic events induced by CO2 injection at In Salah, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, James P.; Stork, Anna L.; Bissell, Rob C.; Bond, Clare E.; Werner, Maximilian J.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage technology has the potential to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions. However, the geomechanical response of the reservoir and sealing caprocks must be modelled and monitored to ensure that injected CO2 is safely stored. To ensure confidence in model results, there is a clear need to develop ways of comparing model predictions with observations from the field. In this paper we develop an approach to simulate microseismic activity induced by injection, which allows us to compare geomechanical model predictions with observed microseismic activity. We apply this method to the In Salah CCS project, Algeria. A geomechanical reconstruction is used to simulate the locations, orientations and sizes of pre-existing fractures in the In Salah reservoir. The initial stress conditions, in combination with a history matched reservoir flow model, are used to determine when and where these fractures exceed Mohr-Coulomb limits, triggering failure. The sizes and orientations of fractures, and the stress conditions thereon, are used to determine the resulting micro-earthquake focal mechanisms and magnitudes. We compare our simulated event population with observations made at In Salah, finding good agreement between model and observations in terms of event locations, rates of seismicity, and event magnitudes.

  5. Elasticity/saturation relationships using flow simulation from an outcrop analogue for 4D seismic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirstetter, O.; Corbett, P.; Somerville, J.; MacBeth, C. [Heriot-Watt Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Three production scenarios have been simulated for three displacement mechanisms using three lithofacies models built at two scales (fine and coarse) from a 2D outcrop analogue. Analysis of the flow simulation results and the associated seismic modelling investigate the dependence of the time-lapse response on the lithofacies model and the vertical grid block size. Elastic attribute quantification from coarse-grid models requires a decision on the type of fluid saturation distribution (uniform or patchy) within the coarse-grid blocks. Here, empirical relations for scaling up the fluid bulk modulus are developed which, when inserted into standard Gassmann calculations, permit calibration of the response for the coarse-grid block model from the finer-scale model. At the coarse scale, fluid saturation changes during water injection and pressure depletion can be represented adequately by these relations but, for gas injection, it appears necessary to refer back to the fine-scale models. For the case of gas injection they cannot be generalized readily for each different lithofacies model and are thus observed to be outcrop dependent. (author)

  6. FEMSA: A Finite Element Simulation Tool for Quasi-static Seismic Deformation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M.; Melini, D.; Piersanti, A.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling postseismic deformation is an increasingly valuable tool in earthquake seismology. In particular, the Finite Element (FE) numerical method allows accurate modeling of complex faulting geometry, inhomogeneous materials and realistic viscous flow, appearing an excellent tool to investigate a lot of specific phenomena related with earthquakes. We developed a FE simulation tool, FEMSA (Finite Element Modeling for Seismic Applications), to model quasi-static deformation generated by faulting sources. The approach allows to automatically implement arbitrary faulting sources and calculate displacement and stress fields induced by slip on the fault. The package makes use of the capabilities of CalculiX, a non commercial FE software designed to solve field problems, and is freely distributed. The main advantages of the method are: reliability, wide diffusion and flexibility, allowing geometrical and/or rheological heterogeneities to be included in a mechanical analysis. We carried out an optimization study on boundary conditions as well as a series of benchmark simulations on test cases and we also verified the capability of our approach to face the presence of 3D heterogeneities within the domain. Here, we present our package and show some simple examples of application.

  7. Numerical simulation for accuracy of velocity analysis in small-scale high-resolution marine multichannel seismic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Di; Cai, Feng; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    When used with large energy sparkers, marine multichannel small-scale high-resolution seismic detection technology has a high resolution, high-detection precision, a wide applicable range, and is very flexible. Positive results have been achieved in submarine geological research, particularly in the investigation of marine gas hydrates. However, the amount of traveltime difference information is reduced for the velocity analysis under conditions of a shorter spread length, thus leading to poorer focusing of the velocity spectrum energy group and a lower accuracy of the velocity analysis. It is thus currently debatable whether the velocity analysis accuracy of short-arrangement multichannel seismic detection technology is able to meet the requirements of practical application in natural gas hydrate exploration. Therefore, in this study the bottom boundary of gas hydrates (Bottom Simulating Reflector, BSR) is used to conduct numerical simulation to discuss the accuracy of the velocity analysis related to such technology. Results show that a higher dominant frequency and smaller sampling interval are not only able to improve the seismic resolution, but they also compensate for the defects of the short-arrangement, thereby improving the accuracy of the velocity analysis. In conclusion, the accuracy of the velocity analysis in this small-scale, high-resolution, multi-channel seismic detection technology meets the requirements of natural gas hydrate exploration.

  8. High Performance Simulation of Large-Scale Red Sea Ocean Bottom Seismic Data on the Supercomputer Shaheen II

    KAUST Repository

    Tonellot, Thierry

    2017-02-27

    A combination of both shallow and deepwater, plus islands and coral reefs, are some of the main features contributing to the complexity of subsalt seismic exploration in the Red Sea transition zone. These features often result in degrading effects on seismic images. State-of-the-art ocean bottom acquisition technologies are therefore required to record seismic data with optimal fold and offset, as well as advanced processing and imaging techniques. Numerical simulations of such complex seismic data can help improve acquisition design and also help in customizing, validating and benchmarking the processing and imaging workflows that will be applied on the field data. Subsequently, realistic simulation of wave propagation is a computationally intensive process requiring a realistic model and an efficient 3D wave equation solver. Large-scale computing resources are also required to meet turnaround time compatible with a production time frame. In this work, we present the numerical simulation of an ocean bottom seismic survey to be acquired in the Red Sea transition zone starting in summer 2016. The survey\\'s acquisition geometry comprises nearly 300,000 unique shot locations and 21,000 unique receiver locations, covering about 760 km2. Using well log measurements and legacy 2D seismic lines in this area, a 3D P-wave velocity model was built, with a maximum depth of 7 km. The model was sampled at 10 m in each direction, resulting in more than 5 billion cells. Wave propagation in this model was performed using a 3D finite difference solver in the time domain based on a staggered grid velocity-pressure formulation of acoustodynamics. To ensure that the resulting data could be generated sufficiently fast, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) supercomputer Shaheen II Cray XC40 was used. A total of 21,000 three-component (pressure and vertical and horizontal velocity) common receiver gathers with a 50 Hz maximum frequency were computed in less

  9. Remote triggering and numerical simulations of passing seismic waves at the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Florian; Lupi, Matteo; Saenger, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Seismic waves generated by large magnitude earthquakes can affect geological systems located thousands of kilometers far from the epicenter. The Larderello-Travale geothermal field is one of the most studied high-enthalpy geothermal systems worldwide shown to be sensitive to incoming seismic energy. In this study we detected local seismic activity at the Larderello-Travale field, coinciding with the passage of Rayleigh waves released by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The earthquakes of local magnitudes 1.6 and 1.7 occurred at 6 km and 8 km depth, respectively. We suggest that these earthquakes were dynamically triggered by transient Rayleigh waves which induced a maximum vertical displacement of approximately 7.5 mm at the hydrothermal field (for waves with period of 200 s). We estimate a dynamic stress of about 8 kPa for a measured peak ground velocity of 0.8 mm/s and propose that this additional stress in a clock-advance process triggered the local earthquakes which may have eventually occurred naturally at a later time. Previous studies also report increased seismic activity at the Larderello-Travale geothermal field after regional earthquakes. We conducted numerical simulations of P-, S-, Love and Rayleigh waves propagating through a detailed model of the Larderello-Travale geothermal field based on the known velocity structure. This enables us to identify potential regions where seismic energy may accumulate due to local structure. Results indicate that maximum displacements focus differently when considering body or surface waves. We identify a region located at 3-5 km depth (k-horizon) that may correspond to the brittle-ductile boundary where almost no seismic energy is focused.

  10. Assessing and improving seismic tomography models using 3-D numerical wave simulations. Geologica Ultraiectina (308)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozdag, H.E.

    2009-01-01

    We have reached a stage in seismic tomography where further refinements with classical techniques become very difficult. Advances in numerical methods and computational facilities are providing new opportunities in seismic tomography to enhance the resolution of tomographic mantle images. 3-D numeri

  11. Kineto-Elastodynamic Characteristics of the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Parallel Structure Seismic Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the kineto-elastodynamic assumptions, the dynamic model of the six-degree-of-freedom parallel structure seismic simulator is developed by virtue of the finite element method and the substructure synthesis technique. The kineto-elastodynamic characteristics represented by the natural frequency, the sensitivity analysis, the energy ratios, and the displacement response of the moving platform are investigated. It is shown that the second-order natural frequency is much higher than the first-order natural frequency, and the first-order natural frequency is sensitive to the radius of the strut and the radius of the lead screw. In order to improve the dynamic characteristic of the manipulator, the mass of the moving platform should be reduced or the stiffness of the strut should be increased especially for the sixth strut. For the investigated trajectory, the displacement response of the moving platform along the x direction is smaller than these displacement responses along the y direction and along the z direction. The angular displacement response of the moving platform rotating about z-axis is slightly larger than those angular displacement responses rotating about the x-axis and about the y-axis.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Earthquake Nucleation Process and Seismic Precursors on Faults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Changrong

    2000-01-01

    To understand precursory phenomena before seismic fault slip, this work focuses onearthquake nucleation process on a fault plane through numerical simulation. Rate and statedependent friction law with variable normal stress is employed in the analysis. The resultsshow that in the late stage of nucleation process: (1) The maximum slip velocity ismonotonically accelerating; (2) The slipping hot spot (where the slip rate is maximum)migrates spontaneously from a certain instant, and such migration is spatially continuous;(3) When the maximum velocity reaches a detectable order of magnitude (at least one orderof magnitude greater than the loading rate), the remaining time is 20 hours or longer, andthe temporal variation of slip velocity beyond this point may be used as a precursoryindicator; (4) The average slip velocity is related to the remaining time by a log-log linearrelation, which means that a similar relation between rate of microseismicity and remainingtime may also exist; (5) When normal stress variation is taken into account, time scale ofsuch processes can be extended by 2 times.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Lightning Surge Responses in a Seismic Isolated Building by FDTD and EMTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Naoto; Morita, Hiroshi; Baba, Yoshihiro; Ametani, Akihiro

    Current distribution and overvoltages in a structure of a seismic isolated building struck by lightning are analyzed by a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method and by the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). The simulated results by the FDTD method show that the voltage at the first floor, which is an important factor of a design of building installation, shows a damped oscillatory wave. The transient overvoltage is caused by the multiple reflections within the structures and the resonance between a stray capacitance of the structure and an equivalent inductance of the bonding wire, which electrically shunts a rubber insulator installed for dumping earthquake tremor. The investigation shows that the transient response can be expressed by a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit. Two numerical models for circuit analysis method are proposed in this paper. A multiphase model reproduces a distribution of currents flowing through vertical pillars by mutual couplings between the pillars. A single phase model is obtained by a simplification of the multiphase model and gives the voltage at the first floor. The calculation time is remarkably reduced compared to that by the FDTD method. The accuracy of the models is discussed in comparison with the results obtained by the FDTD method.

  14. A Feasibility Study of an FEM Simulation Used in Co-Seismic Deformations: A Case Study of a Dip-Slip Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For this study, we conducted a numerical simulation on co-seismic displacement for a dip-slip fault in a half-space medium based upon a finite element method (FEM. After investigating technical problems of modeling, source and boundary treatment, we calculated co-seismic deformation with consideration to topography. To verify the numerical simulation results, the simulated co-seismic displacement was compared with that calculated using a dislocation theory. As a case study, considering the seismic parameters of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (M 8.0 as a source model, we calculate the co-seismic displacements with or without consideration of the terrain model in the finite element model to observe terrain effects on co-seismic deformation. Results show that topography has a non-negligible effect on co-seismic displacement, reaching from -11.59 to 4.0 cm in horizontal displacement, and from -3.28 to 3.28 cm in vertical displacement. The relative effects are 9.05 and 2.95% for horizontal and vertical displacement, respectively. Such a terrain effect is sufficiently large and can be detected by modern geodetic measurements such as GPS. Therefore, we conclude that the topography should be considered in applying dislocation theory to calculate co-seismic deformations.

  15. SiSeRHMap v1.0: a simulator for mapped seismic response using a hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelle, Gerardo; Bonito, Laura; Lampasi, Alessandro; Revellino, Paola; Guerriero, Luigi; Sappa, Giuseppe; Guadagno, Francesco Maria

    2016-04-01

    The SiSeRHMap (simulator for mapped seismic response using a hybrid model) is a computerized methodology capable of elaborating prediction maps of seismic response in terms of acceleration spectra. It was realized on the basis of a hybrid model which combines different approaches and models in a new and non-conventional way. These approaches and models are organized in a code architecture composed of five interdependent modules. A GIS (geographic information system) cubic model (GCM), which is a layered computational structure based on the concept of lithodynamic units and zones, aims at reproducing a parameterized layered subsoil model. A meta-modelling process confers a hybrid nature to the methodology. In this process, the one-dimensional (1-D) linear equivalent analysis produces acceleration response spectra for a specified number of site profiles using one or more input motions. The shear wave velocity-thickness profiles, defined as trainers, are randomly selected in each zone. Subsequently, a numerical adaptive simulation model (Emul-spectra) is optimized on the above trainer acceleration response spectra by means of a dedicated evolutionary algorithm (EA) and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) as the final optimizer. In the final step, the GCM maps executor module produces a serial map set of a stratigraphic seismic response at different periods, grid solving the calibrated Emul-spectra model. In addition, the spectra topographic amplification is also computed by means of a 3-D validated numerical prediction model. This model is built to match the results of the numerical simulations related to isolate reliefs using GIS morphometric data. In this way, different sets of seismic response maps are developed on which maps of design acceleration response spectra are also defined by means of an enveloping technique.

  16. Numerical simulation of seismic low-frequency shadows and its application%地震低频伴影的数值模拟与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺振华; 熊晓军; 边立恩

    2008-01-01

    Strong low-frequency energy beneath a hydrocarbon reservoir is called a seismic low-frequency shadow and can be used as a hydrocarbon indicator (Taner et al., 1979) but the physical mechanism of the observed low-frequency shadow is still unclear. To study the mechanism, we performed seismic numerical simulation of geological models with a hydrocarbon-bearing zone using the 2-D diffusive-viscous wave equation which can effectively model the characteristics of velocity dispersion and transform the seismic data centered in a target layer slice within a time window to the time-frequency domain by using time-frequency signal analysis and sort the frequency gathers to common frequency cubes. Then, we observe the characteristics of the seismic low-frequency shadow in the common frequency cubes. The numerical simulations reveal that the main mechanism of seismic low-frequency shadows is attributed to high attenuation of the medium to high seismic frequency components caused by absorption in the hydrocarbon-filled reservoir. Results from a practical example of seismic low-frequency shadows show that it is possible to identify the reservoir by the low-frequency shadow with high S/N seismic data.

  17. Numerical simulation of bubble plumes and an analysis of their seismic attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Canping; Gou, Limin; You, Jiachun

    2017-04-01

    To study the bubble plume's seismic response characteristics, the model of a plume water body has been built in this article using the bubble-contained medium acoustic velocity model and the stochastic medium theory based on an analysis of both the acoustic characteristics of a bubble-contained water body and the actual features of a plume. The finite difference method is used for forward modelling, and the single-shot seismic record exhibits the characteristics of a scattered wave field generated by a plume. A meaningful conclusion is obtained by extracting seismic attributes from the pre-stack shot gather record of a plume. The values of the amplitude-related seismic attributes increase greatly as the bubble content goes up, and changes in bubble radius will not cause seismic attributes to change, which is primarily observed because the bubble content has a strong impact on the plume's acoustic velocity, while the bubble radius has a weak impact on the acoustic velocity. The above conclusion provides a theoretical reference for identifying hydrate plumes using seismic methods and contributes to further study on hydrate decomposition and migration, as well as on distribution of the methane bubble in seawater.

  18. Towards Simulating a Realistic Planetary Seismic Wavefield: The Contribution of the Megaregolith and Low-Velocity Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Weber, Renee C.; Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Thorne, Michael Scott; Garnero, Ed J.

    2011-01-01

    Lunar seismograms are distinctly different from their terrestrial counterparts. The Apollo lunar seismometers recorded moonquakes without distinct P- or S-wave arrivals; instead waves arrive as a diffuse coda that decays over several hours making the identification of body waves difficult. The unusual character of the lunar seismic wavefield is generally tied to properties of the megaregolith: it consists of highly fractured and broken crustal rock, the result of extensive bombardment of the Moon. The megaregolith extends several kilometers into the lunar crust, possibly into the mantle in some regions, and is covered by a thin coating of fine-scale dust. These materials possess very low seismic velocities that strongly scatter the seismic wavefield at high frequencies. Directly modeling the effects of the megaregolith to simulate an accurate lunar seismic wavefield is a challenging computational problem, owing to the inherent 3-D nature of the problem and the high frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) required. Here we focus on modeling the long duration code, studying the effects of the low velocities found in the megaregolith. We produce synthetic seismograms using 1-D slowness integration methodologies, GEMINI and reflectivity, and a 3-D Cartesian finite difference code, Wave Propagation Program, to study the effect of thin layers of low velocity on the surface of a planet. These codes allow us generate seismograms with dominant frequencies of approximately 1 Hz. For background lunar seismic structure we explore several models, including the recent model of Weber et al., Science, 2011. We also investigate variations in megaregolithic thickness, velocity, attenuation, and seismogram frequency content. Our results are compared to the Apollo seismic dataset, using both a cross correlation technique and integrated envelope approach to investigate coda decay. We find our new high frequency results strongly support the hypothesis that the long duration of the lunar seismic

  19. SiSeRHMap v1.0: a simulator for mapped seismic response using a hybrid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grelle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SiSeRHMap is a computerized methodology capable of drawing up prediction maps of seismic response. It was realized on the basis of a hybrid model which combines different approaches and models in a new and non-conventional way. These approaches and models are organized in a code-architecture composed of five interdependent modules. A GIS (Geographic Information System Cubic Model (GCM, which is a layered computational structure based on the concept of lithodynamic units and zones, aims at reproducing a parameterized layered subsoil model. A metamodeling process confers a hybrid nature to the methodology. In this process, the one-dimensional linear equivalent analysis produces acceleration response spectra of shear wave velocity-thickness profiles, defined as trainers, which are randomly selected in each zone. Subsequently, a numerical adaptive simulation model (Spectra is optimized on the above trainer acceleration response spectra by means of a dedicated Evolutionary Algorithm (EA and the Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm (LMA as the final optimizer. In the final step, the GCM Maps Executor module produces a serial map-set of a stratigraphic seismic response at different periods, grid-solving the calibrated Spectra model. In addition, the spectra topographic amplification is also computed by means of a numerical prediction model. This latter is built to match the results of the numerical simulations related to isolate reliefs using GIS topographic attributes. In this way, different sets of seismic response maps are developed, on which, also maps of seismic design response spectra are defined by means of an enveloping technique.

  20. Earthquake and slow-slip nucleation investigated with a micro-physics based seismic cycle simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ende, Martijn; Chen, Jianye; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory experiments grant essential insights into the frictional behaviour of faults over a wide range of conditions. However, these experiments are limited in the size of the test subject (the rock sample) and in their duration, which hinders the extrapolation of lab results to the scales of natural faults. Seismic cycle numerical modelling provides the means to bridge this spatial and temporal gap between laboratory experiments and nature. Modelling of the evolution of fault rock friction, leading to earthquake nucleation, and rupture propagation is commonly performed based on rate-and-state friction (RSF). While the governing equations are convenient for implementation into numerical codes, they are empirical in nature, and the absence of a physical basis for extrapolation of laboratory-derived parameters complicates the interpretation of results that are derived from such models. By contrast, analytical models based on micro-physical principles allow for an interpretation of their predictions in terms of well-defined material properties and thermodynamic quantities, but are often restricted to highly simplified geometries and boundary conditions. In this work, we present a numerical implementation of the micro-physical model proposed by Chen & Spiers (2016), which describes the interplay between granular flow and ductile creep of fault gouges, into an earthquake cycle simulator, QDYN (Luo & Ampuero, 2011). This physics-based approach offers an alternative to the rate-and-state friction laws for more detailed investigation of earthquake source mechanics. With this implementation, characteristic features typically ascribed to rate-and-state friction laws emerge spontaneously from the model, and can be related to physical properties of the material of study under the appropriate pressure and temperature conditions. We investigate the nucleation behaviour of frictional instabilities, with focus on the transition from stable creep to slow-slip and to dynamic

  1. Numerical simulations of passing seismic waves at the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Matteo; Fuchs, Florian; Saenger, Erik H.

    2017-06-01

    Passing seismic waves released by large-magnitude earthquakes may affect geological systems located thousands of miles far from the epicenter. The M9.0 Tohoku earthquake struck on 11 March 2011 in Japan. We detected local seismic activity at the Larderello-Travale geothermal field, Italy, coinciding with the maximum amplitudes of the Rayleigh waves generated by the Tohoku earthquake. We suggest that the earthquakes were triggered by passing Rayleigh waves that induced locally a maximum vertical displacement of approximately 7.5 mm (for waves with period of 100 s). The estimated dynamic stress was about 8 kPa for a measured peak ground velocity of 0.8 mm/s. Previous similar observations pointed out local seismicity at the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field triggered by the 2012 Mw5.9 Po Plain earthquake. We conducted forward numerical modeling to investigate the effects caused by passing P, S, Love, and Rayleigh waves through the known velocity structure of the geothermal field. Results indicate that maximum displacements focus differently when considering body or surface waves, with displacement values being higher within the first 2 km of depth. The focusing of the displacement below 3 km seems to be strongly controlled by the velocity structure of the Larderello-Travale geothermal field. We propose that seismic activity triggered by passing seismic waves may be related to a clock-advancing mechanism for local seismic events that may have occurred in any case. Furthermore, our analysis shows that local anisotropies in the velocity structure of the Larderello-Travale geothermal field (possibly linked to compartments of elevated pore pressures) strongly control the reactivation of regions of the geothermal field affected by passing seismic waves.

  2. Seismic performance evaluation of an MR elastomer-based smart base isolation system using real-time hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eem, S. H.; Jung, H. J.; Koo, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, magneto-rheological (MR) elastomer-based base isolation systems have been actively studied as alternative smart base isolation systems because MR elastomers are capable of adjusting their modulus or stiffness depending on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. By taking advantage of the MR elastomers’ stiffness-tuning ability, MR elastomer-based smart base isolation systems strive to alleviate limitations of existing smart base isolation systems as well as passive-type base isolators. Until now, research on MR elastomer-based base isolation systems primarily focused on characterization, design, and numerical evaluations of MR elastomer-based isolators, as well as experimental tests with simple structure models. However, their applicability to large civil structures has not been properly studied yet because it is quite challenging to numerically emulate the complex behavior of MR elastomer-based isolators and to conduct experiments with large-size structures. To address these difficulties, this study employs the real-time hybrid simulation technique, which combines physical testing and computational modeling. The primary goal of the current hybrid simulation study is to evaluate seismic performances of an MR elastomer-based smart base isolation system, particularly its adaptability to distinctly different seismic excitations. In the hybrid simulation, a single-story building structure (non-physical, computational model) is coupled with a physical testing setup for a smart base isolation system with associated components (such as laminated MR elastomers and electromagnets) installed on a shaking table. A series of hybrid simulations is carried out under two seismic excitations having different dominant frequencies. The results show that the proposed smart base isolation system outperforms the passive base isolation system in reducing the responses of the structure for the excitations considered in this study.

  3. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  4. Asperity generation and its relationship to seismicity on a planar fault: a laboratory simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-02-01

    Earthquake faults, and all frictional surfaces, establish contact through asperities. A detailed knowledge of how asperities form will enable a better understanding of the manner in which they communicate during foreshock failure sequences that are observed, leading to the larger main shock. We present results of experiments where a pressure sensitive film was used to map, size and measure the magnitudes of the normal stresses at asperities along a seismogenic section of a laboratory simulated fault. We measured seismicity acoustically and foreshocks were found to be the result of localized asperity failure during the nucleation phase of gross fault rupture. Since surface roughness plays an important role in how asperities are formed, two Hurst exponents were measured to characterize a highly worn interface using roughness profiles: (i) long wavelength estimates (H ˜ 0.45) and (ii) short wavelength estimates (H ˜ 0.8-1.2). The short wavelength roughness estimates were computed at the scale of single asperity junction points. Macroscopically, the number of asperities and real contact area increased with additional application of normal force while the mean normal stress remained constant. The ratio of real to nominal contact area was low - ranging from 0.02 < Ar/A0 < 0.05-predicting that the asperities should be elastically independent of each other. Results from the pressure sensitive film showed that asperities were closely spaced and could not be treated as mechanically independent. Larger asperities carried both higher levels of average normal stress and higher levels of normal stress heterogeneity than smaller ones. Using linear stability theorem, the critical slip distance on foreshocking asperities was estimated to be d0 ˜ 0.65-3 μm. The critical slip distance d0 was ˜1.8-11.5 per cent of the premonitory slip needed to initiate gross fault rupture of the interface (20-40 μm) and the overall slip necessary to initiate gross fault rupture was on the order

  5. Full Wavefield Numerical Simulations of Sub-glacial Seismic Tremor at Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yingzi; Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Pálsson, Finnur

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic systems, including the central volcanoes Bárðarbunga and Grimsvötn in South-East Iceland lie beneath the Vatnajökull glacier and are covered by up to 700 m of ice. This ice layer inhibits the recording of the seismic signal close to the source and acts as a wave guide, significantly modifying the seismic wavefield. Recordings of local earthquakes or tremor will therefore be modified by a potentially strong and unknown path effect. We tackle this problem with full wavefield numerical simulations, (2D and 3D) using the Spectral Element method. This allows for the introduction of viscoelasticity in the sub-surface geology and captures all wave conversions and scattering. We employ a 3D model of the glacier thickness and subglacial topography and insert a source wavelet at different depths and locations in order to simulate the wavefield recorded at the location of the field seismometers, in the region of Vatnajökull. Furthermore we calculate sensitivity kernels which show us which part of the model creates a specific part of the simulated seismogram, yielding a deeper understanding of tremor seismogram composition. Our findings show that path effects play a very significant role in determining the overall character of the tremor wavefield and must be removed or suppressed in order to gain a better understanding of the tremor source process itself.

  6. Experimental study on impact-induced seismic wave propagating through quartz sand simulating asteroid regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko; Yasui, Minami; Matsumoto, Rie; Tsujido, Sayaka; Takano, Shota; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: Recent spacecraft surveys clarified that asteroid surfaces were covered with regolith made of boulders and pebbles such as that found on the asteroid Itokawa. It was also found that surface morphologies of asteroids formed on the regolith layer were modified. For example, the high-resolution images of the asteroid Eros revealed the evidence of the downslope movement of the regolith layer, then it could cause the degradation and the erasure of small impact crater. One possible process to explain these observations is the regolith layer collapse caused by seismic vibration after projectile impacts. The impact-induced seismic wave might be an important physical process affecting the morphology change of regolith layer on asteroid surfaces. Therefore, it is significant for us to know the relationship between the impact energy and the impact-induced seismic wave. So in this study, we carried out impact cratering experiments in order to observe the seismic wave propagating through the target far from the impact crater.Experimental method: Impact cratering experiments were conducted by using a single stage vertical gas gun set at Kobe Univ and a two-stage vertical gas gun set at ISAS. We used quartz sands with the particle diameter of 500μm, and the bulk density of 1.48g/cm3. The projectile was a ball made of polycarbonate with the diameter of 4.75mm and aluminum, titan, zirconia, stainless steel, cupper, tungsten carbide projectile with the diameter of 2mm. These projectiles were launched at the impact velocity from 0.2 to 7km/s. The target was set in a vacuum chamber evacuated below 10 Pa. We measured the seismic wave by using a piezoelectric uniaxial accelerometer.Result: The impact-induced seismic wave was measured to show a large single peak and found to attenuate with the propagation distance. The maximum acceleration of the seismic wave was recognized to have a good relationship with the normalized distance x/R, where x is the propagation distance

  7. Numerical Procedure to Forecast the Tsunami Parameters from a Database of Pre-Simulated Seismic Unit Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, César; Carbonel, Carlos; Rojas, Joel

    2017-09-01

    We have implemented a numerical procedure to forecast the parameters of a tsunami, such as the arrival time of the front of the first wave and the maximum wave height in real and virtual tidal stations along the Peruvian coast, with this purpose a database of pre-computed synthetic tsunami waveforms (or Green functions) was obtained from numerical simulation of seismic unit sources (dimension: 50 × 50 km2) for subduction zones from southern Chile to northern Mexico. A bathymetry resolution of 30 arc-sec (approximately 927 m) was used. The resulting tsunami waveform is obtained from the superposition of synthetic waveforms corresponding to several seismic unit sources contained within the tsunami source geometry. The numerical procedure was applied to the Chilean tsunami of April 1, 2014. The results show a very good correlation for stations with wave amplitude greater than 1 m, in the case of the Arica tide station an error (from the maximum height of the observed and simulated waveform) of 3.5% was obtained, for Callao station the error was 12% and the largest error was in Chimbote with 53.5%, however, due to the low amplitude of the Chimbote wave (tsunami early warning, where speed is required rather than accuracy, so the results should be taken as preliminary.

  8. Precursory seismicity in regions of low strain rate: Insights from a physics-based earthquake23 simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Annemarie; Rhoades, David A.; Colella, Harmony V.

    2017-03-01

    The well-established earthquake forecasting model 'Every Earthquake a Precursor According to Scale' (EEPAS) is based on the observation that the magnitude and rate of minor earthquakes increases prior to large earthquakes. The precursor time is measured between this increase and the mainshock and is in the order of months to decades. Fitting the EEPAS model to different regional earthquake catalogues has indicated that the precursor time is longer in more slowly deforming tectonic environments. Examples from the stable continental region of Australia confirm this. To overcome the challenge of limited earthquake records in the analysis of the precursor time for areas with low strain rate, we use the physics-based earthquake simulator, RSQSim to generate a series of synthetic earthquake catalogues. A fault network with realistic complexity, is employed, based on the Wellington, New Zealand, fault network. The slip rates on faults are systematically reduced by five successive factors of 1/4. Fitting the EEPAS model to these synthetic catalogues shows that the precursor time is inversely proportional to the reduction in slip rate. Results suggest that the expected precursor times for large earthquakes in stable continental regions far exceed the length of available catalogues. The expected precursor time for the 2010 M7.1 Darfield, New Zealand, earthquake, which apparently had no precursory seismicity in the instrumental catalogue, also exceeds the length of the available catalogue. Therefore, applying the EEPAS model to physics-based simulators allows us to start understanding the phenomenon of precursory seismicity.

  9. Bio-inspired seismic metamaterials: Time domain simulations in transformed crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Aznavourian, Ronald; Brule, Stephane; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of transformation crystallography which consists of the application of geometric transforms to periodic structures. We consider motifs with three-fold, four-fold and six-fold symmetries according to the crystallographic restriction theorem. Furthermore, we define motifs with five-fold symmetry such as quasi-crystals generated by a cut-and-projection method. We analyze elastic wave propagation in the transformed crystals and (Penrose-type) quasi-crystals with the finite difference time domain freeware SimSonic. We consider geometric transforms underpinning the design of seismic cloaks with square, circular, elliptical and peanut shapes in the context of triangular, square and honeycomb crystals. Interestingly, the use of morphing techniques leads to the design of cloaks with interpolated geometries reminiscent of Victor Vasarely's artwork. Employing the case of transformed graphene-like (honeycomb) structures allows one to draw useful analogies between large-scale seismic metamaterials...

  10. Numerical Simulation for the Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction under Seismic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Luan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piles are widely used as reinforcement structures in geotechnical engineering designs. If the settlement of the soil is greater than the pile, the pile is pulled down by the soil, and negative friction force is produced. Previous studies have mainly focused on the interaction of pile-soil under static condition. However, many pile projects are located in earthquake-prone areas, which indicate the importance of determining the response of the pile-soil structure under seismic load. In this paper, the nonlinear, explicit, and finite difference program FLAC3D, which considers the mechanical behavior of soil-pile interaction, is used to establish an underconsolidated soil-pile mode. The response processes of the pile side friction force, the pile axial force, and the soil response under seismic load are also analyzed.

  11. Numerical simulation of seismic wave field in graded geological media containing multiple cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontara, Ioanna-Kleoniki; Dineva, Petia S.; Manolis, George D.; Wuttke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we develop an efficient boundary integral equation method for estimation of seismic motion in a graded medium with multiple cavities under antiplane strain conditions. This inhomogeneous and heterogeneous medium is subjected to either time-harmonic incident shear seismic waves or to body waves radiating from a point seismic source. Three different types of soil material gradient are considered: (i) density and shear modulus vary proportionally as quadratic functions of depth, but the wave velocity remains constant; (ii) the soil material is viscoelastic, with a shear modulus and density that vary with respect to the spatial coordinates in an arbitrary fashion, so that the wave velocity is both frequency and position-dependent and (iii) the soil material has position-dependent shear modulus and constant density, yielding a linear profile for the wave velocity. Three different, frequency-dependent boundary integral equation schemes are respectively developed for the aforementioned three types of graded soil materials based on: (i) Green's function for the quadratically graded elastic half-plane; (ii) a fundamental solution for the viscoelastic full-plane with position-dependent wave speed profiles and (iii) a fundamental solution for an elastic full-plane with a linearly varying wave speed profile. Next, a number of cases involving geological media with position-dependent material properties and any number of cavities of various shapes and geometry are solved in the frequency domain. The numerical results reveal the dependency of the wave fields and zones of stress concentration on the following key factors: (i) type and properties of the soil material gradient; (ii) type and characteristics of the applied seismic load; (iii) shape, position and number of cavities and (iv) interaction phenomena between the cavities and the free surface.

  12. Dramatic Decomposition Weakening of Simulated Faults in Carrara Marble at Seismic Slip-rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.; Hirose, T.; Ree, J.

    2005-12-01

    Evolution of fault-zone strength and its weakening mechanisms during an earthquake are critical for understanding of earthquake rupture process. We report dramatic weakening of dry simulated faults in Carrara marble at seismic slip-rates, with frictional coefficient as low as 0.04 (probably the lowest record as rock friction). Calcite decomposition was confirmed by in-situ CO2 detection and other methods and the weakening may require new weakening mechanisms other than currently suggested ones such as frictional melting, thermal pressurization and silica gel formation. We conducted rotary-shear friction experiments on Carrara marble at slip-rates (V) of 0.09-1.24 m/s and normal stresses (σn) of 2.5-13.4 MPa. For preventing a thermal fracturing and applying a high normal load, we used solid cylindrical specimens jacketed with aluminum tubes. Narrow gap was left between the two aluminum tubes to avoid metal-to-metal contact. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) Slip weakening occurs in all experiments except for the runs at the lowest V (0.09 m/s); (2) Steady-state friction coefficient (μss) decreases as slip-rate and normal load increase; (3) At the highest V (1.13-1.24 m/s) and σn = 7.3 MPa, the average friction coefficient of initial peak friction (μp) is 0.61 (± 0.02), but the average μss is 0.04! (± 0.01) which is much lower than μp; (4) Decrease in average temperature of sliding surfaces corresponds to increase in friction, and strength recovery occurs very rapidly and completely upon cooling of specimens; (5) XRD and EPMA data show that the gouge for the specimens at V > 0.09 m/s is composed of calcite, lime (CaO) and/or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2); (6) CO2 gas was detected with sensors during the weakening; (7) Decomposed calcite forms a fault zone consisting of ultrafine-grained gouge, but no melt or amorphous material was identified by optical microscopy or XRD analysis. Calcite decomposition clearly indicates that temperature in the fault

  13. Numerical Simulation Analysis of Seismic of Frame Structure on Hill Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Weisu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, Wenchuan,Ya’an,Yushu and other areas in china occur a series of high earthquake, however areas of earthquake is similar as mountainous terrain, building structure of seismic increasingly aroused our concern, and the research that hill topography affected building structure seismic in shallow mountain. The research content mainly includes: through modelling was built by the ANSYS software, the cooperative effects of a ten layer of frame structure- hill system were calculation. First, simple comparative dynamic characteristics analysis of soil - structure interaction and the rigid foundation assumption conditions; Second, put Hill-Soil-Structure Interaction(referred to as HSSI and Soil - Structure - Interaction(referred to as SSI further analysis of the dynamic response, including: including structural modal analysis (vibration mode, cycle, the time history analysis (such as displacement, internal force and acceleration and so on. Through Hill-Soil-Structure Interaction research, taking each factor in consideration, giving structure seismic key technology measures about shallow mountain to provide reference for such structure theory research.

  14. The Gassmann-Burgers Model to Simulate Seismic Waves at the Earth Crust And Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Craglietto, Aronne

    2016-12-01

    The upper part of the crust shows generally brittle behaviour while deeper zones, including the mantle, may present ductile behaviour, depending on the pressure-temperature conditions; moreover, some parts are melted. Seismic waves can be used to detect these conditions on the basis of reflection and transmission events. Basically, from the elastic-plastic point of view the seismic properties (seismic velocity and density) depend on effective pressure and temperature. Confining and pore pressures have opposite effects on these properties, such that very small effective pressures (the presence of overpressured fluids) may substantially decrease the P- and S-wave velocities, mainly the latter, by opening of cracks and weakening of grain contacts. Similarly, high temperatures induce the same effect by partial melting. To model these effects, we consider a poro-viscoelastic model based on Gassmann equations and Burgers mechanical model to represent the properties of the rock frame and describe ductility in which deformation takes place by shear plastic flow. The Burgers elements allow us to model the effects of seismic attenuation, velocity dispersion and steady-state creep flow, respectively. The stiffness components of the brittle and ductile media depend on stress and temperature through the shear viscosity, which is obtained by the Arrhenius equation and the octahedral stress criterion. Effective pressure effects are taken into account in the dry-rock moduli using exponential functions whose parameters are obtained by fitting experimental data as a function of confining pressure. Since fluid effects are important, the density and bulk modulus of the saturating fluids (water and steam) are modeled using the equations provided by the NIST website, including supercritical behaviour. The theory allows us to obtain the phase velocity and quality factor as a function of depth and geological pressure and temperature as well as time frequency. We then obtain the PS and SH

  15. The Gassmann-Burgers Model to Simulate Seismic Waves at the Earth Crust And Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Craglietto, Aronne

    2017-03-01

    The upper part of the crust shows generally brittle behaviour while deeper zones, including the mantle, may present ductile behaviour, depending on the pressure-temperature conditions; moreover, some parts are melted. Seismic waves can be used to detect these conditions on the basis of reflection and transmission events. Basically, from the elastic-plastic point of view the seismic properties (seismic velocity and density) depend on effective pressure and temperature. Confining and pore pressures have opposite effects on these properties, such that very small effective pressures (the presence of overpressured fluids) may substantially decrease the P- and S-wave velocities, mainly the latter, by opening of cracks and weakening of grain contacts. Similarly, high temperatures induce the same effect by partial melting. To model these effects, we consider a poro-viscoelastic model based on Gassmann equations and Burgers mechanical model to represent the properties of the rock frame and describe ductility in which deformation takes place by shear plastic flow. The Burgers elements allow us to model the effects of seismic attenuation, velocity dispersion and steady-state creep flow, respectively. The stiffness components of the brittle and ductile media depend on stress and temperature through the shear viscosity, which is obtained by the Arrhenius equation and the octahedral stress criterion. Effective pressure effects are taken into account in the dry-rock moduli using exponential functions whose parameters are obtained by fitting experimental data as a function of confining pressure. Since fluid effects are important, the density and bulk modulus of the saturating fluids (water and steam) are modeled using the equations provided by the NIST website, including supercritical behaviour. The theory allows us to obtain the phase velocity and quality factor as a function of depth and geological pressure and temperature as well as time frequency. We then obtain the PS and SH

  16. Lithofacies and associated reservoir properties co-simulations constraint by seismic data; Cosimulations de lithofacies et de proprietes reservoirs associees contraintes par les donnees sismiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichtl, P.

    1998-01-19

    Integration of data different sources and nature leads to more accurate reservoir models, useful for controlling fluid and assessing final uncertainties. In this frame, this thesis presents a new technique for co-simulating in 3D two high resolution properties - one categorical, one continuous - conditionally to well information and under the constraint of seismic data. This technique could be applied to simulate lithofacies and related reservoir properties like acoustic impedances or porosities. The proposed algorithm combines a non-parametric approach for the categorical variable and a parametric approach for the continuous variable through a sequential co-simulation. The co-simulation process is divided in two steps: in the first step, the lithofacies is co-simulated with the seismic information by a sequential indicator co-simulation with co-kriging and, in the second step, the reservoir property of interest is simulated from the previously co-simulated lithofacies using sequential Gaussian (co- )simulation or P-field simulation. A validation study on a synthetic but realistic model shows that this technique provides alternative models of lithofacies and associated high resolution acoustic impedances consistent with the seismic data. The seismic information constraining the co-simulations contributes to reduce the uncertainties for the lithofacies distribution at the reservoir level. In some case, a Markov co-regionalization model can be used for simplifying the inference and modelling of the cross-covariances; finally, the co-simulation algorithm was applied to a 3D real case study with objective the joint numerical modelling of lithofacies and porosity in a fluvial channel reservoir. (author) 88 refs.

  17. 3D modeling of stratigraphic units and simulation of seismic facies in the Lion gulf margin; Modelisation 3D des unites stratigraphiques et simulation des facies sismiques dans la marge du golfe du Lion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihi, H.

    1997-05-12

    This work aims at providing a contribution to the studies carried out on reservoir characterization by use of seismic data. The study mainly consisted in the use of geostatistical methods in order to model the geometry of stratigraphic units of the Golfe du Lion margin and to simulate the seismic facies from high resolution seismic data. We propose, for the geometric modelling, a methodology based on the estimation of the surfaces and calculation afterwards of the thicknesses, if the modelling of the depth is possible. On the other hand the method consists in estimating the thickness variable directly and in deducing the boundary surfaces afterwards. In order to simulate the distribution of seismic facies within the units of the western domain, we used the truncated Gaussian method. The used approach gave a satisfactory results, when the seismic facies present slightly dipping reflectors with respect to the reference level. Otherwise the method reaches its limits because of the problems of definition of a reference level which allows to follow the clino-forms. In spite of these difficulties, this simulation allows us to estimate the distribution of seismic facies within the units and then to deduce their probable extension. (author) 150 refs.

  18. A physics-based earthquake simulator and its application to seismic hazard assessment in Calabria (Southern Italy) region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Console, Rodolfo; Nardi, Anna; Carluccio, Roberto; Murru, Maura; Falcone, Giuseppe; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    The use of a newly developed earthquake simulator has allowed the production of catalogs lasting 100 kyr and containing more than 100,000 events of magnitudes ≥4.5. The model of the fault system upon which we applied the simulator code was obtained from the DISS 3.2.0 database, selecting all the faults that are recognized on the Calabria region, for a total of 22 fault segments. The application of our simulation algorithm provides typical features in time, space and magnitude behavior of the seismicity, which can be compared with those of the real observations. The results of the physics-based simulator algorithm were compared with those obtained by an alternative method using a slip-rate balanced technique. Finally, as an example of a possible use of synthetic catalogs, an attenuation law has been applied to all the events reported in the synthetic catalog for the production of maps showing the exceedance probability of given values of PGA on the territory under investigation.

  19. A physics-based earthquake simulator and its application to seismic hazard assessment in Calabria (Southern Italy) region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Console, Rodolfo; Nardi, Anna; Carluccio, Roberto; Murru, Maura; Falcone, Giuseppe; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    The use of a newly developed earthquake simulator has allowed the production of catalogs lasting 100 kyr and containing more than 100,000 events of magnitudes ≥4.5. The model of the fault system upon which we applied the simulator code was obtained from the DISS 3.2.0 database, selecting all the faults that are recognized on the Calabria region, for a total of 22 fault segments. The application of our simulation algorithm provides typical features in time, space and magnitude behavior of the seismicity, which can be compared with those of the real observations. The results of the physics-based simulator algorithm were compared with those obtained by an alternative method using a slip-rate balanced technique. Finally, as an example of a possible use of synthetic catalogs, an attenuation law has been applied to all the events reported in the synthetic catalog for the production of maps showing the exceedance probability of given values of PGA on the territory under investigation.

  20. The Seismicity of the Central Apennines Region Studied by Means of a Physics-Based Earthquake Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Console, R.; Vannoli, P.; Carluccio, R.

    2016-12-01

    The application of a physics-based earthquake simulation algorithm to the central Apennines region, where the 24 August 2016 Amatrice earthquake occurred, allowed the compilation of a synthetic seismic catalog lasting 100 ky, and containing more than 500,000 M ≥ 4.0 events, without the limitations that real catalogs suffer in terms of completeness, homogeneity and time duration. The algorithm on which this simulator is based is constrained by several physical elements as: (a) an average slip rate for every single fault in the investigated fault systems, (b) the process of rupture growth and termination, leading to a self-organized earthquake magnitude distribution, and (c) interaction between earthquake sources, including small magnitude events. Events nucleated in one fault are allowed to expand into neighboring faults, even belonging to a different fault system, if they are separated by less than a given maximum distance. The seismogenic model upon which we applied the simulator code, was derived from the DISS 3.2.0 database (http://diss.rm.ingv.it/diss/), selecting all the fault systems that are recognized in the central Apennines region, for a total of 24 fault systems. The application of our simulation algorithm provides typical features in time, space and magnitude behavior of the seismicity, which are comparable with those of real observations. These features include long-term periodicity and clustering of strong earthquakes, and a realistic earthquake magnitude distribution departing from the linear Gutenberg-Richter distribution in the moderate and higher magnitude range. The statistical distribution of earthquakes with M ≥ 6.0 on single faults exhibits a fairly clear pseudo-periodic behavior, with a coefficient of variation Cv of the order of 0.3-0.6. We found in our synthetic catalog a clear trend of long-term acceleration of seismic activity preceding M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes and quiescence following those earthquakes. Lastly, as an example of a

  1. Seismic moment tensor resolution on a local scale: Simulated rockburst and mine-induced seismic events in the Kopanang gold mine, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sileny, J

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available modelled as an isotropic explosive source. At regional distances, this inversion experiment has been performed with seismic records of a calibration blast, detonated on November 11, 1999 in the Dead Sea (S? ?LENY? and HOFSTETTER, 2002). The aim... rockburst?a blasting experiment carried out in a deep-level gold mine?was performed within a rock mass. Thus, this experiment was much more suitable for testing the resolvability of the individual source components. Several mine-induced seismic events...

  2. Self-consistent seismic cycle simulation in a three-dimensional continuum model: methodology and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranger, C. C.; Le Pourhiet, L.; May, D.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction zones evolve over millions of years. The state of stress, the distribution of materials, and the strength and structure of the interface between the two plates is intricately tied to a host of time-dependent physical processes, such as damage, friction, (nonlinear) viscous relaxation, and fluid migration. In addition, the subduction interface has a complex three-dimensional geometry that evolves with time and can adjust in response to a changing stress environment or in response to impinging topographical features, and can even branch off as a splay fault. All in all, the behaviour of (large) earthquakes at the millisecond to minute timescale is heavily dependent on the pattern of stress accumulation during the 100 year inter-seismic period, the events occurring on or near the interface in the past thousands of years, as well as the extended geological history of the region. We address the aforementioned modeling requirements by developing a self-consistent 3D staggered grid finite difference continuum description of motion, thermal advection-diffusion, and poro-visco-elastic two-phase flow. Faults are modelled as plastic shear bands that can develop and evolve in response to a changing stress environment without having a prescribed geometry. They obey a Mohr-Coulomb or Drucker-Prager yield criterion and a rate-and-state friction law. For a sound treatment of plasticity, we borrow elements from mechanical engineering, and extend these with high-quality nonlinear iteration schemes and adaptive time-stepping to resolve the rupture process at all time scales. We will present these techniques together with proof-of-concept examples of self-consistently developing seismic cycles in 2D and 3D, including phases of stress accumulation, fault nucleation, dynamic rupture, and healing.

  3. Developing an Internet Oriented Platform for Earthquake Engineering Application and Web-based Virtual Reality Simulation System for Seismic hazards: Towards Disaster Mitigation in Metropolises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alaghehbandian

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art on risk communication to the public, with an emphasis on simulation of seismic hazards using VRML. Rapid growth computer technologies, especially the Internet provide human beings new measures to deal with engineering and social problems which were hard to solve in traditional ways. This paper presents a prototype of an application platform based on the Internet using VR (Virtual Reality for civil engineering considering building an information system of risk communication for seismic hazards and at the moment in the case of bridge structure.

  4. Numerical simulation of the seismic behavior of self-centering steel beam-column connections with bottom flange friction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tong; Song, Lianglong; Zhang, Guodong

    2011-06-01

    A new type of steel moment resisting frame with bottom flange friction devices (BFFDs) has been developed to provide self-centering capacity and energy dissipation, and to reduce permanent deformations under earthquakes. This paper presents a numerical simulation of self-centering beam-column connections with BFFDs, in which the gap opening /closing at the beam-column interfaces is simulated by using pairs of zero-length elements with compression-only material properties, and the energy dissipation due to friction is simulated by using truss elements with specified hysteretic behavior. In particular, the effect of the friction bolt bearing against the slotted plate in the BFFDs was modeled, so that the increase in lateral force and the loss of friction force due to the bolt bearing could be taken into account. Parallel elastic-perfectly plastic gap (ElasticPPGap) materials in the Open System for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (OpenSees) were used with predefined gaps to specify the sequence that each bolt went into the bearing and the corresponding increase in bending stiffness. The MinMax material in OpenSees is used to specify the minimum and maximum values of strains of the ElasticPPGap materials. To consider the loss of friction force due to bolt bearing, a number of parallel hysteretic materials were used, and the failure of these materials in sequence simulated the gradual loss of friction force. Analysis results obtained by using the proposed numerical model are discussed and compared with the test results under cyclic loadings and the seismic loading, respectively.

  5. How to simulate pedestrian behaviors in seismic evacuation for vulnerability reduction of existing buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliarini, Enrico; Bernardini, Gabriele; D'Orazio, Marco

    2017-07-01

    Understanding and representing how individuals behave in earthquake emergencies would be essentially to assess the impact of vulnerability reduction strategies on existing buildings in seismic areas. In fact, interactions between individuals and the scenario (modified by the earthquake occurrence) are really important in order to understand the possible additional risks for people, especially during the evacuation phase. The current approach is based on "qualitative" aspects, in order to define best practice guidelines for Civil Protection and populations. On the contrary, a "quantitative" description of human response and evacuation motion in similar conditions is urgently needed. Hence, this work defines the rules for pedestrians' earthquake evacuation in urban scenarios, by taking advantages of previous results of real-world evacuation analyses. In particular, motion laws for pedestrians is defined by modifying the Social Force model equation. The proposed model could be used for evaluating individuals' evacuation process and so for defining operative strategies for interferences reduction in critical urban fabric parts (e.g.: interventions on particular buildings, evacuation strategies definition, city parts projects).

  6. Analysis of seismic disaster failure mechanism and dam-break simulation of high arch dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingkui; Zhang, Liaojun

    2014-06-01

    Based on a Chinese national high arch dam located in a meizoseismal region, a nonlinear numerical analysis model of the damage and failure process of a dam-foundation system is established by employing a 3-D deformable distinct element code (3DEC) and its re-development functions. The proposed analysis model considers the dam-foundation-reservoir coupling effect, influence of nonlinear contact in the opening and closing of the dam seam surface and abutment rock joints during strong earthquakes, and radiation damping of far field energy dissipation according to the actual workability state of an arch dam. A safety assessment method and safety evaluation criteria is developed to better understand the arch dam system disaster process from local damage to ultimate failure. The dynamic characteristics, disaster mechanism, limit bearing capacity and the entire failure process of a high arch dam under a strong earthquake are then analyzed. Further, the seismic safety of the arch dam is evaluated according to the proposed evaluation criteria and safety assessment method. As a result, some useful conclusions are obtained for some aspects of the disaster mechanism and failure process of an arch dam. The analysis method and conclusions may be useful in engineering practice.

  7. Enhancing the revision of the static geological model of the Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot site by integration of reservoir simulations and 3D seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Norden, Ben; Ivanova, Alexandra; Lüth, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Pilot-scale carbon dioxide storage has been performed at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany from June 2007 to August 2013 with about 67 kt of CO2 injected into the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation. In this context, the main aims focussed on verification of the technical feasibility of CO2 storage in saline aquifers and development of efficient strategies for CO2 behaviour monitoring and prediction. A static geological model has been already developed at an early stage of this undertaking, and continuously revised with the availability of additional geological and operational data as well as by means of reservoir simulations, allowing for revisions in line with the efforts to achieve a solid history match in view of well bottomhole pressures and CO2 arrival times at the observation wells. Three 3D seismic campaigns followed the 2005 3D seismic baseline in 2009, 2012 and 2015. Consequently, the interpreted seismic data on spatial CO2 thickness distributions in the storage reservoir as well as seismic CO2 detection limits from recent conformity studies enabled us to enhance the previous history-matching results by adding a spatial component to the previous observations, limited to points only. For that purpose, we employed the latest version of the history-matched static geological reservoir model and revised the gridding scheme of the reservoir simulation model by coarsening and introducing local grid refinements at the areas of interest. Further measures to ensure computational efficiency included the application of the MUFITS reservoir simulator (BLACKOIL module) with PVT data derived from the MUFITS GASSTORE module. Observations considered in the inverse model calibration for a simulation time of about 5 years included well bottomhole pressures, CO2 arrival times and seismically determined CO2 thickness maps for 2009 and 2012. Pilot points were employed by means of the PEST++ inverse simulation framework to apply permeability multipliers, interpolated by kriging

  8. SEISMIC PROPAGATION SIMULATION IN COMPLEX MEDIA WITH NON-RECTANGULAR IRREGULAR-GRID FINITE-DIFFERENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Weitao; YANG Huizhu

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a finite-difference (FD) method with spatially non-rectangular irregular grids to simulate the elastic wave propagation. Staggered irregular grid finite difference operators with a second-order time and spatial accuracy are used to approximate the velocity-stress elastic wave equations. This method is very simple and the cost of computing time is not much. Complicated geometries like curved thin layers, cased borehole and nonplanar interfaces may be treated with nonrectangular irregular grids in a more flexible way. Unlike the multi-grid scheme, this method requires no interpolation between the fine and coarse grids and all grids are computed at the same spatial iteration. Compared with the rectangular irregular grid FD, the spurious diffractions from "staircase"interfaces can easily be eliminated without using finer grids. Dispersion and stability conditions of the proposed method can be established in a similar form as for the rectangular irregular grid scheme. The Higdon's absorbing boundary condition is adopted to eliminate boundary reflections. Numerical simulations show that this method has satisfactory stability and accuracy in simulating wave propagation near rough solid-fluid interfaces. The computation costs are less than those using a regular grid and rectangular grid FD method.

  9. Finite difference simulations of seismic scattering Implications for the propagation of short-period seismic waves in the crust and models of crustal heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.; Clayton, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic seismographs that were obtained by the finite difference method are presently applied to the study of elastic and acoustic wave scattering in two-dimensional media with random spatial variations in seismic velocity. The seismograms are analyzed to determine the variation in travel times and waveforms across arrays of receivers. The random media with Gaussian and exponential correlation functions considered differ in the spectral falloff of their velocity fluctuations at wavelengths smaller than 2pi times the correlation distance. It is found that alternative models of crustal heterogeneity can be tested by improved measurements of the frequency dependence of the crustal Q at frequencies greater than about 1 Hz, assuming that scattering is responsible for most of the attenuation at such frequencies.

  10. Detection of co-seismic earthquake gravity field signals using GRACE-like mission simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Shahamat, Abolfazl

    2017-05-01

    After launching the GRACE satellite mission in 2002, the earth's gravity field and its temporal variations are measured with a closer inspection. Although these variations are mainly because of the mass transfer of land water storage, they can also happen due to mass movements related to some natural phenomena including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, melting of polar ice caps and glacial isostatic adjustment. Therefore this paper shows which parameters of an earthquake are more sensitive to GRACE-Like satellite missions. For this purpose, the parameters of the Maule earthquake that occurred in recent years and Alaska earthquake that occurred in 1964 have been chosen. Then we changed their several parameters to serve our purpose. The GRACE-Like sensitivity is observed by using the simulation of the earthquakes along with gravity changes they caused, as well as using dislocation theory under a half space earth. This observation affects the various faulting parameters which include fault length, width, depth and average slip. These changes were therefore evaluated and the result shows that the GRACE satellite missions tend to be more sensitive to Width among the Length and Width, the other parameter is Dip variations than other parameters. This article can be useful to the upcoming scenario designers and seismologists in their quest to study fault parameters.

  11. Simulation of seismic waves at the Earth crust (brittle-ductile transition) based on the Burgers model

    OpenAIRE

    Carcione, J.M.; Poletto, F.; B. Farina; A. Craglietto

    2014-01-01

    The Earth crust presents two dissimilar rheological behaviours depending on the in-situ stress-temperature conditions. The upper, cooler, part is brittle while deeper zones are ductile. Seismic waves may reveal the presence of the transition but a proper characterization is required. We first obtain a stress–strain relation including the effects of shear seismic attenuation and ductility due to shear deformations and plastic flow. The anelastic behaviour i...

  12. Simulation of seismic waves at the earth's crust (brittle–ductile transition) based on the Burgers model

    OpenAIRE

    Carcione, J.M.; Poletto, F.; B. Farina; A. Craglietto

    2014-01-01

    The earth's crust presents two dissimilar rheological behaviors depending on the in situ stress-temperature conditions. The upper, cooler part is brittle, while deeper zones are ductile. Seismic waves may reveal the presence of the transition but a proper characterization is required. We first obtain a stress–strain relation, including the effects of shear seismic attenuation and ductility due to shear deformations and plastic flow. The anelastic behavior is based on the Bur...

  13. A 1.8 trillion degrees-of-freedom, 1.24 petaflops global seismic wave simulation on the K computer

    KAUST Repository

    Tsuboi, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We present high-performance simulations of global seismic wave propagation with an unprecedented accuracy of 1.2 s seismic period for a realistic three-dimensional Earth model using the spectral element method on the K computer. Our seismic simulations use a total of 665.2 billion grid points and resolve 1.8 trillion degrees of freedom. To realize these large-scale computations, we optimize a widely used community software code to efficiently address all hardware parallelization, especially thread-level parallelization to solve the bottleneck of memory usage for coarse-grained parallelization. The new code exhibits excellent strong scaling for the time stepping loop, that is, parallel efficiency on 82,134 nodes relative to 36,504 nodes is 99.54%. Sustained performance of these computations on the K computer is 1.24 petaflops, which is 11.84% of its peak performance. The obtained seismograms with an accuracy of 1.2 s for the entire globe should help us to better understand rupture mechanisms of devastating earthquakes.

  14. 3D geological to geophysical modelling and seismic wave propagation simulation: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS (Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides) mining camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for base metals, uranium and precious metals has been pushing mineral explorations at greater depth. Seismic techniques and surveys have become essential in finding and extracting mineral rich ore bodies, especially for deep VMS mining camps. Geophysical parameters collected from borehole logs and laboratory measurements of core samples provide preliminary information about the nature and type of subsurface lithologic units. Alteration halos formed during the hydrothermal alteration process contain ore bodies, which are of primary interests among geologists and mining industries. It is known that the alteration halos are easier to detect than the ore bodies itself. Many 3D geological models are merely projection of 2D surface geology based on outcrop inspections and geochemical analysis of a small number of core samples collected from the area. Since a large scale 3D multicomponent seismic survey can be prohibitively expensive, performance analysis of such geological models can be helpful in reducing exploration costs. In this abstract, we discussed challenges and constraints encountered in geophysical modelling of ore bodies and surrounding geologic structures from the available coarse 3D geological models of the Lalor Lake mining camp, located in northern Manitoba, Canada. Ore bodies in the Lalor lake VMS camp are rich in gold, zinc, lead and copper, and have an approximate weight of 27 Mt. For better understanding of physical parameters of these known ore bodies and potentially unknown ones at greater depth, we constructed a fine resolution 3D seismic model with dimensions: 2000 m (width), 2000 m (height), and 1500 m (vertical depth). Seismic properties (P-wave, S-wave velocities, and density) were assigned based on a previous rock properties study of the same mining camp. 3D finite-difference elastic wave propagation simulation was performed in the model using appropriate parameters. The generated synthetic 3D seismic data was then compared to

  15. Scattering of high-frequency P wavefield derived by dense Hi-net array observations in Japan and computer simulations of seismic wave propagations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We studied the scattering properties of high-frequency seismic waves due to the distribution of small-scale velocity fluctuations in the crust and upper mantle beneath Japan based on an analysis of three-component short-period seismograms and comparison with finite difference method (FDM) simulation of seismic wave propagation using various stochastic random velocity fluctuation models. Using a large number of dense High-Sensitivity Seismograph network waveform data of 310 shallow crustal earthquakes, we examined the P-wave energy partition of transverse component (PEPT), which is caused by scattering of the seismic wave in heterogeneous structure, as a function of frequency and hypocentral distances. At distance of less than D = 150 km, the PEPT increases with increasing frequency and is approximately constant in the range of from D = 50 to 150 km. The PEPT was found to increase suddenly at a distance of over D = 150 km and was larger in the high-frequency band (f > 4 Hz). Therefore, strong scattering of P wave may occur around the propagation path (upper crust, lower crust and around Moho discontinuity) of the P-wave first arrival phase at distances of larger than D = 150 km. We also found a regional difference in the PEPT value, whereby the PEPT value is large at the backarc side of northeastern Japan compared with southwestern Japan and the forearc side of northeastern Japan. These PEPT results, which were derived from shallow earthquakes, indicate that the shallow structure of heterogeneity at the backarc side of northeastern Japan is stronger and more complex compared with other areas. These hypotheses, that is, the depth and regional change of small-scale velocity fluctuations, are examined by 3-D FDM simulation using various heterogeneous structure models. By comparing the observed feature of the PEPT with simulation results, we found that strong seismic wave scattering occurs in the lower crust due to relatively higher velocity and stronger heterogeneities

  16. Comparison of Structurally Controlled Landslide Hazard Simulation to the Co-seismic Landslides Caused by the M 7.2 2013 Bohol Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galang, J. A. M. B.; Eco, R. C.; Lagmay, A. M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The M_w 7.2 October 15, 2013 Bohol earthquake is one of the more destructive earthquake to hit the Philippines in the 21st century. The epicenter was located in Sagbayan municipality, central Bohol and was generated by a previously unmapped reverse fault called the "Inabanga Fault". The earthquake resulted in 209 fatalities and over 57 million USD worth of damages. The earthquake generated co-seismic landslides most of which were related to fault structures. Unlike rainfall induced landslides, the trigger for co-seismic landslides happen without warning. Preparations for this type of landslides rely heavily on the identification of fracture-related slope instability. To mitigate the impacts of co-seismic landslide hazards, morpho-structural orientations of discontinuity sets were mapped using remote sensing techniques with the aid of a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) obtained in 2012. The DTM used is an IFSAR derived image with a 5-meter pixel resolution and approximately 0.5 meter vertical accuracy. Coltop 3D software was then used to identify similar structures including measurement of their dip and dip directions. The chosen discontinuity sets were then keyed into Matterocking software to identify potential rock slide zones due to planar or wedged discontinuities. After identifying the structurally-controlled unstable slopes, the rock mass propagation extent of the possible rock slides was simulated using Conefall. Separately, a manually derived landslide inventory has been performed using post-earthquake satellite images and LIDAR. The results were compared to the landslide inventory which identified at least 873 landslides. Out of the 873 landslides identified through the inventory, 786 or 90% intersect the simulated structural-controlled landslide hazard areas of Bohol. The results show the potential of this method to identify co-seismic landslide hazard areas for disaster mitigation. Along with computer methods to simulate shallow landslides, and debris flow

  17. Investigation of the ability for slow slip events to trigger earthquakes through a comparison of seismic and geodetic observations with fault slip simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    There is growing evidence that slow slip events (SSEs) promote nearby seismicity, often in the form of swarms of small to moderate earthquakes or as tectonic tremor that are primarily swarms of low frequency earthquakes. Yet the question remains whether SSEs are capable of triggering large to great earthquakes due to the generally small stress change associated with typical SSEs. There have been a few recent large to great earthquakes that appear to have been preceded by evidence of a SSE, but whether these cases are rare is not yet clear. Even if several other cases were documented, it would still be difficult to translate this information into quantitative estimates of the hazard increase during a given SSE. In this study, we move towards this long-term goal with an earthquake simulator (RSQSim), which is capable of modeling a variety of fault slip behaviors (i.e. earthquakes, SSEs, and continuous creep), and can generate robust statistics on the relationships between SSEs, microseismicity, and large/great earthquakes. The simulations seek to explain observations like those of the recent Mw 7.4 Ometepec, Mexico and Mw 6.5 Cook Strait earthquakes that show increased seismic activity in small fault patches between the transition zone and mainshock source zone during SSEs that were in process in the months leading up to, and particularly immediately prior to, the mainshock. The potential causative relationships will be probed with models that use a range of fault properties and configurations. One hypothesis to test is whether observed swarms of seismicity during SSEs represent fast slip on weaker areas of the plate interface that are more sensitive to the relatively small stress changes associated with SSEs. An alternative hypothesis is that no area of the fault is more easily influenced by SSEs, just that the relative prevalence of smaller earthquakes leads to more frequent observations of the triggered mainshocks.

  18. Mineralogical Controls of Fault Healing in Natural and Simulated Gouges with Implications for Fault Zone Processes and the Seismic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Ikari, M.; Marone, C.

    2011-12-01

    The frictional strength and stability of tectonic faults is determined by asperity contact processes, granular deformation, and fault zone fabric development. The evolution of grain-scale contact area during the seismic cycle likely exhibits significant control on overall fault stability by influencing frictional restrengthening, or healing, during the interseismic period, and the rate-dependence of sliding friction, which controls earthquake nucleation and the mode of fault slip. We report on laboratory experiments designed to explore the affect of mineralogy on fault healing. We conducted frictional shear experiments in a double-direct shear configuration at room temperature, 100% relative humidity, and a normal stress of 20 MPa. We used samples from a wide range of natural faults, including outcrop samples and core recovered during scientific drilling. Faults include: Alpine (New Zealand), Zuccale (Italy), Rocchetta (Italy), San Gregorio (California), Calaveras (California), Kodiak (Alaska), Nankai (Japan), Middle America Trench (Costa Rica), and San Andreas (California). To isolate the role of mineralogy, we also tested simulated fault gouges composed of talc, montmorillonite, biotite, illite, kaolinite, quartz, andesine, and granite. Frictional healing was measured at an accumulated shear strain of ~15 within the gouge layers. We conducted slide-hold-slide tests ranging from 3 to 3000 seconds. The main suite of experiments used a background shearing rate of 10 μm/s; these were augmented with sub-suites at 1 and 100 μm/s. We find that phyllosilicate-rich gouges (e.g. talc, montmorillonite, San Andreas Fault) show little to no healing over all hold times. We find the highest healing rates (β ≈ 0.01, Δμ per decade in time, s) in gouges from the Alpine and Rocchetta faults, with the rest of our samples falling into an intermediate range of healing rates. Nearly all gouges exhibit log-linear healing rates with the exceptions of San Andreas Fault gouge and

  19. Simulation of seismic waves at the Earth crust (brittle-ductile transition based on the Burgers model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Carcione

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Earth crust presents two dissimilar rheological behaviours depending on the in-situ stress-temperature conditions. The upper, cooler, part is brittle while deeper zones are ductile. Seismic waves may reveal the presence of the transition but a proper characterization is required. We first obtain a stress–strain relation including the effects of shear seismic attenuation and ductility due to shear deformations and plastic flow. The anelastic behaviour is based on the Burgers mechanical model to describe the effects of seismic attenuation and steady-state creep flow. The shear Lamé constant of the brittle and ductile media depends on the in-situ stress and temperature through the shear viscosity, which is obtained by the Arrhenius equation and the octahedral stress criterion. The P- and S-wave velocities decrease as depth and temperature increase due to the geothermal gradient, an effect which is more pronounced for shear waves. We then obtain the P-S and SH equations of motion recast in the velocity-stress formulation, including memory variables to avoid the computation of time convolutions. The equations correspond to isotropic anelastic and inhomogeneous media and are solved by a direct grid method based on the Runge–Kutta time stepping technique and the Fourier pseudospectral method. The algorithm is tested with success against known analytical solutions for different shear viscosities. A realistic example illustrates the computation of surface and reverse-VSP synthetic seismograms in the presence of an abrupt brittle-ductile transition.

  20. VIBRATION SIMULATION ANALYSIS OF WIND TURBINE UNDER SEISMIC LOAD%地震作用下的风电机组振动仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何玉林; 王磊; 杜静; 金鑫

    2012-01-01

    The vibration response of wind turbine under seismic load was analyzed by simulation technology based on multi flexible body dynamics. Firstly the aerodynamic load of wind turbine was calculated by applying GDW theory. The multi flexible body dynamics model for " rotor-nacelle-tower" of wind turbine was programmed in Fortran. Then wind turbine under the action of earthquake was co-simulated in the ADAMS through the dynamic link files and the compiled seismic load spectrum base on Eurocode8. The results compared with Bladed simulation results show that the method is excellent to simulate the vibration response under earthquake. The research work presents a new way for studying the impact of earthquakes on the wind turbine.%应用基于多柔体动力学的联合仿真技术对地震作用下的风力发电机振动响应进行了研究.首先采用GDW理论进行风力机气动载荷计算分析,在Fortran下建立风力发电“叶轮—机舱—塔架”整机的多柔体系统动力学模型,将该系统模型转化为ADAMS分析模型.然后通过动态链接文件和根据Eurocode8编写的地震载荷谱,在ADAMS中进行地震作用下的风力机系统联合仿真.仿真数据同Bladed软件结果比较表明,该联合仿真方法可较好的模拟风力机在地震作用下的振动响应.该文为研究地震对风力发电机的影响进行了一次有益的探索.

  1. Subsided Column Seismic Wave Advanced Prospecting Numerical Simulation and Application%陷落柱地震波超前探测数值模拟与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勃; 刘盛东; 胡泽安

    2012-01-01

    针对陷落柱与周围煤体之间存在明显波阻抗差异的特点,建立巷道内地震波超前探测陷落柱数值模型.采用波场正演模拟方法,分析巷道前方存在陷落柱时的地震波场特征,总结出基于绕射偏移的陷落柱边界探测方法.在新元矿南二正巷实际超前探测中,该方法准确圈定了巷道前方陷落柱的范围.探测结果和实际揭露情况对比表明:地震波超前探测技术可以对巷道前方120m范围内的陷落柱构造进行有效预测.%In allusion to the obvious wave impedance difference existed between subsided column and peripheral coal mass, the numerical model of subsided column roadway seismic wave advanced prospecting has been modeled. The analysis using wave field forward simulation has found roadway front subsidence seismic wave field features existed, and then a subsided column boundary detection method based on diffracted migration summed up. During the advanced prospecting in the S2 main roadway of the Xinyuan coalmine, using of the method has cycled out subsided column extent ahead of roadway with accuracy. The contrast of prospecting and practical revealed results demonstrated that: the seismic wave advanced prospecting technology can effectively predict roadway front subsided column within 120m extent.

  2. Seismic performance test and numerical simulation of prestressed high-intensity concrete pile%PHC管桩抗震性能试验及数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戎贤; 宋鹏; 李艳艳

    2014-01-01

    对3根PHC管桩进行了抗震性能拟静力试验,对其在低周往复荷载作用下的受力状态、破坏机理、恢复力特性进行了分析,得到了添加非预应力筋和剪切端勾型钢纤维对PHC管桩抗震性能的影响规律,并采用非线性有限元方法对PHC的受弯承载力进行了模拟分析。结果表明,配置一定数量非预应力筋可以改善管桩的抗震性能;而剪切端勾型钢纤维的加入则对其抗震性能影响不大,同时有限元所建立的计算模型是合理可行的,模拟结果与试验结果吻合较好。%Based on the experiment of three seismic performance PHC pile under low cyclic reversed lateral load,influence law about adding non-prestressed reinforcement and shear end hook steel fiber pile on seismic behavior was got according to the analy of stress state,failure mechanism,restoring force characteristics.The flexural strength of PHC are simulated and analyzed by nonlinear finite element method.The results show that a certain number of non-prestressed reinforcement configuration can improve the seismic performance of pile, adding cut end hook steel fiber while adding hook style steel fiber at the end of shear side has little effect on its seismic performance.The finite element calculation model established is reasonable and feasible.Calculation and analysis in good agreement with the experimental results was obtaind.

  3. Detailed seismic modeling of induced seismicity at the Groningen gas field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Steeghs, T.P.H.; Kraaijpoel, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed seismic modeling study of induced seismicity observed at the Groningen gas field, situated in the North-eastern part of the Netherlands. Seismic simulations are valuable to support the interpretation of observed earthquake waveforms recordings and to increase the

  4. Seismic failure modes and seismic safety of Hardfill dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun XIONG; Yong-hong WENG; Yun-long HE

    2013-01-01

    Based on microscopic damage theory and the finite element method, and using the Weibull distribution to characterize the random distribution of the mechanical properties of materials, the seismic response of a typical Hardfill dam was analyzed through numerical simulation during the earthquakes with intensities of 8 degrees and even greater. The seismic failure modes and failure mechanism of the dam were explored as well. Numerical results show that the Hardfill dam remains at a low stress level and undamaged or slightly damaged during an earthquake with an intensity of 8 degrees. During overload earthquakes, tensile cracks occur at the dam surfaces and extend to inside the dam body, and the upstream dam body experiences more serious damage than the downstream dam body. Therefore, under the seismic conditions, the failure pattern of the Hardfill dam is the tensile fracture of the upstream regions and the dam toe. Compared with traditional gravity dams, Hardfill dams have better seismic performance and greater seismic safety.

  5. Midget Seismic in Sandbox Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M. L.; Philipp, J.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2008-12-01

    Analog sandbox simulation has been applied to study geological processes to provide qualitative and quantitative insights into specific geological problems. In nature, the structures, which are simulated in those sandbox models, are often inferred from seismic data. With the study introduced here, we want to combine the analog sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modeling of those sandbox models. The long-term objectives of this approach are (1) imaging of seismic and seismological events of actively deforming and static 3D analogue models, and (2) assessment of the transferability of the model data to field data in order to improve field data acquisition and interpretation according to the addressed geological problem. To achieve this objective, a new midget-seismic facility for laboratory use was designed and developed, comprising a seismic tank, a PC control unit including piezo-electric transducers, and a positioning system. The first experiments are aimed at studying the wave field properties of the piezo- transducers in order to investigate their feasibility for seismic profiling. The properties investigated are their directionality and the change of waveform due to their size (5-12 mm) compared to the wavelengths (material properties and the effects of wave propagation in an-/isotropic media by physical studies, before we finally start using different seismic imaging and processing techniques on static and actively deforming 3D analog models.

  6. Seismic Creep

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seismic creep is the constant or periodic movement on a fault as contrasted with the sudden erupture associated with an earthquake. It is a usually slow deformation...

  7. Seismic seiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  8. Seismic Wave Amplification in 3D Alluvial Basins: 3D/1D Amplification Ratios from Fast Multipole BEM Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fajardo, Kristel C Meza; Chaillat, Stéphanie; Lenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study seismic wave amplification in alluvial basins having 3D standard geometries through the Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method in the frequency domain. We investigate how much 3D amplification differs from the 1D (horizontal layering) case. Considering incident fields of plane harmonic waves, we examine the relationships between the amplification level and the most relevant physical parameters of the problem (impedance contrast, 3D aspect ratio, vertical and oblique incidence of plane waves). The FMBEM results show that the most important parameters for wave amplification are the impedance contrast and the so-called equivalent shape ratio. Using these two parameters, we derive simple rules to compute the fundamental frequency for various 3D basin shapes and the corresponding 3D/1D amplification factor for 5% damping. Effects on amplification due to 3D basin asymmetry are also studied and incorporated in the derived rules.

  9. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    OpenAIRE

    Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.; M.-L. Buddensiek; C. M. Krawczyk

    2012-01-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox mo...

  10. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Krawczyk; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-01-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale str...

  11. 地震模拟振动台多向扩展系统%Seismic simulation shaking table multidirectional expansion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程麦理; 李青宁; 吴多; 毕研超; 苗如松

    2016-01-01

    For the multidimensional,multipoint excitation vibration table test research of large-span space structures by using single vibration table,this paper put forth a seismic simulation shaking-table redirection extended system concept.Combined the characteristics of changed curved-bar mechanism on seismic wave propagation direction,the dynamics of the shaking table expand system was analyzed.Based on the multipoint excitation theory,considering the effect of superstructure inertia force to sub-units,the formula of the sub-units of equivalent mass was derived.Under the harmonic load,the multidirectional extended system dynamic response analytic expression was obtained.Studies show that multidirectional extended systems can effectively change the peak of seismic-wave acceleration,phase and the transfer direction;it is an effective method to achieve the large-span structure multipoint excitation test using a single shaking table.Examples show that the theory is correct;the method is reliable.%为利用单振动台实现大跨度空间结构多维多点激励的振动台试验研究,提出地震模拟振动台改向扩展系统概念。结合曲杆机构改变地震波传递方向的特性,对地震模拟振动台扩展系统进行结构动力分析。根据多点激励理论,考虑上部结构惯性力对子台的作用,推导出子台等效质量的计算公式。在谐波荷载作用下,给出多向扩展系统动力响应的解析式。研究表明,多向扩展系统能有效改变地震波的峰值加速度、相位和传递方向,是一种利用单振动台实现大跨结构多维多点激励试验研究的有效方法。算例结果验证了该理论的正确性,为振动台多向扩展系统的研制提供理论依据。

  12. Seismic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground

  13. Simulation of the Basin Effects in the Po Plain During the Emilia-Romagna Seismic Sequence (2012) Using Empirical Green's Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Alain; Causse, Mathieu; Courboulex, Françoise; Traversa, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The two main earthquakes that occurred in 2012 (May 20 and 29) in the Reggio-Emiliano region (Northern Italy) were relatively small (Mw 6.1 and Mw 5.9) but they generated unexpected damages in a large area around the epicenter. On some stations, the observed seismic levels exceeded design levels recommended by the EC8 seismic code for buildings and civil engineering works. The ground motions generated by the two mainshocks have specific characteristics: the waveforms are mainly controlled by surface waves generated by the deep sedimentary Po plain, by local site effects and also, on some stations, by non-linear behaviors. In this particular context, we test the ability of an empirical Green's function (EGF) simulation approach to reproduce the recorded seismograms in a large frequency band without any knowledge of the underground medium. We focus on the possibility to reproduce the strong surface waves generated by the basin at distances between 25 and 90 km. We choose to work on the second mainshock of the sequence (Mw 5.9), which occurred on May 29, 2012, because it is better recorded by the seismological networks than the May 20th first mainshock. We use a k-2 kinematic source model to generate a set of 100 slip distributions on the fault plane and choose the recordings of a close-by Mw 3.9 event as EGF. We then generate a set of broad-band seismograms (from 0.2 to 35 Hz) and compare them to the mainshock signals at 15 stations (Seismograms, Fourier spectra, PGA, PGV, duration, Stockwell Transforms) at epicentral distances from 5 to 160 km. We find that the main specific features of the signals are very well reproduced for all the stations within and beyond the basin. Nevertheless, at nearby stations, the PGA values are over-evaluated, which could be explained by the fact that non- linear effects are not taken into account in the simulation process. A better fit was found for a position of the nucleation point to the bottom west of the fault, that suggest a

  14. Seismic Symphonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  15. Assessment of seismic loss dependence using copula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Katsuichiro; Ren, Jiandong

    2010-07-01

    The catastrophic nature of seismic risk is attributed to spatiotemporal correlation of seismic losses of buildings and infrastructure. For seismic risk management, such correlated seismic effects must be adequately taken into account, since they affect the probability distribution of aggregate seismic losses of spatially distributed structures significantly, and its upper tail behavior can be of particular importance. To investigate seismic loss dependence for two closely located portfolios of buildings, simulated seismic loss samples, which are obtained from a seismic risk model of spatially distributed buildings by taking spatiotemporally correlated ground motions into account, are employed. The characterization considers a loss frequency model that incorporates one dependent random component acting as a common shock to all buildings, and a copula-based loss severity model, which facilitates the separate construction of marginal loss distribution functions and nonlinear copula function with upper tail dependence. The proposed method is applied to groups of wood-frame buildings located in southwestern British Columbia. Analysis results indicate that the dependence structure of aggregate seismic losses can be adequately modeled by the right heavy tail copula or Gumbel copula, and that for the considered example, overall accuracy of the proposed method is satisfactory at probability levels of practical interest (at most 10% estimation error of fractiles of aggregate seismic loss). The developed statistical seismic loss model may be adopted in dynamic financial analysis for achieving faster evaluation with reasonable accuracy.

  16. Frictional evolution, acoustic emissions activity, and off-fault damage in simulated faults sheared at seismic slip rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passelègue, François. X.; Spagnuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    We present a series of high-velocity friction tests conducted on Westerly granite, using the Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA) installed at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Roma with acoustic emissions (AEs) monitored at high frequency (4 MHz). Both atmospheric humidity and pore fluid (water) pressure conditions were tested, under effective normal stress σneff in the range 5-20 MPa and at target sliding velocities Vs in the range 0.003-3 m/s. Under atmospheric humidity two consecutive friction drops were observed. The first one is related to flash weakening, and the second one to the formation and growth of a continuous layer of melt in the slip zone. In the presence of fluid, a single drop in friction was observed. Average values of fracture energy are independent of effective normal stress and sliding velocity. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities on the sheared samples suggested that larger damage was induced for 0.1 < Vs<0.3 m/s. This observation is supported by AEs recorded during the test, most of which were detected after the initiation of the second friction drop, once the fault surface temperature was high. Some AEs were detected up to a few seconds after the end of the experiments, indicating thermal rather than mechanical cracking. In addition, the presence of pore water delayed the onset of AEs by cooling effects and by reducing of the heat produced, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat during sliding. Using a thermoelastic crack model developed by Fredrich and Wong (1986), we confirm that damage may be induced by heat diffusion. Indeed, our theoretical results predict accurately the amount of shortening and shortening rate, supporting the idea that gouge production and gouge comminution are in fact largely controlled by thermal cracking. Finally, we discuss the contribution of thermal cracking in the seismic energy balance. In fact, while a dichotomy exists in the literature regarding

  17. How geometry and structure control the seismic radiation : spectral element simulation of the dynamic rupture of the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, G.; Vilotte, J.; Scala, A.

    2012-12-01

    The M 9.0, 2011 Tohoku earthquake, along the North American-Pacific plate boundary, East of the Honshu Island, yielded a complex broadband rupture extending southwards over 600 km along strike and triggering a large tsunami that ravaged the East coast of North Japan. Strong motion and high-rate continuous GPS data, recorded all along the Japanese archipelago by the national seismic networks K-Net and Kik-net and geodetic network Geonet, together with teleseismic data, indicated a complex frequency dependent rupture. Low frequency signals (fmeters), extending along-dip over about 100 km, between the hypocenter and the trench, and 150 to 200 km along strike. This slip asperity was likely the cause of the localized tsunami source and of the large amplitude tsunami waves. High-frequency signals (f>0.5 Hz) were instead generated close to the coast in the deeper part of the subduction zone, by at least four smaller size asperities, with possible repeated slip, and were mostly the cause for the ground shaking felt in the Eastern part of Japan. The deep origin of the high-frequency radiation was also confirmed by teleseismic high frequency back projection analysis. Intermediate frequency analysis showed a transition between the shallow and deeper part of the fault, with the rupture almost confined in a small stripe containing the hypocenter before propagating southward along the strike, indicating a predominant in-plane rupture mechanism in the initial stage of the rupture itself. We numerically investigate the role of the geometry of the subduction interface and of the structural properties of the subduction zone on the broadband dynamic rupture and radiation of the Tohoku earthquake. Based upon the almost in-plane behavior of the rupture in its initial stage, 2D non-smooth spectral element dynamic simulations of the earthquake rupture propagation are performed including the non planar and kink geometry of the subduction interface, together with bi-material interfaces

  18. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidler, Rolf, E-mail: rsidler@gmail.com [Center for Research of the Terrestrial Environment, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Carcione, José M. [Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), Borgo Grotta Gigante 42c, 34010 Sgonico, Trieste (Italy); Holliger, Klaus [Center for Research of the Terrestrial Environment, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge–Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid–solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  19. Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface waves, and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐wave velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐wave propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface waves with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a 3D velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface waves and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.

  20. Numerical simulations of temperature, dehydration, and flow fields associated with subduction of the Cocos plate, and its relation to the occurrence of interplate seismic events in southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, N.; Ji, Y.; Yoshioka, S.; Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2016-12-01

    In southern Mexico, tectonic tremors mainly occur in the "flat slab region, and the last three SSEs in southern Mexico occurred in the shallower region. Besides, there are two seismic gaps of megathrust earthquakes in Guerrero and Oaxaca. To investigate generation mechanisms of megathrust earthquakes, tectonic tremors, and slow slip events (SSEs) in southern Mexico, we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of temperature and mantle flow associated with subduction of the Cocos plate, and estimated dehydrated water content from the subducting plate. Here we considered retreat of the Middle American trench initiating about 16 Ma as one of the generation mechanisms of the slab flattening. In our model, we introduced the trench retreat effect during only a certain period between 16 Ma and present in order to best fit the observed heat flow data (from Global Heat Flow Database) as well as Curie point depths defined by the 580 ° isotherm. Our preliminary results show that trench rollback has a strong influence on temperature distribution. Models with trench rollback induce a weaker mantle wedge convection cell compared with models with stationary trench. Other parameter that is currently investigated in this study is the rate of trench retreat.

  1. Thermal regime from bottom simulating reflectors along the N Ecuador - S Colombia margin: relation between tectonic segmentation, thermal variation and the limit of the seismic rupture zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, B.; Spence, G.; Collot, J.; Wang, K.; Ribodetti, A.

    2005-12-01

    In the North Ecuador South Columbian (NESC) convergent margin (0°N) three megathrust events, in 1942, 1958 and 1979, present rupture zones that abut one another. Multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection and bathymetric data acquired during the SISTEUR (2000) and AMADEUS (2005) cruises highlighted that the margin comprises four transverse segments (called, from south to north, the Esmeraldas, Manglares, Tumaco and Patia segments), each with clearly different tectonic and structural patterns. The central Manglares and Tumaco segments are separated by the newly discovered NW trending Manglares fault that matches the boundary between the 1958 and 1979 rupture zones. North of the fault, the fore-arc basin is shortened deformed and uplifted, while to the south the fore-arc basin, located landward of a prominent Outer Basement High (OBH), is widely subsiding and undeformed. Moreover, to the north of the Manglares fault, the underthrusting Nazca plate present an intense normal faulting is absent to the south. To investigate the relationships between seismogenesis and thermal structure along the plate boundary, we conducted thermal modelling constrained by sediment heat flow measurements and by heat flow derived from Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) on MCS lines collected during the SISTEUR and AMADEUS cruises. Just landward of the deformation front in the region of the Tumaco segment, a zone of anomalously low heat flow values is present and results in a thermal segmentation of the margin consistent with the tectonic segmentation. Finite-element thermal models carried out for each thermal segment show that: The along-strike heat flow variations are produced by changes in the age of the oceanic plate, the dip of the decollement and hydrothermal cooling due to the subduction of the strongly faulted part of the Nazca crust. The hypocenters for both the 1958 and 1979 earthquakes occurred at a depth on the interface where the temperature is ~160°C. For the seismogenic zone

  2. A Workflow for Simulation and Visualization Of Seismic Wave Propagation Using SeisSol, VisIt and Avizo

    KAUST Repository

    Passone,Luca

    2011-08-01

    Ground motion estimation and subsurface exploration are main research areas in computational seismology, they are fundamental for implementing earthquake engineering requirements and for modern subsurface reservoir assessment. In this study we propose a workflow for discretizing, simulating and visualizing near source ground motion due to earthquake rupture. For data generation we use an elastic wave equation solver called SeisSol based on the Discontinuous Galerkin formulation with Arbitrary high-order DERivatives (ADER-DG). SeisSol is capable of highly accurate treatment of any earthquake source characterization, occurring on geometrically complex fault systems embedded in geologically complicated earth structures. We then visualize the results with two tools: VisIt (“a free interactive parallel visualization and graphical analysis tool for viewing scientific data”) and Avizo (“The 3D Analysis Software for Scientific and Industrial data”). We investigate each approach, include our experiences from model generation to visualization in highly immersive environments and conclude with a set of general recommendations for earthquake visualization.

  3. High-order Staggered Finite-difference Numerical Simulation of While-drilling Seismic Wave Field%随钻地震波场高阶交错网格有限差分数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓瑞; 张亮

    2012-01-01

    The while-drilling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a new kind of geophysical prospecting techniques which uses the noise of drill vibration as its seismic source and receives signal by the wave detector deployed on the earth. The vibration of rock-drill is random and continuous, and the wave signal is weak. However, the noise in the well field is strong, and the waves of different times and seismic phases superpose and interfere with each other. As a result, these factors make the SNR of while-drilling seismic data too low and result in the complexity of wave field, in the meantime, make the data processing much more difficult. By using high-order staggered grid FD, it could simulate while-drilling seismic wave field with the different shotpoint depth and different offset distance from the first-order velocity-stress wave equations. Finally, the study on the spatial propagation regulation and characteristics of while-drilling seismic field is able to guide the processing and interpretation of practical while-drilling seismic data.%随钻VSP是利用钻头振动噪声作为震源,在地面布设检波器进行信号接收的一种新的物探技术.基于随钻地震波场的空间传播特征,从(一)阶速度-应力波动方程出发,利用高阶交错网格有限差分,模拟出不同炮点深度和不同偏移距情形的随钻地震波场,研究随钻地震波场的空间传播规律和特征.结果表明,数值模拟可以有效的解决现场试验周期长,费用高,地下结构未知因素多等问题,为随钻地震技术研究提供了一种高效的手段.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM. A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i initial compaction stage; (ii crushing stage; and (iii crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV, of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  5. SEISMIC GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091465 Cai Xuelin(College of Earth Sciences,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Cao Jiamin Preliminary Study on the 3-D Crust Structure for the Longmen Lithosphere and the Genesis of the Huge Wenchuan Earthquake,Sichuan Province,China(Journal of Chengdu University of Technology,ISSN1671-9727,CN51-1634/N,35(4),2008,p.357-365,8 illus.,39 refs.)Key words:deep-seated structures,large earthquakes,Longmenshan Fracture ZoneBased on a structural analysis of many seismic sounding profiles,there are two fault systems in Longmen collisional orogenic belt,Sichuan Province,China.They are both different obviously and correlative closely.One is shallow fault system composed mainly of brittle shear zones in surface crust,and the other is deep fault system composed mainly of crust-mantle ductile shear zones cutting Moho discontinuity.Based on the result of researching geological structure and seismic sounding profiles,

  6. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MAGNITUDE DEVIATION BEFORE AND AFTER SIMULATION IN HENAN DIGITAL SEISMIC NETWORK%河南数字测震台网仿真前后震级对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑培玲; 赵大鹏

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the deviation of the velocity magnitudes and simulated magnitudes are analyzed and compared by selecting data recorded by digital seismic network in Henan province from Jan. 2012 to April 2013. The results show that most of simulated magnitudes were bigger than velocity magnitudes, but the magnitude deviation is under 0.3 magnitude. Seismic network report couldn’t be used in the simulated magnitude. But catalogers and researchers can use the simulated magnitude.%对河南数字测震台网2012年1月-2013年4月记录到的80个地震事件,在震级方面分别做了仿真前和仿真后的对比分析,给出其偏差。结果表明:仿真后的震级多数大于仿真前的震级,但震级差均在0.3级以内。对于速报时可不采用仿真震级。但对于编目和研究人员可采用仿真震级。

  7. Integrated Tsunami Database: simulation and identification of seismic tsunami sources, 3D visualization and post-disaster assessment on the shore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivorot'ko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey; Marinin, Igor; Karas, Adel; Khidasheli, David

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important problems of tsunami investigation is the problem of seismic tsunami source reconstruction. Non-profit organization WAPMERR (http://wapmerr.org) has provided a historical database of alleged tsunami sources around the world that obtained with the help of information about seaquakes. WAPMERR also has a database of observations of the tsunami waves in coastal areas. The main idea of presentation consists of determining of the tsunami source parameters using seismic data and observations of the tsunami waves on the shore, and the expansion and refinement of the database of presupposed tsunami sources for operative and accurate prediction of hazards and assessment of risks and consequences. Also we present 3D visualization of real-time tsunami wave propagation and loss assessment, characterizing the nature of the building stock in cities at risk, and monitoring by satellite images using modern GIS technology ITRIS (Integrated Tsunami Research and Information System) developed by WAPMERR and Informap Ltd. The special scientific plug-in components are embedded in a specially developed GIS-type graphic shell for easy data retrieval, visualization and processing. The most suitable physical models related to simulation of tsunamis are based on shallow water equations. We consider the initial-boundary value problem in Ω := {(x,y) ?R2 : x ?(0,Lx ), y ?(0,Ly ), Lx,Ly > 0} for the well-known linear shallow water equations in the Cartesian coordinate system in terms of the liquid flow components in dimensional form Here ?(x,y,t) defines the free water surface vertical displacement, i.e. amplitude of a tsunami wave, q(x,y) is the initial amplitude of a tsunami wave. The lateral boundary is assumed to be a non-reflecting boundary of the domain, that is, it allows the free passage of the propagating waves. Assume that the free surface oscillation data at points (xm, ym) are given as a measured output data from tsunami records: fm(t) := ? (xm, ym,t), (xm

  8. SEISMIC DAMAGE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF TYPICAL RC FRAMES OF XUANKOU SCHOOL%漩口中学典型框架结构震害模拟与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉虎; 陆新征; 叶列平; 唐代远; 李易

    2011-01-01

    该文以汶川地震震中附近的漩口中学教学楼和办公楼框架结构震害为背景,对其进行了模拟分析.针对震害特征,提出了微观-宏观多尺度有限元分析模型,以更准确的模拟结构的实际震害.在此基础上,为提高计算分析效率,结合微观-宏观多尺度有限元分析模型,提出能考虑楼板影响和基础转动的改进宏观有限元分析模型.采用多尺度模型和改进的宏观模型,用弹塑性动力时程分析模拟了漩口中学教学楼和办公楼框架结构的倒塌过程,对其倒塌模式、倒塌机理及其影响因素进行了分析比较,找出了影响结构抗倒塌能力的关键部位,为改进框架结构抗震倒塌能力设计提供了参考.%The seismic damage of typical reinforced concrete (RC) frames based on the classroom buildings and office buildings of the Xuankou School, which are close to the epicenter of Wenchuan Earthquake, is simulated and analyzed. According to the seismic damage characters, a micro-macro multi-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to accurately simulate the seismic damage of the structures. Based on the multi-scale FE model, an improved macro FE model considering the influence of slabs and footing rotations is proposed to improve the computational efficiency. With the micro-macro multi-scale FE model and the improved macro FE model, the collapse process of classroom buildings and office buildings is simulated with elastic-plastic time-history analysis.By comparing the collapse modes and failure mechanisms of the structures, critical positions that influence seismic collapse resistance of a structure are found, which could be used for a reference for the improvement of seismic collapse prevention design of RC frame structures.

  9. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  10. Seismic Imaging of Sandbox Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddensiek, M. L.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    Analog sandbox simulations have been applied to study structural geological processes to provide qualitative and quantitative insights into the evolution of mountain belts and basins. These sandbox simulations provide either two-dimensional and dynamic or pseudo-three-dimensional and static information. To extend the dynamic simulations to three dimensions, we combine the analog sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modeling of these sandbox models. The long-term objective of this approach is to image seismic and seismological events of static and actively deforming 3D analog models. To achieve this objective, a small-scale seismic apparatus, composed of a water tank, a PC control unit including piezo-electric transducers, and a positioning system, was built for laboratory use. For the models, we use granular material such as sand and glass beads, so that the simulations can evolve dynamically. The granular models are required to be completely water saturated so that the sources and receivers are directly and well coupled to the propagating medium. Ultrasonic source frequencies (˜500 kHz) corresponding to wavelengths ˜5 times the grain diameter are necessary to be able to resolve small scale structures. In three experiments of different two-layer models, we show that (1) interfaces of layers of granular materials can be resolved depending on the interface preparation more than on the material itself. Secondly, we show that the dilation between the sand grains caused by a string that has been pulled through the grains, simulating a shear zone, causes a reflection that can be detected in the seismic data. In the third model, we perform a seismic reflection survey across a model that contains both the prepared interface and a shear zone, and apply 2D-seismic reflection processing to improve the resolution. Especially for more complex models, the clarity and penetration depth need to be improved to study the evolution of geological structures in dynamic

  11. Seismic failure modes and seismic safety of Hardfill dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun XIONG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on microscopic damage theory and the finite element method, and using the Weibull distribution to characterize the random distribution of the mechanical properties of materials, the seismic response of a typical Hardfill dam was analyzed through numerical simulation during the earthquakes with intensities of 8 degrees and even greater. The seismic failure modes and failure mechanism of the dam were explored as well. Numerical results show that the Hardfill dam remains at a low stress level and undamaged or slightly damaged during an earthquake with an intensity of 8 degrees. During overload earthquakes, tensile cracks occur at the dam surfaces and extend to inside the dam body, and the upstream dam body experiences more serious damage than the downstream dam body. Therefore, under the seismic conditions, the failure pattern of the Hardfill dam is the tensile fracture of the upstream regions and the dam toe. Compared with traditional gravity dams, Hardfill dams have better seismic performance and greater seismic safety.

  12. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes. Currently, the seismic value chain paradigm is in a feed-forward mode. Modern seismic data now have the potential to yield the best images in terms of spatial resolution, amplitude accuracy, and incre...

  13. Analysing seismic scattering characteristics of complex seabed by using the boundary-element simulation method%应用边界元模拟方法分析复杂海底地震散射特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绪宣; 于更新; 符力耘; 温书亮; 管西竹

    2011-01-01

    边界元法对随机起伏的复杂海底界面具有良好的适应性.比较了边界元法与有限差分法对复杂断层模型的模拟精度,并验证了边界元法的有效性.利用边界元法对复杂海底模型进行波场模拟,反映起伏海底界面对地震波传播的影响;利用统计参数描述复杂海底地貌特征,将崎岖海底界面划分为快、慢变化和强、弱起伏等4种特征类型.根据不同统计参数的选择建立崎岖海底理论模型,利用边界元法对不同类型的崎岖海底理论模型进行模拟研究,同时与实际海底资料相对比,分析了复杂海底地震散射特征.此项研究成果可为复杂海底地区目标导向地震观测系统设计和采集参数优化提供理论依据.%The boundary-element method ( BEM) has a good adaptability for simulating irregularly rough and complex seabed. The simulation accuracy of BEM for a complex fault model was compared with that of the finite-difference method, and the effectiveness of BEM was confirmed. BEM can be used to conduct wave simulation of rough seabed models, reflecting the impacts of rough seabed on seismic wave propagation. The statistical parameters were used to describe complex seabed topography, and then four types of rough seabed interface can be identified, i. e. fast lateral change, slow lateral change, strong vertical relief and weak vertical relief. The theoretical models of rough seabed can be build by selecting various statistical parameters, and BEM was used to make simulation of different theoretical models of rough seabed. Simultaneously, some actual seabed data was compared and the seismic scattering characteristics of complex seabed were analyzed. These results will provide some theoretical foundations for the seismic acquisition design of complex seabed and the optimization of seismic acquisition parameters.

  14. Seismic imaging and evaluation of channels modeled by boolean approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinola, M.; Aggio, A. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1999-07-01

    The seismic method attempt to image the subsurface architecture and has been able to significantly contribute to detect areal and vertical changes in rock properties. This work presents a seismic imaging study of channel objects generated using the boolean technique. Three channels having different thicknesses were simulated, using the same width, sinuosity and direction. A velocity model was constructed in order to allow seismic contrasts between the interior of channels and the embedding rock. To examine the seismic response for different channel thicknesses, a 3D ray tracing with a normal incident point survey was performed. The three channels were resolved and the way the seismic could image them was studied. (author)

  15. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  16. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  17. 沙漠区起伏地表地震波正演模拟与资料处理%Relief surface seismic wave forward simulation in desert area and data processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可洋; 吴沛熹; 张德新; 杨微

    2014-01-01

    针对沙漠区的沙丘近地表条件,开展了起伏地表地震波正演模拟与资料处理分析.给出用于起伏地表的地震波正演模拟相关数值算法及关键参数.同时将随机孔洞介质用于刻画沙丘的松散地层结构,地表以上部分充填空气速度,并按沙漠区地震观测方式进行数据采集.以沙漠区实际地震资料为例,并结合理论模型进行地震数据处理和波场模拟分析.研究表明,沙漠区沙丘的松散结构是降低叠前道集和叠加剖面信噪比的主要原因,利用叠前时间偏移方法中加权绕射叠加功能可有效提高成像剖面和共反射点道集的信噪比,这对于沙漠区起伏地表实际地震资料处理具有一定的借鉴意义.%Considering the complex sand dune near-surface conditions in desert area,we carry out the forward simulation and data processing study.We present seismic wave numerical simulating algorithm and key parameters used for relief surface case.We introduce the random cave medium to depict the incompact sand dune structure,fill the practical air velocity above the surface,and simulate the seismic data acquisition in desert area.We take practical seismic data in desert area as example and use theoretical model to do the data processing and wave field analysis.The results show that the sand dunes' incompact structure in desert area is the main cause for the low S/N ratio in the pre-stack gather and stacking section.The pre-stack time migration method effectively improves the quality of the migration section and common reflection point gather by the weighted diffraction summation function,which provides certain significance for relief surface practical seismic data processing in desert area.

  18. Studies on seismic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海明; 陈晓非

    2003-01-01

    The development of seismic wave study in China in the past four years is reviewed. The discussion is divided into several aspects, including seismic wave propagation in laterally homogeneous media, laterally heterogeneous media, anisotropic and porous media, surface wave and seismic wave inversion, and seismic wave study in prospecting and logging problems. Important projects in the current studies on seismic wave is suggested as the development of high efficient numerical methods, and applying them to the studies of excitation and propagation of seismic waves in complex media and strong ground motion, which will form a foundation for refined earthquake hazard analysis and prediction.

  19. Seismic response of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváč Z.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling and computer simulation of the seismic response of fuel assembly components. The seismic response is investigated by numerical integration method in time domain. The seismic excitation is given by two horizontal and one vertical synthetic accelerograms at the level of the pressure vessel seating. Dynamic response of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly is caused by spatial motion of the support plates in the reactor core investigated on the reactor global model. The modal synthesis method with condensation is used for calculation of the fuel assembly component displacements and speeds on the level of the spacer grid cells.

  20. Study on attribute characterization for reservoir dynamic monitoring by seismic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Study on characterizing reservoir parameters dynamic variations by time-lapse seismic attributes is the theoretical basis for effectively distinguishing reservoir parameters variations and conducting time-lapse seismic interpretation,and it is also a key step for time-lapse seismic application in real oil fields. Based on the rock physical model of unconsolidated sandstone,the different effects of oil saturation and effective pressure variations on seismic P-wave and S-wave velocities are calculated and analyzed. Using numerical simulation on decoupled wave equations,the responses of seismic amplitude with different offsets to reservoir oil saturation variations are analyzed,pre-stack time-lapse seismic attributes differences for oil saturation and effective pressure variations of P-P wave and P-S converted wave are calculated,and time-lapse seismic AVO (Amplitude Versus Offset) response rules of P-P wave and P-S converted wave to effective pressure and oil saturation variations are compared. The theoretical modeling study shows that it is feasible to distinguish different reservoir parameters dynamic variations by pre-stack time-lapse seismic information,including pre-stack time-lapse seismic attributes and AVO information,which has great potential in improving time-lapse seismic interpreta-tion precision. It also shows that the time-lapse seismic response mechanism study on objective oil fields is especially important in establishing effective time-lapse seismic data process and interpreta-tion scheme.

  1. Seismic response of steel suspension bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Astaneh-Asl, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01

    Performing accurate, realistic numerical simulations of the seismic response of long-span bridges presents a significant challenge to the fields of earthquake engineering and seismology. Suspension bridges in particular represent some of the largest and most important man-made structures and ensuring the seismic integrity of these mega-structures is contingent on accurate estimations of earthquake ground motions and accurate computational simulations of the structure/foundation system response. A cooperative, multi-year research project between the Univ. of California and LLNL was recently initiated to study engineering and seismological issues essential for simulating the response of major structures. Part of this research project is focused on the response of the long-span bridges with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge serving as a case study. This paper reports on the status of this multi-disciplinary research project with emphasis on the numerical simulation of the transient seismic response of the Bay Bridge.

  2. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes.

  3. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes. Cur

  4. Robotization in Seismic Acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquière, G.; Berkhout, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of sources and detectors in the seismic method follows "Moore’s Law of seismic data acquisition", i.e., it increases approximately by a factor of 10 every 10 years. Therefore automation is unavoidable, leading to robotization of seismic data acquisition. Recently, we introduced a new

  5. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  6. 福建台网速度震级与仿真震级差异分析%Difference research on velocity magnitude and simulated magnitude of Fujian Seismic Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡杏辉; 陈惠芳; 王旭

    2011-01-01

    Based on ML≥1.0 earthquakes recorded by Fujian Seismic Network, we conducted a statistical analysis on the velocity magnitudes and simulated magnitude deviation. The magnitude deviation between two types of magnitudes and correlation coefficient are primarily gotten. We also analyze the causation to magnitude discrepancy forming. This result is useful as a reference for magnitude correction of Fujian Seismic Networks.%选用福建地震台网“十五”观测系统运行以来记录的ML≥1.0地震资料,对测定的速度震级和仿真震级进行了震级偏差统计分析,初步得出两种震级偏差值及相关系数,并分析了震级差异形成原因,为福建地震台网震级的测定提供参考.

  7. Stochastic Reservoir Characterization Constrained by Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eide, Alfhild Lien

    1999-07-01

    In order to predict future production of oil and gas from a petroleum reservoir, it is important to have a good description of the reservoir in terms of geometry and physical parameters. This description is used as input to large numerical models for the fluid flow in the reservoir. With increased quality of seismic data, it is becoming possible to extend their use from the study of large geologic structures such as seismic horizons to characterization of the properties of the reservoir between the horizons. Uncertainties because of the low resolution of seismic data can be successfully handled by means of stochastic modeling, and spatial statistics can provide tools for interpolation and simulation of reservoir properties not completely resolved by seismic data. This thesis deals with stochastic reservoir modeling conditioned to seismic data and well data. Part I presents a new model for stochastic reservoir characterization conditioned to seismic traces. Part II deals with stochastic simulation of high resolution impedance conditioned to measured impedance. Part III develops a new stochastic model for calcite cemented objects in a sandstone background; it is a superposition of a marked point model for the calcites and a continuous model for the background.

  8. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  9. 地震动力作用触发的斜坡崩滑效应模拟%Numerical Simulation of Collapsing and Sliding Response of Slope Triggered by Seismic Dynamic Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔芳鹏; 许强; 谭儒蛟; 殷跃平

    2011-01-01

    A simulation was carried out on initial collapsingsliding and a subsequent running out process of Wangjiayan Landslide in Beichuan County during the Wenchuan Earthquake triggered by single and combined action with time difference, regionality and spatial heterogeneity of primary and secondary seismic waves based on discrete element method by taking into the consideration the fact that vertical ground motion was still evident in post-earthquake field geological investigation, and formation mechanism and key controlling factors of slope collapsing and sliding under seismic load were determined, which was different with the traditional dynamic response analysis based on a consideration of horizontal seismic load.The result shows that initial collapsing and sliding of the slope are triggered by combined action of vertical and horizontal tension, which plays a dominant role,of primary seismic wave, whereas a subsequent collision and debris flow of slope mass fractured are triggered by combined action of primary and secondary seismic wave.On the other hand, single action of primary seismic wave is the key controlling factor inducing the slope initial collapsing and sliding, and the topography near the slope is the key controlling factor leading to collision and debris flow of the slope mass fractured in later process.%依据震后实地调查中竖向地震力作用十分明显的现象,突破传统斜坡动力反应分析中仅考虑水平地震力作用的局限,运用离散元数值模拟技术,对北川王家岩斜坡体在具地域性和空间非均质性的地震纵横波时差耦合作用下产生崩滑破坏的动力全过程进行了模拟,确定了地震动力作用下该斜坡体崩滑破坏的形成机制及主控因素.研究表明:该斜坡体的初期崩滑破坏是受到纵波产生的水平和竖向拉裂耦合作用所致,且以水平拉裂作用占优,而后期的抛射及碎屑流动则是受到纵横波耦合作用所致;即纵波的个体作用是

  10. Angola Seismicity MAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  11. Reassessment of Seismic Design and Noise Simulation using Finite Element Calculation of the Condensate Storage Tank of Cofrentes NPP according to standard API-650 11th Ed; Reevaluacion del diseno Sismico mediante Simulacion de Fluidos y Calculo por Elementos Finitos del Deposito del Almacenamiento de Condensado de Central Nuclear de Cofrentes conforme a la norma API-650 11th Ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarti Fernandez, F.; Gavilan Moreno, C.; Paez Ortega, E.

    2012-07-01

    There have been several dynamic simulations in which I analyzed: fluid-structure interaction effect of the wave, studying stress, vibration modes and possible effects of structural instability. After this process to make the changes in the tank to comply with the new rules and updated seismic conditions were designed. were performed.

  12. A Gradient Regularization Method in Crosswell Seismic Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shoudong

    2006-01-01

    Crosswell seismic tomography can be used to study the lateral variation of reservoirs, reservoir properties and the dynamic movement of fluids. In view of the instability of crosswell seismic tomography, the gradient method was improved by introducing regularization, and a gradient regularization method in presented in this paper. This method was verified by processing numerical simulation data and physical model data.

  13. Seismic waveform modeling over cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    With the fast growing computational technologies, numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation achieved huge successes. Obtaining the synthetic waveforms through numerical simulation receives an increasing amount of attention from seismologists. However, computational seismology is a data-intensive research field, and the numerical packages usually come with a steep learning curve. Users are expected to master considerable amount of computer knowledge and data processing skills. Training users to use the numerical packages, correctly access and utilize the computational resources is a troubled task. In addition to that, accessing to HPC is also a common difficulty for many users. To solve these problems, a cloud based solution dedicated on shallow seismic waveform modeling has been developed with the state-of-the-art web technologies. It is a web platform integrating both software and hardware with multilayer architecture: a well designed SQL database serves as the data layer, HPC and dedicated pipeline for it is the business layer. Through this platform, users will no longer need to compile and manipulate various packages on the local machine within local network to perform a simulation. By providing users professional access to the computational code through its interfaces and delivering our computational resources to the users over cloud, users can customize the simulation at expert-level, submit and run the job through it.

  14. Horizontal Acoustic Barriers for Protection from Seismic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Kuznetsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic idea of a seismic barrier is to protect an area occupied by a building or a group of buildings from seismic waves. Depending on nature of seismic waves that are most probable in a specific region, different kinds of seismic barriers can be suggested. Herein, we consider a kind of a seismic barrier that represents a relatively thin surface layer that prevents surface seismic waves from propagating. The ideas for these barriers are based on one Chadwick's result concerning nonpropagation condition for Rayleigh waves in a clamped half-space, and Love's theorem that describes condition of nonexistence for Love waves. The numerical simulations reveal that to be effective the length of the horizontal barriers should be comparable to the typical wavelength.

  15. Simplified seismic risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellissetti, Manuel; Klapp, Ulrich [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Within the context of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) for nuclear power plants (NPP's), seismic risk assessment has the purpose to demonstrate that the contribution of seismic events to overall risk is not excessive. The most suitable vehicle for seismic risk assessment is a full scope seismic PSA (SPSA), in which the frequency of core damage due to seismic events is estimated. An alternative method is represented by seismic margin assessment (SMA), which aims at showing sufficient margin between the site-specific safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) and the actual capacity of the plant. Both methods are based on system analysis (fault-trees and event-trees) and hence require fragility estimates for safety relevant systems, structures and components (SSC's). If the seismic conditions at a specific site of a plant are not very demanding, then it is reasonable to expect that the risk due to seismic events is low. In such cases, the cost-benefit ratio for performing a full scale, site-specific SPSA or SMA will be excessive, considering the ultimate objective of seismic risk analysis. Rather, it will be more rational to rely on a less comprehensive analysis, used as a basis for demonstrating that the risk due to seismic events is not excessive. The present paper addresses such a simplified approach to seismic risk assessment which is used in AREVA to: - estimate seismic risk in early design stages, - identify needs to extend the design basis, - define a reasonable level of seismic risk analysis Starting from a conservative estimate of the overall plant capacity, in terms of the HCLPF (High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure), and utilizing a generic value for the variability, the seismic risk is estimated by convolution of the hazard and the fragility curve. Critical importance is attached to the selection of the plant capacity in terms of the HCLPF, without performing extensive fragility calculations of seismically relevant SSC's. A suitable basis

  16. Numerical simulation of multi-material ALE method for diversion tunnel seismic response%输水隧道地震响应的多物质ALE数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼云锋; 杨颜志; 金先龙

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the seismic response of shallow diversion tunnel considering sloshing amplitude of the water, an analytical model of tunnel-soil-fluid is proposed taking account of nonlinear material behavior of soil, viscoelastic artificial boundary, the effective rigidity ratios and fluid-solid coupling. Firstly, the hoop, radial and axial structural rigidities of tunnel lining are obtained by numerical rigidity reduction tests. Furthermore, the orthotropic material is used in tunnel lining model. As an application, the seismic responses of a project of large-diameter parallel diversion tunnels, which is one of the key projects in Shanghai, are calculated using the multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. The equivalent density method is then used to validate the established simulation model. Finally, two seismic input modes, the uniform and nonuniform excitations, are involved in the seismic analyses of the tunnel-soil-fluid system. The numerical results show that under horizontal earthquake excitation the influence of fluid on tunnel's displacement is small;however, the influences of fluid on both stress and deformation of the section are great. The tunnel moment are always focused on the position of the tunnel 45° cross-hatched. Comparing with the uniform seismic input, the results show that the nonuniform excitation can remarkably increase both displacement and deformation responses of the tunnel.%为研究浅埋输水隧道内部流体对隧道地震响应的影响,考虑黏弹性人工边界、土壤的非线性、隧道结构刚度有效率及流-固耦合作用,建立了双线隧道-土体-流体相互耦合作用的力学模型。通过刚度折减试验得到衬砌环环向、径向、轴向刚度,进而引入正交各向异性连续材料作为衬砌材料模型。采用基于任意拉格朗日-欧拉(ALE)描述法的流-固耦合方法,对上海某大直径双线输水隧道在流体作用下的地震响应进行了

  17. Reconstruction of a 2D seismic wavefield by seismic gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We reconstructed a 2D seismic wavefield and obtained its propagation properties by using the seismic gradiometry method together with dense observations of the Hi-net seismograph network in Japan. The seismic gradiometry method estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients at any location from a discrete station record by using a Taylor series approximation. From the spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, the properties of a propagating wave packet, including the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern can be obtained. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary conditions, the 2D vector elastic wavefield can be decomposed into divergence and rotation components. First, as a feasibility test, we performed an analysis with a synthetic seismogram dataset computed by a numerical simulation for a realistic 3D medium and the actual Hi-net station layout. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives were very well-reproduced for period bands longer than 25 s. Applications to a real large earthquake showed that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield were well reconstructed, along with slowness vector. The slowness of the reconstructed wavefield showed a clear contrast between body and surface waves and regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation, possibly owing to scattering. Slowness vectors together with divergence and rotation decomposition are expected to be useful for determining constituents of observed wavefields in inhomogeneous media.

  18. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, N M

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  19. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  20. Numerical Simulation Analysis of Seismic of Frame Structure on Hill Terrain%陡坎地形框架结构抗震数值模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旭鹏; 翁维素

    2016-01-01

    In recent year,earthquakes with high magnitude frequently occurred in such areas as Wen-chuan,Ya’an,Yushu in china,which are similar in mountainous terrain.Therefore,building seis-mic structure increasingly aroused our concern,In this paper,the influence of hill topography on building seismic structure in shallow mountains is studied.The research is mainly as follows:mod-eling was built by the ANSYS software,through which the cooperative effects of a ten layer of frame structure-hill system were calculated.Firstly,dynamic characteristics analysis of soil-struc-ture interaction and the rigid foundation assumption conditions are simply compared.Secondly, Hill-Soil-Structure Interaction(referred to HSSI)and Soil-Structure-Interaction(referred to SSI) are further analyzed,including structural modal analysis(vibration mode,cycle),the time history analysis(such as displacement,internal force and acceleration),and so on.Through the research of Hill-Soil-Structure interaction,each factor is taken into consideration,giving key technology meas-ures for seismic structure in shallow mountain areas,providing reference for such structure re-search.%近年来我国汶川、雅安、玉树等地区接连发生高震级的地震,而这些地震区域均有类似的多山地形,浅山地区建筑结构抗震日益引起人们的关注,进而拟对浅山地区中陡坎地形对建筑结构抗震影响进行研究。研究内容主要包括:通过有限元 ANSYS数值仿真建模,对一个10层的混凝土框架结构-陡坎地形相互作用进行数值模拟计算。首先进行土-结构相互作用与刚性地基假定情况下动力特性的简单对比分析;然后将陡坎-土-结构相互作用(Hill-Soil-Struc-ture Interaction,简称 HSSI)与土-结构相互作用(Soil-Structure-Interaction,简称 SSI)进一步的分析对上部结构的动力响应,包括进行结构的模态分析(振型、周期)、时程分析(位移、内力、加速度

  1. A NEW INVERSION METHOD OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Time-Lapse Seismic improves oil recovery ratio by dynamic reservoir monitoring. Because of the large number of seismic explorations in the process of time-lapse seismic inversion, traditional methods need plenty of inversion calculations which cost high computational works. The method is therefore inefficient. In this paper, in order to reduce the repeating computations in traditional, a new time-lapse seismic inversion method is put forward. Firstly a homotopy-regularization method is proposed for the first time inversion. Secondly, with the first time inversion results as the initial value of following model, a model of the second time inversion is rebuilt by analyzing the characters of time-lapse seismic and localized inversion method is designed by using the model. Finally, through simulation, the comparison between traditional method and the new scheme is given. Our simulation results show that the new scheme could save the algorithm computations greatly.

  2. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  3. Imaging seismic reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Root, Timotheus Johannes Petrus Maria

    2011-01-01

    The goal of reflection seismic imaging is making images of the Earth subsurface using surface measurements of reflected seismic waves. Besides the position and orientation of subsurface reflecting interfaces it is a challenge to recover the size or amplitude of the discontinuities. We investigate tw

  4. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (models may need improvement.

  5. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2-D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2017-01-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  6. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  7. Seismic texture classification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinther, R.

    1997-12-31

    The seismic texture classification method, is a seismic attribute that can both recognize the general reflectivity styles and locate variations from these. The seismic texture classification performs a statistic analysis for the seismic section (or volume) aiming at describing the reflectivity. Based on a set of reference reflectivities the seismic textures are classified. The result of the seismic texture classification is a display of seismic texture categories showing both the styles of reflectivity from the reference set and interpolations and extrapolations from these. The display is interpreted as statistical variations in the seismic data. The seismic texture classification is applied to seismic sections and volumes from the Danish North Sea representing both horizontal stratifications and salt diapers. The attribute succeeded in recognizing both general structure of successions and variations from these. Also, the seismic texture classification is not only able to display variations in prospective areas (1-7 sec. TWT) but can also be applied to deep seismic sections. The seismic texture classification is tested on a deep reflection seismic section (13-18 sec. TWT) from the Baltic Sea. Applied to this section the seismic texture classification succeeded in locating the Moho, which could not be located using conventional interpretation tools. The seismic texture classification is a seismic attribute which can display general reflectivity styles and deviations from these and enhance variations not found by conventional interpretation tools. (LN)

  8. Seismic wave field simulation of several typical geological models%几种典型地质模型的地震波场数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐佼; 张智; 董超; 陈立波; ; 李飞

    2014-01-01

    Stability condition and astringency of difference equation,the elimination of dispersion are important in seismic wave numerical modeling.From the factors in modeling result,based on two-dimensional acoustic wave equation,the seismic wave numerical modeling is shown by finite difference method with two-order ab-sorbing boundary condition in the wave-field of heterogeneous media and inhomogeneous media.By theory cal-culation and finite difference wave equation numerical modeling in the heterogeneous model,the strata model, the fault model and the anticline model,this method can achieve ideal results if the parameters are reasonable. Through the finite difference method,the wave equation is derived by Taylor series,which makes inherent errors in scattering the wave equation.The low-order difference method may increase the numerical dispersion,and vice versa,the high-order difference method leads to small errors and exact solutions.Meanwhile,larger spatial sampling interval and sampling time interval are better in the calculation rate,but may decrease the correspond-ing numerical dispersion.So consideration must be given to both the accuracy and speed in the finite difference wave equation numerical modeling.%在地震波场数值模拟中,边界条件的选取、差分方程的稳定性条件和收敛性以及频散的消除对于模拟质量至关重要。在综合考虑这些影响因素的基础上,对二维声波方程采用有限差分方法,利用二阶吸收边界条件,模拟了均匀模型、层状模型、断层模型、背斜模型等几种典型介质模型的地震波场。模拟结果揭示了参数的选取对模拟精度的影响程度。通过泰勒级数展开推导得到有限差分波动方程,造成离散的波动方程固有误差的存在。差分阶数越低,频散越严重;相反,有限差分的误差就越小,就越接近于精确解;此外,空间和时间采样间隔越大,会加快计算速度,同时可能会产

  9. Simulation of effect of fault structure heterogeneity on seismicity using cellular automata model%断层结构非均匀性对地震活动性影响的细胞自动机模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锰; 杨峰

    2011-01-01

    A 2-D cellular automata fault model with 81×81 cells was constructed to test its seismicity performance. In a series of tests 4 kinds of fault strength heterogeneity and 6 different strength geometrical distributions were taken. With the model simulation we analyzed how the fault structure heterogeneity affects macroscopic fault failure behavior and generated seismic sequence type. The results show that with increasing degree of heterogeneity the macroscopic deformation and fracture process present from brittle to plastic behavior, and produce 3 different types of seismic sequence, I.e. , main shock type, foreshock-main shock-aftershock type and swarm type. In the same time, with increasing fault strength heterogeneity the fracture size distribution more regularly follows the G-R relation. Besides, temporarily the events occur in a certain random process, that is, small events appear randomly, medium size events occur in clusters and large ones emerge quasi-periodically. The event clustering and quasi-periodic occurrences become less significant with the fault heterogeneity increasing. It is also found that the randomness of structural geometric variation may affect characteristics of seismic sequences, but the difference in randomness becomes weaker as degree of heterogeneity increases.%基于断层强度分布的非均匀性,构建了由81×81个细胞单元组成的4种不同匀质度及其各自6种不同随机构型共计24个非均匀二维单断层模型样本,并通过设计的细胞自动机模拟程序,在保持其它模拟参数不变的条件下对它们进行了模拟试验.研究结果表明,随着断层结构非匀质度的增加,其宏观变形破坏行为由相对脆性向塑性变化;地震序列类型依次表现出主震型、前震-主震-余震型和震群型;震级分布表现出非均匀性依次减小;地震发生在时间上表现为一种确定性的随机过程,即小震随机、中强地震丛集和大震准周期的特点.此

  10. Numerical Simulation of Borehole Seismic Scattered Wave Imaging for the Detection of Underground Obstacles%地下障碍物探测井中地震散射波成像数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伍; 曾来; 司永峰; 沈恩来

    2012-01-01

      井中地震具有多波接收、高精度、高分辨率、能量传播距离短、接近探测目标、避开低速带等优点,在工程中得到了越来越广泛的应用。地震散射波是由地下三维不均匀体引起的地震波的变化,因此散射波成像特征与不均匀体分布情况密切相关。采用声波方程有限差分法对城市地下不均匀体如桩基、深埋管道等的散射波成像特征进行了数值模拟和分析;根据理论模拟给出了多种探测方式,并讨论了各方式的适用条件及应注意的问题。为城市地下空间开发中地下障碍物探测提供了理论指导。%  Borehole seismic imaging has been widely applied in a variety of engineering projects, and its advantages include multi-wave receiving, accuracy, high resolution, a short energy transfer distance, ease of use, and the avoidance of low-speed zones. Scattered seismic waves are generated when the original waves pass through subsurface 3D inhomogeneous layers, and the imaging characteristics of such scattered waves are closely related to the characteristics of the inhomogeneous body. This paper discusses the numerical simulation and analysis of the imaging features of scattered waves from typical inhomogeneous bodies in urban underground spaces (e.g., piles and deep-buried tubes) by applying the finite difference method to the acoustic equation. Several detection methods are used in the theoretical simulations, with the relevant conditions and other important points highlighted for each method, and we present theoretical guidance for detecting underground obstructions in urban developments.

  11. The Seismic Wavefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, B. L. N.

    2002-12-01

    The two volumes of The Seismic Wavefield are a comprehensive guide to the understanding of seismograms in terms of physical propagation processes within the Earth. The focus is on the observation of earthquakes and man-made sources on all scales, for both body waves and surface waves. Volume I provides a general introduction and a development of the theoretical background for seismic waves. Volume II looks at the way in which observed seismograms relate to the propagation processes. Volume II also discusses local and regional seismic events, global wave propagation, and the three-dimensional Earth.

  12. Identifying spatial and temporal variations in seismicity in eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiampo, K. F.; Atkinson, G. M.; Fereidoni, A.; Bhattacharya, P.; Cho, N.; Kazemian, J.; Vincent, P.; Gonzalez, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Natural earthquake fault systems are highly heterogeneous in space; inhomogeneities occur because of the varying internal structures and material strengths that dissipate stress differently. However, because analysis of the actual earthquake fault system remains incomplete due to the inherent difficulty in sampling the solid Earth (Richter, 1958; Kanamori, 1981; Geller et al., 1997), much of the recent research in statistical seismology has centered on investigating the variety of spatial and temporal patterns that exist in local and regional data. In particular, in recent years a combination of theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and seismicity data analysis has established the link between variations in seismicity rates and the dynamics of the underlying stress field (Dieterich, 1994; Dieterich et al., 2002; Toda et al., 2002; Rundle et al., 2002; Tiampo et al., 2002, 2006; Schorlemmer and Wiemer, 2005). However, this research has predominantly focused on tectonically-active regions with a relatively high rate of background seismicity. Here we present new work that quantifies seismicity rate changes in the intraplate region of eastern Canada in order to identify spatial and temporal variations in local and regional stress (Tiampo et al, 2002, 2006). Although stable eastern North America generally has much lower seismicity than plate boundary regions, there are areas of substantial seismicity and earthquake hazard. The bulk of the eastern Canadian seismicity is concentrated in both the lower Saint Lawrence seismic zone, downriver from Québec City and the Charlevoix seismic zone to the west of Québec City. Although Mazzotti and Adams (2005) estimate that seismic strain rates in most of eastern Canada are about 10-13 to 10-11/yr, exceptions to these low strain rates can be found in these regions of higher seismic activation. These seismically active zones generally are associated with large lithospheric-scale paleotectonic geologic features and this strong

  13. Research on seismic stress triggering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万永革; 吴忠良; 周公威; 黄静; 秦立新

    2002-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews basic theory of seismic stress triggering. Recent development on seismic stress triggering has been reviewed in the views of seismic static and dynamic stress triggering, application of viscoelastic model in seismic stress triggering, the relation between earthquake triggering and volcanic eruption or explosion, other explanation of earthquake triggering, etc. And some suggestions for further study on seismic stress triggering in near future are given.

  14. Reproducibility in Seismic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Verdejo O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of exploration seismology, there is interest at national level of integrating reproducibility in applied, educational and research activities related to seismic processing and imaging. This reproducibility implies the description and organization of the elements involved in numerical experiments. Thus, a researcher, teacher or student can study, verify, repeat, and modify them independently. In this work, we document and adapt reproducibility in seismic processing and imaging to spread this concept and its benefits, and to encourage the use of open source software in this area within our academic and professional environment. We present an enhanced seismic imaging example, of interest in both academic and professional environments, using Mexican seismic data. As a result of this research, we prove that it is possible to assimilate, adapt and transfer technology at low cost, using open source software and following a reproducible research scheme.

  15. Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Lavialle, Olivier; Germain, Christian; Donias, Marc; Guillon, Sebastien; Keskes, Naamen; Berthoumieu, Yannick

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the denoising and enhancing of 3-D reflection seismic data. We propose a pre-processing step based on a non linear diffusion filtering leading to a better detection of seismic faults. The non linear diffusion approaches are based on the definition of a partial differential equation that allows us to simplify the images without blurring relevant details or discontinuities. Computing the structure tensor which provides information on the local orientation of the geological layers, we propose to drive the diffusion along these layers using a new approach called SFPD (Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion). In SFPD, the eigenvalues of the tensor are fixed according to a confidence measure that takes into account the regularity of the local seismic structure. Results on both synthesized and real 3-D blocks show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  16. Seismic fault preserving diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavialle, Olivier; Pop, Sorin; Germain, Christian; Donias, Marc; Guillon, Sebastien; Keskes, Naamen; Berthoumieu, Yannick

    2007-02-01

    This paper focuses on the denoising and enhancing of 3-D reflection seismic data. We propose a pre-processing step based on a non-linear diffusion filtering leading to a better detection of seismic faults. The non-linear diffusion approaches are based on the definition of a partial differential equation that allows us to simplify the images without blurring relevant details or discontinuities. Computing the structure tensor which provides information on the local orientation of the geological layers, we propose to drive the diffusion along these layers using a new approach called SFPD (Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion). In SFPD, the eigenvalues of the tensor are fixed according to a confidence measure that takes into account the regularity of the local seismic structure. Results on both synthesized and real 3-D blocks show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  17. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  18. Assessment of seismic design response factors of concrete wall buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwafy, Aman

    2011-03-01

    To verify the seismic design response factors of high-rise buildings, five reference structures, varying in height from 20- to 60-stories, were selected and designed according to modern design codes to represent a wide range of concrete wall structures. Verified fiber-based analytical models for inelastic simulation were developed, considering the geometric nonlinearity and material inelasticity of the structural members. The ground motion uncertainty was accounted for by employing 20 earthquake records representing two seismic scenarios, consistent with the latest understanding of the tectonic setting and seismicity of the selected reference region (UAE). A large number of Inelastic Pushover Analyses (IPAs) and Incremental Dynamic Collapse Analyses (IDCAs) were deployed for the reference structures to estimate the seismic design response factors. It is concluded that the factors adopted by the design code are adequately conservative. The results of this systematic assessment of seismic design response factors apply to a wide variety of contemporary concrete wall buildings with various characteristics.

  19. Seismic metamaterial: how to shake friends and influence waves?

    CERN Document Server

    Brûlé, Stéphane; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nano-meter scale have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics, with applications ranging from periodic structures disallowing light and sound propagation at stop band frequencies, to subwavelength focussing and cloaking with metamaterials. Here, we present the description of a seismic test held on a soil structured at the meter scale using vibrocompaction probes. The most simplistic way to interact with a seismic wave is to modify the global properties of the medium, acting on the soil density and then on the wave velocity. The main concept is then to reduce the amplification of seismic waves at the free surface, called site effects in earthquake engineering. However, an alternative way to counteract the seismic signal is by modifying the distribution of seismic energy thanks to a metamaterial made of a grid of vertical, cylindrical and empty inclusions bored in the initial soil, in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate mo...

  20. 数据采集系统在地震模拟振动台试验中的应用%Application of Data Acquisition System in Shaking Table Tests for the Seismic Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦彪; 钟静

    2013-01-01

    An application of Data acquisition system in shaking table tests for the seismic simulation were research in the paper based on circuitous philosophy. Switching elements of sensors were made and worked normally. Modal testing were presented on shear walls with kinds of structure. The digital compensation feedback method was used for reproducing earthquake waves, the natural vibration frequency, the horizontal and vertical acceleration response were studied. By data analyzing and processing and camparising the test results, the strengthening method on shear walls were proved correct.%在数据采集系统的电路原理基础上,将其应用于地震模拟振动台试验中,并根据需要制作了传感器的转接元件,验证了其可靠性。对不同结构的剪切墙进行了模态试验,在试验方法上采用数字迭代反馈技术,精确再现了地震波,通过试验对结构自振频率、水平和垂直加速度反应等进行了研究。对采集的数据进行了处理和分析,经过对比证明剪切墙加固方法设计的合理性。

  1. Seismic facies; Facies sismicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johann, Paulo Roberto Schroeder [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao Corporativo. Gerencia de Reservas e Reservatorios]. E-mail: johann@petrobras.com.br

    2004-11-01

    The method presented herein describes the seismic facies as representations of curves and vertical matrixes of the lithotypes proportions. The seismic facies are greatly interested in capturing the spatial distributions (3D) of regionalized variables, as for example, lithotypes, sedimentary facies groups and/ or porosity and/or other properties of the reservoirs and integrate them into the 3D geological modeling (Johann, 1997). Thus when interpreted as curves or vertical matrixes of proportions, seismic facies allow us to build a very important tool for structural analysis of regionalized variables. The matrixes have an important application in geostatistical modeling. In addition, this approach provides results about the depth and scale of the wells profiles, that is, seismic data is integrated to the characterization of reservoirs in depth maps and in high resolution maps. The link between the different necessary technical phases involved in the classification of the segments of seismic traces is described herein in groups of predefined traces of two approaches: a) not supervised and b) supervised by the geological knowledge available on the studied reservoir. The multivariate statistical methods used to obtain the maps of the seismic facies units are interesting tools to be used to provide a lithostratigraphic and petrophysical understanding of a petroleum reservoir. In the case studied these seismic facies units are interpreted as representative of the depositional system as a part of the Namorado Turbiditic System, Namorado Field, Campos Basin.Within the scope of PRAVAP 19 (Programa Estrategico de Recuperacao Avancada de Petroleo - Strategic Program of Advanced Petroleum Recovery) some research work on algorithms is underway to select new optimized attributes to apply seismic facies. One example is the extraction of attributes based on the wavelet transformation and on the time-frequency analysis methodology. PRAVAP is also carrying out research work on an

  2. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  3. Spectral-element seismic wave propagation on emerging HPC architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qiancheng; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2017-04-01

    Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach to infer physical properties of Earth's internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Using seismic signals from ground-motion records, recent advances in full-waveform inversions require increasingly accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media to provide access to the complete 3D seismic wavefield. However, such numerical simulations are computationally expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, new multi- and many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. To employ a wide variety of hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here benchmark applications of seismic wave propagation on GPUs and CPUs, comparing performances on emerging hardware architectures.

  4. Seismicity in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Monika; Gestermann, Nicolai; Plenefisch, Thomas; Bönnemann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Northern Germany is a region of low tectonic activity, where only few and low-magnitude earthquakes occur. The driving tectonic processes are not well-understood up to now. In addition, seismic events during the last decade concentrated at the borders of the natural gas fields. The source depths of these events are shallow and in the depth range of the gas reservoirs. Based on these observations a causal relationship between seismicity near gas fields and the gas production is likely. The strongest of these earthquake had a magnitude of 4.5 and occurred near Rotenburg in 2004. Also smaller seismic events were considerably felt by the public and stimulated the discussion on the underlying processes. The latest seismic event occurred near Langwedel on 22nd November 2012 and had a magnitude of 2.8. Understanding the causes of the seismicity in Northern Germany is crucial for a thorough evaluation. Therefore the Seismological Service of Lower Saxony (NED) was established at the State Office for Mining, Energy and Geology (LBEG) of Lower Saxony in January 2013. Its main task is the monitoring and evaluation of the seismicity in Lower Saxony and adjacent areas. Scientific and technical questions are addressed in close cooperation with the Seismological Central Observatory (SZO) at the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The seismological situation of Northern Germany will be presented. Possible causes of seismicity are introduced. Rare seismic events at greater depths are distributed over the whole region and probably are purely tectonic whereas events in the vicinity of natural gas fields are probably related to gas production. Improving the detection threshold of seismic events in Northern Germany is necessary for providing a better statistical basis for further analyses answering these questions. As a first step the existing seismic network will be densified over the next few years. The first borehole station was installed near Rethem by BGR

  5. Upgrading of seismic design of nuclear power plant building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kitada, Yoshio

    1997-03-01

    In Japan seismic design methodology of nuclear power plant (NPP) structures has been established as introduced in the previous session. And yet efforts have been continued to date to upgrade the methodology, because of conservative nature given to the methodology in regard to unknown phenomena and technically-limited modeling involved in design analyses. The conservative nature tends to produce excessive safety margins, and inevitably send NPP construction cost up. Moreover, excessive seismic design can increase the burden on normal plant operation, though not necessarily contributing to overall plant safety. Therefore, seismic engineering has put to many tests and simulation analyses in hopes to rationalize seismic design and enhance reliability of seismic safety of NPPs. In this paper, we describe some studies on structural seismic design of NPP underway as part of Japan`s effort to upgrade existing seismic design methodology. Most studies described here are carried out by NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Company) funded by MITI (the Ministry of International Trade and Industry Japan), though, similar studies with the same motive are also carrying out by nuclear industries such as utilities, NPP equipment and system manufacturers and building constructors. This paper consists of three sections, each introducing studies relating to NPP structural seismic design, new siting technology, and upgrading of the methodology of structural design analyses. (J.P.N.)

  6. Seismic traveltime inversion based on tomographic equation without integral terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxing; Nobes, David C.

    2017-07-01

    The Jacobian matrix in the seismic traveltime tomographic equations usually contains several integral terms. These integral expressions not only greatly increase the computational complexity of seismic traveltime tomography, but also increase difficulty for programming these expressions. Therefore, if these integral expressions of the Jacobian matrix can be eliminated, the program of seismic traveltime tomography can be greatly simplified. In order to solve the computational complexity of the traditional seismic traveltime tomography, we found an anisotropic seismic traveltime tomographic equation which does not contain integral expressions. Then, it is degenerated into an isotropic seismic traveltime tomographic equation. In order to verify the effectiveness of this seismic traveltime tomographic equation based on the node network, a program has been coded to execute seismic traveltime inversion. For a crosswell checkerboard velocity model, the same results are obtained by this proposed tomographic method and the traditional method (with integral terms). Besides, two undulating topography velocity models are used as testing models. Numerical simulation results show that this proposed tomographic method can achieve good tomograms. Finally, this proposed tomographic method is used to investigate near surface velocity distribution near a power plant. Tomogram indicates that contaminated liquid diffuses and aggregates along strata at a certain depth. And velocity is lower near pollutant source than that away from it.

  7. Dynamic analysis of the actuated redundantly parallel seismic simulator by using the virtual prototype software%冗余驱动地震模拟台虚拟样机动力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱可; 何俊; 张晓妮; 董兴建; 赵永杰

    2012-01-01

    The process of building the virtual prototyping and the dynamic analysis of a kind of actuated redundantly parallel seismic simulator was carried out by using the solid modeling software SolidWorks(R) and the multibody dynamics software ADAMS(R). The virtual prototyping was built by virtue of SolidWorks(R) and ADAMS(R). Then the position, the velocity, the acceleration of the sliders, the driving torque and power were calculated when the motion of the moving platform was defined in ADAMS(R). Finally, the required output work was also achieved by means of Post-Processor. The simulation results show that the maximal driving torque, the maximal driving power and the output work of the 3rd motor are biggest among all the motors according to the given trajectory. The whole process reveals the advantages of the virtual prototyping technique since it not only reduces the work of complex modeling and programming, but also completes the dynamic analysis of the parallel seismic simulator rapidly for the building of the prototype.%以实体造型软件SolidWorks(R)及多刚体动力学软件ADAMS(R)为工具,对一种冗余驱动地震模拟台进行虚拟样机搭建及动力学分析.首先在SolidWorks(R)中搭建好冗余驱动地震模拟台的装配体模型,然后导入ADAMS(R)中完成虚拟样机构建.利用ADAMS(R)软件对地震模拟台末端添加运动,通过运动学与动力学逆解计算出滑块的位置、速度、加速度、驱动力矩及功率,采用后处理模块对驱动功率的绝对值积分求解出驱动电机的作功.根据给定的轨迹,仿真结果表明:在8个电机中,第3个电机的最大驱动力矩、驱动功率与作功均大于其余电机.该过程免去了繁琐的理论建模及编程工作,可快速实现冗余驱动地震模拟台的动力学分析,为物理样机的建造提供依据,体现了虚拟样机技术的优越性.

  8. Numerical test on polystyrene tunnel seismic-isolation material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress-strain mechanical properties of polystyrene foam plastic material were tested under different loading conditions. An empirical constitutive model for describing metal materials was proposed for the polystyrene plastic foam. The static and dynamic tests results show that the ductility and watertightness of the polystyrene plastic foam are significantly improved. At the same time, in order to check its seismic-isolation property, the high-performance foam concrete as filling materials of Galongla tunnel in Tibet was simulated by FEM. The simulated results show that the polystyrene plastic foam can remarkably decrease the stress and the plastic zone in final lining, so it can effectively reduce the seismic damage of the tunnel. Considering the seismic-isolation property and low price of polystyrene plastic foam, it is a good reference for the anti-seismic design of tunnels in high intensity zones.

  9. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  10. Seismic rehabilitation and analysis of Chaohe earth dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Fu; Xiangwu Zeng

    2005-01-01

    Stability of earth dams during earthquakes has been a major concern for geotechnical engineers in seismic active regions. Liquefaction induced slope failure occurred at the upstream slope of a major earth dam in the suburb of Beijing, China, during the 1976 Tangshan Earthquake. The gravelly soil with loose initial condition liquefied under relatively small ground vibration. In recent years, a major seismic rehabilitation project was carried out on a similar earth dam nearby using dumped quarry stone. Seismic stability analysis was carried out using model test, finite element simulation, and pseudostatic slope stability program after taking into account the influence of excess pore pressure.

  11. Seismic modelling and ava analysis of hidrocarbon traps

    OpenAIRE

    Faro Gómez, Ricardo J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, forward seismic modelling of four geological models with Hydrocarbon (HC) traps were performed by ray tracing method to produce synthetic seismogram of each model. The idea is to identify the Hydrocarbon Indicators (HCI‟s) such as bright spot, flat spot, dim spot and Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) in the synthethic seismogram. The modelling was performed in DISCO/FOCUS 5.0 seismic data processing programme. Strong positive and negative reflection amplitudes and some artifact...

  12. Landslide seismic magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  13. Studies on seismic source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世愚; 陈运泰

    2003-01-01

    During the period of 1999~2002, the Chinese seismologists made a serious of developments in the study on seismic sources including observations, experiments and theory. In the field of observation, the methods of the accuracy location of earthquake sources, the inversion of seismic moment tensor and the mechanism of earthquake source are improved and developed. A lot of important earthquake events are studied by using these methods. The rupture processes of these events are inverted and investigated combined with the local stress fields and the tectonic moment by using the measurements of surface deformation. In the fields of experiments and theory, many developments are obtained in cause of seismic formation, condition of stress and tectonics, dynamics of earthquake rupture, rock fracture and nucleation of strong earthquakes.

  14. Numerical modeling of tunneling-induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Urpi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Removal of rock mass in mining environment has been associated since long-time with seismic event of magnitude 3 and above, with the potential to cause damage to the infrastructures or even loss of human life. Although with similarities with mining, relatively unknown up to now are seismic events induced by tunneling. However with modern mechanized tunneling techniques, making possible to digging deeper and longer underground infrastructure, the risk is not negligible. As an example, the excavation of the 57km long Gotthard Base Tunnel has been associated more than hundred seismic events, with the largest one having magnitude of ML 2.4, damaging the tunnel infrastructures. For future scenario of deep geological storage of nuclear waste, tunneling will constitute the primary activity during site construction. Hence, it will be crucial to understand the risk associated with the underground construction operation that can reactivate seismogenic features nearby the future location of emplacement tunnels. Here we present numerical simulation aimed at understanding the potential for inducing seismicity during tunnel construction. The stress changes and their evolution during the excavation are evaluated with a finite element solver (FLAC3d). A strain-softening friction model is then used to simulate the occurrence of a sudden slip on a fault zone (if critical conditions for reactivation are reached). We also present a sensitivity analysis of the potential for inducing different seismic events by different tunnel sizes at varying distance from a nearby failure plane, with the final purpose of evaluating safety of a potential nuclear repository site on the short- and long-term.

  15. Towards Exascale Seismic Imaging and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Post-petascale supercomputers are now available to solve complex scientific problems that were thought unreachable a few decades ago. They also bring a cohort of concerns tied to obtaining optimum performance. Several issues are currently being investigated by the HPC community. These include energy consumption, fault resilience, scalability of the current parallel paradigms, workflow management, I/O performance and feature extraction with large datasets. In this presentation, we focus on the last three issues. In the context of seismic imaging and inversion, in particular for simulations based on adjoint methods, workflows are well defined.They consist of a few collective steps (e.g., mesh generation or model updates) and of a large number of independent steps (e.g., forward and adjoint simulations of each seismic event, pre- and postprocessing of seismic traces). The greater goal is to reduce the time to solution, that is, obtaining a more precise representation of the subsurface as fast as possible. This brings us to consider both the workflow in its entirety and the parts comprising it. The usual approach is to speedup the purely computational parts based on code optimization in order to reach higher FLOPS and better memory management. This still remains an important concern, but larger scale experiments show that the imaging workflow suffers from severe I/O bottlenecks. Such limitations occur both for purely computational data and seismic time series. The latter are dealt with by the introduction of a new Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). Parallel I/O libraries, namely HDF5 and ADIOS, are used to drastically reduce the cost of disk access. Parallel visualization tools, such as VisIt, are able to take advantage of ADIOS metadata to extract features and display massive datasets. Because large parts of the workflow are embarrassingly parallel, we are investigating the possibility of automating the imaging process with the integration of scientific workflow

  16. Seismic failure mechanisms for loaded slopes with associated and nonassociated flow rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-li; SUI Zhi-rong

    2008-01-01

    Seismic failure mechanisms were investigated for soil slopes subjected to strip load with upper bound method of limit analysis and finite difference method of numerical simulation, considering the influence of associated and nonassociated flow rules. Quasi-static representation of soil inertia effects using a seismic coefficient concept was adopted for seismic failure analysis. Numerical study was conducted to investigate the influences of dilative angle and earthquake on the seismic failure mechanisms for the loaded slope, and the failure mechanisms for different dilation angles were compared. The results show that dilation angle has influences on the seismic failure surfaces, that seismic maximum displacement vector decreases as the dilation angle increases, and that seismic maximum shear strain rate decreases as the dilation angle increases.

  17. Seismic Disaster Reduction in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ministry of Construction

    2001-01-01

    @@ Great accomplishments have been made in seismic disaster reduction in China's engineering construction and city construction projects during the past decade (1990~2000). A new national map on the division of seismic intensity has been promulgated, and a series of anti-seismic standards and norms have been drafted or revised, which has further improved the country's technical code system on anti-seismic engineering measures.

  18. B341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-02

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3. Based on our evaluation the building does not meet a Life Safety performance level for the BSE- 1E earthquake ground shaking hazard. The BSE-1E is the recommended seismic hazard level for evaluation of existing structures and is based on a 20% probability of exceedence in 50 years.

  19. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  20. Seismic vulnerability assessments in risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Nina; Larionov, Valery; Bonnin, Jean; Ugarov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of seismic vulnerability is a critical issue within natural and technological risk analysis. In general, there are three common types of methods used for development of vulnerability functions of different elements at risk: empirical, analytical and expert estimations. The paper addresses the empirical methods for seismic vulnerability estimation for residential buildings and industrial facilities. The results of engineering analysis of past earthquake consequences, as well as the statistical data on buildings behavior during strong earthquakes presented in the different seismic intensity scales, are used to verify the regional parameters of mathematical models in order to simulate physical and economic vulnerability for different building types classified according to seismic scale MMSK-86. Verified procedure has been used to estimate the physical and economic vulnerability of buildings and constructions against earthquakes for the Northern Caucasus Federal region of the Russian Federation and Krasnodar area, which are characterized by rather high level of seismic activity and high population density. In order to estimate expected damage states to buildings and constructions in the case of the earthquakes according to the OSR-97B (return period T=1,000 years) within big cities and towns, they were divided into unit sites and their coordinates were presented as dots located in the centers of unit sites. Then the indexes obtained for each unit site were summed up. The maps of physical vulnerability zoning for Northern Caucasus Federal region of the Russian Federation and Krasnodar area includes two elements: percent of different damage states for settlements with number of inhabitants less than 1,000 and vulnerability for cities and towns with number of inhabitants more than 1,000. The hypsometric scale is used to represent both elements on the maps. Taking into account the size of oil pipe line systems located in the highly active seismic zones in

  1. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.......Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable...

  2. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  3. 地震勘探用电容式闭环微加速度计的仿真%Closed-Loop System Simulation of the Capacitive Micro-Accelerometer for the Seismic Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌贵辉; 刘建生; 李礼; 杨帆

    2012-01-01

    The performances of the new geophone are significantly improved by the MEMS acceleration sensors. The mechanical model of the silicon cantilever beam was set up by means of the finite element software ANSYS, and the best design structure size was gained through the stimulation of the mechanical properties. The design result shows that the length L is 150 μm, the width b is-40 μm, the thickness h is 4 μm, and d0 is 1 pm (do is the space between the moving electrode and fixed electrode). Meanwhile, the overall mathematical model of the closed-loop system was established using the sensor circuit simulation software. The simulation results show that the step response and sinusoidal response agree well with the result of the theoretical analysis. The sensor resolution and bandwidth are up to 0. 001 m/s2 and 500 MHz, respectively. The new-type geophone based on the MEMS acceleration sensor will have wide application prospects in the seismic exploration.%MEMS加速度传感器大幅提高了新型地震检波器的各项性能指标.利用有限元软件AN-SYS建立了悬臂硅梁的力学模型,并通过其力学性能仿真,得出优化的设计结构尺寸,即梁长L=150μm,梁宽b=40μm,梁厚h=4μm,活动电极和固定电极的间距d0取为1μm.同时利用电路仿真软件建立了传感器闭环系统的整体仿真数学模型,仿真结果表明其阶跃响应和正弦响应基本和理论分析结果吻合,传感器的分辨率可达0.001m/s2,频带宽度可达500MHz.该基于MEMS加速度传感器的新型地震检波器在地震勘探中将具有广阔的应用前景.

  4. Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

  5. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where seismi

  6. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where

  7. Mobile seismic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräbenstedt, A.; Cao, X.; Polom, U.; Pätzold, F.; Zeller, T.; Hecker, P.; Seyfried, V.; Rembe, C.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  8. Mobile seismic exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dräbenstedt, A., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de; Seyfried, V. [Research & Development, Polytec GmbH, Waldbronn (Germany); Cao, X.; Rembe, C., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Institute of Electrical Information Technology, TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Polom, U., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Leibniz Institute of Applied Geophysics, Hannover (Germany); Pätzold, F.; Hecker, P. [Institute of Flight Guidance, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Zeller, T. [Clausthaler Umwelttechnik Institut CUTEC, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  9. Geophysics and Seismic Hazard Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuGuihua; ZhouYuanze; YuSheng

    2003-01-01

    The earthquake is a natural phenomenon, which often brings serious hazard to the human life and material possession. It is a physical process of releasing interior energy of the earth, which is caused by interior and outer forces in special tectonic environment in the earth, especially within the lithosphere. The earthquake only causes casualty and loss in the place where people inhabit. Seismic hazard reduction is composed of four parts as seismic prediction, hazard prevention and seismic engineering, seismic response and seismic rescuing, and rebuilding.

  10. Investigation of the Seismic Performance of Reinforced Highway Embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toksoy, Y. S.; Edinçliler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that highway embankments are highly prone to earthquake induced damage, there are not enough studies in the literature concentrated on improving the seismic performance of highway embankments. Embankments which are quite stable under static load conditions can simply collapse during earthquakes due to the destructive seismic loading. This situation poses a high sequence thread to the structural integrity of the embankment, service quality and serviceability. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of the geosynthetic reinforcement on the seismic performance of the highway embankments and evaluate the seismic performance of the geotextile reinforced embankment under different earthquake motions. A 1:50 scale highway embankment model is designed and reinforced with geosynthetics in order to increase the seismic performance of the embankment model. A series of shaking table tests were performed for the identical unreinforced and reinforced embankment models using earthquake excitations with different characteristics. The experimental results were evaluated comparing the unreinforced and reinforced cases. Results revealed that reinforced embankment models perform better seismic performance especially under specificied ground excitations used in this study. Also, the prototype embankment was numerically modelled. It is seen that similar seismic behavior trend is obtained in the finite element simulations.

  11. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  12. Design response spectra-compliant real and synthetic GMS for seismic analysis of seismically isolated nuclear reactor containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmer [ENVICO Consultants Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abu-Hayah, Nadin; Kim, Doo Kie [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Gook [Innose Tech Co., Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Due to the severe impacts of recent earthquakes, the use of seismic isolation is paramount for the safety of nuclear structures. The diversity observed in seismic events demands ongoing research to analyze the devastating attributes involved, and hence to enhance the sustainability of base-isolated nuclear power plants. This study reports the seismic performance of a seismically-isolated nuclear reactor containment building (NRCB) under strong short-period ground motions (SPGMs) and long-period ground motions (LPGMs). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission-based design response spectrum for the seismic design of nuclear power plants is stipulated as the reference spectrum for ground motion selection. Within the period range(s) of interest, the spectral matching of selected records with the target spectrum is ensured using the spectral-compatibility approach. NRC-compliant SPGMs and LPGMs from the mega-thrust Tohoku earthquake are used to obtain the structural response of the base-isolated NRCB. To account for the lack of earthquakes in low-to-moderate seismicity zones and the gap in the artificial synthesis of long-period records, wavelet-decomposition based autoregressive moving average modeling for artificial generation of real ground motions is performed. Based on analysis results from real and simulated SPGMs versus LPGMs, the performance of NRCBs is discussed with suggestions for future research and seismic provisions.

  13. Seismically integrated geologic modelling: Guntong Field, Malay Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvert, Craig S.; Bhuyan, K.; Sterling, J. Helwick; Hill, Rob E.; Hubbard, R. Scott; Khare, Vijay; Wahrmund, Leslie A.; Wang, Gann-Shyong

    1998-12-31

    This presentation relates to a research project on offshore seismically reservoir modelling. The goal of the project was to develop and test a process for interpreting reservoir properties from 3-D seismic data and for integrating these data into the building of 3-D geologic models that would be suitable for use in flow simulation studies. The project produced a 3-D geologic model for three reservoir intervals and three predominantly non-reservoir intervals. Each reservoir interval was subdivided into faces that were determined by integrating core, well log, and seismic interpretations. predictions of porosity and lithology used in building the geologic model were made using seismic attributes calculated from acoustic impedance data. 8 figs.

  14. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Concentrically Braced Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Po-Chien

    Concentrically braced frames (CBFs) are broadly used as lateral-load resisting systems in buildings throughout the US. In high seismic regions, special concentrically braced frames (SCBFs) where ductility under seismic loading is necessary. Their large elastic stiffness and strength efficiently sustains the seismic demands during smaller, more frequent earthquakes. During large, infrequent earthquakes, SCBFs exhibit highly nonlinear behavior due to brace buckling and yielding and the inelastic behavior induced by secondary deformation of the framing system. These response modes reduce the system demands relative to an elastic system without supplemental damping. In design the re reduced demands are estimated using a response modification coefficient, commonly termed the R factor. The R factor values are important to the seismic performance of a building. Procedures put forth in FEMAP695 developed to R factors through a formalized procedure with the objective of consistent level of collapse potential for all building types. The primary objective of the research was to evaluate the seismic performance of SCBFs. To achieve this goal, an improved model including a proposed gusset plate connection model for SCBFs that permits accurate simulation of inelastic deformations of the brace, gusset plate connections, beams and columns and brace fracture was developed and validated using a large number of experiments. Response history analyses were conducted using the validated model. A series of different story-height SCBF buildings were designed and evaluated. The FEMAP695 method and an alternate procedure were applied to SCBFs and NCBFs. NCBFs are designed without ductile detailing. The evaluation using P695 method shows contrary results to the alternate evaluation procedure and the current knowledge in which short-story SCBF structures are more venerable than taller counterparts and NCBFs are more vulnerable than SCBFs.

  15. Broadband seismic effects from train vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Florian; Bokelmann, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Seismologists rarely study train induced vibrations which are mainly regarded an unwanted source of noise for classical seismological applications such as earthquake monitoring. A few seismological studies try to utilize train vibrations however as active sources, e.g. for subsurface imaging, but they do not focus on the characteristics of the train signal itself. Most available studies on train induced vibrations take an engineering approach and aim at better understanding the generation and short-distance propagation of train induced vibrations, mainly for mitigation and construction purposes. They mostly rely on numerical simulations and/or short-period or accelerometer recordings obtained directly on the train track or up to few hundred meters away and almost no studies exist with seismic recordings further away from the track. In some of these previous studies sharp and equidistant peaks are present in the vibration spectrum of heavy freight trains, but they do not attempt to explain them. Here we show and analyze various train vibration signals obtained from a set of seismic broadband stations installed in the context of the temporary, large-scale regional seismic network AlpArray. The geometrical restrictions of this seismic network combined with budget and safety considerations resulted in a number of broad-band instruments deployed in the vicinity of busy railway lines. On these stations we observe very characteristic seismic signals associated with different types of trains, typically showing pronounced equidistant spectral lines over a wide frequency range. In this study we analyze the nature of such signals and discuss if they are generated by a source effect or by wave propagation effects in near-surface soil layers.

  16. Toward Building a New Seismic Hazard Model for Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Y.; Xu, X.; Chen, G.; Cheng, J.; Magistrale, H.; Shen, Z.

    2015-12-01

    At present, the only publicly available seismic hazard model for mainland China was generated by Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program in 1999. We are building a new seismic hazard model by integrating historical earthquake catalogs, geological faults, geodetic GPS data, and geology maps. To build the model, we construct an Mw-based homogeneous historical earthquake catalog spanning from 780 B.C. to present, create fault models from active fault data using the methodology recommended by Global Earthquake Model (GEM), and derive a strain rate map based on the most complete GPS measurements and a new strain derivation algorithm. We divide China and the surrounding regions into about 20 large seismic source zones based on seismotectonics. For each zone, we use the tapered Gutenberg-Richter (TGR) relationship to model the seismicity rates. We estimate the TGR a- and b-values from the historical earthquake data, and constrain corner magnitude using the seismic moment rate derived from the strain rate. From the TGR distributions, 10,000 to 100,000 years of synthetic earthquakes are simulated. Then, we distribute small and medium earthquakes according to locations and magnitudes of historical earthquakes. Some large earthquakes are distributed on active faults based on characteristics of the faults, including slip rate, fault length and width, and paleoseismic data, and the rest to the background based on the distributions of historical earthquakes and strain rate. We evaluate available ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) by comparison to observed ground motions. To apply appropriate GMPEs, we divide the region into active and stable tectonics. The seismic hazard will be calculated using the OpenQuake software developed by GEM. To account for site amplifications, we construct a site condition map based on geology maps. The resulting new seismic hazard map can be used for seismic risk analysis and management, and business and land-use planning.

  17. Seismic base isolation by nonlinear mode localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [University of Illinois, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Washington University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, St. Louis, MO (United States); McFarland, D.M. [University of Illinois, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Vakakis, A.F. [National Technical University of Athens, Division of Mechanics (Greece); Bergman, L.A. [University of Illinois, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, the performance of a nonlinear base-isolation system, comprised of a nonlinearly sprung subfoundation tuned in a 1:1 internal resonance to a flexible mode of the linear primary structure to be isolated, is examined. The application of nonlinear localization to seismic isolation distinguishes this study from other base-isolation studies in the literature. Under the condition of third-order smooth stiffness nonlinearity, it is shown that a localized nonlinear normal mode (NNM) is induced in the system, which confines energy to the subfoundation and away from the primary or main structure. This is followed by a numerical analysis wherein the smooth nonlinearity is replaced by clearance nonlinearity, and the system is excited by ground motions representing near-field seismic events. The performance of the nonlinear system is compared with that of the corresponding linear system through simulation, and the sensitivity of the isolation system to several design parameters is analyzed. These simulations confirm the existence of the localized NNM, and show that the introduction of simple clearance nonlinearity significantly reduces the seismic energy transmitted to the main structure, resulting in significant attenuation in the response. (orig.)

  18. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  19. Seismic detectability of meteorite impacts on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Teanby, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Europa, the second of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, has an icy outer shell, beneath which there is probably liquid water in contact with a rocky core. Europa, may thus provide an example of a sub-surface habitable environment so is an attractive object for future lander missions. In fact, the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE) mission has been selected for the L1 launch slot of ESA's Cosmic Vision science programme with the aim of launching in 2022 to explore Jupiter and its potentially habitable icy moons. One of the best ways to probe icy moon interiors in any future mission will be with a seismic investigation. Previously, the Apollo seismic experiment, installed by astronauts, enhanced our knowledge of the lunar interior. For a recent mission, NASA's 2016 InSight Mars lander aims to obtain seismic data and will deploy a seismometer directly onto Mars' surface. Motivated by these works, in this study we show how many meteorite impacts will be detected using a single seismic station on Europa, which will be useful for planning the next generation of outer solar system missions. To this end, we derive: (1) the current small impact flux on Europa from Jupiter impact rate models; (2) a crater diameter versus impactor energy scaling relation for ice by merging previous experiments and simulations; (3) scaling relations for seismic signals as a function of distance from an impact site for a given crater size based on analogue explosive data obtained on Earth's icy surfaces. Finally, resultant amplitudes are compared to the noise level of a likely seismic instrument (based on the NASA InSight mission seismometers) and the number of detectable impacts are estimated. As a result, 0.5-3.0 local/regional small impacts (i.e., direct P-waves through the ice crust) are expected to be detected per year, while global-scale impact events (i.e., PKP-waves refracted through the mantle) are rare and unlikely to be detected by a short duration mission. We note that our results are

  20. Swept Impact Seismic Technique (SIST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.; Black, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A coded seismic technique is developed that can result in a higher signal-to-noise ratio than a conventional single-pulse method does. The technique is cost-effective and time-efficient and therefore well suited for shallow-reflection surveys where high resolution and cost-effectiveness are critical. A low-power impact source transmits a few to several hundred high-frequency broad-band seismic pulses during several seconds of recording time according to a deterministic coding scheme. The coding scheme consists of a time-encoded impact sequence in which the rate of impact (cycles/s) changes linearly with time providing a broad range of impact rates. Impact times used during the decoding process are recorded on one channel of the seismograph. The coding concept combines the vibroseis swept-frequency and the Mini-Sosie random impact concepts. The swept-frequency concept greatly improves the suppression of correlation noise with much fewer impacts than normally used in the Mini-Sosie technique. The impact concept makes the technique simple and efficient in generating high-resolution seismic data especially in the presence of noise. The transfer function of the impact sequence simulates a low-cut filter with the cutoff frequency the same as the lowest impact rate. This property can be used to attenuate low-frequency ground-roll noise without using an analog low-cut filter or a spatial source (or receiver) array as is necessary with a conventional single-pulse method. Because of the discontinuous coding scheme, the decoding process is accomplished by a "shift-and-stacking" method that is much simpler and quicker than cross-correlation. The simplicity of the coding allows the mechanical design of the source to remain simple. Several different types of mechanical systems could be adapted to generate a linear impact sweep. In addition, the simplicity of the coding also allows the technique to be used with conventional acquisition systems, with only minor modifications.

  1. Advanced Waveform Simulation for Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    velocity model. The method separates the main arrivals of the regional waveform into 5 windows: Pnl (vertical and radial components), Rayleigh (vertical and...ranges out to 10°, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D...existing models perform in predicting the various regional phases, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, and Pnl waves. Previous events from this Basin-and-Range

  2. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmberger, D; Tromp, J; Rodgers, A

    2007-07-16

    Comprehensive test ban monitoring in terms of location and discrimination has progressed significantly in recent years. However, the characterization of sources and the estimation of low yields remains a particular challenge. As the recent Korean shot demonstrated, we can probably expect to have a small set of teleseismic, far-regional and high-frequency regional data to analyze in estimating the yield of an event. Since stacking helps to bring signals out of the noise, it becomes useful to conduct comparable analyses on neighboring events, earthquakes in this case. If these auxiliary events have accurate moments and source descriptions, we have a means of directly comparing effective source strengths. Although we will rely on modeling codes, 1D, 2D, and 3D, we will also apply a broadband calibration procedure to use longer periods (P>5s) waveform data to calibrate short-period (P between .5 to 2 Hz) and high-frequency (P between 2 to 10 Hz) as path specify station corrections from well-known regional sources. We have expanded our basic Cut-and-Paste (CAP) methodology to include not only timing shifts but also amplitude (f) corrections at recording sites. The name of this method was derived from source inversions that allow timing shifts between 'waveform segments' (or cutting the seismogram up and re-assembling) to correct for crustal variation. For convenience, we will refer to these f-dependent refinements as CAP+ for (SP) and CAP++ for still higher frequency. These methods allow the retrieval of source parameters using only P-waveforms where radiation patterns are obvious as demonstrated in this report and are well suited for explosion P-wave data. The method is easily extended to all distances because it uses Green's function although there may be some changes required in t* to adjust for offsets between local vs. teleseismic distances. In short, we use a mixture of model-dependent and empirical corrections to tackle the path effects. Although we reply on the large TriNet array as a testbed for refining methods, we will present some preliminary results on Korea and Iran.

  3. Comparison of seismic sources for shallow seismic: sledgehammer and pyrotechnics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Aleksander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pyrotechnic materials are one of the types of the explosives materials which produce thermal, luminous or sound effects, gas, smoke and their combination as a result of a self-sustaining chemical reaction. Therefore, pyrotechnics can be used as a seismic source that is designed to release accumulated energy in a form of seismic wave recorded by tremor sensors (geophones after its passage through the rock mass. The aim of this paper was to determine the utility of pyrotechnics for shallow seismic engineering. The work presented comparing the conventional method of seismic wave excitation for seismic refraction method like plate and hammer and activating of firecrackers on the surface. The energy released by various sources and frequency spectra was compared for the two types of sources. The obtained results did not determine which sources gave the better results but showed very interesting aspects of using pyrotechnics in seismic measurements for example the use of pyrotechnic materials in MASW.

  4. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Yanhua O; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relat...

  5. Probing the internal structure of the asteriod Didymoon with a passive seismic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, N.; Hempel, S.; Pou, L.; Cadu, A.; Garcia, R. F.; Mimoun, D.; Margerin, L.; Karatekin, O.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the internal structure of an asteroid has important implications for interpreting its evolutionary history, for understanding its continuing geological evolution, and also for asteroid deflection and in-situ space resource utilisation. Given the strong evidence that asteroids are seismically active, an in-situ passive seismic experiment could provide information about the asteroid surface and interior properties. Here, we discuss the natural seismic activity that may be present on Didymoon, the secondary component of asteroid (65803) Didymos. Our analysis of the tidal stresses in Didymoon shows that tidal quakes are likely to occur if the secondary has an eccentric orbit. Failure occurs most easily at the asteroid poles and close to the surface for both homogeneous and layered internal structures. Simulations of seismic wave propagation in Didymoon show that the seismic moment of even small meteoroid impacts can generate clearly observable body and surface waves if the asteroid's internal structure is homogeneous. The presence of a regolith layer over a consolidated core can result in the seismic energy becoming trapped in the regolith due to the strong impedance contrast at the regolith-core boundary. The inclusion of macro-porosity (voids) further complexifies the wavefield due to increased scattering. The most prominent seismic waves are always found to be those traveling along the surface of the asteroid and those focusing in the antipodal point of the seismic source. We find also that the waveforms and ground acceleration spectra allow discrimination between the different internal structure models. Although the science return of a passive seismic experiment would be enhanced by having multiple seismic stations, one single seismic station can already vastly improve our knowledge about the seismic environment and sub-surface structure of an asteroid. We describe several seismic measurement techniques that could be applied in order to study the

  6. Numerical simulation of seismic performance for different types of steel plate shear walls%不同类型钢板剪力墙抗震性能的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李峰; 王栋; 郭宏超; 吴冠男; 方飞虎

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide theory support for the use of steel plate shear walls in actual engineering, the seismic performance of the thin steel plate shear wall, the cross stiffener steel plate shear wall and the steel plate shear wall with slits, based on experiments, was simulated under the low cycle reciprocating loading via ANSYS and compared with the test data. The hysteresis curve, skeleton curve, the stress and deformation of infill plate were analyzed. The results indicate that the finite element model data agrees well with the experimental ones. The maximum error of yield load is 10. 9% , and that of peak load is only 1.4%. The stress of infill plates gets full development within dividers, while the disabled cross stiffener just gives a weak restraint on the out plane deformation of an infill plate in the later loading period. The local instability below the beam - column joints and column base lead to the failure of the whole structure.%为了给钢板剪力墙在实际工程中的应用提供理论支持,在试验研究的基础上,通过ANSYS模拟了薄钢板、十字加劲及开缝钢板剪力墙在低周往复荷载作用下的抗震性能,并与试验数据进行了对比,分析了滞回曲线、骨架曲线、内填板应力及变形等指标.结果表明:有限元分析与试验数据吻合较好,屈服荷载最大误差为10.9%,峰值荷载最大误差仅为1.4%;加劲肋使得内填板应力在小区格范围内发展更充分,但加载后期,加劲肋失效,对内填板面外约束作用微弱;柱脚和梁柱节点以下部位发生局部屈曲,导致整个结构失效.

  7. REGULATION OF SEISMIC LOAD ON BUILDINGS SEISMIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. N. Mazhiev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of regulation of seismic loads on structures using kinematic supports of highstrength concrete on the impregnated coarse aggregate and seismic isolation bearings Belleville. The results of experimental studies related to the obtaining of a new coarse aggregate and construction of seismic isolation bearings. Addresses the issues of interaction forces in thehemispherical supports vibration process.

  8. Stutter seismic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumma, W. H.; Hughes, D. R.; Zimmerman, N. S.

    1980-08-12

    An improved seismic prospecting system comprising the use of a closely spaced sequence of source initiations at essentially the same location to provide shorter objective-level wavelets than are obtainable with a single pulse. In a preferred form, three dynamite charges are detonated in the same or three closely spaced shot holes to generate a downward traveling wavelet having increased high frequency content and reduced content at a peak frequency determined by initial testing.

  9. Principle and Program of Evaluating Diffuse Seismicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Xiangdong

    2001-01-01

    Concept and origin of the term "the diffuse seismicity" are illustrated. Some different viewpoints regarding the diffuse seismicity and the influence characteristics on determining seismic design basis of engineering from the seismicity are analyzed. Principle and program for evaluating diffuse seismicity are studied and discussed base on over contents.

  10. Shaking table tests under simulated earthquakes for seismic performance evaluation of primary water accident pump used in nuclear reactor%某核级一次水事故泵抗震性能评估的振动台试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永武; 戴君武; 金波; 聂桂波

    2015-01-01

    由于一次水事故泵运行条件下的振动台试验可评估抗震性能,用钢丝橡胶波纹管连接进出口水管、沙堆支撑橡胶管提供柔性约束。合理模拟水泵在试验过程中所受接管荷载,保证试验过程中水泵与循环水箱变形协调。对正常运行的事故泵进行5次 OBE、1次 SSE 人造地震动输入振动台试验,并据动应变曲线判断仍处于弹性状态。试验表明,经5次 OBE、1次 SSE 人造地震动输入后的一次水事故泵仍能保证压力边界完整性及功能可运行性。较试验前各项功能指标无明显变化,抗震性能良好。%Primary water accident pump is an important part of reactor for its waste heat export,whose seismic performance will directly affect the safe shutdown of reactor and the exuding of waste heat after the occurrence of major earthquakes.The prototype shaking table tests under simulated earthquakes are the most intuitive method to evaluate the seismic performance of primary water accident pump in running condition.The steel wire rubber corrugated pipe connection was selected as the import and export connections of water pipe,and the sand pile support rubber bellows were used as the flexible constraints.The connecting load on the water pump in the processes of tests was reasonably simulated and the deformation coordination was ensured between the primary water accident pump and circulating water tank in the test processes.Suitable wire rubber bellows were selected and sand was used to guarantee the rationality of boundary conditions in the experiments.Five OBE and one SSE earthquake simulation shaking table tests on the primary water accident pump were performed by using artificial seismic waves as the seismic inputs in normal running.According to time history curves of strain,the maximum strain responses under the input of different artificial seismic waves were obtained, and the structure was found still in elastic state.The results show that

  11. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R.P. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented.

  12. Seismic basement in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The area of contact between Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe in Poland has complicated structure of sedimentary cover and basement. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclize is only 0.3-1 km thick, increases to 7-8 km along the East European Craton margin, and 9-12 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1- to 2-km-thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sediments, up to c. 20 km. The map of the basement depth is created by combining data from geological boreholes with a set of regional seismic refraction profiles. These maps do not provide data about the basement depth in the central part of the TESZ and in the Carpathians. Therefore, the data set is supplemented by 32 models from deep seismic sounding profiles and a map of a high-resistivity (low-conductivity) layer from magnetotelluric soundings, identified as a basement. All of these data provide knowledge about the basement depth and of P-wave seismic velocities of the crystalline and consolidated type of basement for the whole area of Poland. Finally, the differentiation of the basement depth and velocity is discussed with respect to geophysical fields and the tectonic division of the area.

  13. Estimation of reservoir fluid volumes through 4-D seismic analysis on Gullfaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veire, H.S.; Reymond, S.B.; Signer, C.; Tenneboe, P.O.; Soenneland, L.; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla

    1998-12-31

    4-D seismic has the potential to monitor hydrocarbon movement in reservoirs during production, and could thereby supplement the predictions of reservoir parameters offered by the reservoir simulator. However 4-D seismic is often more band limited than the vertical resolution required in the reservoir model. As a consequence the seismic data holds a composite response from reservoir parameter changes during production so that the inversion becomes non-unique. A procedure where data from the reservoir model are integrated with seismic data will be presented. The potential of such a procedure is demonstrated through a case study from a recent 4-D survey over the Gullfaks field. 2 figs.

  14. Gauss linear frequency modulation wavelet transforms and its application to seismic phases identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘希强; 周惠兰; 曹文海; 李红; 李永红; 季爱东

    2002-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of gradual change style seismic signal onset which has more high frequency signal components but less magnitude, this paper selects Gauss linear frequency modulation wavelet as base function to study the change characteristics of Gauss linear frequency modulation wavelet transform with difference wavelet and signal parameters, analyzes the error origin of seismic phases identification on the basis of Gauss linear frequency modulation wavelet transform, puts forward a kind of new method identifying gradual change style seismic phases with background noise which is called fixed scale wavelet transform ratio, and presents application examples about simulation digital signal and actual seismic phases recording onsets identification.

  15. Seismic hazard assessment of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafory-Ashtiany

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of the new seismic hazard map of Iran is based on probabilistic seismic hazard computation using the historical earthquakes data, geology, tectonics, fault activity and seismic source models in Iran. These maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Iran in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines, and seismic hazard zoning, by using current probabilistic procedures. They display the probabilistic estimates of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA for the return periods of 75 and 475 years. The maps have been divided into intervals of 0.25 degrees in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions to calculate the peak ground acceleration values at each grid point and draw the seismic hazard curves. The results presented in this study will provide the basis for the preparation of seismic risk maps, the estimation of earthquake insurance premiums, and the preliminary site evaluation of critical facilities.

  16. Seismic fragility analysis of seismically isolated nuclear power plants piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi Firoozabad, Ehsan, E-mail: e.salimi@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Bub-Gyu, E-mail: bkjeon79@pusan.ac.kr [KOCED Seismic Simulation Test Center, Pusan National University, Yangsan Campus Mulgeum, Yangsan, Kyungsangnam (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung-Suk, E-mail: engineer@pusan.ac.kr [KOCED Seismic Simulation Test Center, Pusan National University, Yangsan Campus Mulgeum, Yangsan, Kyungsangnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam-Sik, E-mail: nskim@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The critical points of a seismically isolated NPP piping system are identified. • The simulation results are validated through a monotonic and cyclic test of the critical points. • The conditional mean spectrum method is used to scale the selected records. • The fragility curves of the NPP piping system are estimated. • Computation of the fragility parameters is addressed. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are high risk facilities due to the possibility of sudden seismic events, because any possible failure could initiate catastrophic radioactive contamination. The seismic fragility analysis of NPPs and related equipments (such as piping systems) is a proven method to determine their performance against any possible earthquake. In this study the Brookhaven National laboratory benchmark model of a piping system was considered for the fragility analysis. A tensile test was conducted to define the material properties. An initial seismic analysis of the piping system is performed to indicate the critical sections of the piping system. Numerical analysis was validated through a monotonic and cyclic loading experiment of two identified critical points of the piping system. The tests were conducted at the Korea Construction Engineering Development (KOCED) Seismic Simulation Test Center, Pusan National University, Korea. Fragility curves were expressed for critical points of the system as a function of the spectral acceleration of the records and the maximum relative displacement. The standard deviation of the response and capacity were calculated using mathematical formulas, assuming that those follow a log-normal distribution. We determined that the fragility curve of a pipe elbow must be derived for both the opening and closing mode, regarding the difference between the capacities of the elbow on those modes. The high confidence of low probability of failure for the considered fragility functions in a straight section in any direction is

  17. Estimation of reliability of seismic and electromagnetic monitoring in seismic active areas by diffraction tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Troyan, V. N.; Kiselev, Yu. V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the algorithms and results of the numerical simulation of the solution of a 2-D inverse problem on the restoration of seismic parameters and electrical conductivity of local inhomogeneities by the diffraction tomography method based upon the first order Born approximation. The direct problems for the Lame and Maxwell equations are solved by the finite difference method. Restoration of inhomogeneities which are not ...

  18. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Leprince, Sebastien; Michel, Remi

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  19. 地震正演模拟复杂构造中的地震波传播%Modeling seismic wave propagation within complex structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨金华; 刘韬; 唐跟阳; 胡天跃

    2009-01-01

    Seismic modeling is a useful tool for studying the propagation of seismic waves within complex structures. However, traditional methods of seismic simulation cannot meet the needs for studying seismic wavefields in the complex geological .structures found in seismic exploration of the mountainous area in Northwestern China. More powerful techniques of seismic modeling are demanded for this purpose. In this paper, two methods of finite element-finite difference method (FE-FDM) and arbitrary difference precise integration ADPI) for seismic forward modeling have been developed and implemented to understand the behavior of seismic waves in complex geological subsurface structures and reservoirs, Two case studies show that the FE-FDM and ADPI techniques are well suited to modeling seismic wave propagation in complex geology.

  20. Seismic capacity of a reinforced concrete frame structure without seismic detailing and limited ductility seismic design in moderate seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. K.; Kim, I. H. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    A four-story reinforced concrete frame building model is designed for the gravity loads only. Static nonlinear pushover analyses are performed in two orthogonal horizontal directions. The overall capacity curves are converted into ADRS spectra and compared with demand spectra. At several points the deformed shape, moment and shear distribution are calculated. Based on these results limited ductility seismic design concept is proposed as an alternative seismic design approach in moderate seismicity resign.

  1. Mathematical model of the seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) in non crystalline substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, L. C. C.; Yahya, N.; Daud, H.; Shafie, A. [Electromagnetic cluster, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2012-09-26

    The mathematical model of seismic electromagnetic waves in non crystalline substances is developed and the solutions are discussed to show the possibility of improving the electromagnetic waves especially the electric field. The shear stress of the medium in fourth order tensor gives the equation of motion. Analytic methods are selected for the solutions written in Hansen vector form. From the simulated SEMS, the frequency of seismic waves has significant effects to the SEMS propagating characteristics. EM waves transform into SEMS or energized seismic waves. Traveling distance increases once the frequency of the seismic waves increases from 100% to 1000%. SEMS with greater seismic frequency will give seismic alike waves but greater energy is embedded by EM waves and hence further distance the waves travel.

  2. Modelling of NW Himalayan Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, A. R.; Dimri, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The northwest Himalaya is seismicity active region due to the collision of Indian and Eurasian plates and experienced many large earthquakes in past. A systematic analysis of seismicity is useful for seismic hazard estimation of the region. We analyzed the seismicity of northwestern Himalaya since 1980. The magnitude of completeness of the catalogue is carried out using different methods and found as 3.0. A large difference in magnitude of completeness is found using different methods and a reliable value is obtained after testing the distribution of magnitudes with time. The region is prone to large earthquake and many studied have shown that seismic activation or quiescence takes place before large earthquakes. We studied such behavior of seismicity based on Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model and found that a stationary ETAS model is more suitable for modelling the seismicity of this region. The earthquake catalogue is de-clustered using stochasting approach to study behavior of background and triggered seismicity. The triggered seismicity is found to have shallower depths as compared to the background events.

  3. Flat lens for seismic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brule, Stephane; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    A prerequisite for achieving seismic invisibility is to demonstrate the ability of civil engineers to control seismic waves with artificially structured soils. We carry out large-scale field tests with a structured soil made of a grid consisting of cylindrical and vertical holes in the ground and a low frequency artificial source (< 10 Hz). This allows the identification of a distribution of energy inside the grid, which can be interpreted as the consequence of an effective negative refraction index. Such a flat lens reminiscent of what Veselago and Pendry envisioned for light opens avenues in seismic metamaterials to counteract the most devastating components of seismic signals.

  4. Neural networks in seismic discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, F.U.

    1995-01-01

    Neural networks are powerful and elegant computational tools that can be used in the analysis of geophysical signals. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have developed neural networks to solve problems in seismic discrimination, event classification, and seismic and hydrodynamic yield estimation. Other researchers have used neural networks for seismic phase identification. We are currently developing neural networks to estimate depths of seismic events using regional seismograms. In this paper different types of network architecture and representation techniques are discussed. We address the important problem of designing neural networks with good generalization capabilities. Examples of neural networks for treaty verification applications are also described.

  5. Seismic hazard estimation of northern Iran using smoothed seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Naeem; Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Cramer, Chris H.

    2017-07-01

    This article presents a seismic hazard assessment for northern Iran, where a smoothed seismicity approach has been used in combination with an updated seismic catalog and a ground motion prediction equation recently found to yield good fit with data. We evaluate the hazard over a geographical area including the seismic zones of Azerbaijan, the Alborz Mountain Range, and Kopeh-Dagh, as well as parts of other neighboring seismic zones that fall within our region of interest. In the chosen approach, seismic events are not assigned to specific faults but assumed to be potential seismogenic sources distributed within regular grid cells. After performing the corresponding magnitude conversions, we decluster both historical and instrumental seismicity catalogs to obtain earthquake rates based on the number of events within each cell, and smooth the results to account for the uncertainty in the spatial distribution of future earthquakes. Seismicity parameters are computed for each seismic zone separately, and for the entire region of interest as a single uniform seismotectonic region. In the analysis, we consider uncertainties in the ground motion prediction equation, the seismicity parameters, and combine the resulting models using a logic tree. The results are presented in terms of expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps and hazard curves at selected locations, considering exceedance probabilities of 2 and 10% in 50 years for rock site conditions. According to our results, the highest levels of hazard are observed west of the North Tabriz and east of the North Alborz faults, where expected PGA values are between about 0.5 and 1 g for 10 and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, respectively. We analyze our results in light of similar estimates available in the literature and offer our perspective on the differences observed. We find our results to be helpful in understanding seismic hazard for northern Iran, but recognize that additional efforts are necessary to

  6. Seismic hazard estimation of northern Iran using smoothed seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Naeem; Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Cramer, Chris H.

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a seismic hazard assessment for northern Iran, where a smoothed seismicity approach has been used in combination with an updated seismic catalog and a ground motion prediction equation recently found to yield good fit with data. We evaluate the hazard over a geographical area including the seismic zones of Azerbaijan, the Alborz Mountain Range, and Kopeh-Dagh, as well as parts of other neighboring seismic zones that fall within our region of interest. In the chosen approach, seismic events are not assigned to specific faults but assumed to be potential seismogenic sources distributed within regular grid cells. After performing the corresponding magnitude conversions, we decluster both historical and instrumental seismicity catalogs to obtain earthquake rates based on the number of events within each cell, and smooth the results to account for the uncertainty in the spatial distribution of future earthquakes. Seismicity parameters are computed for each seismic zone separately, and for the entire region of interest as a single uniform seismotectonic region. In the analysis, we consider uncertainties in the ground motion prediction equation, the seismicity parameters, and combine the resulting models using a logic tree. The results are presented in terms of expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps and hazard curves at selected locations, considering exceedance probabilities of 2 and 10% in 50 years for rock site conditions. According to our results, the highest levels of hazard are observed west of the North Tabriz and east of the North Alborz faults, where expected PGA values are between about 0.5 and 1 g for 10 and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, respectively. We analyze our results in light of similar estimates available in the literature and offer our perspective on the differences observed. We find our results to be helpful in understanding seismic hazard for northern Iran, but recognize that additional efforts are necessary to

  7. Parallel computation of seismic analysis of high arch dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Houqun; Ma Huaifa; Tu Jin; Cheng Guangqing; Tang Juzhen

    2008-01-01

    Parallel computation programs are developed for three-dimensional meso-mechanics analysis of fully-graded dam concrete and seismic response analysis of high arch dams (ADs), based on the Parallel Finite Element Program Generator (PFEPG). The computational algorithms of the numerical simulation of the meso-structure of concrete specimens were studied. Taking into account damage evolution, static preload, strain rate effect, and the heterogeneity of the meso-structure of dam concrete, the fracture processes of damage evolution and configuration of the cracks can be directly simulated. In the seismic response analysis of ADs, all the following factors are involved, such as the nonlinear contact due to the opening and slipping of the contraction joints, energy dispersion of the far-field foundation, dynamic interactions of the dam-foundation-reservoir system, and the combining effects of seismic action with all static loads. The correctness, reliability and efficiency of the two parallel computational programs are verified with practical illustrations.

  8. The influence of backfill on seismicity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hemp, DA

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available , that the seismicity has been reduced in areas where backfill had been placed. A factor complicating the evaluation of backfill on seismicity is the effect of geological structures on seismicity....

  9. Evaluation of Seismic Performance and Effectiveness of Multiple Slim-Type Damper System for Seismic Response Control of Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of a multiple slim-type damper system developed for the vibration control of earthquake excited buildings. The multiple slim-type damper (MSD that consists of several small slim-type dampers and linkage units can control damping capacity easily by changing the number of small dampers. To evaluate the performance of the MSD, dynamic loading tests are performed with three slim-type dampers manufactured at a real scale. Numerical simulations are also carried out by nonlinear time history analysis with a ten-story earthquake excited building structure. The seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of the MSD system are investigated according to the various installation configurations of the MSD system. From the results of numerical simulation and cost-effectiveness evaluation, it is shown that combinations of the MSD systems can effectively improve the seismic performance of earthquake excited building structures.

  10. Seismic design and analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pentti Varpasuo

    2013-01-01

    The seismic design and analysis of nuclear power plant (NPP) begin with the seismic hazard assessment and design ground motion development for the site.The following steps are needed for the seismic hazard assessment and design ground motion development:a.the development of regional seismo-tectonic model with seismic source areas within 500 km radius centered to the site; b.the development of strong motion prediction equations;c.logic three development for taking into account uncertainties and seismic hazard quantification; d.the development of uniform hazard response spectra for ground motion at the site; e.simulation of acceleration time histories compatible with uniform hazard response spectra.The following phase two in seismic design of NPP structures is the analysis of structural response for the design ground motion.This second phase of the process consists of the following steps:a.development of structural models of the plant buildings; b.development of the soil model underneath the plant buildings for soil-structure interaction response analysis; c.determination of in-structure response spectra for the plant buildings for the equipment response analysis.In the third phase of the seismic design and analysis the equipment is analyzed on the basis of in-structure response spectra.For this purpose the structural models of the mechanical components and piping in the plant are set up.In large 3D-structural models used today the heaviest equipment of the primary coolant circuit is included in the structural model of the reactor building.In the fourth phase the electrical equipment and automation and control equipment are seismically qualified with the aid of the in-structure spectra developed in the phase two using large three-axial shaking tables.For this purpose the smoothed envelope spectra for calculated in-structure spectra are constructed and acceleration time is fitted to these smoothed envelope spectra.

  11. On the nature of the seismic ringing of the Moon. Analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmin, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, V. V.; Fatyanov, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents an analytical method for modeling of seismic wave fields at long distances. The method has no restrictions on the calculation accuracy, model of a medium and distance observations. It allows calculating the wave fields for large space-time scales characteristic of lunar experimental data. The most characteristic feature of the lunar seismograms is considerable duration of the seismic signal (seismic "ringing"). The seismic "ringing" on the Moon has been simulated based on the created program of calculation of wave fields.. Results of the simulation lead to the following conclusions. In a first approximation, a significant duration of the seismic "ringing" on the Moon can be explained by the resonance properties of a thin layer (regolith), without attracting the scattering effects due to the high degree of heterogeneity of the environment.

  12. Seismic Analysis of a Viscoelastic Damping Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Wun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic prevention issues are discussed much more seriously around the world after Fukushima earthquake, Japan, April 2011, especially for those countries which are near the earthquake zone. Approximately 1.8×1012 kilograms of explosive energy will be released from a magnitude 9 earthquake. It destroys most of the unprotected infrastructure within several tens of miles in diameter from the epicenter. People can feel the earthquake even if living hundreds of miles away. This study is a seismic simulation analysis for an innovated and improved design of viscoelastic damping isolator, which can be more effectively applied to earthquake prevention and damage reduction of high-rise buildings, roads, bridges, power generation facilities, and so forth, from earthquake disaster. Solidworks graphic software is used to draw the 3D geometric model of the viscoelastic isolator. The dynamic behavior of the viscoelastic isolator through shock impact of specific earthquake loading, recorded by a seismometer, is obtained via ANSYS finite element package. The amplitude of the isolator is quickly reduced by the viscoelastic material in the device and is shown in a time response diagram. The result of this analysis can be a crucial reference when improving the design of a seismic isolator.

  13. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bob A. Hardage; Milo M. Backus; Michael V. DeAngelo; Sergey Fomel; Khaled Fouad; Robert J. Graebner; Paul E. Murray; Randy Remington; Diana Sava

    2006-07-31

    The purpose of our research has been to develop and demonstrate a seismic technology that will provide the oil and gas industry a better methodology for understanding reservoir and seal architectures and for improving interpretations of hydrocarbon systems. Our research goal was to expand the valuable science of seismic stratigraphy beyond the constraints of compressional (P-P) seismic data by using all modes (P-P, P-SV, SH-SH, SV-SV, SV-P) of a seismic elastic wavefield to define depositional sequences and facies. Our objective was to demonstrate that one or more modes of an elastic wavefield may image stratal surfaces across some stratigraphic intervals that are not seen by companion wave modes and thus provide different, but equally valid, information regarding depositional sequences and sedimentary facies within that interval. We use the term elastic wavefield stratigraphy to describe the methodology we use to integrate seismic sequences and seismic facies from all modes of an elastic wavefield into a seismic interpretation. We interpreted both onshore and marine multicomponent seismic surveys to select the data examples that we use to document the principles of elastic wavefield stratigraphy. We have also used examples from published papers that illustrate some concepts better than did the multicomponent seismic data that were available for our analysis. In each interpretation study, we used rock physics modeling to explain how and why certain geological conditions caused differences in P and S reflectivities that resulted in P-wave seismic sequences and facies being different from depth-equivalent S-wave sequences and facies across the targets we studied.

  15. Seismic risk perception test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The perception of risks involves the process of collecting, selecting and interpreting signals about uncertain impacts of events, activities or technologies. In the natural sciences the term risk seems to be clearly defined, it means the probability distribution of adverse effects, but the everyday use of risk has different connotations (Renn, 2008). The two terms, hazards and risks, are often used interchangeably by the public. Knowledge, experience, values, attitudes and feelings all influence the thinking and judgement of people about the seriousness and acceptability of risks. Within the social sciences however the terminology of 'risk perception' has become the conventional standard (Slovic, 1987). The mental models and other psychological mechanisms which people use to judge risks (such as cognitive heuristics and risk images) are internalized through social and cultural learning and constantly moderated (reinforced, modified, amplified or attenuated) by media reports, peer influences and other communication processes (Morgan et al., 2001). Yet, a theory of risk perception that offers an integrative, as well as empirically valid, approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing". To understand the perception of risk is necessary to consider several areas: social, psychological, cultural, and their interactions. Among the various research in an international context on the perception of natural hazards, it seemed promising the approach with the method of semantic differential (Osgood, C.E., Suci, G., & Tannenbaum, P. 1957, The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press). The test on seismic risk perception has been constructed by the method of the semantic differential. To compare opposite adjectives or terms has been used a Likert's scale to seven point. The test consists of an informative part and six sections respectively dedicated to: hazard; vulnerability (home and workplace); exposed value (with reference to

  16. Passive seismic experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G V; Ewing, M; Press, F; Sutton, G; Dorman, J; Nakamura, Y; Toksöz, N; Wiggins, R; Derr, J; Duennebier, F

    1970-01-30

    Seismometer operation for 21 days at Tranquillity Base revealed, among strong signals produced by the Apollo 11 lunar module descent stage, a small proportion of probable natural seismic signals. The latter are long-duration, emergent oscillations which lack the discrete phases and coherence of earthquake signals. From similarity with the impact signal of the Apollo 12 ascent stage, they are thought to be produced by meteoroid impacts or shallow moonquakes. This signal character may imply transmission with high Q and intense wave scattering, conditions which are mutually exclusive on earth. Natural background noise is very much smaller than on earth, and lunar tectonism may be very low.

  17. Seismic wave propagation in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; López, Francisco; Gallot, Thomas; Ginares, Alejandro; Ortega, Henry; Sanchís, Johnny; Agriela, Adrián; Weatherley, Dion

    2016-10-01

    Asteroids and small bodies of the Solar System are thought to be agglomerates of irregular boulders, therefore cataloged as granular media. It is a consensus that many asteroids might be considered as rubble or gravel piles.Impacts on their surface could produce seismic waves which propagate in the interior of these bodies, thus causing modifications in the internal distribution of rocks and ejections of particles and dust, resulting in a cometary-type comma.We present experimental and numerical results on the study of propagation of impact-induced seismic waves in granular media, with special focus on behavior changes by increasing compression.For the experiment, we use an acrylic box filled with granular materials such as sand, gravel and glass spheres. Pressure inside the box is controlled by a movable side wall and measured with sensors. Impacts are created on the upper face of the box through a hole, ranging from free-falling spheres to gunshots. We put high-speed cameras outside the box to record the impact as well as piezoelectic sensors and accelerometers placed at several depths in the granular material to detect the seismic wave.Numerical simulations are performed with ESyS-Particle, a software that implements the Discrete Element Method. The experimental setting is reproduced in the numerical simulations using both individual spherical particles and agglomerates of spherical particles shaped as irregular boulders, according to rock models obtained with a 3D scanner. The numerical experiments also reproduces the force loading on one of the wall to vary the pressure inside the box.We are interested in the velocity, attenuation and energy transmission of the waves. These quantities are measured in the experiments and in the simulations. We study the dependance of these three parameters with characteristics like: impact speed, properties of the target material and the pressure in the media.These results are relevant to understand the outcomes of impacts in

  18. Friction at seismic slip rates: testing thermal weakening models experimentally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent experiments systematically explore rock friction under crustal earthquake conditions (fast slip rate 1desing an efficient and accurate wavenumber approximation for a solution of the temperature evolution on the fault. Finally, we propose a compact and paractical model based on a small number of memory variables for the implementation of thermal weakening friction in seismic fault simulations.

  19. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF DAM WITH SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycroft, G.N.; Mork, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution to the response of a long trapezoidal-section dam on a foundation consisting of an elastic half-space and subjected to simulated earthquake motion is developed. An optimum seismic design is achieved when the cross section of the dam is triangular. The effect of soil structure interaction is to lower the strain occurring in the dam.

  20. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  1. Procedures for computing site seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferritto, John

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared as part of the Navy's Seismic Hazard Mitigation Program. The Navy has numerous bases located in seismically active regions throughout the world. Safe effective design of waterfront structures requires determining expected earthquake ground motion. The Navy's problem is further complicated by the presence of soft saturated marginal soils that can significantly amplify the levels of seismic shaking as evidenced in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command's seismic design manual, NAVFAC P355.l, requires a probabilistic assessment of ground motion for design of essential structures. This report presents the basis for the Navy's Seismic Hazard Analysis procedure that was developed and is intended to be used with the Seismic Hazard Analysis computer program and user's manual. This report also presents data on geology and seismology to establish the background for the seismic hazard model developed. The procedure uses the historical epicenter data base and available geologic data, together with source models, recurrence models, and attenuation relationships to compute the probability distribution of site acceleration and an appropriate spectra. This report discusses the developed stochastic model for seismic hazard evaluation and the associated research.

  2. 有限差分法地震波数值模拟的几个关键问题%Several key issues of finite-difference seismic wave numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国平; 姚逢昌; 石玉梅; 黄文锋; 程利敏

    2011-01-01

    地震波数值模拟是研究地震波传播规律的重要手段,对指导地震资料的采集、处理和解释有重要意义.有限差分法由于其简单易于数值计算,在求解偏微分方程和近场波动的问题越来越受到关注.本文详细阐述了与有限差分法地震波数值模拟有关的几个重要问题,对有限差分法地震波数值模拟的发展历史、波动方程的差分离散、震源处理、稳定性分析、边界条件和数值频散的理论原理和特点进行了全面阐述和详细分析.%The seismic wave propagation modelling is an important way to study the seismic propagation rules. It is of great significance on instructing seismic data gathering, data processing and interpretation. The finite-difference method is very easy to numerical computation and is concerned about the resolution of partial differential equation and near-field wave propagation. The article elaborates several important problems about the finite-difference seismic propagation numerical modelling. The theory and feature of the finite-difference modelling development history, wave equation differential scattering, source processing, stability analysis, boundary condition and numerical dispersion are thoroughly elaborated and analyzed.

  3. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  4. Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brune, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Rotational motion is increasingly understood to be a significant part of seismic wave motion. Rotations can be important in earthquake strong motion and in Induced Seismicity Monitoring. Rotational seismic data can also enable shear selectivity and improve wavefield sampling for vertical geophones in 3D surveys, among other applications. However, sensor technology has been a limiting factor to date. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding a multi-year project that is now entering Phase 2 to develop and deploy a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. Initial focus is on induced seismicity monitoring, particularly for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with fracturing. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, improved noise floors, robustness, and repeatability. This paper presents a summary of Phase 1 results and Phase 2 status.

  5. EMSE: Synergizing EM and seismic data attributes for enhanced forecasts of reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-10-01

    New developments of electromagnetic and seismic techniques have recently revolutionized the oil and gas industry. Time-lapse seismic data is providing engineers with tools to more accurately track the dynamics of multi-phase reservoir fluid flows. With the challenges faced in distinguishing between hydrocarbons and water via seismic methods, the industry has been looking at electromagnetic techniques in order to exploit the strong contrast in conductivity between hydrocarbons and water. Incorporating this information into reservoir simulation is expected to considerably enhance the forecasting of the reservoir, hence optimizing production and reducing costs. Conventional approaches typically invert the seismic and electromagnetic data in order to transform them into production parameters, before incorporating them as constraints in the history matching process and reservoir simulations. This makes automatization difficult and computationally expensive due to the necessity of manual processing, besides the potential artifacts. Here we introduce a new approach to incorporate seismic and electromagnetic data attributes directly into the history matching process. To avoid solving inverse problems and exploit information in the dynamics of the flow, we exploit petrophysical transformations to simultaneously incorporate time lapse seismic and electromagnetic data attributes using different ensemble Kalman-based history matching techniques. Our simulation results show enhanced predictability of the critical reservoir parameters and reduce uncertainties in model simulations, outperforming with only production data or the inclusion of either seismic or electromagnetic data. A statistical test is performed to confirm the significance of the results. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Seismic moulin tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeoesli, Claudia; Walter, Fabian; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Kissling, Edi

    2016-08-01

    Through glacial moulins, meltwater is routed from the glacier surface to its base. Moulins are a main feature feeding subglacial drainage systems and thus influencing basal motion and ice dynamics, but their geometry remains poorly known. Here we show that analysis of the seismic wavefield generated by water falling into a moulin can help constrain its geometry. We present modeling results of hour-long seimic tremors emitted from a vertical moulin shaft, observed with a seismometer array installed at the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The tremor was triggered when the moulin water level exceeded a certain height, which we associate with the threshold for the waterfall to hit directly the surface of the moulin water column. The amplitude of the tremor signal changed over each tremor episode, in close relation to the amount of inflowing water. The tremor spectrum features multiple prominent peaks, whose characteristic frequencies are distributed like the resonant modes of a semiopen organ pipe and were found to depend on the moulin water level, consistent with a source composed of resonant tube waves (water pressure waves coupled to elastic deformation of the moulin walls) along the water-filled moulin pipe. Analysis of surface particle motions lends further support to this interpretation. The seismic wavefield was modeled as a superposition of sustained wave radiation by pressure sources on the side walls and at the bottom of the moulin. The former was found to dominate the wave field at close distance and the latter at large distance to the moulin.

  7. Seismic Radiation from Crack Coalescence Model and Reconstruction of Seismically Equivalent Single Crack Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kame, N.; Uchida, K.

    2006-12-01

    We simulate dynamic rupture propagation in which two mode II cracks coalesce on a planar fault using a boundary integral equation method. Our main interests are in the rupture complexity and resultant seismic radiation due to coalescence and in the reconstruction of seismically equivalent another dynamic model that could be inferred only from the waveforms. First we analyze crack coalescence model (CCM) with homogeneous source parameters except on two pre- slipped regions. In CCM, a main crack nucleates, propagates and coalesces with a nucleating subsidiary crack. Our analysis shows that local high slip-rate pulse is generated by coalescence and a secondary Rayleigh slip pulse subsequently begins to propagate trailing the rupture front. Second we reconstruct a single crack model (SCM) with heterogeneous source parameters that can reproduce the same slip-rate history in CCM, that is, both models are seismically equivalent. In SCM we found singular increase in the stress drop and sudden decrease in the strength excess corresponding to the coalescence pulse region, which means that these two inhomogeneities appeared in SCM originally resulted from the stress interaction between approaching crack tips in CCM. Third we synthesize seismic radiation from CCM and successfully identify distinct phases associated with two pulses: the coalescence pulse phase shows seismic radiation similar to the stopping phase that has a typical ω-2 behavior at high frequency, which is also consistent with theoretically predicted radiation by the singular stress drop in SCM. Rayleigh slip-pulse phase appears dominantly in transverse component with strong forward directivity similar to rupture front phase although disappears in parallel component except very near the fault.

  8. Seismic shaking in the North China Basin expected from ruptures of a possible seismic gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Benchun; Liu, Dunyu; Yin, An

    2017-05-01

    A 160 km long seismic gap, which has not been ruptured over 8000 years, was identified recently in North China. In this study, we use a dynamic source model and a newly available high-resolution 3-D velocity structure to simulate long-period ground motion (up to 0.5 Hz) from possibly worst case rupture scenarios of the seismic gap. We find that the characteristics of the earthquake source and the local geologic structure play a critical role in controlling the amplitude and distribution of the simulated strong ground shaking. Rupture directivity and slip asperities can result in large-amplitude (i.e., >1 m/s) ground shaking near the fault, whereas long-duration shaking may occur within sedimentary basins. In particular, a deep and closed Quaternary basin between Beijing and Tianjin can lead to ground shaking of several tens of cm/s for more than 1 min. These results may provide a sound basis for seismic mitigation in one of the most populated regions in the world.

  9. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2012-10-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic device is

  10. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kukowski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads. Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0–1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic

  11. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-02-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first 2-D experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and is applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of high quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and indications of the fault traces from shear zones. Since these were artificially introduced in our test models, they can be regarded as zones of disturbance rather than tectonic shear zones characterized by decompaction. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here, improves the quality with respect to S / N ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass

  12. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Krawczyk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first 2-D experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads. Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0–1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and is applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of high quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and indications of the fault traces from shear zones. Since these were artificially introduced in our test models, they can be regarded as zones of disturbance rather than tectonic shear zones characterized by decompaction. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here, improves the quality with respect to S / N ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth

  13. seismic-py: Reading seismic data with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of seismic exploration of the Earth has changed
    dramatically over the last half a century. The Society of Exploration
    Geophysicists (SEG has worked to create standards to store the vast
    amounts of seismic data in a way that will be portable across computer
    architectures. However, it has been impossible to predict the needs of the
    immense range of seismic data acquisition systems. As a result, vendors have
    had to bend the rules to accommodate the needs of new instruments and
    experiment types. For low level access to seismic data, there is need for a
    standard open source library to allow access to a wide range of vendor data
    files that can handle all of the variations. A new seismic software package,
    seismic-py, provides an infrastructure for creating and managing drivers for
    each particular format. Drivers can be derived from one of the known formats
    and altered to handle any slight variations. Alternatively drivers can be
    developed from scratch for formats that are very different from any previously
    defined format. Python has been the key to making driver development easy
    and efficient to implement. The goal of seismic-py is to be the base system
    that will power a wide range of experimentation with seismic data and at the
    same time provide clear documentation for the historical record of seismic
    data formats.

  14. Indication to distinguish the burst region of coal gas from seismic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jian-yuan; TANG Hong-wei; XU Lin; LI Yan-fang

    2009-01-01

    The velocity of an over-burst coal seam is about 1/3 compared to a normal coal seam based on laboratory test results. This can be considered as a basis to confirm the area of coal and gas burst by seismic exploration technique. Similarly, the simulation result of the theoretical seismic model shows that there is obvious distinction between over-burst coal and normal coal based on the coal reflection's travel-time, energy and frequency. The results from the actual seismic data acquired in the coal and gas over-burst cases is con-sistent with that of the laboratory and seismic modeling; that is, in the coal and gas burst region, seismic reflection travel time is delayed, seismic amplitude is weakened and seis-mic frequency is reduced. Therefore, it can be concluded that seismic exploration tech-nique is promising for use in distinguishing coal and gas over-burst regions based on the variation of seismic reflection travel time, amplitude and frequency.

  15. Indication to distinguish the burst region of coal gas from seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian-yuan Cheng; Hong-wei Tang; Lin Xu; Yan-fang Li [China Coal Research Institute, Xi' an (China). Xi' an Research Institute

    2009-09-15

    The velocity of an over-burst coal seam is about 1/3 compared to a normal coal seam based on laboratory test results. This can be considered as a basis to confirm the area of coal and gas burst by seismic exploration technique. Similarly, the simulation result of the theoretical seismic model shows that there is obvious distinction between over-burst coal and normal coal based on the coal reflection's travel-time, energy and frequency. The results from the actual seismic data acquired in the coal and gas over-burst cases is consistent with that of the laboratory and seismic modeling; that is, in the coal and gas burst region, seismic reflection travel time is delayed, seismic amplitude is weakened and seismic frequency is reduced. Therefore, it can be concluded that seismic exploration technique is promising for use in distinguishing coal and gas over-burst regions based on the variation of seismic reflection travel time, amplitude and frequency. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Bernoulli-based random undersampling schemes for 2D seismic data regularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Rui; Zhao Qun; She De-Ping; Yang Li; Cao Hui; Yang Qin-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Seismic data regularization is an important preprocessing step in seismic signal processing. Traditional seismic acquisition methods follow the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, whereas compressive sensing (CS) provides a fundamentally new paradigm to overcome limitations in data acquisition. Besides the sparse representation of seismic signal in some transform domain and the 1-norm reconstruction algorithm, the seismic data regularization quality of CS-based techniques strongly depends on random undersampling schemes. For 2D seismic data, discrete uniform-based methods have been investigated, where some seismic traces are randomly sampled with an equal probability. However, in theory and practice, some seismic traces with different probability are required to be sampled for satisfying the assumptions in CS. Therefore, designing new undersampling schemes is imperative. We propose a Bernoulli-based random undersampling scheme and its jittered version to determine the regular traces that are randomly sampled with different probability, while both schemes comply with the Bernoulli process distribution. We performed experiments using the Fourier and curvelet transforms and the spectral projected gradient reconstruction algorithm for 1-norm (SPGL1), and ten different random seeds. According to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between the original and reconstructed seismic data, the detailed experimental results from 2D numerical and physical simulation data show that the proposed novel schemes perform overall better than the discrete uniform schemes.

  17. Updated Colombian Seismic Hazard Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraso, J.; Arcila, M.; Romero, J.; Dimate, C.; Bermúdez, M. L.; Alvarado, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Colombian seismic hazard map used by the National Building Code (NSR-98) in effect until 2009 was developed in 1996. Since then, the National Seismological Network of Colombia has improved in both coverage and technology providing fifteen years of additional seismic records. These improvements have allowed a better understanding of the regional geology and tectonics which in addition to the seismic activity in Colombia with destructive effects has motivated the interest and the need to develop a new seismic hazard assessment in this country. Taking advantage of new instrumental information sources such as new broad band stations of the National Seismological Network, new historical seismicity data, standardized global databases availability, and in general, of advances in models and techniques, a new Colombian seismic hazard map was developed. A PSHA model was applied. The use of the PSHA model is because it incorporates the effects of all seismic sources that may affect a particular site solving the uncertainties caused by the parameters and assumptions defined in this kind of studies. First, the seismic sources geometry and a complete and homogeneous seismic catalog were defined; the parameters of seismic rate of each one of the seismic sources occurrence were calculated establishing a national seismotectonic model. Several of attenuation-distance relationships were selected depending on the type of seismicity considered. The seismic hazard was estimated using the CRISIS2007 software created by the Engineering Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México -UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). A uniformly spaced grid each 0.1° was used to calculate the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and response spectral values at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3.0 seconds with return periods of 75, 225, 475, 975 and 2475 years. For each site, a uniform hazard spectrum and exceedance rate curves were calculated. With the results, it is

  18. Seismic hazard assessment: Issues and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic hazard and risk are two very important concepts in engineering design and other policy considerations. Although seismic hazard and risk have often been used inter-changeably, they are fundamentally different. Furthermore, seismic risk is more important in engineering design and other policy considerations. Seismic hazard assessment is an effort by earth scientists to quantify seismic hazard and its associated uncertainty in time and space and to provide seismic hazard estimates for seismic risk assessment and other applications. Although seismic hazard assessment is more a scientific issue, it deserves special attention because of its significant implication to society. Two approaches, probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and deterministic seismic hazard analysis (DSHA), are commonly used for seismic hazard assessment. Although PSHA has been pro-claimed as the best approach for seismic hazard assessment, it is scientifically flawed (i.e., the physics and mathematics that PSHA is based on are not valid). Use of PSHA could lead to either unsafe or overly conservative engineering design or public policy, each of which has dire consequences to society. On the other hand, DSHA is a viable approach for seismic hazard assessment even though it has been labeled as unreliable. The biggest drawback of DSHA is that the temporal characteristics (i.e., earthquake frequency of occurrence and the associated uncertainty) are often neglected. An alternative, seismic hazard analysis (SHA), utilizes earthquake science and statistics directly and provides a seismic hazard estimate that can be readily used for seismic risk assessment and other applications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG.

  19. Seismic modeling of carbonate outcrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafleu, J.; Schlager, W.; Campbell, E.; Everts, A.J. (Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-09-01

    Traditionally, seismic modeling has concentrated on one-dimensional borehole modeling and two-dimensional forward modeling of basic structural-stratigraphic schemes, which are directly compared with real seismic data. Two-dimensional seismic models based on outcrop observations may aid in bridging the gap between the detail of the outcrop and the low resolution of seismic lines. Examples include the Dolomites (north Italy), the High Atlas (Morocco), the Vercors (southeast France) and the Last chance Canyon (New Mexico). The seismic models generally are constructed using the following procedure: (1) construction of a detailed lithological model based on direct outcrop observations; (2) division of the lithological model into lithostratigraphic units, using master bedding planes and important facies transitions as boundaries; (3) assignment of petrophysical properties of these lithostratigraphic units; (4) computation of time sections of reflectivity, using different modeling techniques; and (5) convolution with source wavelets of different frequencies. The lithological detail modeled in the case studies lead to some striking results, particularly the discovery of pseudo-unconformities. Pseudo-unconformities are unconformities in seismics, but correspond to rapid changes of dip and facies in outcrop. None of the outcrop geometries studied were correctly portrayed seismically at 25 Hz frequency. However, in some instances the true relationship would emerge gradually at frequencies of 50 to 100 Hz. These results demonstrate that detailed, outcrop-derived/seismic models can reveal what stratigraphic relationships and features are likely to be resolved under ideal or less ideal conditions, and what pitfalls may befall the interpreter of real seismic data.

  20. Integrated system for seismic evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the various features of the Seismic Module of the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures). This system was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and capability of nuclear power plant facilities. The CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the features of the Seismic Module in particular. The development of the Seismic Module of the CARES system is based on an approach which incorporates all major aspects of seismic analysis currently employed by the industry into an integrated system that allows for carrying out interactively computations of structural response to seismic motions. The code operates on a PC computer system and has multi-graphics capabilities. It has been designed with user friendly features and it allows for interactive manipulation of various analysis phases during the seismic design process. The capabilities of the seismic module include (a) generation of artificial time histories compatible with given design ground response spectra, (b) development of Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions associated with the seismic input, (c) deconvolution analysis using vertically propagating shear waves through a given soil profile, and (d) development of in-structure response spectra or corresponding PSD's. It should be pointed out that these types of analyses can also be performed individually by using available computer codes such as FLUSH, SAP, etc. The uniqueness of the CARES, however, lies on its ability to perform all required phases of the seismic analysis in an integrated manner. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Seismic calm predictors of rockburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmushko, Tatjana; Turuntaev, Sergey; Kulikov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    The method of "seismic calm" is widely used for forecasting of strong natural earthquakes (Sobolev G.A., Ponomarev A.V., 2003). The "seismic calm" means that during some time period before the main earthquake, the smaller events (with energies of several order smaller than that of the main earthquake) don't occur. In the presented paper the applicability of the method based on the idea of seismic calm for forecasting rockburst is considered. Three deposits (with seismicity induced by mining) are analyzed: Tashtagol iron deposit (Altai, Russia), Vorkuta (North Ural, Russia) and Barentsburg (Spitsbergen, Norway) coalmines. Local seismic monitoring networks are installed on each of them. The catalogues of seismic events were processed and strong events (rockbursts) were studied (Vorkuta M=2,3; Barentsburg M=1,8; Tashtagol M=1,9÷2,2). All catalogues cover at least two years (Vorkuta - 2008-2011, Barentsburg - 2011-2012, Tashtagol - 2002-2012). It was found that the number of seismic events with magnitudes M=0,5÷1 decreased in a month before the main strong event at Vorkuta coalmines. This event was not directly related with coal mining, its epicenter was located aside of the area of coal mining. In Barentsburg mine the rockburst wasn't so strong as in Vorkuta. The number of events with energies M=0,5 decreased slightly before the rockburst, but not so obviously as in Vorkuta case. The seismic events with high energies occur often at Tashtagol iron deposit. Mining methods used there differ from the coal deposit mining. At coalmines the mining combine runs from edge to edge of the wall, cutting off the coal. The considered iron deposit is developed by a method of block blasting. Not all rockbursts occur immediately after the blasting, so, the problem of the rockburst prediction is important for mining safety. To find rockburst precursors it is necessary to separate the events occurred due to the block blasting from the seismic events due to relocation of stresses in

  2. Stochastic seismic inversion using greedy annealed importance sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-10-01

    A global optimization method called very fast simulated annealing (VFSA) inversion has been applied to seismic inversion. Here we address some of the limitations of VFSA by developing a new stochastic inference method, named greedy annealed importance sampling (GAIS). GAIS combines VFSA and greedy importance sampling (GIS), which uses a greedy search in the important regions located by VFSA, in order to attain fast convergence and provide unbiased estimation. We demonstrate the performance of GAIS with application to seismic inversion of field post- and pre-stack datasets. The results indicate that GAIS can improve lateral continuity of the inverted impedance profiles and provide better estimation of uncertainties than using VFSA alone. Thus this new hybrid method combining global and local optimization methods can be applied in seismic reservoir characterization and reservoir monitoring for accurate estimation of reservoir models and their uncertainties.

  3. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy

  4. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  5. Seismic signals from Dust Devils on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenda, Balthasar; Lognonné, Philippe; Spiga, Aymeric; Kawamura, Taichi; Kedar, Sharon; Banerdt, Bruce; Lorenz, Ralph

    2016-10-01

    We modeled the long-period seismic signals generated by Dust Devils and convective vortices on Mars. To characterize the source term, we used Large-Eddy Simulations with a spatial resolution of 50 m that resolve large turbulent and convective structures of the Martian atmosphere. The corresponding surface pressure fluctuations induce a quasi-static ground displacement and thus a tilt of the surface, which over weak soils can be detected by sensitive seismometers, as shown in terrestrial field experiments. Typical convective vortices on Mars have core-pressure drops of 2-5 Pa and generate tilt accelerations of 10-20 nm/s2 over a regolith halfspace, and of a few nm/s2 in the presence of a layer of harder rock at shallow depth. This signals are strong enough to be detected by the Very-Broad Band seismometer of the InSight/SEIS experiment up to a distance of several tens of meters from the vortex. The results of numerical simulations are compared to meteorological data from previous mission to Mars, and they give estimates of the encounter frequencies, showing how convective vortices will be routinely detected during the central hours of the day. A joint analysis of meteorological and seismic data will permit to distinguish atmospheric episodes from internal seimic sources and to investigate the structure and the elastic properties of the near surface at the InSight landing site.

  6. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  7. Reevaluation of the Seismicity and seismic hazards of Northeastern Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Suleman, abdunnur; Aousetta, Fawzi

    2014-05-01

    Libya, located at the northern margin of the African continent, underwent many episodes of orogenic activities. These episodes of orogenic activities affected and shaped the geological setting of the country. This study represents a detailed investigation that aims to focus on the seismicity and its implications on earthquake hazards of Northeastern Libya. At the end of year 2005 the Libyan National Seismological Network starts functioning with 15 stations. The Seismicity of the area under investigation was reevaluated using data recorded by the recently established network. The Al-Maraj earthquake occurred in May 22nd 2005was analyzed. This earthquake was located in a known seismically active area. This area was the sight of the well known 1963 earthquake that kills over 200 people. Earthquakes were plotted and resulting maps were interpreted and discussed. The level of seismic activity is higher in some areas, such as the city of Al-Maraj. The offshore areas north of Al-Maraj seem to have higher seismic activity. It is highly recommended that the recent earthquake activity is considered in the seismic hazard assessments for the northeastern part of Libya.

  8. Validating induced seismicity forecast models - Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    CERN Document Server

    Kiraly-Proag, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-For\\^ets 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distri...

  9. Optimized staggered grid finite-difference numerical simulation of well seismic and analysis of numerical dispersion%优化交错网格差分算子的井间地震数值模拟及其频散分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章阳; 孟凡顺

    2014-01-01

    In the finite-difference numerical simulation of well seismic,when using discretized higher-order differential equation approximate continuous derivative wave equation,it will inevitably lead to numerical dispersion.As numerical disper-sion directly affects the precision of numerical simulation of seismic wave,so in order to get more clear and accurate records of seismic wave field,we must try best to suppress numerical dispersion.In this paper,we are based on an order velocity-stress elastic wave equation,introducing two constraint conditions and construct a Lagrange function,then obtain new differential co-efficients by extremely conditions.Analyze and compare the numerical simulation of an order velocity-stress elastic wave equa-tion with high-order staggered grid differential operators by Taylor expansion and optimized differential operators,we con-clude that the numerical simulation using by optimized staggered grid differential operators can more effectively suppress the numerical dispersion and improve the accuracy of simulation.and provide a reliable basis for wave field imaging of high preci-sion seismic data in well and interpretation between P wave and S wave.%在井间地震有限差分数值模拟中,用离散化的高阶差分方程近似连续导数的波动方程时,不可避免地会产生数值频散,而数值频散程度则直接影响到地震波数值模拟精度,因此为了得到清晰准确的地震波场记录,必须尽可能地压制数值频散。这里在一阶速度应力弹性波方程的基础上,利用两个约束条件构造拉格朗日函数获取优化差分系数,与泰勒展开差分系数下的交错网格高阶差分模拟结果比较,发现改进的优化交错网格差分算子的高阶差分数值模拟能更有效地压制数值频散,进一步提高交错网格高阶差分数值模拟的精度,为高精度井间地震数据的波场成像、纵横波联合解释等提供可靠依据。

  10. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-01

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  11. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-20

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  12. Earthquake Activity - SEISMIC_DATA_IN: Seismic Refraction Data for Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SEISMIC_DATA_IN is a point shapefile created from a shapefile named SEISMIC_DATA, which was derived from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet named SEISMIC_DECODED. The...

  13. null Seismic Creep, null Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seismic creep is the constant or periodic movement on a fault as contrasted with the sudden rupture associated with an earthquake. It is a usually slow deformation...

  14. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non- Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  15. Worldwide Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a large volume of both Analog and Digital seismic reflection data. Currently only a limited number of lines are available online. Digital data include...

  16. Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Tianshui Urban Area, Gansu Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A scenario seismic hazard analysis was performed for the city of Tianshui. The scenario hazard analysis utilized the best available geologic and seismological information as well as composite source model (i.e., ground motion simulation to derive ground motion hazards in terms of acceleration time histories, peak values (e.g., peak ground acceleration and peak ground velocity, and response spectra. This study confirms that Tianshui is facing significant seismic hazard, and certain mitigation measures, such as better seismic design for buildings and other structures, should be developed and implemented. This study shows that PGA of 0.3 g (equivalent to Chinese intensity VIII should be considered for seismic design of general building and PGA of 0.4 g (equivalent to Chinese intensity IX for seismic design of critical facility in Tianshui.

  17. Are seismic hazard assessment errors and earthquake surprises unavoidable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Why earthquake occurrences bring us so many surprises? The answer seems evident if we review the relationships that are commonly used to assess seismic hazard. The time-span of physically reliable Seismic History is yet a small portion of a rupture recurrence cycle at an earthquake-prone site, which makes premature any kind of reliable probabilistic statements about narrowly localized seismic hazard. Moreover, seismic evidences accumulated to-date demonstrate clearly that most of the empirical relations commonly accepted in the early history of instrumental seismology can be proved erroneous when testing statistical significance is applied. Seismic events, including mega-earthquakes, cluster displaying behaviors that are far from independent or periodic. Their distribution in space is possibly fractal, definitely, far from uniform even in a single segment of a fault zone. Such a situation contradicts generally accepted assumptions used for analytically tractable or computer simulations and complicates design of reliable methodologies for realistic earthquake hazard assessment, as well as search and definition of precursory behaviors to be used for forecast/prediction purposes. As a result, the conclusions drawn from such simulations and analyses can MISLEAD TO SCIENTIFICALLY GROUNDLESS APPLICATION, which is unwise and extremely dangerous in assessing expected societal risks and losses. For example, a systematic comparison of the GSHAP peak ground acceleration estimates with those related to actual strong earthquakes, unfortunately, discloses gross inadequacy of this "probabilistic" product, which appears UNACCEPTABLE FOR ANY KIND OF RESPONSIBLE SEISMIC RISK EVALUATION AND KNOWLEDGEABLE DISASTER PREVENTION. The self-evident shortcomings and failures of GSHAP appeals to all earthquake scientists and engineers for an urgent revision of the global seismic hazard maps from the first principles including background methodologies involved, such that there becomes: (a) a

  18. Visualization of volumetric seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickermann, Dela; Böttinger, Michael; Ashfaq Ahmed, Khawar; Gajewski, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Mostly driven by demands of high quality subsurface imaging, highly specialized tools and methods have been developed to support the processing, visualization and interpretation of seismic data. 3D seismic data acquisition and 4D time-lapse seismic monitoring are well-established techniques in academia and industry, producing large amounts of data to be processed, visualized and interpreted. In this context, interactive 3D visualization methods proved to be valuable for the analysis of 3D seismic data cubes - especially for sedimentary environments with continuous horizons. In crystalline and hard rock environments, where hydraulic stimulation techniques may be applied to produce geothermal energy, interpretation of the seismic data is a more challenging problem. Instead of continuous reflection horizons, the imaging targets are often steep dipping faults, causing a lot of diffractions. Without further preprocessing these geological structures are often hidden behind the noise in the data. In this PICO presentation we will present a workflow consisting of data processing steps, which enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, followed by a visualization step based on the use the commercially available general purpose 3D visualization system Avizo. Specifically, we have used Avizo Earth, an extension to Avizo, which supports the import of seismic data in SEG-Y format and offers easy access to state-of-the-art 3D visualization methods at interactive frame rates, even for large seismic data cubes. In seismic interpretation using visualization, interactivity is a key requirement for understanding complex 3D structures. In order to enable an easy communication of the insights gained during the interactive visualization process, animations of the visualized data were created which support the spatial understanding of the data.

  19. Seismic properties of polyphase rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin

    2005-11-01

    Knowledge about the seismic properties of polyphase rocks is fundamental for interpreting seismic refraction and reflection data and for establishing lithospheric structure and composition models. This study aims to obtain more precise relationships between seismic properties of rocks and controlling factors (e.g., pressure, temperature, mineralogical and chemical compositions, microstructure of rocks), particularly for those rocks imprinted by ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism. These relationships will be very helpful to extrapolate calculated and measured seismic properties of rocks to depths of interest and to engender interpretations relevant to petrological composition and tectonic process. An Internet Database of Rock Seismic Properties (DRSP) was set up and a Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores was published. They comprise almost all data available in the literature during the past 4 decades and can serve as a convenient, comprehensive and concise information source on physical properties of rocks to the earth sciences and geotechnical communities. Statistical results of the DRSP reveal the dependence of seismic properties on density, porosity, humidity, and mineralogical and chemical compositions. Using 16 different averaging methods, we calculated P-wave velocities of 696 dry samples according to the volume fraction and elastic constants of each constituent mineral. Although only 22 common minerals were taken into account in the computation, the calculated P-wave velocities agree well with laboratory values measured at about 300 MPa, where most microcracks are closed and the mean Vp of a polymineralic rock is exclusively controlled by its modal composition. However, none of these mixture rules can simultaneously fit measured P-wave velocities for all lithologies or at all pressures. Therefore, more prudence is required in selecting an appropriate mixture rule for calculation of seismic velocities of different rock types.

  20. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  1. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  2. seismicity and seismotectonics of Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Suleman, abdunnur

    2015-04-01

    Libya, located at the central Mediterranean margin of the African shield, underwent many episodes of orogenic activity that shaped its geological setting. The present day deformation of Libya is the result of the Eurasia-Africa continental collision. The tectonic evolution of Libya has yielded a complex crustal structure that is composed of a series of basins and uplifts. This study aims to explain in detail the seismicity and seismotectonics of Libya using new data recorded by the recently established Libyan National Seismograph Network (LNSN) incorporating other available geophysical and geological information. Detailed investigations of the Libyan seismicity indicates that Libya has experienced earthquakes of varying magnitudes The seismic activity of Libya shows dominant trends of Seismicity with most of the seismic activity concentrated along the northern coastal areas. Four major clusters of Seismicity were quit noticeable. Fault plane solution was estimated for 20 earthquakes recorded by the Libyan National Seismograph Network in northwestern and northeastern Libya. Results of fault plane solution suggest that normal faulting was dominant in the westernmost part of Libya; strike slip faulting was dominant in northern-central part of Libya. The northern-eastern part of the country suggests that dip-dip faulting were more prevalent.

  3. Seismic stratigraphy of the Bahamas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, J.W.; Sheridan, R.E.

    1987-06-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Straits of Florida, Northwest Providence Channel, Tongue of the Ocean, and Exuma Sound reveal a seismic stratigraphy characterized by a series of prograding Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary seismic sequences with seismic velocities generally less than 4 km/sec overlying a Lower Cretaceous section of low-amplitude reflections which are more nearly horizontal than the overlying prograding clinoforms and have seismic velocities greater than 5 km/sec. The prograding units are detrital shallow-water carbonates shed from nearby carbonate banks into deep intrabank basins that were established in the Late Cretaceous. The Lower Cretaceous units are probably shallow-water carbonate banks that were drowned in the middle Cretaceous but which, during the Early Cretaceous, extended from Florida throughout the Bahamas region. The seismic reflection profiles reveal a sharp angular unconformity at 5-sec two-way traveltime in northwest Tongue of the Ocean, suggesting a rift-drift unconformity and deposition on thinned continental crust. No such unconformity is seen in central and southeast Tongue of the Ocean or in Exuma Sound, suggesting that these areas are built on oceanic crust.

  4. Seismic risk perception in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Risk perception is a fundamental element in the definition and the adoption of preventive counter-measures. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. This paper presents results of a survey on seismic risk perception in Italy conducted from January 2013 to present . The research design combines a psychometric and a cultural theoretic approach. More than 7,000 on-line tests have been compiled. The data collected show that in Italy seismic risk perception is strongly underestimated; 86 on 100 Italian citizens, living in the most dangerous zone (namely Zone 1), do not have a correct perception of seismic hazard. From these observations we deem that extremely urgent measures are required in Italy to reach an effective way to communicate seismic risk. Finally, the research presents a comparison between groups on seismic risk perception: a group involved in campaigns of information and education on seismic risk and a control group.

  5. Seismicity of the Jalisco Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Rutz, M.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Trejo-Gomez, E.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    In April 2002 began to transmit the stations of the first phase of Jalisco Telemetric Network located at the northwest of Jalisco Block and at the area of Volcan de Fuego (Colima Volcano), in June were deployed four additional MarsLite portable stations in the Bahia de Banderas area, and by the end of August one more portable station at Ceboruco Volcano. The data of these stations jointly with the data from RESCO (Colima Telemetric Network) give us the minimum seismic stations coverage to initiate in a systematic and permanent way the study of the seismicity in this very complex tectonic region. A preliminary analysis of seismicity based on the events registered by the networks using a shutter algorithm, confirms several important features proposed by microseismicity studies carried out between 1996 and 1998. A high level of seismicity inside and below of Rivera plate is observed, this fact suggest a very complex stress pattern acting on this plate. Shallow seismicity at south and east of Bahia de Banderas also suggest a complex stress pattern in this region of the Jalisco Block, events at more than 30 km depth are located under the mouth of the bay and in face of it, a feature denominated Banderas Boundary mark the change of the seismic regime at north of this latitude (20.75°N), however some shallow events were located at the region of Nayarit.

  6. Inverse seismic interferometry: can we observe seismic data at greater depth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelemeijer, Paula; Fichtner, Andreas; Kimman, Wouter

    2015-04-01

    By the very nature of our planet, seismological recordings are limited to the Earth's surface with some deployments in boreholes and more recently the placement of seismometers on the sea floor. Therefore, only travelling and standing waves that are excited and oscillate at shallow depths can be observed. Seismic waves oscillating at great depth with zero amplitude near the surface, e.g. higher frequency core-mantle boundary Stoneley modes, remain practically invisible to us. Seismic interferometry based on background noise has become a standard method for obtaining information regarding shallow and more recently also deeper Earth structure. Noise cross-correlations between a set of stations located on the surface of the Earth provide in theory information on the inter-station Green's functions, in case of an equipartitioned wave field or an isotropic source distribution. Using reciprocity, similar techniques can be employed to obtain the Green's function between two events for a distribution of receivers. In this contribution, we propose to use the concept of inverse interferometry for observing seismic data with only deep non-zero amplitude. As an initial step, cross-correlation measurements between two deep events, recorded at stations over the globe, will be analysed. Numerical wave field simulations will enable us to investigate the sensitivity of these measurements to Earth structure. Important contributing factors are possibly the source mechanisms of the events, inter-source distance and the distribution of receivers over the surface of the Earth.

  7. Investigation of ambient seismic noise using seismic interferometry in western Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywosz, Natalia

    Passive seismic interferometry is a process by which ambient noise data recorded at different seismic stations can be cross-correlated to estimate Green's functions. In the past, both surface waves and body waves have successfully been extracted by cross-correlation of ambient noise data on both regional and global scales. In this study, I have generated Matlab code to simulate an application of seismic interferometry on a synthetic model with pre-defined layers and p-wave velocities. For areas with known velocity models, the Matlab code produced in this study can be used to generate synthetic seismograms, and model the effects of cross-correlation on receiver responses. In order to develop a general understanding of the ambient noise wavefield in western Montana, a spectral analysis program was developed in Matlab. This program is used to process ambient noise data from the Transportable Array (TA) Seismographic Network, and to generate its power spectral density plots and probability density functions. The detailed spectral analysis provides some insight to the ambient noise sources, and their energy distribution throughout western Montana. In addition, an attempt was made to preprocess ambient noise data from the TA array in Matlab for later use. Although preprocessing of the data was successful, limitations in computing power and time, allowed for temporal stacking of only one month of data. The one month period was not long enough to produce Green's functions which contain coherent body waves.

  8. Seismic pattern treatment method through calculation of seismic density at grid nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of seismic data and seismicity characteristics in China, we gave a method to deal with seismic patterns by calculating density at grid nodes. Number of earthquakes and epicenter distribution are considered comprehen-sively in this method. Effect of datum accuracy is stressed on parameter confirmation. Seismic patterns from this method are stable and can reflect seismic characteristics reliably. These seismic patterns are the base of quantita-tive analysis of seismicity. It can be applied in seismic tendency analysis and medium-long term earthquake pre-diction, earthquake countermeasure and risk mitigation.

  9. Seismic analysis of ITER fourth PF (Poloidal Field Coil) feeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Sumei, E-mail: smliu@ipp.ac.cn [School of Engineering, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Wei [School of Engineering, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Song, Yuntao; Ni, Xiaojun; Wang, Zhongwei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Yonghua; Gong, Chenyu [Magnet Division, TKM, ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER feeder systems connect the ITER magnet systems located inside the main cryostat to the cryo-plant, power-supply and control system interfaces outside the cryostat. The main purpose of the feeders is to convey the cryogenic supply and electrical power to the coils as well as house the instrumentation wiring. The PF busbar which carries 52 kA current will suffer from high Lorentz force due to the background magnetic field inspired by the coils and the self-field between every pair of busbars. Except their mechanical strength and thermal insulation performance must be achieved, the dynamic mechanism on PF structure should be assessed. This paper presents the simulation and seismic analysis on ITER 4th PF feeder including the Coil Terminal Box and S-bend Box (CTB and SBB), the Cryostat Feed-through (CFT), the In-Cryostat-Feeder (ICF), especially for the ground supports and main outer-tube firstly. This analysis aims to study seismic resistance on system design under local seismograms with floor response spectrum, the structural response vibration mode and response duration results of displacement, membrane stress, and bending stress on structure under different directions actuating signals were obtained by using the single-seismic spectrum analysis and Dead Weight analysis respectively. Based on the simulative and analytical results, the system seismic resistance and the integrity of the support structure in the 4th PF feeder have been studied and the detail design confirmed.

  10. An extended stochastic method for seismic hazard estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Abd el-aal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we developed an extended stochastic technique for seismic hazard assessment purposes. This technique depends on the hypothesis of stochastic technique of Boore (2003 "Simulation of ground motion using the stochastic method. Appl. Geophy. 160:635–676". The essential characteristics of extended stochastic technique are to obtain and simulate ground motion in order to minimize future earthquake consequences. The first step of this technique is defining the seismic sources which mostly affect the study area. Then, the maximum expected magnitude is defined for each of these seismic sources. It is followed by estimating the ground motion using an empirical attenuation relationship. Finally, the site amplification is implemented in calculating the peak ground acceleration (PGA at each site of interest. We tested and applied this developed technique at Cairo, Suez, Port Said, Ismailia, Zagazig and Damietta cities to predict the ground motion. Also, it is applied at Cairo, Zagazig and Damietta cities to estimate the maximum peak ground acceleration at actual soil conditions. In addition, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 20 % damping median response spectra are estimated using the extended stochastic simulation technique. The calculated highest acceleration values at bedrock conditions are found at Suez city with a value of 44 cm s−2. However, these acceleration values decrease towards the north of the study area to reach 14.1 cm s−2 at Damietta city. This comes in agreement with the results of previous studies of seismic hazards in northern Egypt and is found to be comparable. This work can be used for seismic risk mitigation and earthquake engineering purposes.

  11. Application of Seismic Array Processing to Tsunami Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, C.; Meng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tsunami wave predictions of the current tsunami warning systems rely on accurate earthquake source inversions of wave height data. They are of limited effectiveness for the near-field areas since the tsunami waves arrive before data are collected. Recent seismic and tsunami disasters have revealed the need for early warning to protect near-source coastal populations. In this work we developed the basis for a tsunami warning system based on rapid earthquake source characterisation through regional seismic array back-projections. We explored rapid earthquake source imaging using onshore dense seismic arrays located at regional distances on the order of 1000 km, which provides faster source images than conventional teleseismic back-projections. We implement this method in a simulated real-time environment, and analysed the 2011 Tohoku earthquake rupture with two clusters of Hi-net stations in Kyushu and Northern Hokkaido, and the 2014 Iquique event with the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array. The results yield reasonable estimates of rupture area, which is approximated by an ellipse and leads to the construction of simple slip models based on empirical scaling of the rupture area, seismic moment and average slip. The slip model is then used as the input of the tsunami simulation package COMCOT to predict the tsunami waves. In the example of the Tohoku event, the earthquake source model can be acquired within 6 minutes from the start of rupture and the simulation of tsunami waves takes less than 2 min, which could facilitate a timely tsunami warning. The predicted arrival time and wave amplitude reasonably fit observations. Based on this method, we propose to develop an automatic warning mechanism that provides rapid near-field warning for areas of high tsunami risk. The initial focus will be Japan, Pacific Northwest and Alaska, where dense seismic networks with the capability of real-time data telemetry and open data accessibility, such as the Japanese HiNet (>800

  12. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    Romania is one of the most active seismic countries in Europe, with more than 500 earthquakes occurring every year. The seismic hazard of Romania is relatively high and thus understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects at the earth surface represents an important step toward the education of population in earthquake affected regions of the country and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this direction, the first national educational project in the field of seismology has recently started in Romania: the ROmanian EDUcational SEISmic NETwork (ROEDUSEIS-NET) project. It involves four partners: the National Institute for Earth Physics as coordinator, the National Institute for Research and Development in Construction, Urban Planning and Sustainable Spatial Development " URBAN - INCERC" Bucharest, the Babeş-Bolyai University (Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Engineering) and the software firm "BETA Software". The project has many educational, scientific and social goals. The main educational objectives are: training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, preparing of several comprehensive educational materials, designing and testing didactic activities using informatics and web-oriented tools. The scientific objective is to introduce into schools the use of advanced instruments and experimental methods that are usually restricted to research laboratories, with the main product being the creation of an earthquake waveform archive. Thus a large amount of such data will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. For the social objectives, the project represents an effective instrument for informing and creating an awareness of the seismic risk, for experimentation into the efficacy of scientific communication, and for an increase in the direct involvement of schools and the general public. A network of nine seismic stations with SEP seismometers

  13. Full Seismic Waveform Inversion for the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukauskaitė, Saulė; Steptoe, Hamish; Fichtner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We present a seismic tomography model for the Japanese archipelago obtained using full waveform inversion and adjoint methods. A credible seismic velocity model is essential for the Japan region as a means to further our understanding of earthquake source mechanics by allowing for more accurate seismic source inversion, to benefit seismic hazard assessment as well as early warning systems, and to comprehend the complexity of the tectonic setting. The study area covers the Japanese islands, Taiwan, Korean peninsula, easternmost parts of China and Russia, Sakhalin and the majority of the Kuril Islands chain. The domain extends down into the mantle transition zone. We choose 58 earthquakes of magnitudes Mw5.0 - 6.9 distributed across the model domain as uniformly as possible. The data are obtained from several seismic networks in the area, namely F-net in Japan, BATS in Taiwan, South Korean National Earthquake Network and several stations from each China National Seismic Network, New China Digital Seismograph Network, Global Seismograph Network and Korean Seismic Network made available by IRIS Data Management Center. To facilitate full waveform inversion the forward problem is solved numerically using the spectral element method (SEM), which comes with the geometric flexibility of the finite-elements method and the accuracy of the spectral methods. Owing to the SEM and the advance in High Performance Computing we are able to perform numerical simulations of seismic waves in realistic 3D heterogeneous visco-elastic structures. Differences between the calculated and the real waveforms are quantified using the time-frequency misfits (Fichtner et al., 2008), which allow us to explore the temporal evolution of the frequency content of the data with no need to identify specific seismic phases. We use adjoint methods as an effective means to obtain sensitivity kernels and ultimately gradients, required for iterative gradient-based minimisation techniques. The obtained model

  14. SIMULATION STUDY ON HETEROGENEOUS CELLULAR AUTOMATION INFLUENCING SEISMICITY FACTORS%影响地震活动性因素的非均匀细胞自动机模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锰; 杨峰

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating conditions of earthquake pregnancy,a heterogeneous 2-D single fault model with 81×81 cells is set up. By using cellular automata models and changing the model heterogeneity and correlation parameters respectively,we compute and get different synthetic event catalogues for analyzing general seismic activity and intensity distribution properties. The computation results show that different heterogeneous structures produce different seismic sequence types and G-R relation,so the heterogeneity is an important influencing factor on seismicity. Nevertheless ,both the coefficients of stress redistribution and local friction loss can also influence seimicity to some extent. It is possibly helpful for further understandings of earthquake process complexity.%基于细胞自动机模型,构建了由81×81个细胞单元组成非均匀二维单断层介质样本,研究了断层结构细观非均匀性以及相关模型参数变化对模拟输出结果和强度分布特征的影响.研究结果表明:结构非均匀性是影响地震活动性的控制性参量,随着非均匀程度的增强,地震事件数量增多,震级分布变得越来越均匀,破裂演化模式由相对“脆性”向“塑性”变化;介质结构的初始条件和应力加载的随机性对地震活动演化过程基本不产生影响,此外,应力降分配系数减小使b值主体线性段向大震级延伸;随着局部摩擦损耗系数增大,模拟地震事件的数量有所增加,大震级事件数量和震级衰减增强,b值主体线性区间变窄,使断层的变形破坏方式由相对“脆性”向“塑性”变化.这些对理解孕震过程的复杂性是有帮助的.

  15. Seismic Dynamic Damage Characteristics of Vertical and Batter Pile-supported Wharf Structure Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering a typical steel pipe pile-supported wharf as the research object, finite element analytical models of batter and vertical pile structures were established under the same construction site, service, and geological conditions to investigate the seismic dynamic damage characteristics of vertical and batter pile-supported wharf structures. By the numerical simulation and the nonlinear time history response analysis of structure system and the moment–axial force relation curve, we analyzed the dynamic damage characteristics of the two different structures of batter and vertical piles under different seismic ground motions to provide reasonable basis and reference for designing and selecting a pile-supported wharf structure. Results showed that the axial force of batter piles was dominant in the batter pile structure and that batter piles could effectively bear and share seismic load. Under the seismic ground motion with peak ground acceleration (PGA of 350 Gal and in consideration of the factors of the design requirement of horizontal displacement, the seismic performance of the batter pile structure was better than that of the vertical pile structure. Under the seismic ground motion with a PGA of 1000 Gal, plastic failure occurred in two different structures. The contrastive analysis of the development of plastic damage and the absorption and dissipation for seismic energy indicated that the seismic performance of the vertical pile structure was better than that of the batter pile structure.

  16. Estimation of reliability of seismic and electromagnetic monitoring in seismic active areas by diffraction tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Troyan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the algorithms and results of the numerical simulation of the solution of a 2-D inverse problem on the restoration of seismic parameters and electrical conductivity of local inhomogeneities by the diffraction tomography method based upon the first order Born approximation. The direct problems for the Lame and Maxwell equations are solved by the finite difference method. Restoration of inhomogeneities which are not very weak is implemented with the use of a small number of receivers (source-receiver pairs.

  17. Characterization and performance evaluation of a vertical seismic isolator using link and crank mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, N.; Ito, A.; Sekiya, Y.; Nan, C.; Yasuda, M.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various seismic isolators have been developed to prevent earthquake damage to valuable art and other rare objects. Many seismic isolators only defend against horizontal motions, which are the usual cause of falling objects. However, the development of a seismic isolator designed for vertical vibration is necessary since such great vertical vibration earthquakes as the 2004 Niigata Prefecture Chuetsu Earthquake have occurred, and their increased height characteristics are undesirable. In this study, we developed a vertical seismic isolator that can be installed at a lower height and can support loads using a horizontal spring without requiring a vertical spring. It has a mechanism that combines links and cranks. The dynamic model was proposed and the frequency characteristics were simulated when the sine waves were the input. Shaking tests were also performed. The experimental value of the natural frequency was 0.57 Hz, and the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics were close to the experimental values. In addition, we verified this vertical seismic isolator's performance through shaking tests and simulation for typical seismic waves in Japan. We verified the seismic isolation's performance from the experimental result because the average reduction rate of the acceleration was 0.21.

  18. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  19. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.

  20. Seismic signal analysis based on the dual-tree complex wavelet packet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢周敏; 王恩福; 张国宏; 赵国存; 陈旭庚

    2004-01-01

    We tried to apply the dual-tree complex wavelet packet transform in seismic signal analysis. The complex waveletpacket transform (CWPT) combine the merits of real wavelet packet transform with that of complex continuouswavelet transform (CCWT). It can not only pick up the phase information of signal, but also produce better "focalizing" function if it matches the phase spectrum of signals analyzed. We here described the dual-tree CWPT algorithm, and gave the examples of simulation and actual seismic signals analysis. As shown by our results, thedual-tree CWPT is a very efecfive method in analyzing seismic signals with non-linear phase.

  1. Seismicity and fluid injections: numerical modelling of fault activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G.; Bean, C.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Injection of fluid into the subsurface is a common technique and is used to optimise returns from hydrocarbon plays (e.g. enhanced oil recovery, hydrofacturing of shales) and geothermal sites as well as for the sequestering carbon dioxide. While it is well understood that stress perturbations caused by fluid injections can induce/trigger earthquakes; the modelling of such hazard is still in its infancy. By combining fluid flow and seismicity simulations we have created a numerical model for investigating induced seismicity over large time periods so that we might examine the role of operational and geological factors in seismogenesis around a sub-surface fluid injection. In our model, fluid injection is simulated using pore fluid movement throughout a permeable layer from a high-pressure point source using a lattice Boltzmann scheme. We can accommodate complicated geological structures in our simulations. Seismicity is modelled using a quasi-dynamic relationship between stress and slip coupled with a rate-and state friction law. By spatially varying the frictional parameters, the model can reproduce both seismic and aseismic slip. Static stress perturbations (due to either to fault cells slipping or fluid injection) are calculated using analytical solutions for slip dislocations/pressure changes in an elastic half space. An adaptive time step is used in order to increase computational efficiency and thus allow us to model hundreds of years of seismicity. As a case study, we investigate the role that relative fault - injection location plays in seismic activity. To do this we created three synthetic catalogues with only the relative location of the fault from the point of injection varying between the models. In our control model there is no injection meaning it contains only tectonically triggered events. In the other two catalogues, the injection site is placed below and adjacent to the fault respectively. The injection itself is into a permeable thin planar layer

  2. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  3. Introducing seismic metamaterials and their potential geophysical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Craster, Richard; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    What if in the future the propagation of seismic surface waves in urban environments could be shaped at will? Until a few years ago, this question would have sounded rather provocative to the seismological community: Today, thanks to seismic metamaterials, this is no longer the case. This talk reviews the recent developments that have brought metamaterials, introduced in the 90's to mould the flow of electromagnetic waves at micro- or nano-scales, to be promising in the control the propagation of seismic waves in the ground. The idea behind a seismic metamaterial is tomodify the local properties of the ground through the insertion of inclusions of a different material at a sub-wavelength scale. The different types of inclusions, resonant or non-resonant, determine the property and the performance of the metamaterial. After a brief overview on some seminal acoustic experiments, we introduce three types of seismic metamaterials: The first is based on a cluster of closely spaced sub-wavelength resonators attached to the ground realising a metasurface that can stop the propagation of Rayleigh waves. A geophysical experiment has demonstrated that forest trees can act like this metamaterial for frequencyies between 30 and 100 Hz. The second type is derived from the previous, but now the subwavelength resonators realising the cluster are graded (i.e. of decreasing height) such that they allow Rayleigh waves to be converted into shear waves. Finally, in the last example, we present a metamaterial that uses soft soil inclusions in the ground to create a lens for rerouting seismic surface waves around an obstacle. Since most of the results shown here come from numerical simulations, this talk will be of interest also for numerical modelers concerned with scattering from deeply subwavelength (resonant) inclusions.

  4. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of the Pyrenean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secanell, R.; Bertil, D.; Martin, C.; Goula, X.; Susagna, T.; Tapia, M.; Dominique, P.; Carbon, D.; Fleta, J.

    2008-07-01

    A unified probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) for the Pyrenean region has been performed by an international team composed of experts from Spain and France during the Interreg IIIA ISARD project. It is motivated by incoherencies between the seismic hazard zonations of the design codes of France and Spain and by the need for input data to be used to define earthquake scenarios. A great effort was invested in the homogenisation of the input data. All existing seismic data are collected in a database and lead to a unified catalogue using a local magnitude scale. PSHA has been performed using logic trees combined with Monte Carlo simulations to account for both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties. As an alternative to hazard calculation based on seismic sources zone models, a zoneless method is also used to produce a hazard map less dependant on zone boundaries. Two seismogenic source models were defined to take into account the different interpretations existing among specialists. A new regional ground-motion prediction equation based on regional data has been proposed. It was used in combination with published ground-motion prediction equations derived using European and Mediterranean data. The application of this methodology leads to the definition of seismic hazard maps for 475- and 1,975-year return periods for spectral accelerations at periods of 0 (corresponding to peak ground acceleration), 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 1 and 2 s. Median and percentiles 15% and 85% acceleration contour lines are represented. Finally, the seismic catalogue is used to produce a map of the maximum acceleration expected for comparison with the probabilistic hazard maps. The hazard maps are produced using a grid of 0.1°. The results obtained may be useful for civil protection and risk prevention purposes in France, Spain and Andorra.

  5. National Seismic Network of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanova, N.; Kakhoberashvili, S.; Omarashvili, V.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.

    2016-12-01

    Georgia, as a part of the Southern Caucasus, is tectonically active and structurally complex region. It is one of the most active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The deformation and the associated seismicity are due to the continent-continent collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Seismic Monitoring of country and the quality of seismic data is the major tool for the rapid response policy, population safety, basic scientific research and in the end for the sustainable development of the country. National Seismic Network of Georgia has been developing since the end of 19th century. Digital era of the network started from 2003. Recently continuous data streams from 25 stations acquired and analyzed in the real time. Data is combined to calculate rapid location and magnitude for the earthquake. Information for the bigger events (Ml>=3.5) is simultaneously transferred to the website of the monitoring center and to the related governmental agencies. To improve rapid earthquake location and magnitude estimation the seismic network was enhanced by installing additional 7 new stations. Each new station is equipped with coupled Broadband and Strong Motion seismometers and permanent GPS system as well. To select the sites for the 7 new base stations, we used standard network optimization techniques. To choose the optimal sites for new stations we've taken into account geometry of the existed seismic network, topographic conditions of the site. For each site we studied local geology (Vs30 was mandatory for each site), local noise level and seismic vault construction parameters. Due to the country elevation, stations were installed in the high mountains, no accessible in winter due to the heavy snow conditions. To secure online data transmission we used satellite data transmission as well as cell data network coverage from the different local companies. As a result we've already have the improved earthquake location and event magnitudes. We

  6. A study on seismicity and seismic hazard for Karnataka State

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T G Sitharam; Naveen James; K S Vipin; K Ganesha Raj

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the seismic pattern of the state of Karnataka and also quantifies the seismic hazard for the entire state. In the present work, historical and instrumental seismicity data for Karnataka (within 300 km from Karnataka political boundary) were compiled and hazard analysis was done based on this data. Geographically, Karnataka forms a part of peninsular India which is tectonically identified as an intraplate region of Indian plate. Due to the convergent movement of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate, movements are occurring along major intraplate faults resulting in seismic activity of the region and hence the hazard assessment of this region is very important. Apart from referring to seismotectonic atlas for identifying faults and fractures, major lineaments in the study area were also mapped using satellite data. The earthquake events reported by various national and international agencies were collected until 2009. Declustering of earthquake events was done to remove foreshocks and aftershocks. Seismic hazard analysis was done for the state of Karnataka using both deterministic and probabilistic approaches incorporating logic tree methodology. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) at rock level was evaluated for the entire state considering a grid size of 0.05° × 0.05°. The attenuation relations proposed for stable continental shield region were used in evaluating the seismic hazard with appropriate weightage factors. Response spectra at rock level for important Tier II cities and Bangalore were evaluated. The contour maps showing the spatial variation of PGA values at bedrock are presented in this work.

  7. Seismic Fortification Analysis of the Guoduo Gravity Dam in Tibet, China

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Lin; Wenwei Zheng; Bo Huang; Haichao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to analyze the seismic performance of the Guoduo gravity dam. A nonlinear FEM method was implemented to study the deformation, stress, and overall stability of dam under both static and dynamic loading conditions, including both normal and overloading conditions. A dam seismic failure risk control method is proposed based on the cracking mechanism induced by the dynamic load to ensure dam safety and stability. Numerical simulation revealed that (1) under n...

  8. Developments of Finite-Frequency Seismic Theory and Applications to Regional Tomographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-31

    Seism . Soc. Am. 94, 1690–1705, doi 10.1785/012004016. Kennett, B. L. N. (1983). Seismic Wave Propagation in Stratified Media, Cambridge University...Vilotte (1998). The spectral-element method: an efficient tool to simulate the seismic response of 2D and 3D, geolog- ical structures, Bull. Seism ...Crosson (1990). Determination of teleseismic relative phase arrival times using multi-channel cross-correlation and least squares, Bull. Seism . Soc

  9. An improved PSO algorithm and its application in seismic wavelet extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshou Dai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The seismic wavelet estimation is finally a multi-dimension, multi-extreme and multi-parameter optimization problem. PSO is easy to fall into local optimum, which has simple concepts and fast convergence. This paper proposes an improved PSO with adaptive parameters and boundary constraints, in ensuring accuracy of the algorithm optimization and fast convergence. Simulation results show that the methods have good applicability and stability for seismic wavelet extraction.

  10. Improvement of S/N ratio of seismic data by hyperbolic filter algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Hao; Yue Li; Baojun Yang

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of the hyperbolic filter algorithm for noise suppression of seismic data. Known the velocity of reflection event, utilizes the resemblance of reflection signal in each seismic trace, the hyperbolic filter algorithm is effective in enhance reflection event and suppress the random noise. This algorithm is used to CDP gathers also is compared with the algorithm of τ-p transform. Simulation shows the hyperbolic filter is effective and better than τ-p transform.

  11. Seismic behaviour of geotechnical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vinale

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some fundamental considerations regarding the behaviour of geotechnical structures under seismic loading. First a complete definition of the earthquake disaster risk is provided, followed by the importance of performing site-specific hazard analysis. Then some suggestions are provided in regard to adequate assessment of soil parameters, a crucial point to properly analyze the seismic behaviour of geotechnical structures. The core of the paper is centered on a critical review of the analysis methods available for studying geotechnical structures under seismic loadings. All of the available methods can be classified into three main classes, including the pseudo-static, pseudo-dynamic and dynamic approaches, each of which is reviewed for applicability. A more advanced analysis procedure, suitable for a so-called performance-based design approach, is also described in the paper. Finally, the seismic behaviour of the El Infiernillo Dam was investigated. It was shown that coupled elastoplastic dynamic analyses disclose some of the important features of dam behaviour under seismic loading, confirmed by comparing analytical computation and experimental measurements on the dam body during and after a past earthquake.

  12. Inertial Effects on Finite Length Pipe Seismic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A seismic analysis for soil-pipe interaction which accounts for length and constraining conditions at the ends of a continuous pipe is developed. The Winkler model is used to schematize the soil-structure interaction. The approach is focused on axial strains, since bending strains in a buried pipe due to the wave propagation are typically a second-order effect. Unlike many works, the inertial terms are considered in solving equations. Accurate numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of pipe length and constraint conditions on the pipe seismic strain. The obtained results are compared with results inferred from other models present in the literature. For free-end pipelines, inertial effects have significant influence only for short length. On the contrary, their influence is always important for pinned pipes. Numerical simulations show that a simple rigid model can be used for free-end pipes, whereas pinned pipes need more accurate models.

  13. TECHNICAL NOTES SEISMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    SEISMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AS A POTENTIAL TOOL FOR. ECONOMICAL SEISMIC ... inherent in the system as in any other material like the superstructure itself. ..... [9] Gazetas, G., “Analysis of Machine. Foundation Vibration: ...

  14. SEG Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert; Laughlin, Darren; Brune, Bob

    2016-10-17

    Significant advancements in the development of sensors to enable rotational seismic measurements have been achieved. Prototypes are available now to support experiments that help validate the utility of rotational seismic measurements.

  15. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  16. The Apollo passive seismic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The completed data set obtained from the 4-station Apollo seismic network includes signals from approximately 11,800 events of various types. Four data sets for use by other investigators, through the NSSDC, are in preparation. Some refinement of the lunar model based on seismic data can be expected, but its gross features remain as presented two years ago. The existence of a small, molten core remains dependent upon the analysis of signals from a single, far-side impact. Analysis of secondary arrivals from other sources may eventually resolve this issue, as well as continued refinement of the magnetic field measurements. Evidence of considerable lateral heterogeneity within the moon continues to build. The mystery of the much meteoroid flux estimate derived from lunar seismic measurements, as compared with earth-based estimates, remains; although, significant correlations between terrestrial and lunar observations are beginning to emerge.

  17. Chaotic behavior of seismic mechanisms: experiment and observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Bezzeghoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    To simulate the dynamics of earthquakes, a mechanical prototype was constructed that was inspired by the Burridge-Knopoff model and equipped with accurate instrumental devices. The data obtained by the prototype appeared to be consistent with seismic data from the San Andreas Fault, California, USA, which were analyzed using two different methodologies: seismology and modern developments of chaos theory. Perspectives for future work are also presented.

  18. Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Temporal changes in seismic wave speeds in the Earth's crust have been measured at several locations, notably The Geysers geothermal area in California, in studies that used three-dimensional seismic tomography. These studies have used conventional tomography methods to invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets independently and assumed that any differences in the derived structures reflect real temporal variations. Such an assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural variation in earthquake locations. This problem can be severe when changes in the seismicity distribution are systematic, as, for example, at the onset of an aftershock sequence. The sudden change in the ray distribution can produce artifacts that mimic changes in the seismic wave speeds at the time of a large earthquake. Even if the source locations did not change (if only explosion data were used, for example), derived structures would inevitably differ because of observational errors. A better approach to determining what temporal changes are truly required by the data is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, imposing constraints to minimize differences between the models for different epochs. This problem is similar to that of seeking models similar to some a priori initial assumption, and a method similar to "damped least squares" can solve it. The order of the system of normal equations for inverting data from two epochs is twice as large as that for a single epoch, and solving it by standard methods requires eight times the computational labor. We present an algorithm for reducing this factor to two, so that inverting multiple epochs simultaneously is comparable in difficulty to inverting them independently, and illustrate its performance using synthetic arrival times and observed data from several areas in

  19. USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Barnhard, T.P.; Leyendecker, E.V.; Wesson, R.L.; Harmsen, S.C.; Klein, F.W.; Perkins, D.M.; Dickman, N.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Hopper, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed new probabilistic seismic hazard maps for the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. These hazard maps form the basis of the probabilistic component of the design maps used in the 1997 edition of the NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures, prepared by the Building Seismic Safety Council arid published by FEMA. The hazard maps depict peak horizontal ground acceleration and spectral response at 0.2, 0.3, and 1.0 sec periods, with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years, corresponding to return times of about 500, 1000, and 2500 years, respectively. In this paper we outline the methodology used to construct the hazard maps. There are three basic components to the maps. First, we use spatially smoothed historic seismicity as one portion of the hazard calculation. In this model, we apply the general observation that moderate and large earthquakes tend to occur near areas of previous small or moderate events, with some notable exceptions. Second, we consider large background source zones based on broad geologic criteria to quantify hazard in areas with little or no historic seismicity, but with the potential for generating large events. Third, we include the hazard from specific fault sources. We use about 450 faults in the western United States (WUS) and derive recurrence times from either geologic slip rates or the dating of pre-historic earthquakes from trenching of faults or other paleoseismic methods. Recurrence estimates for large earthquakes in New Madrid and Charleston, South Carolina, were taken from recent paleoliquefaction studies. We used logic trees to incorporate different seismicity models, fault recurrence models, Cascadia great earthquake scenarios, and ground-motion attenuation relations. We present disaggregation plots showing the contribution to hazard at four cities from potential earthquakes with various magnitudes and

  20. Historical Seismicity of Central Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, E.

    2013-05-01

    Central Panama lies in the Panama microplate, neighboring seismically active regions of Costa Rica and Colombia. This region, crossed by the Panama Canal, concentrates most of the population and economic activity of the Republic of Panama. Instrumental observation of earthquakes in Panama began on 1882 by the Compagnie Universelle du Canal Interocéanique de Panama and continued from 1904 to 1977 by the Panama Canal Company. From October 1997 to March 1998 the USGS deployed a temporary digital seismic network. Since 2003 this region is monitored by a digital seismic network operated by the Panama Canal Authority and I complemented by the broad band stations of the University of Panama seismic network. The seismicity in this region is very diffuse and the few events which are recorded have magnitudes less than 3.0. Historical archives and antique newspapers from Spain, Colombia, Panama and the United Sates have been searched looking for historical earthquake information which could provide a better estimate of the seismicity in this region. We find that Panama City has been shaken by two destructive earthquakes in historical times. One by a local fault (i.e. Pedro Miguel fault) on May 2, 1621 (I=Vlll MM), and a subduction event from the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB) on September 7, 1882 (I=Vll MM). To test these findings two earthquakes scenarios were generated, using SELENA, for Panama City Old Quarter. Panama City was rebuilt on January 21, 1673, on a rocky point facing the Pacific Ocean after the sack by pirate Morgan on January 28, 1671. The pattern of damage to calicanto (unreinforced colonial masonry) and wood structures for a crustal local event are higher than those for an event from the NPDB and seem to confirm that the city has not been shaken by a major local event since May 2, 1621 and a subduction event since September 7, 1882

  1. A Review of Seismicity in 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Gang; Liu Jie; Yu Surong

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 SURVEY OF GLOBE SEISMICITY IN 2008 A total of 19 strong earthquakes with Ms≥7.0 occurred in the world in 2008 according to the Chinese Seismic Station Network (Table 1 ). The strongest earthquake was the Wenchuan earthquake with Ms8.0 on May 12,2008 (Fig.1). Earthquake frequency was apparently lower and the energy release remarkably attenuated in 2008, compared to seismicity in 2007. The characteristics of seismicity are as follows:

  2. Seismic detection of meteorite impacts on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Teanby, N.A.; Wookey, J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Meteorite impacts provide a potentially important seismic source for probing Mars? interior. It has recently been shown that new craters can be detected from orbit using high resolution imaging, which means the location of any impact-related seismic event could be accurately determined thus improving the constraints that could be placed on internal structure using a single seismic station. This is not true of other seismic sources on Mars such as sub-surface faulting, whic...

  3. Time-lapse seismic within reservoir engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenziel, T.

    2003-01-01

    Time-lapse 3D seismic is a fairly new technology allowing dynamic reservoir characterisation in a true volumetric sense. By investigating the differences between multiple seismic surveys, valuable information about changes in the oil/gas reservoir state can be captured. Its interpretation involves different disciplines, of which the main three are: reservoir management, rock physics, and seismics. The main challenge is expressed as "How to optimally benefit from time-lapse seismic". The chall...

  4. Robustness of timber structures in seismic areas

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Luís A.C.; Branco, Jorge M.

    2011-01-01

    Major similarities between robustness assessment and seismic design exist, and significant information can be brought from seismic design to robustness design. As will be discussed, although some methods and limitations considered in seismic design can improve robustness, the capacity of the structure to sustain limited damage without disproportionate effects is significantly more complex. In fact, seismic design can either improve or reduce the resistance of structures to unfo...

  5. Earthquake Rate Models for Evolving Induced Seismicity Hazard in the Central and Eastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llenos, A. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Michael, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Injection-induced earthquake rates can vary rapidly in space and time, which presents significant challenges to traditional probabilistic seismic hazard assessment methodologies that are based on a time-independent model of mainshock occurrence. To help society cope with rapidly evolving seismicity, the USGS is developing one-year hazard models for areas of induced seismicity in the central and eastern US to forecast the shaking due to all earthquakes, including aftershocks which are generally omitted from hazards assessments (Petersen et al., 2015). However, the spatial and temporal variability of the earthquake rates make them difficult to forecast even on time-scales as short as one year. An initial approach is to use the previous year's seismicity rate to forecast the next year's seismicity rate. However, in places such as northern Oklahoma the rates vary so rapidly over time that a simple linear extrapolation does not accurately forecast the future, even when the variability in the rates is modeled with simulations based on an Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model (Ogata, JASA, 1988) to account for earthquake clustering. Instead of relying on a fixed time period for rate estimation, we explore another way to determine when the earthquake rate should be updated. This approach could also objectively identify new areas where the induced seismicity hazard model should be applied. We will estimate the background seismicity rate by optimizing a single set of ETAS aftershock triggering parameters across the most active induced seismicity zones -- Oklahoma, Guy-Greenbrier, the Raton Basin, and the Azle-Dallas-Fort Worth area -- with individual background rate parameters in each zone. The full seismicity rate, with uncertainties, can then be estimated using ETAS simulations and changes in rate can be detected by applying change point analysis in ETAS transformed time with methods already developed for Poisson processes.

  6. Combined Studies of ODP log Data and Seismic Reflection Data at Southern Hydrate Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, C. A.; Petersen, J.; Klaeschen, D.

    2003-12-01

    In August 2002 Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 (Hydrate Ridge) provided essential borehole data to complement recent seismic studies at Hydrate Ridge to correlate amplitude analysis investigations and to constrain previous results. Seismic data was acquired during cruise SO-150 in September 2000 on the German RV SONNE, aiming at qualitative and quantitative estimates of free gas and gas hydrates within the sediments across Hydrate Ridge. Hydrate Ridge is part of the accretionary complex and is characterized by the presence of extensive gas hydrates, causing a prominent Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) in marine seismic records. Several seismic in- and crosslines were shot across the ridge to map the spatial distribution of the BSR. Wide angle reflection data of narrowly spaced Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) allow frequency dependent amplitude variations with offset (AVO) investigations. Seismic reflection data, recorded simultaneously with a single channel surface and deep tow streamer completed the data set. The usage of different sources during acquisition provided additional information of the frequency response of the BSR signature. This data set was used to study the complex seismic behaviour of such gas hydrate environments in detail. The borehole data, collected during ODP Leg 204, now improve recent seismic investigations and support previous results. Within the COLIBRI project log information (Vp, Vs and density) was used for forward modeling to combine seismic investigations with new borehole data. The P wave velocity model of a traveltime inversion and AVO analysis of the seismic OBS sections suggest rather low quantities of gas hydrate or at least the lack of massive hydrate zones. Shear wave phases, identified in the seismic OBS sections, refer to slow S wave velocities in the upper sediment layers above the BSR, which support a model with small amounts of hydrate or patchy hydrate zones within the upper sediments.

  7. Development of seismic analysis model of LMFBR and seismic time history response analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yoo, B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop the seismic analysis model of KALIMER reactor structures including the primary coolant of sodium and to evaulate the seismic responses of the maximum peak acceleration and the relative displacements by the time history seismic response analysis. The seismic time history response analyses were carried out for both cases of the seismic isolation design and the non-isolation one to verify the seismic isolation performance. From the results of seismic response analysis using the developed seismic analysis model, it is clearly verified that the seismic isolation design gives very significantly reduced seismic responses compared with the non-isolation design. All design criteria for the relative displacement repsonse were satisfied for KALIMER reactor structures.

  8. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  9. Ground motion estimation and nonlinear seismic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, D.B.; Hutchings, L.J.

    1995-08-14

    Site specific predictions of the dynamic response of structures to extreme earthquake ground motions are a critical component of seismic design for important structures. With the rapid development of computationally based methodologies and powerful computers over the past few years, engineers and scientists now have the capability to perform numerical simulations of many of the physical processes associated with the generation of earthquake ground motions and dynamic structural response. This paper describes application of a physics based, deterministic, computational approach for estimation of earthquake ground motions which relies on site measurements of frequently occurring small (i.e. M < 3 ) earthquakes. Case studies are presented which illustrate application of this methodology for two different sites, and nonlinear analyses of a typical six story steel frame office building are performed to illustrate the potential sensitivity of nonlinear response to site conditions and proximity to the causative fault.

  10. Community Seismic Network (CSN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. W.; Heaton, T. H.; Kohler, M. D.; Cheng, M.; Guy, R.; Chandy, M.; Krause, A.; Bunn, J.; Olson, M.; Faulkner, M.; Liu, A.; Strand, L.

    2012-12-01

    We report on developments in sensor connectivity, architecture, and data fusion algorithms executed in Cloud computing systems in the Community Seismic Network (CSN), a network of low-cost sensors housed in homes and offices by volunteers in the Pasadena, CA area. The network has over 200 sensors continuously reporting anomalies in local acceleration through the Internet to a Cloud computing service (the Google App Engine) that continually fuses sensor data to rapidly detect shaking from earthquakes. The Cloud computing system consists of data centers geographically distributed across the continent and is likely to be resilient even during earthquakes and other local disasters. The region of Southern California is partitioned in a multi-grid style into sets of telescoping cells called geocells. Data streams from sensors within a geocell are fused to detect anomalous shaking across the geocell. Temporal spatial patterns across geocells are used to detect anomalies across regions. The challenge is to detect earthquakes rapidly with an extremely low false positive rate. We report on two data fusion algorithms, one that tessellates the surface so as to fuse data from a large region around Pasadena and the other, which uses a standard tessellation of equal-sized cells. Since September 2011, the network has successfully detected earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 or higher within 40 Km of Pasadena. In addition to the standard USB device, which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or wifi. This bypasses security concerns that some companies have with the USB-connected devices, and allows for 24/7 monitoring at sites that would otherwise shut down their computers after working hours. In buildings we use the sensors to model the behavior of the structures during weak events in order to understand how they will perform during strong events. Visualization models of instrumented buildings ranging

  11. Numerical simulation of seismic performance on reactive pocoder concrete beam-column joint based on OpenSees%基于OpenSees的活性粉末混凝土梁柱节点抗震性能非线性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德弘; 牟雨; 鞠彦忠

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete reactive pocoder concrete is a new cementitious material with high strength ,durability and tough-ness.It is especially suitable for main seismic components of a RC frame.It takes a nonlinear model for beam-column joint based on OpenSees.Simulation on reactive pocoder concrete beam-column joint under reversed cyclic loading with different axial compression ratio was carried out.The hysteretic curve and skeleton curve are obtained.According to the results ,the reactive pocoder concrete beam-column joint has better bearing capacity and seismic performance.The strength and stiffness degradation is not obvious ,the ductility is better.%活性粉末混凝土是一种具有超高强度、高耐久性和高韧性的超高性能水泥基材料,尤其适合用于框架结构中主要抗震构件。采用基于OpenSees的有限元非线性节点模型,对活性粉末混凝土梁柱节点进行了拟静力加载模拟,研究了不同轴压比下梁柱节点的抗震性能,得出了其滞回曲线和骨架曲线。结果表明:活性粉末混凝土梁柱节点具有良好的承载力和抗震性能,强度、刚度退化缓慢,延性较好。

  12. Seismic Physical Modeling Technology and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the seismic physical modeling technology in the CNPC Key Lab of Geophysical Exploration. It includes the seismic physical model positioning system, the data acquisition system, sources, transducers,model materials, model building techniques, precision measurements of model geometry, the basic principles of the seismic physical modeling and experimental methods, and two physical model examples.

  13. Seismic processing in the inverse data space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Until now, seismic processing has been carried out by applying inverse filters in the forward data space. Because the acquired data of a seismic survey is always discrete, seismic measurements in the forward data space can be arranged conveniently in a data matrix (P). Each column in the data matrix

  14. Simplified seismic performance assessment and implications for seismic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy J.; Welch, David P.; Calvi, Gian Michele

    2014-08-01

    The last decade or so has seen the development of refined performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) approaches that now provide a framework for estimation of a range of important decision variables, such as repair costs, repair time and number of casualties. This paper reviews current tools for PBEE, including the PACT software, and examines the possibility of extending the innovative displacement-based assessment approach as a simplified structural analysis option for performance assessment. Details of the displacement-based s+eismic assessment method are reviewed and a simple means of quickly assessing multiple hazard levels is proposed. Furthermore, proposals for a simple definition of collapse fragility and relations between equivalent single-degree-of-freedom characteristics and multi-degree-of-freedom story drift and floor acceleration demands are discussed, highlighting needs for future research. To illustrate the potential of the methodology, performance measures obtained from the simplified method are compared with those computed using the results of incremental dynamic analyses within the PEER performance-based earthquake engineering framework, applied to a benchmark building. The comparison illustrates that the simplified method could be a very effective conceptual seismic design tool. The advantages and disadvantages of the simplified approach are discussed and potential implications of advanced seismic performance assessments for conceptual seismic design are highlighted through examination of different case study scenarios including different structural configurations.

  15. Modelling earthquake interaction and seismicity statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steacy, S.; Hetherington, A.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of earthquake interaction and fault complexity on seismicity statistics are investigated in a 3D model composed of a number of cellular automata (each representing an individual fault) distributed in a volume. Each automaton is assigned a fractal distribution of strength. Failure occurs when the 3D Coulomb stress on any cell exceeds its strength and stress transfer during simulated earthquake rupture is via nearest-neighbor rules formulated to give realistic stress concentrations. An event continues until all neighboring cells whose stresses exceed their strengths have ruptured and the size of the event is determined from its area and stress drop. Long-range stress interactions are computed following the termination of simulated ruptures using a boundary element code. In practice, these stress perturbations are only computed for events above a certain size (e.g. a threshold length of 10 km) and stresses are updated on nearby structures. Events which occur as a result of these stress interactions are considered to be "triggered" earthquakes and they, in turn, can trigger further seismic activity. The threshold length for computing interaction stresses is a free parameter and hence interaction can be "turned off" by setting this to an unrealistically high value. We consider 3 synthetic fault networks of increasing degrees of complexity - modelled on the North Anatolian fault system, the structures in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the Southern California fault network. We find that the effect of interaction is dramatically different in networks of differing complexity. In the North Anatolian analogue, for example, interaction leads to a decreased number of events, increased b-values, and an increase in recurrence intervals. In the Bay Area model, by contrast, we observe that interaction increases the number of events, decreases the b-values, and has little effect on recurrence intervals. For all networks, we find that interaction can activate mis

  16. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence

  17. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  18. Promoting Diversity in Undergraduate Research in Robotics-Based Seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, C. M.; Arthur, C. L.; Carmichael, B. L.; Webber, G. K.; Agah, A.

    2006-12-01

    The motivation for this research was to investigate forming evenly-spaced grid patterns with a team of mobile robots for future use in seismic imaging in polar environments. A team of robots was incrementally designed and simulated by incorporating sensors and altering each robot's controller. Challenges, design issues, and efficiency were also addressed. This research project incorporated the efforts of two undergraduate REU students from Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in North Carolina, and the research staff at the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) at the University of Kansas. ECSU is a historically black university. Mentoring these two minority students in scientific research, seismic, robotics, and simulation will hopefully encourage them to pursue graduate degrees in science-related or engineering fields. The goals for this 10-week internship during summer 2006 were to educate the students in the fields of seismology, robotics, and virtual prototyping and simulation. Incrementally designing a robot platform for future enhancement and evaluation was central to this research, and involved simulation of several robots working together to change seismic grid shape and spacing. This process gave these undergraduate students experience and knowledge in an actual research project for a real-world application. The two undergraduate students gained valuable research experience and advanced their knowledge of seismic imaging, robotics, sensors, and simulation. They learned that seismic sensors can be used in an array to gather 2D and 3D images of the subsurface. They also learned that robotics can support dangerous or difficult human activities, such as those in a harsh polar environment, by increasing automation, robustness, and precision. Simulating robot designs also gave them experience in programming behaviors for mobile robots. Thus far, one academic paper has resulted from their research. This paper received third place at the 2006

  19. Frozen Gaussian approximation for three-dimensional seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in three-dimensional earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a three-dimensional (3D) seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3D crust-over-mantle model.

  20. Frozen Gaussian approximation for 3-D seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in 3-D earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a 3-D seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3-D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model, respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3-D crust-over-mantle model.

  1. Robust seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, E.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Garnier, J.; Melis, N. S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Tsogka, C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings. Motivated by Zhan et al., we study how the velocity change estimation is affected by seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. More precisely, we consider a numerical model and introduce spatio-temporal seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. We show that indeed, as pointed out by Zhan et al., the stretching method is affected by these fluctuations and produces misleading apparent velocity variations which reduce dramatically the signal to noise ratio of the method. We also show that these apparent velocity variations can be eliminated by an adequate normalization of the cross-correlation functions. Theoretically we expect our approach to work as long as the seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources are uniform, an assumption which holds for closely located seismic stations. We illustrate with numerical simulations in homogeneous and scattering media that the proposed normalization significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity change estimation. Similar behaviour is also observed with real data recorded in the Aegean volcanic arc. We study in particular the volcano of Santorini during the seismic unrest of 2011-2012 and observe a decrease in the velocity of seismic waves which is correlated with GPS measured elevation.

  2. Theory and feasibility tests for a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect subwavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the scatterer is in the near-field region. This means that, as the scatterer approaches the source, imaging of the scatterer with super-resolution can be achieved. Acoustic and elastic simulations support this concept, and a seismic experiment in an Arizona tunnel shows a TRM profile with super-resolution adjacent to the fault location. The SSTM is analogous to the optical scanning tunnelling microscopes having subwavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by the imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  3. 泾阳地磁台数字化与模拟资料的对比分析%Comparative Analysis between at Jingyang Digital Data and Simulating Data Seismic Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄英; 张世民; 张创军

    2012-01-01

    本文选取泾阳地磁台2007年FHD-1核旋磁力仪和CB3磁变仪观测数据采用日变幅形态、日均值年变形态、总场21点值年变形态等方法做对比分析。结果表明:两种观测一致性较好,说明数字化仪器观测的数据是可靠的,但是数字化仪器还存在易受外界环境干扰,稳定性不好的问题,需要工作人员按规范调试仪器,认真维护与管理。%This article selects observation data of FHD-I nuclear precession magnetometer and CB3 geomagnetic variometer at Jingyang Geomagnetic Seismic Station in 2007, and makes comparative analysis in terms of the daily amplitude, mean annual change shape, and total intensity magnetic field. The results show that two kinds of observation have good consistency, and digital instrument observation data are reliable, but the digital instrument is vulnerable to external environment interference and is not stable enough, and needs careful maintenance and management.

  4. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    El Centro station. 76 6.6 Observed and predicted mean horizontal peak accelerations for the 15 October 1979, Imperial Valley earthquake plotted as a...Earthtqua kes Dato . Location. 1. or m b Date. Location. 10 or m b LogP 1o~1 Divide by 162_of Years Function Proportional to 16-3 Historical Exceednce...FIGURE 6.5 1940 Imperial Valley earthquake. Observed and simulated acceleration records at El Centro station (Munguia and Brune, 1984). 77 The

  5. Dynamics of multifractal and correlation characteristics of the spatio-temporal distribution of regional seismicity before the strong earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kiyashchenko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the distribution of regional seismicity and the results of numerical simulations of the seismic process show the increase of inhomogenity in spatio-temporal distribution of the seismicity prior to large earthquakes and formation of inhomogeneous clusters in a wide range of scales. Since that, the multifractal approach is appropriate to investigate the details of such dynamics. Here we analyze the dynamics of the seismicity distribution before a number of strong earthquakes occurred in two seismically active regions of the world: Japan and Southern California. In order to study the evolution of spatial inhomogeneity of the seismicity distribution, we consider variations of two multifractal characteristics: information entropy of multifractal measure generation process and the higher-order generalized fractal dimension of the continuum of the earthquake epicenters. Also we studied the dynamics of the level of spatio-temporal correlations in the seismicity distribution. It is found that two aforementioned multifractal characteristics tend to decrease and the level of spatio-temporal correlations tends to increase before the majority of considered strong earthquakes. Such a tendency can be considered as an earthquake precursory signature. Therefore, the results obtained show the possibility to use multifractal and correlation characteristics of the spatio-temporal distribution of regional seismicity for seismic hazard risk evaluation.

  6. Scattering of high-frequency seismic waves caused by irregular surface topography and small-scale velocity inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2015-04-01

    Based on 3-D finite difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation, we examined the processes by which the complex, scattered high-frequency (f > 1 Hz) seismic wavefield during crustal earthquakes is developed due to heterogeneous structure, which includes small-scale velocity inhomogeneity in subsurface structure and irregular surface topography on the surface, and compared with observations from dense seismic networks in southwestern Japan. The simulations showed the process by which seismic wave scattering in the heterogeneous structure develops long-duration coda waves and distorts the P-wave polarization and apparent S-wave radiation pattern. The simulations revealed that scattering due to irregular topography is significant only near the station and thus the topographic scattering effects do not accumulate as seismic waves propagate over long distances. On the other hand, scattering due to velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure distorts the seismic wavefield gradually as seismic waves propagate. The composite model, including both irregular topography and velocity inhomogeneity, showed the combined effects. Furthermore, by introducing irregular topography, the effects of seismic wave scattering on both body and coda waves were stronger than in the model with velocity inhomogeneity alone. Therefore, to model the high-frequency seismic wavefield, both topography and velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure should be taken into account in the simulation model. By comparing observations with the simulations including topography, we determined that the most preferable small-scale velocity heterogeneity model for southwestern Japan is characterized by the von Kármán power spectral density function with correlation distance a = 5 km, rms value of fluctuation ɛ = 0.07 and decay order κ = 0.5. We also demonstrated that the relative contribution of scattering due to the topography of southwestern Japan is approximately 12 per cent.

  7. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Faical Ramdani; Omar Kettani; Benaissa Tadili

    2015-06-01

    Seismic triggering at plate boundaries has a very complex nature that includes seismic events at varying distances. The spatial orientation of triggering cannot be reduced to sequences from the main shocks. Seismic waves propagate at all times in all directions, particularly in highly active zones. No direct evidence can be obtained regarding which earthquakes trigger the shocks. The first approach is to determine the potential linked zones where triggering may occur. The second step is to determine the causality between the events and their triggered shocks. The spatial orientation of the links between events is established from pre-ordered networks and the adapted dependence of the spatio-temporal occurrence of earthquakes. Based on a coefficient of synchronous seismic activity to grid couples, we derive a network link by each threshold. The links of high thresholds are tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  8. Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.C.C.; Johnston, A.C.; Chiu, J.M. [Memphis State Univ., TN (United States). Center for Earthquake Research and Information

    1994-08-01

    The seismic activity in the southern Appalachian area was monitored by the Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network (SARSN) since late 1979 by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at Memphis State University. This network provides good spatial coverage for earthquake locations especially in east Tennessee. The level of activity concentrates more heavily in the Valley and Ridge province of eastern Tennessee, as opposed to the Blue Ridge or Inner Piedmont. The large majority of these events lie between New York - Alabama lineament and the Clingman/Ocoee lineament, magnetic anomalies produced by deep-seated basement structures. Therefore SARSN, even with its wide station spacing, has been able to define the essential first-order seismological characteristics of the Southern Appalachian seismic zone. The focal depths of the southeastern U.S. earthquakes concentrate between 8 and 16 km, occurring principally beneath the Appalachian overthrust. In cross-sectional views, the average seismicity is shallower to the east beneath the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces and deeper to the west beneath the Valley and Ridge and the North American craton. Results of recent focal mechanism studies by using the CERI digital earthquake catalog between October, 1986 and December, 1991, indicate that the basement of the Valley and Ridge province is under a horizontal, NE-SW compressive stress. Right-lateral strike-slip faulting on nearly north-south fault planes is preferred because it agrees with the trend of the regional magnetic anomaly pattern.

  9. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.; El-Hadidy, M.; Deif, A.; Abou Elenean, K.

    2012-12-01

    The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5° × 0.5°) within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA) values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  10. Seismic amplitude recovery with curvelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, P.P.; Herrmann, F.J.; Stolk, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    A non-linear singularity-preserving solution to the least-squares seismic imaging problem with sparseness and continuity constraints is proposed. The applied formalism explores curvelets as a directional frame that, by their sparsity on the image, and their invariance under the imaging operators,

  11. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  12. Seismic isolation for Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, R; Allen, G; Cowley, S; Daw, E; Debra, D; Giaime, J; Hammond, G; Hammond, M; Hardham, C; How, J; Hua, W; Johnson, W; Lantz, B; Mason, K; Mittleman, R; Nichol, J; Richman, S; Rollins, J; Shoemaker, D; Stapfer, G; Stebbins, R

    2002-01-01

    The baseline design concept for a seismic isolation component of the proposed 'Advanced LIGO' detector upgrade has been developed with proof-of-principle experiments and computer models. It consists of a two-stage in-vacuum active isolation platform that is supported by an external hydraulic actuation stage. Construction is underway for prototype testing of a full-scale preliminary design.

  13. Seismicity dynamics and earthquake predictability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Sobolev

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Many factors complicate earthquake sequences, including the heterogeneity and self-similarity of the geological medium, the hierarchical structure of faults and stresses, and small-scale variations in the stresses from different sources. A seismic process is a type of nonlinear dissipative system demonstrating opposing trends towards order and chaos. Transitions from equilibrium to unstable equilibrium and local dynamic instability appear when there is an inflow of energy; reverse transitions appear when energy is dissipating. Several metastable areas of a different scale exist in the seismically active region before an earthquake. Some earthquakes are preceded by precursory phenomena of a different scale in space and time. These include long-term activation, seismic quiescence, foreshocks in the broad and narrow sense, hidden periodical vibrations, effects of the synchronization of seismic activity, and others. Such phenomena indicate that the dynamic system of lithosphere is moving to a new state – catastrophe. A number of examples of medium-term and short-term precursors is shown in this paper. However, no precursors identified to date are clear and unambiguous: the percentage of missed targets and false alarms is high. The weak fluctuations from outer and internal sources play a great role on the eve of an earthquake and the occurrence time of the future event depends on the collective behavior of triggers. The main task is to improve the methods of metastable zone detection and probabilistic forecasting.

  14. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  15. On the obstacles and way to assess the seismic catastrophe for high arch dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To prevent possible seismic catastrophe,naturally,its assessment is deeply concerned over in China as a series of arch dams of about 300 m high will be constructed in the severe seismic regions.In this paper the major obstacles to the seismic catastrophe assessment of high arch dams which focused on clearly defining the Maximum Credible Earthquake (MCE) and reasonably selecting its site-specific seismic input parameters as well as quantitatively evaluating the limit state of dam-breach for designers are emphasized.Some breakthrough progress with pending problems is presented,such as to adopt more reasonable seismic input parameters based on seismic hazard evaluation of dam site; to develop model and method more fit in with the reality for non-linear seismic analysis of dam-foundation-reservoir system.The ideals of further improvement both in evaluating the MCE and defining the quantitative index of its performance objective are discussed,including how to use semi-empirical method of simulating strong ground motion near fault,how to solve the long-standing problem of stress singularity at dam heel,and how to investigate dynamic behaviors of fully-graded damconcrete through dynamic tests and 3-dimensional meso-mechanics analysis checked by CT technique.

  16. Structural control on the directional amplification of seismic noise (Campo Imperatore, central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, M.; Fondriest, M.; Demurtas, M.; Magnoni, F.; Di Toro, G.; Rovelli, A.

    2017-08-01

    Seismic signals propagating across a fault may yield information on the internal structure of the fault zone. Here we have assessed the amplification of seismic noise (i.e., ambient vibrations generated by natural or anthropogenic disturbances) across the Vado di Corno Fault (Campo Imperatore, central Italy). The fault zone is considered as an exhumed analogue of the normal faults activated during the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake sequence. Detailed structural geological survey of the footwall block revealed that the fault zone is highly anisotropic and is affected by a complex network of faults and fractures with dominant WNW-ESE strike. We measured seismic noise with portable seismometers along a ∼500 m long transect perpendicular to the average fault strike. Seismic signals were processed calculating the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios and performing wavefield polarization analyses. We found a predominant NE-SW to NNE-SSW (i.e., ca. perpendicular to the average strike of the fault-fracture network) amplification of the horizontal component of the seismic waves. Numerical simulations of earthquake-induced ground motions ruled out the role of topography in controlling the polarization and the amplitude of the waves. Therefore, the higher seismic noise amplitude observed in the fault-perpendicular direction was related to the measured fracture network and the resulting stiffness anisotropy of the rock mass. These observations open new perspectives in using measures of ambient seismic noise, which are fast and inexpensive, to estimate the dominant orientation of fracture networks within fault zones.

  17. Robust seismicity forecasting based on Bayesian parameter estimation for epidemiological spatio-temporal aftershock clustering models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Hossein; Jalayer, Fatemeh

    2017-08-29

    In the immediate aftermath of a strong earthquake and in the presence of an ongoing aftershock sequence, scientific advisories in terms of seismicity forecasts play quite a crucial role in emergency decision-making and risk mitigation. Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models are frequently used for forecasting the spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity in the short-term. We propose robust forecasting of seismicity based on ETAS model, by exploiting the link between Bayesian inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation. The methodology considers the uncertainty not only in the model parameters, conditioned on the available catalogue of events occurred before the forecasting interval, but also the uncertainty in the sequence of events that are going to happen during the forecasting interval. We demonstrate the methodology by retrospective early forecasting of seismicity associated with the 2016 Amatrice seismic sequence activities in central Italy. We provide robust spatio-temporal short-term seismicity forecasts with various time intervals in the first few days elapsed after each of the three main events within the sequence, which can predict the seismicity within plus/minus two standard deviations from the mean estimate within the few hours elapsed after the main event.

  18. Seismic phases from the Moho and its implication on the ultra-slow spreading ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiazheng; ZHAO Minghui; QIU Xuelin; LI Jiabiao; RUAN Aiguo

    2013-01-01

    The Moho interface provides critical evidence for crustal thickness and the mode of oceanic crust accretion. The seismic Moho interface has not been identified yet at the magma-rich segments (46°-52°E) of the ultra-slow spreading Southwestern Indian Ridge (SWIR). This paper firstly deduces the characteristics and do-mains of seismic phases based on a theoretical oceanic crust model. Then, topographic correction is carried out for the OBS record sections along Profile Y3Y4 using the latest OBS data acquired from the detailed 3D seismic survey at the SWIR in 2010. Seismic phases are identified and analyzed, especially for the reflected and refracted seismic phases from the Moho. A 2D crustal model is finally established using the ray tracing and travel-time simulation method. The presence of reflected seismic phases at Segment 28 shows that the crustal rocks have been separated from the mantle by cooling and the Moho interface has already formed at zero age. The 2D seismic velocity structure across the axis of Segment 28 indicates that detachment faults play a key role during the processes of asymmetric oceanic crust accretion.

  19. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  20. Time-dependent seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Of methods for measuring temporal changes in seismic-wave speeds in the Earth, seismic tomography is among those that offer the highest spatial resolution. 3-D tomographic methods are commonly applied in this context by inverting seismic wave arrival time data sets from different epochs independently and assuming that differences in the derived structures represent real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of independent inversions would differ even if the structure in the Earth did not change, due to observational errors and differences in the seismic ray distributions. The latter effect may be especially severe when data sets include earthquake swarms or aftershock sequences, and may produce the appearance of correlation between structural changes and seismicity when the wave speeds are actually temporally invariant. A better approach, which makes it possible to assess what changes are truly required by the data, is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, minimizing the difference between models for different epochs as well as the rms arrival-time residuals. This problem leads, in the case of two epochs, to a system of normal equations whose order is twice as great as for a single epoch. The direct solution of this system would require twice as much memory and four times as much computational effort as would independent inversions. We present an algorithm, tomo4d, that takes advantage of the structure and sparseness of the system to obtain the solution with essentially no more effort than independent inversions require. No claim to original US government works Journal compilation ?? 2010 RAS.

  1. Seismic evaluation methods for existing buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, B.J.

    1995-07-01

    Recent US Department of Energy natural phenomena hazards mitigation directives require the earthquake reassessment of existing hazardous facilities and general use structures. This applies also to structures located in accordance with the Uniform Building Code in Seismic Zone 0 where usually no consideration is given to seismic design, but where DOE specifies seismic hazard levels. An economical approach for performing such a seismic evaluation, which relies heavily on the use of preexistent structural analysis results is outlined below. Specifically, three different methods are used to estimate the seismic capacity of a building, which is a unit of a building complex located on a site considered low risk to earthquakes. For structures originally not seismically designed, which may not have or be able to prove sufficient capacity to meet new arbitrarily high seismic design requirement and which are located on low-seismicity sites, it may be very cost effective to perform detailed site-specific seismic hazard studies in order to establish the true seismic threat. This is particularly beneficial, to sites with many buildings and facilities to be seismically evaluated.

  2. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  3. Seismic acquisition parameters analysis for deep weak reflectors in the South Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Huaishan; Wu, Zhiqiang; Yue, Long

    2016-10-01

    The Mesozoic-Paleozoic marine residual basin in the South Yellow Sea (SYS) is a significant deep potential hydrocarbon reservoir. However, the imaging of the deep prospecting target is quite challenging due to the specific seismic-geological conditions. In the Central and Wunansha Uplifts, the penetration of the seismic wavefield is limited by the shallow high-velocity layers (HVLs) and the weak reflections in the deep carbonate rocks. With the conventional marine seismic acquisition technique, the deep weak reflection is difficult to image and identify. In this paper, we could confirm through numerical simulation that the combination of multi-level air-gun array and extended cable used in the seismic acquisition is crucial for improving the imaging quality. Based on the velocity model derived from the geological interpretation, we performed two-dimensional finite difference forward modeling. The numerical simulation results show that the use of the multi-level air-gun array can enhance low-frequency energy and that the wide-angle reflection received at far offsets of the extended cable has a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and higher energy. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the unconventional wide-angle seismic acquisition technique mentioned above could overcome the difficulty in imaging the deep weak reflectors of the SYS, and it may be useful for the design of practical seismic acquisition schemes in this region.

  4. Seismic demand evaluation of medium ductility RC moment frames using nonlinear procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarzadeh, Hosein; Talebian, Nima; Kohandel, Roya

    2013-09-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering is a recent focus of research that has resulted in widely developed design methodologies due to its ability to realistically simulate structural response characteristics. Precise prediction of seismic demands is a key component of performance-based design methodologies. This paper presents a seismic demand evaluation of reinforced concrete moment frames with medium ductility. The accuracy of utilizing simplified nonlinear static analysis is assessed by comparison against the results of time history analysis on a number of frames. Displacement profiles, drift demand and maximum plastic rotation were computed to assess seismic demands. Estimated seismic demands were compared to acceptance criteria in FEMA 356. The results indicate that these frames have sufficient capacity to resist interstory drifts that are greater than the limit value.

  5. Evaluation of Seismic Behaviors of Partially Deteriorated Reinforced Concrete Circular Columns Retrofitted with CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the concrete strength in some regions of reinforced concrete (RC columns in practice may weaken the seismic behaviors of columns. Its effects on RC columns should be well understood. This paper aims to investigate the influences of deteriorated segment on the seismic behaviors of partially deteriorated RC columns and attempts to recover the seismic behaviors of partially deteriorated columns with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites. A finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the seismic behaviors of CFRP-confined partially deteriorated RC columns. The numerical results were verified by the laboratory tests of six specimens. Based on the finite element results, the failure location of partially deteriorated columns in an earthquake was predicted, and the effectiveness of CFRP retrofitted on partially deteriorated columns was evaluated.

  6. Control of asperities size and spacing on seismic behavior of subduction megathrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, Fabio; Funiciello, Francesca; Brizzi, Silvia; Lallemand, Serge; Rosenau, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The majority of the largest subduction megathrust earthquakes share the common characteristic of rupturing more than one asperity along strike of the margin. Understanding the factors that control coseismic failure of multiple asperities, and thus maximum magnitude, is central for seismic hazard assessment. To investigate the role of asperities size and spacing on maximum magnitude, seismicity rate, and percentage of synchronized ruptures, we use analog models simulating along-strike rupture behavior of megathrust earthquakes. We found negative correlations between the barrier-to-asperity length ratio Db/Da and maximum magnitude and seismicity rate. Db/Da also controls the process of asperities synchronization along the megathrust. A permanent barrier behavior is observed for Db/Da > 0.5. Comparing our experimental results to the Nankai Trough historical seismicity, we propose that the distribution of megathrust frictional heterogeneities likely explains the diversity of earthquakes which occurred there.

  7. Pseudo-seismic wavelet transformation of transient electromagnetic response in engineering geology exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, G. Q.; Yan, Y. J.; Li, X.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents some new theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of that transient electromagnetic diffusion-field response is transformed into a pseudo-seismic wavelet in engineering geology exploration. It can clearly reveal the electric interface under ground. To simplify the integral equation used in the transformation, the integral range is separated into seven windows, and each window is compiled into a group of integral coefficients. Then, the accuracy of the coefficients is tested, and the calculated coefficients are used to derive the pseudo-seismic wavelet by optimization method. Finally, several geo-electric models are designed, so that model responses are transformed into the pseudo-seismic wavelet. The transformed imaginary wave shows that some reflection and refraction phenomena appear when the wave meets the electric interface. This result supports the introduction of the seismic interpretation in data processing of transient electromagnetic method.

  8. Structural design of active seismic isolation floor with a charging function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakakoji, Hayato; Miura, Nanako

    2016-04-01

    This study shows an optimum structure of a seismic isolation floor against horizontal ground motions. Although a seismic isolation floor is effective with vibration reduction, the response of the floor becomes larger when excited by long-period ground motions. It is shown that caster equipment move and suffer damage in a seismic isolation structure by an experiment. Moreover, the permissible displacement of the floor is limited. Therefore, the focus is on an active seismic isolation. About active control, the system cannot operate without power supply. To solve these problems an energy regeneration is considered in our previous study. These studies only analyze simple model and did not choose the suitable structure for active control and energy regeneration. This research propose a new structure which has regenerated energy exceeds the energy required for the active control by numerical simulation.

  9. Delineation of seismic source zones based on seismicity parameters and probabilistic evaluation of seismic hazard using logic tree approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Vipin; T G Sitharam

    2013-06-01

    The delineation of seismic source zones plays an important role in the evaluation of seismic hazard. In most of the studies the seismic source delineation is done based on geological features. In the present study, an attempt has been made to delineate seismic source zones in the study area (south India) based on the seismicity parameters. Seismicity parameters and the maximum probable earthquake for these source zones were evaluated and were used in the hazard evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation of seismic hazard for south India was carried out using a logic tree approach. Two different types of seismic sources, linear and areal, were considered in the present study to model the seismic sources in the region more precisely. In order to properly account for the attenuation characteristics of the region, three different attenuation relations were used with different weightage factors. Seismic hazard evaluation was done for the probability of exceedance (PE) of 10% and 2% in 50 years. The spatial variation of rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) and spectral acceleration (Sa) values corresponding to return periods of 475 and 2500 years for the entire study area are presented in this work. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values at ground surface level were estimated based on different NEHRP site classes by considering local site effects.

  10. Assessing the Comprehensive Seismic Earth Model using normal mode data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelemeijer, Paula; Afanasiev, Michael; Fichtner, Andreas; Gokhberg, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Advances in computational resources and numerical methods allow the simulation of realistic seismic wave propagation through complex media, while ensuring that the complete wave field is correctly represented in synthetic seismograms. This full waveform inversion is widely applied on regional and continental scales, where particularly dense data sampled can be achieved leading to an increased resolution in the obtained model images. On a global scale, however, full waveform tomography is still and will continue to be limited to longer length scales due to the large computational costs. Normal mode tomography provides an alternative fast full waveform approach for imaging seismic structures in a global way. Normal modes are not limited by the poor station-earthquake distribution and provide sensitivity to density structure. Using normal modes, a more robust long wavelength background model can be obtained, leading to more accurate absolute velocity models for tectonic and mineral physics interpretations. In addition, it is vital to combine all seismic data types across accessible periods to obtain a more complete, consistent and interpretable image of the Earth's interior. Here, we aim to combine the globally sensitive long period normal modes with shorter period full waveform modelling within the multi-scale framework of the Comprehensive Seismic Earth Model (CSEM). The multi-scale inversion framework of the CSEM allows exploitation of the full waveform capacity on both sides of the seismic spectrum. As the CSEM includes high-resolution subregions with velocity variations at much shorter wavelengths than normal modes could constrain, the question arises whether these small-scale variations are noticeable in normal mode data, and which modes respond in particular. We report here on experiments in which we address these questions. We separately investigate the effects of small-scale variations in shear-wave velocity and compressional wave velocity compared to the

  11. Seismic structure of the oceanic lithosphere inferred from guided wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shito, A.; Suetsugu, D.; Furumura, T.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.

    2012-12-01

    Characteristic seismic waves are observed by seismological experiment using Broad-Band Ocean Bottom Seismometers (BBOBSs) conducted in the northwestern Pacific from 2007 to 2008 and from 2010 to 2011. The seismic waves have low frequency onset (phases (2.5-10 Hz). The high frequency later phases have large amplitude and long duration for both P and S waves. The seismic waves are observed commonly at the BBOBS array from events in the subducting Pacific plate. To investigate generation and propagation mechanisms of the seismic wave will help us to understand the seismic structure and the origin of the oceanic lithosphere. High frequency phases travelling efficiently through the oceanic lithosphere more than 3000 km are well known phenomenon. These phases were previously called as Po/So waves. Po/So waves were observed as early as 1935, and were studied actively from the 1970s to 1990s. However, the mechanism of generation and propagation of the phases are still controversial. The guided waves propagating in subducting plate are also common phenomenon in the subduction zone. The waves are generally characterized by separation of low frequency and high frequency components. In order to explain the separation, Martin and Rietbrock [2003] considered the trapping of waves in the waveguide formed by thin low velocity former oceanic crust at the top of the plate. However, large amplitude and long duration of the high frequency component cannot be achieved by the model. From the analysis of waveform observed at the eastern seaboard of northern Japan and numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation, Furumura and Kennet [2005] demonstrate that the guided wave travelling in the subducting plate is produced by multiple forward scattering of high-frequency seismic waves due to small-scale random heterogeneity in the plate structure. We apply the method proposed by Furumura and Kennett [2005] to reproduce the seismograms recorded by the BBOBS array. We conduct 2D numerical

  12. Cursory seismic drift assessment for buildings in moderate seismicity regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yong; R.K.L. Su; Zhou Fulin

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to assess the seismic drift of reinforced concrete buildings with limited structural and geotechnical information. Based on the latest and the most advanced research on predicting potential near-field and far field earthquakes affecting Hong Kong, the engineering response spectra for both rock and soil sites are derived. A new step-by-step procedure for displacement-based seismic hazard assessment of building structures is proposed to determine the maximum inter-storey drift demand for reinforced concrete buildings. The primary information required for this assessment is only the depth of the soft soil above bedrock and the height of the building. This procedure is further extended to assess the maximum chord rotation angle demand for the coupling beam of coupled shear wall or frame wall structures, which may be very critical when subjected to earthquake forces. An example is provided to illustrate calibration of the assessment procedure by using actual engineering structural models.

  13. Seismic damage and destructive potential of seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Petrazzuoli

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper has been written within a research framework investigating the destructive potential of seismic events. The elastic response spectra seem insufficient to explain the behaviour of structures subject to large earthquakes in which they experience extensive plastic deformations. Recent works emphasise that there were many difficulties in the definition of a single pararneter linked to the destl-uctive potential of an earthquake. In this work a study on the effect of frequency content on structural damage has been carried out. The behaviour of two different elastoplastic oscillators has been analysed, considering several artificial earthquakes. The results obtained suggest a method for evaluating the destructive seismic potential of an earthquake through the response spectra ad the frequency content of the signal. and through the mechai~ical characteristics of the structures within the analysed area.

  14. Seismic stability analysis of concrete gravity dams with penetrated cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-yan JIANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The seismic stability of a cracked dam was examined in this study. Geometric nonlinearity and large deformations, as well as the contact condition at the crack site, were taken into consideration. The location of penetrated cracks was first identified using the concrete plastic-damage model based on the nonlinear finite element method (FEM. Then, the hard contact algorithm was used to simulate the crack interaction in the normal direction, and the Coloumb friction model was used to simulate the crack interaction in the tangential direction. After verification of numerical models through a case study, the seismic stability of the Koyna Dam with two types of penetrated cracks is discussed in detail with different seismic peak accelerations, and the collapse processes of the cracked dam are also presented. The results show that the stability of the dam with two types of penetrated cracks can be ensured in an earthquake with a magnitude of the original Koyna earthquake, and the cracked dam has a large earthquake-resistant margin. The failure processes of the cracked dam in strong earthquakes can be divided into two stages: the sliding stage and the overturning stage. The sliding stage ends near the peak acceleration, and the top block slides a long distance along the crack before the collapse occurs. The maximum sliding displacement of the top block will decrease with an increasing friction coefficient at the crack site.

  15. Fluid Induced Earthquakes: From KTB Experiments to Natural Seismicity Swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    ), both heterogeneously distributed in rocks. The results of the analysis of the most significant and best studied (year 2000) earthquake swarm support this concept. Using a numerical model, where spatially correlated diffusivity and criticalit y patches (where patches with higher diffusivity are assumed to be less stable) are considered, we successfully simulate a general seismicity pattern of the swarms, including the spatio-temporal clustering of events and the migration of seismic activity. Therefore, in some cases spontaneously triggered natural seismicity, like earthquake swarms, also shows diffusion-typical signatures mentioned above. However, it seems that there are also some principle differences. They are emphasized in this presentation.

  16. A study of seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerberg, Peeter Michael

    Three different aspects of estimating properties from seismic data are treated in this thesis: (1) Deterministic processing of a high resolution shallow seismic data set with good geologic control, (2) traveltime estimation from complicated models described statistically, and (3) estimation of a the vertical autocorrelation length of such models. The first part of this thesis is the processing and interpretation of a shallow seismic dataset collected in an open pit copper mine near Tyrone, New Mexico. The seismic image is compared with the outcrop in the open pit mine wall along which the seismic line was collected, and with drill data obtained from the mine operators. Specific features imaged by the experiment include the base of the overlaying sediment, the base of the leached capping, and fractures and shear zones that control local ground water flow. The features in the migrated section compare well with outcrop and drill data. The second part of the thesis studies the systematic bias of velocities estimated from first arrival travel times measured from a class of very complicated velocity models. Traveltimes were computed for statistically described velocity models with anisotropic von Karman correlation functions. The results of a finite difference eikonal solver, corresponding to very small wavelength experiments, are compared to results from picking first arrivals of full wavefield finite difference simulations. The eikonal solver results show the largest systematic bias, corresponding to the ray theoretical limit, and the results from the full wavefield experiments are smaller, but with very similar dependence on aspect ratio of the anisotropic correlation function. The third part defines two methods to obtain the vertical correlation length from seismic data approximated by the primary reflectivity series, which conventionally is used as the ideal result of seismic imaging. The first method is based on fitting a theoretical power spectrum based on the

  17. Europa's small impactor flux and seismic detection predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Teanby, Nicholas A.

    2016-10-01

    Europa is an attractive target for future lander missions due to its dynamic surface and potentially habitable sub-surface environment. Seismology has the potential to provide powerful new constraints on the internal structure using natural sources such as faults or meteorite impacts. Here we predict how many meteorite impacts are likely to be detected using a single seismic station on Europa to inform future mission planning efforts. To this end, we derive: (1) the current small impactor flux on Europa from Jupiter impact rate observations and models; (2) a crater diameter versus impactor energy scaling relation for icy moons by merging previous experiments and simulations; and (3) scaling relations for seismic signal amplitudes as a function of distance from the impact site for a given crater size, based on analogue explosive data obtained on Earth's ice sheets. Finally, seismic amplitudes are compared to predicted noise levels and seismometer performance to determine detection rates. We predict detection of 0.002-20 small local impacts per year based on P-waves travelling directly through the ice crust. Larger regional and global-scale impact events, detected through mantle-refracted waves, are predicted to be extremely rare (10-8-1 detections per year), so are unlikely to be detected by a short duration mission. Estimated ranges include uncertainties from internal seismic attenuation, impactor flux, and seismic amplitude scaling. Internal attenuation is the most significant unknown and produces extreme uncertainties in the mantle-refracted P-wave amplitudes. Our nominal best-guess attenuation model predicts 0.002-5 local direct P detections and 6 × 10-6-0.2 mantle-refracted detections per year. Given that a plausible Europa landed mission will only last around 30 days, we conclude that impacts should not be relied upon for a seismic exploration of Europa. For future seismic exploration, faulting due to stresses in the rigid outer ice shell is likely to be a

  18. Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

  19. Interval Estimation of Seismic Hazard Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw

    2016-11-01

    The paper considers Poisson temporal occurrence of earthquakes and presents a way to integrate uncertainties of the estimates of mean activity rate and magnitude cumulative distribution function in the interval estimation of the most widely used seismic hazard functions, such as the exceedance probability and the mean return period. The proposed algorithm can be used either when the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is accepted or when the nonparametric estimation is in use. When the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is used the interval estimation of its parameters is based on the asymptotic normality of the maximum likelihood estimator. When the nonparametric kernel estimation of magnitude distribution is used, we propose the iterated bias corrected and accelerated method for interval estimation based on the smoothed bootstrap and second-order bootstrap samples. The changes resulted from the integrated approach in the interval estimation of the seismic hazard functions with respect to the approach, which neglects the uncertainty of the mean activity rate estimates have been studied using Monte Carlo simulations and two real dataset examples. The results indicate that the uncertainty of mean activity rate affects significantly the interval estimates of hazard functions only when the product of activity rate and the time period, for which the hazard is estimated, is no more than 5.0. When this product becomes greater than 5.0, the impact of the uncertainty of cumulative distribution function of magnitude dominates the impact of the uncertainty of mean activity rate in the aggregated uncertainty of the hazard functions. Following, the interval estimates with and without inclusion of the uncertainty of mean activity rate converge. The presented algorithm is generic and can be applied also to capture the propagation of uncertainty of estimates, which are parameters of a multiparameter function, onto this function.

  20. Parametric study of cantilever walls subjected to seismic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Cesare; Corigliano, Mirko; Foti, Sebastiano; Lai, Carlo G.; Lancellotta, Renato; Leuzzi, Francesco; Nicosia, Giovanni Li Destri; Paolucci, Roberto; Pettiti, Alberto; Psarropoulos, Prodromos N.; Zanoli, Omar

    2008-07-01

    The design of flexible earth retaining structures under seismic loading is a challenging geotechnical problem, the dynamic soil-structure interaction being of paramount importance for this kind of structures. Pseudo-static approaches are often adopted but do not allow a realistic assessment of the performance of the structure subjected to the seismic motions. The present paper illustrates a numerical parametric study aimed at estimating the influence of the dynamic soil-structure interaction in the design. A series of flexible earth retaining walls have been preliminary designed according to the requirements of Eurocode 7 and Eurocode 8—Part 5; their dynamic behaviour has been then evaluated by means of dynamic numerical simulations in terms of bending moments, accelerations and stress state. The results obtained from dynamic analyses have then been compared with those determined using the pseudo-static approach.

  1. Exploring the relationship between the magnitudes of seismic events

    CERN Document Server

    Spassiani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of the magnitudes of seismic events is generally assumed to be independent on past seismicity. However, by considering events in causal relation, for example mother-daughter, it seems natural to assume that the magnitude of a daughter event is conditionally dependent on the one of the corresponding mother event. In order to find experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis, we analyze different catalogs, both real and simulated, in two different ways. From each catalog, we obtain the law of triggered events' magnitude by kernel density. The results obtained show that the distribution density of triggered events' magnitude varies with the magnitude of their corresponding mother events. As the intuition suggests, an increase of mother events' magnitude induces an increase of the probability of having "high" values of triggered events' magnitude. In addition, we see a statistically significant increasing linear dependence of the magnitude means.

  2. Anatomy of the TAMA SAS seismic attenuation system

    CERN Document Server

    Marka, S; Ando, M; Bertolini, A; Cella, G; DeSalvo, R; Fukushima, M; Iida, Y; Jacquier, F; Kawamura, S; Nishi, Y; Numata, K; Sannibale, V; Somiya, K; Takahashi, R; Tariq, H; Tsubono, K; Ugas, J; Viboud, N; Wang Chen Yang; Yamamoto, H; Yoda, T

    2002-01-01

    The TAMA SAS seismic attenuation system was developed to provide the extremely high level of seismic isolation required by the next generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors to achieve the desired sensitivity at low frequencies. Our aim was to provide good performance at frequencies above approx 10 Hz, while utilizing only passive subsystems in the sensitive frequency band of the TAMA interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The only active feedback is relegated below 6 Hz and it is used to damp the rigid body resonances of the attenuation chain. Simulations, based on subsystem performance characterizations, indicate that the system can achieve rms mirror residual motion measured in a few tens of nanometres. We will give a brief overview of the subsystems and point out some of the characterization results, supporting our claims of achieved performance. SAS is a passive, UHV compatible and low cost system. It is likely that extremely sensitive experiments in other fields will also profit ...

  3. Deviation from power law of the global seismic moment distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of seismic moment is of capital interest to evaluate earthquake hazard, in particular regarding the most extreme events. We make use of likelihood-ratio tests to compare the simple Gutenberg-Richter power-law (PL) distribution with two statistical models that incorporate an exponential tail, the so-called tapered Gutenberg-Richter (Tap) and the truncated gamma, when fitted to the global CMT earthquake catalog. Although the Tap distribution does not introduce any significant improvement of fit respect the PL, the truncated gamma does. Simulated samples of this distribution, with parameters β = 0.68 and mc = 9.15 and reshuffled in order to mimic the time occurrence of the order statistics of the empirical data, are able to explain the temporal heterogeneity of global seismicity both before and after the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004. PMID:28053311

  4. Discussion about the relationship between seismic belt and seismic statistical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘华; 金严; 胡聿贤

    2003-01-01

    This paper makes a summary of status of delimitation of seismic zones and belts of China firstly in aspects of studying history, purpose, usage, delimiting principles, various presenting forms and main specialties. Then the viewpoints are emphasized, making geographical divisions by seismicity is just the most important purpose of delimiting seismic belts and the concept of seismic belt is also quite different from that of seismic statistical zone used in CPSHA method. The concept of seismic statistical zone and its history of evolvement are introduced too. Large differences between these two concepts exist separately in their statistical property, actual meaning, gradation, required scale, and property of refusing to overlap each other, aim and usage of delimitation. But in current engineering practice, these two concepts are confused. On the one hand, it causes no fit theory for delimiting seismic statistical zone in PSHA to be set up; on the other hand, researches about delimitation of seismic belts with purposes of seismicity zoning and studying on structural environment, mechanism of earthquake generating also pause to go ahead. Major conclusions are given in the end of this paper, that seismic statistical zone bases on the result of seismic belt delimiting, it only arises in and can be used in the especial PSHA method of China with considering spatially and temporally inhomogeneous seismic activities, and its concept should be clearly differentiated from the concept of seismic belt.

  5. Seismic techniques in coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, A.K.; Belleza, G.V.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the peripheral fracture zones in coal pillars left for support in underground mines. The fracture zones are caused by the redistribution of stresses in strata resulting from the process of excavation and blasting if it is used. The extent and degree of these fracture zones, in turn, have a direct influence on the ability of pillars to provide stable support to the overlying strata. Seismic methods such as refraction, uphole, and collinear techniques outlined in previous reports are being used to investigate the extent and degree of the peripheral fracture zones. Some of the work that has been carried out and is described in this report, relates to the study of peripheral fracture zones in coal pillars using seismic techniques.

  6. Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, D

    2008-01-01

    This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

  7. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  8. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFMAYER,C.H.

    1999-03-29

    The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

  9. Displacement Based Seismic Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hofmayer, C.; Park, Y.J.

    1999-03-29

    The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

  10. An economical educational seismic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in seismology from the nonprofessional or amateur standpoint. The operation of a seismic system can be satisfying and educational, especially when you have built and operated the system yourself. A long-period indoor-type sensor and recording system that works extremely well has been developed in the James Madison University Physics Deparment. The system can be built quite economically, and any educational institution that cannot commit themselves to a professional installation need not be without first-hand seismic information. The system design approach has been selected by college students working a project or senior thesis, several elementary and secondary science teachers, as well as the more ambitious tinkerer or hobbyist at home 

  11. Physics-based Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Seismicity Induced by Fluid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxall, W.; Hutchings, L. J.; Johnson, S.; Savy, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Risk associated with induced seismicity (IS) is a significant factor in the design, permitting and operation of enhanced geothermal, geological CO2 sequestration and other fluid injection projects. Whereas conventional probabilistic seismic hazard and risk analysis (PSHA, PSRA) methods provide an overall framework, they require adaptation to address specific characteristics of induced earthquake occurrence and ground motion estimation, and the nature of the resulting risk. The first problem is to predict the earthquake frequency-magnitude distribution of induced events for PSHA required at the design and permitting stage before the start of injection, when an appropriate earthquake catalog clearly does not exist. Furthermore, observations and theory show that the occurrence of earthquakes induced by an evolving pore-pressure field is time-dependent, and hence does not conform to the assumption of Poissonian behavior in conventional PSHA. We present an approach to this problem based on generation of an induced seismicity catalog using numerical simulation of pressure-induced shear failure in a model of the geologic structure and stress regime in and surrounding the reservoir. The model is based on available measurements of site-specific in-situ properties as well as generic earthquake source parameters. We also discuss semi-empirical analysis to sequentially update hazard and risk estimates for input to management and mitigation strategies using earthquake data recorded during and after injection. The second important difference from conventional PSRA is that in addition to potentially damaging ground motions a significant risk associated with induce seismicity in general is the perceived nuisance caused in nearby communities by small, local felt earthquakes, which in general occur relatively frequently. Including these small, usually shallow earthquakes in the hazard analysis requires extending the ground motion frequency band considered to include the high

  12. 软弱场地地铁车站结构地震反应的数值模拟与模型试验对比分析%Comparative Analysis between Numerical Simulation and Model Test on the Seismic Response of Subway Station Structure in Soft Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶道奎; 陈国兴; 左熹

    2012-01-01

    根据软弱场地土上地铁车站结构大型振动台模型试验结果,以软件ABAQUS为平台,采用记忆型嵌套面黏塑性动力本构模型和动塑性损伤模型,分别模拟土体和车站结构混凝土的动力特性,建立了土-地铁车站结构非线性动力相互作用二维和三维有限元分析模型,对各种试验工况下地基土-地铁车站结构体系的地震反应进行了数值模拟,并与试验结果进行了对比.结果表明:二维、三维数值模拟与振动台模型试验结果基本一致,三维模型可更好地模拟软弱场地与地铁车站结构的动力相互作用及模型结构的动力反应.数值模拟结果和振动台试验结果可相互验证其可靠性.%Based on the results of the large-scale shaking table test of subway station structures in soft clay, finite element software ABAQUS was used to establish two-and three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic interaction model for soil-subway station structure system. In the modeling, dynamic visco-plastic memorial nested yield surface model was used to describe the dynamic characteristics of soils, and dynamic plastic-damage model was used to simulate the dynamic characteristics of tunnel concrete. The seismic response of soil-subway station structure system under different test conditions was analyzed by the numerical simulation method. Moreover, the numerical simulation results and the shaking table test were compared in detail. The results show that the simulation results of the two-and three-dimensional model are basically identical with the shaking table tests. The three-dimensional model is better to simulate the dynamic interaction of the subway station structure and the soil as well as the dynamic responses of the station structure in soft clay. The modeling analysis based on software ABAQUS and the shaking table test results are mutually verified.

  13. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuo El-Ela A. Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba–Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5° × 0.5° within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  14. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-10-01

    In this report we will show the fundamental concepts of two different methods to compute seismic energy absorption. The first methods gives and absolute value of Q and is based on computation with minimum phase operators. The second method gives a relative energy loss compared to a background trend. This method is a rapid, qualitative indicator of anomalous absorption and can be combined with other attributes such as band limited acoustic impedance to indicate areas of likely gas saturation.

  15. Research on the effect estimation of seismic safety evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹其嘉; 陶裕禄

    2004-01-01

    Seismic safety evaluation is a basic work for determining the seismic resistance requirements of major construction projects. The effect, especially the economic effect of the seismic safety evaluation has been generally concerned. The paper gives a model for estimating the effect of seismic safety evaluation and calculates roughly the economic effect of seismic safety evaluation with some examples.

  16. TSUNAMI DISPERSION SENSITIVITY TO SEISMIC SOURCE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Igorevich Gusev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the sensitivity of frequency dispersion effects to the form of initial surface elevation of seismic tsunami source. We vary such parameters of the source as rupture depth, dip-angle and rake-angle. Some variations in magnitude and strike angle are considered. The fully nonlinear dispersive model on a rotating sphere is used for wave propagation simulations. The main feature of the algorithm is the splitting of initial system on two subproblems of elliptic and hyperbolic type, which allows implementation of well-suitable numerical methods for them. The dispersive effects are estimated through differences between computations with the dispersive and nondispersive models. We consider an idealized test with a constant depth, a model basin for near-field tsunami simulations and a realistic scenario. Our computations show that the dispersion effects are strongly sensitive to the rupture depth and the dip-angle variations. Waves generated by sources with lager magnitude may be even more affected by dispersion.

  17. Seismic studies of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astaneh-Asl, A; Larsen, S; McCallen, D

    1999-08-17

    Computational simulation plays a central role in the engineering analysis and design of major bridge structures and accurate simulations are essential for the development of earthquake resistant and economical structural designs. This paper describes new methodologies and computational tools which have recently been developed for simulating earthquake ground motions and the seismic response of cable supported bridges. The simulation tools are described and an example application for an important long-span suspension bridge is demonstrated. The application portion of the study has particular focus on the potential damaging effects of long period displacement pulses and permanent ground displacements which can occur when a bridge is located in the near-field of a major earthquake fault.

  18. Seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This publication describes the seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity and is intended for use in seismic hazard studies of that nation. Included are digital files with information on earthquakes that have been recorded in Afghanistan and vicinity through mid-December 2004. Chapter A provides an overview of the seismicity and tectonics of Afghanistan and defines the earthquake parameters included in the 'Summary Catalog' and the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects.' Chapter B summarizes compilation of the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' and documents their formats. The 'Summary Catalog' itself is presented as a comma-delimited ASCII file, the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects' is presented as an html file, and the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' are presented as flat ASCII files. Finally, this report includes as separate plates a digital image of a map of epicenters of earthquakes occurring since 1964 (Plate 1) and a representation of areas of damage or strong shaking from selected past earthquakes in Afghanistan and vicinity (Plate 2).

  19. Seismic risk mapping for Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagunov, S.; Grünthal, G.; Wahlström, R.; Stempniewski, L.; Zschau, J.

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and map the seismic risk for Germany, restricted to the expected losses of damage to residential buildings. There are several earthquake prone regions in the country which have produced Mw magnitudes above 6 and up to 6.7 corresponding to observed ground shaking intensity up to VIII-IX (EMS-98). Combined with the fact that some of the earthquake prone areas are densely populated and highly industrialized and where therefore the hazard coincides with high concentration of exposed assets, the damaging implications from earthquakes must be taken seriously. In this study a methodology is presented and pursued to calculate the seismic risk from (1) intensity based probabilistic seismic hazard, (2) vulnerability composition models, which are based on the distribution of residential buildings of various structural types in representative communities and (3) the distribution of assets in terms of replacement costs for residential buildings. The estimates of the risk are treated as primary economic losses due to structural damage to residential buildings. The obtained results are presented as maps of the damage and risk distributions. For a probability level of 90% non-exceedence in 50 years (corresponding to a mean return period of 475 years) the mean damage ratio is up to 20% and the risk up to hundreds of millions of euro in the most endangered communities. The developed models have been calibrated with observed data from several damaging earthquakes in Germany and the nearby area in the past 30 years.

  20. Building a Smartphone Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    We are exploring to build a new type of seismic network by using the smartphones. The accelerometers in smartphones can be used to record earthquakes, the GPS unit can give an accurate location, and the built-in communication unit makes the communication easier for this network. In the future, these smartphones may work as a supplement network to the current traditional network for scientific research and real-time applications. In order to build this network, we developed an application for android phones and server to record the acceleration in real time. These records can be sent back to a server in real time, and analyzed at the server. We evaluated the performance of the smartphone as a seismic recording instrument by comparing them with high quality accelerometer while located on controlled shake tables for a variety of tests, and also the noise floor test. Based on the daily human activity data recorded by the volunteers and the shake table tests data, we also developed algorithm for the smartphones to detect earthquakes from daily human activities. These all form the basis of setting up a new prototype smartphone seismic network in the near future.

  1. Seismic microzonation of Bangalore, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Anbazhagan; T G Sitharam

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to evaluate the seismic hazard considering local site effects by carrying out detailed geotechnical and geophysical site characterization in Bangalore, India to develop microzonation maps. An area of 220 km2, encompassing Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BMP) has been chosen as the study area. Seismic hazard analysis and microzonation of Bangalore are addressed in three parts: in the first part, estimation of seismic hazard is done using seismotectonic and geological information. Second part deals with site characterization using geotechnical and shallow geophysical techniques. In the last part, local site effects are assessed by carrying out one-dimensional (1-D) ground response analysis (using the program SHAKE 2000) using both standard penetration test (SPT) data and shear wave velocity data from multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) survey. Further, field experiments using microtremor studies have also been carried out for evaluation of predominant frequency of the soil columns. The same has been assessed using 1-D ground response analysis and compared with microtremor results. Further, the Seed and Idriss simplified approach has been adopted to evaluate the soil liquefaction susceptibility and liquefaction resistance assessment. Microzonation maps have been prepared with a scale of 1:20,000. The detailed methodology, along with experimental details, collated data, results and maps are presented in this paper.

  2. Importance of direct and indirect triggered seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Helmstetter, A; Helmstetter, Agnes; Sornette, Didier

    2003-01-01

    Using the simple ETAS branching model of seismicity, which assumes that each earthquake can trigger other earthquakes, we quantify the role played by the cascade of triggered seismicity in controlling the rate of aftershock decay as well as in the overall level of seismicity in the presence of a constant external seismicity source. We show that, in this model, the proportion of triggered seismicity is equal to the proportion of secondary plus later-generation aftershocks, and is given by the average number of triggered events per earthquake. Based on these results and on the observation that a large fraction of seismicity are triggered earthquakes, we conclude that similarly a large fraction of aftershocks occurring a few hours or days after a mainshock are triggered indirectly by the mainshock.

  3. Seismic activity at the western Pyrenean edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M.; Gallart, J.; Díaz, J.; Olivera, C.; Pedreira, D.; López, C.; González-Cortina, J. M.; Pulgar, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The present-day seismicity at the westernmost part of the Pyrenean domain reported from permanent networks is of low to moderate magnitude. However, it is poorly constrained due to the scarce station coverage of the area. We present new seismic data collected from a temporary network deployed there for 17 months that provides an enhanced image of the seismic activity and its tectonic implications. Our results delineate the westward continuity of the E-W Pyrenean band of seismicity, through the Variscan Basque Massifs along the Leiza Fault, ending up at the Hendaya Fault. This seismicity belt is distributed on a crustal scale, dipping northward to almost 30 km depth. Other relevant seismic events located in the area can be related to the central segment of the Pamplona fault, and to different E-W thrust structures.

  4. Numerical simulation and first-order hazard analysis of large co-seismic tsunamis generated in the Puerto Rico trench: near-field impact on the North shore of Puerto Rico and far-field impact on the US East Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Grilli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We perform numerical simulations of the coastal impact of large co-seismic tsunamis, initiated in the Puerto Rican trench, both in far-field areas along the upper US East coast (and other Caribbean islands, and in more detail in the near-field, along the Puerto Rico North Shore (PRNS. We first model a magnitude 9.1 extreme co-seismic source and then a smaller 8.7 magnitude source, which approximately correspond to 600 and 200 year return periods, respectively. In both cases, tsunami generation and propagation (both near- and far-field are first performed in a coarse 2′ basin scale grid, with ETOPO2 bathymetry, using a fully nonlinear and dispersive long wave tsunami model (FUNWAVE. Coastal runup and inundation are then simulated for two selected areas, using finer coastal nested grids. Thus, a 15″ (450 m grid is used to calculate detailed far-field impact along the US East Coast, from New Jersey to Maine, and a 3″ (90 m grid (for the finest resolution, encompassing the entire PRNS, is used to compute detailed near-field impact along the PRNS (runup and inundation. To perform coastal simulations in nested grids, accurate bathymetry/topography databases are constructed by combining ETOPO2 2′ data (in deep water and USGS' or NOAA's 15″ or 3″ (in shallow water data. In the far-field, runup caused by the extreme 9.1 source would be severe (over 10 m for some nearby Caribbean islands, but would only reach up to 3 m along the selected section of the East coast. A sensitivity analysis to the bathymetric resolution (for a constant 3″ model grid of runup along the PRNS, confirms the convergence of runup results for a topographic resolution 24″ or better, and thus stresses the importance of using sufficiently resolved bathymetric data, in order to accurately predict extreme runup values, particularly when bathymetric focusing is significant. Runup (10–22 m and inundation are found to be very large at most locations for the extreme 9

  5. A Review of Seismicity in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Ping; Li Gang; Liu Jie; Ni Sidao

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1 SURVEY OF GLOBE SEISMICITY IN 2010 A total of 28 strong earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 occurred in 2010 throughout the world according to the China Seismic Network (Table 1).The strongest was the Chile earthquake measuring Ms8.8 on February 27, 2010 (Fig.1).There was an apparent increase in frequency and the energy release of earthquakes in 2010, compared with seismicity in 2009.

  6. LANL seismic screening method for existing buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, S.L.; Feller, K.C.; Fritz de la Orta, G.O. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Seismic Screening Method is to provide a comprehensive, rational, and inexpensive method for evaluating the relative seismic integrity of a large building inventory using substantial life-safety as the minimum goal. The substantial life-safety goal is deemed to be satisfied if the extent of structural damage or nonstructural component damage does not pose a significant risk to human life. The screening is limited to Performance Category (PC) -0, -1, and -2 buildings and structures. Because of their higher performance objectives, PC-3 and PC-4 buildings automatically fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method and will be subject to a more detailed seismic analysis. The Laboratory has also designated that PC-0, PC-1, and PC-2 unreinforced masonry bearing wall and masonry infill shear wall buildings fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method because of their historically poor seismic performance or complex behavior. These building types are also recommended for a more detailed seismic analysis. The results of the LANL Seismic Screening Method are expressed in terms of separate scores for potential configuration or physical hazards (Phase One) and calculated capacity/demand ratios (Phase Two). This two-phase method allows the user to quickly identify buildings that have adequate seismic characteristics and structural capacity and screen them out from further evaluation. The resulting scores also provide a ranking of those buildings found to be inadequate. Thus, buildings not passing the screening can be rationally prioritized for further evaluation. For the purpose of complying with Executive Order 12941, the buildings failing the LANL Seismic Screening Method are deemed to have seismic deficiencies, and cost estimates for mitigation must be prepared. Mitigation techniques and cost-estimate guidelines are not included in the LANL Seismic Screening Method.

  7. Using Composites in Seismic Retrofit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    composite shells/wraps/ jackets for the seismic retrofit of concrete columns, a number of these could potentially be used, and these are briefly discussed...Use of Concrete and Steel Jackets for Seismic Retrofit For reinforced concrete columns with these substandard reinforcement details, retrofit systems...an overview of the variations possible for the application of FRP composite jackets for purposes of seismic retrofit of columns. Wherever possible

  8. New Methodology for Rapid Seismic Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikyan, A. E.; Balassanian, S. Y.

    2002-05-01

    Seismic risk is growing worldwide and is, increasingly, a problem of developing countries. Along with growing urbanization future earthquakes will have more disastrous social and economic consequences. Seismic risk assessment and reduction are important goals for each country located in seismically active zone. For Armenia these goals are of primary importance because the results of studies carried out by Armenian NSSP for assessment of the losses caused by various types of disasters in Armenia had shown that earthquakes are the most disastrous hazard for Armenia. The strategy for seismic risk reduction in 1999 was adopted by the Government of Armenia as a high priority state program. The world experience demonstrates that for efficient response the rapid assessment of seismic losses is necessary. There are several state-of-the-art approaches for seismic risk assessment (Radius, Hazus, etc.). All of them required large amount of various input data, which is impossible to collect in many developing countries, in particular in Armenia. Taking into account this very serious problem existing for developing countries, as well as rapid seismic risk assessment need immediately after strong earthquake the author undertake the attempt to contribute into a new approach for rapid seismic risk assessment under the supervision of Prof. S. Balassanian. The analysis of numerous factors influencing seismic risk in Armenia shows that the following elements contribute most significantly to the possible losses: seismic hazard; density of population; vulnerability of structures. Proposed approach for rapid seismic risk assessment based on these three factors has been tested for several seismic events. These tests have shown that such approach might represent from 80 to 90 percent of real losses.

  9. Seismic reflection characteristics of fluvial sand and shale interbedded layers%河流相砂泥岩薄互层地震反射特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国发; 熊金良; 周辉; 翟通利

    2008-01-01

    A sedimentary geological model is established in order to study the seismic reflection characteristics of channel sand bodies. Synthetic seismic shot gathers are simulated using the acoustic wave equation and then are prestack time migrated. On the imaged data,the reflection characteristics and instantaneous attributes are analyzed and log-constrained impedance inversion is tested. Because of wave field interference, the experimental results show that seismic events do not definitely correspond to the channel sand bodies and that seismic modes of occurrence do not represent the actual ones. The seismic events formed by wave interference may lead to errors and pitfalls in sand body interpretation. The corresponding relations between instantaneous seismic attributes and sedimentary sands are not well established. Log-constrained impedance inversion improves the resolution of channel sands. However, if the inverted resolution is forced to be too high, artifacts related to the initial model may occur.

  10. Causality between expansion of seismic cloud and maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Ito, Takatoshi; Häring, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Occurrence of induced seismicity with large magnitude is critical environmental issues associated with fluid injection for shale gas/oil extraction, waste water disposal, carbon capture and storage, and engineered geothermal systems (EGS). Studies for prediction of the hazardous seismicity and risk assessment of induced seismicity has been activated recently. Many of these studies are based on the seismological statistics and these models use the information of the occurrence time and event magnitude. We have originally developed physics based model named "possible seismic moment model" to evaluate seismic activity and assess seismic moment which can be ready to release. This model is totally based on microseismic information of occurrence time, hypocenter location and magnitude (seismic moment). This model assumes existence of representative parameter having physical meaning that release-able seismic moment per rock volume (seismic moment density) at given field. Seismic moment density is to be estimated from microseismic distribution and their seismic moment. In addition to this, stimulated rock volume is also inferred by progress of microseismic cloud at given time and this quantity can be interpreted as the rock volume which can release seismic energy due to weakening effect of normal stress by injected fluid. Product of these two parameters (equation (1)) provide possible seismic moment which can be released from current stimulated zone as a model output. Difference between output of this model and observed cumulative seismic moment corresponds the seismic moment which will be released in future, based on current stimulation conditions. This value can be translated into possible maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in future. As this way, possible seismic moment can be used to have feedback to hydraulic stimulation operation in real time as an index which can be interpreted easily and intuitively. Possible seismic moment is defined as equation (1), where D

  11. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  12. Issues on the seismic performance of embankments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Y.; Psarropoulos, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic vulnerability of embankments with reinforcement at their base is strongly related to the slip displacements, which may accumulate along the interface between soil and geosynthetic. The inertial accelerations within the embankment, due to the propagation of seismic waves and the subsequent...... performed. The stability of the soil mass was estimated in terms of seismic slip deformations along low-shear-strength interfaces, while the response of the embankment is assessed through the acceleration time histories at the top surface of the soil. This investigation presents also the effect of the most......’t be neglected during the seismic design of embankments....

  13. Seismic Structure of Southern African Cratons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina; Levander, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Cratons are extremely stable continental crustal areas above thick depleted lithosphere. These regions have remained largely unchanged for more than 2.5 Ga. This study presents a new seismic model of the seismic structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle constrained by seismic receiver...... functions and finite-frequency tomography based on data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE). Combining the two methods provides high vertical and lateral resolution. The main results obtained are (1) the presence of a highly heterogeneous crustal structure, in terms of thickness, composition (as...

  14. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  15. A Review of Seismicity in 2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Gang; Liu Jie; Yu Surong

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1. SURVEY OF GLOBE SEISMICITY IN 2004 A total of 19 strong earthquakes with Ms≥7.0 occurred in the world according to the Chinese Seismic Station Network in 2004 (Table 1 ). The strongest earthquake was the Sumatra earthquake with Ms 8.7 near the northwest coast of Sumatra on December 26 ( Fig. 1 ). Global seismicity maintains the same patterns from recent years, being distributed mainly on the western part of the circum-Pacific seismic zone. Remarkable macroseismic activities were seen in the India-Australian plate and in the Japan region. The macroseismic activities of Ms≥7.0 in 2004 were as follows:

  16. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic-event probabilistic seismic hazard model, which can be used further for estimates of seismic loss and seismic risk analysis, has been developed for the territory of Yemen. An updated composite earthquake catalogue has been compiled using the databases from two basic sources and several research publications. The spatial distribution of earthquakes from the catalogue was used to define and characterize the regional earthquake source zones for Yemen. To capture all possible scenarios in the seismic hazard model, a stochastic event set has been created consisting of 15,986 events generated from 1,583 fault segments in the delineated seismic source zones. Distribution of horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA was calculated for all stochastic events considering epistemic uncertainty in ground-motion modeling using three suitable ground motion-prediction relationships, which were applied with equal weight. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps were created showing PGA and MSK seismic intensity at 10% and 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years, considering local soil site conditions. The resulting PGA for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years (return period 475 years ranges from 0.2 g to 0.3 g in western Yemen and generally is less than 0.05 g across central and eastern Yemen. The largest contributors to Yemen’s seismic hazard are the events from the West Arabian Shield seismic zone.

  17. Sensitivity of Seismic Interferometry and Conventional Reflection Seismics at a Landfil to Processing and Survey Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Draganov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Ghose, R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how sensitive the seismic method is to errors that can occur during a seismic survey or during the processing of the seismic data is of high importance for any exploration geophysical project. Our aim is to image the subsurface of a landfill, which is typically a heterogeneous system

  18. Thermal and seismic impacts on the North Ramp at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P. [J.F.T. Agapito & Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Jung, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The impacts of thermal and seismic loads on the stability of the Exploratory Studies Facility North Ramp at Yucca Mountain were assessed using both empirical and analytical approaches. This paper presents the methods and results of the analyses. Thermal loads were first calculated using the computer code STRES3D. This code calculates the conductive heat transfer through a semi-infinite elastic, isotropic, homogeneous solid and the resulting thermally-induced stresses. The calculated thermal loads, combined with simulated earthquake motion, were then modeled using UDEC and DYNA3D, numerical codes with dynamic simulation capabilities. The thermal- and seismic-induced yield zones were post-processed and presented for assessment of damage. Uncoupled bolt stress analysis was also conducted to evaluate the seismic impact on the ground support components.

  19. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  20. Seismic-Reliability-Based Optimal Layout of a Water Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Guen Yoo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We proposed an economic, cost-constrained optimal design of a water distribution system (WDS that maximizes seismic reliability while satisfying pressure constraints. The model quantifies the seismic reliability of a WDS through a series of procedures: stochastic earthquake generation, seismic intensity attenuation, determination of the pipe failure status (normal, leakage, and breakage, pipe failure modeling in hydraulic simulation, and negative pressure treatment. The network’s seismic reliability is defined as the ratio of the available quantity of water to the required water demand under stochastic earthquakes. The proposed model allows no pipe option in decisions, making it possible to identify seismic-reliability-based optimal layout for a WDS. The model takes into account the physical impact of earthquake events on the WDS, which ultimately affects the network’s boundary conditions (e.g., failure level of pipes. A well-known benchmark network, the Anytown network, is used to demonstrate the proposed model. The network’s optimal topology and pipe layouts are determined from a series of optimizations. The results show that installing large redundant pipes degrades the system’s seismic reliability because the pipes will cause a large rupture opening under failure. Our model is a useful tool to find the optimal pipe layout that maximizes system reliability under earthquakes.

  1. Application of a New Wavelet Threshold Method in Unconventional Oil and Gas Reservoir Seismic Data Denoising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guxi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data processing is an important aspect to improve the signal to noise ratio. The main work of this paper is to combine the characteristics of seismic data, using wavelet transform method, to eliminate and control such random noise, aiming to improve the signal to noise ratio and the technical methods used in large data systems, so that there can be better promotion and application. In recent years, prestack data denoising of all-digital three-dimensional seismic data is the key to data processing. Contrapose the characteristics of all-digital three-dimensional seismic data, and, on the basis of previous studies, a new threshold function is proposed. Comparing between conventional hard threshold and soft threshold, this function not only is easy to compute, but also has excellent mathematical properties and a clear physical meaning. The simulation results proved that this method can well remove the random noise. Using this threshold function in actual seismic processing of unconventional lithologic gas reservoir with low porosity, low permeability, low abundance, and strong heterogeneity, the results show that the denoising method can availably improve seismic processing effects and enhance the signal to noise ratio (SNR.

  2. PROCEDURES FOR SEISMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF TRADITIONAL AND MODERN WOODEN BUILDING TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ario Ceccotti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes different wooden buildings types used in past and nowadays to realized low-rise and mid-rise timber structures from the seismic point of view. A preliminary overview about the procedures prescribed by codes for the seismic characterization of the timber building systems is given. Then the definition of the behaviour q-factor in the literature and its relevance in design of structures in seismic areas is treated. Available research methods for estimating the q-factor based on the verification of the nonlinear seismic response of entire buildings by means of experimental tests and numerical simulations are presented and analyzed. The relevance of a proper definition of the yielding limit and of failure condition in the seismic characterization of wooden building systems is treated. Moreover, a comparison between the q-factor estimations obtained using different calculation methods is presented. Lastly, the appropriate q-factor values are given for a reliable and safe seismic design of buildings realized using the examined wooden constructive systems.

  3. Investigations on Local Seismic Phases and Modeling of Seismic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-31

    Brocher, T. M., 1987. Coincident seismic reflection/refraction studies of the continental lithosphere: a global review, Rev. Geophys., 25, 723-742...36.39 Laza 300889 42.105 -07.516 13. 3.7 3.9 35.37 Nazare 310389 39.601 -09.493 25 ? 3.7 3.5 33.35 Camero 2009 87 42.138 - 02.476 05. 3.5 3.6 34.35 Aldea ...used might be accurate enough to describe the global waveforms recorded. NEAR SOURCE SITE EFFECTS EXPECTED AT YUCCA FLAT The map of Paleozoic basement

  4. Spectral-element Seismic Wave Propagation on CUDA/OpenCL Hardware Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, D. B.; Videau, B.; Pouget, K.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation codes are essential tools to investigate a variety of wave phenomena in the Earth. Furthermore, they can now be used for seismic full-waveform inversions in regional- and global-scale adjoint tomography. Although these seismic wave propagation solvers are crucial ingredients to improve the resolution of tomographic images to answer important questions about the nature of Earth's internal processes and subsurface structure, their practical application is often limited due to high computational costs. They thus need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities to improving the current state of knowledge. At present, numerous large HPC systems embed many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) to enhance numerical performance. Such hardware accelerators can be programmed using either the CUDA programming environment or the OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted by additional hardware accelerators, like e.g. AMD graphic cards, ARM-based processors as well as Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. For seismic wave propagation simulations using the open-source spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we incorporated an automatic source-to-source code generation tool (BOAST) which allows us to use meta-programming of all computational kernels for forward and adjoint runs. Using our BOAST kernels, we generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages within the source code package. Thus, seismic wave simulations are able now to fully utilize CUDA and OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show benchmarks of forward seismic wave propagation simulations using SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  5. Study of damage mechanism and FLAC3D simulation of the seismic dynamic response of Shiguan gate in Diaoyucheng ruins%钓鱼城遗址始关门破坏机制研究与FLAC3D地震动力响应模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘积魁; 方云; 刘智; 刘建辉; 王晓东

    2011-01-01

    The ancient ruins.Shiguan gate attached to rock and soil mass, is a part of rock and soil mass; so geotechnical analysis is used to study of its damage mechanism.In the "5.12" Wenchuan earthquake, local cracking and dislocation phenomena occurred in Shiguan gate of Diaoyucheng ancient battlefield ruins in Hechuan of Chongqing.Geological survey shows that the Shiguan gate is under complicated geological conditions like landslides, cracks etc.,so geological model of Shiguan gate is sampled and the fast Lagrangian analysis of continua in 3D (FLAC3D) is used to make 3D simulation of the seismic dynamic response and analyze damage mechanism of Shiguan gate.Simulation results show that the stress concentration obviously occurs in Shiguan gate and displacements appear