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Sample records for ionizing radiation increase

  1. Ionizing radiation causes increased tau phosphorylation in primary neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Li; Wang, Wenzhang; Welford, Scott; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Xinglong; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2014-01-01

    .... Ionizing radiation can induce various detrimental pathophysiological effects in the adult brain, and Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders are considered to be late effects of radiation...

  2. Depression and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, K N; Vasilenko, Z L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this at issue paper is the analysis of published data in correlation with the results of own research on the potential role of ionizing radiation in the genesis of depressive disorders. Depression is one of the most significant and long-term effect of the atomic bombings, nuclear testing and radiation emergences. The participants of the accident at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant increased prevalence of depression (18.0% and 13.1% in controls) and suicide rates. Depression is mainly observed in the structure of an organic mental disorder against cerebrovascular disease. The clinical pattern is dominated by asthenoadynamic and asthenoapathetic depression. Depressive disorders in radiation emergencies are multifactorial, that is the result of exposure to the complex psychogenic and radiological accident's factors, impact of traditional risk factors, somatic and neurological diseases, genetic predisposition, predisposition, etc. At the same time, exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor in the genesis of depression. This impact can be direct (to the Central Nervous System), and indirectly through the somatic and neurological abnormalities (multiorgan dysfunction) as well as by a variety of pathogenic mechanisms of ionizing radiation on the brain that have been discovered recently. It is strongly necessary analytical clinical and epidemiological studies with verification of depression and evidence-based establishment of the role of radiation and non-radiation risk factors. Loganovskyj K. N., Vasylenko Z. L., 2013.

  3. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy.

  4. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  5. Pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR increase labile iron in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin C. Moser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Labile iron, i.e. iron that is weakly bound and is relatively unrestricted in its redox activity, has been implicated in both the pathogenesis as well as treatment of cancer. Two cancer treatments where labile iron may contribute to their mechanism of action are pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR. Pharmacological ascorbate has been shown to have tumor-specific toxic effects due to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. By catalyzing the oxidation of ascorbate, labile iron can enhance the rate of formation of hydrogen peroxide; labile iron can also react with hydrogen peroxide. Here we have investigated the magnitude of the labile iron pool in tumor and normal tissue. We also examined the ability of pharmacological ascorbate and IR to change the size of the labile iron pool. Although a significant amount of labile iron was seen in tumors (MIA PaCa-2 cells in athymic nude mice, higher levels were seen in murine tissues that were not susceptible to pharmacological ascorbate. Pharmacological ascorbate and irradiation were shown to increase the labile iron in tumor homogenates from this murine model of pancreatic cancer. As both IR and pharmacological ascorbate may rely on labile iron for their effects on tumor tissues, our data suggest that pharmacological ascorbate could be used as a radio-sensitizing agent for some radio-resistant tumors.

  6. Pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR) increase labile iron in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Justin C; Rawal, Malvika; Wagner, Brett A; Du, Juan; Cullen, Joseph J; Buettner, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Labile iron, i.e. iron that is weakly bound and is relatively unrestricted in its redox activity, has been implicated in both the pathogenesis as well as treatment of cancer. Two cancer treatments where labile iron may contribute to their mechanism of action are pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR). Pharmacological ascorbate has been shown to have tumor-specific toxic effects due to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. By catalyzing the oxidation of ascorbate, labile iron can enhance the rate of formation of hydrogen peroxide; labile iron can also react with hydrogen peroxide. Here we have investigated the magnitude of the labile iron pool in tumor and normal tissue. We also examined the ability of pharmacological ascorbate and IR to change the size of the labile iron pool. Although a significant amount of labile iron was seen in tumors (MIA PaCa-2 cells in athymic nude mice), higher levels were seen in murine tissues that were not susceptible to pharmacological ascorbate. Pharmacological ascorbate and irradiation were shown to increase the labile iron in tumor homogenates from this murine model of pancreatic cancer. As both IR and pharmacological ascorbate may rely on labile iron for their effects on tumor tissues, our data suggest that pharmacological ascorbate could be used as a radio-sensitizing agent for some radio-resistant tumors.

  7. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ling; Chen, Wun-Ke; Liu, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-10-13

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation.

  8. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  9. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  10. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs, modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV. An increase (P<0.05 in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons.

  11. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  12. The R527H mutation in LMNA gene causes an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Ricordy, Ruggero; Tanzarella, Caterina; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia type A (MADA; OMIM # 248370) is a premature ageing disease caused by the homozygous R527H mutation in the LMNA gene. At the cellular level, MADA is characterized by unprocessed prelamin A accumulation, nuclear architecture alterations, chromatin defects and increased incidence of apoptosis. In some progeroid laminopathies (e.g., HGPS) it has been demonstrated that such biochemical and morphological alterations are strongly linked with genomic instability. To test this also in MADA fibroblasts, their response to the ionising radiation-induced damage was analysed. We observed that their ability to repair the damage was significantly impaired, as demonstrated by the increased chromosome damage and the higher percentage of residual gamma-H2AX foci, corresponding to unrepaired DNA-damage sites. Moreover, MADA fibroblasts showed a markedly reduced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15(S15) and a lower induction of p53 and CDKN1A proteins after irradiation, compared to the control cell line. Upon irradiation, we also detected differences in the expression of some p53 downstream target genes. In addition, MADA cells showed partial defects in the checkpoint response, particularly in G(1)/S transition. Our results indicate that accumulation of the lamin A precursor protein determines a defect in DNA damage response after X-ray exposure, supporting a crucial role of lamin A in regulating DNA repair process and cell cycle control.

  13. Ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Sugarman, Stephen L

    2014-02-01

    Although the spectrum of information related to diagnosis and management of radiation injuries and illnesses is vast and as radiation contamination incidents are rare, most emergency practitioners have had little to no practical experience with such cases. Exposures to ionizing radiation and internal contamination with radioactive materials can cause significant tissue damage and conditions. Emergency practitioners unaware of ionizing radiation as the cause of a condition may miss the diagnosis of radiation-induced injury or illness. This article reviews the pertinent terms, physics, radiobiology, and medical management of radiation injuries and illnesses that may confront the emergency practitioner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of health effects of non-ionizing radiations | Ughachukwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-ionizing radiations (electromagnetic waves) consist of electric and ... There are conflicting research reports concerning the safety of non-ionizing radiations. ... There is need, therefore, to increase public awareness on the dangers of ...

  15. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  16. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  17. Radiative feedback from ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O

    2007-01-01

    H2 formation in metal-free gas occurs via the intermediate H- or H2+ ions. Destruction of these ions by photodissociation therefore serves to suppress H2 formation. In this paper, I highlight the fact that several processes that occur in ionized primordial gas produce photons energetic enough to photodissociate H- or H2+ and outline how to compute the photodissociation rates produced by a particular distribution of ionized gas. I also show that there are circumstances of interest, such as during the growth of HII regions around the first stars, in which this previously overlooked form of radiative feedback is of considerable importance.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards for...

  19. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, Michael D. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  20. Fiber optic ionizing radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)); Poret, J.C.; Rosen, M. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Radiation detection can be done by various types of devices, such as Geiger counters, thermoluminescent detectors, and electric field sensors. This paper reports on a noel design for an ionizing radiation sensor using coiled optical fibers, which can be placed within or near a radioactive source. This design has several features that make it different from sensors proposed in the past. In order to evaluate this sensor, coiled fiber samples were placed inside metallic and metal-matrix composite cylinders to evaluate the sensitivity of the detector as well as the shielding effectiveness of the materials.

  1. Evidence That Lifelong Low Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiation Increase Lifespan in Long- and Short-Lived Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Socol, Yehoshua

    2017-01-01

    After the 1956 radiation scare to stop weapons testing, studies focused on cancer induction by low-level radiation. Concern has shifted to protecting "radiation-sensitive individuals." Since longevity is a measure of health impact, this analysis reexamined data to compare the effect of dose rate on the lifespans of short-lived (5% and 10% mortality) dogs and on the lifespans of dogs at 50% mortality. The data came from 2 large-scale studies. One exposed 10 groups to different γ dose rates; the other exposed 8 groups to different lung burdens of plutonium. Reexamination indicated that normalized lifespans increased more for short-lived dogs than for average dogs, when radiation was moderately above background. This was apparent by interpolating between the lifespans of nonirradiated dogs and exposed dogs. The optimum lifespan increase appeared at 50 mGy/y. The threshold for harm (decreased lifespan) was 700 mGy/y for 50% mortality dogs and 1100 mGy/y for short-lived dogs. For inhaled α-emitting particulates, longevity was remarkably increased for short-lived dogs below the threshold for harm. Short-lived dogs seem more radiosensitive than average dogs and they benefit more from low radiation. If dogs model humans, this evidence would support a change to radiation protection policy. Maintaining exposures "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) appears questionable.

  2. Evidence That Lifelong Low Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiation Increase Lifespan in Long- and Short-Lived Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Socol, Yehoshua

    2017-01-01

    After the 1956 radiation scare to stop weapons testing, studies focused on cancer induction by low-level radiation. Concern has shifted to protecting “radiation-sensitive individuals.” Since longevity is a measure of health impact, this analysis reexamined data to compare the effect of dose rate on the lifespans of short-lived (5% and 10% mortality) dogs and on the lifespans of dogs at 50% mortality. The data came from 2 large-scale studies. One exposed 10 groups to different γ dose rates; the other exposed 8 groups to different lung burdens of plutonium. Reexamination indicated that normalized lifespans increased more for short-lived dogs than for average dogs, when radiation was moderately above background. This was apparent by interpolating between the lifespans of nonirradiated dogs and exposed dogs. The optimum lifespan increase appeared at 50 mGy/y. The threshold for harm (decreased lifespan) was 700 mGy/y for 50% mortality dogs and 1100 mGy/y for short-lived dogs. For inhaled α-emitting particulates, longevity was remarkably increased for short-lived dogs below the threshold for harm. Short-lived dogs seem more radiosensitive than average dogs and they benefit more from low radiation. If dogs model humans, this evidence would support a change to radiation protection policy. Maintaining exposures “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) appears questionable.

  3. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  4. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  5. The Increase in Animal Mortality Risk following Exposure to Sparsely Ionizing Radiation Is Not Linear Quadratic with Dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Haley

    Full Text Available The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII, which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS. It was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limited number of animal studies.We argue that the linear-quadratic model does not provide appropriate support to estimate the risk of contemporary exposures. In this work, we re-estimated DDREFLSS using 15 animal studies that were not included in BEIR VII's original analysis. Acute exposure data led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 0.9 to 3.0. By contrast, data that included both acute and protracted exposures led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 4.8 to infinity. These two estimates are significantly different, violating the assumptions of the linear-quadratic model, which predicts that DDREFLSS values calculated in either way should be the same.Therefore, we propose that future estimates of the risk of protracted exposures should be based on direct comparisons of data from acute and protracted exposures, rather than from extrapolations from a linear-quadratic model. The risk of low dose exposures may be extrapolated from these protracted estimates, though we encourage ongoing debate as to whether this is the most valid approach. We also encourage efforts to enlarge the datasets used to estimate the risk of protracted exposures by including both human and animal data, carcinogenesis outcomes, a wider range of exposures, and by making more radiobiology data publicly accessible. We believe that these steps will contribute to better estimates

  6. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaranarayanan, K. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Sylvius Laboratories, Wassenaarseweg 72, 2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: sankaran@lumc.nl; Wassom, J.S. [YAHSGS, LLC, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Recent estimates of genetic risks from exposure of human populations to ionizing radiation are those presented in the 2001 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). These estimates incorporate two important concepts, namely, the following: (1) most radiation-induced mutations are DNA deletions, often encompassing multiple genes, but only a small proportion of the induced deletions is compatible with offspring viability; and (2) the viability-compatible deletions induced in germ cells are more likely to manifest themselves as multi-system developmental anomalies rather than as single gene disorders. This paper: (a) pursues these concepts further in the light of knowledge of mechanisms of origin of deletions and other rearrangements from two fields of contemporary research: repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian somatic cells and human molecular genetics; and (b) extends them to deletions induced in the germ cell stages of importance for radiation risk estimation, namely, stem cell spermatogonia in males and oocytes in females. DSB repair studies in somatic cells have elucidated the roles of two mechanistically distinct pathways, namely, homologous recombination repair (HRR) that utilizes extensive sequence homology and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) that requires little or no homology at the junctions. A third process, single-strand annealing (SSA), which utilizes short direct repeat sequences, is considered a variant of HRR. HRR is most efficient in late S and G{sub 2} phases of the cell cycle and is a high fidelity mechanism. NHEJ operates in all cell cycle phases, but is especially important in G{sub 1}. In the context of radiation-induced DSBs, NHEJ is error-prone. SSA is also an error-prone mechanism and its role is presumably similar to that of HRR. Studies in human molecular genetics have demonstrated that the occurrence of large deletions, duplications or other

  7. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of a apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  8. Ametryne degradation by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Debora Cristina de; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Duarte, Celina Lopes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: deboracandrade@globo.com; mnmori@ipen.br; clduarte@ipen.br; Melo, Rita Paiva [Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt

    2007-07-01

    Ametryne may be released to the environment during its manufacture, transport, storage, formulation and use as selective herbicide for the control of annual broadleaf and grass weeds. It is applied as an aqueous suspension for preemergence or post-directed applications on crops. Depending on the pesticide formulation and type of application, ametryne residues may be detectable in water, soil and on the surfaces for months or years. The herbicide used to this study was Ametryne (commercial name, Gesapax 500), commonly used on field crops and on corn and commercialized since 1975. Ametryne was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC Shimadzu 17A), after extraction with hexane/dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) solution. The calibration curve was obtained with a regression coefficient of 0.9871. In addition, the relative standard deviation was lower than 10%. The radiation-processing yield was evaluated by the destruction G-value (Gd) (Eq. 1), that is defined by the number of destroyed molecules by absorption of 100 eV of energy from ionizing radiation. Different concentrations of the herbicide (11.4 mol L{sup -1}; 22.7 mol L{sup -1}; 34.1 mol L{sup -1} and 45.5 mol L{sup -1}) were irradiated at the AECL 'Gammacell 220' {sup 60}Co source, with 1 kGy, 3 kGy, 6 kGy, 9 kGy, 12 kGy, 15 kGy and 30 kGy absorbed doses. After irradiation processing, the ametryne highest reduction rate occurs at low doses of radiation: at 6 kGy more than 85-90% of all ametryne compounds were removed. Two products of incomplete degradation of ametryne were identified as s-triazyne isomers. However, further work is needed in order to fully understand the ametryne degradation mechanisms the degradation yield of ametryne depends on its initial concentration and the process seems to be more efficient at higher concentrations. (author)

  9. Measuring ionizing radiation with a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsburg, Matthias; Fehrenbach, Thomas; Puente León, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    In cases of nuclear disasters it is desirable to know one's personal exposure to radioactivity and the related health risk. Usually, Geiger-Mueller tubes are used to assess the situation. Equipping everyone with such a device in a short period of time is very expensive. We propose a method to detect ionizing radiation using the integrated camera of a mobile consumer device, e.g., a cell phone. In emergency cases, millions of existing mobile devices could then be used to monitor the exposure of its owners. In combination with internet access and GPS, measured data can be collected by a central server to get an overview of the situation. During a measurement, the CMOS sensor of a mobile device is shielded from surrounding light by an attachment in front of the lens or an internal shutter. The high-energy radiation produces free electrons on the sensor chip resulting in an image signal. By image analysis by means of the mobile device, signal components due to incident ionizing radiation are separated from the sensor noise. With radioactive sources present significant increases in detected pixels can be seen. Furthermore, the cell phone application can make a preliminary estimate on the collected dose of an individual and the associated health risks.

  10. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.B.C. [Radiation Safety Consultancy, Engadine, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Mutational signatures of ionizing radiation in second malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Behjati, Sam; Gundem, Gunes; Wedge, David C.; Roberts, Nicola D.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Cooke, Susanna L; Van Loo, Peter; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Raine, Keiran M.; Stebbings, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent carcinogen, inducing cancer through DNA damage. The signatures of mutations arising in human tissues following in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation have not been documented. Here, we searched for signatures of ionizing radiation in 12 radiation-associated second malignancies of different tumour types. Two signatures of somatic mutation characterize ionizing radiation exposure irrespective of tumour type. Compared with 319 radiation-naive tumours, radiation-ass...

  12. Apoptotic resistance to ionizing radiation in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia frequently involves increased NF-kappaB survival pathway signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Victoria J; Austen, Belinda; Wei, Wenbin; Marston, Eliot; Alvi, Azra; Lawson, Sarah; Darbyshire, Philip J; Griffiths, Mike; Hill, Frank; Mann, Jill R; Moss, Paul A H; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2004-09-01

    To investigate possible causes of the variable response to treatment in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to establish potential novel therapeutic targets, we used ionizing radiation (IR) exposure as a model of DNA damage formation to identify tumors with resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis. Twenty-one of 40 ALL tumors responded normally to IR, exhibiting accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins and cleavage of caspases 3, 7, and 9 and of PARP1. Nineteen tumors exhibited apoptotic resistance and lacked PARP1 and caspase cleavage; although 15 of these tumors had normal accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins, examples exhibited abnormal expression of TRAF5, TRAF6, and cIAP1 after IR, suggesting increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling as the mechanism of apoptotic resistance. The presence of a hyperactive PARP1 mutation in one tumor was consistent with such increased NF-kappaB activity. PARP1 inhibition restored p53-dependent apoptosis after IR in these leukemias by reducing NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In the remaining 4 ALL tumors, apoptotic resistance was associated with a TP53 mutation or with defective activation of p53. We conclude that increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling is a frequent mechanism by which B-precursor ALL tumors develop apoptotic resistance to IR and that PARP1 inhibition may improve the DNA damage response of these leukemias.

  13. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  14. Chemical Protection Against Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    experimentally obtained. SPONSOR: Div of Cancer Treatment, NIH /A TOPICS: 2D PI/ORG: Moss, Alfred J; Veterans Administration Ned Ctr, Little Rock AR TITLE...Robert C; Dartmouth- Hitchcock Ned Ctr, Hanover NH TITLE: Radiation-chemical induction of mutagenesis. SUMMARY: Effects of sensitizers on radiation

  15. High dose ionizing irradiation induces an early and transient increase in peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells; L`exposition aigue aux radiations ionisantes induit un recrutement transitoire des progeniteurs hematopoietiques au niveau du sang peripherique: implications therapeutiques potentielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, M.; Mathieu, J.; Grenier, N.; Vetillard, J.; Chauvelot, F.; Thierry, D.; Mestries, J.C.; Herodin, F. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche, 38 - Grenoble (France)]|[Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees - Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1997-12-31

    Nonhuman primates exposed to ionizing radiation exhibit an early and transient increase in peripheral blood committed hematopoietic progenitor cells. The management of bone marrow aplasia secondary to accidental irradiation could be based in part on the re-infusion of those circulating autologous progenitors following a period of ex vivo expansion with cytokines. (authors)

  16. Silencing Prx1 and/or Prx5 sensitizes human esophageal cancer cells to ionizing radiation and increases apoptosis via intracellular ROS accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mai-cang GAO; Xiao-di JIA; Qi-fei WU; Yan CHENG; Fen-rong CHEN; Jun ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether down-regulation of peroxiredoxin 1(Prx1)and/or peroxiredoxin 5(Prx5)sensitizes human esophageal cancer cells to ionizing radiation(IR).Methods:Human esophageal carcinoma celllines Eca-109 and TE-1 were used.Prx mRNA expression profiles in Eca-109 and TE-1cells were determined using RT-PCR.Two highly expressed isoforms of Prxs,Prx1 and Prx5,were silenced by RNA interference(RNAi).Following IR,intracellular reactive oxygen species(ROS)and apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry,the activities of catalase,superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were measured,and the radiosensjtjzjng effect of RNAi was observed.Tumor xenograft model was also used to examine the radiOsensitizing effect of RNAi in vivo.Results:Down-regulation of Prx1 and/or Prx5 by RNAi does not alter the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase,but made human tumor cells more sensitive to IR-induced apoptosis both fn vitro and in vivO.When the two isoforms were decreased simultaneously,intracellular ROS and apoptosis significantly increased after IR.Conclusion:Silencing Prx1 and/or Prx5 by RNAi sensitizes human Eca-109 and TE-1 cells to IR, and the intracellular ROS accumulation may contribute to the radiosensitizing effect of the RNAi.

  17. Diffuse ionizing radiation within HH jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C., E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-12-20

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of a time-dependent ejection velocity precessing jet. The parameters used in our models correspond to a high excitation Herbig-Haro object, such as HH 80/81. We have included the transfer of ionizing radiation produced within the shocked regions of the jet. The radiative transfer is computed with a ray-tracing scheme from all the cells with an emissivity above a certain threshold. We show the development of a radiative precursor, and compare the morphology with a model without the diffuse radiation. Our simulations show that the morphology of the Hα emission is affected considerably if the diffuse ionizing radiation is accounted for. The predicted Hα position-velocity diagram (i.e., spatially resolved emission line profiles) from a model with the transfer of ionizing radiation has a relatively strong component at zero velocity, corresponding to the radiative precursor. Qualitatively similar 'zero velocity components' are observed in HH 80/81 and in the jet from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  18. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  19. Roles of ionizing radiation in cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.A.; Albright, N.W.; Yang, T.C.

    1983-07-01

    Earlier the authors described a repair misrepair model (RMR-I) which is applicable for radiations of low LET, e.g., x rays and gamma rays. RMR-II was described later. Here is introduced a mathematical modification of the RMR model, RMR-III, which is intended to describe lethal effects caused by heavily ionizing tracks. 31 references, 4 figures.

  20. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  1. Fungi and ionizing radiation from radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighton, John; Tugay, Tatyana; Zhdanova, Nelli

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclides in the environment are one of the major concerns to human health and ecotoxicology. The explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant renewed interest in the role played by fungi in mediating radionuclide movement in ecosystems. As a result of these studies, our knowledge of the importance of fungi, especially in their mycorrhizal habit, in long-term accumulation of radionuclides, transfer up the food chain and regulation of accumulation by their host plants was increased. Micro-fungi have been found to be highly resilient to exposure to ionizing radiation, with fungi having been isolated from within and around the Chernobyl plant. Radioresistance of some fungal species has been linked to the presence of melanin, which has been shown to have emerging properties of acting as an energy transporter for metabolism and has been implicated in enhancing hyphal growth and directed growth of sensitized hyphae towards sources of radiation. Using this recently acquired knowledge, we may be in a better position to suggest the use of fungi in bioremediation of radioactively contaminated sites and cleanup of industrial effluent.

  2. Non-Ionizing Radiation Used in Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Microwave Ovens Non-Ionizing Radiation Used in Microwave Ovens Explore the interactive, virtual community of RadTown USA ! ... learn more About Non-Ionizing Radiation Used in Microwave Ovens Microwave Oven. Microwave ovens use electromagnetic waves that ...

  3. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and Human Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Goldhagen, Paul; Friedberg, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Copeland, K.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is of interest, apart from its main concern of aircraft exposures, because it is a principal source of human exposure to radiations with high linear energy transfer (LET). The ionizing radiations of the lower atmosphere near the Earth s surface tend to be dominated by the terrestrial radioisotopes. especially along the coastal plain and interior low lands, and have only minor contributions from neutrons (11 percent). The world average is substantially larger but the high altitude cities especially have substantial contributions from neutrons (25 to 45 percent). Understanding the world distribution of neutron exposures requires an improved understanding of the latitudinal, longitudinal, altitude and spectral distribution that depends on local terrain and time. These issues are being investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical program. This paper will give an overview of human exposures and describe the development of improved environmental models.

  4. Radiation Generated by Charge Migration Following Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kuleff, Alexander I

    2010-01-01

    Electronic many-body effects alone can be the driving force for an ultrafast migration of a positive charge created upon ionization of molecular systems. Here we show that this purely electronic phenomenon generates a characteristic IR radiation. The situation when the initial ionic wave packet is produced by a sudden removal of an electron is also studied. It is shown that in this case a much stronger UV emission is generated. This emission appears as an ultrafast response of the remaining electrons to the perturbation caused by the sudden ionization and as such is a universal phenomenon to be expected in every multielectron system.

  5. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu, E-mail: oommen1978@gmail.com; Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  6. Responsive copolymer films obtained by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, G.; Bucio, E. [Departamento de Quimica de Radiaciones y Radioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: burillo@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-01

    The graft copolymerization of ph and/or thermo sensitive monomers onto polymeric films can be achieved by different radiation methods which have great advantages compared to conventional methods. Their ph and thermal sensitivity properties, as well as LCST and critical ph point, have been studied by DSC, UV, FTIR, water contact angle and swelling. Graft copolymerization can be carried out by pre-irradiation oxidative and direct methods, using {sup 6}0Co gamma radiation or a Van de Graaff electron beam accelerator. The influence of synthesis conditions, such as pre-irradiation or radiation doses, dose rate, reaction time, monomer concentration, and reaction temperature are being studied. Advances in the field of responsive polymeric systems synthesized by ionizing radiation, their applications and promising future research on radiation graft polymerization and crosslinking will be discussed. (Author)

  7. Ionizing radiation detector using multimode optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.); Poret, J.C.; Rosen, M. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Rifkind, J.M. (National Inst. of Health, Baltimore, MD (United States). Lab. of Cellular and Molecular Biology)

    1993-08-01

    An optical ionizing radiation detector, based on the attenuation of 850-nm light in 50/125-[mu]m multimode fibers, is described. The detector is especially well suited for application on spacecraft because of its small design. The detection element consists of a section of coiled fibers that has been designed to strip higher-order optical modes. Cylindrical radiation shields with atomic numbers ranging from Z = 13 (aluminum too) Z = 82 (lead) were placed around the ionizing radiation detector so that the effectiveness of the detector could be measured. By exposing the shields and the detector to 1.25-MeV cobalt 60 radiation, the mass attenuation coefficients of the shields were measured. The detector is based on the phenomenon that radiation creates optical color centers in glass fibers. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy performed on the 50/125-[mu]m fibers showed the presence of germanium oxide and phosphorus-based color centers. The intensity of these centers is directly related to the accumulated gamma radiation.

  8. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S, E-mail: fabrice.confalonieri@u-psud.fr, E-mail: suzanne.sommer@u-psud.fr [University Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR8621, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Batiments 400-409, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  9. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  10. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  11. A link between solar events and congenital malformations: Is ionizing radiation enough to explain it?

    CERN Document Server

    Overholt, A C; Atri, D

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are known to cause biological effects directly and through ionizing radiation produced by their secondaries. These effects have been detected in airline crews and other specific cases where members of the population are exposed to above average secondary fluxes. Recent work has found a correlation between solar particle events and congenital malformations. In this work we use the results of computational simulations to approximate the ionizing radiation from such events as well as longer term increases in cosmic ray flux. We find that the amounts of ionizing radiation produced by these events are insufficient to produce congenital malformations under the current paradigm regarding muon ionizing radiation. We believe that further work is needed to determine the correct ionizing radiation contribution of cosmogenic muons. We suggest that more extensive measurements of muon radiation effects may show a larger contribution to ionizing radiation dose than currently assumed.

  12. Influence of Dust Loading on Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  13. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  14. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  15. Influence of ionizing radiation on Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarota, R.M.; Baptista, J.A.; Nascimento, N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biologia Molecular]. E-mail: nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, H.F. [Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Protozoologia; Dias, V.L.; Gimenes, A.P.; Martins, A.R.S.; Passos, L.A.C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica. Lab. de Genetica e Criopreservacao de Embrioes Murinos

    2005-07-01

    Chagas' disease is among the major health problems in South America impairing the wealth fare population. Since its discovery, in 1909, by Carlos Chagas, American Trypanosomiasis showed significant differences in the resistance of infected people. Such observations led to the hypothesis that the genetic background of the host could have an influence on the development of the disease and lifespan of infected people. Considering that ionizing radiation has been successfully employed to modify the immunological properties of biomolecules studies, this paper reports on results obtained by comparing infectivity and immunogenicity of native and irradiated T. cruzi. It was observed that radiation process causes inability of trypanosomes to infect and kill mice, however these results are different according to the strain mice studied. Different strains were immunized with native T. cruzi or 2 KGy irradiated parasite in a {sup 60} Co source with 10{sup 3} or 10{sup 5} forms. The results obtained by ELISA method indicated that when immunized with native T. cruzi, all different strain mice have produced significant antibodies title levels. However, if irradiated parasite is employed, smaller antibodies title is observed. These results indicate that ionizing radiation is a good tool to modify T. cruzi in order to get a less infective parasite, considering that although susceptible mice strain have presented no significant immune response, they did not die. These data could help to understand the immune mechanisms involved in recognition, processing and presentation of both native and irradiated parasites. (author)

  16. A website dedicated to ionizing radiation metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulieu, Christophe E-mail: christophe.dulieu@cea.fr; Chiste, Vanessa; Be, M.-M

    2004-04-01

    In order to disseminate information about decay data and their evaluation, as well as other topics in the field of ionizing radiation, the Bureau National de Metrologie-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (BNM-LNHB) has published a website. Most of the web pages are concerned with the international working groups in which the BNM-LNHB takes part. In particular, a library of uranium and plutonium spectra is now available, as well as the results of evaluation of decay data of nuclides of special interest.

  17. A website dedicated to ionizing radiation metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulieu, Christophe; Chisté, Vanessa; Bé, Marie-Martine

    2004-01-01

    In order to disseminate information about decay data and their evaluation, as well as other topics in the field of ionizing radiation, the Bureau National de Métrologie-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (BNM-LNHB) has published a website. Most of the web pages are concerned with the international working groups in which the BNM-LNHB takes part. In particular, a library of uranium and plutonium spectra is now available, as well as the results of evaluation of decay data of nuclides of special interest.

  18. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, part 1: physics, radiation protection, and radiation instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Doran M; Jenkins, Mark S; Sugarman, Stephen L; Glassman, Erik S

    2014-03-01

    Ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses are exceedingly rare; therefore, most physicians have never managed such conditions. When confronted with a possible radiation injury or illness, most physicians must seek specialty consultation. Protection of responders, health care workers, and patients is an absolute priority for the delivery of medical care. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, as well as radiation protection, requires a basic understanding of physics. Also, to provide a greater measure of safety when working with radioactive materials, instrumentation for detection and identification of radiation is needed. Because any health care professional could face a radiation emergency, it is imperative that all institutions have emergency response plans in place before an incident occurs. The present article is an introduction to basic physics, ionizing radiation, radiation protection, and radiation instrumentation, and it provides a basis for management of the consequences of a radiologic or nuclear incident.

  19. DNA strand breakage by bivalent metal ions and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayene, Iraimoudi S; Koch, Cameron J; Krisch, Robert E

    2007-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms of DNA breakage via the interaction of bivalent metal ion, thiol reducing agent and ionizing radiation, in *OH scavenging abilities comparable to those in cells. We measured the effects of 10 min exposure to 200 microM Fe2+ vs. Fe3+ on the induction of single (SSB) and double (DSB) strand breaks in unirradiated and oxically irradiated SV40 DNA, in aqueous solution containing 75 or 750 mM glycerol and/or 5 mM glutathione (GSH). Fe2+ or GSH alone produced little DNA damage. However, their combination produced a dramatic increase in the production of both SSB and DSB. Experiments with ferric ion suggest that it produces DNA damage only after partial reduction to ferrous by GSH. Induction efficiencies for SSB in the presence of Fe2+/GSH showed additivity of the effects of radiation alone with those from Fe2+/GSH. However, the corresponding induction efficiencies for DSB demonstrated a 2.5-fold enhancement. Our results are consistent with a model in which reduced bivalent metal ions plus thiols, in the presence of O2, produce DSB in DNA primarily via local clusters of hydroxyl radicals arising from site specific Fenton reactions. The synergism observed between DSB production by Fe/GSH and by ionizing radiation, also believed to occur via local clusters of hydroxyl radicals, is consistent with this model. Our results suggest that both normally present intracellular iron and ionizing radiation may be important sources of oxidative stress in cells.

  20. The Akt-inhibitor Erufosine induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells and increases the short term effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eibl Hans-Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer and associated with neoplastic transformation, malignant progression, and enhanced resistance to classical chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, it is a promising target for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, the cytotoxic action of the Akt inhibitor Erufosine (ErPC3 was analyzed in prostate cancer cells and compared to the cytotoxicity of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the efficacy of combined treatment with Akt inhibitors and ionizing radiation in prostate cancer cells was examined. Materials and methods Prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, and LNCaP were treated with ErPC3 (1-100 µM, LY294002 (25-100 µM, irradiated (0-10 Gy, or subjected to combined treatments. Cell viability was determined by the WST-1 assay. Apoptosis induction was analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide in a hypotonic citrate buffer, and by Western blotting using antibodies against caspase-3 and its substrate PARP. Akt activity and regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 family members and key downstream effectors involved in apoptosis regulation were examined by Western blot analysis. Results The Akt inhibitor ErPC3 exerted anti-neoplastic effects in prostate cancer cells, however with different potency. The anti-neoplastic action of ErPC3 was associated with reduced phosphoserine 473-Akt levels and induction of apoptosis. PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells were also sensitive to treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. However, the ErPC3-sensitive PC3-cells were less susceptible to LY294002 than the ErPC3-refractory LNCaP cells. Although both cell lines were largely resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis, both cell lines showed higher levels of apoptotic cell death when ErPC3 was combined with radiotherapy. Conclusions Our data suggest that constitutive Akt activation and survival are

  1. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  2. measurement of indoor background ionizing radiation in some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    ABSTRACT. Certain types of building materials are known to be radioactive. ... Indoor background ionizing radiation profiles for a building are ..... Survey of Radiation Levels during. Radiological Examinations in some selected Hospitals in Jos,.

  3. Environmental Ionizing Radiation Survey of Quarry Sites in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJABS

    ABSTRACT: An environmental ionizing radiation survey around quarry sites in Ilorin was carried out using three. Radalert ... they live in areas with radiation doses above normal background .... also maintaining all exposure levels "as low as.

  4. Antihistamine provides sex-specific radiation protection. [Ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.

    1981-04-01

    Rats suffer an early transient performance decrement immediately after a sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation. However, it has been shown that males experience a more severe incapacitation than females. This sex difference has been attributed to the low estrogen levels in the male. In support of this notion, supplemental estrogens in castrated male rats have produced less-severe performance decrements post-irradiation. Antihistamines have also previously been shown to alleviate radiation's effect on behavior. The present study revealed that antihistamines are only effective in altering the behavioral incapacitation of sexually intact male subjects. This contrasts with previous work which indicates that estrogens can only benefit gonadectomized rats. These findings suggest that different mechanisms may underlie antihistamine and estrogen radiation protection.

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on nucleoside metabolism in Physarum polycephalum. [. gamma. rays; reduced DNA synthesis results in increased deoxynucleoside triphosphate concentration in plasmodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.; Littman, S.R.; Evans, T.E.

    1978-12-01

    The pool sizes and specific activities of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) were determined in control and irradiated S-phase plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum following incubation in the presence of labeled deoxynucleosides. Irradiation (10-kR /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation) was found to increase the intraplasmodial concentrations of all four dNTPs to a similar extent (127 to 158% of the control value). The increase in dNTP concentrations generally paralleled a radiation-induced decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis. The results suggest that the increase in dNTP levels is caused by a reduction in the rate of their utilization for DNA synthesis. The effect of irradiation on the specific activity of the dNTPs depended upon the labeled precursor utilized. Thus, when thymidine, deoxyadenosine, or deoxyuridine was used, the specific activities of TTP, dATP, or TTP, and dCTP, respectively, were reduced to about 50% of the control values. However, when deoxycytidine was used as the labeled precursor, the specific activities of dCTP and TTP were either unchanged or actually increased in the irradiated samples. It is concluded that the phosphorylation of deoxycytidine is increased in irradiated plasmodia.

  7. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  8. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing micro-organisms. Eradi cation techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation-based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the nonspore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-sporeforming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/m2), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  9. Semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S Miller

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most malignant and lethal form of astrocytoma, with patients having a median survival time of approximately 15 months with current therapeutic modalities. It is therefore important to identify novel therapeutics. There is mounting evidence that microglia (specialized brain-resident macrophages play a significant role in the development and progression of glioblastoma tumors. In this paper we show that microglia, in addition to stimulating glioblastoma cell invasion, also promote glioblastoma cell proliferation and resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro. We found that semapimod, a drug that selectively interferes with the function of macrophages and microglia, potently inhibits microglia-stimulated GL261 invasion, without affecting serum-stimulated glioblastoma cell invasion. Semapimod also inhibits microglia-stimulated resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiation, but has no significant effect on microglia-stimulated glioblastoma cell proliferation. We also found that intracranially administered semapimod strongly increases the survival of GL261 tumor-bearing animals in combination with radiation, but has no significant benefit in the absence of radiation. In conclusion, our observations indicate that semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia and/or infiltrating macrophages.

  10. Semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ian S; Didier, Sebastien; Murray, David W; Turner, Tia H; Issaivanan, Magimairajan; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Al-Abed, Yousef; Symons, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and lethal form of astrocytoma, with patients having a median survival time of approximately 15 months with current therapeutic modalities. It is therefore important to identify novel therapeutics. There is mounting evidence that microglia (specialized brain-resident macrophages) play a significant role in the development and progression of glioblastoma tumors. In this paper we show that microglia, in addition to stimulating glioblastoma cell invasion, also promote glioblastoma cell proliferation and resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro. We found that semapimod, a drug that selectively interferes with the function of macrophages and microglia, potently inhibits microglia-stimulated GL261 invasion, without affecting serum-stimulated glioblastoma cell invasion. Semapimod also inhibits microglia-stimulated resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiation, but has no significant effect on microglia-stimulated glioblastoma cell proliferation. We also found that intracranially administered semapimod strongly increases the survival of GL261 tumor-bearing animals in combination with radiation, but has no significant benefit in the absence of radiation. In conclusion, our observations indicate that semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia and/or infiltrating macrophages.

  11. Ionizing Radiation in Glioblastoma Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricruz eRivera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival of 12-15 months with treatment consisting of surgical resection followed by ionizing radiation (IR and chemotherapy. Even aggressive treatment is often palliative due to near universal recurrence. Therapeutic resistance has been linked to a subpopulation of GBM cells with stem-cell like properties termed glioblastoma initiating cells (GICs. Recent efforts have focused on elucidating resistance mechanisms activated in GICs in response to IR. Among these, GICs preferentially activate the DNA damage response (DDR to result in a faster rate of double-strand break (DSB repair induced by IR as compared to the bulk tumor cells. IR also activates NOTCH and the hepatic growth factor (HGF receptor, c-MET, signaling cascades that play critical roles in promoting proliferation, invasion, and resistance to apoptosis. These pathways are preferentially activated in GICs and represent targets for pharmacologic intervention. While IR provides the benefit of improved survival, it paradoxically promotes selection of more malignant cellular phenotypes of glioblastoma. As reviewed here, finding effective combinations of radiation and molecular inhibitors to target GICs and non-GICs is essential for the development of more effective therapies.

  12. Use of Ionizing Radiation Technology for Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas R. Al-Khalidy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In big cities, the cost of treating wastewater is increasing with more stringent environmental requirements. Ionizing radiation technology for treating municipal wastewater may be an alternative to reduce treatment costs. In this paper, laboratory tests were carried out using different doses of radiation to treat wastewater samples collected from the AL-Rustamia wastewater treatment plant in Baghdad city. According to the results, irradiation by gamma radiation with a dose ranging from 100 to 500 krad was efficient in reducing some of the physical contaminants. The organic contaminants were degraded and reduced to about 12% of their original concentrations. Generally, irradiation technology could effectively modify the characteristics of the wastewater to such levels that are compatible with Iraqi disposal standards. The results of the study also showed that, an experimental pilot plant study is required to optimize the cost of wastewater treatment through the use of this technology.

  13. The Effects of the Ionizing Radiation Background on Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hambrick, D Clay; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H

    2009-01-01

    We find that the amount and nature of the assumed ionizing background can strongly affect galaxy formation and evolution. Galaxy evolution simulations typically incorporate an ultraviolet background which falls off rapidly above z=3; e.g., that of Haardt & Madau (1996). However, this decline may be too steep to fit the WMAP constraints on electron scattering optical depth or observations of intermediate redshift (z ~ 2-4) Ly-alpha forest transmission. As an alternative, we present simulations of the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with UV backgrounds that decline more slowly at high redshift: both a simple intensity rescaling and the background recently derived by Faucher-Giguere (2009), which softens the spectrum at higher redshifts. We also test an approximation of the X-ray background with a similar z-dependence. We find for the test galaxies that an increase in either the intensity or hardness of ionizing radiation generically pushes star formation towards lower redshifts: although overa...

  14. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  15. Protective effects of melatonin on the ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undeger, Ulko; Giray, Belma; Zorlu, A Faruk; Oge, Kamil; Baçaran, Nurçen

    2004-03-01

    Melatonin is an endogenously produced antioxidant with radioprotective actions while ionizing radiation is a well-known cytotoxic and mutagenic agent of which the biological results are attributable to its free radical producing effects. The effect of melatonin on the DNA strand breakage and lipid peroxidation induced by ionizing radiation in the rat brain were investigated in order to clarify its radioprotective ability. The DNA strand breakage in rat brain exposed to 1000 cGy ionizing radiation was assessed by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis and the lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations. A significant increase in DNA damage (p radiation treated rat brain. Pre-treatment of rats with intraperitoneal doses of 100 mg/kg melatonin provided a significant decrease in the DNA strand breakage and lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that melatonin can protect brain cells from oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation.

  16. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  17. Desulfurization of petroleum induced by ionization radiation: benzothiophene behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luana S.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Duarte, Celina L., E-mail: lsandrade@ipen.br, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.br, E-mail: clduarte@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is currently the most common method used by refineries; this removes significantly sulfur compounds from petroleum fractions, however, is not highly effective for removing thiophene compounds such as benzothiophene, and generates high costs for the oil industry. Another factor, are the environmental laws, which over the years has become increasingly strict, especially regarding the sulfur content. This compound cause incalculable damage both to the industry and to the environment. Therefore new methods for petroleum desulfurization should be studied in order to minimize the impacts that these compounds cause. In the present study it was used ionizing radiation, a promising method of advanced oxidation in reducing sulfur compounds. The analysis were performed after purge and trap concentration of samples, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Then benzothiophene samples with the same concentration from 27 mg.L{sup -1} to 139 mg.L{sup -1} were irradiated with different absorbed doses of radiation ranging from 1 kGy to 20 kGy in gamma irradiator Cobalt-60, Gammacell. These samples were analyzed by the same procedure used for the calibration curve, and the removals of benzothiophene after ionizing radiation treatment were calculated. It was observed that at higher doses there was a greater degradation of this compound and the formation of fragments, such as 1,2-dimethylbenzene and toluene, which may be removed by simple processes. (author)

  18. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Wallny, R

    2014-01-01

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy. 2012 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record

  19. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Wallny, R

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.

  20. [Use of ionizing radiation sources in metallurgy: risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugni, U

    2012-01-01

    Use of ionizing radiation sources in the metallurgical industry: risk assessment. Radioactive sources and fixed or mobile X-ray equipment are used for both process and quality control. The use of ionizing radiation sources requires careful risk assessment. The text lists the characteristics of the sources and the legal requirements, and contains a description of the documentation required and the methods used for risk assessment. It describes how to estimate the doses to operators and the relevant classification criteria used for the purpose of radiation protection. Training programs must be organized in close collaboration between the radiation protection expert and the occupational physician.

  1. The effect of ionizing radiation on metoprolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodowczyk, Magdalena; Marciniec, Barbara; Czwajda, Aleksandra

    2013-07-01

    The influence of ionising radiation on physico-chemical properties of metoprolol tartrate (MT) in solid phase was studied. The compound was irradiated by radiation produced by a beam of high-energy electrons in an accelerator, in doses from 25 to 400 kGy, and the possible changes in the samples were detected by organoleptic analysis (colour, forms, clarity), chromatographic and spectrometric methods. Already at the standard sterilisation dose of 25 kGy, the presence of free radicals (0.3764 × 10(16) spin/g) and a decrease in the melting point by 1°C were noted. At higher doses of irradiation products of radiolysis appeared (100 kGy) and the colour was changed from white to pale cream (200 kGy). Our observation was that with increasing mass loss of MT after irradiation with 100, 200 and 400 kGy, the concentration of free radicals increased from 1.0330 to 1.6869 × 10(16) spin/g. The radiolytic yield of total radiolysis was 4.54 × 10(7) mol/J for 100 kGy, 7.42 × 10(7) mol/J for 200 kGy and 4.74 × 10(7) mol/J for 400 kGy. No significant changes were observed in the character of FT-IR spectra, but in UV an increase in intensity of the band at the analytical wavelength was noted. As follows from the results MT shows high radiochemical stability for the typical sterilisation doses 25-50 kGy, and will probably be able to be sterilised by radiation in the dose of 25 kGy.

  2. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Desouky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT, possible risks from exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to higher doses of radiation. This model has been challenged by numerous observations, in which cells that were not directly traversed by the ionizing radiation exhibited responses similar to those of the directly irradiated cells. Therefore, it is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects.

  3. Biological effects of ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire]|[Commission Internationale de protection radiologique (France)]|[Association Internationale de Radiopathologie (France)

    1999-01-01

    Since ten years the ionizing radiations are more and more often used in various domains as medical, industrial or research sector. In the same way, these radiation impacts on the environment and the living organisms, have been studied intensively. The effects mechanism knowledge improved considerably and allowed to better protect the workers and the public. (A.L.B.)

  4. 4T CMOS Active Pixel Sensors under Ionizing Radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ionizing radiation effects on 4T pixels and the elementary in-pixel test devices with regard to the electrical performance and the optical performance. In addition to an analysis of the macroscopic pixel parameter degradation, the radiation-induced degradation mechanisms

  5. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  6. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on advanced life support medications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.J.; Hubbard, L.B.; Broadbent, M.V.; Stewart, P.; Jaeger, M.

    1987-06-01

    Advanced life support medications stored in emergency department stretcher areas, diagnostic radiology rooms, and radiotherapy suites are exposed to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that radiation may decrease the potency and thus the shelf life of medications stored in these areas. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation. The potency of the four drugs was unaffected by levels of radiation found in ED stretcher areas and high-volume diagnostic radiograph rooms (eg, chest radiograph, computed tomography, fluoroscopy). The potency of atropine may be reduced by gamma radiation in high-use radiotherapy suites. However, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were unaffected by high doses of gamma radiation. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol may be safely kept in ED stretcher areas and diagnostic radiology rooms without loss of potency over the shelf life of the drugs.

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  9. Application of Lead Sulphide Nanoparticles for Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Kovaļovs, P; Reisfeld, R.; Rešetņikova, A; Romanova, M.; Saraidarov, T; Surkova, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to design a dosimeter that provides measurements of doses of ionizing radiation absorbed in nano-sized objects. Such dosimeters can be useful for radiobiology in order to study effects of radiation on nanosized biological structures such as DNA molecule. We offer to use radiation-sensitive semiconductor nanoparticles as nanosized active elements of the dosimeter. Nanoparticles have to be embedded into a dielectric matrix that provides physical and chemical stabil...

  10. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  11. Synergistic effect of ozonation and ionizing radiation for PVA decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weihua; Chen, Lujun; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-08-01

    Ozonation and ionizing radiation are both advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) without chemical addition and secondary pollution. Also, the two processes' efficiency is determined by different pH conditions, which creates more possibilities for their combination. Importantly, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation could be suitable for treating wastewaters with extreme pH values, i.e., textile wastewater. To find synergistic effects, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation mineralization was investigated for degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at different pH levels. A synergistic effect was found at initial pH in the range 3.0-9.4. When the initial pH was 3.0, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation gave a PVA mineralization degree of 17%. This was 2.7 times the sum achieved by the two individual processes, and factors of 2.1 and 1.7 were achieved at initial pH of 7.0 and 9.4, respectively. The combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation was demonstrated to be a feasible strategy for treatment of PVA-containing wastewater.

  12. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  13. Space Weather Nowcasting of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Wilson, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Solomon, Stan C.; Wiltberger, J.; Kunches, Joseph; Kress, Brian T.; Murray, John J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the health and safety of commercial aircrew and passengers due to their exposure to ionizing radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET), particularly at high latitudes. The International Commission of Radiobiological Protection (ICRP), the EPA, and the FAA consider the crews of commercial aircraft as radiation workers. During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, radiation exposure can exceed annual limits, and the number of serious health effects is expected to be quite high if precautions are not taken. There is a need for a capability to monitor the real-time, global background radiations levels, from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), at commercial airline altitudes and to provide analytical input for airline operations decisions for altering flight paths and altitudes for the mitigation and reduction of radiation exposure levels during a SEP event. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model is new initiative to provide a global, real-time radiation dosimetry package for archiving and assessing the biologically harmful radiation exposure levels at commercial airline altitudes. The NAIRAS model brings to bear the best available suite of Sun-Earth observations and models for simulating the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment. Observations are utilized from ground (neutron monitors), from the atmosphere (the METO analysis), and from space (NASA/ACE and NOAA/GOES). Atmospheric observations provide the overhead shielding information and the ground- and space-based observations provide boundary conditions on the GCR and SEP energy flux distributions for transport and dosimetry simulations. Dose rates are calculated using the parametric AIR (Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation) model and the physics-based HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) code. Empirical models of the near-Earth radiation environment (GCR/SEP energy flux distributions and geomagnetic cut-off rigidity) are benchmarked

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on rat parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraks, George; Tampelini, Flavio Silva; Pereira, Kleber Fernando; Chopard, Renato Paulo [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. of Biomedical Sciences. Dept. of Anatomy]. E-mail: rchopard@usp.br

    2008-01-15

    A common side effect of radiotherapy used in the treatment of oral cancer is the occurrence of structural and physiological alterations of the salivary glands due to exposure to ionizing radiation, as demonstrated by conditions such as decreased salivary flow. The present study evaluated ultrastructural alterations in the parotid glands of rats receiving a fractionated dose (1,500-cGy) of radiation emitted by a Cesium-137 source and rats that were not subjected to ionizing radiation. After sacrifice, the parotid glands were removed and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Damage such as cytoplasmic vacuolisation, dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and destruction of mitochondria, as well as damage to the cellular membrane of acinar cells, were observed. These findings lead to the conclusion that ionizing radiation promotes alterations in the glandular parenchyma, and that these alterations are directly related to the dose level of absorbed radiation. Certain phenomena that appear in the cytoplasm and nuclear material indicate that ionizing radiation causes acinar cell death (apoptosis). (author)

  15. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: structural and biochemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabanero, M.; Flores V, L. L. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Biologia, DCNE, Noria Alta s/n, 36250 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo, M. A.; Cordova F, T.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, DCI, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Castruita D, J. P. [Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Ecologia, CUCBA, Las Agujas, 45100 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); Barbosa S, G., E-mail: myrna.sabanero@gmail.com [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ciencias Medicas, DCS, 20 de Enero No. 929, Col. Obregon, 37000 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv / year) and subsequently exposure to high doses have greater effects in people. However, it is unknown molecular and biochemical level alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa Atcc CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/ 90). Our evaluate multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin micro filaments), nuclei (D API), genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation structurally show alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin micro filaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/1 h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between any biological systems. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  16. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, J.T.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Alpen, E.L.; Bond, V.; Curtis, S.B.; Fry, R.J.M.; Jackson, K.L.; Nachtwey, S.; Sondhaus, C.; Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities.

  17. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1096 - Ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... frequent servicing such as lubrication or cleaning. (v) Where several activating devices feed activating...'s program for control of these radiation sources is incompatible with the requirements of this..., provided the State's program for control of these radiation sources is the subject of a currently...

  19. Ionizing radiations in Italian health care structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fizzano, M.R.; Frusteri, L. [Technical Advisory Dept. for Risk Assessment and Prevention, Italian Workers Compensation Authority, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The Council of the European Union has completely renewed the framework regarding radiation protection by adopting some directives: Directive 97/43 EURATOM lays down the general principles of the radiation protection of individuals undergoing exposure to ionising radiations related to medical exposures, as a supplement of Directive 96/29 EURATOM laying down the basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiations.The incorporation into Italian legislation of the European Community directives on the improvement of health and safety at work has promoted a vast effort in order to revise the surveillance approach in many facilities, including hospitals. In Italy, safety law is referred to every workplace; anyway the use of ionising radiations is ruled by specific laws. So in the health care structures it is necessary integrating both the laws and this process is often difficult to carry on. The Italian Legislative Decree 230/95, one the main laws that aim to protect workers against ionising radiations, introduced Directive 96/29/EURATOM. This Decree asks that a doctor and a technical expert analyse the workplace and classify area and workers in according to dose of ionising radiation established by law. The Italian Legislative Decree 626/94 asks that risk analysis in general is made by doctor and specialist in risk. So, in case of risk from ionising radiation, all these figures have to cooperate in order to make an evaluation risk document. (N.C.)

  20. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  1. Features of manufacturing Cd1–xZnxTe ionizing radiation detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomashik Z. F.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a newly-developed method of manufacturing of an operating element of the Cd1–xZnxTe-detector of ionizing radiation with high sensitivity to low-energy gamma radiation of the americium 241Am radioactive isotope. The proposed two-step method of chemical surface treatment with the use of new bromine releasing polishing etchants significantly improves the quality of the detector material and increases its specific sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This allows to use smaller Cd1–xZnxTe plates, which results in lowering of the cost of detectors.

  2. The role of ionizing radiation in primordial organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnamperuma, C.; Sweeney, M.

    1971-01-01

    Attempt to reveal how ionizing radiation may have been effective in producing the molecules necessary for life. In examining the sequence of events leading to the appearance of the first organisms the problem is considered in two parts: the formation of the small molecules such as amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and carbohydrates; and the condensation of these molecules to give rise to polypeptides and polynucleotides. It is concluded that in the accumulation of organic compounds on the early earth ionizing radiation was not only a substantial part of the available energy, but was also an effective form of energy.

  3. Combustion study with synchrotron radiation single photon ionization technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rui; WANG Jing; HUANG Chaoqun; YANG Bin; WEI Lixia; SHAN Xiaobin; SHENG Liusi; ZHANG Yunwu; QI Fei

    2005-01-01

    Here we report a combustion endstation at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and some primary experimental results. Synchrotron radiation can provide the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon with the high intensity and the good collimation. VUV photoionization is a single-photon ionization process. Combined with molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), the VUV single-photon ionization can be applied to detect the combustion products, especially the intermediates and free radicals produced from combustion process. This method is proved to be a powerful tool for combustion study, which could be helpful for developing combustion kinetic models and understanding the mechanism of combustion reactions.

  4. The role of ionizing radiation in primordial organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnamperuma, C.; Sweeney, M.

    1971-01-01

    Attempt to reveal how ionizing radiation may have been effective in producing the molecules necessary for life. In examining the sequence of events leading to the appearance of the first organisms the problem is considered in two parts: the formation of the small molecules such as amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and carbohydrates; and the condensation of these molecules to give rise to polypeptides and polynucleotides. It is concluded that in the accumulation of organic compounds on the early earth ionizing radiation was not only a substantial part of the available energy, but was also an effective form of energy.

  5. Interaction between {beta}-Lapachone and Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Song, Si Yeol; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Sang Wook; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Jong Hoon [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heon Joo [College of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Won [University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2006-07-01

    {beta}-Lapachone (3,4-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-2Hnaphtho[ 1,2-b]pyran-5,6-dione)({beta}-lap) was originally isolated from the bark of the Lapacho tree growing in South America (1). This drug has attracted considerable interest in recent years because of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines through a mechanism that works independent of the cell cycle of p53 status. Interestingly, {beta}-lap has been reported to react synergistically with Taxol, mitomycin C, genistein, and ionizing radiation (IR) (2-3) in vitro against cultured cancer cells. It has also been reported that {beta}-lap inhibits the repair of potentially lethal radiation damage by converting repairable single-stranded DNA breaks into repair-resistant, double-stranded DNA breaks. Thus {beta}- lap has been thought to act as a radiation sensitizer by inhibiting DNA damage repair. In the present study, we observed that IR sensitizes cancer cells to {beta}-lap. It thus appeared that the synergistic interaction of IR and {beta}-lap in killing cancer cells was due to an increase in cellular susceptibility to {beta}-lap, probably in addition to {beta}-lap. induced radiosensitization.

  6. Ionizing radiation effects on SBP9900 microprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Mallen, W.; Springer, P.

    1977-01-01

    The radiation resistance of a 16-bit microprocessor based on integrated injection logic technology has been investigated. Cumulative fluences of 10 to the 12th power to 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm were used in the radiation-resistance study. Complete failure of the microprocessor was noted at a fluence level of 1.2 times 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. Though the radiation resistance of the microprocessor makes it suited for space applications, reductions in the power dissipation of the device are needed.

  7. Commentary: ethical issues of current health-protection policies on low-dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Doss, Mohan; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Janiak, Marek K; Miller, Mark L; Sanders, Charles L; Scott, Bobby R; Ulsh, Brant; Vaiserman, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-model predictions at low doses are "speculative, unproven, undetectable and 'phantom'." Moreover, numerous experimental, ecological, and epidemiological studies show that low doses of sparsely-ionizing or sparsely-ionizing plus highly-ionizing radiation may be beneficial to human health (hormesis/adaptive response). The present LNT-model-based regulations impose excessive costs on the society. For example, the median-cost medical program is 5000 times more cost-efficient in saving lives than controlling radiation emissions. There are also lives lost: e.g., following Fukushima accident, more than 1000 disaster-related yet non-radiogenic premature deaths were officially registered among the population evacuated due to radiation concerns. Additional negative impacts of LNT-model-inspired radiophobia include: refusal of some patients to undergo potentially life-saving medical imaging; discouragement of the study of low-dose radiation therapies; motivation for radiological terrorism and promotion of nuclear proliferation.

  8. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. The impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of a supermassive star in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Sunmyon

    2016-01-01

    A massive primordial halo near an intensely star forming galaxy may collapse into a supermassive star (SMS) and leave a massive black hole seed of about $10^5~M_{sun}$. To investigate the impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of an SMS from a nearby galaxy, we perform three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations by selecting a pair of massive dark matter halos forming at $z >10$. We find that rich structures such as clumps and filaments around the source galaxy shield the cloud from ionizing radiation. In fact, in some cases cloud collapse is accelerated under ionizing radiation. This fact suggests that the ionization of the cloud's surroundings helps its collapse. Only strong radiation at the early stage of structure formation can halt the cloud collapse, but this is much stronger than observationally allowed value. We also explored the effect of ionizing radiation on a sample of 68 halos by employing an analytical model and found that increase in the mean density of the gas between the SMS...

  10. Compendium of resources for radiation safety in medical imaging using ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Anum S; Frush, Donald P

    2013-05-01

    Diagnostic imaging, including ionizing radiation modalities, maintains a prominent role in the medical evaluation of patients. There is increasing awareness and need for information across varied sectors about low-level radiation and potential risks. Many medical and scientific organizations have resources discussing radiation risk and management. However, there is no single resource compiling this information. Websites, including those of national and international medical organizations, were reviewed for information on radiation dose, risk, justification, optimization, guidelines (including general information about improvement in quality and dose reduction without specific mention of optimization techniques), appropriateness criteria, and general principles of radiation safety for CT, fluoroscopy or angiography, and radiography. This information was organized into 8 tables, categorized by modality, and separated for adult and pediatric populations. Websites with training modules were noted as well. Twenty-nine websites were explored. Overall, less information is available about medical radiation safety in children compared with adults. Across both groups, most information is available on CT, then fluoroscopy, and finally radiography. Across all groups and modalities, there is no information available for patients or parents on optimization, appropriateness, or guidelines, with the exception of adult radiography, for which there are some guidelines. This compendium serves as a collective resource for communities including the public and regulatory organizations. Additionally, the compendium can be used to determine redundant or deficient areas, providing opportunities for more comprehensive resources and efficient efforts in accessing medical radiation patient safety information. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-07-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  12. Preservation of food by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, E.S.; Peterson, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    This study is presented in three volumes. Vol. I: Presents a concise description of the philosophy of radiation, protection for people working with irradiation processes, including problems associated with the design and operation of a large facility and solutions to problems encountered. Radiation dosimetry and radiolytic effects in foods are also presented. Vol. II: Effects of radiation on bacteria and viruses are discussed as well as the lethal effect on microorganisms and insects. Also presented are the effects of irradiated food on packaging materials. Vol. III: The effects of radurization on meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, fruits, vegetables, and spices. Also included are the effects of irradiation for the use of shelf-life extension.

  13. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  14. State Register of Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Occupational exposure

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of main tasks of Radiation Protection Centre is to collect, process, systematize, store and provide the data on sources of ionizing radiation and occupational exposures. The number of sources in 2002 is provided and compared with previous year. Distribution of workers according to the type of practice is compared with previous year. Distribution of sealed sources and x-ray machines according their use is presented.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Satomi, Lucilia Cristina [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A. [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: tjapinto@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  16. Exploration of the Dissociative Recombination following DNA ionization to DNA+ due to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Richard A.; Zimmerly, Andrew T.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that ionizing radiation generates low-energy secondary electrons, which may interact with the surrounding area, including biomolecules, such as triggering DNA single strand and double strand breaks as demonstrated by Sanche and coworkers (Radiat. Res. 157, 227(2002)). The bio-effects of low-energy electrons are currently a topic of high interest. Most of the studies are dedicated to dissociative electron attachments; however, the area is still mostly unexplored and still not well understood. We are computationally investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on DNA, such as its ionization to DNA+. More specifically, we are exploring the possibility of the dissociative recombination of the temporary DNA+ with one of the low-energy secondary electrons, produced by the ionizing radiation, to be another process of DNA strand breaks. Our preliminary results, which are performed with the binaries of ORCA, will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  17. On the large escape of ionizing radiation from GEHRs

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos, M; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2001-01-01

    A thorough analysis of well studied giant HII regions on galactic discs for which we know the ionizing stellar population, the gas metallicity and the Wolf-Rayet population, leads to photoionization models which can only match all observed line intensity ratios ([OIII], [OII], [NII], [SII] and [SIII] with respect to the intensity of H$\\beta$), as well as the H$\\beta$ luminosity and equivalent width if one allows for an important escape of energetic ionizing radiation. For the three regions presented here, the fractions of escaping Lyman continuum photons amount to 10 to 73 % and, in all cases, the larger fraction of escaping photons has energies between 13.6 and 24.4 eV. These escaping photons clearly must have an important impact as a source of ionization of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) found surrounding many galaxies, as well as of the intergalactic medium (IGM).

  18. Ionizing Radiation Environments and Exposure Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are simulated to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, near-Earth asteroid, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmospheres of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut's body tissues using NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. Space radiation protection methods, which are derived largely from ground-based methods recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) or International Commission on Radiological Protections (ICRP), are built on the principles of risk justification, limitation, and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). However, because of the large uncertainties in high charge and energy (HZE) particle radiobiology and the small population of space crews, NASA develops distinct methods to implement a space radiation protection program. For the fatal cancer risks, which have been considered the dominant risk for GCR, the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model has been developed from recommendations by NCRP; and undergone external review by the National Research Council (NRC), NCRP, and through peer-review publications. The NSCR model uses GCR environmental models, particle transport codes describing the GCR modification by atomic and nuclear interactions in atmospheric shielding coupled with spacecraft and tissue shielding, and NASA-defined quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates for HZE particles. By implementing the NSCR model, the exposure risks from various heliospheric conditions are assessed for the radiation environments for various-class mission types to understand architectures and strategies of human exploration missions and ultimately to contribute to the optimization of radiation safety and well-being of space crewmembers participating in long-term space missions.

  19. Chemical inhibition of cell recovery after irradiation with sparsely and densely ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evastratova, Ekaterina S.; Petin, Vladislav [A. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Centre-branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Youg Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The dependence of cell survival on exposure dose and the duration of the liquid holding recovery (LHR) was obtained for diploid yeast cells irradiated with ionizing radiation of different linear energy transfer (LET) and recovering from radiation damage without and with various concentrations of cisplatin - the most widely used anticancer drug. The ability of yeast cells to recover from radiation damage was less effective after cell exposure to high-LET radiation, when cells were irradiated without drug. The increase in cisplatin concentration resulted in the disappearance of this difference whereas the fraction of irreversible damage was permanently enlarged independently of radiation quality. The probability of cell recovery was shown to be constant for various conditions of irradiation and recovery. A new mechanism of cisplatin action was suggested according with which the inhibition of cell recovery after exposure to ionizing radiations was completely explained by the production of irreversible damage.

  20. Ionizing radiation augments glioma tropism of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan G; Parker Kerrigan, Brittany C; Hossain, Anwar; Gumin, Joy; Shinojima, Naoki; Nwajei, Felix; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Love, Patrice; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F

    2017-03-31

    OBJECTIVE Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to localize to gliomas after intravascular delivery. Because these cells home to areas of tissue injury, the authors hypothesized that the administration of ionizing radiation (IR) to tumor would enhance the tropism of MSCs to gliomas. Additionally, they sought to identify which radiation-induced factors might attract MSCs. METHODS To assess the effect of IR on MSC migration in vitro, transwell assays using conditioned medium (CM) from an irradiated commercially available glioma cell line (U87) and from irradiated patient-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs; GSC7-2 and GSC11) were employed. For in vivo testing, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled MSCs were injected into the carotid artery of nude mice harboring orthotopic U87, GSC7-2, or GSC17 xenografts that were treated with either 0 or 10 Gy of IR, and brain sections were quantitatively analyzed by immunofluorescence for GFP-positive cells. These GSCs were used because GSC7-2 is a weak attractor of MSCs at baseline, whereas GSC17 is a strong attractor. To determine the factors implicated in IR-induced tropism, CM from irradiated GSC7-2 and from GSC11 was assayed with a cytokine array and quantitative ELISA. RESULTS Transwell migration assays revealed statistically significant enhanced MSC migration to CM from irradiated U87, GSC7-2, and GSC11 compared with nonirradiated controls and in a dose-dependent manner. After their intravascular delivery into nude mice harboring orthotopic gliomas, MSCs engrafted more successfully in irradiated U87 (p = 0.036), compared with nonirradiated controls. IR also significantly increased the tropism of MSCs to GSC7-2 xenografts (p = 0.043), which are known to attract MSCs only poorly at baseline (weak-attractor GSCs). Ionizing radiation also increased the engraftment of MSCs in strong-attractor GSC17 xenografts, but these increases did not reach statistical significance. The chemokine CCL2 was released by GSC7-2 and GSC

  1. Role for DNA polymerase beta in response to ionizing radiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Cramers, P.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a role of DNA polymerase beta in determining radiosensitivity is conflicting. In vitro assays show an involvement of DNA polymerase beta in single strand break repair and base excision repair of oxidative damages, both products of ionizing radiation. Nevertheless the lack of DNA polymer

  2. ionizing radiation measurements and assay of corresponding dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    Measurements of ionizing radiation and corresponding dose rate around bottling and pharma- ceutical facilities in ... be monitored closely to protect the public from adverse health effects. Keywords: Gamma ... natural environment that we experience today. (Oke 2004 ... This decay is a phenomenon by which large number of ...

  3. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  4. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at Earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the TUV radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radi...

  5. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism.

  6. Wound Trauma Alters Ionizing Radiation Dose Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    the Chernobyl reactor meltdown, 10% of 237 victims exposed to radiation received thermal burns [3]. In animals including mice [4,5], rats [6,7...When mice were subjected to combined injury, the wound took ≥30 d to close in surviving animals with an approximate rate of 8 mm 2 /day (Figure 1D...await further rigorous specificity and sensitivity studies. These studies should use appropriate animals , when possible, and address potential

  7. Animal Models of Ionizing Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Haggbloom, and R.A. Gazzara, Effects of Hippocampal X-irradiation-Produced Granule-Cell Agenesis on Instrumental Runway Performance in Rats, Physiol...Bowden, and J.P. Wyatt, A Pathway To Pulmonary Fibrosis: An Ultrastructural Study Of Mouse and Rat Following Radiation to the Whole Body and Hemithorax...532-536, 1956. 27. Brooks, P.M., E.O. Richey, and J.E. Pickering, Prompt Pulmonary Ventilation and Oxygen Consumption Changes in Rhesus Monkeys

  8. Building Protection Against External Ionizing Fallout Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Michael B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steven G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill tens to hundreds of thousands of people through exposure to fallout (external gamma) radiation. Existing buildings can protect their occupants (reducing external radiation exposures) by placing material and distance between fallout particles and indoor individuals. This protection is not well captured in current fallout risk assessment models and so the US Department of Defense is implementing the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology to improve the ability of the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) model to account for building protection. This report supports the HPAC improvement effort by identifying a set of building attributes (next page) that, when collectively specified, are sufficient to calculate reasonably accurate, i.e., within a factor of 2, fallout shelter quality estimates for many individual buildings. The set of building attributes were determined by first identifying the key physics controlling building protection from fallout radiation and then assessing which building attributes are relevant to the identified physics. This approach was evaluated by developing a screening model (PFscreen) based on the identified physics and comparing the screening model results against the set of existing independent experimental, theoretical, and modeled building protection estimates. In the interests of transparency, we have developed a benchmark dataset containing (a) most of the relevant primary experimental data published by prior generations of fallout protection scientists as well as (b) the screening model results.

  9. Ionizing radiation treatment to improve postharvest life and maintain quality of fresh guava fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Pal, R. K.

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation for improving physiological responses, quality, and storage time of fresh guava fruit. Ionizing radiation treatment suppressed the respiration and ethylene production rates and thus retarded the process of fruit ripening during storage. Irradiation treatment also retarded the physical and biochemical changes associated with ripening such as firmness, titratable acidity, soluble solids content, and vitamin C during storage, but for doses higher than 0.25 kGy the vitamin C content decreased. The positive effects of ionizing radiation treatment on delayed fruit ripening and other quality attributes diminished during 22 days of storage at 10 °C. Thus, a combination of ionizing radiation with low-temperature storage (10 °C) did not have much synergistic effect on storage life and quality of guava fruit. In conclusion, ionizing radiation treatment of guava fruit with 0.25 kGy dose increased the postharvest life by 3-4 days, maintained fruit quality, and reduced the decay incidence. The optimal dose (0.25 kGy) for postharvest life extension of guava fruit may be exploited to provide phytosanitary security against many insect pests including fruit flies.

  10. Ionizing radiation treatment to improve postharvest life and maintain quality of fresh guava fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P. [Handling and Storage Laboratory, Division of Postharvest Technology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), Pusa, New Delhi 110 012 (India)], E-mail: sukhvinder.singh@curtin.edu.au; Pal, R.K. [Handling and Storage Laboratory, Division of Postharvest Technology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), Pusa, New Delhi 110 012 (India)

    2009-02-15

    We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation for improving physiological responses, quality, and storage time of fresh guava fruit. Ionizing radiation treatment suppressed the respiration and ethylene production rates and thus retarded the process of fruit ripening during storage. Irradiation treatment also retarded the physical and biochemical changes associated with ripening such as firmness, titratable acidity, soluble solids content, and vitamin C during storage, but for doses higher than 0.25 kGy the vitamin C content decreased. The positive effects of ionizing radiation treatment on delayed fruit ripening and other quality attributes diminished during 22 days of storage at 10 deg. C. Thus, a combination of ionizing radiation with low-temperature storage (10 deg. C) did not have much synergistic effect on storage life and quality of guava fruit. In conclusion, ionizing radiation treatment of guava fruit with 0.25 kGy dose increased the postharvest life by 3-4 days, maintained fruit quality, and reduced the decay incidence. The optimal dose (0.25 kGy) for postharvest life extension of guava fruit may be exploited to provide phytosanitary security against many insect pests including fruit flies.

  11. F--Ray: A new algorithm for efficient transport of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yi; Zhang, J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Shapiro, P. R.; Iliev, I. T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new algorithm for the 3D transport of ionizing radiation, called F2-Ray (Fast Fourier Ray-tracing method). The transfer of ionizing radiation with long mean free path in diffuse intergalactic gas poses a special challenge to standard numerical methods which transport the radiation in position space. Standard methods usually trace each individual ray until it is fully absorbed by the intervening gas. If the mean free path is long, the computational cost and memory load are likely to be prohibitive. We have developed an algorithm that overcomes these limitations and is, therefore, significantly more efficient. The method calculates the transfer of radiation collectively, using the Fast Fourier Transform to convert radiation between position and Fourier spaces, so the computational cost will not increase with the number of ionizing sources. The method also automatically combines parallel rays with the same frequency at the same grid cell, thereby minimizing the memory requirement. The method is explicitly photon-conserving, i.e. the depletion of ionizing photons is guaranteed to equal the photoionizations they caused, and explicitly obeys the periodic boundary condition, i.e. the escape of ionizing photons from one side of a simulation volume is guaranteed to be compensated by emitting the same amount of photons into the volume through the opposite side. Together, these features make it possible to numerically simulate the transfer of ionizing photons more efficiently than previous methods. Since ionizing radiation such as the X-ray is responsible for heating the intergalactic gas when first stars and quasars form at high redshifts, our method can be applied to simulate thermal distribution, in addition to cosmic reionization, in three-dimensional inhomogeneous cosmological density field.

  12. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, W H; Artoli, A M [Al Neelain University Department of Medical and Biophysics 11121 Khartoum (Sudan)], E-mail: wasilhashim@yahoo.com

    2008-08-15

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  13. Epidemiology and ionizing radiations; Epidemiologie et rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, M. [Direction generale de la surete nucleaire et de la radioprotection (DGSNR), 75 - Paris (France); Masse, R. [Academie des technologies, 75 - Paris (France); Slama, R.; Spira, A. [Inserm et Ined U569, Epidemiologie, Demographie et Sciences Sociales: Sante Reproductive, Sexualite et Infection a VIH, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Timarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Billon, S.; Rogel, A.; Telle Lamberton, M.; Catelinois, O.; Thierry, I. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Grosche, B. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene; Hall, P. [Karolinska Inst., Dept. d' Epidemiologie Medicale, Stockholm (Sweden); Ron, E. [Institut national du cancer, Div. Epidemiologie du Cancer et Genetique (United States); Vathaire, F. de [INSERM XR 521, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Cherie Challine, L.; Donadieu, J.; Pirard, Ph. [Institut de veille sanitaire (InVs), 94415 - Saint-Maurice (France); Bloch, J. [Direction generale de la sante, 75 - Paris (France); Setbon, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-01-01

    The ionizing radiations have effects on living being. The determinist effects appear since a threshold of absorbed dose of radiation is reached. In return, the stochastic effects of ionizing radiations are these ones whom apparition cannot be described except in terms of probabilities. They are in one hand, cancers and leukemia, on the other hand, lesions of the genome potentially transmissible to the descendants. That is why epidemiology, defined by specialists as the science that studies the frequency and distribution of illness in time and space, the contribution of factors that determine this frequency and this distribution among human populations. This issue gathers and synthesizes the knowledge and examines the difficulties of methodologies. It allows to give its true place to epidemiology. (N.C.)

  14. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  15. Ionizing radiation in the polyelectrolytes technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; Dragusin, M.; Radoiu, M.; Moraru, R.; Oproiu, C.; Toma, M.; Ferdes, O.; Jianu, A.; Bestea, V.; Manea, A.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma ray and accelerated electron beam application in the chemistry of polyelectrolytes is presented. The polyelectrolytes preparation is based on radiation induced polymerization of aqueous solutions containing an appropriate mixture of monomers such as acrylamide, acrylic acid, vinyl acetate, diallyldimethylammonium-chloride and certain initiators, complexing agents and chain transfer agents. The effects of absorbed dose, rate of absorbed dose and chemical composition of aqueous solution on the polymerization process are discussed. The results obtained by testing these polyelectrolytes with waste water from food industry are also given.

  16. The effect of ionizing radiation on intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerin, B E; Nisce, L Z; Roberts, C W; Thornell, C; Sabbas, A; Wang, H; Li, P M; Nori, D

    2001-09-01

    The native crystalline lens is the principal shield against ultraviolet radiation (UV), damage to the human retina. Every year in the United States, more than one million patients undergo removal of the natural lens in the course of cataract surgery (phakectomy), at which time an intraocular lens (IOL) is placed in the lens capsule. The IOL thenceforth serves as the principal barrier to ultraviolet radiation over the life of the implant, potentially for decades. The synthetic organic molecules of which IOLs are composed offer little UV protection unless ultraviolet-absorbing chromophores are incorporated into the lens material during manufacture. However, chromophores are alkenes potentially subject to radiolytic degradation. It is unknown whether ionizing radiation at clinical doses (e.g., to the brain or in the head-and-neck region) affects the UV-absorbing capacity of chromophore-bearing IOLs and consequently exposes the retina to potentially chronic UV damage. In addition, the polymers of which IOLs are composed are themselves subject to radiation damage, which theoretically might result in optical distortion in the visible light range. To determine whether megavoltage photon ionizing radiation alters the absorption spectra of ultraviolet-shielding polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and organopolysiloxane (silicone) intraocular lenses (IOLs) in the UV (280 nm ionizing irradiation to doses of 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 100 Gray, respectively. Because of artifactual aberrations inherent in analyzing convex lenses on a conventional flat-plate spectrophotometer, post-irradiation absorption spectra were subsequently reanalyzed on a Cary 300 spectrophotometer outfitted with a Labsphere Diffused Reflectance Accessory (DRA-CA-30-I) incorporating a Spectralon-coated integrating sphere. Primary: Changes in UV absorbance after irradiation. Secondary: Changes in visible and low-end near-infrared absorbance after irradiation. Photon ionizing radiation in the 2-Gy to 100-Gy range

  17. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  18. Interactive visual intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas

    Radiation is omnipresent. It has many interesting applications: in medicine, where it allows curing and diagnosing patients; in communication, where modern communication systems make use of electromagnetic radiation; and in science, where it is used to discover the structure of materials; to name a few. Physically, radiation is a process in which particles or waves travel through any kind of material, usually air. Radiation can be very energetic, in which case it can break the atoms of ordinary matter (ionization). If this is the case, radiation is called ionizing. It is known that ionizing radiation can be far more harmful to living beings than non-ionizing radiation. In this dissertation, we are concerned with ionizing radiation. Naturally occurring ionizing radiation in the form of radioactivity is a most natural phenomenon. Almost everything is radioactive: there is radiation emerging from the soil, it is in the air, and the whole planet is constantly undergoing streams of energetic cosmic radiation. Sinc...

  19. Radiation pressure confinement - III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jonathan; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-12-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe0+ to Fe25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN/d log ξ|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 ≲ ξ ≲ 104 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN/d log ξ| ≈ N1ξa) yield N1 = 3 × 1021 cm- 2 ± 0.4 dex and a = 0-0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed N1 and a? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN/d log ξ| = 8 × 1021 ξ0.03 cm-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of N1 and a depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.

  20. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  1. Ionizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 1. The nature of ionizing radiation and its use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-04-01

    Legislation governing the use of ionizing radiation in the workplace and in medical treatment first became law in 1985 and 1988, being superseded by the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRR99) and the Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000, (IR(ME)R 2000), respectively. This legislation ensures a safe environment in which to work and receive treatment and requires that those involved in the radiographic process must be appropriately trained for the type of radiographic practice they perform. A list of the topics required is detailed in Schedule 2 of IR(ME)R 2000 and is paraphrased in Table 1, with the extent and amount of knowledge required depending on the type of radiographic practice undertaken. Virtually all dental practitioners undertake radiography as part of their clinical practice. Legislation requires that users of radiation, including dentists and members of the dental team, understand the basic principles of radiation physics, hazards and protection, and are able to undertake dental radiography safely with the production of high quality, diagnostic images.

  2. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated with Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the present experiment was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of chromosome aberrations such as dicentrics, centric rings, and excess acentrics. Radiation is one of the more dangerous clastogens in the environment. Ionizing radiation causes chromosome breakages and various cytogenetic aberrations in exposed cells. In an investigation into radiation emergencies, it is important to estimate the dose to exposed persons for several reasons. Physical dosimeters (e. g., film badges) may misrepresent the actual radiation dose and may not be available in a radiological accident or terrorism incident. Biological dosimetry is suitable for estimating the radiation dose during such accidents. The dicentric chromosome assay is very sensitive and a reliable bio-indicator in cases of accidental overexposure.

  3. Research on Dependable Ionizing Radiation Protection based on Model i*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Hai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The software’s unreliability mostly attributes to an erroneous analysis on the requirements done at the beginning. In this paper, we apply the tool of i* frame requirement modeling and build early requirement model against ionizing radiation. After finding out possible risks and corresponding solutions during the process of modeling analysis, we propose reasoning models against ionizing radiation. The radiation protection system  with  the  above models  can  figure out  the  purpose  of agents  related  to radiant source and provide normal service even when the environment software system is being interfered. It can serve the ecological and economical society with stability and development.  The model is divided into several sections. Section 1 gives the outline of the dependant software. Section 2 illustrates the  i* frame  technology. Section 3, 4 and 5 cover the topic of dependant security requirement analysis, SD&SR model on ionizing radiation respectively. Section 6 gives the conclusion.

  4. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  5. The biobehavioral and neuroimmune impact of low-dose ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Meling, Daryl D; Peterlin, Molly B; Gridley, Daila S; Cengel, Keith A; Freund, Gregory G

    2011-01-01

    In the clinical setting, repeated exposures (10–30) to low-doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 200 cGy), as seen in radiotherapy for cancer, causes fatigue. Almost nothing is known, however, about the fatigue inducing effects of a single exposure to environmental low-dose ionizing radiation that might occur during high-altitude commercial air flight, a nuclear reactor accident or a solar particle event (SPE). To investigate the short-term impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on mouse biobehaviors and neuroimmunity, male CD-1 mice were whole body irradiated with 50 cGy or 200 cGy of gamma or proton radiation. Gamma radiation was found to reduce spontaneous locomotor activity by 35% and 36%, respectively, 6 h post irradiation. In contrast, the motivated behavior of social exploration was un-impacted by gamma radiation. Examination of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts in the brain demonstrated that gamma radiation increased hippocampal TNF-α expression as early as 4 h post-irradiation. This was coupled to subsequent increases in IL-1RA (8 h and 12 h post irradiation) in the cortex and hippocampus and reductions in activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) (24 h post irradiation) in the cortex. Finally, restraint stress was a significant modulator of the neuroimmune response to radiation blocking the ability of 200 cGy gamma radiation from impairing locomotor activity and altering the brain-based inflammatory response to irradiation. Taken together, these findings indicate that low-dose ionizing radiation rapidly activates the neuroimmune system potentially causing early onset fatigue-like symptoms in mice. PMID:21958477

  6. Amphibian nitrate stress as an additional terrestrial threat from astrophysical ionizing radiation events?

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    As diversity in amphibian species declines, the search for causes has intensified. Work in this area has shown that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would no...

  7. Ionizing radiation from Chernobyl affects development of wild carrot plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratyński, Zbyszek; Arias, Javi Miranda; Garcia, Cristina; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Pajares, Antonio Jesús Muñoz; Piwczyński, Marcin; Tukalenko, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Radioactivity released from disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima is a global hazard and a threat to exposed biota. To minimize the deleterious effects of stressors organisms adopt various strategies. Plants, for example, may delay germination or stay dormant during stressful periods. However, an intense stress may halt germination or heavily affect various developmental stages and select for life history changes. Here, we test for the consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation on plant development. We conducted a common garden experiment in an uncontaminated greenhouse using 660 seeds originating from 33 wild carrots (Daucus carota) collected near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These maternal plants had been exposed to radiation levels that varied by three orders of magnitude. We found strong negative effects of elevated radiation on the timing and rates of seed germination. In addition, later stages of development and the timing of emergence of consecutive leaves were delayed by exposure to radiation. We hypothesize that low quality of resources stored in seeds, damaged DNA, or both, delayed development and halted germination of seeds from plants exposed to elevated levels of ionizing radiation. We propose that high levels of spatial heterogeneity in background radiation may hamper adaptive life history responses.

  8. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  9. Mortality from diseases other than cancer following low doses of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Ashmore, P

    2007-01-01

    , whether such effects also occur following the lower doses and dose rates of public health concern. METHODS: We used data from an international (15-country) nuclear workers cohort study to evaluate whether mortality from diseases other than cancer is related to low doses of external ionizing radiation...... workers (attained age radiation, random variation or residual confounding. CONCLUSIONS: The most informative low-dose radiation......BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation at very high (radio-therapeutic) dose levels can cause diseases other than cancer, particularly heart diseases. There is increasing evidence that doses of the order of a few sievert (Sv) may also increase the risk of non-cancer diseases. It is not known, however...

  10. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Colette J; Sharma, Ashish; Vuong, Dinh-Van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta and matrix metallop......BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta and matrix...... with enzymatic activity was investigated in multiple tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. Transwell migration assays were performed to evaluate invasive capacity of naive tumor cells in response to IR-induced LOX. In vivo studies for confirming IR-enhanced LOX were performed employing...

  11. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and......Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p......-nitrobenzylchloride and subsequent formation of the p-nitrobenzyl radical and the reaction of p-nitrotoluene with O– are studied by resonance Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy....

  12. The Spanish National Reference Database for Ionizing Radiations (BANDRRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Arcos, J.M. E-mail: arcos@ciemat.es; Bailador, A.; Gonzalez, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Gorostiza, C.; Ortiz, F.; Sanchez, E.; Shaw, M.; Williart, A

    2000-03-01

    The Spanish National Reference Database for Ionizing Radiations (BANDRRI) is being implemented by a research team in the frame of a joint project between CIEMAT (Unidad de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes and Direccion de Informatica) and the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED, Departamento de Mecanica y Departamento de Fisica de Materiales). This paper presents the main objectives of BANDRRI, its dynamic and relational data base structure, interactive Web accessibility and its main radionuclide-related contents at this moment.

  13. Consultative committee on ionizing radiation: Impact on radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, L R; Ratel, G

    2016-03-01

    In response to the CIPM MRA, and to improve radioactivity measurements in the face of advancing technologies, the CIPM's consultative committee on ionizing radiation developed a strategic approach to the realization and validation of measurement traceability for radionuclide metrology. As a consequence, measurement institutions throughout the world have devoted no small effort to establish radionuclide metrology capabilities, supported by active quality management systems and validated through prioritized participation in international comparisons, providing a varied stakeholder community with measurement confidence.

  14. Comparisons organized by Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory of FTMC, Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudelis, A; Gorina, I

    2016-03-01

    The newly established Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory of the National Metrology Institute (FTMC) in Lithuania organized four comparisons in the field of low-level radioactivity measurements in water. For gamma-ray emitters, the activity concentration in the samples was in the range 1-25Bq/kg, while for tritium it was around 2Bq/g. The assigned values of all comparisons were traceable to the primary standards of the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI).

  15. Stimulation of the corneal blinking reflex by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.; Luce, J.; Yanni, N.; Brustad, T.; Lyman, J.; Kimura, S.

    1961-05-04

    Accelerated alpha particles from the Berkeley heavy-ion linear accelerator were used in a series of experiments designed to elucidate the conditions by which radiation can stimulate or modify nerve action in mammals. Single millisecond pulses in excess of 40,000 radsor pulse trains of less than 1 sec duration elicited the corneal blinking reflex when delivered to the cornea of unanesthetized rabbits. The lowest threshold dose was observed when the Bragg ionization peak was placed at 140 {mu} depth.

  16. The non ionizing radiations; Les rayonnements non ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchia, P. [Institut National de la Sante, Lab. de Physique, Rome (Italy); Souques, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service des Etudes Medicales, 75 - Paris (France); Lambrozo, J. [EDF/GDF, Service des Etudes Medicales, 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    The biological effects of non ionizing radiations are studied in this part. The magnetic fields and the cardiac implants, melatonin secretion among the electricians exposed to magnetic fields of 50 hz, the effects of electromagnetic fields in professional medium, evaluation of the effect of an exposure to a signal of a mobile phone (GSM 900) on the skin are the different subjects discussed. (N.C.)

  17. The Spanish National Reference Database for Ionizing Radiations (BANDRRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Arcos JM; Bailador; Gonzalez; Gonzalez; Gorostiza; Ortiz; Sanchez; Shaw; Williart

    2000-03-01

    The Spanish National Reference Database for Ionizing Radiations (BANDRRI) is being implemented by a reasearch team in the frame of a joint project between CIEMAT (Unidad de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes and Direccion de Informatica) and the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED, Departamento de Mecanica y Departamento de Fisica de Materiales). This paper presents the main objectives of BANDRRI, its dynamic and relational data base structure, interactive Web accessibility and its main radionuclide-related contents at this moment.

  18. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Ana P; Neves, Lucio P; Vivolo, Vitor; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ionizing radiation resistant bacteria; Des bacteries resistantes aux rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libert, M. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DESD), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-07-01

    The living being are not equal face to ionizing radiations. The palm of resistance goes to some bacteria. The champion at any category, the Deinococcus radiodurans, tolerates radiations doses whom one thousandth would kill a man. Two reasons to this fact: after irradiation, the DNA replication is stopped in order that the bacteria can use a repair process called multiple recombination. It cuts intact pieces of a injured chromosome and recombines them with other intact pieces, reconstituting a functional chromosome. It has also an ability to endure the extended action of oxygen, large source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  20. L-shell radiative transition rates by selective synchrotron ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonetto, R D [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge J. Ronco, CONICET-UNLP, Calle 47 No. 257-Cc 59 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Carreras, A C [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y FIsica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria (5000) Cordoba (Argentina); Trincavelli, J [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y FIsica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria (5000) Cordoba (Argentina); Castellano, G [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y FIsica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria (5000) Cordoba (Argentina)

    2004-04-14

    Relative L-shell radiative transition rates were obtained for a number of decays in Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta and Re by means of a method for refining atomic and experimental parameters involved in the spectral analysis of x-ray irradiated samples. For this purpose, pure samples were bombarded with monochromatic synchrotron radiation tuning the incident x-ray energy in order to allow selective ionization of the different atomic shells. The results presented are compared to experimental and theoretical values published by other authors. A good general agreement was found and some particular discrepancies are discussed.

  1. Application of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongfej, H.; Jilan, W.

    1988-01-01

    The applied radiation chemistry has made great contributions to the development of polymeric industrial materials by the characteristics reaction means such as crosslinking, graft copolymerization and low-temperature or solid-phase polymerization, and become a important field on peaceful use of atomic energy. A brief review on the applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics is presented. The examples of this technique were the studies on biocompatible and biofunctional polymers for medical use and on resists of lithography in microelectronics.

  2. Ionizing radiation effects on food vitamins: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionisio, Ana Paula, E-mail: annadionisio@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia de Alimentos. Dept. de Ciencia de Alimentos; Gomes, Renata Takassugui; Oetterer, Marilia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2009-09-15

    Ionizing radiation has been widely used in industrial processes, especially in the sterilization of medicines, pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products, and in food processing. Similar to other techniques of food processing, irradiation can induce certain alterations that can modify both the chemical composition and the nutritional value of foods. These changes depend on the food composition, the irradiation dose and factors such as temperature and presence or absence of oxygen in the irradiating environment. The sensitivity of vitamins to radiation is unpredictable and food vitamin losses during the irradiation are often substantial. The aim of this study was to discuss retention or loss of vitamins in several food products submitted to an irradiation process. (author)

  3. Health risk assessment of jobs involving ionizing radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Tišma Vera D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 75 subjects exposed to low doses of external ionizing radiation and 25 subjects from the control group, all male. The first group (A consisted of 25 subjects employed in the production of technetium, with an average job experience of 15 years. The second group (B consisted of 25 subjects exposed to ionizing radiation from enclosed sources, working in jobs involving the control of X-ray devices and americium smoke detectors, their average work experience being 18.5 years. The third group (C consisted of 25 subjects involved in the decontamination of the terrain at Borovac from radioactive rounds with depleted uranium left over after the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999, their average job experience being 18.5 years. The control group (K consisted of 25 subjects who have not been in contact with sources of ionizing radiation and who hold administrative positions. Frequencies of chromosome aberrations were determined in lymphocytes of peripheral blood and compared to the control group. The average annual absorbed dose determined by thermoluminescent dosimeters for all three groups did not exceed 2 mSv. In the present study, the largest number of observed changes are acentric fragments and chromosome breaks. The highest occupational risk appears to involve subjects working in manufacturing of the radio-isotope technetium.

  4. Supported transition metal nanomaterials: Nanocomposites synthesized by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, D. M.; Castano, C. E.; Rojas, J. V.

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructures decorated with transition metal nanoparticles using ionizing radiation as a synthesis method in aqueous solutions represents a clean alternative to existing physical, chemical and physicochemical methods. Gamma irradiation of aqueous solutions generates free radicals, both oxidizing and reducing species, all distributed homogeneously. The presence of oxidant scavengers in situ during irradiation generates a highly reductive environment favoring the reduction of the metal precursors promoting seed formation and nanoparticle growth. Particle growth is controlled by addition of surfactants, polymers or various substrates, otherwise referred to as supports, which enhance the formation of well dispersed nanoparticles. Furthermore, the combination of nanoparticles with supports can offer desirable synergisms not solely presented by the substrate or nanoparticles. Thus, supported nanoparticles offer a huge diversity of applications. Among the ionizing radiation methods to synthesize nanomaterials and modify their characteristics, gamma irradiation is of growing interest and it has shown tremendous potential in morphological control and distribution of particle size by judiciously varying parameters including absorbed dose, dose rate, concentration of metal precursor, and stabilizing agents. In this work, major advances on the synthesis of supported nanoparticles through gamma irradiation are reviewed as well as the opportunities to develop and exploit new composites using gamma-rays and other accessible ionizing radiation sources such as X-rays.

  5. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new ionization chamber was made and tested for radiation field mapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ionization chamber was made using only accessible low cost materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The operational tests were made and the results were within the recommended limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field map was compared with a commercial chamber presenting a 1.25% difference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our chamber presents potential for assurance reliability in calibration procedures.

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  7. Procedure to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over LED and magnetic induction lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Otavio Luis de; Menzel, Silvio Carlos, E-mail: otavioluis@ipen.br, E-mail: scmenzel@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Ribas, Jacinto Oliveira, E-mail: jacinto@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Eletrica e Instrumentacao

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a methodology to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over Lighting Emitting Diode (LED) and Magnetic Induction (MI) lamps as they use a lot of electronic in their power supply. Considering they have a huge lifetime it is interesting to apply this technology into environments under ionizing radiation, such as a nuclear facility. Thus, it is possible to increase the period between two consecutive maintenance, reduce the repair and global maintenance costs and reduce the operational personnel exposure to ionizing radiation. In this context it is going to be presented a scheme to select different LED and MI lamps available in the Brazilian market, a methodology to irradiate several lamp samples according various radiation levels that can be found in the facilities and the electrical and photometric evaluation to be performed. Considering this methodology it will be possible to analyze the lamps capacity to withstand ionizing radiation, under regular operating conditions of the facilities and its effects in the performance and lifetime of the selected lamps. Thus, the procedures suggested in this work can be used as a guide to perform experiments and analysis to find specific lamps that can reduce the global maintenance costs and the personnel exposure. Hereafter, several lamps are going to be acquired and the tests performed, according the procedures here described. (author)

  8. Dexmedetomidine acts as an oxidative damage prophylactic in rats exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanis, Dilek; Erturk, Engin; Besir, Ahmet; Demirci, Yucel; Kayir, Selcuk; Akdogan, Ali; Vanizor Kural, Birgul; Bahat, Zumrut; Canyilmaz, Emine; Kara, Hanife

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on oxidative injury caused by ionizing radiation. Randomized controlled experimental study. Department of radiation oncology and research laboratory of an academic hospital. Twenty-eight rats were randomized to 4 groups (n=7 per group). Group S rats were administered physiologic serum; group SR rats were administered physiologic serum and 10 Gy external ionizing radiation. Groups D100 and D200 were administered 100 and 200 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intraperitoneally, respectively, 45 minutes before ionizing radiation. Liver, kidney, lung, and thyroid tissue and serum levels of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase [GPX], superoxide dismutase, and catalase) and oxidative metabolites (advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde, and nitrate/nitrite, and serum ischemia-modified albumin) were measured 6 hours postprocedure. In group SR, IR decreased antioxidant enzyme levels and increased oxidative metabolite levels (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (P<.01). Hepatic, renal, and lung nitrate/nitrite levels were lower in group D200 than in group SR (P<.05). Dexmedetomidine preserves the antioxidant enzyme levels and reduces toxic oxidant metabolites. Therefore, it can provide protection from oxidative injury caused by ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor genes by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J. [Queensland Inst. of Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)]|[Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Lavin, M.F. [Queensland Inst. of Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    We used differential display, a method designed to amplify partial cDNA sequences from subsets of mRNAs, to identify mRNAs induced by ionizing radiation in human Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cells. Increased expression of a cDNA corresponding to the inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (InsP{sub 3}R) type 1 was observed after exposure of cells to 3Gy {gamma}-rays. This was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. The increase in mRNA for InsP{sub 3}R type 1 was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the level of InsP{sub 3}R type 1 protein as determined by Western blotting. Exposure of cells from patients with the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), characterized by hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, failed to change the levels of InsP{sub 3}R type 1 mRNA and, as expected, there was no increase in InsP{sub 3}R type 1 protein in A-T cells in response to radiation exposure. Protein levels for two other InsP{sub 3}Rs, types 2 and 3, were observed to increase in control and A-T cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. The induction of the InsP{sub 3}R type 1, which is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum, may play an important role in radiation signal transduction. (Author).

  10. Solar irradiance changes and phytoplankton productivity in Earth's ocean following astrophysical ionizing radiation events

    CERN Document Server

    Neale, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Two atmospheric responses to simulated astrophysical ionizing radiation events significant to life on Earth are production of odd-nitrogen species, especially NO2, and subsequent depletion of stratospheric ozone. Ozone depletion increases incident short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVB, 280-315 nm) and longer ( > 600 nm) wavelengths of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR, 400 -700 nm). On the other hand, the NO2 haze decreases atmospheric transmission in the long-wavelength UVA (315-400 nm) and short wavelength PAR. Here we use the results of previous simulations of incident spectral irradiance following an ionizing radiation event to predict changes in Terran productivity focusing on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton. The prediction is based on a spectral model of photosynthetic response developed for the dominant genera in central regions of the ocean (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), and remote-sensing based observations of spectral water transparency, temperature, wind speed and mixed...

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  12. Comet assay as a procedure for detecting possible genotoxicity induced by non-ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zsuzsanna Nemeth

    2015-01-01

    Non-ionizing radiation (NIR) is the term given to radiation in the part of the electromagnetic spectrum that does not have enough energy to ionize atoms or molecules directly. The NIR includes electric and magnetic fields up to 300 GHz, infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation (UV). People are exposed to non-ionizing radiation by several man-made sources every day. From highest to lowest energy, this includes for example microwave ovens, cell phones, baby monitors, cordless phones, ga...

  13. The pathology of ionizing radiation as defined by morphologic patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Luis Felipe [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    This article presents a brief description of the effects of ionizing radiation in human tissues, as seen by the Pathologist. The lesions that occur in multiple organ/tissues will be discussed, dividing them into those that affect (a) the parenchyma or epithelia, (b) the stromal elements, and (c) the blood vessels. Since not all lesions fit into these patterns, the exceptions will be described as characteristic organ lesions. Unless specified otherwise the alterations presented are those that result from electromagnetic radiation (x-rays and gamma rays) as used for clinical radiation therapy. Most of the material presented will be delayed injury (i.e. months-to-years after exposure). The epithelial/parenchymal lesions include atrophy, necrosis, metaplasia, cellular atypia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. The common stromal lesions--the best recognized by pathologists--include fibrosis, fibrinous exudates, necrosis (with a paucity of cellular inflammatory exudates), and atypical fibroblasts. The vascular lesions are quite consistent: most often they affect the microvessels (capillaries, sinusoids) producing lethal and sublethal damage to the endothelial cells, with capillary rupture or thrombosis. Medium-size vessels show neointimal proliferation, fibrinoid necrosis, thrombosis, or acute arteritis. Damage in large vessels is less common; it occurs more in arteries than in veins and includes neointimal proliferation, atheromatosis, thrombosis and rupture (a dramatic complication). Some of the characteristic organ lesions are veno-occlusive liver disease, acute radiation pneumonitis, permanent bone marrow hypoplasia or aplasia, and colitis cystica profunda. Neoplasms are a well-recognized delayed complication of radiation and will not be described in detail. It is important to remember that there are no pathognomonic features of injuries produced by ionizing radiation. Nonetheless, although not specific individually, the combined features are characteristic enough to be

  14. Studying the Effect of Ionization Radiation of 60Co on the Spirulina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuang-Sheng; Ai, Weidang; Dong, Wen-Ping; Qin, Li-Feng; Tang, Yong-Kang

    It studied the effect of ionization radiation on the Spirulina plastensis(No.6) by using the γ-rays of 60 Co. In the experiment, Spirulina were irradiated, and the dose of the ionization radiation covered 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0kGy. After irradiating, these Spirulina were cultured under the same conditions. During the course of the experiment, the growth rate, photosynthetic efficiency and nutrition quality of the Spirulina, were analyzed. From the results, low dose of γ-rays (less than 1.5kGy) could improve the content of phycobilin and protein of Spirulina. Only small changes in the morphology of algae filament were found at dose less than 1.0kGy. But with the increase of the dose of γ-rays (more than 1.5kGy), the filaments would break up or even disintegrate. Spirulina had stronger ionization radiation proof and self-rehabilitation capacity, but the growth of Spirulina was stagnated. The LD50 (i.e. the dose resulted in 50% death of the Spirulina) of the colony was 2.0kGy. Considering the capacity of being resistant to γ-rays irradiation, Spirulina can be considered as one of the key biological components in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for future long-term space missions. Keywords: Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS); Spirulina; ionization radiation; biological component

  15. Disordered redox metabolism of brain cells in rats exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation or UHF electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, A P; Druzhyna, M O; Vovk, A V; Lukin, S М

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the changes of redox-state of mammalian brain cells as the critical factor of initiation and formation of radiation damage of biological structures in setting of continuous exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation or fractionated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF EMR) at non-thermal levels. The influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation was studied on outbred female rats kept for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl accident zone. The effects of total EMR in the UHF band of non-thermal spectrum were investigated on Wistar rats. The rate of formation of superoxide radicals and the rate of NO synthesis in mitochondria were determined by the EPR. After exposure to ionizing or UHF radiation, the levels of ubisemiquinone in brain tissue of rats decreased by 3 and 1.8 times, respectively. The content of NO-FeS-protein complexes in both groups increased significantly (р < 0.05). In the conditions of ionizing or EMR the rates of superoxide radical generation in electron-transport chain of brain cell mitochondria increased by 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively (р < 0.05). In brain tissue of rats kept in the Chernobyl zone, significant increase of NO content was registered; similar effect was observed in rats treated with UHFR (р < 0.05). The detected changes in the electron transport chain of mitochondria of brain cells upon low-intensity irradiation or UHF EMR cause the metabolic reprogramming of cell mitochondria that increases the rate of superoxide radical generation and nitric oxide, which may initiate the development of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Thirty Years After".

  16. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals{sup .} Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland.

  17. [Radiation situation prognosis for deep space: reactions of water and living systems to chronic low-dose ionizing irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, I B; Tsetlin, V V; Moisa, S S

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the findings of researches into the effects of low-dose ionizing irradiation on diverse biological objects (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger, Spirostomum ambiguum Ehrbg., mesenchymal stem cells from mouse marrow, dry higher plants seeds, blood lymphocytes from pilots and cosmonauts). Model experiments with chronic exposure to ionizing radiation doses comparable with the measurements inside orbital vehicles and estimations for trips through the interplanetary space resulted in morphological disorders (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger), radiation hormesis (Aspergillus niger, MSCs from mouse marrow), increase in the seed germination rate, inhibition of Spirostomum spontaneous activity, DNA damages, chromosomal aberrations, and increase of the blood lymphocytes reactivity to additional radiation loading. These facts give grounds to assume that the crucial factor in the radiation outcomes is changes in liquid medium. In other words, during extended orbiting within the magnetosphere region and interplanetary missions ionizing radiation affects primarily liquids of organism and, secondarily, its morphofunctional structures.

  18. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-07-28

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (programing.

  19. [Damage and functional recovery of the mouse retina after exposure to ionizing radiation and methylnitrosourea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Iu V; Tronov, V A; Liakhova, K N; Poplinskaia, V A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2014-01-01

    The eye retina consists of terminally differentiated cells that have lost their ability to proliferate. The death of these cells leads tothe loss of sight. The mice retina is characterized by relatively high resistance to radiation, which is provided by its ability to repair damage caused by environmental factors. The aim of our work was to assess the damaging effect of ionizing radiation and methylnitrosourea (MNU) on the DNA structure in the mouse retina, the functional activity of the retina, and its ability to recover in vivo. The results confirm the ability of the mature retina to structural and functional recovery. Adapting influence of low dose chemical agent increases retina resistance to cytotoxic dose of genotoxicants and prevents degeneration of photoreceptor layer of the retina. The results show the possibility of neurohormesis effect in the mice retina after exposure to ionizing radiation and chemicals.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G. (Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10/sup 9//l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 ..mu..mol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests.

  1. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single

  2. Interactive Learning Module Improves Resident Knowledge of Risks of Ionizing Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Alexander Y; Breaud, Alan H; Schneider, Jeffrey I; Kadom, Nadja; Mitchell, Patricia M; Linden, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Physician awareness of the risks of ionizing radiation exposure related to medical imaging is poor. Effective educational interventions informing physicians of such risk, especially in emergency medicine (EM), are lacking. The SIEVERT (Suboptimal Ionizing Radiation Exposure Education - A Void in Emergency Medicine Residency Training) learning module was designed to improve provider knowledge of the risks of radiation exposure from medical imaging and comfort in communicating these risks to patients. The 1-hour module consists of introductory lecture, interactive discussion, and role-playing scenarios. In this pilot study, we assessed the educational effect using unmatched, anonymous preintervention and postintervention questionnaires that assessed fund of knowledge, participant self-reported imaging ordering practices in several clinical scenarios, and trainee comfort level in discussing radiation risks with patients. All 25 EM resident participants completed the preintervention questionnaire, and 22 completed the postintervention questionnaire within 4 hours after participation. Correct responses on the 14-question learning assessment increased from 6.32 (standard deviation = 2.36) preintervention to 12.23 (standard deviation = 1.85) post-intervention. Overall, 24% of residents were comfortable with discussing the risks of ionizing radiation exposure with patients preintervention, whereas 41% felt comfortable postintervention. Participants ordered fewer computed tomography scans in 2 of the 4 clinical scenarios after attending the educational intervention. There was improvement in EM residents' knowledge regarding the risks of ionizing radiation exposure from medical imaging, and increased participant self-reported comfort levels in the discussion of these risks with patients after the 1-hour SIEVERT learning module. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ionizing radiation - one of the most important link of the energetic chain in biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraczko, W. [Technical Univ. Poznan, Radio- and Photochemistry Dept., Poznan (Poland)

    1999-09-01

    High (large) and low (small) doses of ionizing radiation consistently induce opposite physiologic effects in biological systems. The effects of low doses cannot be inferred by interpolation between the result from groups exposed to high doses and controls irradiated only by Natural Background Radiation. Stimulation ('bio-positive') effects by low-level doses of ionizing radiation are called radiation hormesis. It is still controversial idea, however it was found that some biological objects (yeast, seeds, animals) after gamma irradiation by low-level doses (10-50 times more NBR) can increase their development. The result of present researches demonstrate that the excitation of living system by gamma quanta (high energy) initiates prolonged secondary emission that influences biota and activates many important processes in biological systems. According to the excitation theory of bio-molecules the author suggests that gamma irradiation in low-level doses excites such molecules as DNA and proteins, and this being followed by a long-termed secondary coherent radiation. The spectral analysis of this secondary emission confirmed the contribution of the UV component to the total emission. The data obtaining by using SPC method (single photon counting) make possible a partial understanding of the radiation hormesis phenomenon and suggest closer relationship to UV emission from biological systems during mitotic processes. The experiments with humic acid (high doses) and glycine (low doses) confirm the author hypothesis that gamma-irradiated organic compounds are capable to emit secondary radiation. This secondary radiation probably plays very significant role in the intercellular communication inside the living systems. In conclusion the author proposed de-excitation processes in bio-molecules as a common denominator of UV and ionizing radiation interacting with living cells. Finally he refers to the Cerenkov radiation which is created inside the biological cells

  4. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  5. EPR detection of foods preserved with ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlinska, G.; Michalik, J.

    1998-06-01

    The applicability of the epr technique for the detection of dried vegetables, mushrooms, some spices, flavour additives and some condiments preserved with ionizing radiation is discussed. The epr signals recorded after exposure to gamma rays and to beams of 10 MeV electrons from linac are stable, intense and specific enough as compared with those observed with nonirradiated samples and could be used for the detection of irradiation. However, stability of radiation induced epr signals produced in these foods depends on storage condition. No differences in shapes (spectral parameters) and intensities of the epr spectra recorded with samples exposed to the same doses of gamma rays ( 60Co) and 10 MeV electrons were observed

  6. Teratogen effects of ionizing radiations. Effets teratogenes des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, P. (Hopital Beaujon, 92 - Clichy (France)); Gambini, D.J.; Collignon-le-Bouedec, M.A.; Barritault, L. (Hopital Laennec, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-03-01

    This article treats the problem of teratogenesis of ionizing radiations. If no malformations has been seen before 20*10 [sup -2] Grays and no carcinogen effect before 30*10 [sup -2] Grays, it is reasonable to limit the irradiation of pregnant women. If there is an emergency for mother's life as it is the case in thrombo-embolic pathology, all ways of protection must be used: high voltage, diaphragms, reduction of time exposure, abdomen protection with screens, fast screen-film couples, radioscopy television, limiting number of negatives, make the mother drink after the examination to eliminate the radioactive products. Note that beta radiations are contraindicated and preferentially use, when it is possible, echography, echo doppler or nuclear magnetic resonance.

  7. Ionizing radiation, nuclear energy and radiation protection for school; Radiacao ionizante, energia nuclear e protecao radiologica para a escola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, E.A.; Reis, R.G.; Pinho, A.S.; Alves, A.S.; Rio, M.A.P.; Reis, A.A., E-mail: arlene@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, J.W.S. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Paula, G.A. de; Goncalves Junior, M.A. [Escola Sesc de Ensino Medio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, ionizing radiation has been applied in many sectors of society, such as medicine, industry, safety, construction, engineering and research. However, population is unaware of both the applications of ionizing radiation and their risks and benefits. It can be seen that most people associate the terms 'radiation' and 'nuclear energy' with the atomic bomb or cancer, most likely because of warlike applications and the stealthy way radioactivity had been treated in the past. Thus, it is necessary to clarify the population about the main aspects related to the applications, risks and associated benefits. These knowledge can be disseminated in schools. Brazilian legislation for basic education provides for topics such as nuclear energy and radioactivity to high school students. However, some factors hamper such an educational practice, namely, few hours of class, textbooks do not address the subject, previous concepts obtained in the media, difficulty in dealing with the subject in the classroom, phobia, etc. One solution would be the approximation between schools and institutions that employ technologies involving radioactivity, which would allow students to know the practices, associated radiological protection, as well as the risks and benefits to society. Currently, with the increasing application of ionizing radiation, especially in medicine, it is necessary to demystify the use of radioactivity. (author)

  8. Molecular targets in cellular response to ionizing radiation and implications in space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M.; Tabocchini, M.A. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Physics Lab.; Sapora, O. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Comparative Toxicology Lab.

    2002-12-01

    DNA repair systems and cell cycle checkpoints closely co-operate in the attempt of maintaining the genomic integrity of cells damaged by ionizing radiation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered as the most biologically important radiation-induced damage. Their spatial distribution and association with other types of damage depend on radiation quality. It is believed these features affect damage reparability, thus explaining the higher efficiency for cellular effects of densely ionizing radiation with respect to {gamma}-rays. DSB repair systems identified in mammalian cells are homologous recombination (HR), single-strand annealing (SSA) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Some enzymes may participate in more than one of these repair systems. DNA damage also triggers biochemical signals activating checkpoints responsible for delay in cell cycle progression that allows more time for repair. Those at G1/S and S phases prevent replication of damaged DNA and those at G2/M phase prevent segregation of changed chromosomes. Individuals with lack or alterations of genes involved in DNA DSB repair and cell cycle checkpoints exhibit syndromes characterized by genome instability and predisposition to cancer. Information reviewed in this paper on the basic mechanisms of cellular response to ionizing radiation indicates their importance for a number of issues relevant to protection of astronauts from space radiation. (author)

  9. Ionizing radiation and a wood-based biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Stipanovic, Arthur J.; Cheng, Kun; Barber, Vincent A.; Manning, Mellony; Smith, Jennifer L.; Sundar, Smith

    2014-01-01

    Woody biomass is widely available around the world. Cellulose is the major structural component of woody biomass and is the most abundant polymer synthesized by nature, with hemicellulose and lignin being second and third. Despite this great abundance, woody biomass has seen limited application outside of the paper and lumber industries. Its use as a feedstock for fuels and chemicals has been limited because of its highly crystalline structure, inaccessible morphology, and limited solubility (recalcitrance). Any economic use of woody biomass for the production of fuels and chemicals requires a "pretreatment" process to enhance the accessibility of the biomass to enzymes and/or chemical reagents. Electron beams (EB), X-rays, and gamma rays produce ions in a material which can then initiate chemical reactions and cleavage of chemical bonds. Such ionizing radiation predominantly scissions and degrades or depolymerizes both cellulose and hemicelluloses, less is known about its effects on lignin. This paper discusses how ionizing radiation can be used to make a wood-based biorefinery more environmentally friendly and profitable for its operators.

  10. Large single-crystal diamond substrates for ionizing radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Marco; Bellucci, Alessandro; Calvani, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniele M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Sede Secondaria di Montelibretti, Monterotondo Stazione, Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    The need for large active volume detectors for ionizing radiations and particles, with both large area and thickness, is becoming more and more compelling in a wide range of applications, spanning from X-ray dosimetry to neutron spectroscopy. Recently, 8.0 x 8.0 mm{sup 2} wide and 1.2 mm thick single-crystal diamond plates have been put on the market, representing a first step to the fabrication of large area monolithic diamond detectors with optimized charge transport properties, obtainable up to now only with smaller samples. The more-than-double thickness, if compared to standard plates (typically 500 μm thick), demonstrated to be effective in improving the detector response to highly penetrating ionizing radiations, such as γ-rays. Here we report on the first measurements performed on large active volume single-crystal diamond plates, both in the dark and under irradiation with optical wavelengths (190-1100 nm), X-rays, and radioactive γ-emitting sources ({sup 57}Co and {sup 22}Na). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  12. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinghui [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mulligan, Padhraic; Cao, Lei R., E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, Leonard [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    With the largest band gap energy of all commercial semiconductors, GaN has found wide application in the making of optoelectronic devices. It has also been used for photodetection such as solar blind imaging as well as ultraviolet and even X-ray detection. Unsurprisingly, the appreciable advantages of GaN over Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), SiC, amorphous SiC (a-SiC), and GaAs, particularly for its radiation hardness, have drawn prompt attention from the physics, astronomy, and nuclear science and engineering communities alike, where semiconductors have traditionally been used for nuclear particle detection. Several investigations have established the usefulness of GaN for alpha detection, suggesting that when properly doped or coated with neutron sensitive materials, GaN could be turned into a neutron detection device. Work in this area is still early in its development, but GaN-based devices have already been shown to detect alpha particles, ultraviolet light, X-rays, electrons, and neutrons. Furthermore, the nuclear reaction presented by {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C and various other threshold reactions indicates that GaN is intrinsically sensitive to neutrons. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art development of GaN detectors for detecting directly and indirectly ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is given to GaN's radiation hardness under high-radiation fields.

  13. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Mulligan, Padhraic; Brillson, Leonard; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-09-01

    With the largest band gap energy of all commercial semiconductors, GaN has found wide application in the making of optoelectronic devices. It has also been used for photodetection such as solar blind imaging as well as ultraviolet and even X-ray detection. Unsurprisingly, the appreciable advantages of GaN over Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), SiC, amorphous SiC (a-SiC), and GaAs, particularly for its radiation hardness, have drawn prompt attention from the physics, astronomy, and nuclear science and engineering communities alike, where semiconductors have traditionally been used for nuclear particle detection. Several investigations have established the usefulness of GaN for alpha detection, suggesting that when properly doped or coated with neutron sensitive materials, GaN could be turned into a neutron detection device. Work in this area is still early in its development, but GaN-based devices have already been shown to detect alpha particles, ultraviolet light, X-rays, electrons, and neutrons. Furthermore, the nuclear reaction presented by 14N(n,p)14C and various other threshold reactions indicates that GaN is intrinsically sensitive to neutrons. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art development of GaN detectors for detecting directly and indirectly ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is given to GaN's radiation hardness under high-radiation fields.

  14. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola, E-mail: ola.hammarsten@clinchem.gu.se

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  15. Ionizing Radiation in Earth’s Atmosphere and in Space Near Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    chronic myeloid (myelocytic) leukemia are the main types in irradiated adults (9). Susceptibility to acute lymphatic leukemia (stem-cell leukemia ... leukemia too premature to classify) is highest in childhood and decreases sharply during maturation (9). Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is not...risk coefficients for chronic exposures to low- LET ionizing radiation (lifetime percent increased risk of fatal cancer per 100 mSv) are (10): for

  16. Concomitant treatment of F98 glioma cells with new liposomal platinum compounds and ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Charest, Gabriel; Paquette, Benoit; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Sanche, Léon

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances, the radiotherapy and chemotherapy protocols marginally improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Lipoplatin™, and Lipoxal™, the liposomal formulations of cisplatin and oxaliplatin respectively, were tested on the F98 glioma cells for their ability to improve the cell uptake and increase the synergic effect when combined with ionizing radiation. The cytotoxicity and synergic effect of platinum compounds were assessed by colony formation assay, wh...

  17. A cytogenetic approach to the effects of low levels of ionizing radiations on occupationally exposed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakeri, Farideh [National Radiation Protection Department, Iranian Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Nuclear Science and Research Institute-Agriculture, Medicine and Industry Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: fzakeri@aeoi.org.ir; Hirobe, Tomohisa [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Radiation Effect Mechanism Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in hospital workers exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Thirty-two interventional cardiologists, 36 nuclear medicine physicians and 33 conventional radiologists were included in this study, along with 35 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals as the control group. We used conventional metaphase chromosome aberration (CA) analysis, cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay as important biological indicators of ionizing radiation exposure. Occupational dosimetry records were collected over the last year (ranged from 0.25 to 48 mSv) and their whole life exposure (ranged from 1.5 to 147 mSv). The results showed significantly higher frequencies of dicentric and acentric CAs (p < 0.001) and MN (p < 0.01) in all exposed groups than in the controls. Taking all the confounding factors into account, no obvious trend of increased chromosomal damages as a function of either duration of employment, exposed dose, sex or age was observed. Interventional cardiologists had the highest rates of CA and MN frequencies between the worker groups, though the differences were not significant. These results indicate that long term exposure to low dose ionizing radiation could result in DNA damage. Hence, the personnel who work in the hospitals should carefully apply the radiation protection procedures.

  18. Ground-level ozone following astrophysical ionizing radiation events: an additional biological hazard?

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to-date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling we have examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and find that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supe...

  19. Ionizing radiation, antioxidant response and oxidative damage: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einor, D., E-mail: daniel@einor.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Bonisoli-Alquati, A., E-mail: andreabonisoli@gmail.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Costantini, D., E-mail: davidcostantini@libero.it [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, B-2610, Antwerp (Belgium); Mousseau, T.A., E-mail: mousseau@sc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Faculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Møller, A.P., E-mail: anders.moller@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire d' Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, CNRS UMR 8079, Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 362, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2016-04-01

    One mechanism proposed as a link between exposure to ionizing radiation and detrimental effects on organisms is oxidative damage. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the scientific literature on the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on antioxidant responses and oxidative damage. We found 40 publications and 212 effect sizes for antioxidant responses and 288 effect sizes for effects of oxidative damage. We performed a meta-analysis of signed and unsigned effect sizes. We found large unsigned effects for both categories (0.918 for oxidative damage; 0.973 for antioxidant response). Mean signed effect size weighted by sample size was 0.276 for oxidative damage and − 0.350 for antioxidant defenses, with significant heterogeneity among effects for both categories, implying that ionizing radiation caused small to intermediate increases in oxidative damage and small to intermediate decreases in antioxidant defenses. Our estimates are robust, as shown by very high fail-safe numbers. Species, biological matrix (tissue, blood, sperm) and age predicted the magnitude of effects for oxidative damage as well as antioxidant response. Meta-regression models showed that effect sizes for oxidative damage varied among species and age classes, while effect sizes for antioxidant responses varied among species and biological matrices. Our results are consistent with the description of mechanisms underlying pathological effects of chronic exposure to LDIR. Our results also highlight the importance of resistance to oxidative stress as one possible mechanism associated with variation in species responses to LDIR-contaminated areas. - Highlights: • There is interest in variation in metabolic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation • A random effect meta-analysis of effect sizes of radioactive contamination was performed • We found significant effects of radiation on oxidative damage and antioxidant response • We found significant heterogeneity among

  20. Ionizing radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress and prolonged cell injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard I.; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-01-01

    Cellular exposure to ionizing radiation leads to oxidizing events that alter atomic structure through direct interactions of radiation with target macromolecules or via products of water radiolysis. Further, the oxidative damage may spread from the targeted to neighboring, non-targeted bystander cells through redox-modulated intercellular communication mechanisms. To cope with the induced stress and the changes in the redox environment, organisms elicit transient responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels to counteract toxic effects of radiation. Metabolic pathways are induced during and shortly after the exposure. Depending on radiation dose, dose-rate and quality, these protective mechanisms may or may not be sufficient to cope with the stress. When the harmful effects exceed those of homeostatic biochemical processes, induced biological changes persist and may be propagated to progeny cells. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play critical roles in many cellular functions. In irradiated cells, levels of these reactive species may be increased due to perturbations in oxidative metabolism and chronic inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the long-term effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on genomic stability. Here, in addition to immediate biological effects of water radiolysis on DNA damage, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in the delayed outcomes of ionization radiation. Defects in mitochondrial functions lead to accelerated aging and numerous pathological conditions. Different types of radiation vary in their linear energy transfer (LET) properties, and we discuss their effects on various aspects of mitochondrial physiology. These include short and long-term in vitro and in vivo effects on mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial protein import and metabolic and antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22182453

  1. Ionizing radiation exposure among kidney transplant recipients due to medical imaging during the pretransplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim N; Patel, Anup M; Weng, Francis L

    2013-05-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for malignancies. One recognized risk for malignancy is ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine, among kidney transplant recipients, the medical imaging procedures that contribute to radiation exposure and their cumulative radiation exposure, as a result of their pretransplant evaluation. Medical records of patients who received a first, kidney-alone transplant during 2008 at a single transplant center were examined. This study identified medical imaging procedures that were performed as prerequisites for deceased donor wait-listing or receipt of live donor kidney transplants and to maintain active status on the wait list. Frequencies of medical imaging procedures and cumulative effective doses of radiation were calculated. Among the 172 kidney transplant recipients, 905 procedures were performed. Seventy patients (40.7%) were exposed to low dose (0-20 mSv), 51 (29.7%) were exposed to moderate dose (>20-50 mSv), 28 (16.3%) were exposed to high dose (>50-100 mSv), and 23 (13.4%) were exposed to very high dose (>100 mSv) cumulative effective radiation. Nuclear stress tests accounted for 82.9% of the total radiation exposure. In multivariate analysis, older age, diabetes, and black race were associated with exposure to >20 mSv radiation during the pretransplant evaluation. Kidney transplant recipients are exposed to large amounts of ionizing radiation from medical imaging during the pretransplant evaluation. The effects of radiation upon malignancy risk and strategies to reduce this radiation exposure warrant further investigation.

  2. A graded-gap detector for ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozhela, Y; Shilenas, A; Yasutis, V; Dapkus, L; Kinduris, A; Yutsene, V

    2002-01-01

    The current response to optical and X-ray radiation in graded-gap Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layers is investigated. Graded-gap electric field in Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layer of L = 15 mu m thickness, with x changing from 0 to 0.4 along the layer, makes it possible to get full accumulation of charge carriers generated by ionizing radiation and enables to achieve the current/power sensitivity of Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As up to 0.25 A/W. It is shown that low-doped layer on the narrow-gap side of the Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As graded-gap layer provide the volt/watt sensitivity to X-radiation with the energy lower than 15 keV up to 16 x 10 sup 3 V/W in the photovoltaic regime

  3. Learning From Biomarkers in Victims Accidentally Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Liqing Du; Chang Xu; Qin Wang; Zhiyi Song; Jianxiang Liu; Xu Su

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers,such as chromosome aberration and micronuclei assays,prove to be reliable for facilitating clinical diagnosis in radiation accidents.In a radiation accident in India,chromosomal aberration,γ-H2AX,as well as other blood markers,were detected in accidentally exposed victims.This multi-parametric approach aided in confirming that individuals had been exposed by ionizing radiation.However,doses were impossible to estimate because of a 30-day delay in accident awareness.Exposure dose for victims was estimated using a dose-response curve previously established.Dose estimation,blood cell depletion kinetics,and no appearance of prodromal symptoms suggested that doses of exposure were low.Hematologic investigation,sampling time,and chromosome aberration scoring were all proposed according to data from the victims exposed to 60Co.Finally,knowledge regarding chromosome aberration analysis and the importance of international co-operation and assistance should be shared from this accident.

  4. What happens when spins meet for ionizing radiation dosimetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavoni, Juliana F.; Neves-Junior, Wellington F. P.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-07-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to measure radiation dose deposited in different milieu through its effects. Radiation can break chemical bonds and if they produce stable free radicals, ESR can measure their concentration through their spins and a dose can be inferred. Ionizing radiation can also promote polymerization and in this case proton relaxation times can be measured and an image weighed by T2 can be produced giving spatial information about dose. A review of the basics of these applications is presented concluding with an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom to validate 3-dimensionally dose distribution delivered in a simulation of Volume Modulated Arch Therapy on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  5. Ionizing radiation as preconditioning against transient cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokošová, Natália; Danielisová, Viera; Smajda, Beňadik; Burda, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Induction of ischemic tolerance (IT), the ability of an organism to survive an otherwise lethal ischemia, is the most effective known approach to preventing postischemic damage. IT can be induced by exposing animals to a broad range of stimuli. In this study we tried to induce IT of brain neurons using ionizing radiation (IR). A preconditioning (pre-C) dose of 10, 20, 30 or 50 Gy of gamma rays was used 2 days before an 8 min ischemia in adult male rats. Ischemia alone caused the degeneration of almost one half of neurons in CA1 region of hippocampus. However, a significant decrease of the number of degenerating neurons was observed after higher doses of radiation (30 and 50 Gy). Moreover, ischemia significantly impaired the spatial memory of rats as tested in Morris's water maze. In rats with a 50 Gy pre-C dose, the latency times were reduced to values close to the control level. Our study is the first to reveal that IR applied in sufficient doses can induce IT and thus allow pyramidal CA1 neurons to survive ischemia. In addition, we show that the beneficial effect of IR pre-C is proportional to the radiation dose.

  6. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  7. Antitumor interaction of short-course endostatin and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, N N; Seetharam, S; Mauceri, H J; Beckett, M A; Jaskowiak, N T; Salloum, R M; Hari, D; Dhanabal, M; Ramchandran, R; Kalluri, R; Sukhatme, V P; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether endostatin, an antiangiogenic cleavage fragment of collagen XVIII, enhances the antitumor effects of ionizing radiation (IR). Endostatin was injected to coincide with fractionated radiotherapy. Xenografts of radioresistant SQ-20B tumor cells were established in athymic nude mice. Lewis lung carcinoma cells were injected into C57BI/6 mice. Mice bearing SQ-20B xenografts were injected intraperitoneally with 2.5 mg/kg/day of murine recombinant endostatin 5 times per week for 2 weeks 3 hours before IR treatment (50 Gy total dose). Mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were injected intraperitoneally with endostatin (2.5 mg/kg/day) four times; the first injection was given 24 hours before the first IR dose (15 Gy) and then 3 hours before IR (15 Gy/day) for 3 consecutive days. Microvascular density was assessed on tumor tissue sections by use of CD31 immunohistochemistry and light microscopy. Endothelial cell survival analyses were employed to evaluate endostatin effects on human aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Endothelial cell apoptosis was examined by use of FACS analysis and DAPI microscopy. In SQ-20B xenografts, combined treatment with endostatin and IR produced tumor growth inhibition that was most pronounced at the nadir of regression (day 21). By day 35, tumors receiving combined treatment with endostatin and IR were 47% smaller than tumors treated with endostatin alone. Interactive cytotoxic treatment effects between endostatin and IR were also demonstrated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in the endostatin/IR group at days 11 and 13 compared with IR alone. Histologic analyses demonstrated a reduction in microvascular density after combined treatment with endostatin and IR compared with endostatin treatment alone. Survival analyses confirmed interactive cytotoxicity between endostatin and IR in both human aortic

  8. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and radiation dosimetery assessment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M El-Arag; M A Ayad; M A El-Kolaly; W Madcour

    2010-10-01

    Scattered ionizing radiation emissions from a low-energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather-type) device operating with different gases were studied. The plasma focus device was powered by a capacitor bank of 1 F at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The radiation emissions were investigated using time-integrated thermoluminescence TLD-500. These detectors were calibrated against standard X-ray machine as well as standard sources (60Co and 137Ca). Calibration of detectors showed linear relation over all the region of measurements. It was found that radiation levels would be minimum for different gases, when the gas pressure was between 0.5 and 0.8 Torr. Only helium deviated from this phenomenon as it gave maximum radiation level at 0.8 Torr pressure. It was also found that, for all the gases used, the radiation levels were maximum when the applied voltage was 15 keV.

  9. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Ecologia, Cosenza (Italy); Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A. [Universita di Messina, Dipt. di Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale, Messina (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  10. Transient optical gratings for pulsed ionizing radiation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Hall, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the invention of holography or lasers, Bragg's X-ray microscope opened the door to optical computation in short-wavelength studies using spatially coherent visible light, including phase retrieval methods. This optical approach lost ground to semiconductor detection and digital computing in the 1960s. Since then, visible optics including spatial light modulators (SLMs), array detectors and femtosecond lasers have become widely available, routinely allowing versatile and computer-interfaced imposition of optical phase, molecular coherent control, and detection. Today, high brilliance X-ray sources begin to offer opportunities for atomic resolution and ultrafast pump-probe studies. Correspondingly, this work considers an overlooked aspect of Bragg's X-ray microscope - the incoherent ionizing radiation to coherent visible (IICV) conversion that is a necessary prerequisite for coherent optical computations. Technologies are suggested that can accomplish this conversion. Approaches to holographic data sto...

  11. Solar Irradiance Changes and Phytoplankton Productivity in Earth's Ocean Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Patrick J; Thomas, Brian C

    2016-04-01

    Two atmospheric responses to simulated astrophysical ionizing radiation events significant to life on Earth are production of odd-nitrogen species, especially NO2, and subsequent depletion of stratospheric ozone. Ozone depletion increases incident short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVB, 280-315 nm) and longer (>600 nm) wavelengths of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm). On the other hand, the NO2 haze decreases atmospheric transmission in the long-wavelength UVA (315-400 nm) and short-wavelength PAR. Here, we use the results of previous simulations of incident spectral irradiance following an ionizing radiation event to predict changes in terran productivity focusing on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton. The prediction is based on a spectral model of photosynthetic response, which was developed for the dominant genera in central regions of the ocean (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), and on remote-sensing-based observations of spectral water transparency, temperature, wind speed, and mixed layer depth. Predicted productivity declined after a simulated ionizing event, but the effect integrated over the water column was small. For integrations taking into account the full depth range of PAR transmission (down to 0.1% of utilizable PAR), the decrease was at most 2-3% (depending on strain), with larger effects (5-7%) for integrations just to the depth of the surface mixed layer. The deeper integrations were most affected by the decreased utilizable PAR at depth due to the NO2 haze, whereas shallower integrations were most affected by the increased surface UV. Several factors tended to dampen the magnitude of productivity responses relative to increases in surface-damaging radiation, for example, most inhibition in the modeled strains is caused by UVA and PAR, and the greatest relative increase in damaging exposure is predicted to occur in the winter when UV and productivity are low.

  12. Exposure to electromagnetic fields (non-ionizing radiation) and its relationship with childhood leukemia: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvente, I.; Fernandez, M.F. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Villalba, J. [Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Olea, N. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Nunez, M.I., E-mail: isabeln@ugr.es [Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Childhood exposure to physical contamination, including non-ionizing radiation, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread and increasing sources of exposure to this type of radiation. The primary objective of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Scientific publications between 1979 and 2008 that include examination of this association have been reviewed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Studies to date have not convincingly confirmed or ruled out an association between non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Discrepancies among the conclusions of the studies may also be influenced by confounding factors, selection bias, and misclassification. Childhood defects can result from genetic or epigenetic damage and from effects on the embryo or fetus, which may both be related to environmental exposure of the parent before conception or during the pregnancy. It is therefore critical for researchers to define a priori the type and 'window' of exposure to be assessed. Methodological problems to be solved include the proper diagnostic classification of individuals and the estimated exposure to non-ionizing radiation, which may act through various mechanisms of action. There appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research into the relationship between exposure to non-ionizing radiation and adverse human health effects.

  13. Exposure to electromagnetic fields (non-ionizing radiation) and its relationship with childhood leukemia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvente, I; Fernandez, M F; Villalba, J; Olea, N; Nuñez, M I

    2010-07-15

    Childhood exposure to physical contamination, including non-ionizing radiation, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread and increasing sources of exposure to this type of radiation. The primary objective of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Scientific publications between 1979 and 2008 that include examination of this association have been reviewed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Studies to date have not convincingly confirmed or ruled out an association between non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Discrepancies among the conclusions of the studies may also be influenced by confounding factors, selection bias, and misclassification. Childhood defects can result from genetic or epigenetic damage and from effects on the embryo or fetus, which may both be related to environmental exposure of the parent before conception or during the pregnancy. It is therefore critical for researchers to define a priori the type and "window" of exposure to be assessed. Methodological problems to be solved include the proper diagnostic classification of individuals and the estimated exposure to non-ionizing radiation, which may act through various mechanisms of action. There appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research into the relationship between exposure to non-ionizing radiation and adverse human health effects.

  14. Genomic damage in children accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fucic, A; Brunborg, G; Lasan, R

    2007-01-01

    doses of radiation; (b) effects on children from combined exposure to low doses of radiation and chemical agents from food, water and air; and (c) specific effects from exposure during early childhood (radioisotopes from water, radon in homes). Special consideration should also be given to a possible......, environmental radiation pollution and indoor accidental contamination reveals consistently increased chromosome aberration and micronuclei frequency in exposed than in referent children. Future research in this area should be focused on studies providing information on: (a) effects on children caused by low...... of children to environmental genotoxicants. Environmental research on children predominantly investigates the health effects of air pollution while effects from radiation exposure deserve more attention. The main sources of knowledge on genome damage of children exposed to radiation are studies performed...

  15. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place.

  16. 29 CFR 570.57 - Exposure to radioactive substances and to ionizing radiations (Order 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure to radioactive substances and to ionizing radiations (Order 6). 570.57 Section 570.57 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... walls of solid material and extending from floor to ceiling; (3) The term ionizing radiations shall mean...

  17. 21 CFR 579.22 - Ionizing radiation for treatment of animal diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ionizing radiation for treatment of animal diets... for treatment of animal diets. Ionizing radiation for treatment of complete diets for animals may be... Bagged complete diets, packaged feeds, feed ingredients, bulk feeds, animal treats and chews...

  18. Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Anna Domańska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Łódź, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. Materials and Methods: In 2013 the studied diagnostic unit has employed 10 technicians, whose exposure is permanently monitored by individual dosimetry. We analyzed retrospective data of quarterly doses in terms of Hp(10 dose equivalents over the years 2001-2010. Also annual and five-year doses were determined to relate the results to current regulations. Moreover, for a selected period of one year, we collected data on the total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics, to analyze potential relationship with doses recorded in technicians performing the examinations. Results: In a 10-year period under study, the highest annual dose recorded in a technician was 2 mSv, which represented 10% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. The highest total dose for a 5-year period was 7.1 mSv, less than 10% of a 5-year dose limit for occupational exposure. Positive linear correlation was observed between total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics in the period of three months and respective quarterly doses received by technicians performing examinations. Conclusions: Doses received by nuclear medicine technicians performing diagnostic procedures in compliance with principles of radiation protection are low, which is confirmed by recognizing the technicians of this unit as B category employees. Med Pr 2013;64(4:503–506

  19. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in demineralized, lyophilized or frozen human bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antebi, Uri; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: uri@usp.br, E-mail: mathor@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Guimaraes, Rodrigo P., E-mail: clinicaguimaraes@gmail.com [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCM/SCSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2015-07-01

    The aim is the study of the application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electron) as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, the demineralized bone tissue frozen and freeze-dried for use in transplants. Five human femoral diaphysis of different donors demineralized bone tissues were preserved as lyophilized or frozen at - 80 deg C. The samples were divided into non-irradiated groups (control) and irradiated by gamma rays or electron beam. The bone proteins were extracted and used to determine the concentrations of total protein, BMP 2 and 7. It was observed a decrease in total protein concentrations, and BMP 2 and 7. The decrease in total protein concentrations, as compared to respective control groups was significant in the lyophilized and frozen samples irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy gamma radiation and beam electrons with greater than 30% reduction. The significant decrease in the levels of BMP 2 and 7 were also observed in higher doses and especially by electron beam. The reductions in the concentrations of total protein and osteoinductive proteins (BMP 2 and 7), were related to the radiation dose, i.e., increase with higher doses of ionizing radiation type and the type of preservation of the bones. The largest reductions in concentrations were observed in bone irradiated by electron beam and at a dose of 50 kGy. But this type of radiation and this high dose are not usual practice for the sterilization of bone tissue. Keywords: demineralized bone tissue, ionizing radiation, Tissue Bank, BMP 2, BMP 7, bone proteins. (author)

  1. Physicians' knowledge about ionizing radiation and radiological imaging techniques: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Aylin; Alyesil, Cansu; Sim, Saadet

    2011-06-01

    Radiological examinations are critical for the evaluation of many disorders in daily practice. To determine the knowledge of ionizing radiation and radiological imaging techniques among physicians of various grades. A cross-sectional survey was carried out of 55 physicians with a mean age of 35.7 ± 6.0 years (age range 25-52 years) in a university hospital. A questionnaire which tested physicians' information about ionizing radiation and their risks was distributed by medical school students. Among the participants, 32 (58.2%) were consultants and 23 (41.8%) were residents. The mean score was 68.2 ± 11.1 (range 37.8-91.8) out of 100. Consultants' points were lower than residents (p = 0.040). Consultants had significantly higher frequency of incorrect answer than residents in the question about 'whether CT scan increases lifetime cancer risk' (p = 0.036). Medical practices in years do not enhance the level of the awareness regarding the ionizing radiation.

  2. When theory and observation collide: Can non-ionizing radiation cause cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, Magda

    2017-02-01

    This paper attempts to resolve the debate about whether non-ionizing radiation (NIR) can cause cancer-a debate that has been ongoing for decades. The rationale, put forward mostly by physicists and accepted by many health agencies, is that, "since NIR does not have enough energy to dislodge electrons, it is unable to cause cancer." This argument is based on a flawed assumption and uses the model of ionizing radiation (IR) to explain NIR, which is inappropriate. Evidence of free-radical damage has been repeatedly documented among humans, animals, plants and microorganisms for both extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and for radio frequency (RF) radiation, neither of which is ionizing. While IR directly damages DNA, NIR interferes with the oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in oxidative stress, damage to cellular components including DNA, and damage to cellular processes leading to cancer. Furthermore, free-radical damage explains the increased cancer risks associated with mobile phone use, occupational exposure to NIR (ELF EMF and RFR), and residential exposure to power lines and RF transmitters including mobile phones, cell phone base stations, broadcast antennas, and radar installations.

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on some quality attributes of nutraceutically valued lotus seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rajeev; Karim, A A

    2009-01-01

    Radiation processing has been employed successfully for value addition of food and agricultural products. Preliminary studies were undertaken to evaluate the changes induced by ionizing radiation (up to 30 kGy), in the form of gamma irradiation and electron beam irradiation, on some quality attributes and nutritive values of nutraceutically valued lotus seeds. Significant loss in seed firmness was recorded between control and irradiated seeds, irrespective of radiation source. Similarly, the specific viscosity of irradiated lotus seeds decreased significantly up to a dose of 7.5 kGy. Starch increased after exposure to gamma or electron beam irradiation, whereas the total phenolic contents were decreased. Gamma irradiation revealed an enhancement in protein, while the electron beam showed a decrease. Partial oxidation of the seeds during radiation treatments might have occurred as evidenced from the decomposition profiles (thermogravimetry) during heating. It is evident that ionizing radiation brought about significant and variable changes in the quality and nutritive values of lotus seed. Further exploration of this technology for safety and quality is warranted.

  4. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Postharvest Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rae-Dong Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Postharvest diseases cause losses in a wide variety of crops around the world. Irradiation, a useful nonchemical approach, has been used as an alternative treatment for fungicide to control plant fungal pathogens. For a preliminary study, ionizing radiations (gamma, X-ray, or e-beam irradiation were evaluated for their antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus stolonifer through mycelial growth, spore germination, and morphological analysis under various conditions. Different fungi exhibited different radiosensitivity. The inhibition of fungal growth showed in a dose-dependent manner. Three fungal pathogens have greater sensitivity to the e-beam treatment compared to gamma or X-ray irradiations. The inactivation of individual fungal-viability to different irradiations can be considered between 3–4 kGy for B. cinerea and 1–2 kGy for P. expansum and R. stolonifer based on the radiosensitive and radio-resistant species, respectively. These preliminary data will provide critical information to control postharvest diseases through radiation.

  5. Pest control of ligniperdous insects by means of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung); Kerner, G.; Unger, W. (Amt fuer Standardisierung, Messwesen und Warenpruefung, Berlin (German Democratic Republic)); Koehler, W. (Staatliche Schloesser und Gaerten, Potsdam-Sanssouci (German Democratic Republic). Abt. Restaurierung)

    1983-01-01

    Wooden objects of art and monuments are endangered by wood-destroying insects. The treatment of these objects with ionizing radiation is one way to control these pests. For this purpose the portable HWK-3 high-dose irradiation device was developed. In July 1979, a radiation experiment was made under field conditions in Potsdam-Sanssouci in order to gain experience in the operation and effectiveness of the new device. During the following 18 months the results of this experiment were evaluated by means of the SM 231 vibration measuring instrument. It became evident that a total dose of over 3 kGy would kill all of the death-watch beetles (Anobium punctatum de Geer) and doses down to 0.55 kGy would largely diminish the population, with future damages caused by death-watch beetles being highly unlikely. Delayed damages in the larvae caused by low total doses still add to the effectiveness of the pest control.

  6. Mechanisms of Radiation Damage Generated by Ionizing Radiation in Optical Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    SUMMARY OF APPENDIX B "Optical scattering and SPR study of ZBLAN glass : Dependence on preparation and processing methods" LMater. Sci. Forum 19-20...studied the types of centers created by ionizing radiation in ZBLAN (ZrF 4, BaF 2 , LaF 3, AlF 3 , and NaF) glass . Samples of ZBLAN were prepared using...radiation-induced centers in ZBLAN glass depend strongly on the glass -processing conditions. For example, ZBLAN glasses processed with CC14 yield paramagnetic

  7. FT-IR spectroscopy assessment of aesthetic dental materials irradiated with low-dose therapeutic ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, A. D.; Almeida, S. M.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Byscolo, F. N.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose therapeutic ionizing radiation on different aesthetic dental materials. Forty five specimens ( n = 45) of three different aesthetic restorative materials were prepared and randomly divided into five groups: G1 (control group); G2, G3, G4, G5 experimental groups irradiated respectively with 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 Gy of gamma radiation by the 60Co teletherapy machine. Chemical analyses were performed using a FT-IR Nicolet 520 spectrophotometer with reflectance diffuse technique. Even a minimal exposition at ionizing radiation in therapeutic doses can provide chemical changes on light-cured composite resins. The three studied restorative materials showed changes after exposure at gamma radiation, however the increase of the radiation dose did not contribute to an increase in this effect.

  8. Ionizing radiation and mitogenetic radiation: two links of the same energetic chain in a biological cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Present research demonstrates that the excitation of living systems by high energy/low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) initiates prolonged secondary ultraviolet (UV) range emission that influences biota. When doses of this energy are too high, the process of energy or radiation absorption by the cells causes negative changes (i.e. negative mutations or death). When these doses are sufficiently low, vital processes inside the cells are stimulated and can create positive changes. This paper proposes a common denomination for mechanisms of UV and ionizing radiation when interacting with living cells, underlying both its mitogenetic effect and radiation hormesis. Data from radon exposure in chronically exposed nuclear workers, acutely exposed Hiroshima and Nagasaki victims and observers of atmospheric nuclear explosions, combined with animal results, present irrefutable evidence that low doses of IR are beneficial. As a conclusion the author postulates the possibility of new methods of therapy regarding the use of IR and mitogenetic radiation. This paper has been written to encourage debate regarding possible future benefits that may be derived from low level doses of IR exposure in the general population.

  9. Interaction of ionizing radiation with mater; Oddzialywanie promieniowania jonizujacego z materia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogocki, D. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    The early radiation effects (e.g. excitation, ionization) have been described and compared for different kind of radiation interacting with mater. The mechanism of energy deposition in connection with radiation dose and their spatial distribution has been shown.The commonly used definitions and units in radiation dosimetry have been also reviewed. 4 refs, 4 figs.

  10. The scrapie disease process is unaffected by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, H.; Farquhar, C.F.; McConnell, I.; Davies, D. (AFRC MRC Neuropathogenesis Unit, Edinburgh (England))

    1989-01-01

    The incubation period of scrapie, its degenerative neuropathology and the replication of its causal unconventional virus are all tightly controlled parameters of the experimental disease in mice. Each parameter can vary depending on the strain and dose of virus, on the route of infection, and on the host genotype. Exposure to whole-body gamma-irradiation from Cesium 137 has no effect on the progress or development of the disease, based on the three independent indices of incubation period, neuropathology, or infectibility by high or low doses of virus. These results are based on an extensive series of experiments in many mouse strains and are consistent using different strains (ME7, 22A, 79A, 87V) and doses of virus, routes of infection, timing and dose of radiation (3-15 Gy) administered as single or fractionated exposures with or without bone-marrow (b.m.) replacement therapy. Levels of infection in the spleen are unaltered after lethal whole-body irradiation of the scrapie-infected host, despite several-fold reductions in tissue mass due to the loss of proliferating myeloid and lymphoid precursor cells and their progeny. Contrary to our earlier suggestion, scrapie infection with the 22A virus does not reduce the effectiveness of post-exposure bone-marrow replacements to recolonize an infected host after repeated ionizing radiation totalling 15Gy. This work narrows the search for the candidate cells and biosynthetic systems which replicate the virus in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. Many programmed cellular events are radiation sensitive but protein synthesis is extremely radioresistant.

  11. Comparative study of the use of non-ionizing and ionizing radiation in the cure of epoxy resin: microwave versus electron electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.kersting@usp.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Wiebeck, Helio, E-mail: hwiebeck@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica; Marinucci, Gerson; Silva, Leonardo G.A. e, E-mail: marinuci@ipen.br, E-mail: gasilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Several processes for curing epoxy resins were developed over the years. Two methods are discussed in this paper, in order to present the main advantages and disadvantages of using microwave radiation (non-ionizing radiation) and electron beam radiation (ionizing radiation). The microwave radiation is a non-ionizing radiation, with great power of penetration and transfer of heat in microwave absorbing materials, or materials with microwave absorbing fillers. The frequency usually used in research and development is 2.45 GHz, the same available in commercial equipment. The microwave effect provides increase on the collision velocity between the reactant which, combined with energy absorbed by the reaction system, accelerates the curing reaction. None modifications in the epoxy system are required to use microwave heating for the curing process.On the other hand, the electron beam is a form of ionizing radiation in which the high energy electrons have the ability to interact with the irradiated material and produce ions, free radicals, and molecules in excited state, which can be used to initiate and propagate a polymerization. Specific initiators are necessary for an effective cure of the resin. In this study, a DGEBA epoxy resin with initiators based on anhydride and amine was used under the same conditions indicated by the manufacturer. The curing of the catalyzed system was performed in a domestic microwave oven adapted for laboratory use. The degradation and glass transition temperatures were evaluated by thermal analysis techniques. For comparative purposes, it was used data available in the literature for electron beam irradiation. (author)

  12. The Protective Effect of Curcumin on Ionizing Radiation-induced Cataractogenesis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Nesrin Turan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the protective effect of curcumin against ionizing radiation-induced cataract in the lens of rats. Material and Methods: Rats were divided into six groups. Group 1: Control, Group 2: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, Group 3: DMSO+curcumin, Group 4: Irradiation, Group 5: Irradiation+DMSO, Group 6: Irradiation+DMSO+curcumin. A 15 Gy total dose was given to 4, 5, 6 groups for radiation damage. Curcumin (100 mg/kg was dissolved in DMSO and given by intragastric intubation for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, lenses were graded and enucleated. The lenticular activity of the antioxidant enzymes, total antioxidant and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and the malondialdehyde (MDA were measured.Results: 100% Cataract was seen in the irradiation group. Cataract rate fell to 40% and was limited at grade 1 and 2 in the curcumin group. In the irradiation group, antioxidant enzyme levels were decreased, MDA levels were increased. There was an increase in antioxidant enzyme levels and a significant decrease in MDA in the group which was given curcumin.Conclusion: Curcumin has antioxidant and radioprotective properties and is likely to be a valuable agent for protection against ionizing radiation. Hence, it may be used as an antioxidant and radioprotector against radiation-induced cataractogenesis.

  13. Ionizing radiations in pregnancy and teratogenesis: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, M; Di Gianantonio, E; Straface, G; Cavaliere, A F; Caruso, A; Schiavon, F; Berletti, R; Clementi, M

    2005-01-01

    The present paper is a review of the data available in the literature concerning the prenatal exposure to radiation evaluating the reported teratogenic effect. We have particularly focused on the fetal effects of maternal ionising radiation exposure, both diagnostic and occupational, particularly in terms of congenital anomalies and birth weight. Ionising radiation represents a possible teratogen for the fetus, but this risk has been found to be dependent on the dosage and the effects correlatable to the gestational age at exposure. Recently, of particularly note is the fact that maternal thyroid exposure to diagnostic radiation has been associated with a slight reduction in the birth weight. Inadvertent exposure from diagnostic procedures in pregnancy doesn't usually increase the natural risk of congenital anomalies but creates a considerable state of maternal anxiety. Diagnostic radiological procedures should be avoided in pregnant women unless the information cannot be obtained by other techniques.

  14. Structural and functional damages of whole body ionizing radiation on rat brain homogenate membranes and protective effect of amifostine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Gulgun; Severcan, Mete; Zorlu, Faruk; Severcan, Feride

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of whole body ionizing radiation at a sublethal dose on rat brain homogenate membranes and the protective effects of amifostine on these systems at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, in the absence and presence of amifostine, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 8 Gy and decapitated after 24 h. The brain homogenate membranes of these rats were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Ionizing radiation caused a significant increase in the lipid to protein ratio and significant decreases in the ratios of olefinic = CH/lipid, CH2/lipid, carbonyl ester/lipid and CH3/lipid suggesting, respectively, a more excessive decrease in the protein content and the degradation of lipids as a result of lipid peroxidation. In addition, radiation changed the secondary structure of proteins and the status of packing of membrane lipid head groups. Furthermore, it caused a decrease in lipid order and an increase in membrane fluidity. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited all the radiation-induced alterations in brain homogenate membranes. The results revealed that whole body ionizing radiation at a sublethal dose causes significant alterations in the structure, composition and dynamics of brain homogenate membranes and amifostine has a protective effect on these membranes.

  15. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants to low-let ionizing radiation: Growth and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Aronne, G.; Pugliese, M.; Virzo De Santo, A.; De Maio, A.

    2013-10-01

    The scenarios for the long-term habitation of space platforms and planetary stations involve plants as fundamental part of Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) to support the crew needs. Several constraints may limit plant growth in space: among them ionizing radiation is recognized to severely affect plant cell at morphological, physiological and biochemical level. In this work, plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were subjected to four different doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50 and 100 Gy) in order to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on this species and to analyze possible mechanisms carried out to overcome the radiation injuries. The effects of X-rays on plant growth were assessed by measuring stem elongation, number of internodes and leaf dry weight. The integrity of photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by photosynthetic pigment composition and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, whereas changes in total antioxidant pool and glutathione S transferase activity (GST) were utilized as markers of oxidative stress. The distribution of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues as natural shielding against radiation was also determined. Irradiation of plants at 0.3 and 10 Gy did not determine differences in all considered parameters as compared to control. On the contrary, at 50 and 100 Gy a reduction of plant growth and a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, as well as an increase in phenolic compounds and a decrease in total antioxidant content and GST activity were found. Only a slight reduction of Rubisco activity in leaves irradiated at 50 and 100 Gy was found. The overall results indicate P. vulgaris as a species with a good potential to face ionizing radiation and suggest its suitability for utilization in BLSSs.

  16. Ionizing radiation effects on the matter and its applications in research and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D. F. (Mexico); Martinez B, G. [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Km. 12 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, San Cayetano 50200, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation as alpha and beta particles, electron accelerated, neutron particle, and X-rays and photons with relative high energy, as an useful radiation tool for many applications. the last two kind radiations are know as electromagnetic radiation. The radiation effects on the matter are well know that produces about fourteen processes during interaction with solids, aqueous solution and gases. In applications, commonly it depends of the nature and interest on the material samples that their characteristics can modify with the energy deposited on them. This part is devoted to more important effects produced by ionizing radiation with the matter and talk about the wide range applications recently; crystals radiation detectors and for application in medicine, detection of foodstuffs irradiated for preservation, and the application of ionizing radiation on polymeric materials. (Author)

  17. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Mi Joo

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells, mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13, and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  18. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hae Mi; Kang, Su Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general

  20. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ragon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in

  1. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    cellular damge caused by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Deinococcus radiodurans; Lactobacillus plantarurn; cyanobacteria ; radiation...6 3. K. S. Makarova and MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria. Bacterial Stress Responses...In Press) Abstract | The prospect of comparative genomics resolving the seemingly paradoxical mechanism of extreme radiation resistance in

  2. c-jun gene expression in human cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Horio, M.; Huberman, E.

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and protein kinase C (PKC) in radiation- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-evoked c-jun gene expression in human HL-205 cells. This induction of c-jun gene expression could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with Nacetylcysteine (an antioxidant) or H7 (a PKC and PKA inhibitor) but not by HA1004, a PKA inhibitor, suggesting a role for ROls and PKC in mediating c-jun gene expression. We also investigated potential differences in c-jun gene expression in a panel of normal and tumor cells untreated or treated with ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Treatment with radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced a varied response, from some reduction to an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA. These data indicate that although induction of c-jun may be a common response to ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, this response was reduced or absent in some cell types.

  3. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: an FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Gulgun; Miller, Lisa M; Zorlu, Faruk; Severcan, Feride

    2012-04-15

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH(2) groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH(3) groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  5. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-14

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  6. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  7. Ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response in fibroblasts under both monolayer and 3-dimensional conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinlong; Zhong, Rui; Sun, Liguang; Jia, Jie; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the adaptive response (AR) induced by ionizing radiation in human fibroblasts under monolayer and 3-dimensional (3-D) condition. Three kinds of fibroblasts were cultured under both monolayer and 3-D condition. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the γ-H2AX foci and the morphological texture. Trypan blue staining was used to detect the cell death. Western blot was used to detect the expressions of γ-H2AX, p53 and CDKN1A/p21 (p21). We found that DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner after high doses of radiation. When cells were pretreated with a priming low dose of radiation followed by high dose radiation, DNA damage was attenuated under both monolayer and 3-D condition, and the adaptive response (AR) was induced. Additionally, the morphology of cells under monolayer and 3-D conditions were different, and radiation also induced AR according to morphological texture analysis. Priming low dose radiation induced AR both under monolayer and 3-D condition. Interestingly, 3-D microenvironment made cells more sensitive to radiation. The expression of p53 and p21 was changed and indicated that they might participate in the regulation of AR.

  8. Ionizing radiation effects on food vitamins: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Dionísio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been widely used in industrial processes, especially in the sterilization of medicals, pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products, and in food processing. Similar to other techniques of food processing, irradiation can induce certain alterations that can modify both the chemical composition and the nutritional value of foods. These changes depend on the food composition, the irradiation dose and factors such as temperature and presence or absence of oxygen in the irradiating environment. The sensitivity of vitamins to radiation is unpredictable and food vitamin losses during the irradiation are often substantial. The aim of this study was to discuss retention or loss of vitamins in several food products submitted to an irradiation process.Assim como outras técnicas de processamento de alimentos, a irradiação induz certas alterações, que podem modificar a composição química e o valor nutritivo dos alimentos. A natureza e extensão destas mudanças dependem essencialmente da composição do alimento, da dose de irradiação e de fatores tais como a temperatura e a presença ou ausência do oxigênio do ar. Enquanto que algumas vitaminas, como a riboflavina, niacina e vitamina D são bastante estáveis, outras, como a tiamina e vitaminas A e E, são relativamente lábeis. O objetivo da presente revisão foi discutir as prováveis perdas de vitaminas de diversos produtos submetidos ao processo de irradiação.

  9. Response of hematopoietic stem cells to ionizing radiation; Reponse des cellules souches hematopoitiques aux radiations ionisantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonnet, A

    2008-12-15

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood and immune system throughout life and restore them after hematological injuries. Exposure of an organism to ionizing radiation (IR) causes rapid and acute myelosuppression and challenges the replenishment capacity of HSCs. Yet, the precise damages that are generated remain largely unexplored. To better understand these effects, phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartments of sublethally irradiated mice were monitored over a ten week period after radiation exposure. We report that shortly after sublethal IR-exposure, HSCs, defined by their repopulating ability, still segregate in the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP); yet, their Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels are increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SP{sup SK} cells positive for established indicators of HSC presence: CD150{sup +} and CD105{sup +}. A great proportion of HSCs quickly but transiently enter the cell cycle to replenish the bone marrow of myelo-ablated mice. Ten weeks after, whereas bone marrow cellularity has recovered and hematopoietic homeostasis is restored, major phenotypic modifications can be observed within the Lin{sup -/low} Sca-1{sup +} c-Kit{sup +} (LSK) stem/progenitor compartment: CD150{sup +}/Flk2{sup -} and CD150{sup -}/Flk2{sup +} LSK cell frequencies are increased and dramatically reduced, respectively. CD150{sup +} LSK cells also show impaired reconstitution capacity, accrued number of {gamma}-H2AX foci and increased tendency to apoptosis. This demonstrates that the LSK compartment is not properly restored 10 weeks after sublethal exposure, and that long-term IR-induced injury to the bone marrow proceeds, at least partially, through direct damage to the stem cell pool. Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been shown to promote the survival of lethally irradiated mice when administrated quickly after exposure. We investigated the mechanisms underlying

  10. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization.

  11. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles in hydrogels crosslinked by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara, Maria Tania S.; Oliani, Washington L.; Brant, Antonio J.C.; Oliveira, Maria Jose A. de; Riella, Humberto Gracher; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: maratalcantara@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which exhibits the ability to swell and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure without dissolving the polymeric network. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in a range of medicinal products based on hydrogels and diverse other products due to their antibacterial properties at low concentrations. The use of ionizing radiation in the production process of hydrogels of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in aqueous solutions enables the crosslinking of their polymer chains. If polymer solutions contain Ag{sup +} ions, these can be reduced radiolytically to nanocrystalline silver. The objective of this study was to investigate the reduction of Ag{sup +} ions by gamma-irradiation for the synthesis of AgNPs in hydrogels of PVA and PVP as main polymers and to make a comparison of the performance of the two polymeric matrices, chiefly focusing on the effect of the AgNPs' synthesis on the crosslinking of both polymers. The properties of the hydrogel matrices obtained were evaluated from tests of gel fraction, swelling in water, and stress-strain. The results of mechanical properties of PVA matrix were higher than those of PVP one whereas the latter exhibited a higher swelling degree. The reduction of silver ions was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectrum, whose characteristics also indicated the formation of silver nanoparticles in both arrays. (author)

  12. Coupling the emission of ionizing radiation and Lyman alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The class of objects that reionized intergalactic hydrogen remains an observational and theoretical problem that is in contention for being the most prominent puzzle piece in contemporary astrophysics. The current consensus - determined almost entirely by ruling out bright active galaxies - is that the process was possibly begun and almost certainly finished by faint, lower-mass galaxies forming their early generations of stars. Recent observations of z 3 galaxies may even have identified the analog populations.However understanding how the emitted ionizing power of galaxies is causally related to their {robustly determined} physical properties is not a study that can be performed at high-z: neither the spatial information nor the standard multi-wavelength diagnostics are available. Moreover, on a case-by-case basis, the intervening IGM absorption is impossible to determine. These considerations have spawned a number of detailed studies with UV space telescopes, the synthesis of which however is that a characteristic population of Lyman continuum {LyC} emitting objects has not yet been identified. We show in this proposal that we have identified a characteristic trait in galaxy spectra that is highly indicative of LyC emission, by combining {a} high-z phenomenological studies, {b} new high-resolution UV spectra of local galaxies, and {c} sophisticated models of radiation transport. Believing that we have determined the signature, we propose to test the new hypothesis with deep spectroscopic observations with HST/COS under the Cycle 21 UV initiative.

  13. Chromatin Modifications and the DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tej K Pandita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: 1 non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and 2 homologous recombination (HR, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but posttranslational modification (PTMs of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modification by t

  14. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response. PMID:23346550

  15. MicroRNAs, cancer and ionizing radiation: Where are we?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nader Marta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary The aim of this study is to describe the biogenesis of microRNA, its relations with carcinogenesis, and the correlation between microRNA and ionizing radiation (IR, focusing on radioresponsiveness. It is known that microRNA biogenesis is well established and involves different enzymatic cleavages, resulting in the production of mature microRNA. MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis. Their interaction is related to the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with activation of proto-oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Several studies have shown that the levels of expression of some microRNAs vary significantly after irradiation. There are evidences that microRNAs can influence cellular response after IR. In addition, microRNAs are related to modulation of the expression of several post-transcriptional targets in DNA damage response pathways, and to the DNA damage repair regulation mechanism. Future studies can clarify a possible clinical use of microRNAs as a new class of radiosensitive agents.

  16. Compensation for damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Sobehart, L J

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the possibility to establish a scheme to compensate damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina for those cases in which it is possible to assume that the exposure to ionizing radiation is the cause of the cancer suffered by the worker. The proposed scheme is based on the recommendations set out in the 'International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection: Protecting Workers against Exposure to Ionization Radiation, held in Geneva, Switzerland, August 26-30, 2002. To this end, the study analyzes the present state of scientific knowledge on cancer causation due to genotoxic factors, and the accepted form of the doses-response curve, for the human beings exposure to ionization radiation at low doses with low doses rates. Finally, the labor laws and regulations related to damage compensation; in particular the present Argentine Labor Law; the National Russian Federal Occupational Radiological Health Impairment and Workmen Compensation, t...

  17. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  18. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiina Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  19. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  20. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  1. High-throughput identification of ionizing radiation-sensitive plant genes and development of radiation indicator plant and radiation sensing Genechip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Jinbaek; Ha, Bokeun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sunhee

    2013-05-15

    Physiological analysis of monocot model plant (rice) in response to ionizing radiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - Identification of antioxidant characters through cytochemical analysis. - Comparison of antioxidant activities in response to ionizing irradiation. - Evaluation of anthocyanin quantity in response to ionizing irradiation. Ionization energy response gene family analysis via bioinformatic validation. - Expression analysis of monocot and dicot gene families. - In silico and bioinformatic approach to elucidate gene function. Characterization and functional analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing irradiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - High throughput trancriptomic analysis of plants under ionizing radiation using microarray. - Promotor and cis-element analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing radiation. - Validation and function analysis of candidate genes. - Elucidation of plant mechanism of sensing and response to ionization energy. Development of bioindicator plants detecting ionization energy. - Cloning and identification of 'Radio marker genes (RMG)'. - Development of Over-expression (O/E) or Knock-out (K/O) plant using RMG. Development of Genechip as an ionization energy detector. - Expression profiling analysis of genes specifically expression in response to ionization energy. - Prepare high-conserved gene specific oligomer. - Development of ionization energy monitoring Genechip and application.

  2. Cell-density dependent effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Sarimov, R M; Belyaev, I Ya

    2003-01-01

    The changes in genome conformational state (GCS) induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in E. coli cells were measured by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in cellular lysates. Effects of X-rays at doses 0.1 cGy--1 Gy depended on post-irradiation time. Significant relaxation of DNA loops followed by a decrease in AVTD. The time of maximum relaxation was between 5-80 min depending on the dose of irradiation. U-shaped dose response was observed with increase of AVTD in the range of 0.1-4 Gy and decrease in AVTD at higher doses. No such increase in AVTD was seen upon irradiation of cells at the beginning of cell lysis while the AVTD decrease was the same. Significant differences in the effects of X-rays and gamma-rays at the same doses were observed suggesting a strong dependence of low-dose effects on LET. Effects of 0.01 cGy gamma-rays were studied at different cell densities during irradiation. We show that the radiation-induced changes in GCS lasted longer at higher cell density as compared to lower cell density. Only small amount of cells were hit at this dose and the data suggest cell-to-cell communication in response to low-dose ionizing radiation. This prolonged effect was also observed when cells were irradiated at high cell density and diluted to low cell density immediately after irradiation. These data suggest that cell-to-cell communication occur during irradiation or within 3 min post-irradiation. The cell-density dependent response to low-dose ionizing radiation was compared with previously reported data on exposure of E. coli cells to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency and extremely high frequency (millimeter waves). The body of our data show that cells can communicate in response to electromagnetic fields and ionizing radiation, presumably by reemission of secondary photons in infrared-submillimeter frequency range.

  3. Metallothionein induction in human CNS in vitro: neuroprotection from ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L; Cherian, M G; Iskander, S; Leblanc, M; Hammond, R R

    2000-07-01

    There have been extensive studies on the regulation of metallothionein (MT) synthesis, and its biological role in liver and kidney. Although there are few reports on brain MT, there is a growing interest in the role of MT in brain. There have been no publications to date on MT synthesis in the human central nervous system (CNS) following exposure to ionizing radiation. In the present study, primary human CNS cultures were used to examine the effect of ionizing radiation on MT mRNA and protein synthesis. In the same cultures, the neuroprotective effects of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd)-induced MT synthesis from high-dose radiation were also examined. Primary, serum-free, human CNS cultures were exposed to 30 or 60 Gy gamma-rays. The total MT protein was then measured by a Cd-heme assay, and mRNA for MT-II and MT-III was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cytotoxicity was measured by LDH release and apoptotic cell death by DNA fragmentation analysis. Sublethal neuroglial injury was assessed morphologically using specific astrocytic (glial fibrillary acidic protein--GFAP) and neuronal (microtubule-associated protein 2--MAP2) immunohistochemical markers. The total MT protein content was increased 12h after exposure to 30Gy. The increase in MT content in response to 60Gy was not statistically significant. MT-II mRNA levels increased at 3 and 6h after exposure to 30Gy gamma-rays, with a maximum expression at 12-24 h. MT-III mRNA was not significantly affected. Exposure to 60 Gy, but not 30 Gy, caused a marked increase in LDH release. Cells exposed to 30 Gy or less showed some apoptotic cell death by DNA fragmentation analysis, while exposure to 60 Gy resulted in a DNA smear confirmed by LDH assays. Preinduction of MT by 5 microM Cd or 100 microM Zn resulted in a significant reduction in radiation-induced LDH release. Morphological evaluations revealed that Cd or Zn preincubation led to relative preservation of MAP2 staining and GFAP. Both

  4. A History of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repacholi, M H

    2017-10-01

    Concern about health risks from exposure to non-ionizing radiation (NIR) commenced in the 1950s after tracking radars were first introduced during the Second World War. Soon after, research on possible biological effects of microwave radiation in the former Soviet Union and the U.S. led to public and worker exposure limits being much lower in Eastern European than in Western countries, mainly because of different protection philosophies. As public concern increased, national authorities began introducing legislation to limit NIR exposures from domestic microwave ovens and workplace devices such as visual display units. The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) was formed in 1966 to represent national radiation protection societies. To address NIR protection issues, IRPA established a Working Group in 1974, then a Study Group in 1975, and finally the International NIR Committee (INIRC) in 1977. INIRC's publications quickly became accepted worldwide, and it was logical that it should become an independent commission. IRPA finally established the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), chartering its remit in 1992, and defining NIR as electromagnetic radiation (ultraviolet, visible, infrared), electromagnetic waves and fields, and infra- and ultrasound. ICNIRP's guidelines have been incorporated into legislation or adopted as standards in many countries. While ICNIRP has been subjected to criticism and close scrutiny by the public, media, and activists, it has continued to issue well-received, independent, science-based protection advice. This paper summarizes events leading to the formation of ICNIRP, its key activities up to 2017, ICNIRP's 25th anniversary year, and its future challenges.

  5. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  6. Cytogenetic and hormonal studies of persons occupationally irradiated with ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, B.; Maleeva, A.; Praskova, L.; Mileva, M.; Bulanova, M.

    1979-01-01

    Cytogenetic and hormonal investigations were carried out on 23 subjects working in the sphere of ionizing radiation at medical institutions. Statistically significant differences in number of chromosomal aberrations were found between medical personnel and the general public, and in the group of personnel with more than 10 years of service. Futhermore, among the medical personnel, a statistically significant decrease was found in the level of sex hormones in blood plasma. Plasma cortisol levels were increased in all subjects examined whereas aldosterone levels were normal in subjcts with a length of service to 10 years and were lower in those with a length of service over 10 years.

  7. Mars Radiation Risk Assessment and Shielding Design for Long-term Exposure to Ionizing Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Nealy, John E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is now focused on the agency's vision for space exploration encompassing a broad range of human and robotic missions including missions to Moon, Mars and beyond. As a result, there is a focus on long duration space missions. NASA is committed to the safety of the missions and the crew, and there is an overwhelming emphasis on the reliability issues for space missions and the habitat. The cost-effective design of the spacecraft demands a very stringent requirement on the optimization process. Exposure from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space and/or long duration missions is a critical design constraint and a potential 'show stopper'. Thus, protection from the hazards of severe space radiation is of paramount importance to the agency's vision. It is envisioned to have long duration human presence on the Moon for deep space exploration. The exposures from ionizing radiation - galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events - and optimized shield design for a swing-by and a long duration Mars mission have been investigated. It is found that the technology of today is inadequate for safe human missions to Mars, and revolutionary technologies need to be developed for long duration and/or deep space missions. The study will provide a guideline for radiation exposure and protection for long duration missions and career astronauts and their safety.

  8. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sherin T; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Biological dosimetry using chromosome aberration analyses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is suitable and useful tool for estimating the dose when a nuclear or radiological emergency is investigated. Blood samples from five healthy donors were obtained to establish dose-response calibration curves for chromosomal aberrations after exposure to ionizing radiation. In this work, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. In a total of 21,688 analyzed metaphase spreads, 10,969 dicentric chromosomes, 563 centric rings and 11,364 acentric chromosomes were found. The number of metaphase cells decreased with increasing radiation dose. The centric rings were not found in the non-irradiated control. There was no relationship between radiation dose and acentric ring induction. The frequency of total MN increased in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison with the control value, MN increased about 9, 32, 75, 87, and 52 fold higher after treatment with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy, respectively. The results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosomal aberrations, both in dicentric and in micronuclei analyses increased with increasing radiation dose. PMID:28217281

  10. Ionizing radiation and the risk of brain and central nervous system tumors: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braganza, Melissa Z; Kitahara, Cari M; Berrington de González, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Johnson, Kimberly J; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Although exposure to moderate-to-high doses of ionizing radiation is the only established environmental risk factor for brain and CNS tumors, it is not clear whether this relationship differs across...

  11. Ecological effects of various toxic agents on the aquatic microcosm in comparison with acute ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuma, S. E-mail: fuma@nirs.go.jp; Ishii, N.; Takeda, H.; Miyamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Ichimasa, Y.; Saito, M.; Kawabata, Z.; Polikarpov, G.G

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the effect levels of various toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation for the experimental model ecosystem, i.e., microcosm mimicking aquatic microbial communities. For this purpose, the authors used the microcosm consisting of populations of the flagellate alga Euglena gracilis as a producer, the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as a consumer and the bacterium Escherichia coli as a decomposer. Effects of aluminum and copper on the microcosm were investigated in this study, while effects of {gamma}-rays, ultraviolet radiation, acidification, manganese, nickel and gadolinium were reported in previous studies. The microcosm could detect not only the direct effects of these agents but also the community-level effects due to the interspecies interactions or the interactions between organisms and toxic agents. The authors evaluated doses or concentrations of each toxic agent which had the following effects on the microcosm: (1) no effects; (2) recognizable effects, i.e., decrease or increase in the cell densities of at least one species; (3) severe effects, i.e., extinction of one or two species; and (4) destructive effects, i.e., extinction of all species. The resulting effects data will contribute to an ecological risk assessment of the toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation.

  12. Hematological Changes Induced by Mercury Ions and Ionizing Radiation in Experimental Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Choi, Dae-Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hyang [Biotechnology Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cebulska-Wasilewska, Antonina [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Toxic metals such as lead, chromium, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Mercury, one of the most diffused and hazardous organ specific environmental contaminants, exists in a wide variety of physical and chemical states, each of which has unique characteristics for a target organ specificity. Although reports indicate that mercury induces deleterious damage, little is known about its effects on living organisms. Ionizing radiation, an extensively used therapeutic modality in oncology, not only eradicates neoplastic cells but also generates inevitable side effects for normal tissues. Such biological effects are made through the production of reactive oxygen species which include a superoxide anion, a hydroxyl radical and a hydrogen peroxide. These reactive species may contribute to the radiation-induced cytotoxicity (e.g., chromosome aberrations, protein oxidation, and muscle injury) and to the metabolic and morphologic changes (e.g., increased muscle proteolysis and changes in the central nervous system) in animals and humans. In the present study, radioimmunoassay of the cortisol in the serum and the analysis of the hematological components and enzymes related to a tissue injury were carried out to evaluate the effects of mercury chloride in comparison with those of ionizing radiation.

  13. The structure of radiative shock waves. III. The model grid for partially ionized hydrogen gas

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyev, Y A; Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2001-01-01

    The grid of the models of radiative shock waves propagating through partially ionized hydrogen gas with temperature 3000K <= T_1 <= 8000K and density 10^{-12} gm/cm^3 <= \\rho_1 <= 10^{-9}gm/cm^3 is computed for shock velocities 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 90 km/s. The fraction of the total energy of the shock wave irreversibly lost due to radiation flux ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 for 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 70 km/s. The postshock gas is compressed mostly due to radiative cooling in the hydrogen recombination zone and final compression ratios are within 1 <\\rho_N/\\rho_1 \\lesssim 10^2, depending mostly on the shock velocity U_1. The preshock gas temperature affects the shock wave structure due to the equilibrium ionization of the unperturbed hydrogen gas, since the rates of postshock relaxation processes are very sensitive to the number density of hydrogen ions ahead the discontinuous jump. Both the increase of the preshock gas temperature and the decrease of the preshock gas density lead to lower postsh...

  14. Influence of ionizing radiation on nucleus 24 cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenzner, T; Knapp, F; Röhner, F; von Wallenberg, E; Mauch, H; Pedersen, P; Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Lutterbach, J

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of conventional or hyperfractionated radiotherapy on Nucleus CI24M or CI24R(CS) implant systems. As a consequence of more than 70,000 cochlear implant recipients worldwide, the potential need for radiotherapy is an issue requiring consideration by both implantees and implantation centers. Conditions requiring radiotherapy of the head may include head, neck, or brain tumors. The study examines the effect of ionizing radiation on cochlear implant function. The implanted devices examined were the Nucleus CI24M and Nucleus CI24R(CS). In a modeled study, two implants of each type were treated with fraction schemes most frequently used in clinical routine (e.g., conventional fractionation [total dose, 120 Gy] and hyperfractionation [total dose, 116 Gy]). Parameters quantified were the implant output amplitude changes at high and low current level (current levels 255 and 100, respectively), the charge balance of the biphasic pulse, and the accuracy of the impedance telemetry function. Within the clinically relevant dose range (< 80 Gy), implant function in all four devices was normal. Failure occurred in one Nucleus CI24R(CS) device treated with hyperfractionation. A dramatic drop in the output amplitude at 106 Gy was observed, and the impedance measurement failed at a total dose of 111 Gy. The results suggest that conventional or hyperfractionated radiotherapy can be applied safely at Nucleus CI24M or CI24R(CS) implant systems in a patient-like setting. Therefore, the authors propose that the results of the study can be applicable in clinical practice.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  16. Ionizing radiation post-curing of objects produced by stereolithography and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David H.; Eberle, Claude C.; Janke, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    An object comprised of a curable material and formed by stereolithography or another three-dimensional prototyping method, in which the object has undergone initial curing, is subjected to post-curing by ionizing radiation, such as an electron beam having a predetermined beam output energy, which is applied in a predetermined dosage and at a predetermined dose rate. The post-cured object exhibits a property profile which is superior to that which existed prior to the ionizing radiation post-curing.

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on transcription of colorectal cancer MDR1 gene of HCT-8 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Li; Lin Ma; Jing Lu; Li-Xia Kong; Xiao-Hua Long; Su-Huan Liao; Bao-Rong Chi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To discuss effect of ionizing radiation on transcription of colorectal cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) 1 gene of HCT-8 cells. Methods: Total RNA was extracted by guanidine thiocyanate one-step method. Northern blot was applied to detect transcription level of MDR1 gene. The expression of P-gp protein was detected by flow cytometry. Results: The expression of MDR1 of normal colorectal cancer HCT-8 cells was low. It was increased by 8.35 times under stimulus with 2 Gy. When treated with low doses in advance, high expressed MDR was decreased significantly under 0.05, 0.1 Gy, which was 69.00%, 62.89% in 2 Gy group and 5.77 times, 5.25 times in sham irradiation group. No obvious difference was detected between (0.2+2) Gy group and 2 Gy group. Compared with sham irradiation group, the percentage of P-gp positive cells after radiation of a high 2 Gy dose was increased significantly (P<0.01). When treated with high radiation dose following low radiation dose (0.05 Gy, 0.1 Gy) in advance, the percentage of P-gp positive cells were also increased significantly. The percentage of P-gp positive cells were increased obviously in 0.2 Gy and 2 Gy groups. Compared with simple high radiation 2 Gy group, the percentage of P-gp positive cells was decreased significantly (P<0.05). Conclusions:Low radiation dose can reverse multidrug resistance of colorectal cancer cells caused by high radiation dose.

  18. DUAL THEORY OF ACTION IONIZING RADIATION AND SPONTANEOUS CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Gubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for radiogenic increasing of mortality was proposed, taking into account spontaneous background damages of the genetic material, that always occur in cells due to the influence of non-radiation internal and environmental factors. The model is based on the representation of indistinguishability between radiogenic andspontaneous cancers and on the postulates of the Kellerer-Rossi dual action theory. It was proposed that duringformation of premalignant damages dual interactions occur both between primary radiation damages, and betweenradiation and spontaneous primary damages (hybrid interactions. The role of the latter is particularly important at low levels exposure that corresponds to a linear dependence of cancer incidence on dose. Their significance is indicated by the following factor: at the adopted value of the nominal (radiation risk factor (0,05 Sv-1 and cancer mortality share among the population (0,15–0,2, the contribution of non-radiative carcinogenic factors for the total life is equivalent to radiation dose of 3–4 Sv or radiation at a constant dose rate of 40–50 mSv / year.The model assumes formation in DNA of both spaced apart (single damages with high probability of recovery, and nearby (double damages, which are more likely to interact, entering into the permanent state. Permanent damages being formed in certain portions of DNA can be inherited to daughter cells as premalignant defects. The relative role of spontaneous primary damages is greater the more single damages are formed as compared to double ones within the area of potential interaction.It was shown within this model that the presence of background cancer mortality for initial and finite population in the used by ICRP expression for interpopulation risk transfer has logical and biophysical justifications. Accounting of spontaneous primary damages and hybrid interactions enhances the capabilities for development of radiation risk models.

  19. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  20. Ionizing radiation induces astrocyte gliosis through microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, So-Young; Jung, Jae-Seob; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Oh, Eok-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Ji, Kyung-Ae; Joe, Eun-Hye; Cho, Kwan-Ho; Han, Inn-Oc

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of microglia in radiation-induced astrocyte gliosis. We found that a single dose of 15 Gy radiation to a whole rat brain increased immunostaining of glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes 6 h later, and even more so 24 h later, indicating the initiation of gliosis. While irradiation of cultured rat astrocytes had little effect, irradiation of microglia-astrocyte mixed-cultures displayed altered astrocyte phenotype into more processed, which is another characteristic of gliosis. Experiments using microglia-conditioned media indicated this astrocyte change was due to factors released from irradiated microglia. Irradiation of cultured mouse microglial cells induced a dose-dependent increase in mRNA levels for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, which are usually associated with microglia activation. Consistent with these findings, irradiation of microglia activated NF-kappaB, a transcription factor that regulates microglial activation. Addition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2: a metabolic product of the COX-2 enzyme) to primary cultured rat astrocytes resulted in phenotypic changes similar to those observed in mixed-culture experiments. Therefore, it appears that PGE(2) released from irradiated microglia is a key mediator of irradiation-induced gliosis or astrocyte phenotype change. These data suggest that radiation-induced microglial activation and resultant production of PGE2 seems to be associated with an underlying cause of inflammatory complications associated with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas.

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in lyophilized or frozen demineralized human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antebi, Uri; Mathor, Monica Beatriz; da Silva, André Ferreira; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to study the effects of application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electrons) as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, on lyophilized or frozen demineralized bone tissue for use in transplants. Methods Five human femoral diaphyses from different donors of musculoskeletal tissue were demineralized and preserved as lyophilized or frozen at −80 °C. The samples were divided into two groups: non-irradiated (control) and irradiated by means of gamma rays or an electron beam. The bone proteins were extracted and used to determine the concentrations of total protein and BMP 2 and 7. Results Decreases in total protein and BMP 2 and 7 concentrations were observed. The decreases in total protein concentrations, in comparison with the respective control groups, were significant in the lyophilized and frozen samples that were irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy of gamma radiation and electron beam, with reductions of more than 30%. Significant decreases in the levels of BMP 2 and 7 were also observed at higher doses and especially through use of the electron beam. Conclusion The reductions in the concentrations of total proteins and osteoinductive proteins (BMP 2 and 7) were related to the radiation dose, i.e. they increased with higher doses of ionizing radiation type and the type of bone preservation. The largest reductions in concentrations were observed in the bones irradiated by means of an electron beam and at a dose of 50 kGy. However, this type of radiation and this high dose are not usual practices for sterilization of bone tissue. PMID:27069893

  2. Applications of the interaction of the radiations ionizations with the matter in medicine and industry.

    CERN Document Server

    Fornaro, L

    2000-01-01

    When the ionizing radiation interact with the matter different effects happen on the radiations and on the matter. Many of these effects have been used with very different ends giving place to applications in several fields, among those that stand out the applications in medicine and industry. Basically, two different dispositions exist: one in that the radiation crosses or retrodisperse in the material and another in that the radiation acts on and it modifies the material.

  3. Human exposition to non ionizing electromagnetic radiations. Legislation and base stations measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Alonso Alonso

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals about measurement procedures of non-ionizing radiations and their recorded levels in practice. The analyzed radiation sources cover the most common broadcasting media such as AM and FM transmissions and the GSM mobile telephony base stations. These sources currently radiate locations with high density of population. Spanish radiation level regulations are briefly described and some possible improvements are pointed out. The measurement results are discussed.

  4. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  5. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masao S; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-05-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the 'integrate-and-fire' algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (i) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (ii) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to (239)Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation-environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking.

  6. A Therapeutic Role for Survivin in Mitigating the Harmful Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine H. Carruthers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radiation therapy is a form of adjuvant care used in many oncological treatment protocols. However, nonmalignant neighboring tissues are harmed as a result of this treatment. Therefore, the goal of this study was to induce the production of survivin, an antiapoptotic protein, to determine if this protein could provide protection to noncancerous cells during radiation exposure. Methods. Using a murine model, a recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV was used to deliver survivin to the treatment group and yellow fluorescence protein (YFP to the control group. Both groups received targeted radiation. Visual inspection, gait analysis, and tissue histology were used to determine the extent of damage caused by the radiation. Results. The YFP group demonstrated ulceration of the irradiated area while the survivin treated mice exhibited only hair loss. Histology showed that the YFP treated mice experienced dermal thickening, as well as an increase in collagen that was not present in the survivin treated mice. Gait analysis demonstrated a difference between the two groups, with the YFP mice averaging a lower speed. Conclusions. The use of gene-modification to induce survivin expression in normal tissues allows for the protection of nontarget areas from the negative side effects normally associated with ionizing radiation.

  7. Ionizing radiation selectively reduces skin regulatory T cells and alters immune function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    Full Text Available The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel.

  8. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  9. Comparison of the ionizing radiation effects on cochineal, annatto and turmeric natural dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Helio M.; Takinami, Patricia Y. I.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2016-07-01

    As studies on radiation stability of food dyes are scarce, commercially important natural food grade dyes were evaluated in terms of their sensitivity against gamma ionizing radiation. Cochineal, annatto and turmeric dyes with suitable concentrations were subjected to increasing doses up to 32 kGy and analyzed by spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis. The results showed different pattern of absorbance versus absorbed dose for the three systems. Carmine, the glucosidal coloring matter from the scale insect Coccus cacti L., Homoptera (cochineal) remained almost unaffected by radiation up to doses of about 32 kGy (absorbance at 494 nm). Meanwhile, at that dose, a plant-derived product annatto or urucum (Bixa orellana L.) tincture presented a nearly 58% reduction in color intensity. Tincture of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) the active ingredient in the eastern spice turmeric (Curcuma longa) showed to be highly sensitive to radiation when diluted. These data shall be taken in account whenever food products containing these food colors were going to undergo radiation processing.

  10. Possible interaction between ionizing radiation, smoking, and gender in the causation of meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint-Richter, Pazit; Mandelzweig, Lori; Oberman, Bernice; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2011-03-01

    Data on the association between smoking and meningioma are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the role of smoking in radiation- and non-radiation-related meningiomas. The study was designed as a 4-group case-control study, balanced for irradiation, including 160 irradiated meningioma case patients, 145 irradiated control subjects, 82 nonirradiated case patients, and 135 nonirradiated control subjects. The sources of these groups included a cohort of individuals who underwent radiotherapy (mean dose, 1.5 Gy to the brain) during childhood for treatment of tinea capitis, claims filed for radiation damage in the framework of a compensation law, and the Israel Cancer Registry. All tests of statistical significance were 2-sided. A statistically significantly elevated risk of meningioma was found among men who had ever smoked, compared with those who were never smokers (odds ratio [OR], 2.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-4.15), increasing with smoking pack-years from 1.67 to 2.69 for 20 pack-years, respectively. Among women, an interaction between radiation and smoking was observed, expressed by a significant protective effect for meningioma (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.14-0.77), with a strong dose-response association (P effects of distinct host factors, such as past exposure to ionizing radiation and/or hormonal factors.

  11. Candidate gene biodosimeters of mice and human exposure to ionizing radiation by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Rezaeejam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR is essential for the development of predictive markers useful for assessing human exposure. Biological markers of exposure to IR in human populations are of great interest for assessing normal tissue injury in radiation oncology and for biodosimetry in nuclear incidents and accidental radiation exposures. Traditional radiation exposure biomarkers based on cytogenetic assays (biodosimetry, are time-consuming and do not provide results fast enough and requires highly trained personnel for scoring. Hence, the development of rapid biodosimetry methods is one of the highest priorities. Exposure of cells to IR activates multiple signal transduction pathways, which result in complex alterations in gene-expression. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become the benchmark for the detection and quantification of RNA targets and is being utilized increasingly in monitoring the specific genes with more accurately and sensitively. This review evaluates the RT-qPCR as a biodosimetry method and we investigated the papers from 2000 up to now, which identified the genes-expression related the DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis induced by ionization radiation in peripheral blood and determined as biodosimeters. In conclusion, it could be say that RT-qPCR technique for determining the specific genes as biodosimeters could be a fully quantitative reliable and sensitive method. Furthermore, the results of the current review will help the researchers to recognize the most expressed genes induced by ionization radiation.

  12. Responses to low doses of ionizing radiation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A

    2004-07-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems.To examine tissue effects specific for low-dose radiation, (1) absorbed dose in tissue is replaced by the sum of the energies deposited by each track event, or hit, in a cell-equivalent tissue micromass (1 ng) in all micromasses exposed, that is, by the mean energy delivered by all microdose hits in the exposed micromasses, with cell dose expressing the total energy per micromass from multiple microdoses; and (2) tissue effects are related to cell damage and protective cellular responses per average microdose hit from a given radiation quality for all such hits in the exposed micromasses.The probability of immediate DNA damage per low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) average micro-dose hit is extremely small, increasing over a certain dose range in proportion to the number of hits. Delayed temporary adaptive protection (AP) involves (a) induced detoxification of reactive oxygen species, (b) enhanced rate of DNA repair, (c) induced removal of damaged cells by apoptosis followed by normal cell replacement and by cell differentiation, and (d) stimulated immune response, all with corresponding changes in gene expression. These AP categories may last from less than a day to weeks and be tested by cell responses against renewed irradiation. They operate physiologically against nonradiogenic, largely endogenous DNA damage, which occurs abundantly and continually. Background radiation damage caused by rare microdose hits per micromass is many orders of magnitude less frequent. Except for apoptosis, AP increasingly fails above about 200 mGy of low-LET radiation, corresponding to about 200 microdose hits per exposed micromass. This ratio appears to exceed approximately

  13. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-Carboxamide Riboside Enhances Effect of Ionizing Radiation in PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isebaert, Sofie F., E-mail: sofie.isebaert@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Swinnen, Johannes V. [Department of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Begg, Adrian C. [Division of Experimental Therapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The nucleoside 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) is a low-energy mimetic and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist that can affect the phenotype of malignant cells by diminishing their anabolism. It does this by being converted to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (ZMP), an AMP analog. We combined this promising antineoplastic agent with ionizing radiation in an attempt to increase its efficacy. Methods and Materials: The effect of AICAR on cell proliferation, cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species production, radiosensitivity, and AMPK activation was determined in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. To elucidate the radiosensitizing mechanism, clonogenic survival assays in the presence of a drug agonist or antagonist or with small interfering RNA targeting AMPK were done, as well as measurements of ZMP production and double strand break repair. Moreover, immunoblot analysis of the radiation response signaling pathways after AICAR treatment was performed. Results: The incubation of human PC3 prostate cancer cells with AICAR-activated AMPK inhibited cell proliferation, decreased viability, increased apoptosis, and generated reactive oxygen species in a dose- and time-dependent manner. None of these endpoints gave more than additive effects when radiation was added. Radiosensitization was observed but only after 72 hours of treatment with 250 {mu}M AICAR, suggesting that it was independent of AMPK activation. This finding was confirmed by small interfering RNA knockdown of AMPK. The mechanism of radiosensitization was associated with imbalanced deoxynucleotide pools owing to ZMP accumulation after AICAR administration that interfered with DNA repair. Conclusions: Our findings on the favorable interaction between low doses of AICAR and ionizing radiation in PC3 cells could open new perspectives for the clinical use of this or similar compounds. However, additional research is still required

  14. [Ionizing radiation in the aeronautics industry. Non-destructive testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Verde, R; Travaglini, C

    1983-08-25

    The constant increase in the non-military use of nuclear energy in various fields induced this study of one particular field: the aero industry. Alitalia has been using gammagraphy and industrial metallography for nondestructive testing for over 20 years. Workers exposed to ionising radiations at work are protected by precisely detailed standards based on extremely rigorous national and international legislation. The health and protection of these workers is entrusted to a Company Doctor and a Qualified Specialist. The latter is thought to be indispensable since he is responsible for primary preventions as well as prompt diagnosis.

  15. Ionizing radiation and the risk of brain and central nervous system tumors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braganza, Melissa Z; Kitahara, Cari M; Berrington de González, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Johnson, Kimberly J; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-11-01

    Although exposure to moderate-to-high doses of ionizing radiation is the only established environmental risk factor for brain and CNS tumors, it is not clear whether this relationship differs across tumor subtypes, by sex or age at exposure, or at the low-to-moderate range of exposure. This systematic review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence on the association between ionizing radiation exposure and risk of brain/CNS tumors. Articles included in this review estimated radiation exposure doses to the brain and reported excess relative risk (ERR) estimates for brain/CNS tumors. Eight cohorts were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. Average age at exposure ranged from 8 months to 26 years. Mean dose to the brain ranged from 0.07 to 10 Gy. Elevated risks for brain/CNS tumors were consistently observed in relation to ionizing radiation exposure, but the strength of this association varied across cohorts. Generally, ionizing radiation was more strongly associated with risk for meningioma compared with glioma. The positive association between ionizing radiation exposure and risk for glioma was stronger for younger vs older ages at exposure. We did not observe an effect modification on the risk for meningioma by sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, or attained age. The etiologic role of ionizing radiation in the development of brain/CNS tumors needs to be clarified further through additional studies that quantify the association between ionizing radiation and risk for brain/CNS tumors at low-to-moderate doses, examine risks across tumor subtypes, and account for potential effect modifiers.

  16. Human epidermal keratinocytes death and expression of protein markers of apoptosis after ionizing radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Wong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Knowledge of the pathophysiology of the irradiated skin is important to understand the tolerance and cosmetic response of the human skin to radiation. There are limited studies on the effect of radiotherapy dosage and fraction size in inducing apoptotic cell death in human skin. The expression of apoptotic biomarkers within a controlled population in different fractionation schemes has also never been studied. This study aims to investigate radiation induced apoptotic cell death in human skin cells after fractionated radiation exposure and the expression of unique biomarkers that reflect cell death or biology using multiplexed immunoassays.Methods: Breast skin biopsies were obtained from a single individual and divided into small pieces. Each piece was irradiated under different radiotherapy treatment fractionation schedules to a total dose of 50Gy. The irradiated skin tissues were analysed using Tunnel, immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays for expression of apoptotic keratinocytes and biomarkers (p53, p21, and PCNA. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E immunostaining was performed to study the morphological changes in the skin cells. Results: Radiation is mostly absorbed by the epidermal layers and observed to damage the epidermal keratinocytes leading to the activation of apoptotic proteins. Apoptotic proteins (p53, p21 and PCNA were confirmed to be up-regulated in radiation exposed skin cells as compared to normal skin cells with no radiation. There is strong correlation of apoptotic protein expressions with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation. Statistical analysis with ANOVA revealed a significant increase of PCNA and p21 expression with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, 14 % (range 10.71% to 17.29% of the keratinocytes were positive for PCNA and 22.5% (range 18.28% to 27.2% for p21 after 2Gy of irradiation.  The most widespread, intense and uniform staining for PCNA

  17. Micronuclei in humans induced by exposure to low level of ionizing radiation: influence of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Sabrina [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy) and Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden)]. E-mail: angelini@biocfarm.unibo.it; Kumar, Rajiv [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Carbone, Fabio [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Maffei, Francesca [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Forti, Giorgio Cantelli [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Violante, Francesco Saverio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Occupational Medicine Unit, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Pelagi 9, Bologna 40100 (Italy); Lodi, Vittorio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Curti, Stefania [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hemminki, Kari [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hrelia, Patrizia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    Understanding the risks deriving from protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has remarkable societal importance in view of the large number of work settings in which sources of IR are encountered. To address this question, we studied the frequency of micronuclei (MN), which is an indicator of DNA damage, in a population exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and in matched controls. In both exposed population and controls, the possible influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3 and XPD genes on the frequency of micronuclei was also evaluated. We also considered the effects of confounding factors, like smoking status, age and gender. The results indicated that MN frequency was significantly higher in the exposed workers than in the controls [8.62 {+-} 2.80 versus 6.86 {+-} 2.65; P = 0.019]. Radiological workers with variant alleles for XRCC1 or XRCC3 polymorphisms or wild-type alleles for XPD exon 23 or 10 polymorphisms showed a significantly higher MN frequency than controls with the same genotypes. Smoking status did not affect micronuclei frequency either in exposed workers or controls, while age was associated with increased MN frequency in the exposed only. In the combined population, gender but not age exerted an influence on the yield of MN, being higher in females than in males. Even though there is a limitation in this study due to the small number of subjects, these results suggest that even exposures to low level of ionizing radiation could have genotoxic effects and that XRCC3, XRCC1 and XPD polymorphisms might contribute to the increased genetic damage in susceptible individuals occupationally exposed to chronic low levels of ionizing radiation. For a clear conclusion on the induction of DNA damage caused by protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and the possible influence of genetic polymorphism in DNA repair genes larger studies are needed.

  18. Infrared investigation of hard human teeth tissues exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl accident

    OpenAIRE

    Darchuk, L. A.; Zaverbna, L. V.; Bebeshko, V. G.; Worobiec, A.; Stefaniak, E. A.; Van Grieken, R.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR) was applied to study changes in solid teeth tissues of persons exposed to low (0.12–0.20 Gy) and high (0.5–1.7 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation during their work in the Chernobyl zone after the accident. Changes in the inorganic and organic matrix of teeth were noted for both high and low radiation doses. The obtained results demonstrated that high doses of radiation lead to imbalance between phosphate–carbonate phases level (because of increasing of CO32− content) a...

  19. Sterilization by ionizing radiation comparative evaluation; Sterilizzazione mediante radiazioni e confronto con le tecniche convenzionali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tata, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Giuliani, S.

    1996-01-01

    Sterilization of surgical and medical devices by ionizing radiation (gamma or accelerated electron beams) is currently regarded as one of the main industrial-scale applications of radiation technology processes. Considering the most widely utilized chemical-physical methods (i.e. ethylene oxide (EtO) fumigation and radiation treatment), about 10-12 millions m(3) of surgical and medical devices are estimated to be processed yearly all around the world, of which 70 % by EtO, 27% by gamma-irradiation and 3% using accelerated beams. Due to the increasing demand for reusable and single-use devices, and the need of assuring their sterility in order to prevent, as much as possible, the diffusion of serious infective diseases (among which for instance Aids), the market of sterilization of these items is considerably expanding. In the general depicted scenario, radiation technologies are expected to gain a leading role, even a part from their economic attractiveness, as an alternative to EtO treatment, which is more and more considered as responsible for increasing environmental, social and public health problems.

  20. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto, E-mail: arojasmtz@gmail.com, E-mail: augusto.rojasm@uanl.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. (author)

  1. Development and characterization of acrylated palm oil nanoparticles using ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajau, Rida; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Hashim, Kamaruddin [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-11-27

    In this study, the utilization of radiation crosslinking methods which are known as intermolecular and intramolecular crosslinking for the formation of nanoparticles of Acrylated Palm Oil (APO) in the microemulsion system that also consists of Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) surfactant was demonstrated. This microemulsion system was subjected to the ionizing radiation i.e. gamma irradiation at different doses to form the crosslinked APO nanoparticles. The effects of radiation doses on the size of APO nanoparticles were investigated using the Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method and their images were viewed using the Transmission Electron Microcrospy (TEM). The Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure and the crosslinking conversion of carbon-carbon double bond (-C = C-) of the APO nanoparticles after irradiation. As a result, the size of the APO nanoparticle decreased when the irradiation dose increased. Reduce in size might be due to the effect of intramolecular crosslinking reaction of the APO nanoparticles during irradiation process. Meanwhile, the intramolecular -C C- crosslinking conversion percentage was increased at doses below 1kGy before decreasing at the higher dose that might due to the intermolecular crosslinking of the macromolecules. This study showed that radiation crosslinking methods of polymerization and crosslinking in the microemulsion were found to be promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

  2. Development and characterization of acrylated palm oil nanoparticles using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajau, Rida; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the utilization of radiation crosslinking methods which are known as intermolecular and intramolecular crosslinking for the formation of nanoparticles of Acrylated Palm Oil (APO) in the microemulsion system that also consists of Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) surfactant was demonstrated. This microemulsion system was subjected to the ionizing radiation i.e. gamma irradiation at different doses to form the crosslinked APO nanoparticles. The effects of radiation doses on the size of APO nanoparticles were investigated using the Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method and their images were viewed using the Transmission Electron Microcrospy (TEM). The Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure and the crosslinking conversion of carbon-carbon double bond (-C = C-) of the APO nanoparticles after irradiation. As a result, the size of the APO nanoparticle decreased when the irradiation dose increased. Reduce in size might be due to the effect of intramolecular crosslinking reaction of the APO nanoparticles during irradiation process. Meanwhile, the intramolecular -C = C- crosslinking conversion percentage was increased at doses below 1kGy before decreasing at the higher dose that might due to the intermolecular crosslinking of the macromolecules. This study showed that radiation crosslinking methods of polymerization and crosslinking in the microemulsion were found to be promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

  3. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  4. Comet assay as a procedure for detecting possible genotoxicity induced by non-ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Nemeth

    2015-05-01

    In our laboratory we use comet assay for testing genotoxicity of non-ionizing radiation for more than ten years. In the experiments we use whole blood samples (human or dog, cell lines (e.g. H295R cell line or 3 dimensional in vitro skin tissue (epidermis models. In our protocol a slightly modified alkaline Comet assay method of Singh et al. (1988 is used. On our poster there will be presented a brief summary of our experiments with exposure to different types of radiation (ELF, RF, and intermediate frequency. In our protocols the non-ionizing radiation was often combined with ionizing radiation to see whether the non-ionizing radiation can influence the repair of the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. For the evaluation of the slides mainly Komet 4.0 image analysis system software (Kinetic Imaging, Liverpool, UK was used, but as we got familiarized with other methods for slide evaluation like grading the comets by visual scoring into 5 categories or the CaspLab software, the comparison of these three methods will be also presented.

  5. National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - Brazilian CNEN; Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The activities of the Brazilian National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations Metrology are described. They include research and development of metrological techniques and procedures, the calibration of area radiation monitors, clinical dosemeters and other instruments and the preparation and standardization of reference radioactive sources. 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Industrial applications of ionizing radiation in France; Zastosowanie przemyslowe promieniowania jonizujacego we Francji promieniowania jonizujacego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icre, P. [CORFAR S.A., (France)

    1997-10-01

    The review of industrial applications of ionizing radiations in France has been done. The special attention has been paid on irradiation of minerals, polymers and biological materials.The perspectives of radiosterilization have been also discussed.The review of radiation sources commonly used in irradiation plants has been performed as well.

  7. Is Ionizing Radiation Harmful at any Exposure? An Echo That Continues to Vibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard I; Colangelo, Nicholas W; Domogauer, Jason D; Sharma, Neha; de Toledo, Sonia M

    2016-03-01

    The health risks to humans and non-human biota exposed to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. The need to establish risk assessment standards based on the mechanisms underlying low-level radiation exposure has been recognized by regulatory agencies as critical to adequately protect people and to make the most effective use of national resources. Here, the authors briefly review evidence showing that the molecular and biochemical changes induced by low doses of radiation differ from those induced by high doses. In particular, an array of redundant and inter-related mechanisms act in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to restore DNA integrity following exposures to relatively low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. Furthermore, the radiation-induced protective mechanisms often overcompensate and minimize the mutagenic potential of the byproducts of normal oxidative metabolism. In contrast to adaptive protection observed at low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation, there is evidence that even a single nuclear traversal by a densely ionizing particle track can trigger harmful effects that spread beyond the traversed cell and induce damaging effects in the nearby bystander cells. In vivo studies examining whether exposure to low dose radiation at younger age modulates the latency of expression of age-related diseases such as cancer, together with studies on the role of genetic susceptibility, will further illuminate the magnitude of risk of exposure to low dose radiation.

  8. Kinetics of interaction of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in Tribolium confusum. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P.K.; Ducoff, H.S.

    1977-11-01

    The interaction of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation was investigated using the flour beetle, Tribolium confusum. A series of temperature-tolerance curves from 43.5 to 46.0/sup 0/C in 0.5/sup 0/C increments were determined. Three nonlethal hyperthermia schemes, i.e., 45.0/sup 0/C for 2 hr, 43.0/sup 0/C for 2 hr, and 43.0/sup 0/C for 12 hr, were applied either immediately before or immediately after irradiation. The sensitizing effect of hyperthermia was indicated by the shifting of the regression line of survival in probits on dose to the left of that of the control. The sensitizing effect as measured by decreased LD/sub 50/ did not reveal any definite trend related to the order of application of the two modalities in immediate sequence. The importance of the order of application of the two modalities was immediately apparent if various time intervals intervened between a fixed radiation dose and a fixed hyperthermia treatment. The effect of hyperthermia given 60 min or longer after irradiation of male beetles was not detectable, as the survival was indistinguishable from that of the irradiated controls. This disappearance of interaction within 60 min seemed to be independent of radiation dose and of the temperature of hyperthermic treatment. In contrast, hyperthermia before irradiation exerted as effect lasting at least 5 hr. The results are in keeping with the hypothesis that hyperthermia affects the repair capability of the beetles.

  9. Recent advances in the study of ionizing radiation damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrand, J E; Michael, B D

    1992-06-01

    This workshop, organized under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action Programme on DNA Repair and Cancer, was held at the CRC Gray Laboratory, Northwood, Middlesex, UK, 23-25 October 1991. The 42 participants were drawn mainly from laboratories participating in the EC Concerted Action, with a few visitors from elsewhere. The discussions centred on the increasing convergence of classical radiobiology and biophysics with molecular biology and mammalian cell genetics to study mechanisms of DNA strand break accumulation and repair following exposure to ionizing radiation. There was a strong emphasis on the application of this research both to cancer radiotherapy and to detection of individuals at risk from cancer due to exposure to ionizing radiation. The first two days were organized as six workshop sessions; on the third day we joined forces with Julie Denekamp and dedicated a session to the memory of our late friend and colleague, Nic McNally. The rest of this day was devoted to reviews by his colleagues and collaborators of the fields of research to which he contributed so much. An evening of music and readings, organized by Joanna and Rachel McNally, completed the memorial. Here we review the first seven sessions of the workshop, emphasizing the more recent approaches and the new information they have given us.

  10. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Ryu, Tae Ho; Hyun, Kyung Man; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Wilhelmova, Nad [Institute of Experimental Botany, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-15

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  11. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  12. Ionizing radiation induced cataract; Katarakt-Induktion durch ionisierende Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    2013-07-01

    Until recently it was believed that the cataract (opacity of the eye lens) is a deterministic effect with a dose threshold of several Gray in dependence on the exposure conditions. Studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, of American radiologic technologists, astronauts, and patients after having received several computer tomographies of the head region, however, have shown that this assumption is not correct. It had been overlooked in the past that with decreasing dose the latency period is increasing. Therefore, the originally available studies were terminated too early. The more recent studies show that, in the case of a threshold existing at all, it is definitely below 0.8 Gy independently of an acute or a chronic exposure. All studies, however, include 0 Gy in the confidence interval, so that the absence of a dose threshold cannot be excluded. The German Commission on Radiological Protection (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK) suggested therefore among others: targeted recording of the lens dose during activities which are known to be associated with possible significant lens exposure, examination of the lens should be included as appropriate in the medical monitoring of people occupationally exposed to radiation, if there is potentially high lens exposure, adoption of research strategies to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying radiation induced cataracts. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) actually assumes a threshold dose of 0.5 Gy and, based on this assumption, has recommended in 2011 to reduce the dose limit for the eye lens from 150 mSv in a year to 20 mSv in a year for people occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. (orig.)

  13. Combined effects of streptozotocin-diabetes and ionizing radiation on nephropathy in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claycamp, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The individual effects of radiation and diabetes on nephropathy in the rat are well-documented; however, the combined effects of these factors on nephropathy have not been adequately studied. The combined effect of radiation and diabetes on nephropathy is a significant problem in view of human populations at risk; diabetic radiation workers and diabetic radiotherapy patients. Streptozotocin-diabetic and control rats were irradiated using 137-Cs to whole body doses of 0, 0.29, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy. Glomerulopathy in the rats was measured using standard histological grading techniques on left kidney biopsy samples taken at times of one month prior to and three, six and nine months after irradiation. Twelve months after irradiation, both right and left kidneys were graded for the degree of glomerulopathy. A pilot tubular attributes study of the histologic samples was added in which eight attributes of tubular histopathology were scored for the degree of severity. The acute effects of radiation on hemopoiesis were studied in the 0, 0.29, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy rats, and dose levels of 7.0 and 8.5 Gy were added to extend the dose range of the hemopoiesis study only. The factors of diabetes, irradiation, time after irradiation and the interactions of these factors did not significantly affect glomerulopathy in the rats. Radiation also was not a significant factor in the tubular attribute study. The results of this study imply that diabetic radiation workers are not at a significantly increased risk of nephropathy as a result of ionizing radiation exposure.

  14. Medical applications of ionizing radiation; Aplicaciones medicas de las radiaciones ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, M. L.; Prieto, C.; Garcia, P.; Bejar, M. J.

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is nowadays widely used for both diagnosis and therapy mainly in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology specialities. Benchmark techniques and advanced equipment like multislice CT in diagnostic radiology, PET-CT in nuclear medicine or IMRT or IGRT in radiotherapy are currently becoming regular in daily practice at hospitals. Medical exposures are by far the largest artificial source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. although concentrated in a relatively small percentage of the worlds population, these medical exposures continue to grow in a significant way, especially in developed countries. This fact makes it necessary to keep on working in radiological protection and safety at medical facilities. (Author) 11 refs.

  15. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-11-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2•- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim #2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim #3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation

  16. [Influence of low dozes of ionizing radiation on accumulation of melanin pigments and catalase and superoxidedismutase activities in Cladosporium cladosporioides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhaĭ, T I

    2007-01-01

    Influence of low dozes of ionizing radiation on melanin pigments synthesis and activity of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxidedismutase of two strains of Cladosporium cladosporioides 4, (isolated from radioactive soil) and 396 (control) were investigated. It was shown, that in C. cladosporioides 4 under the exposure of ionizing radiation an increase of melanin synthesis in a stationary growth phase and increase of superoxidedismutase activity in a logarithmic phase were observed; in the control strain C. cladosporioides 396 activation of melanin synthesis and superoxide dismutase activity in both growth phases was revealed. It was established that in C. cladosporioides 4 the endocellular catalase activity in a logarithmic phase is 3.2 times higher, than in control strain. Under the action of ionizing radiation a 2-fold increase of this enzyme activity unlike the control strain in which the activity inhibition was revealed. The obtained results testify to the complex response of antioxidant systems and melanin to the action of low dozes of radiation which depends on the growth phase and presence of radioadaptation properties in the investigated fungi.

  17. Detection of the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By definition, the direct effect is referred to interaction between photon and DNA molecule, whereas the indirect effect is mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiolysis and subsequent reaction. It has been reported that ROS produced after exposure to IR can react with cellular materials such as DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. ROS is free radicals such as the superoxide anion, hydroxyl radicals and the non-radical hydrogen peroxide. Cells generate ROS during aerobic metabolism. Excessive production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, genetic alteration and even cell death. It has been reported that ROS plays a critical role in radiation-induced cell injury. Thus, it is of great interest to determine the radiation-induced ROS level. Many kinds of methods to detect the level of ROS have been developed so far. There were random changes of fluorescence intensity in the treatment after irradiation. This result meant that this protocol was not appropriate for determination of radiation-induced ROS. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity was increased in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation. Conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results of this study. In order to properly measure the ROS level in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation, the cells should be treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation.

  18. Non-ionizing radiation hazards - dealing with misconceptions, uncertainties, and risk communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliney, D. [USA Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Gunpowder, MD (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Non-ionizing radiation hazards are not always easily defined, at the hazards frequently are very much dependent upon frequency and wavelength and exposure geometry matters. This leads to rather technical exposure limits that are not the easiest to communicate to the worker or the general public. The problem is most difficult to explain for spectral (frequency bands) outside of the visible, when there is little or no perception. Both workers and the general public also do not enjoy uncertainty about a risk. Thus, with new technologies employing laser and RF radiation, all of the biological information may be not be completed, but greater safety factors were introduced into exposure guidelines to account for the magnitude of the uncertainties. Fortunately for the optical radiation safety community, the level of unwarranted concerns about health and safety at exposures below recommended exposure limits have generally been less than those working with radiofrequency radiation and low-frequency electro-magnetic fields. When the apparent experts appear to disagree, as when the interpretation of individual biological research studies are widely publicized, the level of discomfort upon an exposed population increases. Still more frustrating for the public health officials is the use of health and safety questions by special interest groups or commercial interests to delay the use of a particular technology. Myths of hazards from low-power lasers, or cell phones provide us with a challenge for better training of workers and better risk communication with the public. (orig.)

  19. [Metabolic effect of amaranth oil and impulse hypoxic training under chronic fluoride intoxication and small doses of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyk, U V; Hzhehots'kyĭ, M P; Koval'chuk, S M

    2002-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation and antioxidative defence system in blood, liver and heart tissues, nitric oxide metabolites content in brain tissue of rats under binary action of small-doses of ionizing radiation and fluoride intoxication treated by amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training have been studied. Complex using of amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training result in increase both enzymatic, as nonezymatic links of antioxidant defence in all investigated tissues. It was revealed also enhance of NO system metabolites content in brain gomogenate. In this conditions lipid peroxidation processes in liver and heart tissues normalize comparison with essential increase level LPO under binary action influence. On the basis of obtained results LPO metabolites content we can suppossed that complex using of amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training result in increase of organism adaptative possibility. This complex can be using for binary action of ionizing radiation and fluoride intoxication correction.

  20. An Ionizing Radiation Sensor Using a Pre-Programmed MAHAOS Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Hsieh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal-aluminum oxide–hafnium aluminum oxide‒silicon oxide–silicon (hereafter MAHAOS devices can be candidates for ionizing radiation sensor applications. In this work, MAHAOS devices (SONOS-like structures with high k stack gate dielectric were studied regarding the first known characterization of the ionization radiation sensing response. The change of threshold voltage VT for a MAHAOS device after gamma ray exposure had a strong correlation to the total ionization dose (TID of gamma radiation up to at least 5 Mrad TID. In this paper, the gamma radiation response performances of the pre-programmed and virgin (non-pre-programmed MAHAOS devices are presented. The experimental data show that the change of VT for the pre-programmed MAHAOS device with gamma irradiation is very significant. The data of pre-programmed MAHAOS devices written by 5 Mrad TID of gamma radiation was also stable for a long time with data storage. The sensing of gamma radiation by pre-programmed MAHAOS devices with high k stack gate dielectric reported in this study has demonstrated their potential application for non-volatile ionizing radiation sensing technology in the future.

  1. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S.; Kurisu, Y.; Murata, I.; Takahashi, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Masui, H.; Iida, T. [Department of Electronic, Information Systems and Energy Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy {approx} 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  2. Study of the ionizing radiation effects on the swedish telecommunications network. Studie av telekommunikationernas talighet mot joniserande stralning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeransson, G.; Liljegren, T.

    1992-11-01

    The aim of the study is to form a basis for decisions on possible protective measures concerning the ionizing radiation effects on the Swedish telecommunications from nuclear weapon explosions outside Sweden. The report contains a brief survey of analysis and the experimental investigations of the ionizing radiation effects on optical fibers, repeaters and microwave radio-link equipments. It also deals with the Swedish Telecommunication Network buildings and their ionizing radiation protection as well as with some specially selected telecommunication objects.

  3. The evaluation of non-ionizing radiation (near-infrared radiation) based medical imaging application: Diabetes foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Cheol Won; Ahn, Sung Min; Hong, Jun Yong; Ahn, Yun Jin; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Near-infrared radiation (NIR) is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and deep tissue penetration in biological material, thereby increasing research interests as a medical imaging technique in the world. However, the use of current near-infrared medical image is extremely limited in Korea (ROK) since it is not well known among radiologic technologists and radiological researchers. Therefore to strengthen the knowledge for NIR medical imaging is necessary so as to prepare a qualified radiological professionals to serve medical images in high-quality on the clinical sites. In this study, an overview of the features and principles of N IR imaging was demonstrated. The latest research topics and worldwide research trends were introduced for radiologic technologist to reinforce their technical skills. In particular, wound care and diabetic foot which have high feasibility for clinical translation were introduced in order to contribute to accelerating NIR research for developing the field of radiological science.

  4. Characterization and evaluation of ionizing and non-ionizing imaging systems used in state of the art image-guided radiation therapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dennis Nichols

    With the growing incidence of cancer worldwide, the need for effective cancer treatment is paramount. Currently, radiation therapy exists as one of the few effective, non-invasive methods of reducing tumor size and has the capability for the elimination of localized tumors. Radiation therapy utilizes non-invasive external radiation to treat localized cancers but to be effective, physicians must be able to visualize and monitor the internal anatomy and target displacements. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy frequently utilizes planar and volumetric imaging during a course of radiation therapy to improve the precision and accuracy of the delivered treatment to the internal anatomy. Clinically, visualization of the internal anatomy allows physicians to refine the treatment to include as little healthy tissue as possible. This not only increases the effectiveness of treatment by damaging only the tumor but also increases the quality of life for the patient by decreasing the amount of healthy tissue damaged. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy is commonly used to treat tumors in areas of the body that are prone to movement, such as the lungs, liver, and prostate, as well as tumors located close to critical organs and tissues such as the tumors in the brain and spinal cord. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy can utilize both ionizing modalities, like x-ray based planar radiography and cone-beam CT, and nonionizing modalities like MRI, ultrasound and video-based optical scanning systems. Currently ionizing modalities are most commonly utilized for their ability to visualize and monitor internal anatomy but cause an increase to the total dose to the patient. Nonionizing imaging modalities allow frequent/continuous imaging without the increase in dose; however, they are just beginning to be clinically implemented in radiation oncology. With the growing prevalence and variety of Image-Guided Radiation Therapy imaging modalities the ability to evaluate the overall image quality, monitor

  5. Measurement of the track structure of ionizing radiation; Messung der Spurstruktur ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, Gerhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Nanodosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    After a description of the nanodosimetric measurement quantities of tracks induced by ionizing radiation the nanodosemeter operated in the PTB is described. Finally the scaling behaviour of nanodosimetry is considered. In order to test the validity of the corresponding equation ionization-cluster size distributions were measured with monoenergetic proton and alpha beams in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV with propane and nitrogen as measuring gases. (HSI)

  6. Effects of ionizing radiations on in utero development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, J. (EdF, 75 - Paris (France))

    1984-01-01

    Following a reminder of embryology and methodology, a review is made of the main teratogenic effects related to radiation exposure, i.e. lethal effects, radioinduced malformations, maldevelopment and cancers. The sensitivity of the embryo and foetus to radiation seems to last during the whole gestation. Howewer, the latest investigations indicate that the main damage is mental retardation. This review concludes on practical considerations of radiation protection in the field of radiographic examinations of pregnant women.

  7. Crosslinking of polysaccharides in room temperature ionic liquids by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Shimada, Akihiko; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    Crosslinking of polysaccharides in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) by ionizing radiation were investigated by the scavenging method, fluorescent and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Radiation chemical yields of hydroxyl radicals inducing the crosslinking of cellulose were estimated with phenol as a scavenger, and increased with water content in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMI-acetate). Cellulose gel was also produced in fluorescent carboxylate-based RTILs, 1,3-dibutylimidazolium acetate (DBI-acetate). Light emission from DBI-acetate in cellulose gel was observed and 20-nm red shifted at a maximum wavelength of 415 nm when excited at 323 nm. Expected elements of carbon and oxygen were detected in neat cellulose by XPS, while additional nitrogen was detected in radiation-crosslinked cellulose gel produced in EMI-acetate. These results indicate that RTILs is incorporated in the cellulose gel. Chitin gel was first obtained in 1-butyl-3-methyimidazolium chloride by γ-ray irradiations, and its gel fraction increased with the dose and reached 86% at 60 kGy.

  8. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu Rui; LIU Yong Ai; SUN Fang; LI He; LEI Su Wen; WANG Ju Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Methods Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Results Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Conclusion Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy: how low-level ionizing radiation can play a key role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Marek K; Wincenciak, Marta; Cheda, Aneta; Nowosielska, Ewa M; Calabrese, Edward J

    2017-07-01

    The cancer immunoediting hypothesis assumes that the immune system guards the host against the incipient cancer, but also "edits" the immunogenicity of surviving neoplastic cells and supports remodeling of tumor microenvironment towards an immunosuppressive and pro-neoplastic state. Local irradiation of tumors during standard radiotherapy, by killing neoplastic cells and generating inflammation, stimulates anti-cancer immunity and/or partially reverses cancer-promoting immunosuppression. These effects are induced by moderate (0.1-2.0 Gy) or high (>2 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation which can also harm normal tissues, impede immune functions, and increase the risk of secondary neoplasms. In contrast, such complications do not occur with exposures to low doses (≤0.1 Gy for acute irradiation or ≤0.1 mGy/min dose rate for chronic exposures) of low-LET ionizing radiation. Furthermore, considerable evidence indicates that such low-level radiation (LLR) exposures retard the development of neoplasms in humans and experimental animals. Here, we review immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by growing tumors as well as immunomodulatory effects of LLR evidently or likely associated with cancer-inhibiting outcomes of such exposures. We also offer suggestions how LLR may restore and/or stimulate effective anti-tumor immunity during the more advanced stages of carcinogenesis. We postulate that, based on epidemiological and experimental data amassed over the last few decades, whole- or half-body irradiations with LLR should be systematically examined for its potential to be a viable immunotherapeutic treatment option for patients with systemic cancer.

  10. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu Rui; Liu, Yong Ai; Sun, Fang; Li, He; Lei, Su Wen; Wang, Ju Fang

    2016-07-01

    To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence- associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms of alteration of the immune system by ionizing radiations: a basis for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, M. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Perez, M.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carosella, E. [CEA, Service de Recherches en Hemato -Immunologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Alterations of the immune system appear in relationship with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in different situations, e.g., accidents, radiation therapy of cancer, prenatal irradiation, some human diseases with hypersensitivity to IR and aging. Thus, the comprehension of the mechanisms of the alterations of the immune system by IR is necessary to elaborate strategies of protection and to pave the way for future possible therapies. At least 9 mechanisms of alterations can be identified: 1- Apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key mechanism of the natural regulation of the immune system and plays also a key role in the response to IR: lymphocytes die rapidly by apoptosis after exposure. Different pathways of induction of apoptosis have been identified, and include p53 dependent and mitochondria mediated pathways, as well as CD95 and ROS initiation; 2- TCR mutations. The T cell antigen receptor is responsible to discriminate between self and non self. Mutations of the TCR may result from exposure to IR; 3- Modification of the Th1-Th2 balance. T helper cells may express 2 distinct secretion patterns: Th1 cytokines promote cell-mediated immunity while Th2 cytokines favor humoral immunity. Although the effects of IR on the Th1/Th2 balance remains controversial, an imbalance towards a Th2 profile is likely and patients with cancer and systemic auto-immune disease often present a switch from Th1 to Th2; 4- Bystander effects and genetic instability. Stimulatory effect or genomic instability have been observed in haematopoietic cells exposed to IR and related to a bystander mechanism. 5- Shift toward an inflammatory profile. Ionizing radiation may induce a persistent inflammatory profile as a result of dis-regulation of cytokine production; such a status of persistent inflammation has been observed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. 6- Modification of antigen presentation. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells is an essential function preceding

  12. Environmental standards for ionizing radiation: theoretical basis for dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, A C

    1983-10-01

    The types of injury attributable to ionizing radiation are subdivided, for purposes of risk assessment and radiological protection, into two broad categories: stochastic effects and nonstochastic effects. Stochastic effects are viewed as probablistic phenomena, varying in frequency but not severity as a function of the dose, without any threshold; nonstochastic effects are viewed as deterministic phenomena, varying in both frequency and severity as a function of the dose, with clinical thresholds. Included among stochastic effects are heritable effects (mutations and chromosome aberrations) and carcinogenic effects. Both types of effects are envisioned as unicellular phenomena which can result from nonlethal injury of individual cells, without the necessity of damage to other cells. For the induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations in the low-to-intermediate dose range, the dose-response curve with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation generally conforms to a linear nonthreshold relationship and varies relatively little with the dose rate. In contrast, the curve with low-LET radiation generally conforms to a linear-quadratic relationship, rising less steeply than the curve with high-LET radiation and increasing in slope with increasing dose and dose rate. The dose-response curve for carcinogenic effects varies widely from one type of neoplasm to another in the intermediate-to-high dose range, in part because of differences in the way large doses of radiation can affect the promotion and progression of different neoplasms. Information about dose-response relations for low-level irradiation is fragmentary but consistent, in general, with the hypothesis that the neoplastic transformation may result from mutation, chromosome aberration or genetic recombination in a single susceptible cell.

  13. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  14. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwood, J. S.; Shahnazari, M.; Chicana, B.; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, A.; Bartolini, A.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically-active, cancellous-bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total-body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16wk), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50-1.1Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is =10Gy) or accumulates over long-duration, interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4hrs-7d later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4hrs) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1d) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB-ligand (Rankl) within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3d of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (e.g., monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased 11.9-fold, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased 1.7- fold over controls). Marrow expression of the RANKL decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (Opg), also rose after irradiation (11.3-fold). The ratio Rankl/Opg in marrow was increased 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. As expected, radiation increased a serum marker of resorption (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrease in bone volume/total volume) through reduced trabecular struts. We conclude that total-body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal, concerted regulation of gene expression within marrow and mineralized tissue for

  16. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  17. Production of foil electrets by ionizing radiation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-02-01

    Isothermal charge deposition on polymers to form stable foil electrets by using apparatuses resembling parallel-plate ionization chambers is reported. Charge carriers produced by irradiation of the sensitive chamber air volume drift in an externally applied electric field and get trapped on the polymer surface to form electrets with maximum charge densities close to 10-6 C/cm2. Charge density as a function of applied voltage follows the form typical of a Schottky or Poole-Frenkel process.

  18. Ionizing Radiation Potentiates High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Reprograms Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, Vibe; Ingerslev, Lars R; Andersen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of chronic metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes later in life. We hypothesized that irradiation reprograms the epigenome of metabolic progenitor cells, which could account for impaired metabolism after cancer treatment...... mice. Mice subjected to total body irradiation showed alterations in glucose metabolism and, when challenged with HFD, marked hyperinsulinemia. Insulin signaling was chronically disrupted in skeletal muscle and adipose progenitor cells collected from irradiated mice and differentiated in culture...

  19. Dissecting plant chromosomes by the use of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation treatment of genomes is used to generate chromosome breaks for numerous applications. This protocol describes the preparation of seeds and the determination of the optimal level of irradiation dosage for the creation of a radiation hybrid (RH) population. These RH lines can be used to gene...

  20. Effect of therapeutic ionizing radiation on the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, R G; Spence, D; Wu, S; Xiong, X; Kun, L E; Merchant, T E

    2001-12-01

    We test a hypothesis that fractionated radiation therapy within a therapeutic dose range is associated with a dose-related change in normal brain, detectable by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 33 patients were examined by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain tissue spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) before treatment, and at various times during and after radiation therapy. A T1 map was generated at each time point, and radiation therapy isodose contours were superimposed on the corresponding segmented T1 map. Changes in white matter and gray matter T1 were analyzed as a function of radiation therapy dose and time since treatment, controlling for patient age and tumor site. In white matter, a dose level of more than 20 Gy was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in T1 over time, which became significant 6 months after treatment. There was no significant change in T1 of gray matter over time, at radiation therapy doses of less than 60 Gy. However, GM in close proximity to the tumor had a lower T1 before therapy. Our results represent the first radiation dose-response data derived from pediatric brain in vivo. These findings confirm that white matter is more vulnerable to radiation-induced change than is gray matter, and suggest that T1 mapping is sensitive to radiation-related changes over a broad dose range (20 to 60 Gy). Human white matter T1 is not sensitive to radiation therapy of less than 20 Gy, and gray matter T1 is unchanged over the dose range used to treat human brain tumor. The reduction of gray matter T1 near the tumor could result from compression of cortical parenchyma near the growing tumor mass, or from tumor cell invasion directly into the parenchyma. If brain T1 is a surrogate for radiation effect, reducing the volume of normal white matter receiving more than 20 Gy could be an important treatment planning goal.

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on gelatine films added with antioxidant; Efeitos da radiacao ionizante em filmes de gelatina adicionados de antioxidante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraide, Felipe H.; Inamura, Patricia Y.; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work evaluates the effect of ionizing radiation on the gelatin films in presence of antioxidant. Gelatin solutions of glycerine and poly vinil alcohol, with and without the addition were prepared until the complete homogenization. The films were irradiated with 20 and 40 kGy in a electron accelerator, in the presence of air and at the room temperature. The use of ionizing radiation and the addition of antioxidant changed the properties of the film. The result of water absorption test revealed that with increasing of radiation dose occurred a reduction in the absorption, suggesting that happen a reticulation

  2. Performance of a parallel plate ionization chamber in beta radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: patrilan@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A homemade parallel plate ionization chamber with graphite collecting electrode, and developed for use in mammography beams, was tested in relation to its usefulness in beta radiation dosimetry at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Characterization tests of this ionization chamber were performed, using the Sr-90 + Y-90, Kr-85 and Pm-147 sources of a beta secondary standard system. The results of saturation, leakage current, stabilization time, response stability, linearity, angular dependence, and calibration coefficients are within the recommended limits of international recommendations that indicate that this chamber may be used for beta radiation dosimetry. (author)

  3. Genetic effects in somatic and germ cells, induced by ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, B.; Benova, D.; Bajrakova, A.; Bulanova, M.; Vyglenov, A.; Rupova, I.; Georgieva, I. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative data are reported on injuries to hereditary structures in somatic and sex cells, induced by different types of ionizing radiation. The model systems used were human peripheral blood lymphocytes, in vitro irradiated with different doses: bone-marrow cells of mice and rats irradiated in vivo: mouse, rat, rabbit and hamster sex cells. To evaluate the dose-effect dependency after acute and chronic irradiation, the authors used mathematical models, describing the amount of chromosomal injuries. Attempt was made to estimate the somatic and genetic risk, following acute and chronic irradiation with different doses of ionizing radiations.

  4. Crosslinking of rigid PVC by ionizing radiation to improve its thermal properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Castaneda, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo Coahuila (Mexico); Benavides, R., E-mail: robertob@ciqa.m [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo Coahuila (Mexico); Martinez-Pardo, M.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado postal 18-1027, Col. Escandon, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Uribe, R.M. [Kent State University, College of Technology and Program on Electron Beam Technology, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001 (United States); Carrasco-Abrego, H. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado postal 18-1027, Col. Escandon, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo Coahuila (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    Rigid PVC formulations containing two different stabilizer systems (tin and Ca/Zn) and TMPTMA as a crosslinking agent were treated with ionizing radiation (gamma and electron beam) at different doses and irradiation atmospheres. The objective was to increase thermal and mechanical properties of this material. Polyene formation was followed through the yellowing index (YI), the extent of crosslinking by gel percentage, thermal resistance by Vicat temperature and the mechanical properties by DMA. Both formulations became colored with irradiation, especially with gamma as a result of a longer treatment time; the gel formation and the Vicat temperature were also higher for gamma treated samples, suggesting that values were enhanced by oxidation. However, DMA elastic modulus traces were almost similar for both treatments. The main difference observed for Ca/Zn samples compared with traditional tin samples was the lower ability of the former system in protecting the material against processing conditions.

  5. Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Effects in Thin Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    performance of electronic devices and systems that must operate in a radiation harsh environment. Graphene is an emerging two dimensional (2D) material for... graphene -based electronic systems because it has the same lattice structure as graphene , is an insulator, and is known to form on graphene surfaces. h...BN also has superior material and electrical properties as compared to insulators such as SiO2 or Al2O3. Understanding the effects of radiation on h

  6. Ionizing radiation effects on electrical and reliability characteristics of sputtered Ta2O5/Si interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ashwath; Verma, Ankita; Singh, B. R.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the effect of ionizing radiation on the interface properties of Al/Ta2O5/Si metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors using capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The devices were irradiated with X-rays at different doses ranging from 100 rad to 1 Mrad. The leakage behavior, which is an important parameter for memory applications of Al/Ta2O5/Si MOS capacitors, along with interface properties such as effective oxide charges and interface trap density with and without irradiation has been investigated. Lower accumulation capacitance and shift in flat band voltage toward negative value were observed in annealed devices after exposure to radiation. The increase in interfacial oxide layer thickness after irradiation was confirmed by Rutherford Back Scattering measurement. The effect of post-deposition annealing on the electrical behavior of Ta2O5 MOS capacitors was also investigated. Improved electrical and interface properties were obtained for samples deposited in N2 ambient. The density of interface trap states (Dit) at Ta2O5/Si interface sputtered in pure argon ambient was higher compared to samples reactively sputtered in nitrogen-containing plasma. Our results show that reactive sputtering in nitrogen-containing plasma is a promising approach to improve the radiation hardness of Ta2O5/Si MOS devices.

  7. Prevention of cigarette smoke induced lung cancer by low let ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Charles L. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent global cancer, {approx}90% of which is caused by cigarette smoking. The LNT hypothesis has been inappropriately applied to estimate lung cancer risk due to ionizing radiation. A threshold of {approx}1 Gy for lung cancer has been observed in never smokers. Lung cancer risk among nuclear workers, radiologists and diagnostically exposed patients was typically reduced by {approx}40% following exposure to <100 mSv low LET radiation. The consistency and magnitude of reduced lung cancer in nuclear workers and occurrence of reduced lung cancer in exposed non-worker populations could not be explained by the HWE. Ecologic studies of indoor radon showed highly significant reductions in lung cancer risk. A similar reduction in lung cancer was seen in a recent well designed case-control study of indoor radon, indicating that exposure to radon at the EPA action level is associated with a decrease of {approx}60% in lung cancer. A cumulative whole-body dose of {approx}1 Gy gamma rays is associated with a marked decrease in smoking-induced lung cancer in plutonium workers. Low dose, low LET radiation appears to increase apoptosis mediated removal of {alpha}-particle and cigarette smoke transformed pulmonary cells before they can develop into lung cancer.

  8. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  9. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Richard P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  10. Involvement of MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by chemicals and ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asur, Rajalakshmi [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202-3917 (United States); Balasubramaniam, Mamtha [Research Institute - Biostatistics, William Beaumont Hospital, 3911 W. Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3811 W. Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); Thomas, Robert A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202-3917 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202-3917 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Many studies have examined bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation, however few have evaluated the ability of chemicals to induce similar effects. We previously reported the ability of two chemicals, mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin (PHL) to induce bystander effects in normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The focus of the current study was to determine the involvement of the MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by physical and chemical DNA damaging agents and to evaluate the effects of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activation. The phosphorylation levels of the MAPK proteins ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, were measured from 1 to 24 h following direct or bystander exposure to MMC, PHL or radiation. We observed transient phosphorylation, at early time points, of all 3 proteins in bystander cells. We also evaluated the effect of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activity to determine the role of MAPK proteins in bystander-induced apoptosis. We observed bystander-induced activation of caspase 3/7 in bystander cells. Inhibition of MAPK proteins resulted in a decrease in caspase 3/7 activity at the early time points, and the caspase activity increased (in the case of ERK inhibition) or returned to basal levels (in the case of JNK or p38 inhibition) between 12 and 24 h. PHL is considered to be a radiomimetic agent, however in the present study PHL behaved more like a chemical and not like radiation in terms of MAPK phosphorylation. These results point to the involvement of MAPK proteins in the bystander effect induced by radiation and chemicals and provide additional evidence that this response is not limited to radiation but is a generalized stress response in cells.

  11. [Thoughts on carcinogenic pollution caused by ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, R

    1976-01-01

    The pollution phenomenon groups the effects of small doses of radiation on large populations. These effects on Man are not directly accessible. One must: a) consider some epidemiological statistics (cosmic radiation at high altitudes; radioactivity from granitic surroundings); b) extrapolate from datas obtained with high doses; c) extrapolate from datas obtained with low doses in micro-organisms or mammalian cells in vitro. The interpolation scheme of Abrahamson et al. is so available for mutagenicity. The question of a threshold remains theoretical, although radiation-induced carcinogenesis often displays a dose-effects curve with a well market threshold. A new concept, that of a "practical threshold" is developped, which may be of great usefulness. The main genetic considerations are listed upon which the present international admissible doses are based. Finally, in order to establish quantitative comparisons between chemical and radiation carcinogenic pollution, the concept of "rad equivalents" for the main chemical mutagens is stressed.

  12. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  13. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Properties of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Olenych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of ionizing radiation from 226Ra source on the electrical and photoluminescent properties of porous silicon nanostructures was investigated. After the radiation exposure, AC resistance of experimental samples decreased and luminescence band was changed. Temperature dependencies of electrical conductivity and depolarization current were studied in 80-325 K temperature range. Effect of radiation on the energy distribution of localized electronic states in porous silicon based structures is analyzed. Obtained results expand the application prospective of porous silicon for radiation sensing.

  14. Transient effects of ionizing and displacive radiation on the dielectric properties of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, R. H.; Zinkle, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Stoller, R. E.

    1996-03-01

    A resonant cavity technique was used to measure the dielectric constant and loss tangent of ceramic insulators at a frequency near 100 MHz during pulsed fission reactor irradiation near room temperature. Tests were performed on single crystal and several different grades of polycrystalline Al2O3, MgAl2O4, AlN, and Si3N4. Lead shielding experiments were performed for some of the irradiations in order to examine the importance of gamma ray versus neutron irradiation effects. With the exception of AlN, the dielectric constant of all of the ceramics decreased slightly (radiation fields of 4.2×104 Gy/s and 2.4×10-6 dpa/s, respectively. The loss tangent measured during irradiation for the different ceramics did not show any correlation with the preirradiation or postirradiation values. Analysis of the results indicates that the transient increases in loss tangent are due to radiation induced increases in the electrical conductivity. The loss tangent increases were proportional to the ionizing dose rate in all materials except for AlN, which exhibited a dose rate exponent of ˜1.6.

  15. Comparison of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes from people occupationally exposed to ionizing and radiofrequency radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić H

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxic effects of occupational exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation were investigated in 25 physicians and nurses working in hospitals and in 20 individuals working at radio-relay stations. Examination was conducted by chromosome aberration analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data showed that total number of chromosome aberrations in people exposed to ionizing and radio-frequency radiation (4.08 +/- 0.37 and 4.35 +/- 0.5 on 200 scored metaphases, respectively were almost equally higher than those of non-irradiated subjects. The increase was in proportion to the number of individuals having more that 5-aberration/200 metaphases. Acentric fragments comprised the most frequently seen type of aberration. The average numbers in examined groups (11.8 x 10(-3 and 14.8 x 10(-3 per cell, respectively, were significantly higher than 4.2 x 10(-3, which was observed in controls, unexposed individuals. Dicentric fragments were also frequent (4.8 x 10(-3 and 6.25 x 10(-3, respectively, vs. 0.52 x 10(-3 in control. In contrast, the frequency of chromatid breaks increased only after ionizing radiation (3.8 x 10(-3 vs. 0.26 x 10(-3 in control. A positive correlation between the total number of chromosome aberrations and cumulative 6-years dosage was also found. The data emphasized the dangerous effects of prolonged exposure to both types of radiation and indicated that chromosomal aberration analysis should be obligatory for individuals working at radio-relay stations.

  16. Role of AKT and ERK pathways in controlling sensitivity to ionizing radiation and adaptive response induced by low-dose radiation in human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Sun; You, Ga Eun; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji Young; An, Sungkwan; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Lim, Young-Khi; Nam, Seon Young

    2015-12-01

    Despite many studies of the effect of ionizing radiation, biological mechanisms of action might differ greatly depend on dose, dose rate, and cell type. This study was performed to explore the effects of low- and high-dose radiation in human immune cell lines. We examined cell sensitivity after irradiation with 0.05, 0.1, or 2Gy in two normal cell lines and three tumor cell lines. Low-dose radiation of 0.05 and 0.1Gy had no effect on cell survival in any tested cell line, with the exception of IM-9 cells, whose viability was transiently increased. However, IM-9 and C1R-sB7 cells were very sensitive to high-dose radiation-induced cell death, whereas Jurkat and JM1 cells showed moderate sensitivity, and THP-1 cells were completely resistant. This radiosensitivity was correlated with basal AKT activation, which is induced by phosphorylation. In radiosensitive IM-9 cells, priming with chronic low-dose irradiation blocked cell death induced by high-dose radiation challenge via inhibition of caspase activation and PARP cleavage. AKT phosphorylation was not altered in IM-9 cells, but ERK phosphorylation was greatly elevated immediately after chronic low-dose irradiation. Taken together, our results suggest that the different responses of normal and tumor cells to low-dose and high-dose radiation depend on AKT activation, which is regulated by protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A). In radiosensitive normal cells lacking basal AKT activity, chronic low-dose radiation increases activation of the ERK pathway, which plays an important role in the adaptive response to radiation, providing a very important insight into understanding the effects of ionizing radiation on health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  18. Effect Of Feedback On The Escape Of Ionizing Radiation From High-Z Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebitsch, Maxime; Blaizot, Jérémy; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-06-01

    Quantifying how much of the ionizing radiation produced in high-redshift galaxies escapes in the IGM is one of the main challenges in understanding the sources of reionization. We investigate the radiative properties of simulated low mass galaxies (halos of a few 109 Msun at z=6), where radiation is modelled on-the-fly, and different sources of feedback (from stars and AGN) are included. Using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations performed with Ramses-RT we study how the energy and momentum input from supernovae and black hole activity modulates the properties of the interstellar medium and therefore how, and how many, photons can escape from the galaxy. I will present simulations showing (Trebitsch et al. 2017, https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00941) that stellar feedback has a pivotal role in regulating the escape fraction in dwarf galaxies. Supernovae carve holes in the gas distribution, through which ionizing photons can escape.

  19. The Origin and Optical Depth of Ionizing Radiation in the "Green Pea" Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jaskot, A E

    2013-01-01

    Although Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation from star-forming galaxies likely drove the reionization of the Universe, observations of star-forming galaxies at low redshift generally indicate low LyC escape fractions. However, the extreme [O III]/[O II] ratios of the z=0.1-0.3 Green Pea galaxies may be due to high escape fractions of ionizing radiation. To analyze the LyC optical depths and ionizing sources of these rare, compact starbursts, we compare nebular photoionization and stellar population models with observed emission lines in the Peas' SDSS spectra. We focus on the six most extreme Green Peas, the galaxies with the highest [O III]/[O II] ratios and the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation. The Balmer line equivalent widths and He I {\\lambda}3819 emission in the extreme Peas support young ages of 3-5 Myr, and He II {\\lambda}4686 emission in five extreme Peas signals the presence of hard ionizing sources. Ionization by active galactic nuclei or high-mass X-ray binaries is inconsistent with the...

  20. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Wang; Li He; Guoqiang Bao; Xin He; Saijun Fan; Haichao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein,HMGBI,can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells,thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses.In this study we aimed to test the possibility that radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and release.Methods Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and rats were exposed to X-ray radiation,and HMGB1 translocation and release were then assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay,respectively.Results At a wide dose range(4.0-12.0 Gy),X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation,and triggered a time-and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo.The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was also associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability.Conclusions Radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes.

  1. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  2. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  3. Annual effective dose of ionizing radiation from natural sources received by airline aircrew members compared with that received by non-flying residents of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, W.; Copeland, K.; O'Brien, K., III

    In evaluating health aspects of the ionizing radiation exposure of aircrews, risk estimates are normally based on the amount of cosmic radiation received in flight. Not considered is that aircrews spend most of their time on the ground. In this report, annual total effective doses of ionizing radiation from natural sources received by aircrews on and off the job, flying between Los Angeles and Tokyo or Chicago and London, are compared with doses to non-flying residents of the United States and non-flying residents of Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 (Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado --- the region in the United States with the highest dose rates of natural ionizing radiation at ground level). Occupational exposure of aircrews to ionizing radiation is thought to increase their risk of fatal cancer. It may not be a significant concern if one considers: (a) the annual dose of ionizing radiation to the crewmembers in our study is only 7-41% higher than that received by non-flying residents of Region 8 (terrestrial gamma and cosmic radiation in the Denver, Colorado, area of Region 8); (b) the dose to non-flying residents of Region 8 is 87% higher than the average dose to non-flying residents of the United States; and (c) the estimated death rate from cancer in the six states in Region 8 is 3-26% lower than the average for the United States. When considering health concerns of aircrew members, one should recognize that the standard risk coefficient for radiation-induced fatal cancer is derived primarily from studies on individuals exposed to radiation at higher doses and dose rates and of generally lower energy, than the galactic cosmic radiation to which aircrews are exposed. These differences are a major reason that epidemiology studies are important in evaluating health aspects of the occupational radiation exposure of aircrews.

  4. Ionizing Radiation Promotes the Migratory and Invasive Potential of Lung Cancer Cells by Different Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Jin Nyoung; Kang, Ga Young; Um, Hong Duck [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Although radiation therapy is a major therapeutic modality for cancer treatment, previous reports have suggested that ionizing radiation (IR) can promote the invasive and metastatic potential of cancer cells. It was consistently reported that IR can induce certain types of matrix metalloproteinases, which are critical to the degradation of extracellular matrix. Given that the motility of cancer cells is an additional requirement for their metastasis, this study investigated whether IR can also influence the migratory potential of cancer cells.

  5. 21 CFR 579.40 - Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. 579.40 Section 579.40 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 579.40 Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients....

  6. Application of ionizing radiation in sterilization of Selasan milk replacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olbrichova, D.; Zouharova, A.; Buriankova, E. (Statni Vyzkumny Ustav Textilni, Veverska Bityska (Czechoslovakia). Centrum Radiacnich Technologii)

    1984-08-01

    The effect of eight ascending doses of radiation within the range of 3 to 30 kGy on isolated microflora was observed in the milk replacer Selasan with initial contamination 4.9x10/sup 4/ germs per 1 gram of preparation. Microorganisms which survived the said radiation dose were evaluated micro and macroscopically. The level of resistance of isolates was determined on the basis of parameters of inactivation curves Nsub(D)=N/sub 0/.esup(-kD). The obtained data served as the basis for determining the minimum sterilization dose 25 kGy for the Selasan replacer.

  7. Low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation-induced bioeffects in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-03-01

    Animal experimental studies indicate that acute or chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) (≤100 mSv) or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (LDRIR) (radiation exposure (i.e. acute, fractionated or chronic radiation exposure), type of radiation, combination of radiation with other toxic agents (such as smoking, pesticides or other chemical toxins) or animal experimental designs. In this review paper, we aimed to update radiation researchers and radiologists on the current progress achieved in understanding the LDIR/LDRIR-induced bionegative and biopositive effects reported in the various animal models. The roles played by a variety of molecules that are implicated in LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects will be elaborated. The review will help in future investigations of LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects by providing clues for designing improved animal research models in order to clarify the current controversial/contradictory findings from existing studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. A Novel Highly Ionizing Particle Trigger using the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Penwell, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is an important part of the experiment’s charged particle tracking system. It also provides the ability to discriminate electrons from pions efficiently using large signal amplitudes induced in the TRT straw tubes by transition radiation. This amplitude information can also be used to identify heavily ionizing particles, such as monopoles, or Q-balls, that traverse the straws. Because of their large ionization losses, these particles can range out before they reach the ATLAS calorimeter, making them difficult to identify by the experiment’s first level trigger. Much of this inefficiency could be regained by making use of a feature of the TRT electronics that allows fast access to information on whether large-amplitude signals were produced in regions of the detector. A modest upgrade to existing electronics could allow triggers sensitive to heavily ionizing particles at level-1 to be constructed by counting such large-amplitude signals in roads corresponding to...

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on the physicochemical properties of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fellipe S.; Santos, Anderson R.L.; Pereira, Walsan W., E-mail: fellipess@ird.gov.br, E-mail: aleiras@ird.gov.br, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Oenology has as its main purpose the continuous improvement of wine quality without jeopardizing its proprieties, and the intent is to make these improvements using innovative new technologies. The objective of the present work is to assess the effect of ionizing radiation on the physicochemical properties of Cabernet Sauvignon that may lead to changes in wine quality, aging process and other related characteristics. The samples used for this process were irradiated using an Argonaut reactor powered at 340 Watts and with a thermal neutron fluency of 10{sup 9} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}. For irradiation experiments, the samples were put into the reactor chamber until the reactor reached criticality and for an additional 30 minutes while receiving radiation. The analyzed data included density, alcoholic, ashes and spectrophotometric measurements of absorbance at wavelengths of 420, 520 and 620 nm. Increased absorbance values at 420 nm indicate an increase in tannin composition of the wine and therefore a higher level of oxidation. Intriguingly, a rise in absorbance was also observed at 520 nm for the same test samples; which is inconsistent with published data on irradiated cachaca that showed that anthocyanin levels dropped at 520 nm after irradiation. In summary, for measurements made at a fluency of 109 n/cm{sup 2}.s for 30 min, the effects were minimal, which requires a higher dose to have better effects. Future studies should evaluating dosing effects of irradiation on improving the quality of the Cabernet Sauvignon. (author)

  10. New approaches in clinical application of laser-driven ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Szabó, Rita Emilia; Polanek, Róbert; Szabó, Zoltán.; Brunner, Szilvia; Tőkés, Tünde

    2017-05-01

    The planned laser-driven ionizing beams (photon, very high energy electron, proton, carbon ion) at laser facilities have the unique property of ultra-high dose rate (>Gy/s-10), short pulses, and at ELI-ALPS high repetition rate, carry the potential to develop novel laser-driven methods towards compact hospital-based clinical application. The enhanced flexibility in particle and energy selection, the high spatial and time resolution and extreme dose rate could be highly beneficial in radiotherapy. These approaches may increase significantly the therapeutic index over the currently available advanced radiation oncology methods. We highlight two nuclear reactionbased binary modalities and the planned radiobiology research. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is an advanced cell targeted modality requiring 10B enriched boron carrier and appropriate neutron beam. The development of laser-based thermal and epithermal neutron source with as high as 1010 fluence rate could enhance the research activity in this promising field. Boron-Proton Fusion reaction is as well as a binary approach, where 11B containing compounds are accumulated into the cells, and the tumour selectively irradiated with protons. Due to additional high linear energy transfer alpha particle release of the BPFR and the maximum point of the Bragg-peak is increased, which result in significant biological effect enhancement. Research at ELI-ALPS on detection of biological effect differences of modified or different quality radiation will be presented using recently developed zebrafish embryo and rodent models.

  11. Detailed Investigations of Interactions between Ionizing Radiation and Neutral Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen L

    2014-03-31

    We are investigating phenomena that stem from the many body dynamics associated with ionization of an atom or molecule by photon or charged particle. Our program is funded through the Department of Energy EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership Award in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We are using variations on the well established COLTRIMS technique to measure ions and electrons ejected during these interactions. Photoionization measurements take place at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL as part of the ALS-COLTRIMS collaboration with the groups of Reinhard Dörner at Frankfurt and Ali Belkacem at LBNL. Additional experiments on charged particle impact are conducted locally at Auburn University where we are studying the dissociative molecular dynamics following interactions with either ions or electrons over a velocity range of 1 to 12 atomic units.

  12. Combined effect of heptaplatin and ionizing radiation on human squamous carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Mi-Ryeong; Paik, Soon-Young; Chung, Su-Mi

    2005-02-28

    Heptaplatin, cis-malonato [(4R,5R)-4,5-bis (amino-methyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane] platinum(II) (SKI-2053R, Sunpla) is a new platinum derivative with anti-tumor activity comparable to cisplatin on various cancer cell lines. Preclinical studies suggest that it is less nephrotoxic than cisplatin. This study was undertaken to examine the combined effect of heptaplatin and ionizing radiation on two established human squamous carcinoma cell lines (NCI-H520, SQ20B). The cytotoxic activity of heptaplatin was concentration-dependent in both cell lines. When low dose heptaplatin was combined with high dose ionizing radiation, there was an additive cytotoxic effect on NCI-H520 cells (P < 0.05), while a moderate dose of heptaplatin and a low dose of ionizing radiation had an additive cytotoxic effect on the growth of SQ20B cells (P < 0.05). FACS analysis and DAPI staining showed that their additive cytotoxic effects were correlated with the induction of apoptosis. Further studies are warranted using heptaplatin and ionizing radiation in squamous cell carcinoma as a substitute for cisplatin.

  13. Inactivation by ionizing radiation of Salmonella enteritidis serotype montevideo grown in composed sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, J.R.; Burge, W.D.; Enkiri, N.K.

    1977-04-01

    S. enteritidis ser. montevideo were grown in composted sewage sludge to levels of approximately 10/sup 9//g. These bacteria were found to be inactivated by ionizing radiation (with Co/sub 60/) at approximately the same rate (30 krads/log) as Salmonella species in liquid digested sludge.

  14. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  15. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  16. Ionizing Radiation Impacts on Cardiac Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Alexander; Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Pignalosa, Diana; Schroeder, Insa S.; Durante, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of ionizing radiation on the earliest stages of embryonic development although it is well recognized that ionizing radiation is a natural part of our environment and further exposure may occur due to medical applications. The current study addresses this issue using D3 mouse embryonic stem cells as a model system. Cells were irradiated with either X-rays or carbon ions representing sparsely and densely ionizing radiation and their effect on the differentiation of D3 cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes through embryoid body (EB) formation was measured. This study is the first to demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs the formation of beating cardiomyocytes with carbon ions being more detrimental than X-rays. However, after prolonged culture time, the number of beating EBs derived from carbon ion irradiated cells almost reached control levels indicating that the surviving cells are still capable of developing along the cardiac lineage although with considerable delay. Reduced EB size, failure to downregulate pluripotency markers, and impaired expression of cardiac markers were identified as the cause of compromised cardiomyocyte formation. Dysregulation of cardiac differentiation was accompanied by alterations in the expression of endodermal and ectodermal markers that were more severe after carbon ion irradiation than after exposure to X-rays. In conclusion, our data show that carbon ion irradiation profoundly affects differentiation and thus may pose a higher risk to the early embryo than X-rays. PMID:26506910

  17. The Escape of Ionizing Photons from OB Associations in Disk Galaxies Radiation Transfer Through Superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Dove, J B; Ferrara, A; Dove, James B.; Ferrara, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    By solving the time-dependent radiation transfer problem of stellar radiation through evolving superbubbles within a smoothly varying H I distribution, we have estimated the fraction of ionizing photons emitted by OB associations that escapes the H I disk of our Galaxy. We considered a coeval star-formation history and a Gaussian star-formation history with a time spread sigma_t = 2 Myr. We find that the shells of the expanding superbubbles quickly trap or attenuate the ionizing flux, such that most of the escaping radiation escapes shortly after the formation of the superbubble. Superbubbles of large associations can blowout of the H I disk and form dynamic chimneys, which allow the ionizing radiation directly to escape the H I disk. However, blowout occurs when the ionizing photon luminosity has dropped well below the association's maximum luminosity. For the coeval star-formation history, the fraction of photons that escape each side of the disk in the solar vicinity is f_esc approx 6% (the total fraction ...

  18. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  19. Decoloration and detoxification of effluents by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrely, Sueli I.; Morais, Aline V.; Rosa, Jorge M.; Badaró-Pedroso, Cintia; da Conceição Pereira, Maria; Higa, Marcela C.

    2016-07-01

    Three distinct textile samples were investigated for color and toxicity (S1-chemical/textile industry; S2-final textile effluent; S3 - standard textile produced effluent-untreated blue). Radiation processing of these samples were carried out at Dynamitron Electron Beam Accelerator and color and toxicity removal were determined: color removal by radiation was 96% (40 kGy, S1); 55% (2.5 kGy, S2) and 90% (2.5 kGy, S3). Concerning toxicity assays, Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria demonstrated higher reduction after radiation than the other systems: removal efficiencies were 33% (20 kGy, S1); 55% (2.5 kGy, S2) and 33% (2.5 kGy, S3). Daphnia similis and Brachionus plicatilis fitted well for S3 effluents. Hard toxic volumes into biological treatment plant may be avoided if radiation would be previously applied in a real plant. Results reveled how indispensable is to run toxicity to more than one living-organism.

  20. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation and aging time on total phenolics in Brazilian sugarcane spirit with green propolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Claudio L. de; Baptista, Antonio S.; Alencar, Severino M. de; Tiveron, Ana P.; Prado, Adna; Bergamaschi, Keityane B.; Veiga, Lucimara F. da; Baptista, Aparecido S.; Horii, Jorge [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao], e-mail: claguiar@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: asbaptis@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: alencar@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: anptiver@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: adprado@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: kbergamas@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: lcfernan@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: pmatao@gmail.com, e-mail: jhorii@esalq.usp.br; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Propolis is a natural product from vegetable origin that is generally collected from beehives. This product is well-known for its heath benefits attributed to its biological properties. On the other hand, Brazilian sugarcane spirit, cachaca, shows increasing interest and importance in the alcoholic beverage segment in many markets in the world. Therefore, it was evaluated the addition of propolis into cachaca and the effect of ionizing radiation on propolis compounds with biological activity. Samples of cachaca with propolis used in irradiation experiments were prepared from cachaca (40 deg GL) composed with propolis (0,1 %). Eight treatments, with four repetitions each, were carried out in this study. Three doses of ionizing radiation from electron beam and gamma radiation by {sup 60}Co were applied on the cachaca samples, i.e. 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 kGy, aiming to accelerate the aging of the cachaca samples. The spirits samples were stored for two periods (immediately after the radiation treatment and 30 months after the treatments) and their phenolic compounds contents were analyzed. Phenolic compounds contents were statistically different between both storage times of the cachaca. The samples of cachaca treated with electron beam at 2.0 kGy presented higher reduction in phenolic compounds contents, approximately 6 % in the first analysis and 11 % in the second analysis. In conclusion, the time of storage to promote reduction on the phenolics compounds and the ionizing radiations from electron beams affect more the contents of these compounds than gamma radiation. (author)

  2. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko, E-mail: kobashin@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  3. Dephosphorylation and subcellular compartment change of the mitotic Bloom's syndrome DNA helicase in response to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Stéphanie; Sekhri, Redha; Tintignac, Lionel A; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Chatton, Bruno; Jaulin, Christian; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2002-02-22

    Bloom's syndrome is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder that combines a marked genetic instability and an increased risk of developing all types of cancers and which results from mutations in both copies of the BLM gene encoding a RecQ 3'-5' DNA helicase. We recently showed that BLM is phosphorylated and excluded from the nuclear matrix during mitosis. We now show that the phosphorylated mitotic BLM protein is associated with a 3'-5' DNA helicase activity and interacts with topoisomerase III alpha. We demonstrate that in mitosis-arrested cells, ionizing radiation and roscovitine treatment both result in the reversion of BLM phosphorylation, suggesting that BLM could be dephosphorylated through the inhibition of cdc2 kinase. This was supported further by our data showing that cdc2 kinase activity is inhibited in gamma-irradiated mitotic cells. Finally we show that after ionizing radiation, BLM is not involved in the establishment of the mitotic DNA damage checkpoint but is subjected to a subcellular compartment change. These findings lead us to propose that BLM may be phosphorylated during mitosis, probably through the cdc2 pathway, to form a pool of rapidly available active protein. Inhibition of cdc2 kinase after ionizing radiation would lead to BLM dephosphorylation and possibly to BLM recruitment to some specific sites for repair.

  4. Quantitative analysis reveals asynchronous and more than DSB-associated histone H2AX phosphorylation after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianxun; Hendzel, Michael J; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2006-03-01

    Rapid phosphorylation of histone H2AX after exposure of cells to ionizing radiation occurs at DSB sites and extends to a region including as much as 30 Mbp of chromatin to form visible microscopic structures called gamma-H2AX foci. Although the kinetics of total cellular histone H2AX phosphorylation after irradiation has been characterized, we still know little about the phosphorylation kinetics of individual gamma-H2AX foci. In addition, there are hundreds of smaller gamma-H2AX foci that are not associated with DNA double-strand breaks. We refer to these sites as DSB-unrelated gamma-H2AX foci. By using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, deconvolution and three-dimensional image analysis, we established an objective method to quantitatively analyze each gamma-H2AX focus as well as to discriminate DSB-related gamma-H2AX foci from DSB-unrelated gamma-H2AX foci. Using this method, we found that histone H2AX phosphorylation at different DSB sites was asynchronous after exposure to ionizing radiation. This may reflect the heterogeneous characteristic of free DNA ends that are generated under these conditions. In addition, we found that increased histone H2AX phosphorylation also occurred outside of DSB sites after exposure to ionizing radiation. The function of this DSB-unassociated phosphorylation is not known.

  5. Laser-based flow cytometric analysis of genotoxicity of humans exposed to ionizing radiation during the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Bigbee, William L.; Langlois, Richard G.; Grant, Stephen G.; Pleshanov, Pavel G.; Chirkov, Andre A.; Pilinskaya, Maria A.

    1991-05-01

    An analytical technique has been developed that allows laser-based flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of red blood cells that have lost allele-specific expression of a cell surface antigen due to genetic toxicity in bone marrow precursor cells. Previous studies demonstrated a correlation of such effects with the exposure of each individual to mutagenic phenomena, such as ionizing radiation, and the effects can persist for the lifetime of each individual. During the emergency response to the nuclear power plant accidert at Chemobyl, Ukraine, USSR, a number of people were exposed to whole body doses of ioniing radiation. Some of these individuals were tested with this laser-based assay and found to express a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of variant red blood cells that appears to be a persistent biological effect. This effect is similar to that which was previously observed in individuals who were exposed to ionizing radiation at Hiroshima in 1945 because of the A-bomb explosion. All data indicate that this assay might well be used as a biodosimeter to estimate radiation dose and also as an element to be used for estimating the risk of each individual to develop cancer due to radiation exposure.

  6. Evaluation of the compatibility induced by ionizing radiation on polymeric blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Machado, Luci D.B., E-mail: lmachado@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Feitosa, Marcos A.F. [Centro Paula Souza, Faculdade de Tecnologia da Zona Leste, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares

    2011-07-01

    To produce new polymers is a costly and time consuming task. Therefore, the utilization of existing polymers in form of blends enables to obtain new polymeric materials at a competitive cost. In this sense, polymer blending has become a growing scientific and commercial development activity. In most of the cases, polymeric blends have immiscible components and this represents an unbecoming situation on blend design. For such immiscible blends, it is required the use of compatibilizers to gain properties advantage. Compatibilization process can be achieved by chemical handling using additives and heat. On the other hand, ionizing radiation induces compatibilization by free radicals, which improve the dispersion and adhesion of the blend phases, without use of chemical additives and at room temperature. In this work, a polyamide 6.6/low-density polyethylene 75/25% wt/wt composition blend was electron beam irradiated up to 250 kGy, and thereafter mechanical tests were carried out. Tensile measurements have shown that the strength at break increases, the elongation at break decreases, the resistance to impact decreases and hardness increases when the radiation dose increases. Since this mechanical behavior is due to cross-linking and to the radiation induced blend compatibilization, this compatibility was evaluated by the approach of the glass transition temperatures for both components using DMA measurements. The results have shown that the glass transition temperatures of the blend components got closer in 8 deg C in the irradiated sample, when compared to the glass transition temperature values obtained for non-irradiated blend. (author)

  7. Highly sensitive detection of ionizing radiations by a photoluminescent uranyl organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jian; Wang, Yaxing; Liu, Wei; Yin, Xuemiao; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao [School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Zou, Youming [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Liu, Guokui [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-19

    Precise detection of low-dose X- and γ-radiations remains a challenge and is particularly important for studying biological effects under low-dose ionizing radiation, safety control in medical radiation treatment, survey of environmental radiation background, and monitoring cosmic radiations. We report here a photoluminescent uranium organic framework, whose photoluminescence intensity can be accurately correlated with the exposure dose of X- or γ-radiations. This allows for precise and instant detection of ionizing radiations down to the level of 10{sup -4} Gy, representing a significant improvement on the detection limit of approximately two orders of magnitude, compared to other chemical dosimeters reported up to now. The electron paramagnetic resonance analysis suggests that with the exposure to radiations, the carbonyl double bonds break affording oxo-radicals that can be stabilized within the conjugated uranium oxalate-carboxylate sheet. This gives rise to a substantially enhanced equatorial bonding of the uranyl(VI) ions as elucidated by the single-crystal structure of the γ-ray irradiated material, and subsequently leads to a very effective photoluminescence quenching through phonon-assisted relaxation. The quenched sample can be easily recovered by heating, enabling recycled detection for multiple runs. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Shared decision-making: is it time to obtain informed consent before radiologic examinations utilizing ionizing radiation? Legal and ethical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Concerns about the possibility of developing cancer due to diagnostic imaging examinations utilizing ionizing radiation exposure are increasing. Research studies of survivors of atomic bomb explosions, nuclear reactor accidents, and other unanticipated exposures to similar radiation have led to varying conclusions regarding the stochastic effects of radiation exposure. That high doses of ionizing radiation cause cancer in humans is generally accepted, but the question of whether diagnostic levels of radiation cause cancer continues to be hotly debated. It cannot be denied that overexposure to ionizing radiation beyond a certain threshold, which has not been exactly determined, does generate cancer. This causes a dilemma: what should patients be informed about the possibility that a CT or similar examination might cause cancer later in life? At present, there is no consensus in the radiology community as to whether informed consent must be obtained from a patient before the patient undergoes a CT or similar examination. The author analyzes whether there is a legal duty mandating radiologists to obtain such informed consent but also, irrespective of the law, whether there an ethical duty that compels radiologists to inform patients of potential adverse effects of ionizing radiation. Over the past decade, there has been a noticeable shift from a benevolent, paternalistic approach to medical care to an autonomy-based, shared-decision-making approach, whereby patient and physician work as partners in determining what is medically best for the patient. Radiologists should discuss the benefits and hazards of imaging with their patients.

  9. Cataract and ionizing radiation; Cataracte et rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassilieff, S. [Ecole des Applications Militaires de l' Energie Atomique, 50 - Cherbourg Octeville (France)

    2009-10-15

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  10. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. Final report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-12-31

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme`s role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  12. [Biochemical and immunological effects of ionizing radiation in radiology staff members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhatlioğlu, Selami; Oğur, Erkin; Ozan, A Tevfik; Gürsu, Ferit; Gödekmerdan, Ahmet; Ayar, Ahmet

    2004-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of occupational exposures to long term low-dose ionizing radiation on blood biochemistry and immunity levels of the radiology staff. Fifty-one subjects, aged between 21-57 years (30.06+/-7.02 years), working in the department of radiology were enrolled to this study. Twenty-five subjects (49.1%) were female and 26 (50.9%) were male. Control group consisted of 40 healthy non-smoking subjects aged between 20-60 years (mean 31.5+/-5.75) who had never been exposed to radiation; 19 (47.5%) of these were female and 21 (52.5%) male. Venous blood samples were obtained from the radiology staff and control group and immunological and biochemical analysis of samples were performed. CD4+ T-lymphocyte ratio, and serum total IgA, IgG, IgM and C3, C4 levels were lower in the radiology staff compared to the controls. Serum triglycerides and paraoxonase activities were increased in the radiology staff (pperiodical blood biochemistry and immune function tests.

  13. On the biophysical interpretation of lethal DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P; Kundr\\'{a}t, Pavel; Stewart, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Although DNA damage is widely viewed as a critical target for the induction of cell killing by ionizing radiation, the exact nature of DNA damage responsible for these effects is unknown. To address this issue, the probability of forming lethal damage by single proton tracks, derived from published survival data for Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated by protons with energies from 0.57 to 5.01 MeV, has been compared to estimated yields of complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) calculated by Monte Carlo models. The reported studies indicate that total DSB yields and the yields of other classes of clustered DNA damage do not correlate well with trends in the expected number of lethal events for protons with increasing linear energy transfer (LET). However, a good correlation was found between the number of lethal events and the yields of DSBs consisting of 8 or more elementary DNA lesions. These results indicate that differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiations of diverse quality c...

  14. Effect of Exposure to Non-ionizing Radiation (Electromagnetic Fields on Human System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rubya Souza C and acirc;mara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate presence of radio base stations, which emit non-ionizing radiation (NIR, as well as the frequent use of mobile phones, can cause increased susceptibility of populations to the emergence of diseases such as cancers of the head and neck, biochemical, hematopoietic and hepatic changes, among others. Exposure to physical contamination, including NIR, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread sources of exposure to this type of radiation. This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to electromagnetic fields, such as radiofrequency transmissions, and many kinds of human diseases including cancer, as well as alerts to the current knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to NIR and the risk of development of adverse human health effects. This way, there appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(4.000: 187-190

  15. An update on the mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of genomic instability with a focus on ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streffer C

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Christian Streffer Institute for Medical Radiobiology, University Clinics Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: The genome of eukaryotic cells is generally instable. DNA damage occurs by endogenous processes and exogenous toxic agents. The efficient DNA repair pathways conserve the genetic information to a large extent throughout the life. However, exposure to genotoxic agents can increase the genomic instability. This phenomenon develops in a delayed manner after approximately 20 and more cell generations. It is comparatively thoroughly investigated after the exposure to ionizing radiation. The increase of genomic instability has been observed after exposures to ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo as well as with many different types of radiation. The effect is induced over a wide dose range, and it has been found with cell death, chromosomal damage, cell transformations, mutations, double-strand breaks, malformations, and cancers. No specific chromosomes or genomic sites have been observed for such events. The increased genomic instability can be transmitted to the next generation. Possible mechanisms such as oxidative stress (mitochondria may be involved, reduced DNA repair, changes in telomeres, epigenetic effects are discussed. A second wave of oxidative stress has been observed after radiation exposures with considerably high doses as well as with cytotoxic agents at time periods when an increased genomic instability was seen. However, the increase of genomic instability also happens to much lower radiation doses. Hypoxia induces an increase of genomic instability. This effect is apparently connected with a reduction of DNA repair. Changes of telomeres appear as the most probable mechanisms for the increase of genomic instability. Syndromes have been described with a genetic predisposition for high radiosensitivity. These individuals show an increase of cancer, a deficient DNA repair, a disturbed regulation of the cell cycle, and an

  16. Radiation hormesis. Stimulatory effects of low level ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shigenobu; Masui, Hisashi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-04-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis has been executed against animals and plants; subharmful doses of radiation may evoke a stimulatory response in any organism. We executed irradiating experiments of dry seeds with fusion (D-T) neutron, fission neutron, cobalt-60 gamma-ray and investigated existence of the radiation hormesis effects by measuring germination, the length of a stalk and the total weight of a seed leaf on the 7th day after starting cultivation. And we estimated radiation hormesis effects by relative effectiveness, the ratio of the mean value of measurement subjects for the irradiated group to that of non-irradiated group. In relation to Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effects on seed leaf growth from irradiated seeds have only turned up in seed groups irradiated by the fusion (D-T) neutron. We have confirmed that absorbed dose range which revealed the effects is from 1 cGy to 10 Gy and the increasing rate is from 5 percent to 25 percent against a control group. (author)

  17. Awareness of ionizing radiation exposure among junior doctors and senior medical students in radiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelhia, Elfatih

    2017-03-01

    The awareness and knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure in radiological investigations among junior doctors and medical students were studied. The participants were year four to year six senior medical students enrolled at University of Dammam and interns in King Fahad University Hospital. The survey consisted of 22 questions designed online using the software 'QuestionPro' licensed to the University of Dammam. 100 hard copies were also distributed manually and collected. A total of 221 (88.5%) questionnaires were completed. 213 participants viewed, 151 started and 128 (84.7%) completed online. 93% of the distributed samples were completed. Overall knowledge was poor; 44% and 19% of the respondents thought incorrectly that MRI and ultrasound emit ionizing radiation, respectively. Respondents (92%; n  =  203) underestimated the dose of abdominal spiral computed tomography (CT) and 4% thought no ionizing radiation involved in CT. 59% of respondents underestimated the radiation doses in nuclear medicine; bone scan 87%, PET/CT scan 67%, thyroid isotope scan 45% and PET scan 36%. 47% of the subjects had attended formal lectures, tutorials or workshops on radiation protection while 53% (n  =  119) had not. For future education the majority stated they would prefer tutorials or workshops (42.3%) or problem-based learning/case studies (32.4%), while web-based modules would be their last choice (8.1%).

  18. Radionuclide Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks: Calculations of Decay Product Radiative Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A; Visser, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    We present simple analytic solutions for the ionization rate $\\zeta_{\\rm{SLR}}$ arising from the decay of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) within protoplanetary disks. We solve the radiative transfer problem for the decay products within the disk, and thereby allow for the loss of radiation at low disk surface densities; energy loss becomes important outside $R\\gtrsim30$ for typical disk masses $M_g=0.04$ M$_\\odot$. Previous studies of chemistry/physics in these disks have neglected the impact of ionization by SLRs, and often consider only cosmic rays (CRs), because of the high CR-rate present in the ISM. However, recent work suggests that the flux of CRs present in the circumstellar environment could be substantially reduced by relatively modest stellar winds, resulting in severely modulated CR ionization rates, $\\zeta_{\\rm{CR}}$, equal to or substantially below that of SLRs ($\\zeta_{\\rm{SLR}}\\lesssim10^{-18}$ s$^{-1}$). We compute the net ionizing particle fluxes and corresponding ionization rates as a func...

  19. Stabilization of gas-filled surge arrester’s characteristics by use of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajović Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stabilization of electrical discharges in gases by means of external ionizing radiation. Discharges in a gas-filled surge arrester model were studied in both passive and active regimes of the device. An originally developed model of the gas-filled surge arrester was used. Gas pressure and the interelectrode gap were the variable parameters in our measurements. Applied radiation types included α-particles, γ-rays, X-rays, and neutrons. Measurements were performed under highly controlled laboratory conditions. The combined measurement uncertainty of the applied procedure was estimated as being under the 5% level. The results obtained are followed by a theoretical explanation. The crucial result is the conclusion that ionizing radiation does not necessarily degrade the gas-filled surge arrester’s functionality but that it, rather, improves it under certain conditions.

  20. Obtention of gelatin biopolymers by ionizing radiation; Obtencao de biopolimeros de gelatina por radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takinami, Patricia Yoko Inamura

    2014-07-01

    The gelatin (Gel) is a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer, which naturally forms semi-solid colloids or hydrogels in aqueous solutions. As a hydrophilic polymer, the Gel has structural and physico-mechanical properties that distinguish it from synthetic hydrophilic polymers. The study of these properties led to the development of the present work. Thus, Gel-based films and hydrogels were developed using ionizing radiation technology by different techniques: irradiation with {sup 60}Co, electron beam (EB) and/or pulsed EB. The Gel based-films enriched with different additives, such as glycerol (GLY), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), acrylamide and/or vegetal fiber, were irradiated with doses from 10 to 60 kGy, depending on the additive; some parameters like mechanical properties, color, and water absorption were analyzed. In the radio-induced synthesis of GEL nanohydrogels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the mixture (MIX) of additives, PEG and GEL, the size, molar mass and surface morphology of the nanohydrogels were analyzed. There was a significant increase of gel fraction with increase of the radiation dose for the GEL/fiber samples. The GEL based-films with 10% PVA irradiated at 20 kGy showed the highest puncture strength. The addition of antioxidant BHT affected on some GEL based-films properties on applied conditions. Regarding the nanohydrogels, there was a decrease of hydrodynamic radius of MIX irradiated with {sup 60}Co from 68 ± 25 nm (2 kGy) to 35 ± 4 nm (5 kGy). The radiation proved to be a convenient tool in the modification of polymeric materials for both, GEL films and hydrogels. (author)

  1. Concomitant treatment of F98 glioma cells with new liposomal platinum compounds and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Gabriel; Paquette, Benoit; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Sanche, Léon

    2010-04-01

    Despite significant advances, the radiotherapy and chemotherapy protocols marginally improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Lipoplatin(TM), and Lipoxal(TM), the liposomal formulations of cisplatin and oxaliplatin respectively, were tested on the F98 glioma cells for their ability to improve the cell uptake and increase the synergic effect when combined with ionizing radiation. The cytotoxicity and synergic effect of platinum compounds were assessed by colony formation assay, while the cellular uptake was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). After 4 h exposure with platinum compounds, cells were irradiated (1.5-6.6 Gy) with a (60)Co source. The liposomal formulations were compared to their liposome-free analogs and to carboplatin. The concomitant treatment of F98 cells with carboplatin and radiation produced the highest radiosensitizing effect (30-fold increase). Among the platinum compounds tested, Lipoplatin(TM) produced the most promising results. This liposomal formulation of cisplatin improved the cell uptake by 3-fold, and its radiosensitizing potential was enhanced by 14-fold. Although Lipoxal(TM) can potentially reduce the adverse effect of oxaliplatin, a synergic effect with radiation was measured only when incubated at a concentration higher than its IC50. Conversely, concomitant treatment with cisplatin did not result in a synergic effect, as in fact a radioprotective effect was measured on the F98 cells. In conclusion, among the five platinum compounds tested, carboplatin and Lipoplatin(TM) showed the best radiosensitizing effect. Lipoplatin(TM) seems the most promising since it led to the best cellular incorporation and has already been reported to be less neurotoxic than other platinum compounds.

  2. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  3. RADIONUCLIDE IONIZATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: CALCULATIONS OF DECAY PRODUCT RADIATIVE TRANSFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Adams, Fred C.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Visser, Ruud [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We present simple analytic solutions for the ionization rate ζ{sub SLR} arising from the decay of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) within protoplanetary disks. We solve the radiative transfer problem for the decay products within the disk, and thereby allow for the loss of radiation at low disk surface densities; energy loss becomes important outside R ∼> 30 AU for typical disk masses M{sub g} = 0.04 M{sub ☉}. Previous studies of chemistry/physics in these disks have neglected the impact of ionization by SLRs, and often consider only cosmic rays (CRs), because of the high CR-rate present in the interstellar medium. However, recent work suggests that the flux of CRs present in the circumstellar environment could be substantially reduced by relatively modest stellar winds, resulting in severely modulated CR ionization rates, ζ{sub CR}, equal to or substantially below that of SLRs (ζ{sub SLR} ∼< 10{sup –18} s{sup –1}). We compute the net ionizing particle fluxes and corresponding ionization rates as a function of position within the disk for a variety of disk models. The resulting expressions are especially simple for the case of vertically Gaussian disks (frequently assumed in the literature). Finally, we provide a power-law fit to the ionization rate in the midplane as a function of gas disk surface density and time. Depending on location in the disk, the ionization rates by SLRs are typically in the range ζ{sub SLR} ∼ (1-10) × 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}.

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

    1991-05-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  6. Multifluid Modeling of the Partially Ionized Chromosphere with Effects of Impact Ionization, Radiative Recombination and Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Poedts, D. S.; Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.

    2015-12-01

    Neutrals play an important role in the evolution of the weakly ionized solar chromosphere where the number density of neutrals can vastly exceed the number density of protons. Therefore modeling the neutral-ion interactions and studying the effect of neutrals on the ambient plasma properties is an important task for better understanding the observed emission lines and the propagation of disturbances from the photosphere to the transition region and the corona. To pursue this goal we have developed two-fluid and three-fluid simulation setups to study the interaction between electrons, ions and neutrals in a reactive gravitationally stratified collisional media. The model considers the electrons and ions within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations, allowing for propagation of higher frequency waves neglected by the standard MHD approximation. Separate mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for the neutrals and the interaction between the different fluids is determined by the chemical reactions, such as impact ionization, radiative recombination and charge exchange, provided as additional source terms. To initialize the system we consider an ideal gas equation of state with equal initial temperatures for the electrons, ions and the neutrals and different density profiles. The initial temperature and density profiles are height-dependent and follow VAL C atmospheric model for the solar chromosphere. We have searched for a chemical and collisional equilibrium between the ions and the neutrals in the hydrostatic case to avoid unphysical outflows and artificial heating induced by initial pressure imbalances. Next we consider ion-neutral interactions in magnetized plasma with an initial magnetic profile, corresponding to emerging magnetic funnel. Finally we include an external

  7. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of atoms and molecules using VUV synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, Oleg; Kim, Sang Kyu; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-31

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) has been performed for Ar, N(2), O(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, C(2)H(2), and C(6)H(6). MATI allows for a better determination of ionization energies compared to those derived from photoionization efficiency curves traditionally used in synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. The separation of the long-lived Rydberg state from the directly formed prompt ion, essential for a meaningful MATI spectrum, has been accomplished by employing an arrangement of ion optics coupled to unique electric field pulsing schemes. For Ar, a number of resolved bands below the ionization energy are observed, and these are ascribed to high-n,l Rydberg states prepared in the MATI scheme. The first vibrational state resolved MATI spectra of N(2) and O(2) are reported, and spectral characteristics are discussed in comparison with previously reported threshold photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Although MATI performed with synchrotron radiation is intrinsically less sensitive compared to laser-based sources, this work demonstrates that MATI spectroscopy performed with widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is a complementary technique for studying the ionization spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules.

  8. A semiconductor parameter analyzer for ionizing radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luiz A.P., E-mail: lasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Electrometers and ion chamber are normally used to make several types of measurements in a radiation field and there is a unique voltage applied to each detector type. Some electronic devices that are built of semiconductor materials like silicon crystal can also be used for the same purpose. In this case, a characteristic curve of the device must be acquired to choose an operation point which consists of an electrical current or voltage to be applied to the device. Unlike ion chambers, such an electronic device can have different operation points depending on its current versus voltage curve (I x V). The best operation point of the device is also a function of the radiation, energy, dose rate and fluence. The purpose of this work is to show a semiconductor parameter analyzer built to acquire I x V curves as usually, and the innovation here is the fact that it can be used to obtain such a parametric curve when a quad-polar device is under irradiation. The results demonstrate that the system is a very important tool to scientists interested to evaluate a semiconductor detector before, during and after irradiation. A collection of results for devices under an X-ray beam and a neutron fluence are presented: photodiode, phototransistors, bipolar transistor and MOSFET. (author)

  9. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.

  10. Enhancing the biological degradability of sulfamethoxazole by ionizing radiation treatment in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sági, Gyuri; Kovács, Krisztina; Bezsenyi, Anikó; Csay, Tamás; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2016-07-01

    Changes of biodegradability and toxicity were followed up on aqueous solutions of sulfamethoxazole (SMX), during ionizing radiation treatment. The biodegradability of SMX (0.1 mmol dm-3) was specified by five-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5), using municipal activated sludge, and the results showed an improvement with applying only 0.4 kGy dose. BOD5 further increased with prolonged irradiation, indicating a conversion of SMX, a non-biodegradable compound, to biologically treatable substances. At 2.5 kGy dose, the BOD5/COD ratio increased from 0 to 0.16. The total organic carbon (TOC) content showed a decrease of only 15% at this point, thus high degree of mineralization is not necessary to make SMX digestible for the low concentrations of microorganisms used during BOD5 measurements. Increment in respiration inhibition of municipal activated sludge was observed with increasing the dose. The EC50 values showed a decrease of one order of magnitude when changing the dose from 0.4 kGy to 2.5 kGy. The increase of inhibition and formation of H2O2 showed a strong correlation.

  11. Total ionizing dose radiation effects on NMOS parasitic transistors in advanced bulk CMOS technology devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoping, He; Zujun, Wang; Jiangkun, Sheng; Shaoyan, Huang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, total ionizing dose effect of NMOS transistors in advanced CMOS technology are examined. The radiation tests are performed at 60Co sources at the dose rate of 50 rad (Si)/s. The investigation's results show that the radiation-induced charge buildup in the gate oxide can be ignored, and the field oxide isolation structure is the main total dose problem. The total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects of field oxide parasitic transistors are studied in detail. An analytical model of radiation defect charge induced by TID damage in field oxide is established. The I - V characteristics of the NMOS parasitic transistors at different doses are modeled by using a surface potential method. The modeling method is verified by the experimental I - V characteristics of 180 nm commercial NMOS device induced by TID radiation at different doses. The model results are in good agreement with the radiation experimental results, which shows the analytical model can accurately predict the radiation response characteristics of advanced bulk CMOS technology device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11305126).

  12. [Dosimetric system for assessing doses received by people occupationally exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodecki, Marcin; Domienik, Joanna U; Zmyślony, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The current system of dosimetric quantities has been defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Complexity of the system implies the physical nature of ionizing radiation, resulting from the presence of different types of radiation of different ionization capabilities, as well as the individual radiation sensitivity of biological material exposed. According to the latest recommendations, there are three types of dosimeter quantities relevant to radiation protection and radiological assessment of occupational exposure. These are the basic quantities, safety quantities and operational quantities. Dose limits for occupational exposure relate directly to the protection quantities, i.e. the equivalent dose and effective dose, while these quantities are practically unmeasurable in real measurement conditions. For this reason, in the system of dosimetric quantities directly measurable operating volumes were defined. They represent equivalents of the protection quantities that allow for a reliable assessment of equivalent and effective dose by conducting routine monitoring of occupational exposure. This paper presents the characteristics of these quantities, their relationships and importance in assessing individual effects of radiation. Also the methods for their implementation in personal and environmental dosimetry were showcased. The material contained in the article is a compendium of essential information about dosimetric quantities with reference to the contemporary requirements of the law, including the changed annual occupational exposure limit for the lens of the eye. The material is especially addressed to those responsible for dosimetry monitoring in the workplace, radiation protection inspectors and occupational health physicians.

  13. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  14. Quantitative phosphoproteomics identifies filaggrin and other targets of ionizing radiation in a human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Sowa, Marianne B; von Neubeck, Claere; Aldrich, Josh T; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Stenoien, David L

    2012-05-01

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low- and high-dose ionizing radiation-dependent signalling in a complex three-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labelling strategy using sham and three radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1052 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 176 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1, 2 and 3) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. Altered phosphorylation of multiple sites in profilaggrin linker domains coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to both low and high doses of ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain tissue integrity and mitigate effects of radiation exposure.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on changes in the level of gibberellin-like substances during Scotch pine seeds germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Michalski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The level of gibberellin-like substances in pine seeds exposed to ionizing radiation was investigated using extraction, fractionation, acid hydrolysis, partitioning on chromatographic columns and biological tests. It was found that the level of free and bound gibberellin-like substances is dependent on the applied gamma radiation dose. It is assumed that ionizing radiation may re-lease bound gibberellins into free ones.

  16. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A. [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  17. Appearance of pseudo-Pelger Huet anomaly after accidental exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goans, Ronald E; Iddins, Carol J; Christensen, Doran; Wiley, Albert; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the morphology of formed elements of human blood after exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo, archival smears of peripheral blood from eight individuals involved in the 1958 Y-12 criticality accident at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, were examined manually by light microscopy. For each case, increased interlobar bridging was observed in nuclei of the myeloid cells, many of which were bilobed and morphologically similar to Pelger Huet (PH) cells. The high-dose group (n = 5, 2.98-4.61 Gy-Eq) exhibited 13.0 ± 0.85% PH cells (mean ± SEM) in the neutrophil population compared to 6.8 ± 1.6% in the low-dose group (n = 3, 0.29-0.86 Gy-Eq; p = 0.008). An age- and gender-matched control group (n = 8) exhibited 3.6 ± 0.9% PH cells. Results of a one-way ANOVA show that the high-dose group is statistically different from both the low-dose group and the control group (p = 0.002). However, the low-dose group is not statistically different from the control group (p = 0.122). The mean number of nuclear lobes in blood neutrophils was also enumerated as a function of time after exposure and was found to be diminished, consistent with incomplete nuclear segmentation that is characteristic of the Pelger Huet anomaly (PHA). In contrast to these changes in myeloid cells, the morphology of erythrocytes and platelets appeared to be normal. The authors conclude that ionizing radiation induces abnormal morphology of circulating neutrophils, which is similar to the pseudo-PHA that is acquired in disorders such as myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia, and leukemoid reactions. Potential molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces this morphological change are discussed. From this cohort, the biomarker appears to be present early post-accident (accident. Assessment of circulating pseudo-Pelger Huet cells is being investigated as a potential biodosimetric tool.

  18. Silibinin attenuates ionizing radiation-induced pro-angiogenic response and EMT in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K. [Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); Rajamani, Paulraj [School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); Singh, Rana P., E-mail: rana_singh@mail.jnu.ac.in [Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); School of Life Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2015-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Potential model showing mechanism of silibinin-mediated attenuation of IR-induced angiogenic phenotype and EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin counters radiation induced invasive and migratory phenotype of cancer cells by down-regulating mitogenic pathways activated by IR, leading to inhibition of molecules including VEGF, iNOS, MMPs and N-cadherin. Silibinin also reverses IR mediated E-cadherin down-regulation, inhibiting EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin also radiosensitizes endothelial cells, reduces capillary tube formation by targeting various pro-angiogenic molecules. Further, silibinin may inhibit autocrine and paracrine signaling between tumor and endothelial cells by decreasing the levels of VEGF and other signaling molecules activated in response to IR. - Highlights: • Silibinin radiosensitizes endothelial cells. • Silibinin targets ionization radiation (IR)-induced EMT in PCa cells. • Silibinin is in phase II clinical trial in PCa patients, hence clinically relevant. - Abstract: Radiotherapy of is well established and frequently utilized in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. However, recurrence following therapy and distant metastases are commonly encountered problems. Previous studies underline that, in addition to its therapeutic effects, ionizing radiation (IR) increases the vascularity and invasiveness of surviving radioresistant cancer cells. This invasive phenotype of radioresistant cells is an upshot of IR-induced pro-survival and mitogenic signaling in cancer as well as endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a plant flavonoid, silibinin can radiosensitize endothelial cells by inhibiting expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Combining silibinin with IR not only strongly down-regulated endothelial cell proliferation, clonogenicity and tube formation ability rather it strongly (p < 0.001) reduced migratory and invasive properties of PCa cells which were otherwise marginally affected by IR treatment alone. Most of the pro

  19. Thin films deposited by laser ablation for the measurement of the ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; Peliculas delgadas depositadas por ablacion laser para la medicion de radiacion ionizante y no ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal B, J.E.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Romero, S.; Gonzalez, P.; Salinas, B. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In this work the obtained results to synthesize thin films of amorphous carbon with incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen are presented, as well as thin films of aluminium oxide using the laser ablation technique. The thin films were exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma rays of a {sup 60} Co source, beta radiation of a {sup 90} Sr source) and a non-ionizing radiation (UV radiation). The obtained results show that it is possible to obtain materials in thin film form with thickness of hundreds of nanometers, which present thermoluminescent response when being irradiated with ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation. (Author)

  20. [Scrap metal and ionizing radiation hazard: prevention and protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugni, U

    2012-01-01

    The numerous accidents occurred in companies that melt scrap metals have shown that the hazard caused by the presence of radioactive materials--or 'orphan sources'--may have serious consequences on standard production, with great economic and social damage. Italian Legislative Decree No. 100/11 establishes the skills required for the safe management of scrap metals in the whole production cycle, thus requiring the involvement of experts in radiation protection. The paper details the procedures that shall be implemented in the companies that melt scrap metals. Said procedures involve several professional roles: managers, department heads and occupational physicians. The paper describes the general characteristics of the instruments used, staff training programs and the experience gained in 15 years of activity.

  1. Assessment of risks from occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of health effects from occupational exposure to radiation presents a variety of problems resulting from the time dependent nature of the exposure data, the more favorable health frequently experienced by working populations, and limits imposed by the size of the populations and the magnitudes of the exposures received. A proportional hazards model is used to derive tests for determining if statistically significant effects are present and is also considered for point estimation. Because effects of the size expected from current estimates are unlikely to be detected in occupationally exposed groups, methods of calculating upper confidence limits are considered. Data from the Hanford plant are used to illustrate many of the problems and procedures.

  2. Stability evaluation of resveratrol submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momesso, Roberta G.R.A.P.; Silva, Mariana L. da; Spencer, Patrick J.; Sousa, Jose M. de; Rogero, Jose R.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: robertapassarelli@yahoo.com.br

    2009-07-01

    The polyphenol trans-resveratrol (trans-3, 4',5-trihydroxystilbene) is a natural phytoalexin, reported to exert different biological activities, such as antioxidant properties. In the attempt to make possible the topic administration of resveratrol it will be immobilized in a hydrogel matrix obtained by gamma radiation crosslinking process which can cause undesirable hydrolysis reactions in the active compound. The aim of this work was to verify the aqueous/ethanol resveratrol solution stability and antioxidant activity after irradiation at 20 kGy. The integrity and stability were compared with nature one by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technique. The antioxidant activity was determined by the free radical scavenging method, using 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.) as free radical. The results demonstrated the decomposition of resveratrol and reduction of antioxidant capacity after irradiation at 20 kGy dose. (author)

  3. Cumulative ionizing radiation exposure in patients with end stage kidney disease: a 6-year retrospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyle, Joe

    2011-08-13

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). To investigate factors which may be independently associated with risk of high cumulative effective dose (CED). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study had local institutional review board ethical approval. We conducted a retrospective study of 394 period prevalent ESKD patients attending a single tertiary referral centre between 2004 and 2009. Patient demographics were obtained from case records. Details of radiological investigations were obtained from the institutional radiology computerized database. CED was calculated using standard procedure specific radiation levels. High exposure was defined as CED > 50 mSv, an exposure which has been reported to increase cancer mortality by 5%. Data were compared using Pearson χ(2) and Mann-Whitney U test or Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: 394 patients were followed for a median of 4 years (1518 patient years follow-up). Of these 63% were male. Seventeen percent of patients had a CED of >50 mSv. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 9% of total radiological studies\\/procedures while contributing 61.4% of total study dose. Median cumulative dose and median dose per patient year were significantly higher in the hemodialysis (HD) group (15.13 and 5.79 mSv, respectively) compared to the post-transplant group (2.9 and 0.52 mSv, respectively) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: ESKD patients are at risk of cumulative exposure to significant levels of diagnostic radiation. The majority of this exposure is imparted as a result of CT examinations to patients in the HD group.

  4. An Exploratory Analysis of Public Awareness and Perception of Ionizing Radiation and Guide to Public Health Practice in Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Katherine M; Bodmer, Jenna; Edwards, Bryce; Levins, James; O'Meara, Amanda; Ruhotina, Merima; Smith, Richard; Delaney, Thomas; Hoffman-Contois, Razelle; Boccuzzo, Linda; Hales, Heidi; Carney, Jan K

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has potential for acute and chronic health effects. Within the general public of the United States, there may be a discrepancy between perceived and actual health risks. In conjunction with the Vermont Department of Health, a survey designed to assess public perception and knowledge of ionizing radiation was administered at 6 Vermont locations (n = 169). Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. Eighty percent of respondents underestimated the contribution of medical imaging tests to total ionizing radiation exposure. Although only thirty-nine percent of participants were confident in their healthcare professional's knowledge of ionizing radiation, most would prefer to receive information from their healthcare professional. Only one-third of individuals who received a medical imaging test in the past year were educated by their healthcare professional about the risks of these tests. Those who tested their home for radon were twice as likely to choose radon as the greatest ionizing radiation risk to self. Although respondents had an above-average education level, there were many misperceptions of actual risks of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly of medical imaging tests. Educating healthcare professionals would therefore have a profound and positive impact on public understanding of ionizing radiation.

  5. Interactive Visual Intervention Planning: Interactive Visualization for Intervention Planning in Particle Accelerator Environments with Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Intervention planning is crucial for maintenance operations in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation, during which the radiation dose contracted by maintenance workers should be reduced to a minimum. In this context, we discuss the visualization aspects of a new software tool, which integrates interactive exploration of a scene depicting an accelerator facility augmented with residual radiation level simulations, with the visualization of intervention data such as the followed trajectory and maintenance tasks. The visualization of each of these aspects has its effect on the final predicted contracted radiation dose. In this context, we explore the possible benefits of a user study, with the goal of enhancing the visual conditions in which the intervention planner using the software tool is minimizing the radiation dose.

  6. Ionizing radiation exposure and the development of soft-tissue sarcomas in atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samartzis, Dino; Nishi, Nobuo; Cologne, John; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Hayashi, Mikiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Miles, Edward F; Suyama, Akihiko; Soda, Midori; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi

    2013-02-06

    Very high levels of ionizing radiation exposure have been associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. The effects of lower levels of ionizing radiation on sarcoma development are unknown. This study addressed the role of low to moderately high levels of ionizing radiation exposure in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. Based on the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, 80,180 individuals were prospectively assessed for the development of primary soft-tissue sarcoma. Colon dose in gray (Gy), the excess relative risk, and the excess absolute rate per Gy absorbed ionizing radiation dose were assessed. Subject demographic, age-specific, and survival parameters were evaluated. One hundred and four soft-tissue sarcomas were identified (mean colon dose = 0.18 Gy), associated with a 39% five-year survival rate. Mean ages at the time of the bombings and sarcoma diagnosis were 26.8 and 63.6 years, respectively. A linear dose-response model with an excess relative risk of 1.01 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13 to 2.46; p = 0.019) and an excess absolute risk per Gy of 4.3 per 100,000 persons per year (95% CI: 1.1 to 8.9; p = 0.001) were noted in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. This is one of the largest and longest studies (fifty-six years from the time of exposure to the time of follow-up) to assess ionizing radiation effects on the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. This is the first study to suggest that lower levels of ionizing radiation may be associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma, with exposure of 1 Gy doubling the risk of soft-tissue sarcoma development (linear dose-response). The five-year survival rate of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma in this population was much lower than that reported elsewhere.

  7. Ionizing radiation test results for an automotive microcontroller on board the Schiaparelli Mars lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapani Nikkanen, Timo; Hieta, Maria; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2016-04-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has delivered a pressure and a humidity instrument for the ESA ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli lander mission. Schiaparelli is scheduled to launch towards Mars with the Trace Gas Orbiter on 14th of March 2016. The DREAMS-P (pressure) and DREAMS-H (Humidity) instruments are operated utilizing a novel FMI instrument controller design based on a commercial automotive microcontroller (MCU). A custom qualification program was implemented to qualify the MCU for the relevant launch, cruise and surface operations environment of a Mars lander. Resilience to ionizing radiation is one of the most critical requirements for a digital component operated in space or at planetary bodies. Thus, the expected Total Ionizing Dose accumulated by the MCU was determined and a sample of these components was exposed to a Co-60 gamma radiation source. Part of the samples was powered during the radiation exposure to include the effect of electrical biasing. All of the samples were verified to withstand the expected total ionizing dose with margin. The irradiated test samples were then radiated until failure to determine their ultimate TID.

  8. Free Radicals Generated by Ionizing Radiation Signal Nuclear Translocation of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. D.; Pennington, M. E.; Craven, M. T.; Warters, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that regulates several pathways, which function collectively to maintain the integrity of the genome. Nuclear localization is critical for wild-type function. However, the signals that regulate subcellular localization of p53 have not been identified. Here, we examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the subcellular localization of p53 in two cell lines in which p63 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm and found that ionizing radiation caused a biphasic translocation response. p53 entered the nucleus 1-2 hours postirradiation (early response), subsequently emerged from the nucleus, and then again entered the nucleus 12-24 hours after the cells had been irradiated (delayed response). These changes in subcellular localization could be completely blocked by the free radical scavenger, WR1065. By comparison, two DNA-damaging agents that do not generate free radicals, mitomycin C and doxorubicin, caused translocation only after 12-24 h of exposure to the drugs, and this effect could not be inhibited by WR1065. Hence, although all three DNA-damaging agents induced relocalization of p53 to the nucleus, only the translocation caused by radiation was sensitive to free radical scavenging. We suggest that the free radicals generated by ionizing radiation can signal p53 translocation to the nucleus.

  9. Influence of XUV radiation on Pv ionization fraction in hot star winds

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Different diagnostics of hot star wind mass-loss rates provide results that are difficult to reconcile with each other. The widely accepted presence of clumping in hot star winds implies a significant reduction of observational mass-loss rate estimates from diagnostics that depend on the square of the density. Moreover, the ultraviolet Pv resonance lines indicate a possible need for even stronger reduction of hot star mass-loss rates, provided that Pv is a dominant ionization stage of phosphorus at least in some hot stars. The latter assumption is challenged by a possible presence of the XUV radiation. Here we study the influence of the XUV radiation on the Pv ionization fraction in the hot star winds. By a detailed solution of the hydrodynamical, radiative transfer, and statistical equilibrium equations we confirm that sufficiently strong XUV radiation source may decrease the Pv ionization fraction, possibly depreciating the Pv lines as a reliable mass-loss rate indicator. On the other hand, the XUV radiatio...

  10. Effect of ionizing (gamma and non-ionizing (UV radiation on the development of Trichogramma euproctidis (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncbilek Aydin S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using gamma and ultraviolet radiation as an alternative treatment to increase the efficiency of Trichogramma euproctidis (Girault 1911 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae was investigated in the laboratory. The developmental and adult stages of T. euproctidis were exposed to gamma radiation of different doses (0-30 Gy and ultraviolet radiation of 254 nm wavelengths (UV-C for different durations (0-10 min to assess their effect on each of the instars and their potential in breaking the developmental cycle of the egg parasitoid. The LD50 values for eggs, prepupae, pupae and adults were 8.1, 10.0, 22.7 and 9.5 Gy for gamma radiation and 9.5, 0.12, 2.0 and 11.9 min for UV radiation, respectively. The pupa and adult stages were more radioresistant to both gamma and UV radiation. The most interesting and unexpected result obtained for the prepupal stage was that UV radiation has a greater effect on prepupal stages than gamma radiation.

  11. Interactive effects of morphine and ionizing radiation on the latency of tail-withdrawal from warm water in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghardt, W.F.; Hunt, W.A.

    1984-04-01

    The analgesic effect of morphine was enhanced in rats exposed to ionizing radiation (250-5000) in a dose-dependent manner. This was indicated by an increase in the latency of tail-withdrawal from warm water, compared with animals receiving morphine alone. Radiation alone had no effect on latencies or on gross behavior. The enhancing effect of radiation was strongest at 24 hours after irradiation and was partially reversible with naloxone, an opiate antagonist, at a dose of 2 mg/kg, i.m. No changes in survival time after irradiation were noted between animals receiving morphine and those receiving saline injections. The results of this study suggest that the effect of narcotic analgesics to relieve pain in casualties on a nuclear battlefield may be enhanced depending on the postirradiation interval.

  12. Biological dosimetry -- cytogenetics findings at persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catović, Amra; Tanacković, Fikreta

    2006-05-01

    A large number of physical and chemical agents are capable to course chromosomal aberrations. Ionizing radiation is frequent and well known course of chromosomal aberrations. If deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is irradiated before synthesis chromosomal-type aberrations are caused. Chromatid-type aberrations are results of DNA damages occurred during or after synthesis. Some of these changes could exist at patients several years after exposition. Biological dosimetry-cytogenetics analysis of persons occupational exposed to ionizing radiation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina have been carried out in "Center for Human Genetics" of Medical Faculty in Sarajevo. In this study we have evaluated cytogenetics findings of persons employed in a zone of radiation. Cytogenetics findings have been demonstrated in allowed limit in 154 (81.1%) examinees, and cytogenetics findings were out of normal values in 36 (18.9%) examinees. The majorities who have been employed in a zone of ionizing radiation were in age group 40-44 (25.3%) and age group 45-49 (24.7%). Radiological technicians (35.7%) were exposed the most to ionizing radiation, than clinical nurse specialists (14.7%), radiologists (11.1), physicians (7.4%) machines technicians (6.3%), pneumologists (4.7%), orthopedists (4.2%) and scrub nurses (4.2%). Biological dosimetry-cytogenetics analysis have been carried out at 108 (56.8%) male and 82 (43.2%) female examinees. The most frequent aberration have been presented with 26.8% in the form of acentric fragments, than chromatid fragments with 21.2%, dicentric chromosomes with 19.5%, gaps with 18.7%, minutes with 12.2% and inter-arm interchanges with 1.6%.

  13. Genetic background of enhanced radioresistance in an anhydrobiotic insect: transcriptional response to ionizing radiations and desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabova, Alina; Mukae, Kyosuke; Cherkasov, Alexander; Cornette, Richard; Shagimardanova, Elena; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Okuda, Takashi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Gusev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that resistance to ionizing radiation, as well as cross-resistance to other abiotic stresses, is a side effect of the evolutionary-based adaptation of anhydrobiotic animals to dehydration stress. Larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki can withstand prolonged desiccation as well as high doses of ionizing radiation exposure. For a further understanding of the mechanisms of cross-tolerance to both types of stress exposure, we profiled genome-wide mRNA expression patterns using microarray techniques on the chironomid larvae collected at different stages of desiccation and after exposure to two types of ionizing radiation-70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He) and the same dose of low-LET radiation (gamma rays). In expression profiles, a wide transcriptional response to desiccation stress that much exceeded the amount of up-regulated transcripts to irradiation exposure was observed. An extensive group of coincidently up-regulated overlapped transcripts in response to desiccation and ionizing radiation was found. Among this, overlapped set of transcripts was indicated anhydrobiosis-related genes: antioxidants, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and heat-shock proteins. The most overexpressed group was that of protein-L-isoaspartate/D-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT), while probes, corresponding to LEA proteins, were the most represented. Performed functional analysis showed strongly enriched gene ontology terms associated with protein methylation. In addition, active processes of DNA repair were detected. We assume that the cross-tolerance of the sleeping chironomid to both desiccation and irradiation exposure comes from a complex mechanism of adaptation to anhydrobiosis.

  14. Membrane Signaling Induced by High Doses of Ionizing Radiation in the Endothelial Compartment. Relevance in Radiation Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Corre

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor areas can now be very precisely delimited thanks to technical progress in imaging and ballistics. This has also led to the development of novel radiotherapy protocols, delivering higher doses of ionizing radiation directly to cancer cells. Despite this, radiation toxicity in healthy tissue remains a major issue, particularly with dose-escalation in these new protocols. Acute and late tissue damage following irradiation have both been linked to the endothelium irrigating normal tissues. The molecular mechanisms involved in the endothelial response to high doses of radiation are associated with signaling from the plasma membrane, mainly via the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide pathway. This review describes this signaling pathway and discusses the relevance of targeting endothelial signaling to protect healthy tissues from the deleterious effects of high doses of radiation.

  15. HSV-1 amplicon-mediated post-transcriptional inhibition of Rad51 sensitizes human glioma cells to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saydam, O; Saydam, N; Glauser, D L; Pruschy, M; Dinh-Van, V; Hilbe, M; Jacobs, A H; Ackermann, M; Fraefel, C

    2007-08-01

    Standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme and other brain tumors consists of surgical resection followed by combined radio-/chemotherapy. However, radiation resistance of tumor cells limits the success of this treatment, and the tumors invariably recur. Therefore, the selective inhibition of molecular mediators of radiation resistance may provide therapeutic benefit to the patient. One of these targets is the Rad51 protein, which is a key component of the homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we investigated whether post-transcriptional silencing of Rad51 by herpes simplex virus-type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vector-mediated short interfering RNA expression can enhance the antitumor effect of radiation therapy. We demonstrate that these vectors specifically and efficiently inhibited the radiation-induced recruitment of Rad51 into nuclear foci in human glioma cells. The combination of vector-mediated silencing of Rad51 expression and treatment with ionizing radiation resulted in a pronounced reduction of the survival of human glioma cells in culture. In athymyc mice, a single intratumoral injection of Rad51-specific HSV-1 amplicon vector followed by a single radiation treatment resulted in a significant decrease in tumor size. In control animals, including mice that received an intratumoral injection of Rad51-specific amplicon vector but no radiation treatment, the tumor sizes increased.

  16. Charge transfer and penning ionization of dopants in or on helium nanodroplets exposed to EUV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchta, Dominic; Krishnan, Siva R; Brauer, Nils B; Drabbels, Marcel; O'Keeffe, Patrick; Devetta, Michele; Di Fraia, Michele; Callegari, Carlo; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Prince, Kevin C; Stienkemeier, Frank; Moshammer, Robert; Mudrich, Marcel

    2013-05-30

    Helium nanodroplets are widely used as a cold, weakly interacting matrix for spectroscopy of embedded species. In this work, we excite or ionize doped He droplets using synchrotron radiation and study the effect onto the dopant atoms depending on their location inside the droplets (rare gases) or outside at the droplet surface (alkali metals). Using photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging spectroscopy at variable photon energies (20-25 eV), we compare the rates of charge-transfer to Penning ionization of the dopants in the two cases. The surprising finding is that alkali metals, in contrast to the rare gases, are efficiently Penning ionized upon excitation of the (n = 2)-bands of the host droplets. This indicates rapid migration of the excitation to the droplet surface, followed by relaxation, and eventually energy transfer to the alkali dopants.

  17. Mitochondrial mutant cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Rohan; Reither, Adrian; Thomas, Robert A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2009-04-26

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important contributor to the ATP-generating oxidative phosphorylation complex. Single nucleotide mutations in mitochondrial genes involved in ATP synthesis result in a broad range of diseases. Leber optic atrophy and Leigh's syndrome are two such diseases arising from point mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Here, ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C (MMC) were used to induce structural chromosomal aberrations in Leber's and Leigh's cells to investigate how these mitochondrial mutations affect the cell's DNA repair processes. Because of the energy deprivation that results from mitochondrial mutations, we hypothesized that these mutant cells would demonstrate hypersensitivity when exposed to oxidative and genotoxic stress and we also expected that these cells would not be able to repair nuclear DNA damage as efficiently as normal cells. As a consequence, these mutant cells are expected to show increased levels of DNA damage, longer cell cycle delays and increased levels of cell death. Following acute radiation exposure these mutant cells showed an increase in the number of chromosomal aberrations and decreased mitotic indices when compared with normal human lymphoblastoid cells with wild-type mtDNA. When exposed to phleomycin or MMC, the mitochondrial mutant cells again showed hypersensitivity and decreased mitotic indices compared to normal cells. These results suggest that Leber's and Leigh's cells have an impaired ability to cope with oxidative and genotoxic stress. These observations may help explain the role of ATP generation in understanding the enhanced sensitivity of mitochondrial mutant cells to cancer therapeutic agents and to adverse environmental exposure, suggesting that individuals with mtDNA mutations may be at a greater risk for cancer and other diseases that result from an accumulation of nuclear DNA damage.

  18. Formation region effects in transition radiation, bremsstrahlung, and ionization loss of ultrarelativistic electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Trofymenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of transition radiation and bremsstrahlung by an ultrarelativistic electron as well as the effect of transition radiation influence upon the electron ionization loss in thin layer of substance are theoretically investigated in the case when radiation formation region has macroscopically large size. Special attention is drawn to transition radiation (TR generated during the traversal of thin metallic plate by the electron previously deflected from its initial direction of motion. In this case TR characteristics are calculated for realistic (circular shape of the electron deflection trajectory. The difference of such characteristics under certain conditions from the ones obtained previously with the use of approximation of anglelike shape of the electron trajectory (instant deflection is shown. The problem of measurement of bremsstrahlung characteristics in the prewave zone is investigated. The expressions defining the measured radiation distribution for arbitrary values of the size and the position of the detector used for radiation registration are derived. The problem of TR influence upon the electron ionization loss in thin plate and in a system of two plates is discussed. The proposal for experimental investigation of such effect is formulated.

  19. Formation region effects in transition radiation, bremsstrahlung, and ionization loss of ultrarelativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofymenko, S. V.; Shul'ga, N. F.

    2016-11-01

    The processes of transition radiation and bremsstrahlung by an ultrarelativistic electron as well as the effect of transition radiation influence upon the electron ionization loss in thin layer of substance are theoretically investigated in the case when radiation formation region has macroscopically large size. Special attention is drawn to transition radiation (TR) generated during the traversal of thin metallic plate by the electron previously deflected from its initial direction of motion. In this case TR characteristics are calculated for realistic (circular) shape of the electron deflection trajectory. The difference of such characteristics under certain conditions from the ones obtained previously with the use of approximation of anglelike shape of the electron trajectory (instant deflection) is shown. The problem of measurement of bremsstrahlung characteristics in the prewave zone is investigated. The expressions defining the measured radiation distribution for arbitrary values of the size and the position of the detector used for radiation registration are derived. The problem of TR influence upon the electron ionization loss in thin plate and in a system of two plates is discussed. The proposal for experimental investigation of such effect is formulated.

  20. Genetic variation in normal tissue toxicity induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popanda, Odilia, E-mail: o.popanda@dkfz.de [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Marquardt, Jens Uwe [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang-Claude, Jenny [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmezer, Peter [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-10

    Radiotherapy is an important weapon in the treatment of cancer, but adverse reactions developing in the co-irradiated normal tissue can be a threat for patients. Early reactions might disturb the usual application schedule and limit the radiation dose. Late appearing and degenerative reactions might reduce or destroy normal tissue function. Genetic markers conferring the ability to identify hyper-sensitive patients in advance would considerably improve therapy. Association studies on genetic variation and occurrence of side effects should help to identify such markers. This survey includes published studies and novel data from our own laboratory. It illustrates the presence of candidate polymorphisms in genes involved in the cellular response to irradiation which could be used as predictive markers for radiosensitivity in breast or prostate cancer patients. For other tumor types such as head and neck cancers or brain tumors, the available data are much more limited. In any case, further validation of these markers is needed in large patient cohorts with systematically recorded data on side effects and patient characteristics. Genetic variation contributing to radiosensitivity should be screened on a broader basis using newly developed, more comprehensive approaches such as genome-wide association studies.

  1. Temperature-responsive copolymeric hydrogel systems synthetized by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barriguete, Jesús Eduardo; Bucio, Emilio

    2017-06-01

    Eight different systems of hydrogel copolymers with diverse temperature responsiveness were prepared to elaborate membranes for their biomedical application. The hydrogels were synthesized using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL), which have a low critical solution temperature (LCST) close to that of the human body temperature. The networks were synthesized using gamma radiation at a dose rate of 11.2 kGy h-1, and dose of 50 kGy. The LCST of each system was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of using hydrophilic monomers of acrylic acid (AAc), methacrylic acid (MAAc), dimethyl acrylamide (DMAAm), and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for the copolymerization on the critical point was evaluated. Five viable systems were obtained, with the best hydrogel being that of poly(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm), which an LCST at 39.8 °C. All the samples were characterized by FTIR-ATR, DSC, TGA, X-Ray Diffraction, and SEM. The proportion of monomers during the formation of the copolymers was decisive in the displacement of the LCST.

  2. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdi, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, R. [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shams, M., E-mail: shams@kntu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis St., Molla-Sadra Ave, Vanak. Sq., P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-13

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack. -- Highlights: → Heat transfer and ionization energy losses were analyzed in the cavitation bubble. → Radiation of hydrodynamic bubble was approximately equal to the black body. → Radiation heat transfer did not affect the bubble dynamic. → Conduction decreased the bubble pressure and increased the bubble temperature. → Ionization decreased the temperature and increased the pressure in the bubble.

  3. Effect of the ionizing radiation on the rain-time atmospheric electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Takeda, Masahiko; Makino, Masahiko; Owada, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric electric field, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 southwest of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) shows peculiar behaviors after the accident, March 2012 due to the conductivity enhancement in the air by the ionizing radiation. This means that the PG provides significant information on the dynamics of the radioactive materials. During last EGU assembly 2012, we showed that the fine-weather PG decreased by one-two orders of magnitudes at the arrival of the radioactive plume, and that the PG recovered in various way depending on various types of re-suspension processes in addition to the physical decay of the deposited radioactive materials. We extended this work to the rain-time PG, which is very simple because of high variability of the PG depending on the cloud types and distribution. We yet found a statistical difference between rain-time PGs before and after the Fukushima NPP Accident: one-hour averaged rain-time PG during the first 45 days after the accident is not as much scattered to the negative side as those during the same period of different years or during 40 days before accident. Further examination of one-minute averaged data (1 Hz sampling) during the second half March for 2006-2012 revealed that this difference comes from short time-spans of negative peaks rather than the peak value after the accident compared to those before the accident. On the other hand, characteristics of positive peaks (cloud without rain) are unchanged. The results suggest either (1) the effect on the local charges in the rain cloud is narrowed under high dose of ionized radiation, making positive charges in the cloud less shielded by the negative charges, or (2) negative charge of ionized aerosol decays much faster under higher dose of ionized radiation due to the shortened time constant of the ionized aerosol (? 1-?, where ? is the atmospheric electric conductivity).

  4. Thin plastic radiochromic dye films as ionizing radiation dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenfil-Burgos, A. E.; Uribe, R. M.; de la Piedad, A.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, A.

    Radiochromic dye films were fabricated by casting polyvinyl butyral (PVB) in weakly acidic solution with the leucocyanide of pararosaniline. Calibrated films of 10-25 μm thickness were useful over a response range of about 10 3-10 5 Gy, by applying spectrophotometric analysis at the wavelength of the maximum of the radiation-induced absorption band (550 nm). The effects of temperature, pressure, and humidity during curing of the films pointed to the need for carefully controlling these parameters. For casting films at the high altitude of Mexico City (≈ 2500 meters), the optimum conditions are 45-75% r.h. and 20-25° C for a drying period of 72 to 92 hours, when the solvent is a mixture of ethanol and 2-methoxyethanol. The response of films fabricated in this way were compared with those of commercially available PVB and Nylon films. The effects of temperature, humidity, and period of storage on the response of these films were studied in the range from -5 to 60° C and from 11.8 to 96.6% r.h. for up to four months between irradiation and spectral analysis, and within nominal experimental uncertainty (≈ 10%), we found that all the radiochromic films studied can be stored for extended periods under steady-state conditions in the temperature range from -5 to 30° C and from 11.8-75.6% r.h. without correction factors for instability, but under extreme conditions of moisture at elevated temperatures the radiochromic image showed a fading effect on storage.

  5. HemoHIM enhances the therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation treatment in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Ran; Ju, Eun-Jin; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-02-01

    Although radiotherapy is commonly used for a variety of cancers, radiotherapy alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. In this study, we examined the possibility that HemoHIM can enhance the anticancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR) in melanoma-bearing mice. The HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of three edible herbs-Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma, and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice exposed to IR. IR treatment (5 Gy at 7 days after melanoma cell injection) reduced the weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with IR enhanced the decreases in tumor weight (P HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, although the proportions of these cells in spleen were not different. In addition, HemoHIM administration increased the interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion from lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice treated with IR. In conclusion, HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during radiotherapy for enhancing the antitumor efficacy.

  6. Ionizing radiation mediated cytological manifestation in microsporogenesis of Brassica campestris L.(Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girjesh KUMAR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the present work is to investigate the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiations (gamma rays on Brassica campestris L. accession no - IC363713. Homogeneous seeds of Brassica were irradiated at four doses of gamma rays i.e. 150 Gy, 300 Gy, 450 Gy and 600 Gy by the gamma-chamber type 60Co at the dose rate of 2 second/Gy. During microsporogenesis, meiotic analysis of young floral buds was carried out in irradiated as well as non-irradiated plant materials. Meiotic study clearly revealed the meiotic malfunctioning of pollen mother cells (PMCs that had shared copious count of cytological abnormalities namely unorientation, stickiness, precocious movement or fragmentation, secondary association of bivalents, asynchronous division, laggards, tripolarity and chromatin bridge. These aberrations were found to be distributed in all the phases of male meiosis. However, this impairing during meiosis has found to be collinearly associated with doses i.e. inclining tendency of abnormality percentage alongwith increasing doses were registered. Perhaps aforementioned chromosomal aberrations may be introduced by asymmetrical distribution of chromatin material in PMCs, had definitely compromised with pollen fertility, resulting the increased frequency of pollen sterility. Hence, pollen fertility registered, simultaneously, a moderate to sharp fall depending upon the intensity of doses.

  7. Effect of the ionizing radiation and aging time on total flavonoids contents in Brazilian sugarcane spirit composed with green propolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Antonio S.; Alencar, Severino M. de; Tiveron, Ana P.; Prado, Adna; Bergamaschi, Keityane B.; Veiga, Lucimara F. da; Aguiar, Claudio L. de; Baptista, Aparecido S.; Horii, Jorge [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao], e-mail: asbaptis@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: alencar@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: anptiver@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: adprado@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: kbergamas@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: lcfernan@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: claguiar@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: pmatao@gmail.com, e-mail: jhorii@esalq.usp.br; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Propolis is a natural product from vegetable origin, but, this substance, in general, is collected in the beehives. This product is largely known because its heath benefit attributed to its biological properties. On the other hand, Brazilian sugarcane spirit, 'cachaca', is an interesting alcoholic beverage with an increasing importance in the segment in many markets in the world. Therefore, was evaluating the addition of the propolis into cachaca and the effect of ionizing radiation on propolis compounds with biological properties. Samples of cachaca with propolis used in irradiation experiments were prepared from cachaca (40 deg GL) composed with propolis (0.1%). Eight treatments, with four repetitions each, were considered in this study. Three doses of ionizing energy from electron beam and gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co were applied on the cachaca samples, i.e. 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 kGy, with the goal to accelerate the aging time of the cachaca. The sugarcane spirits samples were storage during two periods (immediately after the radiation treatment and 30 months after the treatments) and their flavonoids contents were analyzed. Flavonoids contents in sugarcane spirit were statistically different between both storage time. The samples of cachaca treated with electron beam at 2.0 kGy presented the highest reduction in flavonoids contents, approximately 30.0 % in relation to the first analysis time. In conclusion, the time of storage to promote reduction on the flavonoids contents and the ionizing radiation also promoted reduction on the contents of these compounds, mainly in the first period of storage. (author)

  8. Synergistic effect of phenformin in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ionizing radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Xia, Shi'an; Zhu, Zhizhen

    2015-03-01

    Biguanides, used for anti-diabetic drugs, bring more attention in cancer research for their beneficial effects. Phenformin is more potent than metformin. However its potential application as a anti-cancer regent is far behind metformin. In order to investigate any beneficial effect of combination of Phenformin and radiotherapy, non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299 were exposure under different dose of ionizing radiation with or without Phenformin. Results indicated Phenformin showed synergistic effect and could induce more cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of tumor growth compared with ionizing radiation alone. Furthermore, this synergistic effect may be through different pathway according to cancer cell genotype background. Our results showed Phenformin induced AMPK activation in A549 but not H1299. However, Phenformin activated eIF2α in both cell lines. Our findings implicated Phenformin may be used as radiosensitizer for non-small cell lung cancer therapy.

  9. Monolithic Silicon Photodetector - Detector of Ionizing Radiation Based on Functional Integrated MOS Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Legotin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the principle of operation, construction, architecture and fabrication of a new type of monolithic silicon coordinate photodetector - detector of optical and ionizing radiation (MSCP on the basis of functional integrated MOS structures. The analytical estimation of electrophysical characteristics MSCP is given. It is shown that MSCP is a specialized monolithic silicon VLSI containing two-dimensional pixel array with high and low voltage functionally integrated structures (FIS and peripheral electronic circuits of amplification and signal processing matrix. Estimations and presents comparative characteristics are presented. They show potential MSCP possibilities for registration of optical and ionizing radiation. Experimental results of α-particles and electrons registration. The possible areas of application, with the possibility of its use in a wide X-ray panels medical supplies, X-rays, etc are considered.

  10. Characterization of Tandem systems of commercial ionization chambers for radiation dosimetry (radiotherapy level)

    CERN Document Server

    Galhardo, E P

    1998-01-01

    The use of X rays for radiotherapy purposes is of great importance for Medicine, and it is necessary to control periodically the performance of the ionization chambers and the radiation beams in order to obtain the best results. The verification of the beam characteristics is made by using standard dosimetry procedures which include the determination of the half-value layers and the exposure rates or the absorbed dose rates in air. Several Tandem systems were set up and tested, using commercial ionization chambers in the energy interval from 14 up to 130 KeV at the Instrumentation Calibration Laboratory of IPEN and at other three institutions, in substitution to the routine conventional procedure of determination of half-value layers using absorbers. The obtained results show the usefulness of these Tandem system for the routine dosimetric procedures of radiotherapy X radiation beams.

  11. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Jo, Cheorun; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid.

  12. A novel method involving Matlab coding to determine the distribution of a collimated ionizing radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-08-01

    In ionizing radiation related experiments, precisely knowing of the involved parameters it is a very important task. Some of these experiments are involving the use of electromagnetic ionizing radiation such are gamma rays and X rays, others make use of energetic charged or not charged small dimensions particles such are protons, electrons, neutrons and even, in other cases, larger accelerated particles such are helium or deuterium nuclei are used. In all these cases the beam used to hit an exposed target must be previously collimated and precisely characterized. In this paper, a novel method to determine the distribution of the collimated beam involving Matlab coding is proposed. The method was implemented by using of some Pyrex glass test samples placed in the beam where its distribution and dimension must be determined, followed by taking high quality pictures of them and then by digital processing the resulted images. By this method, information regarding the doses absorbed in the exposed samples volume are obtained too.

  13. Hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaichi, Kumio; Usui, Aya; Okumura, Yutaka [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Atomic Disease Inst.; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the possible effect of hypergravity to modify the signal transduction of ionizing radiation, we analyzed the accumulation of p53 and the expression of p53-dependent genes, Waf-1 and Bax, using the western blot analysis. Hypergravity (20 x g) induced the accumulation of p53 in the human glioblastoma cell line A172 after 3 h of incubation. Low-dose (0.5 Gy) irradiation to the cells accumulated p53 1.5 h after irradiation, and induced Waf-1 and Bax. Under the condition of hypergravity (20 x g), the peak of p53 accumulation was shifted from 1.5 h to 3 h after irradiation, and the inductions of Waf-1 and Bax were suppressed entirely. These results indicate that hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53 in the cells. (author)

  14. Quantum mechanical theory of collisional ionization in the presence of intense laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellum, J. C.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a quantum mechanical formalism for treating ionizing collisions occurring in the presence of an intense laser field. Both the intense laser radiation and the internal electronic continuum states associated with the emitted electrons are rigorously taken into account by combining discretization techniques with expansions in terms of electronic-field representations for the quasi-molecule-plus-photon system. The procedure leads to a coupled-channel description of the heavy-particle dynamics which involves effective electronic-field potential surfaces and continua. It is suggested that laser-influenced ionizing collisions can be studied to verify the effects of intense laser radiation on inelastic collisional processes. Calculation procedures for electronic transition dipole matrix elements between discrete and continuum electronic states are outlined.

  15. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data.

  16. Improvements to the Ionizing Radiation Risk Assessment Program for NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semones, E. J.; Bahadori, A. A.; Picco, C. E.; Shavers, M. R.; Flores-McLaughlin, J.

    2011-01-01

    To perform dosimetry and risk assessment, NASA collects astronaut ionizing radiation exposure data from space flight, medical imaging and therapy, aviation training activities and prior occupational exposure histories. Career risk of exposure induced death (REID) from radiation is limited to 3 percent at a 95 percent confidence level. The Radiation Health Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is implementing a program to integrate the gathering, storage, analysis and reporting of astronaut ionizing radiation dose and risk data and records. This work has several motivations, including more efficient analyses and greater flexibility in testing and adopting new methods for evaluating risks. The foundation for these improvements is a set of software tools called the Astronaut Radiation Exposure Analysis System (AREAS). AREAS is a series of MATLAB(Registered TradeMark)-based dose and risk analysis modules that interface with an enterprise level SQL Server database by means of a secure web service. It communicates with other JSC medical and space weather databases to maintain data integrity and consistency across systems. AREAS is part of a larger NASA Space Medicine effort, the Mission Medical Integration Strategy, with the goal of collecting accurate, high-quality and detailed astronaut health data, and then securely, timely and reliably presenting it to medical support personnel. The modular approach to the AREAS design accommodates past, current, and future sources of data from active and passive detectors, space radiation transport algorithms, computational phantoms and cancer risk models. Revisions of the cancer risk model, new radiation detection equipment and improved anthropomorphic computational phantoms can be incorporated. Notable hardware updates include the Radiation Environment Monitor (which uses Medipix technology to report real-time, on-board dosimetry measurements), an updated Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter, and the Southwest Research Institute

  17. Radiation Pressure Confinement -- III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-01-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption features in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe^0+ to Fe^25+). The absorption measure distribution (AMD) is defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN / dlog xi|. The AMD extends over a wide range of 0.1 < xi < 10^4 (cgs), and is remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits to the observed AMDs (|dN / dlog xi| ~ N_1 xi^a) yield N_1 = 3x10^21 cm^-2 +- 0.4 dex and a = 0 -- 0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed $N_1$ and $a$ values? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform pressure medium. However, it has already been shown that the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore ...

  18. Exposure to ionizing radiation induced persistent gene expression changes in mouse mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta Kamal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast tissue is among the most sensitive tissues to the carcinogenic actions of ionizing radiation and epidemiological studies have linked radiation exposure to breast cancer. Currently, molecular understanding of radiation carcinogenesis in mammary gland is hindered due to the scarcity of in vivo long-term follow up data. We undertook this study to delineate radiation-induced persistent alterations in gene expression in mouse mammary glands 2-month after radiation exposure. Methods Six to eight week old female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy of whole body γ radiation and mammary glands were surgically removed 2-month after radiation. RNA was isolated and microarray hybridization performed for gene expression analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used for biological interpretation of microarray data. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on selected genes to confirm the microarray data. Results Compared to untreated controls, the mRNA levels of a total of 737 genes were significantly (p Conclusions Exposure to a clinically relevant radiation dose led to long-term activation of mammary gland genes involved in proliferative and metabolic pathways, which are known to have roles in carcinogenesis. When considered along with downregulation of a number of tumor suppressor genes, our study has implications for breast cancer initiation and progression after therapeutic radiation exposure.

  19. Radiation crosslinking of carboxymethylcellulose of various degree of substitution at high concentration in aqueous solutions of natural pH[Carboxymethylcellulose; Hydrogels; Crosslinking; Ionizing radiation; Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wach, R.A. E-mail: rawach@gazeta.pl; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio

    2003-12-01

    Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogel formed by ionizing radiation at highly concentrated aqueous solutions was found to undergo swelling depending on the pH of the swelling media. Swelling increases at neutral and basic pH due to ionization of carboxymethyl groups on side chains. The presence of charges develops repulsive forces between polymer chains of the network causing its expansion. Hydrogel in relaxed state as well as dried gel reveals good mechanical properties. It was considered that intermolecular crosslinking reactions occur by a radical route. Radicals placed on anhydroglucose repeating unit as well as on side chains were distinguished from ESR spectra of CMC. A stable doublet signal with 2.0 mT splitting constant belongs to a radical placed on the {alpha}-carbon atom of the substituent group, R-O-{sup {center_dot}}CH-COO{sup -}. It was assumed that this species participates in intermolecular crosslinking.

  20. Ionizing radiation and tritium transmutation both cause formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teebor, G W; Frenkel, K; Goldstein, M S

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells grown in the presence of [methyl-3H]thymidine contained large amounts of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (HMdU) in their DNA. When the cells were grown in [6-3H]thymidine and their DNA was labeled to the same specific activity, no HMdU was present. When such [6-3H]thymidine-labeled cells were exposed to increasing amounts of gamma-radiation, small but increasing amounts of HMdU were formed in their DNA. This indicates that HMdU can be formed in DNA by two distinct mechanisms. The first is the result of the transmutation of 3H to 3He (beta decay) in the methyl group of thymidine, leading to formation of a carbocation. This short-lived ion reacts with hydroxide ions of water, yielding the hydroxymethyl group. HMdU that is formed by this mechanism is formed at the rate of beta decay of 3H. It appears only in [methyl-3H]thymidine residues and is present in the DNA of both nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated cells. The second mechanism is the result of the radiolysis of water caused by ionizing radiation. The resultant radical species, particularly hydroxyl radicals, may react with many sites on DNA. When the methyl group of thymine is attacked by hydroxyl radicals, the hydroxymethyl group is formed. The formation of HMdU by this mechanism was detected only when [6-3H]thymidine-labeled cells were used, since transmutation of 3H in position 6 of thymine cannot yield HMdU.

  1. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  2. About particular use of ionizing radiations; Des usages particuliers des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    Different uses of ionizing radiations are reviewed: tracers techniques, nuclear gauges, dating by carbon 14, silica doping, use of gamma irradiation for the density measurement in civil engineering, use of a electron capture detector to study by gas chromatography chlorinated contaminants in environment, neutron activation as environmental gauge, analysis of lead in paint and pollutants in ground and dusts, help for work of art valuation by x spectrometry. (N.C.)

  3. A role for bioelectric effects in the induction of bystander signals by ionizing radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, C; Moran, G; McNeill, F; Gow, M D; Denbeigh, J; Prestwich, W; Seymour, C B

    2007-04-03

    The induction of "bystander effects" i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary explants of mouse bladder and fish skin, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation or treated in a variety of bystander protocols. Exposure of cells was conducted by shielding one group of flasks using lead, to reduce the dose below the threshold of 2mGy (60)Cobalt gamma rays established for the bystander effect. The endpoint for the bystander effect in the reporter system used was reduction in cloning efficiency (RCE). The magnitude of the RCE was similar in shielded and unshielded flasks. When cells were placed in a Faraday cage the magnitude of the RCE was less but not eliminated. The results suggest that liquid media or cell-cell contact transmission of bystander factors may be only part of the bystander mechanism. Bioelectric or bio magnetic fields may have a role to play. To test this further, cells were placed in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine for 10 min using a typical head scan protocol. This treatment also induced a bystander response. Apart from the obvious clinical relevance, the MRI results further suggest that bystander effects may be produced by non-ionizing exposures. It is concluded that bioelectric or magnetic effects may be involved in producing bystander signaling cascades commonly seen following ionizing radiation exposure.

  4. Influence of ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of BisGMA/TEGDMA based experimental resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LMP, Campos; Boaro, LC; LKG, Santos; Parra, DF; Lugão, AB

    2015-10-01

    Dental restorative composites are activated by visible light and the polymerization process, known as direct technique, is initiated by absorbing light in a specific wavelength range (450-500 nm). However this technique presented some disadvantages. If light is not inserted correctly, layers uncured can cause countless damage to restoration, especially with regard to mechanical properties. A clinical alternative used to reduce the shortcomings of direct application is the use of composite resins for indirect application. These composites are adaptations of resins prepared for direct use, with differences mainly in the healing process. Besides the traditional photoactivation, indirect application composites may be submitted to particular curing conditions, such as a slow curing rate, heating, vacuum, and inert-gas pressure leading to an oxygen-free environment. However few studies have been conducted on the process of post-curing by ionizing radiation at low doses. On this sense the purpose of this study was to evaluate possible interactions of ionizing radiation in the post-curing process of the experimental composites based on BisGMA/TEGDMA filled with silica Aerosil OX-50 silanized. Characterization of the experimental composites was performed by thermogravimetry analysis, infrared spectroscopy, elastic modulus and flexural strength. Statistical analysis of results was calculated by one-way ANOVA/Tukey's test. Cross-linking of the polymeric matrix caused by ionizing radiation, influenced the thermal stability of irradiated specimens. FTIR analysis showed that the ionizing radiation induced a post-cure reaction in the specimens. The irradiation dose influenced directly the mechanical properties that showed a strong positive correlation between flexural strength and irradiation and between modulus strength and irradiation.

  5. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Prostaglandins and Gastric Secretion in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    gastric electrical control activity when gastric serosal electrodes are used in conjunction with skin electrodes (16,17). Each tracing was examined blindly...damage to gastric mucosal cells, to the myenteric plexus, or the smooth muscle similar to the one observed during the late postirradiation period (5). In...F: ---------- EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATION ON PROSTAGLANDINS AND GASTRIC SECRETION IN RHESUS MONKS Andre Dubois Etienne Danquechin Dorval Linda Steel

  6. Thermoregulated Nitric Cryosystem for Cooling Gas-Filled Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharkov I.P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryosystem for cooling and filling of gas-filled detectors of ionizing radiation with compressed inert gas on the basis of wide-nitrogen cryostat, which provides detetector temperature control in a range of 173 — 293 K and its stabilization with accuracy of ± 1°. The work was carried out within the Ukraine — NATO Program of Collaboration, Grant SfP #984655.

  7. Dwarf galaxies with ionizing radiation feedback. II. Spatially resolved star formation relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-15

    AWe investigate the spatially resolved star formation relation using a galactic disk formed in a comprehensive high-resolution (3.8 pc) simulation. Our new implementation of stellar feedback includes ionizing radiation as well as supernova explosions, and we handle ionizing radiation by solving the radiative transfer equation rather than by a subgrid model. Photoheating by stellar radiation stabilizes gas against Jeans fragmentation, reducing the star formation rate (SFR). Because we have self-consistently calculated the location of ionized gas, we are able to make simulated, spatially resolved observations of star formation tracers, such as Hα emission. We can also observe how stellar feedback manifests itself in the correlation between ionized and molecular gas. Applying our techniques to the disk in a galactic halo of 2.3 × 1011 M , we find that the correlation between SFR density (estimated from mock Hα emission) and H2 density shows large scatter, especially at high resolutions of ≲ 75 pc that are comparable to the size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). This is because an aperture of GMC size captures only particular stages of GMC evolution and because Hα traces hot gas around star-forming regions and is displaced from the H2 peaks themselves. By examining the evolving environment around star clusters, we speculate that the breakdown of the traditional star formation laws of the Kennicutt-Schmidt type at small scales is further aided by a combination of stars drifting from their birthplaces and molecular clouds being dispersed via stellar feedback.

  8. Portable meter study of ionizing radiation Teletector in high rates of air kerma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damatto, Willian Behling; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: willbdamatto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established. Applied tests were: energy dependence and primarily overload with the new irradiation system. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs) and new calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. (author)

  9. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  10. Typical Cell Signaling Response to