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Sample records for ion-interaction pitzer models

  1. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  2. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of Li2SO4(aq) at T=298.15 and 323.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-Interaction (Pitzer) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, Joseph A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Clegg, Simon L. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Palmer, Donald [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) from 0.1069 to 2.8190 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} at 298.15 K, and from 0.1148 to 2.7969 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} at 323.15 K, with NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. Published thermodynamic data for this system were reviewed, recalculated for consistency, and critically assessed. The present results and the more reliable published results were used to evaluate the parameters of an extended version of Pitzer's ion-interaction model with an ionic-strength dependent third-virial coefficient, as well as those of the standard Pitzer model, for the osmotic and activity coefficients at both temperatures. Published enthalpies of dilution at 298.15 K were also analyzed to yield the parameters of the ion-interaction models for the relative apparent molar enthalpies of dilution. The resulting models at 298.15 K are valid to the saturated solution molality of the thermodynamically stable phase Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O(cr). Solubilities of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O(cr) at 298.15 K were assessed and the selected value of m(sat.)=3.13{+-}0.04 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} was used to evaluate the thermodynamic solubility product K {sub s}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = (2.62{+-}0.19) and a CODATA-compatible standard molar Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}{sub f} G m{sup 0}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = -(1564.6{+-}0.5) kJ{center_dot}mol{sup -1}.

  3. Thermodynamics of {l_brace}zNaCl+(1-z)Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) from T=278.15 K to T=318.15 K, and representation with an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, Joseph A. E-mail: rard1@llnl.gov; Clegg, Simon L.; Platford, Robert

    2003-06-01

    In 1968, R.F. Platford reported the results from extensive isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements for the {l_brace}zNaCl+(1-z)Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) system at T=298.15 K, using NaCl(aq) as the isopiestic reference standard [R.F. Platford, J. Chem. Eng. Data 13 (1968) 46-48]. However, only derived quantities were reported, and the experimental isopiestic equilibrium molalities were not given. The complete set of original isopiestic molalities from that study is tabulated in the present report. In addition, published thermodynamic information for this system is reviewed and the isopiestic equilibrium molalities, electromotive force measurements for five different types of electrochemical cells, and enthalpies of mixing from these other studies are critically assessed and recalculated consistently. These combined results are used to evaluate at T=298.15 K the two mixing parameters of Pitzer's ion-interaction model, {sup S}{theta}(Cl,SO{sub 4})=(1.236{+-}0.032{sub 5}){center_dot}10{sup -2} kg{center_dot}mol{sup -1} and {psi}(Na,Cl,SO{sub 4})=(1.808{+-}0.086){center_dot}10{sup -3} kg{sup 2}{center_dot}mol{sup -2}, and their temperature derivatives {l_brace}{partial_derivative}{sup S}{theta}(Cl,SO{sub 4})/{partial_derivative}T{r_brace}{sub p}=(2.474{+-}0.460){center_dot}10{sup -5} kg{center_dot}mol{sup -1}{center_dot}K{sup -1} and {l_brace}{partial_derivative}{psi}(Na,Cl,SO{sub 4})/{partial_derivative}T{r_brace}{sub p}=-(6.228{+-}0.186){center_dot}10{sup -5} kg{sup 2}{center_dot}mol{sup -2}{center_dot}K{sup -1}. Also reported are parameters for an extended ion-interaction model for Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq), valid from T=(273.15 to 323.15) K, that were required for this mixed electrolyte solution analysis.

  4. Densities and apparent molar volumes of atmospherically important electrolyte solutions. 2. The systems H(+)-HSO4(-)-SO4(2-)-H2O from 0 to 3 mol kg(-1) as a function of temperature and H(+)-NH4(+)-HSO4(-)-SO4)2-)-H2O from 0 to 6 mol kg(-1) at 25 °C using a Pitzer ion interaction model, and NH4HSO4-H2O and (NH4)3H(SO4)2-H2O over the entire concentration range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S L; Wexler, A S

    2011-04-21

    A Pitzer ion interaction model has been applied to the systems H(2)SO(4)-H(2)O (0-3 mol kg(-1), 0-55 °C) and H(2)SO(4)-(NH(4))(2)SO(4)-H(2)O (0-6 mol kg(-1), 25 °C) for the calculation of apparent molar volume and density. The dissociation reaction HSO(4)(-)((aq)) ↔ H(+)((aq)) + SO(4)(2-)((aq)) is treated explicitly. Apparent molar volumes of the SO(4)(2-) ion at infinite dilution were obtained from part 1 of this work, (1) and the value for the bisulfate ion was determined in this study from 0 to 55 °C. In dilute solutions of both systems, the change in the degree of dissociation of the HSO(4)(-) ion with concentration results in much larger variations of the apparent molar volumes of the solutes than for conventional strong (fully dissociated) electrolytes. Densities and apparent molar volumes are tabulated. Apparent molar volumes calculated using the model are combined with other data for the solutes NH(4)HSO(4) and (NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2) at 25 °C to obtain apparent molar volumes and densities over the entire concentration range (including solutions supersaturated with respect to the salts).

  5. Towards a quality-controlled and accessible Pitzer model for seawater and related systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Turner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate the need for a quality-controlled chemical speciation model for seawater and related natural waters, work which forms the major focus of SCOR Working Group 145. Model development is based on Pitzer equations for the seawater electrolyte and trace components. These equations can be used to calculate activities of dissolved ions and molecules and, in combination with thermodynamic equilibrium constants, chemical speciation. The major tasks to be addressed are ensuring internal consistency of the Pitzer model parameters (expressing the interactions between pairs and triplets of species, which ultimately determines the calculated activities, assessing uncertainties, and identifying important data gaps that should be addressed by new measurements. It is recognised that natural organic matter plays an important role in many aquatic ecosystems, and options for including this material in a Pitzer-based model are discussed. The process of model development begins with the core components which include the seawater electrolyte and the weak acids controlling pH. This core model can then be expanded by incorporating additional chemical components, changing the standard seawater composition and/or broadening the range of temperature and pressure, without compromising its validity. Seven important areas of application are identified: open ocean acidification; micro-nutrient biogeochemistry and geochemical tracers; micro-nutrient behaviour in laboratory studies; water quality in coastal and estuarine waters; cycling of nutrients and trace metals in pore waters; chemical equilibria in hydrothermal systems; brines and salt lakes.

  6. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic coefficients and Pitzer model representation for Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(aq) at T=298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Aiyun [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Hei Long Jiang Science and Technology College, Ha' erbin (China); Yao Yan [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China)]. E-mail: yanyao@pub.xaonline.com; Li Lijuan [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Song Pengsheng [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China)

    2005-02-01

    Isopiestic molalities and water activities have been measured for aqueous Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} solutions from (0.0275 to 2.9397) mol.kg{sup -1} at T=298.15 K by isopiestic method, using an improved apparatus. These measurements have extended into the very dilute and the supersaturated molality region. Two types of osmotic coefficients of {phi}{sub S} and {phi}{sub E} were determined. {phi}{sub S} is based on the stoichiometric molalities of the solute Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(aq), and {phi}{sub E} is based on equilibrium molalities based on consideration of the equilibrium speciation of H3BO3,B(OH)4-,B3O3(OH)4-,andB4O5(OH)42- in the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(aq) solutions. The stoichiometric equilibrium constants K{sub mi} for the aqueous speciation reactions were estimated. Three types of representations of the osmotic coefficients for the (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}+H{sub 2}O) system with the ion-interaction models based on Pitzer's equations of osmotic coefficients with minor modifications were presented: the model (I) for representation of the data of {phi}{sub S} with four parameters based on considering the ion-interactions between two ionic species of Li+andB4O72-, the model (II) for representation of the data of {phi}{sub E} based on considering the equilibrium speciation with 18 parameters, and the model (III) simplified from model (II) with six ion-interaction parameters estimated. The reasonable agreements between the experimental osmotic coefficient data and those calculated using the models above were obtained with the standard deviations of 0.0215, 0.0055, and 0.0150 for the three models, respectively. The thermodynamic osmotic coefficient properties for the complex system containing polymetric boron anions and lithium may be explained by use of the Pitzer ion-interaction model with minor modifications in combination with speciation reaction equilibria.

  7. Enthalpies of dilution of aqueous Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} solutions at 298.15K and application of ion-interaction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Guoyin [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yao Yan [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China) and Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: yaoy@isl.ac.cn; Jiao Baojuan [Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Chen Sanping [Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Gao Shengli [Department of Chemistry, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2005-09-15

    The enthalpies of dilution have been measured for aqueous Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} solutions from 0.0212 to 2.1530molkg{sup -1} at 298.15K. The relative apparent molar enthalpies, L{sub {phi}}, and relative partial molar enthalpies of the solvent and solute, L-bar{sub 1} and L-bar{sub 2} were calculated. The thermodynamic properties of the complex aqueous solutions were represented with a modified Pitzer ion-interaction model.

  8. Heavy-ion interactions in relativistic mean-field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashdan, M.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction potential between spherical nuclei and the elastic scattering cross section are calculated within relativistic mean-field (linear and non-linear) models, using a generalized relativistic local density approximation. The nuclear densities are calculated self-consistently from the solution of the relativistic mean-field equations. It is found that both the linear and non-linear models predict the characteristic switching-over phenomenon of the heavy-ion nuclear potential, where the potential gets attraction with increasing energy up to some value where it reverses this behaviour. The non-linear NLC model predicts a deeper potential than the linear LW model. The elastic scattering cross section calculated within the non-linear NLC model is in better agreement with experiments than that calculated within the linear LW model. (orig.)

  9. Calculation of NaCl, KCl and LiCl Salts Activity Coefficients in Polyethylene Glycol (PEG4000)-Water System Using Modified PHSC Equation of State, Extended Debye-Hückel Model and Pitzer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjani, Azam

    2016-07-01

    For biomolecules and cell particles purification and separation in biological engineering, besides the chromatography as mostly applied process, aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) are of the most favorable separation processes that are worth to be investigated in thermodynamic theoretically. In recent years, thermodynamic calculation of ATPS properties has attracted much attention due to their great applications in chemical industries such as separation processes. These phase calculations of ATPS have inherent complexity due to the presence of ions and polymers in aqueous solution. In this work, for target ternary systems of polyethylene glycol (PEG4000)-salt-water, thermodynamic investigation for constituent systems with three salts (NaCl, KCl and LiCl) has been carried out as PEG is the most favorable polymer in ATPS. The modified perturbed hard sphere chain (PHSC) equation of state (EOS), extended Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models were employed for calculation of activity coefficients for the considered systems. Four additional statistical parameters were considered to ensure the consistency of correlations and introduced as objective functions in the particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results showed desirable agreement to the available experimental data, and the order of recommendation of studied models is PHSC EOS > extended Debye-Hückel > Pitzer. The concluding remark is that the all the employed models are reliable in such calculations and can be used for thermodynamic correlation/predictions; however, by using an ion-based parameter calculation method, the PHSC EOS reveals both reliability and universality of applications.

  10. Measurement of distance parameter using semiclassical model in various heavy ion interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Tabassum [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan); Khan, E U [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Baluch, J J [Department of Environmental Sciences, CIIT, Abbottabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, I E [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad (Pakistan); Sajid, M; Shahzad, M I; Khan, H A [Physics Research Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-08-15

    The technique of solid state nuclear track detection was employed to collect data of elastic scattering as well as inelastic reaction channel. The elastic data of the reactions {sup 238}U+{sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U+{sup 197}Au, {sup 208}Pb+{sup 197}Au and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au were used to calculate the experimental elastic scattering cross-sections for various angular bins. The ratio of these cross-sections to Rutherford/Mott cross-sections were plotted with respect to distance d({theta}). Distance parameter d{sub 0} in all four reactions was obtained from the discontinuity of the slope following the method suggested in the semiclassical model. Partial reaction cross-sections were also obtained from the inelastic binary as well as multiprong events in the heavy ion interactions of {sup 208}Pb+{sup 197}Au and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au both at 11.67 MeV/u beam energy. The higher values of partial cross-sections of two prong inelastic events as compared with {sigma}{sub 3} and {sigma}{sub 4} have been attributed to the emission of intermediate mass fragments in both the reactions.

  11. A Combined Thermodynamic and Kinetic Model for Barite Prediction at Oil Reservoir Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhen Wu, Bi Yun

    of the literature (PhD Study 1). The reviewed dataset was used as starting point for geochemical speciation modelling and applied to predict the stability of sulphate minerals in North Sea oil field brines. Second, for modelling of high salinity solutions using the Pitzer ion interaction approach, the temperature...... observations. This information can help planning mitigation and optimise costs in oil production....

  12. Three Dimensional Explicit Model for Cometary Tail Ions Interactions with Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bermani, M. J. F.; Alhamed, S. A.; Khalaf, S. Z.; Ali, H. Sh.; Selman, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The different interactions between cometary tail and solar wind ions are studied in the present paper based on three-dimensional Lax explicit method. The model used in this research is based on the continuity equations describing the cometary tail-solar wind interactions. Three dimensional system was considered in this paper. Simulation of the physical system was achieved using computer code written using Matlab 7.0. The parameters studied here assumed Halley comet type and include the particle density rho, the particles velocity v, the magnetic field strength B, dynamic pressure p and internal energy E. The results of the present research showed that the interaction near the cometary nucleus is mainly affected by the new ions added to the plasma of the solar wind, which increases the average molecular weight and result in many unique characteristics of the cometary tail. These characteristics were explained in the presence of the IMF.

  13. Mean activity coefficient measurement and thermodynamic modelling of the ternary mixed electrolyte (MgCl_2 + glucose + water) system at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhi, Azam; Bagherinia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The main goal of the work is to provide precise thermodynamic data for the system. • The method used was potentiometric method. • Pitzer ion interaction model and modified TCPC model were used. • The mass fractions of glucose were (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40)%. • The ionic strengths were from 0.0010 to 6.0000 mol · kg"−"1. - Abstract: In this work, the mean activity coefficients of MgCl_2 in pure water and (glucose + water) mixture solvent were determined using a galvanic cell without liquid junction potential of type: (Mg"2"+ + ISE)|MgCl_2 (m), glucose (wt.%), H_2O (100 wt.%)|AgCl|Ag. The measurements were performed at T = 298.15 K. Total ionic strengths were from (0.0010 to 6.0000) mol · kg"−"1. The various (glucose + water) mixed solvents contained (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40)% mass fractions percentage of glucose respectively. The mean activity coefficients measured were correlated with Pitzer ion interaction model and the Pitzer adjustable parameters were determined. Then these parameters were used to calculate the thermodynamics properties for under investigated system. The results showed that Pitzer ion interaction model can satisfactory describe the investigated system. The modified three-characteristic-parameter correlation (TCPC) model was applied to correlate the experimental activity coefficient data for under investigation electrolyte system, too.

  14. Development of a Thermodynamic Model for the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator - 12193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Robert; Seniow, Kendra [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) is the current tool used by the Hanford Tank Operations Contractor for system planning and assessment of different operational strategies. Activities such as waste retrievals in the Hanford tank farms and washing and leaching of waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are currently modeled in HTWOS. To predict phase compositions during these activities, HTWOS currently uses simple wash and leach factors that were developed many years ago. To improve these predictions, a rigorous thermodynamic framework has been developed based on the multi-component Pitzer ion interaction model for use with several important chemical species in Hanford tank waste. These chemical species are those with the greatest impact on high-level waste glass production in the WTP and whose solubility depends on the processing conditions. Starting with Pitzer parameter coefficients and species chemical potential coefficients collated from open literature sources, reconciliation with published experimental data led to a self-consistent set of coefficients known as the HTWOS Pitzer database. Using Gibbs energy minimization with the Pitzer ion interaction equations in Microsoft Excel,1 a number of successful predictions were made for the solubility of simple mixtures of the chosen species. Currently, this thermodynamic framework is being programmed into HTWOS as the mechanism for determining the solid-liquid phase distributions for the chosen species, replacing their simple wash and leach factors. Starting from a variety of open literature sources, a collection of Pitzer parameters and species chemical potentials, as functions of temperature, was tested for consistency and accuracy by comparison with available experimental thermodynamic data (e.g., osmotic coefficients and solubility). Reconciliation of the initial set of parameter coefficients with the experimental data led to the development of the self-consistent set known

  15. A computer program incorporating Pitzer's equations for calculation of geochemical reactions in brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Parkhurst, D.L.; Fleming, G.W.; Dunkle, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The program named PHRQPITZ is a computer code capable of making geochemical calculations in brines and other electrolyte solutions to high concentrations using the Pitzer virial-coefficient approach for activity-coefficient corrections. Reaction-modeling capabilities include calculation of (1) aqueous speciation and mineral-saturation index, (2) mineral solubility, (3) mixing and titration of aqueous solutions, (4) irreversible reactions and mineral water mass transfer, and (5) reaction path. The computed results for each aqueous solution include the osmotic coefficient, water activity , mineral saturation indices, mean activity coefficients, total activity coefficients, and scale-dependent values of pH, individual-ion activities and individual-ion activity coeffients , and scale-dependent values of pH, individual-ion activities and individual-ion activity coefficients. A data base of Pitzer interaction parameters is provided at 25 C for the system: Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO4-OH-HCO3-CO3-CO2-H2O, and extended to include largely untested literature data for Fe(II), Mn(II), Sr, Ba, Li, and Br with provision for calculations at temperatures other than 25C. An extensive literature review of published Pitzer interaction parameters for many inorganic salts is given. Also described is an interactive input code for PHRQPITZ called PITZINPT. (USGS)

  16. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions in variably saturated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-01-28

    Concentrated aqueous solutions (CAS) have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in CAS are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. The problem is further complicated by the interaction between CAS flow processes and the naturally heterogeneous sediments. As the CAS migrates through the porous media, the composition may be altered subject to fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of CAS, we must take into account ion-interaction. A combination of the Pitzer ion-interaction and the ion-association model would be an appropriate way to deal with multiple-component systems if the Pitzer' parameters and thermodynamic data of dissolved components and the related minerals are available. To quantify the complicated coupling of CAS flow and transport, as well as the involved chemical reactions in natural and engineered systems, we have substantially extended an existing reactive biogeochemical transport code, BIO-CORE{sup 2D}{copyright}, by incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model. In the present paper, the model, and two test cases against measured data were briefly introduced. Finally we present an application to simulate a laboratory column experiment studying the leakage of the high alkaline waste fluid stored in Hanford (a site of the U.S. Department of Energy, located in Washington State, USA). With the Pitzer ion-interaction ionic activity model, our simulation captures measured pH evolution. The simulation indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges, mineral precipitation and dissolution, are coupled.

  17. Ion interactions with solids and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The models developed for studying processing of energy losses in dense medium, in particular some recent results for atomic systems confined in solids and in partially degenerated medium are described. Applications of these models to some cases of ion interaction with thin metallic foils and with dense plasmas are described. The processes of excitation and energy losses in the case of a degenerated electron gas, and in the general case of a plasma with arbitrary degenerescency are considered. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Application of Pitzer's ion-interaction approach for the calculation of excess properties of trace radionuclides in electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghanel, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two basic problems are commonly encountered in aquatic chemistry: - What is the stoichiometry (and the structure) of the species formed in the solution?; - What are the quantities of these species as a function of the system composition and other basic thermodynamic variables (such as temperature or pressure)? To provide answers to these questions a first assumption is to consider that the system being studied is in equilibrium. Under this assumption, in this paper the focus of attention will be on the methods leading to answers for the second of the above-mentioned questions. (author)

  19. Sequence-dependent separation of trinucleotides by ion-interaction reversed-phase liquid chromatography A structure-retention study assisted by soft-modelling and molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulášek, K.; Jaroň, Kamil S.; Kulhánek, P.; Bittová, M.; Havliš, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1469, October (2016), s. 88-95 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Sequence-dependent separation * Ion-interaction reversed-phase liquid chromatography * Trinucleotides * Oligonucleotide sequence isomers * QSRR * Molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  20. Aqueous Binary Lanthanide(III) Nitrate Ln(NO3)3 Electrolytes Revisited: Extended Pitzer and Bromley Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Campbell, Emily L.; Neiner, Doinita; Pence, Natasha; Robinson, Troy; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2015-09-11

    To date, only limited thermodynamic models describing activity coefficients of the aqueous solutions of lanthanide ions are available. This work expands the existing experimental osmotic coefficient data obtained by classical isopiestic technique for the aqueous binary trivalent lanthanide nitrate Ln(NO3)3 solutions using a combination of water activity and vapor pressure osmometry measurements. The combined osmotic coefficient database for each aqueous lanthanide nitrate at 25°C, consisting of literature available data as well as data obtained in this work, was used to test the validity of Pitzer and Bromley thermodynamic models for the accurate prediction of mean molal activity coefficients of the Ln(NO3)3 solutions in wide concentration ranges. The new and improved Pitzer and Bromley parameters were calculated. It was established that the Ln(NO3)3 activity coefficients in the solutions with ionic strength up to 12 mol kg-1 can be estimated by both Pitzer and single-parameter Bromley models, even though the latter provides for more accurate prediction, particularly in the lower ionic strength regime (up to 6 mol kg-1). On the other hand for the concentrated solutions, the extended three-parameter Bromley model can be employed to predict the Ln(NO3)3 activity coefficients with remarkable accuracy. The accuracy of the extended Bromley model in predicting the activity coefficients was greater than ~95% and ~90% for all solutions with the ionic strength up to 12 mol kg-1 and and 20 mol kg-1, respectively. This is the first time that the activity coefficients for concentrated lanthanide solutions have been predicted with such a remarkable accuracy.

  1. The Pitzer-Lee-Kesler-Teja (PLKT) Strategy and Its Implementation by Meta-Computing Software

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W. R.; Lísal, Martin; Missen, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2001), s. 68-73 ISSN 0009-2479 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : The Pitzer -Lee-Kesler-Teja (PLKT) strategy * implementation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. Estimation of the Pitzer equation parameters for aqueous complexes. A case study for uranium at 298.15 K and 1 atm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyasunov, A.; Grenthe, I.; Fanghaenel, T.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure to estimate the Pitzer parameters for complexes or complex formation reactions from a small number of equilibrium constants (log K vs. I) obtained in 'constant ionic media' is discussed in some detail. It is then often impossible to determine both log K deg., the equilibrium constant at I=0, and all Pitzer parameters, hence some estimations or other simplifications are necessary. Solution coordination chemists have therefore preferred to use the less parametrized Broensted-Guggenheim-Scatchard (SIT) model. By comparison of analytical statements for the mean activity coefficients and equilibrium constants, for the SIT and Pitzer models we have shown that they are equivalent for ionic strengths less than 4 mol kg -1 , and have also established relationships between the Pitzer parameter β (1) and the charge type of the interacting ions, and between Δβ (1) for a complex formation reaction and ΔZETA 2 for the reaction, where ΔZETA 2 is the sum of the squared charges of the reactants/products with the proper stoichiometric coefficients. The first relationship is based on data in single electrolyte systems and the second on equilibrium-constant data determined in ionic media. For reactions involving species of charges one and two in 1-1 electrolyte ionic media we recommend the use of Δβ (1) /ΔZETA 2 = 0.337±0.014 kg mol -1 for the estimation of the Δβ (1) at 298.15 K and 1 atm. In this way we have used concentration equilibrium constant data to estimate log K deg. and Pitzer parameters β (0) and β (1) for more than 30 uranium complexes with other ions at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The procedure makes it possible to use the information on complex formation, acid/base and redox equilibria obtained in ionic media together with the Pitzer parameters for strong electrolytes for the modeling of complex equilibrium systems oer a broad range of ionic strength/ionic medium compositions, up to at least 4 mol kg -1 . (au)

  3. Experimental Determination of Solubilities of Tri-calcium Di-Citrate Tetrahydrate [Ca3[C3H5O(COO)3]2•4H2O] Earlandite in NaCl and MgCl2 Solutions to High Ionic Strengths and Its Pitzer Model: Applications to Nuclear Waste Isolation and Other Low Temperature Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yongliang [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group; Kirkes, Leslie Dawn [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group; Westfall, Terry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group; Marrs, Cassandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group; Knox, Jandi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group; Burton, Heather Lynn [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Carlsbad Programs Group

    2017-09-01

    In this study, solubility measurements on tri-calcium di-citrate tetrahydrate [Ca3[C3H5O(COO)3]2•4H2O, abbreviated as Ca3[Citrate]2•4H2O] as a function of ionic strength are conducted in NaCl solutions up to I = 5.0 mol•kg–1 and in MgCl2 solutions up to I = 7.5 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5°C). The solubility constant (log K$0\\atop{sp}$) for Ca3[Citrate]2•4H2O and formation constant (logβ$0\\atop{1}$) for Ca[C3H5O(COO)3]Ca3[C3H5O(COO)3]2•4H2O (earlandite) = 3Ca2+ + 2[C3H5O(COO)3]3– + 4H2O (1) Ca2+ + [C3H5O(COO)3]3– = Ca[C3H5O(COO)3] (2) are determined as –18.11 ± 0.05 and 4.97 ± 0.05, respectively, based on the Pitzer model with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions in NaCl and MgCl2 media.

  4. Thermodynamic model for the solubility of BaSeO4(cr) in the aqueous Ba2+-SeO42--Na+-H+-OH--H2O system. Extending to high selenate concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Felmy, Andrew R.; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi; Moore, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    The aqueous solubility of BaSeO 4 (cr) was studied at 23 ± 2 C as a function of Na 2 SeO 4 concentrations (0.0001 to 4.1 mol kg -1 ) and equilibration periods (3 to 596 d). The equilibrium, approached from both the under- and over-saturation directions, in this system was reached rather rapidly (≤ 3d). The SIT and Pitzer's ion-interaction models were used to interpret these data and the predictions based on both of these models agreed closely with the experimental data. Thermodynamic analyses of the data show that BaSeO 4 (cr) is the solubility-controlling phase for Na 2 SeO 4 concentrations -1 . The log 10 K 0 value for the BaSeO 4 (cr) solubility product (BaSeO 4 (cr) ↔ Ba 2+ + SeO 4 2- ) calculated by the SIT and Pitzer models were very similar (-7.32 ± 0.07 with Pitzer and -7.25 ± 0.11 with SIT). Although the BaSeO 4 (cr) solubility product and Ba concentrations as a function of Na 2 SeO 4 concentrations predicted by both the SIT and Pitzer models are similar, the models required different sets of fitting parameters. For examples, (1) interpretations using the SIT model required the inclusion of Ba(SeO 4 ) 2 2- species with log 10 K 0 = 3.44 ± 0.12 for the reaction (Ba 2+ + 2SeO 4 2- ↔ Ba(SeO 4 ) 2 2- ), whereas these species are not needed for Pitzer model, and (2) at Na 2 SeO 4 concentrations > 0.59 mol kg -1 it was also possible to calculate the value for log 10 K 0 for the solubility product of a proposed double salt (Na 2 Ba(SeO 4 ) 2 (s) ↔ 2Na + + Ba 2+ + 2SeO 4 2- ) which for the SIT model is -(8.70 ± 0.29) whereas for the Pitzer model it is -(9.19 ± 0.19). The ion-interaction/ion-association parameters hitherto unavailable for both the SIT and Pitzer models required to fit these extensive data extending to as high ionic strengths as 12.3 mol kg -1 were determined. The model developed in this study is consistent with all of the reliable literature data, which was also used to extend the model to barium concentrations as high as 0.22 mol kg

  5. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal systemdeep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approachusing two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz,Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-12-31

    The modeling of coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in geothermal systems is complicated by reservoir conditions such as high temperatures, elevated pressures and sometimes the high salinity of the formation fluid. Coupled THC models have been developed and applied to the study of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecast the long-term evolution of reservoir properties and to determine how fluid circulation within a fractured reservoir can modify its rock properties. In this study, two simulators, FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT, specifically developed to investigate EGS, were applied to model the same geothermal reservoir and to forecast reservoir evolution using their respective thermodynamic and kinetic input data. First, we report the specifics of each of these two codes regarding the calculation of activity coefficients, equilibrium constants and mineral reaction rates. Comparisons of simulation results are then made for a Soultz-type geothermal fluid (ionic strength {approx}1.8 molal), with a recent (unreleased) version of TOUGHREACT using either an extended Debye-Hueckel or Pitzer model for calculating activity coefficients, and FRACHEM using the Pitzer model as well. Despite somewhat different calculation approaches and methodologies, we observe a reasonably good agreement for most of the investigated factors. Differences in the calculation schemes typically produce less difference in model outputs than differences in input thermodynamic and kinetic data, with model results being particularly sensitive to differences in ion-interaction parameters for activity coefficient models. Differences in input thermodynamic equilibrium constants, activity coefficients, and kinetics data yield differences in calculated pH and in predicted mineral precipitation behavior and reservoir-porosity evolution. When numerically cooling a Soultz-type geothermal fluid from 200 C (initially equilibrated with calcite at pH 4.9) to 20 C and suppressing mineral

  6. Influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on double-layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Recently a Poisson-Helmholtz-Boltzmann (PHB) model [Bohinc , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.031130 85, 031130 (2012)] was developed by accounting for solvent-mediated nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions. Nonelectrostatic interactions are described by a Yukawa-like pair potential. In the present work, we modify the PHB model by adding steric effects (finite ion size) into the free energy to derive governing equations. The modified PHB model is capable of capturing both ion specificity and ion crowding. This modified model is then employed to study the capacitance of the double layer. More specifically, we focus on the influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on charging a double layer near a flat surface in the presence of steric effects. We numerically compute the differential capacitance as a function of the voltage under various conditions. At small voltages and low salt concentrations (dilute solution), we find out that the predictions from the modified PHB model are the same as those from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, indicating that nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions and steric effects are negligible. At moderate voltages, nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions play an important role in determining the differential capacitance. Generally speaking, nonelectrostatic interactions decrease the capacitance because of additional nonelectrostatic repulsion among excess counterions inside the double layer. However, increasing the voltage gradually favors steric effects, which induce a condensed layer with crowding of counterions near the electrode. Accordingly, the predictions from the modified PHB model collapse onto those computed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory considering steric effects alone. Finally, theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental data, in particular, in concentrated solutions, leading one to conclude that the modified PHB model adequately predicts the diffuse

  7. Thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer formalism - The PhreeSCALE code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Adeline; Boulahya, Faïza; André, Laurent; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed; Serin, Jean-Paul; Cézac, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous solutions are described according to the Pitzer equation, explicitly taking into account the speciation in the aqueous solutions. The thermal properties are the apparent relative molar enthalpy (Lϕ) and the apparent molar heat capacity (Cp,ϕ). The volumetric property is the apparent molar volume (Vϕ). Equations describing these properties are obtained from the temperature or pressure derivatives of the excess Gibbs energy and make it possible to calculate the dilution enthalpy (∆HD), the heat capacity (cp) and the density (ρ) of aqueous solutions up to high concentrations. Their implementation in PHREEQC V.3 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) is described and has led to a new numerical tool, called PhreeSCALE. It was tested first, using a set of parameters (specific interaction parameters and standard properties) from the literature for two binary systems (Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O), for the quaternary K-Na-Cl-SO4 system (heat capacity only) and for the Na-K-Ca-Mg-Cl-SO4-HCO3 system (density only). The results obtained with PhreeSCALE are in agreement with the literature data when the same standard solution heat capacity (Cp0) and volume (V0) values are used. For further applications of this improved computation tool, these standard solution properties were calculated independently, using the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations. By using this kind of approach, most of the Pitzer interaction parameters coming from literature become obsolete since they are not coherent with the standard properties calculated according to the HKF formalism. Consequently a new set of interaction parameters must be determined. This approach was successfully applied to the Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O binary systems, providing a new set of optimized interaction parameters, consistent with the standard solution properties derived from the HKF equations.

  8. Magnetism of singlet - singlet ions interacting with an electron gas: application to PrAl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various magnetic quantities are investigated for a system consisting of singlet-singlet ions interacting with an electron gas. In obtaining the magnetic state equations, the molecular field approximation is used. At T=0, an onset magnetic order condition in function of crystal field and exchange parameters and eletronic density of states at Fermi level is derived. A parametric study of the model is performed numerically. Main results are shown on diagrams. From the experimental data existent in the literature for magnetisation, susceptibility and magnetic specific heat of the PrAl 2 , a fitting with the model predictions is obtained using the following parameters: exchange interaction: 611meV; crystal field parameters: 2,5 meV; band with: 10 eV (of a rectangular density of states with 0,8 el/atom). (author) [pt

  9. Metal ion interaction with phosphorylated tyrosine analogue monolayers on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoral, Rodrigo M; Björefors, Fredrik; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2006-11-23

    Phosphorylated tyrosine analogue molecules (pTyr-PT) were assembled onto gold substrates, and the resulting monolayers were used for metal ion interaction studies. The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), both prior to and after exposure to metal ions. XPS verified the elemental composition of the molecular adsorbate and the presence of metal ions coordinated to the phosphate groups. Both the angle-dependent XPS and IRAS results were consistent with the change in the structural orientation of the pTyr-PT monolayer upon exposure to metal ions. The differential capacitance of the monolayers upon coordination of the metal ions was evaluated using EIS. These metal ions were found to significantly change the capacitance of the pTyr-PT monolayers in contrast to the nonphosphorylated tyrosine analogue (TPT). CV results showed reduced electrochemical blocking capabilities of the phosphorylated analogue monolayer when exposed to metal ions, supporting the change in the structure of the monolayer observed by XPS and IRAS. The largest change in the structure and interfacial capacitance was observed for aluminum ions, compared to calcium, magnesium, and chromium ions. This type of monolayer shows an excellent capability to coordinate metal ions and has a high potential for use as sensing layers in biochip applications to monitor the presence of metal ions.

  10. Heavy ion interactions in the TeV energy domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Stefan.

    1989-01-01

    Heavy-ion interactions at 60 and 200 A GeV have been studied at the CERN SPS. The energy flow in the pseudo-rapidity region >2.4 is studied with two sampling calorimeters in the WA80 experiment. It is concluded that the nuclear geometry plays an important role for energy flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions at these energies. The laser system for the gain control of the sampling calorimeters is described as well. A new emulsion technique for accurate angular measurements in the pseudo-rapidity region >1.3 used in the EMU01 experiment is described. With this technique the pseudo-rapidity distributions of relativistic singly charged particles are studied. The conclusion is that the geometry together with the fluctuations in participating nucleons, break-up of strings and decay of resonances can describe the obtained results. The standard emulsion technique is used to study the target fragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 A GeV. It is found that a first order cascade correction alone is unable to explain the observed emulsion results on target related fragments. (author)

  11. Ion-ion interaction and energy transfer of 4+ transuranium ions in cerium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.K.; Beitz, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of excited 5f electron states of the transuranium ions Cm 4+ and Bk 4+ in CeF 4 are compared. Based on time- and wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, excitation energy transfer processes have been probed. Depending on concentration and electronic energy level structure of the studied 4+ transuranium ion, the dominant energy transfer mechanisms were identified as cross relaxation, exciton-exciton annihilation, and trapping. Energy transfer rates derived from the fitting of the observed fluorescence decays to theoretical models, based on electric multipolar ion-ion interactions, are contrasted with prior studies of 4f states of 3+ lanthanide and 3d states of transition metal ions. 16 refs., 1 tab

  12. Slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Alexandrov, Y A; Andreeva, N P; Anson, Z V; Arora, R; Avetyan, F A; Badyal, S K; Basova, E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bogdanov, V G; Bubnov, V I; Burnett, T H; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Y; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dressel, B; Eligbaeva, G Z; Eremenko, L E; Friedlander, E M; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V; Heckman, H H; Huang, H; Jakobsson, B; Judek, B; Kachroo, S; Kadyrov, F G; Kalyachkina, G S; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kaul, G L; Kaur, M; Kharlamov, S P; Koss, Y; Krasnov,; Kumar,; Lal, P; Larionova,; Lepetan,; Lindstrom,; Liu,; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J; Lukicheva, N S; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Marutyan,; Maslennikova, N V; Mittra, I S; Mookerjee, S; Mueller, C; Nasrulaeva, H; Nasyrov, S H; Navotny, V S; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Palsania, H S; Peresadko, N G; Petrov, N V; Plyushchev, V A; Qian, W Y; Raniwala,; EMU01 Collaboration

    1991-06-20

    The slow, target associated particles produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions are a quantitative probe of the cascading processes in the spectator parts of the target nucleus. These processes are directly influenced by the proper timescale for the formation of hadronic matter. In this letter we show experimental data on singly and multiply charged particles, with velocities smaller than 0.7c, produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion interactions in nuclear emulsion. (orig.).

  13. Event Generators for Simulating Heavy Ion Interactions of Interest in Evaluating Risks in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Victor; Empl, Anton; Lee, Kerry; Smirmov, Georgi; Zapp, Neal; Ferrari, Alfredo; Tsoulou, Katerina; Roesler, Stefan; hide

    2005-01-01

    Simulating the Space Radiation environment with Monte Carlo Codes, such as FLUKA, requires the ability to model the interactions of heavy ions as they penetrate spacecraft and crew member's bodies. Monte-Carlo-type transport codes use total interaction cross sections to determine probabilistically when a particular type of interaction has occurred. Then, at that point, a distinct event generator is employed to determine separately the results of that interaction. The space radiation environment contains a full spectrum of radiation types, including relativistic nuclei, which are the most important component for the evaluation of crew doses. Interactions between incident protons with target nuclei in the spacecraft materials and crew member's bodies are well understood. However, the situation is substantially less comfortable for incident heavier nuclei (heavy ions). We have been engaged in developing several related heavy ion interaction models based on a Quantum Molecular Dynamics-type approach for energies up through about 5 GeV per nucleon (GeV/A) as part of a NASA Consortium that includes a parallel program of cross section measurements to guide and verify this code development.

  14. Incorporating Pitzer equations in a new thermodynamic model for the prediction of acid gases solubility in aqueous alkanolamine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alhseinat, E.; Mota Martinez, M.; Peters, C.J.; Banat, F.

    2014-01-01

    In gas sweetening, acid gases such as CO2 and/or H2S are usually removed by "chemical" absorption through aqueous amine solutions such as N-Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solution. Reliable prediction of equilibrium properties (vapor–liquid equilibrium and species distribution) is needed for a rigorous

  15. Fusion de-excitation process in heavy ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, A.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of compound nucleus formation and de-excitation are analysed with particular emphasis on de-excitation by particle emission and fission. Calculations of level densities are described and the validity of various approximations studied. The explanatory and predictive possibilities of the statistical model are pointed out [fr

  16. Twisted-Light-Ion Interaction: The Role of Longitudinal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G. F.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Schmiegelow, Christian T.

    2017-12-01

    The propagation of light beams is well described using the paraxial approximation, where field components along the propagation direction are usually neglected. For strongly inhomogeneous or shaped light fields, however, this approximation may fail, leading to intriguing variations of the light-matter interaction. This is the case of twisted light having opposite orbital and spin angular momenta. We compare experimental data for the excitation of a quadrupole transition in a single trapped 40Ca+ ion from Schmiegelow et al. [Nat. Commun. 7, 12998 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms12998] with a complete model where longitudinal components of the electric field are taken into account. Our model matches the experimental data and excludes by 11 standard deviations the approximation of a complete transverse field. This demonstrates the relevance of all field components for the interaction of twisted light with matter.

  17. Heavy ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report, May 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1984-11-01

    This progress report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (a) a new microscopic approach to the calculation of heavy ion interaction potentials; (b) the dynamical orientation of deformed heavy nuclei near the distance of closest approach; and (c) the theory of Coulomb fission (project finished in Sept.)

  18. Manifestation of exchange effects in heavy-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2011-01-01

    Three different approaches to taking into account exchange effects in heavy-ion collisions are studied. Within the first of them, the lowest eigenstates of the Hamiltonian are treated as forbidden states. In the second approach, the eigenstates of the normalization kernel of the resonating-group model that correspond to zero eigenvalues are treated as forbidden states. The third approach takes additionally into account semiforbidden states. The 16 O + 16 O system is considered. A hybrid approach that combines the methods of discrete and continuous mathematics is developed for calculating the widths of narrow resonance states. The resonance width calculated within the approach that takes into account semiforbidden states proves to be sharply different from the widths obtained within traditional approaches.

  19. Biophysical aspects of heavy ion interactions in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Ludewigt, B.; Phillips, M.; Alpen, E.L.; Powers-Risius, P.; DeGuzman, R.J.; Townsend, L.W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of high energy, high charge nuclei (HZE particles) occupy a central role in the management of space radiation hazards due to galactic cosmic rays. For the energy range of interest, the mean free path for nuclear interactions of these heavy ions is comparable to the thickness of the material traversed, and a significant fraction of stopping particles will undergo a nuclear reaction with the nuclei of the stopping material. Transport methods for HZE particles are dependent on models of the interaction of man-made systems with the space environment to an even greater extent than methods used for other types of radiation. Hence, there is a major need to validate these transport codes by comparison with experimental data. The basic physical properties of HZE particles will be reviewed and illustrated with the results of nuclear fragmentation experiments performed with 670A MeV neon ions incident on a water absorber and with measurements of multiple Coulomb scattering of uranium beams in copper. Finally, the extent to which physical measurements yield radiobiological predictions is illustrated for the example of neon

  20. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  1. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  2. Comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper contains comments on the current status and possible future directions of research on heavy-ion interactions near the Coulomb barrier. Fusion reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and transfer reactions are discussed

  3. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  4. The operator technique in the theory of the rare earth ion interaction with ligand nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeenok, O.A.; Eremin, M.V.; Khutsishvili, O.G.

    1986-01-01

    The tensor structure of the operator of rare earth ion interaction with nuclei of close ligands conditioned by virtual processes of charge transport is established. It is taken into account that virtual processes of electron transport from the ligand can take place to the non-filled 4f-, void 5d- and 6s- and preliminarily excited 5p-shells of the rare earth ion. Effects of 4f- and 5d-state mixing by the odd crystal field are considered for the first time. In contrast to the usual multipole-dipole interaction the given one is characterized by anomalously greater significance of highest multipole momenta of the rare earth ion and in the common case it does not have axial symmetry. The theory is compared with data on double electron-nuclear resonance and radiofrequency discrete saturation, taking CaF 2 :Ce 3+ impurity centers as an example

  5. Screened ion-ion interaction in mercury-chain compounds: Single chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, M.M.; Griffin, A.

    1985-01-01

    At room temperature, the mercury chains in Hg/sub 3-delta/AsF 6 exhibit phonons characteristic of a one-dimensional lattice. We calculate the screening of the Hg ion-ion interaction in a single chain by electrons moving in a cylindrical potential of finite radius, within the random-phase approximation. The resulting Bohm-Staver-type expression for the phonon velocity is (Z 2 mN/sub I//MN/sub e/)/sup 1/2/v/sub F/, where Z is the Hg ionic charge and N/sub I/ (N/sub e/) is the number of ions (electrons) per unit length. Use of the Tomonaga-Luttinger solution for the electronic response function (keeping only the small-momentum scattering processes) just renormalizes the Fermi velocity in this expression

  6. Vapor pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for (LiBr + acetonitrile) between the temperatures (298.15 and 343.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat E-mail: karamat.nasirzadeh@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Neueder, Roland; Kunz, Werner

    2004-06-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for pure acetonitrile and (LiBr + acetonitrile) are given for temperatures ranging from T=(298.15 to 343.15) K. The molality range is from m=(0.0579 to 0.8298) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. The osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of acetonitrile. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer and the mole fraction-based thermodynamic model of Clegg-Pitzer are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the available osmotic coefficients. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients.

  7. Does an electronic continuum correction improve effective short-range ion-ion interactions in aqueous solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ellen E.; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2018-06-01

    Non-polarizable force fields for hydrated ions not always accurately describe short-range ion-ion interactions, frequently leading to artificial ion clustering in bulk aqueous solutions. This can be avoided by adjusting the nonbonded anion-cation or cation-water Lennard-Jones parameters. This approach has been successfully applied to different systems, but the parameterization is demanding owing to the necessity of separate investigations of each ion pair. Alternatively, polarization effects may effectively be accounted for using the electronic continuum correction (ECC) of Leontyev et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8024 (2003)], which involves scaling the ionic charges with the inverse square-root of the water high-frequency dielectric permittivity. ECC has proven to perform well for monovalent salts as well as for divalent salts in water. Its performance, however, for multivalent salts with higher valency remains unexplored. The present work illustrates the applicability of the ECC model to trivalent K3PO4 and divalent K2HPO4 in water. We demonstrate that the ECC models, without additional tuning of force field parameters, provide an accurate description of water-mediated interactions between salt ions. This results in predictions of the osmotic coefficients of aqueous K3PO4 and K2HPO4 solutions in good agreement with experimental data. Analysis of ion pairing thermodynamics in terms of contact ion pair (CIP), solvent-separated ion pair, and double solvent-separated ion pair contributions shows that potassium-phosphate CIP formation is stronger with trivalent than with divalent phosphate ions.

  8. A catalytic metal ion interacts with the cleavage site G•U wobble in the HDV ribozyme†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Gong, Bo; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Carey, Paul R.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    The HDV ribozyme self-cleaves by a chemical mechanism involving general acid-base catalysis to generate a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and a 5′-hydroxyl termini. Biochemical studies from several laboratories have implicated C75 as the general acid and hydrated magnesium as the general base. We have previously shown that C75 has a pKa shifted > 2 pH units toward neutrality [Gong, B., Chen, J. H., Chase, E., Chadalavada, D. M., Yajima, R., Golden, B. L., Bevilacqua, P. C., and Carey, P. R. (2007) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13335–13342.], while in crystal structures, it is well-positioned for proton transfer. However no crystallographic evidence for a hydrated magnesium poised to serve as a general base in the reaction has been observed in high-resolution crystal structures of various reaction states and mutants. Herein, we use solution kinetic experiments and parallel Raman crystallographic studies to examine the effects of pH on rate and Mg2+-binding properties of wild-type and 7-deazaguanosine mutants of the HDV ribozyme. These data suggest that a previously-unobserved hydrated magnesium ion interacts with the N7 of the cleavage site G•U wobble base pair. Integrating this metal ion binding site with the available crystal structures provides a new three-dimensional model for the active site of the ribozyme that accommodates all available biochemical data and appears competent for catalysis. The position of this metal is consistent with a role of a magnesium-bound hydroxide as a general base as dictated by biochemical data. PMID:19178151

  9. Pre-compound emission in low-energy heavy-ion interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sharma Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental studies have shown the presence of pre-compound emission component in heavy ion reactions at low projectile energy ranging from 4 to 7 MeV/nucleons. In earlier measurements strength of the pre-compound component has been estimated from the difference in forward-backward distributions of emitted particles. Present measurement is a part of an ongoing program on the study of reaction dynamics of heavy ion interactions at low energies aimed at investigating the effect of momentum transfer in compound, precompound, complete and incomplete fusion processes in heavy ion reactions. In the present work on the basis of momentum transfer the measurement of the recoil range distributions of heavy residues has been used to decipher the components of compound and pre-compound emission processes in the fusion of 16O projectile with 159Tb and 169Tm targets. The analysis of recoil range distribution measurements show two distinct linear momentum transfer components corresponding to pre-compound and compound nucleus processes are involved. In order to obtain the mean input angular momentum associated with compound and pre-compound emission processes, an online measurement of the spin distributions of the residues has been performed. The analysis of spin distribution indicate that the mean input angular momentum associated with pre-compound products is found to be relatively lower than that associated with compound nucleus process. The pre-compound components obtained from the present analysis are consistent with those obtained from the analysis of excitation functions.

  10. Pre-compound emission in low-energy heavy-ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown the presence of pre-compound emission component in heavy ion reactions at low projectile energy ranging from 4 to 7 MeV/nucleons. In earlier measurements strength of the pre-compound component has been estimated from the difference in forward-backward distributions of emitted particles. Present measurement is a part of an ongoing program on the study of reaction dynamics of heavy ion interactions at low energies aimed at investigating the effect of momentum transfer in compound, precompound, complete and incomplete fusion processes in heavy ion reactions. In the present work on the basis of momentum transfer the measurement of the recoil range distributions of heavy residues has been used to decipher the components of compound and pre-compound emission processes in the fusion of 16O projectile with 159Tb and 169Tm targets. The analysis of recoil range distribution measurements show two distinct linear momentum transfer components corresponding to pre-compound and compound nucleus processes are involved. In order to obtain the mean input angular momentum associated with compound and pre-compound emission processes, an online measurement of the spin distributions of the residues has been performed. The analysis of spin distribution indicate that the mean input angular momentum associated with pre-compound products is found to be relatively lower than that associated with compound nucleus process. The pre-compound components obtained from the present analysis are consistent with those obtained from the analysis of excitation functions.

  11. Hadron production in relativistic heavy ion interactions and the search for the quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1989-12-01

    The course starts with an introduction, from the experimentalist's point of view, of the challenge of measuring Relativistic Heavy Ion interactions. A review of some theoretical predictions for the expected signatures of the quark gluon plasma will be made, with a purpose to understand how they relate to quantities which may be experimentally measured. A short exposition of experimental techniques and details is given including charged particles in matter, momentum resolution, kinematics and Lorentz Transformations, calorimetry. Principles of particle identification including magnetic spectrometers, time of flight measurement. Illustrations using the E802 spectrometer and other measured results. Resolution smearing of spectra, and binning effects. Parent to daughter effects in decay, with π 0 → γ γ as an example. The experimental situation from the known data in p -- p collisions and proton-nucleus reactions is reviewed and used as a basis for further discussions. The ''Cronin Effect'' and the ''Seagull Effect'' being two arcana worth noting. Then, selected experiments from the BNL and CERN heavy ion programs are discussed in detail. 118 refs., 45 figs

  12. Studies on the relationship between Pitzer's equation and medium effect: the system of HCl + H2SO4 in {0.06455C2H5OH + 0.93545H2O}

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xingmei; Xu Weiguo; Chang Xiaohong; Lu Dianzhen; Yang Jiazhen

    2004-01-01

    The second ionization constant of sulfuric acid in mixed solvent, K 2 , was determined by e.m.f. of cell without liquid junction: (Pt,H 2 (101.325 kPa) vertical bar HCl(m 1 ),H 2 SO 4 (m 2 ),{ethanol(x=0.06455)+water(x=0.93545)} vertical bar AgCl-Ag))over the temperatures (278.15 to 318.15) K, where x is mole fraction. Combining Owen's definition of medium effect with Pitzer's equations, the values of combination parameters: (λ nHS +λ nCl -λ nS )+(3/2)m n (μ nnHS +μ nnCl -μ nnS ),(1/2)(ξ nHHS +ξ nHCl -ξ nHS ), that represent the interactions between ions and ethanol were obtained at 298.15 K.

  13. Experimental determination and modeling of the solubility phase diagram of the ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at 288.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiqiang, E-mail: wangshiqiang@tust.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Guo, Yafei [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Li, Dongchan [Engineering Research Center of Seawater Utilization Technology of Ministry of Education, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Tang, Peng; Deng, Tianlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-02-10

    Highlights: • Solubility of the ternary system Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O at 288.15 K has been measured. • Phase diagram of this system was simulated and calculated by a thermodynamic model. • Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} belongs to the incongruent double salt in this system. • Solution density was calculated using empirical equation. - Abstract: The solubility and density in the thermodynamic phase equilibria ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at 288.15 K and 0.1 MPa were investigated experimentally with the method of isothermal dissolution equilibrium. This system at 288.15 K consists of two invariant points, three univariant isothermal dissolution curves; and three crystallization regions. The salt Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} belongs to the incongruent double salt, and no solid solution was found. Based on the Pitzer model and its extended Harvie–Weare (HW) model, the mixing ion-interaction parameters of θ{sub Li,K}, ψ{sub Li,K,SO4} at 288.15 K and the solubility equilibrium constants K{sub sp} of solid phases Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which are not reported in the literature were acquired. A comparison between the calculated and experimental results at 288.15 K for the ternary system shows that the calculated solubilities obtained with the extended HW model agree well with experimental data.

  14. Thermodynamic Modeling of Savannah River Evaporators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-08-02

    A thermodynamic model based on the code SOLGASMIX is developed to calculate phase equilibrium in evaporators and related tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This model uses the Pitzer method to calculate activity coefficients, and many of the required Pitzer parameters have been determined in the course of this work. Principal chemical species in standard SRS simulant solutions are included, and the temperature range for most parameters has been extended above 100 C. The SOLGASMIX model and calculations using the code Geochemists Workbench are compared to actual solubility data including silicate, aluminate, and aluminosilicate solutions. In addition, SOLGASMIX model calculations are also compared to transient solubility data involving SRS simulant solutions. These comparisons indicate that the SOLGASMIX predictions closely match reliable data over the range of temperature and solution composition expected in the SRS evaporator and related tanks. Predictions using the Geochemists Workbench may be unreliable, due primarily to the use of an inaccurate activity coefficient model.

  15. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    Deep saline formations and oil and gas reservoirs often contain concentrated brine solutions of ionic strength greater than 1 (I > 1 M). Geochemical modeling, involving high ionic strength brines, is a challenge. In the original TOUGHREACT code (Xu et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006), activity coefficients of charged aqueous species are computed using an extended Debye-Huckel (DH) equation and parameters derived by Helgeson et al. (1981). The DH model can deal with ionic strengths from dilute to moderately saline water (up to 6 molal for an NaCl-dominant solution). The equations implemented for the DH model are presented in Appendix A. During the course of the Yucca Mountain project, a Pitzer ion-interaction model was implemented into TOUGHREACT. This allows the application of this simulator to problems involving much more concentrated aqueous solutions, such as those involving geochemical processes in and around high-level nuclear waste repositories where fluid evaporation and/or boiling is expected to occur (Zhang et al., 2007). The Pitzer ion-interaction model, which we refer to as the Pitzer virial approach, and associated ion-interaction parameters have been applied successfully to study non-ideal concentrated aqueous solutions. The formulation of the Pitzer model is presented in Appendix B; detailed information can be founded in Zhang et al. (2007). For CO 2 geological sequestration, the Pitzer ion-interaction model for highly concentrated brines was incorporated into TOUGHREACT/ECO2N, then was tested and compared with a previously implemented extended Debye-Hueckel (DH) ion activity model. The comparison was made through a batch geochemical system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation

  16. Analysis of the intermediate stage in the heavy ion interactions of 208Pb+197Au and 197Au+197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasir, Tabassum; Khan, E.U.; Baluch, J.J.; Qureshi, I.E.; Sajid, M.; Shahzad, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Two different projectiles 208 Pb and 197 Au at the same energy (11.67MeV/u) have been bombarded on 197 Au target to study heavy ion interactions using mica as a passive detector. In this paper we present results on the study of energy damping and time scale of the existence of di-nuclear composite system in the intermediate reaction step. The plots of Q-values as well as reaction cross sections in various angular bins of scattering angles suggest that K.E. damping was complete and dynamic equilibrium was established between the first and second reaction steps. The time scale of this duration was also determined

  17. An intranuclear cascade calculation of high-energy heavy-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yariv, Y.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade model of Chen is extended to high-energy reactions between two heavy ions. The results of the calculations are compared with experimental results for the inclusive proton and pion cross sections, two-particle correlations, particle multiplicity distributions and spallation cross section distributions from light ( 12 C+ 12 C) to heavy( 40 Ar + 238 U) projectile-target systems in the laboratory bombarding energy range E/A=250-1000 MeV. The comparison shows that the model is fairly successful in reproducing the various aspects of high-energy reactions between heavy ions. It is also shown that the assumption that high particle multiplicities are indicative of ''central'' (small impact parameter) collisions are well founded for heavy projectile-target systems. (B.G.)

  18. Electrom emission from slow highly charged ions interacting with a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Kurz, H.; Toeglhofer, K.; Winter, H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in investigating electron emission from slow highly charged ions approaching a metal surface is discussed. In particular, new informations on generation and decay of transient multiply excited ''hollow atoms'' developing during these processes have been gained from measurement of the statistics of emitted electrons (ES). ES and precise total electron yields derived from the former have been measured for normal incidence of slow (impact velocity 1/15.10 4 ms -1 ) multicharged ions N q+ (q≤6), Ne q+ (q≤10), Ar q+ (q≤16), Kr q+ (q≤10), Xe q+ (q≤10) and I q+ (q≤25) on clean polycrystalline gold. A classical over-barrier approach as recently introduced by Burgdoerfer et al. 1991 has been extended and successfully applied to model the measured impact-velocity dependences of total electron yields. In this way contributions from different electron emission mechanisms could be identified. (orig.)

  19. Understanding the role of ion interactions in soluble salt flotation with alkylammonium and alkylsulfate collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Orhan; Du, Hao; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Nguyen, Anh V; Celik, M S; Miller, Jan D

    2011-03-15

    There is anecdotal evidence for the significant effects of salt ions on the flotation separation of minerals using process water of high salt content. Examples include flotation of soluble salt minerals such as potash, trona and borax in brine solutions using alkylammonium and alkylsulfate collectors such as dodecylamine hydrochloride and sodium dodecylsulfate. Although some of the effects are expected, some do not seem to be encompassed by classical theories of colloid science. Several experimental and modeling techniques for determining solution viscosity, surface tension, bubble-particle attachment time, contact angle, and molecular dynamics simulation have been used to provide further information on air-solution and solid-solution interfacial phenomena, especially with respect to the interfacial water structure due to the presence of dissolved ions. In addition atomic force microscopy, and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have been used to provide further information on surface states. These studies indicate that the ion specificity effect is the most significant factor influencing flotation in brine solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermodynamic approach of the poly-azine - f element ions interaction in aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Madic, C.

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-4,6-di-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (Adptz) was considered as a model compound for selective aromatic nitrogen extractants (poly-azines) of minor actinides. Thermodynamic data ( ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 ) were systematically acquired for the complexation of lanthanide(III) ions as well as yttrium(III) and americium(III) in hydro-alcoholic medium. Two complementary experimental approaches were followed. Stability constants for the formation of the 1:1 complexes were evaluated from UV-visible spectrophotometry titration experiments, whereas enthalpies and entropies of reaction were obtained consistently from either temperature dependence experiments or micro-calorimetry. The interaction of Adptz with lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) ions was found to be essentially ionic and dependent upon the hydration and size of the ion. As for americium(III) ion, stability constant and enthalpy of complexation was significantly larger. This was attributed to a partial electronic transfer from the ligand to empty orbitals of the cation. DFT calculations support this interpretation. (authors)

  1. Studies of nuclear matter under extreme conditions: Heavy-ion interactions at ultra-relativistic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, J

    1996-10-01

    The charged particle production in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 4-200 A GeV has been studied. Two different experimental techniques have been utilized: nuclear emulsions and multi-step avalanche chambers. The performance of the chambers in the experiment as well as the analysis of the chamber data are described in the thesis. The reconstructed particle momenta have been used to study transverse momentum distribution of negatively charged particles, and to perform intensity interferometry analyses in order to determine the source size and study the time-evolution of the interactions. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of singly charged particles obtained from interactions in nuclear emulsion have been studied. Simulations have been performed with various Monte-Carlo models, and particularly the effects of the hadronic rescattering have been studied. The results of the analysis have illustrated the great importance of the nuclear geometry in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Based on gaussian parametrizations a method of predicting the pseudorapidity distributions in systems of different sizes and at different energies has been developed. Furthermore, the multiplicity and angular distributions of slow, target associated particles have been analyzed. 99 refs, 19 figs.

  2. Studies of nuclear matter under extreme conditions: Heavy-ion interactions at ultra-relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, J.

    1996-10-01

    The charged particle production in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 4-200 A GeV has been studied. Two different experimental techniques have been utilized: nuclear emulsions and multi-step avalanche chambers. The performance of the chambers in the experiment as well as the analysis of the chamber data are described in the thesis. The reconstructed particle momenta have been used to study transverse momentum distribution of negatively charged particles, and to perform intensity interferometry analyses in order to determine the source size and study the time-evolution of the interactions. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of singly charged particles obtained from interactions in nuclear emulsion have been studied. Simulations have been performed with various Monte-Carlo models, and particularly the effects of the hadronic rescattering have been studied. The results of the analysis have illustrated the great importance of the nuclear geometry in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Based on gaussian parametrizations a method of predicting the pseudorapidity distributions in systems of different sizes and at different energies has been developed. Furthermore, the multiplicity and angular distributions of slow, target associated particles have been analyzed. 99 refs, 19 figs

  3. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  4. Energy dissipation of highly charged ions interacting with solid surfaces; Energieeintrag langsamer hochgeladener Ionen in Festkoerperoberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, D.

    2006-07-01

    values. In addition, the experimental results are compared with computer simulations based on the extended dynamical over-the-barrier model. From these calculations, the ratio of deposited potential energy that is transformed into kinetic energy before deposition due to the image charge acceleration can be maintained. (orig.)

  5. Electrostatic instabilities, turbulence and fast ion interactions in the TORPEX device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoli, A; Burckel, A; Federspiel, L; Furno, I; Gustafson, K; Iraji, D; Labit, B; Loizu, J; Plyushchev, G; Ricci, P; Theiler, C [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Diallo, A; Podesta, M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Mueller, S H [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Poli, F [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Electrostatic turbulence, related structures and their effect on particle, heat and toroidal momentum transport are investigated in TORPEX simple magnetized plasmas using high-resolution diagnostics, control parameters, linear fluid models and nonlinear numerical simulations. The nature of the dominant instabilities is controlled by the value of the vertical magnetic field, B{sub v}, relative to that of the toroidal field, B{sub T}. For B{sub v}/B{sub T} > 3%, only ideal interchange instabilities are observed. A critical pressure gradient to drive the interchange instability is experimentally identified. Interchange modes give rise to blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from electrostatic probe measurements using pattern recognition methods. The observed values span a wide range and are described by a single analytical expression, from the small blob size regime in which the blob velocity is limited by cross-field ion polarization currents, to the large blob size regime in which the limitation to the blob velocity comes from parallel currents to the sheath. As a first attempt at controlling the blob dynamical properties, limiter configurations with varying angles between field lines and the conducting surface of the limiter are explored. Mach probe measurements clearly demonstrate a link between toroidal flows and blobs. To complement probe data, a fast framing camera and a movable gas puffing system are installed. Density and light fluctuations show similar signatures of interchange activity. Further developments of optical diagnostics, including an image intensifier and laser-induced fluorescence, are under way. The effect of interchange turbulence on fast ion phase space dynamics is studied using movable fast ion source and detector in scenarios for which the development from linear waves into blobs is fully characterized. A theory validation project is conducted in parallel with TORPEX

  6. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  7. Information entropy of a time-dependent three-level trapped ion interacting with a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2005-01-01

    Trapped and laser-cooled ions are increasingly used for a variety of modern high-precision experiments, frequency standard applications and quantum information processing. Therefore, in this communication we present a comprehensive analysis of the pattern of information entropy arising in the time evolution of an ion interacting with a laser field. A general analytic approach is proposed for a three-level trapped-ion system in the presence of the time-dependent couplings. By working out an exact analytic solution, we conclusively analyse the general properties of the von Neumann entropy and quantum information entropy. It is shown that the information entropy is affected strongly by the time-dependent coupling and exhibits long time periodic oscillations. This feature attributed to the fact that in the time-dependent region Rabi oscillation is time dependent. Using parameters corresponding to a specific three-level ionic system, a single beryllium ion in a RF-(Paul) trap, we obtain illustrative examples of some novel aspects of this system in the dynamical evolution. Our results establish an explicit relation between the exact information entropy and the entanglement between the multi-level ion and the laser field. We show that different nonclassical effects arise in the dynamics of the ionic population inversion, depending on the initial states of the vibrational motion/field and on the values of Lamb-Dicke parameter η

  8. Separation of polythionates and the gold thiosulfate complex in gold thiosulfate leach solutions by ion-interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, John W; Shaw, Matthew J; Dicinoski, Greg W; Grosse, Andrew C; Miura, Yasuyuki; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-07-01

    A method for the separation of the polythionates (SxO6(2-), x = 3-5) in gold thiosulfate leach solutions using ion-interaction chromatography with conductivity and ultraviolet (UV) detection is described. Polythionates were eluted within 18 min using an eluent comprising an acetonitrile step gradient at 0.0 min from 15% v/v to 28% v/v, 3 mM TBAOH, and 2.5 mM sodium carbonate, operated using a Dionex NS1-5 micron column with guard. The developed method was capable of separating the gold thiosulfate complex ion in standard solutions, but quantification of this species in realistic leach solutions proved impractical due to a self-elution effect that caused the gold peak to be eluted as a broad band. Detection limits for polythionates using a 10 microL injection volume ranged between 1-6 mg L(-1) (5-23 microM) for conductivity and 0.8-13 mg L(-1) (4-68 microM) for UV detection, based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 2. Calibration was linear over the ranges 5-2000, 10-2000 and 25-2500 mg L(-1) for trithionate, tetrathionate and pentathionate, respectively. The technique was applied successfully to leach liquors containing 0.5 M ammonium thiosulfate, 2 M ammonia, 0.05 M copper sulfate and 20 % m/v gold ore.

  9. Ion-ion interactions in the denatured state contribute to the stabilization of CutA1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutani, Katsuhide; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Naitow, Hisashi; Joti, Yasumasa

    2018-05-16

    In order to elucidate features of the denatured state ensembles that exist in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions, we performed 1.4-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K and 450 K using the monomer subunits of three CutA1 mutants from Escherichia coli: an SH-free mutant (Ec0SH) with denaturation temperature (T d ) = 85.6 °C, a hydrophobic mutant (Ec0VV) with T d  = 113.3 °C, and an ionic mutant (Ec0VV_6) with T d  = 136.8 °C. The occupancy of salt bridges by the six substituted charged residues in Ec0VV_6 was 140.1% at 300 K and 89.5% at 450 K, indicating that even in the denatured state, salt bridge occupancy was high, approximately 60% of that at 300 K. From these results, we can infer that proteins from hyperthermophiles with a high ratio of charged residues are stabilized by a decrease in conformational entropy due to ion-ion interactions in the denatured state. The mechanism must be comparable to the stabilization conferred by disulfide bonds within a protein. This suggests that introduction of charged residues, to promote formation of salt bridges in the denatured state, would be a simple way to rationally design stability-enhanced mutants.

  10. Electro-osmosis over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempt to bring out a generalized formulation for electro-osmotic flows over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions. To this end, we start with modified electro-chemical potential of the individual species and subsequently use it to derive modified Nernst-Planck equation accounting for the ionic fluxes generated because of the presence of non-electrostatic potential. We establish what we refer to as the Poisson-Helmholtz-Nernst-Planck equations, coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations, to describe the complete transport process. Our analysis shows that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions between the ions results in an excess body force on the fluid, and modifies the osmotic pressure as well, which has hitherto remained unexplored. We further apply our analysis to a simple geometry, in an effort to work out the Smoluchowski slip velocity for thin electrical double layer limits. To this end, we employ singular perturbation and develop a general framework for the asymptotic analysis. Our calculations reveal that the final expression for slip velocity remains the same as that without accounting for non-electrostatic interactions. However, the presence of non-electrostatic interactions along with ion specificity can significantly change the quantitative behavior of Smoluchowski slip velocity. We subsequently demonstrate that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions may significantly alter the effective interfacial potential, also termed as the "Zeta potential." Our analysis can potentially act as a guide towards the prediction and possibly quantitative determination of the implications associated with the existence of non-electrostatic potential, in an electrokinetic transport process.

  11. The volumetric and thermochemical properties of Y(ClO4)3 (aq), Yb(ClO4)3 (aq), Dy(ClO4)3 (aq), and Sm(ClO4)3 (aq) at T=(288.15,298.15,313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakin, Andrew W.; Lukacs, Michael J.; Liu, Jin Lian; Erickson, Kristy; Madhavji, Asha

    2003-01-01

    Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities have been measured for aqueous solutions of Y(ClO 4 ) 3 , Yb(ClO 4 ) 3 , Dy(ClO 4 ) 3 , and Sm(ClO 4 ) 3 at T=(288.15,298.15,313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa. These measurements were made in the concentration range 0.01624≤m/(mol·kg -1 )≤0.41822 using a Sodev 02D Vibrating Tube Densimeter and a Picker Microflow Calorimeter, respectively. To counter the potential effects of hydrolysis, aqueous solutions of the investigated salts were acidified with perchloric acid. After correcting for the presence of the acid, the measured properties were used to calculate apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities for solutions of the perchlorate salts in water. The calculated apparent molar properties were modeled at each investigated temperature using Pitzer ion interaction equations to produce estimates of apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution. In addition, the temperature dependences of the apparent molar properties of each salt were found to be well modeled by temperature dependent Pitzer ion interaction equations. The Helgeson, Kirham, and Flowers equations of state were incorporated into the Pitzer ion interaction equations in order to model the infinite dilution properties of the salts. Single ion volumes and heat capacities of the investigated trivalent metal cations have been calculated and compared to previously reported values

  12. Extension of the EQ3/6 computer codes to geochemical modeling of brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K.J.; Wolery, T.J.

    1984-10-23

    Recent modifications to the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling software package provide for the use of Pitzer's equations to calculate the activity coefficients of aqueous species and the activity of water. These changes extend the range of solute concentrations over which the codes can be used to dependably calculate equilibria in geochemical systems, and permit the inclusion of ion pairs, complexes, and undissociated acids and bases as explicit component species in the Pitzer model. Comparisons of calculations made by the EQ3NR and EQ6 compuer codes with experimental data confirm that the modifications not only allow the codes to accurately evaluate activity coefficients in concentrated solutions, but also permit prediction of solubility limits of evaporite minerals in brines at 25/sup 0/C and elevated temperatures. Calculations for a few salts can be made at temperatures up to approx. 300/sup 0/C, but the temperature range for most electrolytes is constrained by the availability of requisite data to values less than or equal to 100/sup 0/C. The implementation of Pitzer's equations in EQ3/6 allows application of these codes to problems involving calculation of geochemical equilibria in brines; such as evaluation of the chemical environment which might be anticipated for nuclear waste canisters located in a salt repository. 26 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  13. Measurement and modeling of osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures (alcohol + 1,3-dimethylpyridinium methylsulfate) at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Elena; Calvar, Noelia; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures (alcohol + ionic liquid) were determined. → The measurements were carried out with a vapor pressure osmometer at 323.15 K. → The Pitzer-Archer, and the MNRTL models were used to correlate the experimental data. → Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. - Abstract: Measurement of osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing several primary and secondary alcohols (1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and 1-pentanol) and the pyridinium-based ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylpyridinium methylsulfate were performed at T = 323.15 K using the vapor pressure osmometry technique, and from experimental data, vapor pressure, and activity coefficients were determined. The extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, and the NRTL model modified by Jaretun and Aly (MNRTL) were used to correlate the experimental osmotic coefficients, obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.017 and 0.054, respectively. From the parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied binary mixtures were calculated. The effect of the cation is studied comparing the experimental results with those obtained for the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylsulfate.

  14. Determination and modelling of osmotic coefficients and vapour pressures of binary systems 1- and 2-propanol with CnMimNTf2 ionic liquids (n = 2, 3, and 4) at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gomez, Elena; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Osmotic coefficients of 1- and 2-propanol with C n MimNTf 2 (n = 2, 3, and 4) are determined. → Experimental data were correlated with extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. → Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. → Effect of the anion is studied comparing these results with literature. - Abstract: The osmotic and activity coefficients and vapour pressures of binary mixtures containing 1-propanol, or 2-propanol and imidazolium-based ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as anion (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 2 MimNTf 2 , 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 3 MimNTf 2 , and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 4 MimNTf 2 ) were determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapour pressure osmometry technique. The experimental osmotic coefficients were correlated using the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer and the MNRTL model, obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.033 and 0.064, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the mixtures studied were calculated from the parameters of the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer. Besides the effect of the alkyl-chain of the cation, the effect of the anion can be assessed comparing the experimental results with those previously obtained for imidazolium ionic liquids with sulphate anions.

  15. Emission of intermediate mass fragments in the heavy ion interaction of (14.0 MeV/u) Pb+Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, E.U.; Qureshi, I.E.; Shahzad, M.I.; Khattak, F.N.; Khan, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the heavy ion interactions of (14.0 MeV/u) Pb + Au using two threshold detectors, mica and CN-85. A thin layer of Au was deposited on each of the three mica and two CN-85 detector pieces. These target-detector assemblies were exposed to a beam of 14.0 MeV/u Pb ions having the fluence of 1.5x10 6 cm 2 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. After removing the target material and etching the samples in appropriate etchants, we scanned 32.29 cm 2 and 24.97 cm 2 area of mica and CN-85, respectively. Based on the observed number of events of various multiplicities, we have determined the total as well as partial experimental reaction cross-sections. It is shown that a significant number of intermediate mass fragments are emitted along with the heavy fragments in the present reaction

  16. Sequential and double sequential fission observed in heavy ion interaction of (11.67 MeV/u){sup 197}Au projectile with {sup 197}Au target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Tabassum [Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics; Khan, Ehsan Ullah [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics; Baluch, Javaid Jahan [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Abbottabad, (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Shafi-Ur-Rehman, [PAEC, Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan). ISL Project; Matiullah, [PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan). Physics Div.; Rafique, Muhammad [University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics

    2009-09-15

    The heavy ion interaction of 11.67 MeV/u {sup 197}Au+ {sup 197}Au has been investigated using mica as a passive detector. By employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detection Technique the data of elastic scattering as well as inelastic reaction channel was collected. The off-line data analysis of multi-pronged events was performed by measuring the three-dimensional geometrical coordinates of correlated tracks on event-by-event basis. Multi pronged events observed in this reaction were due to sequential and double sequential fission. Using a computer code PRONGY based on the procedure of internal calibration, it was possible to derive quantities like mass transfer, total kinetic energy loss and scattering angles. (author)

  17. Analysis of the intermediate stage in the heavy ion interactions of {sup 208}Pb+{sup 197}Au and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Tabassum [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan); Khan, E.U. [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: ehsan@comsats.edu.pk; Baluch, J J [Department of Environmental Sciences, CIIT, Abbottabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, I E [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad (Pakistan); Sajid, M; Shahzad, M I [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-08-15

    Two different projectiles {sup 208}Pb and {sup 197}Au at the same energy (11.67MeV/u) have been bombarded on {sup 197}Au target to study heavy ion interactions using mica as a passive detector. In this paper we present results on the study of energy damping and time scale of the existence of di-nuclear composite system in the intermediate reaction step. The plots of Q-values as well as reaction cross sections in various angular bins of scattering angles suggest that K.E. damping was complete and dynamic equilibrium was established between the first and second reaction steps. The time scale of this duration was also determined.

  18. Sequential and double sequential fission observed in heavy ion interaction of (11.67 MeV/u)197Au projectile with 197Au target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasir, Tabassum; Khan, Ehsan Ullah; Baluch, Javaid Jahan; Shafi-Ur-Rehman; Matiullah; Rafique, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    The heavy ion interaction of 11.67 MeV/u 197 Au+ 197 Au has been investigated using mica as a passive detector. By employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detection Technique the data of elastic scattering as well as inelastic reaction channel was collected. The off-line data analysis of multi-pronged events was performed by measuring the three-dimensional geometrical coordinates of correlated tracks on event-by-event basis. Multi pronged events observed in this reaction were due to sequential and double sequential fission. Using a computer code PRONGY based on the procedure of internal calibration, it was possible to derive quantities like mass transfer, total kinetic energy loss and scattering angles. (author)

  19. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Z.; Lemański, R.

    2004-05-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electrondensity-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously.

  20. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Lemanski, R.

    2004-01-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electron density-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously

  1. Influence of the inter-ion interaction on the phase diagrams of the 1D Falicov-Kimball system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z. E-mail: gajek@int.pan.wroc.pl; Lemanski, R

    2004-05-01

    A model of itinerant, spinless electrons interacting with ions via the on-site Coulomb potential U, modified by the inter-ionic nearest-neighbour interaction V, is studied on the one-dimensional infinite lattice. Only periodical configurations of the ions with a limited number of lattice sites in a unit cell and their mixtures are taken into account. Phases whose energies reach minimum values for given electron and ion chemical potentials are selected and depicted for a set of model parameters. Then the results are translated into the ion density-electron density canonical phase diagrams and summarized in the electron density-U plane. The diagrams clearly show how various kinds of charge ordering evolve with V, starting from V=0 case, that represents the standard Falicov-Kimball model discussed previously.

  2. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic coefficient and vapour pressure of N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C4H9, C5H11, C6H13) in the ethanol solution at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Atabay, Maryam; Azamat, Jafar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The osmotic coefficients of the solutions of ionic liquid in ethanol have been measured. ► Measured osmotic coefficients were correlated using Pitzer, e-NRTL and NRF models and polynomial equation. ► Vapour pressures were evaluated from the correlated osmotic coefficients. - Abstract: Osmotic coefficients of the solutions of room temperature ionic liquid N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C 4 H 9 , C 5 H 11 , C 6 H 13 ) in ethanol have been measured at T = 298.15 K by the isopiestic method. The experimental osmotic coefficients have been correlated using the ion interaction model of Pitzer, electrolyte non-random two liquid (e-NRTL) model of Chen, non-random factor (NRF) and a fourth-order polynomial in terms of molality. The vapour pressures of the solutions studied have been evaluated from the osmotic coefficients.

  3. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  4. Studies on the relationship between Pitzer's equation and medium effect: the system of HCl + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in {l_brace}0.06455C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + 0.93545H{sub 2}O{r_brace}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xingmei E-mail: lxmqt@sohu.com; Xu Weiguo; Chang Xiaohong; Lu Dianzhen; Yang Jiazhen

    2004-03-01

    The second ionization constant of sulfuric acid in mixed solvent, K{sub 2}, was determined by e.m.f. of cell without liquid junction: (Pt,H{sub 2}(101.325 kPa) vertical bar HCl(m{sub 1}),H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(m{sub 2}),{l_brace}ethanol(x=0.06455)+water(x=0.93545){r_brace} vertical bar AgCl-Ag))over the temperatures (278.15 to 318.15) K, where x is mole fraction. Combining Owen's definition of medium effect with Pitzer's equations, the values of combination parameters: ({lambda}{sub nHS}+{lambda}{sub nCl}-{lambda}{sub nS})+(3/2)m{sub n}({mu}{sub nnHS}+{mu}{sub nnC=} l-{mu}{sub nnS}),(1/2)({xi}{sub nHHS}+{xi}{sub nHCl}-{xi}{sub nHS}), that represent the interactions between ions and ethanol were obtained at 298.15 K.

  5. Ground-based simulations of cosmic ray heavy ion interactions in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Borak, T.; Carter, T.; Frankel, K. A.; Fukumura, A.; Murakami, T.; Rademacher, S. E.; Schimmerling, W.; hide

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys some recent accelerator-based measurements of the nuclear fragmentation of high energy nuclei in shielding and tissue-equivalent materials. These data are needed to make accurate predictions of the radiation field produced at depth in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials and in the human body by heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation. Projectile-target combinations include 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe incident on aluminum and graphite and 600 MeV/nucleon 56Fe and 290 MeV/nucleon 12C on polyethylene. We present examples of the dependence of fragmentation on material type and thickness, of a comparison between data and a fragmentation model, and of multiple fragments produced along the beam axis.

  6. Total external reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of protein-metal ion interactions in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N. N.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yur'eva, E. A.; Konovalov, O. V.; Rogachev, A. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Sukhorukov, V. S.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. D.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Yakunin, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into hemoglobin-based protein films that were formed on a liquid surface. X-ray standing wave measurements were performed at the ID 10 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Langmuir station of the Kurchatov Synchrotron Radiation Source. It was found that the ability of the protein to bind metal ions is substantially increased due to the conformational rearrangements of protein macromolecules caused by various damaging effects. The elemental composition of protein preparations, which were isolated from children and adults with chronic metabolic diseases accompanied by endogenous intoxication, was analyzed. The results of the investigations offer evidence that an increase in the ligand-binding properties of the protein molecules, which was observed in model experiments using protein films, is a common trait and corresponds to in vivo processes accompanying metabolic disturbances in the body.

  7. Measurement and modelling of mean activity coefficients of aqueous mixed electrolyte solution containing glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghani, M.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) ; Modarress, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) ]. E-mail: hmodares@aut.ac.ir; Monirfar, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Electrochemical measurements were made on (H{sub 2}O + NaBr + K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} + glycine) mixtures at T = 298.15 K by using ion selective electrodes. The mean ionic activity coefficients of NaBr at molality 0.1 were determined at five K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} molalities (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1) mol . kg{sup -1}. The activity coefficients of glycine were evaluated from mean ionic activity coefficients of NaBr. The modified Pitzer equation was used to model the experimental data.

  8. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic and activity coefficients of the {l_brace}yKCl + (1 - y)K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) system at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Daniela Z. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 001 Belgrade (Serbia); Miladinovic, Jelena, E-mail: duma@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 001 Belgrade (Serbia); Todorovic, Milica D.; Zrilic, Milorad M. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 001 Belgrade (Serbia); Rard, Joseph A., E-mail: solution_chemistry2@comcast.net [4363 Claremont Way, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Isopiestic measurements were made for {l_brace}yKCl + (1 - y)K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) at T = 298.15 K. > The resulting osmotic coefficients were represented by three thermodynamic models. > Activity coefficients from Pitzer model with Scatchard mixing terms are recommended. - Abstract: The osmotic coefficients of aqueous mixtures of KCl and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} have been measured at T = (298.15 {+-} 0.01) K by the isopiestic vapor pressure method over the range of ionic strengths from (2.3700 to 11.250) mol . kg{sup -1} using CaCl{sub 2}(aq) as the reference solution. Our new experimental results were modeled with an extended form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model equations, both with the usual mixing terms and with Scatchard's neutral-electrolyte mixing terms, and with the Clegg-Pitzer-Brimblecombe equations based on the mole-fraction-composition scale. There is a dearth of previously published isopiestic data for mixtures containing salts of HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(aq) and, consequently, no previous measurements are available for comparison with the present results. The present study yields Cl{sup -}HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} mixing parameters for these three models that are needed for modeling the thermodynamic activities of solute components of natural waters and other complex aqueous electrolyte mixtures.

  9. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic and activity coefficients of the {yKCl + (1 - y)K2HPO4}(aq) system at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, Daniela Z.; Miladinovic, Jelena; Todorovic, Milica D.; Zrilic, Milorad M.; Rard, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Isopiestic measurements were made for {yKCl + (1 - y)K 2 HPO 4 }(aq) at T = 298.15 K. → The resulting osmotic coefficients were represented by three thermodynamic models. → Activity coefficients from Pitzer model with Scatchard mixing terms are recommended. - Abstract: The osmotic coefficients of aqueous mixtures of KCl and K 2 HPO 4 have been measured at T = (298.15 ± 0.01) K by the isopiestic vapor pressure method over the range of ionic strengths from (2.3700 to 11.250) mol . kg -1 using CaCl 2 (aq) as the reference solution. Our new experimental results were modeled with an extended form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model equations, both with the usual mixing terms and with Scatchard's neutral-electrolyte mixing terms, and with the Clegg-Pitzer-Brimblecombe equations based on the mole-fraction-composition scale. There is a dearth of previously published isopiestic data for mixtures containing salts of HPO 4 2- (aq) and, consequently, no previous measurements are available for comparison with the present results. The present study yields Cl - HPO 4 2- mixing parameters for these three models that are needed for modeling the thermodynamic activities of solute components of natural waters and other complex aqueous electrolyte mixtures.

  10. Osmotic coefficients of alcoholic mixtures containing BMpyrDCA: Experimental determination and correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, N.; Domínguez, Á.; Macedo, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Osmotic coefficients of alcohols with BMpyrDCA ionic liquid are determined. • Experimental data were correlated with Extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. • Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. • The results have been interpreted in terms of interactions. - Abstract: The vapour pressure osmometry technique (VPO) has been used to obtain the osmotic coefficients of the binary mixtures of the primary and secondary alcohols 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol and 1-pentanol with the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, BMpyrDCA. From these coefficients, the corresponding activity coefficients and vapour pressures of the mixtures have been also determined. The results have been discussed in terms of solute–solvent and ion–ion interactions and have been compared with those taken from literature in order to analyse the influence of the anion or cation constituting the ionic liquid. For the treatment of the experimental data, the Extended Pitzer model of Archer and the MNRTL model have been applied, obtaining standard deviations from the experimental osmotic coefficients lower than 0.015 and 0.065, respectively. From the parameters obtained with the Extended Pitzer model or Archer, the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures have been calculated

  11. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  12. A data base for thermodynamic modeling of +III actinide solubility in concentrated Na-Cl-SO4-CO3-PO4 electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, C.F.; Crafts, C.C.; Dhooge, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    The literature contains thermodynamic parameters for describing the chemical behavior of the following: Am(III) in dilute NaHCO 3 media; Nd(III) in dilute to concentrated Na 2 CO 3 and NaHCO 3 media; Pu(III) in dilute to concentrated NaCl media; Nd(III)/Am(III) in dilute to concentrated Na 2 SO 4 media; and Am(III) in NaH 2 PO 4 media. We have combined this information into a thermodynamic data base for the general +III actinide, An(III), using the analogy for chemical behavior of f-elements in the same oxidation state. This internally consistent data base is based on equilibrium thermodynamics and the specific ion interaction activity coefficient formalism of Pitzer. This data base forms the basis for the prediction of potential Am(III) and Pu(III) dissolved concentrations in the concentrated natural brines associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southeastern New Mexico, USA

  13. Experimental determination and thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibrium and protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems containing biodegradable salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Brenda; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Tubío, Gisela; Nerli, Bibiana; Alcântara Pessôa Filho, Pedro de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Binodal data of systems (water + polyethyleneglycol + sodium) succinate are reported. ► Pitzer model describes the phase equilibrium of systems formed by polyethyleneglycol and biodegradable salts satisfactorily. ► This simple thermodynamic framework was able to predict the partitioning behaviour of model proteins acceptably well. - Abstract: Phase diagrams of sustainable aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) formed by polyethyleneglycols (PEGs) of different average molar masses (4000, 6000, and 8000) and sodium succinate are reported in this work. Partition coefficients (Kps) of seven model proteins: bovine serum albumin, catalase, beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-amylase, lysozyme, pepsin, urease and trypsin were experimentally determined in these systems and in ATPSs formed by the former PEGs and other biodegradable sodium salts: citrate and tartrate. An extension of Pitzer model comprising long and short-range term contributions to the excess Gibbs free energy was used to describe the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium. Comparison between experimental and calculated tie line data showed mean deviations always lower than 3%, thus indicating a good correlation. The partition coefficients were modeled by using the same thermodynamic approach. Predicted and experimental partition coefficients correlated quite successfully. Mean deviations were found to be lower than the experimental uncertainty for most of the assayed proteins.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of (LiCl + N,N-dimethylacetamide) and (LiBr + N,N-dimethylacetamide) at temperatures from (323.15 to 423.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat [Institut fuer Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany) and Department of Chemistry, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: Karamat.Nasirzadeh@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Neueder, Roland [Institut fuer Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Kunz, Werner [Institut fuer Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2005-04-15

    Precise vapor pressure data for LiCl and LiBr solutions in N,N-dimethylacetamide are given for T = (323.15 to 423.15) K. The molality ranges covered in this study are about m = (0.073 to 1.89) mol . kg{sup -1} for lithium chloride and m = (0.06 to 1.75) mol . kg{sup -1} for lithium bromide. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of N,N-dimethylacetamide. The parameters of the extended Pitzer-ion interaction model of Archer, of the MSA-NRTL model and of the chemical model of Barthel are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficients within different concentration ranges. The parameters of the Pitzer-ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies. The non-ideal behaviors of these systems are discussed in terms of the model parameters.

  15. Thermodynamic properties of (LiCl + N,N-dimethylacetamide) and (LiBr + N,N-dimethylacetamide) at temperatures from (323.15 to 423.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat; Neueder, Roland; Kunz, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for LiCl and LiBr solutions in N,N-dimethylacetamide are given for T = (323.15 to 423.15) K. The molality ranges covered in this study are about m = (0.073 to 1.89) mol . kg -1 for lithium chloride and m = (0.06 to 1.75) mol . kg -1 for lithium bromide. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of N,N-dimethylacetamide. The parameters of the extended Pitzer-ion interaction model of Archer, of the MSA-NRTL model and of the chemical model of Barthel are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficients within different concentration ranges. The parameters of the Pitzer-ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies. The non-ideal behaviors of these systems are discussed in terms of the model parameters

  16. Isopiestic investigation of the osmotic coefficients of MgBr{sub 2}(aq) and study of bromide salts solubility in the (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) system at T = 323.15 K. Thermodynamic model of solution behaviour and (solid + liquid) equilibria in the MgBr{sub 2}(aq), and (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) systems to high concentration and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Christomir, E-mail: christov@svr.igic.bas.b [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, ul. ' Acad. G. Bonchev' , bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-03-15

    The isopiestic method has been used to determine the osmotic coefficients of the binary solutions MgBr{sub 2}(aq) (from 0.4950 to 2.5197 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) at the temperature T = 323.15 K. Sodium chloride solutions have been used as isopiestic reference standards. The solubility of the bromide minerals in the mixed system (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) has been investigated at T = 323.15 K by the physico-chemical analysis method. In addition to simple salts {l_brace}KBr(cr) and MgBr{sub 2} . 6H{sub 2}O(cr){r_brace}, equilibrium crystallization of the highly incongruent double salt with stoichiometric composition 1:1:6 {l_brace}bromcarnallite: KBr . MgBr{sub 2} . 6H{sub 2}O(cr){r_brace} was also established. The results obtained from the isopiestic and solubility measurements have been combined with all other experimental thermodynamic quantities available in the literature (osmotic coefficients, and solubility of the bromide mineral) to construct a chemical model that calculates solute and solvent activities and (solid + liquid) equilibria in the MgBr{sub 2}(aq) binary, and (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) mixed systems from dilute to high solution concentration within the (273.15 to 438.15) K temperature range. The solubility modelling approach based on fundamental Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. It was found, that the standard for 2-1 type of electrolytes approach with three ({beta}{sup (0)}, {beta}{sup (1)}, and C{sup {phi}}) single electrolyte ion interaction parameters gives excellent agreement with osmotic coefficients from T = (298.15 to 373.45) K; up to saturation at 298.15 K, and up to m(MgBr{sub 2}) = 5.83 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 373.45 K, and with MgBr{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O(cr) equilibrium pure water solubility data within the (273.15 to 438.15) K temperature range and up to {approx}8.5 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} used in parameterization. The model for the ternary system gives very good

  17. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III)-Fe(III)-Cr(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Laurent; Christov, Christomir; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(III)Cl3(s) (M= Al, Fe, Cr) minerals solubility in Na-Al(III)-Cr(III)-Fe(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III) mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III) remediation). Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production). Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  18. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III-Fe(III-Cr(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Laurent

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(IIICl3(s (M= Al, Fe, Cr minerals solubility in Na-Al(III-Cr(III-Fe(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III remediation. Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production. Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  19. Study and modeling of lanthanide(3)-L and americium(3)-L (With L = NTA, EDTA and DTPA) in high ionic strength aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchiccioli, F.

    2000-01-01

    The dissociation constants of NTA, EDTA, DTPA in NaCl, NaClO 4 , LiCl and LiClO 4 aqueous solutions of various ionic strengths have been gathered from the literature and from the Critical Surveys of Stability Constants. These values have been completed by a series of pKa values obtained in the same salted solution at higher ionic strengths by potentiometry involving a combined glass electrode at 25 deg C. The dependencies of the pKas versus the ionic strength have been investigated by using the Specific Interaction Theory (SIT), the parabolic model and the Pitzer model. The stability constants of complexes involving lanthanides (III), such as Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ and Lu 3+ , and americium (III), with the ligands previously mentioned in NaCl, NaClO 4 , LiCl and LiClO 4 aqueous solutions of high ionic strengths have been determined. The methods used for the determination of the stability constants for the lanthanide complexes are various: direct measurements by potentiometry when possible, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy involving Arsenazo (III) as a competitor ligand. For the actinide complexes, solvent extraction experiments have been performed. The different systems, along with the dissociation constants of several complexes in the same aqueous media, have been successfully modeled by the SIT, the parabolic method and the Pitzer method. (author)

  20. Determination and modeling for the solubility of Na_2MoO_4·2H_2O in the (Na"+ + MoO_4"2"− + SO_4"2"−) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Pengge; Xu, Weifeng; Cao, Hongbin; Lin, Xiao; Xu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of Na_2MoO_4·2H_2O in Na"+ + MoO_4"2"− + SO_4"2"− system was performed. • The new model was established via regressing the published and the determined data. • The Pitzer parameter and the solubility product constant of the salts in solution were calculated. • The model was applied to estimate the solubility of the sodium molybdate in various conditions. - Abstract: The solubility of Na_2MoO_4·2H_2O in (Na"+ + MoO_4"2"− + SO_4"2"−) system was carried out using a dynamic method within the temperature range from 293.15 K to 343.15 K. The new model was established via regression of the published and the determined values to predict the solubility. From the results, the solubility of sodium molybdate increases with the temperature increase, however, it decreases with the increasing concentration of sodium sulfate. The Pitzer parameters and the solubility product constant of sodium sulfate and sodium molybdate in aqueous solution were obtained using the literature data. The solubilities of the sodium molybdate in the sodium sulfate solution as well as the thermodynamic parameters were calculated based on the experimental values obtained. The new model was also applied to estimate the solubility of the sodium molybdate under various conditions. The calculated values agree well with the experiment results.

  1. A thermodynamic model for the solubility of HfO{sub 2}(am) in the aqueous K{sup +} - HCO{sub 3}{sup -} - CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} - OH{sup -} - H{sub 2}O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(am) was determined as a function of KHCO{sub 3} concentrations ranging from 0.001 mol.kg{sup -1} to 0.1 mol.kg{sup -1}. The solubility of HfO{sub 2}(am) increased dramatically with the increase in KHCO{sub 3} concentrations, indicating that Hf(IV) makes strong complexes with carbonate. Thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the formation of Hf-carbonate complexes were determined using both the Pitzer and SIT models. The dramatic increase in Hf concentrations with the increase in KHCO{sub 3} concentrations can best be described by the formation of Hf(OH{sup -}){sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2-} and Hf(CO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 6-}. The log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values for the reactions [Hf{sup 4+}+2CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}+2OH{sup -}↔Hf(OH){sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2-}] and [Hf{sup 4+}+5CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}↔Hf(CO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 6-}], based on the SIT model, were determined to be 44.53±0.46 and 41.53±0.46, respectively, and based on the Pitzer model they were 44.56±0.48 and 40.20±0.48, respectively.

  2. Correlation and prediction of osmotic coefficient and water activity of aqueous electrolyte solutions by a two-ionic parameter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazuki, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, osmotic coefficients and water activities in aqueous solutions have been modeled using a new approach based on the Pitzer model. This model contains two physically significant ionic parameters regarding ionic solvation and the closest distance of approach between ions in a solution. The proposed model was evaluated by estimating the osmotic coefficients of nine electrolytes in aqueous solutions. The obtained results showed that the model is suitable for predicting the osmotic coefficients in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Using adjustable parameters, which have been calculated from regression between the experimental osmotic coefficient and the results of this model, the water activity coefficients of aqueous solutions were calculated. The average absolute relative deviations of the osmotic coefficients between the experimental data and the calculated results were in agreement

  3. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner, P.

    2003-01-01

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO 3 -SO 4 -Br-CO 3 -SiO 2 -CO 2 -O 2 -H 2 O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of

  4. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases

  5. Ammonium ion interaction with conditioned natural zeolite with silver and its effect on the disinfection of polluted water in front of a consortium of gram (+) and gram (-) microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga G, V. E.

    2013-01-01

    Clinoptilolite zeolite material is a relative abundance in Mexico, which has ion exchange properties, therefore, has the ability to retain metal ions giving it an application in the process of disinfecting of water contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. In this research, we conducted a study of disinfection of water contaminated with a microbial consortium, from a zeolite rock clinoptilolite from a deposit located in the State of Guerrero. Initially, the zeolite prepared by the grinding and sieving, for conditioning with NaCl and subsequently with AgNO 3 , finally to be characterized using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Tests using columns packed with zeolite material, the effect of zeolite bactericidal conditioned with silver (ZGAg) against a microbial consortium consisting of Escherichia coli and Sthapyloccocus aureus in aqueous solution in the presence of ammonium ions used to increase the ion exchange with zeolite fitted with silver. To describe curves disinfecting a continuous flow system is adapted Gu pta model, which describes the kinetics and equilibrium adsorption process, considering the microorganisms as the adsorbate and the sanitizing agent (conditioned with silver zeolite) as the adsorbent. Characterization results show that in the scanning electron microscopy (Sem), no changes were obtained on the morphology of typical clinoptilolite crystals before and after that was modified with sodium and then with silver, it is worth mentioning however that fitted with silver zeolite (ZGAg), small particles are seen on the zeolite material which when analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), we found a high concentration of Ag +. The disinfection period is increased as the concentration increased ammonium ions, this behavior is attributed to the ion exchange that occurs between the ammonium ions and silver ions. A lower percentage of inactivation is due, therefore, to a lesser amount of money available to be

  6. Thermodynamic investigation of the ternary mixed aqueous electrolyte (MgCl{sub 2} + MgSO{sub 4}) system by potentiometric method at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagherinia, Mohammad A., E-mail: mabagherinia@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Lahijan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Giahi, Masoud; Pournaghdy, Mohammad; Vaghar, Gholam R. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Lahijan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > In this study we investigated the thermodynamic properties of MgCl{sub 2} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O. > The method used in this work was potentiometric method. > Mg-ISE and the Ag/AgCl electrodes used in this work had a good Nernst response. > The experimental results obeyed the Harned rule. > The Pitzer model could be used to describe this ternary system satisfactorily. - Abstract: This work reports the results of thermodynamic investigation of the ternary mixed-electrolyte system (MgCl{sub 2} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O). The investigation was performed based on Pitzer ion interaction model by using the potentiometric technique at T = 298.15 K. The mean activity coefficients of MgCl{sub 2} in the mixed aqueous electrolyte system were determined on the galvanic cell without liquid junction of the type: Mg-ISE|MgCl{sub 2} (m{sub A}), MgSO{sub 4} (m{sub B}), H{sub 2}O|Ag/AgCl over total ionic strengths from (0.001 to 8.000) mol . kg{sup -1} for different series of salt ratio r (r=m{sub MgCl{sub 2}}/m{sub MgSO{sub 4}}=2.5,5.0,7.5,10.0,15.0 and pure MgCl{sub 2}). The PVC based magnesium ion-selective electrode (Mg-ISE) and the Ag/AgCl electrode used in this work were made in our laboratory and had a reasonably good Nernst response. The experimental results obeyed the Harned rule, and the Pitzer model could be used to describe this ternary system satisfactorily. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for mixed salts were determined for this system. Then, these parameters ({theta}{sub ClSO{sub 4}}=0.0252{+-}0.0042, {psi}{sub MgClSO{sub 4}}=-0.0049{+-}0.0003) were used to calculate the values of the mean activity coefficients of MgSO{sub 4}, the osmotic coefficients of water ({phi}) and the excess Gibbs free energies of solution (G{sup E}) for the whole series of the studied electrolyte systems.

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of phases equilibrium in aqueous systems to recover potassium chloride from natural brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruberlan Gomes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical fertilizers, such as potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate and other chemical products like sodium hydroxide and soda ash are produced from electrolyte solutions or brines with a high content of soluble salts. Some of these products are manufactured by fractional crystallization, when several salts are separated as solid phases with high purity (>90%. Due to the large global demand for potassium fertilizers, a good knowledge about the compositions of salts and brines is helpful to design an effective process. A thermodynamic model based on Pitzer and Harvie's model was used to predict the composition of crystallized salts after water removal by forced evaporation and cooling from multicomponent solutions or brines. Initially, the salts’ solubilities in binary systems (NaCl–H2O, KCl–H2O and MgCl2–H2O and ternary system (KCl–MgCl2–H2O were calculated at 20 °C and compared with literature data. Next, the model was compared to our experimental data on the quinary system NaCl–KCl–MgCl2–CaCl2–H2O system at 20 °C. The Pitzer and Harvie's model represented well both the binary and ternary systems. Besides, for the quinary system the fit was good for brine densities up to 1350 kg/m3. The models were used to estimate the chemical composition of the solutions and salts produced by fractional crystallization and in association with material balance to respond to issues related to the production rates in a solar pond containing several salts dissolved, for instance, NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2.

  8. One parameter model potential for noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrees, M.; Khwaja, F.A.; Razmi, M.S.K.

    1981-08-01

    A phenomenological one parameter model potential which includes s-d hybridization and core-core exchange contributions is proposed for noble metals. A number of interesting properties like liquid metal resistivities, band gaps, thermoelectric powers and ion-ion interaction potentials are calculated for Cu, Ag and Au. The results obtained are in better agreement with experiment than the ones predicted by the other model potentials in the literature. (author)

  9. Effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for aqueous solution of nonionic surfactant and salt: Experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Physical Chemistry Department, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Enghelab Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Heidari, Nosrat; Mohammadlou, Maryam [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sojahrood, Amin Jafari [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of the aqueous solution of surfactant polyoxyethylene cetylether (with abbreviation name Brij 58) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate has been investigated at T = (303.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. The Flory-Huggins equation with two electrostatic terms (Debye-Huckle and Pitzer-Debye-Huckle equations) was used to correlate the phase behavior of this system. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data from both models. The results indicated that the enlargement of the two-phase region upon increasing the temperature. Additionally temperature dependency of the parameters of the Flory-Huggins model has been calculated.

  10. Osmotic and activity coefficients in the binary solutions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and bromide in methanol or ethanol at T = 298.15 K from isopiestic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Azamat, Jafar; Atabay, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The osmotic coefficients of the solutions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and bromide in ethanol and methanol have been measured. → Measured osmotic coefficients were correlated using NRTL and Pitzer models. → Vapor pressures were evaluated from the correlated osmotic coefficients. → Model parameters have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions. - Abstract: Osmotic coefficients of the binary solutions of two room-temperature ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and bromide) in methanol and ethanol have been measured at T = 298.15 K by the isopiestic method. The experimental osmotic coefficient data have been correlated using a forth-order polynomial in terms of (molality) 0.5 , with both, ion interaction model of Pitzer and electrolyte non-random two liquid (e-NRTL) model of Chen. The values of vapor pressures of above-mentioned solutions have been calculated from the osmotic coefficients. The model parameters fitted to the experimental osmotic coefficients have been used for prediction of the mean ionic activity coefficients of those ionic liquids in methanol and ethanol.

  11. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 6 ..... in NaClO4 aqueous solutions by specific ion interaction theory and Pitzer equations .... it be part of the basis set of valence internal coordinates in normal mode analysis?

  12. Inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridley, M.K.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Machesky, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Acid–base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in

  13. German activities towards a thermodynamic reference data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Hagemann, S.; Brendler, V.; Marquardt, Ch.; Voigt, W.; Wilhelm, S.

    2006-01-01

    Leading research centres in the field of radioactive waste disposal in Germany have decided to combine their efforts in order to achieve a common goal, the development of a comprehensive and consistent thermodynamic reference database. All the thermodynamic data needed for the modelling of geochemical near- and far field processes in the geological media for high level waste repositories presently under discussion in Germany (salt, clay, granite) shall be collected and qualified in a single database. The partners participating in the project are a group of experts, who are generating, collecting and evaluating thermodynamic data of all relevant radionuclides and matrix elements according to uniform previously established and internationally accepted criteria. Special attention will be given to complete documentation and traceability of all data entries in the database. Existing data from international databases such as those of NEA, NAGRA, YMP will be integrated. Ion interaction coefficients (SIT, Pitzer) needed for modelling in a high saline environment will be included also. (authors)

  14. German activities towards a thermodynamic reference data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, H.J.; Hagemann, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Brendler, V. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institut fur Radiochemie, Dresden (Germany); Marquardt, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fur Nukleare Entsorgung, Karlsruhe (Germany); Voigt, W. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany); Wilhelm, S. [Colenco Power Engineering, Baden (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    Leading research centres in the field of radioactive waste disposal in Germany have decided to combine their efforts in order to achieve a common goal, the development of a comprehensive and consistent thermodynamic reference database. All the thermodynamic data needed for the modelling of geochemical near- and far field processes in the geological media for high level waste repositories presently under discussion in Germany (salt, clay, granite) shall be collected and qualified in a single database. The partners participating in the project are a group of experts, who are generating, collecting and evaluating thermodynamic data of all relevant radionuclides and matrix elements according to uniform previously established and internationally accepted criteria. Special attention will be given to complete documentation and traceability of all data entries in the database. Existing data from international databases such as those of NEA, NAGRA, YMP will be integrated. Ion interaction coefficients (SIT, Pitzer) needed for modelling in a high saline environment will be included also. (authors)

  15. Geothermal-brine modeling - prediction of mineral solubilities in natural waters: the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO{sub 4}-OH-HCO{sub 3} CO{sub 3}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system to high ionic strengths at 25{sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weare, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The mineral solubility model of Harvie and Weare (1980) is extended to the eight component system, Na-K-Ca-Mg-H-Cl-SO{sub 4}-OH-HCO{sub 3}-CO{sub 3}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at 25{sup 0}C to high concentrations. The model is based on the semi-empirical equations of Pitzer (1973) and co-workers for the thermodynamics of aqueous electrolyte solutions. The model is parameterized using many of the available isopiestic, electromotive force, and solubility data available for many of the subsystems. The predictive abilities of the model are demonstrated by comparison to experimental data in systems more complex than those used in parameterization. The essential features of a chemical model for aqueous electrolyte solutions and the relationship between pH and the equilibrium properties of a solution are discussed.

  16. EQ3/6, a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems: Package overview and installation guide (Version 7.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T.J.

    1992-09-14

    EQ3/6 is a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. This report describes version 7.0. The major components of the package include: EQ3NR, a speciation-solubility code; EQ6, a reaction path code which models water/rock interaction or fluid mixing in either a pure reaction progress mode or a time mode; EQPT, a data file preprocessor, EQLIB, a supporting software library; and five supporting thermodynamic data files. The software deals with the concepts of thermodynamic equilibrium, thermodynamic disequilibrium, and reaction kinetics. The five supporting data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three support the use of the Davies or B-dot equations for the activity coefficients; the other two support the use of Pitzer`s equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on the data files varies from 25{degree}C only to 0--300{degree}C. EQPT takes a formatted data file (a data0 file) and writes an unformatted near-equivalent called a datal file, which is actually the form read by EQ3NR and EQ6. EQ3NR is useful for analyzing groundwater chemistry data, calculating solubility limits, and determining whether certain reactions are in states of partial equilibrium or disequilibrium. It is also required to initialize an EQ6 calculation. EQ6 models the consequences of reacting an aqueous solution with a set of reactants which react irreversibly. It can also model fluid mixing and the consequences of changes in temperature. This code operates both in a pure reaction progress frame and in a time frame.

  17. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Rao, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University, Florida (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(III) species are lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other trivalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is mainly used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  18. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Roa, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(IV) species was lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other tetravalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  19. The volumetric and thermochemical properties of YCl{sub 3}(aq), YbCl{sub 3}(aq), DyCl{sub 3}(aq), SmCl{sub 3}(aq), and GdCl{sub 3}(aq) at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa[Trivalent metal chlorides; Densities; Heat capacities; Single ion properties; Calorimetry; Densimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakin, Andrew W. E-mail: hakin@uleth.ca; Lukacs, Michael J.; Liu, Jin Lian; Erickson, Kristy

    2003-11-01

    Relative densities and massic heat capacities have been measured for acidified aqueous solutions of YCl{sub 3}(aq), YbCl{sub 3}(aq), DyCl{sub 3}(aq), SmCl{sub 3}(aq), and GdCl{sub 3}(aq) at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa. These measurements have been used to calculate experimental apparent molar volumes and heat capacities which, when used in conjunction with Young's rule, were used to calculate the apparent molar properties of the aqueous chloride salt solutions. The latter calculations required the use of volumetric and thermochemical data for aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid that have been previously reported in the literature. The concentration dependences of the apparent molar properties have been modeled using Pitzer ion interaction equations to yield apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution. The temperature and concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of each trivalent salt system were modeled using modified Pitzer ion interaction equations. These equations utilized the revised Helgeson, Kirkham, and Flowers equations of state to model the temperature dependences of apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution. Calculated apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution have been used to calculate single ion properties for the investigated trivalent metal cations. These values have been compared to those previously reported in the literature. The differences between single ion values calculated in this study and those values calculated from thermodynamic data for aqueous perchlorate salts are also discussed.

  20. Nonelectrolyte NRTL-NRF model to study thermodynamics of strong and weak electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghtalab, Ali, E-mail: haghtala@modares.ac.i [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojaeian, Abolfazl; Mazloumi, Seyed Hossein [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    An electrolyte activity coefficient model is proposed by combining non-electrolyte NRTL-NRF local composition model and Pitzer-Debye-Hueckel equation as short-range and long-range contributions, respectively. With two adjustable parameters per each electrolyte, the present model is applied to correlation of the mean activity coefficients of more than 150 strong aqueous electrolyte solutions at 298.15 K. Also the results of the present model are compared with the other local composition models such as electrolyte-NRTL, electrolyte-NRTL-NRF and electrolyte-Wilson-NRF models. Moreover, the present model is used for prediction of the osmotic coefficient of several aqueous binary electrolytes systems at 298.15 K. Also the present activity coefficient model is adopted for representation of nonideality of the acid gases, as weak gas electrolytes, soluble in alkanolamine solutions. The model is applied for calculation of solubility and heat of absorption (enthalpy of solution) of acid gas in the two {l_brace}(H{sub 2}O + MDEA + CO{sub 2}) and (H{sub 2}O + MDEA + H{sub 2}S){r_brace} systems at different conditions. The results demonstrate that the present model can be successfully applied to study thermodynamic properties of both strong and weak electrolyte solutions.

  1. Evaporative evolution of a Na–Cl–NO3–K–Ca–SO4–Mg–Si brine at 95°C: Experiments and modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Susan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, NV was evaporated at 95°C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved toward a complex "sulfate type" brine that contained about 45 mol % Na, 40 mol % Cl, 9 mol % NO3, 5 mol % K, and less than 1 mol % each of SO4, Ca, Mg, ∑CO2(aq, F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter, and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO4 solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of 2 of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite, and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

  2. Chemical modeling of waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-10-01

    The processing of waste from underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and other facilities will require an understanding of the chemical interactions of the waste with process chemicals. Two aspects of sludge treatment should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids, and (2) potential problems due to chemical interactions that could result in process difficulties or safety concerns. It is likely that the treatment of waste tank sludge will begin with washing, followed by basic or acidic leaching. The dissolved materials will be in a solution that has a high ionic strength where activity coefficients are far from unity. Activity coefficients are needed in order to calculate solubilities. Several techniques are available for calculating these values, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. The techniques adopted and described here is the Pitzer method. Like any of the methods, prudent use of this approach requires that it be applied within concentration ranges where the experimental data were fit, and its use in large systems should be preceded by evaluating subsystems. While much attention must be given to the development of activity coefficients, other factors such as coprecipitation of species and Ostwald ripening must also be considered when one aims to interpret results of sludge tests or to predict results of treatment strategies. An understanding of sludge treatment processes begins with the sludge tests themselves and proceeds to a general interpretation with the aid of modeling. One could stop with only data from the sludge tests, in which case the table of data would become an implicit model. However, this would be a perilous approach in situations where processing difficulties could be costly or result in concerns for the environment or health and safety

  3. Free-free Gaunt factors: comparison of various models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Merts, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    We develop the general theory of free-free absorption processes in terms of basic quantum mechanical principles. We perform calculations of the free-free Gaunt factor for several models of the electron-atom (ion) interaction in a variety of systems including rare gases, alkali, and aluminum. In addition, we investigate plasma-screening effects in such models as the Yukawa potential. Our calculations compare well with those of other authors, and our comparative study of various models allows a more thorough understanding of their range of validity. 38 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs

  4. Thermodynamic behavior of binary mixtures CnMpyNTf2 ionic liquids with primary and secondary alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, N.; Gómez, E.; Domínguez, Á.; Macedo, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Osmotic coefficients of alcohols with C n MpyNTf 2 (n = 2, 3, 4) are determined. ► Experimental data were correlated with Extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. ► Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. ► The results have been interpreted in terms of interactions. - Abstract: In this paper, the osmotic and activity coefficients and vapor pressures of the binary mixtures containing the ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 2 MpyNTf 2 , and 1-methyl-3-propylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 3 MpyNTf 2 , with 1-propanol, or 2-propanol and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 4 MpyNTf 2 , with 1-propanol or 2-propanol or 1-butanol or 2-butanol were determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The influence of the structure of the alcohol and of the ionic liquid on both coefficients and vapor pressures is discussed and a comparison with literature data on binary mixtures containing ionic liquids with different cations and anion is also performed. Besides, the results have been interpreted in terms of solute–solvent and ion–ion interactions. The experimental osmotic coefficients were correlated using the Extended Pitzer model of Archer and the Modified Non-Random Two Liquids model obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.059 and 0.102 respectively, and the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures were calculated.

  5. Evaluation Of The Integrated Solubility Model, A Graded Approach For Predicting Phase Distribution In Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, Kayla L.; Belsher, Jeremy D.; Seniow, Kendra R.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy

  6. Evaluation Of The Integrated Solubility Model, A Graded Approach For Predicting Phase Distribution In Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Kayla L.; Belsher, Jeremy D.; Seniow, Kendra R.

    2012-10-19

    The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy.

  7. KX radiation of quasi-molecules in heavy ion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    The object of investigation is the KX radiation of quasimolecules produced at collision of heavy ions with atoms. In collision, electron may change their states adiabatically and form, at sufficiently small distances R between nuclei, quasimolecular states, which transform, in the limiting case of R → 0, to the states of a quasiatom with an atomic number of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 , where Z 1 and Z 2 are the atomic numbers of the heavy ion and atom. The discussion is restricted to collision experiments of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 > 50. The obtained and published data on the systems Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Zr+Nb, La+La, La+Xe, Pb+Pb, and Bi+Bi are analyzed. At a sufficiently high ion energy, one observes an asymmetry of a quasimolecular spectrum, the asymmetry having maximum in the range of the characteristic KX energy of a quasiatom. Data on the absolute yield Y(Ksub(α)) of individual high-energy components of X-rays excited on collision of heavy ions are presented. A considerable drop in yield Y(Ksub(α)) with increasing Z is noted

  8. Transport properties for some atom-ion interactions in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biolsi, L.; Holland, P.M.; Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH)

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity for the N-N(+) and O-O(+) interactions have been calculated, using the kinetic theory of gases, from 500 K-20,000 K. Accurate spectroscopically determined potentials have been used for the calculations. The results are compared with previous results obtained using less accurate potentials. 62 references

  9. Atoms and Ions Interacting with Particles and Fields: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robicheaux, Francis [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2014-09-18

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. The duration of the grant was the 10 year period from 8/2003 to 8/2013. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 65 peer reviewed publications over these 10 years with 8 of the publications in Physical Review Letters; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B, ...). I will disuss the results for the periods of time relevant for each grant period.

  10. A search for quarks produced in heavy-ion interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to search for free fractional charges produced in 225~GeV/A heavy-ion collisions at the SPS. A tank of mercury placed in the NA38 beam stop will serve both as a production target and as an absorber to stop reaction products. Mercury from the tank will subsequently be distilled.\\\\ \\\\ This process will decrease the amount of mercury that has to be processed by a factor of about $10^{5}$. The concentrate will be searched for quarks using the proven SFSU automated Millikan apparatus.\\\\ \\\\ This experiment will be sensitive to about one quark produced per $2 \\times 10^{8}$ beam particles.

  11. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Escoubet, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2011), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mirror mode waves * trapped particles * magnetosheath ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2011 http://www.ann-geophys.net/29/1049/2011/angeo-29-1049-2011.pdf

  12. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion® membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar eMurugesan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions namely solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  13. Products of tungstate ion interaction with primary aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sejfullina, I.I.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of conductometric titration, IR-spectroscopic and thermographic analyses precipitates formed in the process of interaction of diluted aqueous solutions of sodium tungstate with alcoholic solutions of dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and octadecylamine have been studied. It is shown that as a result of interaction tungstates of corresponding amines are formed. The structure and thermal stability of singled out products are determined

  14. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Robert Nicholls

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012 infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; M age = 16.15 years completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes’ scores in these constructs.

  15. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Adam R; Morley, David; Perry, John L

    2015-01-01

    The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012) infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; M age = 16.15 years) completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes' scores in these constructs.

  16. Solubility Model for Ferrous Iron Hydroxide, Hibbingite, Siderite, and Chukanovite in High Saline Solutions of Sodium Chloride, Sodium Sulfate, and Sodium Carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungtae; Marrs, Cassandra; Nemer, Martin; Jang, Jay Je-Hun

    2017-01-01

    Here, a solubility model is presented for ferrous iron hydroxide (Fe(OH) 2 (s)), hibbingite (Fe 2 Cl(OH) 3 (s)), siderite (FeCO 3 (s)), and chukanovite (Fe 2 CO 3 (OH) 2 (s)). The Pitzer activity coefficient equation was utilized in developing the model to account for the excess free energies of aqueous species in the background solutions of high ionic strength. Solubility limiting minerals were analyzed before and after experiments using X-ray diffraction. Formation of Fe(OH) 2 (s) was observed in the experiments that were initiated with Fe 2 Cl(OH) 3 (s) in Na 2 SO 4 solution. Coexistence of siderite and chukanovite was observed in the experiments in Na 2 CO 3 + NaCl solutions. Two equilibrium constants that had been reported by us for the dissolution of Fe(OH) 2 (s) and Fe 2 Cl(OH) 3 (s) (Nemer et al.) were rederived in this paper, using newer thermodynamic data selected from the literature to maintain internal consistency of the series of our data analyses in preparation, including this paper. Three additional equilibrium constants for the following reactions were determined in this paper: dissolution of siderite and chukanovite and dissociation of the aqueous species Fe(CO 3 ) 2 –2 . Five Pitzer interaction parameters were derived in this paper: β (0) , β (1) , and C φ parameters for the species pair Fe +2 /SO 4 –2 ; β (0) and β (1) parameters for the species pair Na+/Fe(CO3)2–2. Our model predicts that, among the four inorganic ferrous iron minerals, siderite is the stable mineral in two WIPP-related brines (WIPP: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), i.e., GWB and ERDA6 (Brush and Domski), and the electrochemical equilibrium between elemental iron and siderite provides a low oxygen fugacity (10 –91.2 atm) that can keep the actinides at their lowest oxidation states. (Nemer et al., Brush and Domski; references numbered 1 and 2 in the main text).

  17. Activity coefficients in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) from T=(278.15 to 328.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Rabindra N.; Roy, Lakshmi N.; Tabor, Bennett J.; Richards, Sarah J.; Cummins, Mason P.; Himes, Curtis A.; Gibbs, Stephanie N.; Christiansen, Edward B.

    2005-01-01

    Activity coefficients of HCl in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) have been calculated from the observed e.m.f.s using the Nernst equation. The temperatures ranged from (278.15 to 328.15) K at 5 K intervals and at constant total ionic strengths of (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) mol.kg -1 . Electromotive-force measurements were made on the cell without liquid junction of the type:Pt vertical bar H 2 (g,p=101.325kPa) vertical bar HCl(m A ),HoCl 3 (m B ) vertical bar AgCl(s), vertical bar Ag(s) The results of the activity coefficients of HCl for this mixed electrolyte mixture have been interpreted in terms of the simpler Harned's equations and the ion-interaction model of Pitzer. Results show that the quadratic term is sufficient for the full range of Y B (the ionic strength fraction of the salt) to 0.9 at all the ionic strengths studied. The Pitzer's mixing parameters S θH,Ho and Ψ H,Ho,Cl (including higher order electrostatic effects) and θ H,Ho and Ψ H,Ho,Cl (excluding higher order electrostatic effects) have been determined. These values at T=298.15 K are: S θH , Ho =0.115, Ψ H,Ho,Cl =-.071; and θ H,Ho =-.663, Ψ H,Ho,Cl =0.165. The parameters obtained in this study reproduce the activity coefficients of HCl in the mixtures within 0.015 over the entire range of ionic strengths and within 0.009 for I>=0.05 mol.kg -1 over the entire temperature range

  18. Thermodynamic modeling of neptunium(V) solubility in concentrated Na-CO3-HCO3-Cl-ClO4-H-OH-H2O systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, C.F.; Roberts, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    Safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories often require estimation of actinide solubilities as a function of groundwater composition. Although considerable amount of research has been done on the solubility and speciation of actinides, relatively little has been done to unify these data into a model applicable to concentrate brines. Numerous authors report data on the aqueous chemical properties of Np(V) in NaClO 4 , Na 2 CO 3 , and NaCl media, but a consistent thermodynamic model for predicting these properties is not available. To meet this need, a model was developed to describe the solubility of Np(V) in Na-Cl-ClO 4 -CO 3 aqueous systems, based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism for concentrated electrolytes. Hydrolysis and/or carbonate complexation are the dominant aqueous reactions with neptunyl in these systems. Literature data for neptunyl extraction and solubility, and solubility data that the authors developed, are used to parameterize an integrated model for Np(V) solubility in the Np(V)-Na-CO 3 -HCO 3 -Cl-ClO 4 -H-OH-H 2 O system. The resulting model is tested against additional solubility data, and compared with Np(V) solubility experiments in complex synthetic brines

  19. Short description of PetraSim 5 with TOUGHREACT 1.2 and model structure; Kurzbeschreibung von PetraSim 5 mit TOUGHREACT 1.2 und Modellaufbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansmeier, Christina

    2014-08-15

    The modeling of reactive transport processes can improve the understanding of simultaneous thermo-hydro-dynamic and geochemical processes in a repository with respect to the long-term safety analysis. The program TOUGHREACT with the user interface PetraSim is able to calculate coupled processes. It is possible to develop 1D, 2D and 3D models in porous, fissured and heterogeneous materials for non-isothermal multi-phase flows. Using modular extensions additional processes (for instance surface complexing, Pitzer parameters, salt precipitation etc.) can e taken into account. The report gives a short overview on the handling of the program PetraSim including the model structure, the settings and exemplary calculations. The application of the user interface PetraSim with THOUGHREACT 1.2 is supposed for the geochemical modeling of diffusive transport of corrosion products from waste containers within the bentonite barrier. The focus of the model will be the investigations of the porosity and permeability variations in the surrounding bentonite.

  20. Apparent molar heat capacities and apparent molar volumes of Pr(ClO4)3(aq), Gd(ClO4)3(aq), Ho(ClO4)3(aq), and Tm(ClO4)3(aq) at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakin, Andrew W.; Lian Liu, Jin; Erickson, Kristy; Munoz, Julie-Vanessa

    2004-01-01

    Acidified aqueous solutions of Pr(ClO 4 ) 3 (aq), Gd(ClO 4 ) 3 (aq), Ho(ClO 4 ) 3 (aq), and Tm(ClO 4 ) 3 (aq) were prepared from the corresponding oxides by dissolution in dilute perchloric acid. Once characterized with respect to trivalent metal cation and acid content, the relative densities of the solutions were measured at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa using a Sodev O2D vibrating tube densimeter. The relative massic heat capacities of the aqueous systems were also determined, under the same temperature and pressure conditions, using a Picker Flow Microcalorimeter. All measurements were made on solutions containing rare earth salt in the concentration range 0.01 ≤ m/(mol · kg -1 ) ≤ 0.2. Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities were used to calculate the apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of the acidified salt solutions from which the apparent molar properties of the aqueous salt solutions were extracted by the application of Young's Rule. The concentration dependences of the isothermal apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of each aqueous salt solution were modelled using Pitzer ion-interaction equations. These models produced estimates of apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities at infinite dilution for each set of isothermal V phi,2 and C pphi,2 values. In addition, the temperature and concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of the aqueous rare earth perchlorate salt solutions were modelled using modified Pitzer ion-interaction equations. The latter equations utilized the Helgeson, Kirkham, and Flowers equations of state to model the temperature dependences (at p=0.1 MPa) of apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities at infinite dilution. The results of the latter models were compared to those previously published in the literature. Apparent molar volumes and apparent heat capacities at infinite dilution

  1. Apparent molar heat capacities and apparent molar volumes of Pr(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), Gd(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), Ho(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), and Tm(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq) at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakin, Andrew W. E-mail: hakin@uleth.ca; Lian Liu, Jin; Erickson, Kristy; Munoz, Julie-Vanessa

    2004-09-01

    Acidified aqueous solutions of Pr(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), Gd(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), Ho(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq), and Tm(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq) were prepared from the corresponding oxides by dissolution in dilute perchloric acid. Once characterized with respect to trivalent metal cation and acid content, the relative densities of the solutions were measured at T=(288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p=0.1 MPa using a Sodev O2D vibrating tube densimeter. The relative massic heat capacities of the aqueous systems were also determined, under the same temperature and pressure conditions, using a Picker Flow Microcalorimeter. All measurements were made on solutions containing rare earth salt in the concentration range 0.01 {<=} m/(mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) {<=} 0.2. Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities were used to calculate the apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of the acidified salt solutions from which the apparent molar properties of the aqueous salt solutions were extracted by the application of Young's Rule. The concentration dependences of the isothermal apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of each aqueous salt solution were modelled using Pitzer ion-interaction equations. These models produced estimates of apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities at infinite dilution for each set of isothermal V{sub phi,2} and C{sub pphi,2} values. In addition, the temperature and concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of the aqueous rare earth perchlorate salt solutions were modelled using modified Pitzer ion-interaction equations. The latter equations utilized the Helgeson, Kirkham, and Flowers equations of state to model the temperature dependences (at p=0.1 MPa) of apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities at infinite dilution. The results of the latter models were compared to those previously published in the literature. Apparent

  2. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate and Lactate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V)and U(V I) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.R.; Free, S.J.; Bynum, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical radiation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV) , Np(V), and U(V I) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in Na CI media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporites systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations

  3. Prediction of scale potential in ethylene glycol containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandengen, Kristian; Oestvold, Terje

    2006-03-15

    This work presents a method for scale prediction in MEG (Mono Ethylene Glycol / 1,2-ethane-diol) containing solutions. It is based on an existing PVT scale model using a Pitzer ion interaction model for the aqueous phase. The model is well suited for scale prediction in saline solutions, where the PVT part is necessary for calculating CO{sub 2} phase equilibria being critical for carbonate scale. MEG influences the equilibria contained in the model, and its effect has been added empirically. Thus the accuracy of the model is limited by the amount of available experimental data. The model is applicable in the range 0-99wt% MEG and includes a wide variety of salts. In addition to the aspects of scale modelling in MEG+water solutions, this work presents new experimental data on CaSO4 solubility (0-95wt% MEG and 22-80 deg.C). CaSO4 solubility is greatly reduced by MEG to an extent that ''Salting-out'' is possible. (author) (tk)

  4. Adsorption of Sr on kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite at high ionic strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.J.; Langmuir, D. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (USA). Dept. of Chemistry and Geochemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of Sr adsorption onto kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite in up to 4.0 mol/kg NaCl solutions, were modelled with the surface ionization and complexation triple-layer (SIC) model (Davis et al.) to determine if model adjustments were required for high ionic strengths. Improved model fits to the adsorption data were obtained at high ionic strengths, reflecting a lowered sensitivity of the model. A general reduction in Sr adsorption with increasing ionic strength was caused by an increase in the outer layer surface charge, rather than by a drop in the number of available adsorption sites. Sensitivity analysis showed that the range of values of model constants yielding acceptable fits was as large as variations reported in the literature for these constants. The study demonstrates that adsorption will not retard Sr migration in brines, and that it is unnecessary to introduce a Pitzer ion interaction subroutine in the SIC model when considering adsorption at high ionic strengths. (orig.).

  5. Avaliação da interação macromolécula/íon Zn+2 em meio aquoso: poli(acrilamida-co-ácido acrílico e taninos Estimation of the macromolecules/zinc ion interaction in the aqueous solution: poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid and tannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia D. Clarisse

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visa o estudo da interação entre polímeros sintéticos e produtos naturais à base de taninos com o íon zinco (Zn+2 em meio aquoso para sua utilização na remoção de metais em efluentes. Uma série de copolímeros poli(acrilamida-co-ácido acrílico de diferentes composições e homopolímeros de acrilamida e de ácido acrílico foram preparados, assim como, taninos comerciais foram utilizados como recebidos e purificados por extração. Uma metodologia de avaliação da eficiência de interação da macromolécula com o íon Zn+2 foi desenvolvida baseada em curva padrão de intensidade de absorção na região do ultravioleta-visível (UV-VIS em função da concentração do complexo formado, utilizando colorimetria. A capacidade de interação com o íon zinco foi ligeiramente maior para os polímeros sintéticos porém o produto natural tem a vantagem de apresentar um custo mais baixo.The aim of this work was to evaluate the interaction between natural and synthetic macromolecules with the zinc ion (Zn+2 in aqueous solution. Polyacrylamide, poly(acrylic acid and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid were prepared and natural products (tannins were extracted and purified from commercial products. The methodology to evaluate the macromolecule/zinc ion interaction was based on colorimetry by using a standard curve. The interaction efficiency was slightly larger for the synthetic macromolecules when compared to the natural one. Nevertheless, the tanning has lower cost and its use could be recommended.

  6. Semi-empirical modelization of charge funneling in a NP diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musseau, O.

    1991-01-01

    Heavy ion interaction with a semiconductor generates a high density of electrons and holes pairs along the trajectory and in a space charge zone the collected charge is considerably increased. The chronology of this charge funneling is described in a semi-empirical model. From initial conditions characterizing the incident ion and the studied structure, it is possible to evaluate directly the transient current, the collected charge and the length of funneling with a good agreement. The model can be extrapolated to more complex structures

  7. Self-consistent nonlinearly polarizable shell-model dynamics for ferroelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkam Tchouobiap, S.E.; Kofane, T.C.; Ngabireng, C.M.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of the polarizable shellmodel with a symmetric double Morse-type electron-ion interaction in one ionic species. A variational calculation based on the Self-Consistent Einstein Model (SCEM) shows that a theoretical ferroelectric (FE) transition temperature can be derive which demonstrates the presence of a first-order phase transition for the potassium selenate (K 2 SeO 4 ) crystal around Tc 91.5 K. Comparison of the model calculation with the experimental critical temperature yields satisfactory agreement. (author)

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of trivalent Am, Cm and Eu-citrate complexation in concentrated NaClO{sub 4} media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, P.; Xiong, Y. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Borkowski, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Carlsbad Operations; Choppin, G.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Carlsbad Program Group

    2012-07-01

    The dissociation constants of citric acid (Cit), and the stability constants of Am{sup 3+}, Cm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} with Cit were determined as a function of ionic strength (NaClO{sub 4}) using potentiometric titration and an extraction technique, respectively. The results have shown the presence of both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes under the experimental conditions. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent stability constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer ionic interaction parameters {beta}{sup (0)}, {beta}{sup (1)}, and C{sup {phi}} which were obtained to fit the experimental data. Thermodynamic stability constants of M(Cit) and M(Cit){sub 2}{sup 3-} (where M = Am{sup 3+}, Cm{sup 3+} or Eu{sup 3+}) were calculated to be log {beta}{sub 101}{sup 0} = 9.91 {+-} 0.10, log {beta}{sub 102}{sup 0} = 14.47 {+-} 0.14 for Am{sup 3+}, log {beta}{sub 101}{sup 0} = 9.53 {+-} 0.16, log {beta}{sub 102}{sup 0} = 14.46 {+-} 0.16 for Cm{sup 3+} and log {beta}{sub 101}{sup 0} = 9.82 {+-} 0.14, log {beta}{sub 102}{sup 0} = 13.31 {+-} 0.12 for Eu{sup 3+} as obtained by extrapolation to zero ionic strength. (orig.)

  9. Luminescence model with quantum impact parameter for low energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Galindo, H S; Martínez-Davalos, A; Belmont-Moreno, E; Galindo, S

    2002-01-01

    We have modified an analytical model of induced light production by energetic ions interacting in scintillating materials. The original model is based on the distribution of energy deposited by secondary electrons produced along the ion's track. The range of scattered electrons, and thus the energy distribution, depends on a classical impact parameter between the electron and the ion's track. The only adjustable parameter of the model is the quenching density rho sub q. The modification here presented, consists in proposing a quantum impact parameter that leads to a better fit of the model to the experimental data at low incident ion energies. The light output response of CsI(Tl) detectors to low energy ions (<3 MeV/A) is fitted with the modified model and comparison is made to the original model.

  10. Solubility of NaNd(CO3)2.6H2O(c) in concentrated Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, L.; Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Fulton, R.W.; Novak, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) was identified to be the final equilibrium solid phase in suspensions containing concentrated sodium carbonate (0.1 to 2.0 M) and sodium bicarbonate (0.1 to 1.0 M), with either NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) or Nd 2 (CO 3 ) 3 x xH 2 O(s) as initial solids. A thermodynamic model, based on Pitzer's specific into-interaction approach, was developed to interpret the solubility of NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) as functions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate concentrations. In this model, the solubility data of NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) were explained by assuming the formation of NdCO 3 + , Nd(CO 3 ) 2 - and Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- species and invoking the specific ion interactions between Na + and Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- . Ion interaction parameters for Na + -Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- were developed to fit the solubility data. Based on the model calculations, Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- was the predominant aqueous neodymium species in 0.1 to 2 M sodium carbonate and 0.1 to 1 M sodium bicarbonate solutions. The logarithm of the NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O solubility product (NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c)=Na + +Nd 3+ +2 CO 3 2- +6 H 2 O) was calculated to be -21.39. This model also provided satisfactory interpretation of the solubility data of the analogous Am(III) system in less concentrated carbonate and bicarbonate solutions. (orig.)

  11. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Ding, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO 3 , NO 2 , PO 4 , SO 4 , and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model

  12. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

  13. Protonation thermodynamics of some aminophenol derivatives in NaCl{sub (aq)} (0 {<=} I {<=}3 mol . kg{sup -1}) at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretti, Clemente; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universita di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres, 31, I-98166 Messina (Vill. S. Agata) (Italy); Sammartano, Silvio, E-mail: ssammartano@unime.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universita di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres, 31, I-98166 Messina (Vill. S. Agata) (Italy); Vianelli, Giuseppina [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universita di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres, 31, I-98166 Messina (Vill. S. Agata) (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Protonation thermodynamics of four aminophenol derivatives were determined. > Dependence on ionic strength was analysed by using different models. > Neutral species activity coefficient was determined by distribution measurements. > Acid-base behaviour of this ligand class was modelled. - Abstract: The acid-base properties of four aminophenol derivatives, namely m-aminophenol (L1), 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene (L2), 2-amino-5-ethylphenol (L3) and 5-amino-4-chloro-o-cresol (L4), are studied by potentiometric and titration calorimetric measurements in NaCl{sub (aq)} (0 {<=} I {<=} 3 mol . kg{sup -1}) at T = 298.15 K. The dependence of the protonation constants on ionic strength is modelled by the Debye-Hueckel, SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) and Pitzer equations. Therefore, the values of protonation constants at infinite dilution and the relative interaction coefficients are calculated. The dependence of protonation enthalpies on ionic strength is also determined. Distribution (2-methyl-1-propanol/aqueous solution) measurements allowed us to determine the Setschenow coefficients and the activity coefficients of neutral species. Experimental results show that these compounds behave in a very similar way, and common class parameters are reported, in particular for the dependence on ionic strength of both protonation constants and protonation enthalpies.

  14. Protonation thermodynamics of some aminophenol derivatives in NaCl(aq) (0 ≤ I ≤3 mol . kg-1) at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretti, Clemente; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Sammartano, Silvio; Vianelli, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Protonation thermodynamics of four aminophenol derivatives were determined. → Dependence on ionic strength was analysed by using different models. → Neutral species activity coefficient was determined by distribution measurements. → Acid-base behaviour of this ligand class was modelled. - Abstract: The acid-base properties of four aminophenol derivatives, namely m-aminophenol (L1), 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene (L2), 2-amino-5-ethylphenol (L3) and 5-amino-4-chloro-o-cresol (L4), are studied by potentiometric and titration calorimetric measurements in NaCl (aq) (0 ≤ I ≤ 3 mol . kg -1 ) at T = 298.15 K. The dependence of the protonation constants on ionic strength is modelled by the Debye-Hueckel, SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) and Pitzer equations. Therefore, the values of protonation constants at infinite dilution and the relative interaction coefficients are calculated. The dependence of protonation enthalpies on ionic strength is also determined. Distribution (2-methyl-1-propanol/aqueous solution) measurements allowed us to determine the Setschenow coefficients and the activity coefficients of neutral species. Experimental results show that these compounds behave in a very similar way, and common class parameters are reported, in particular for the dependence on ionic strength of both protonation constants and protonation enthalpies.

  15. (Solid + liquid) isothermal evaporation phase equilibria in the aqueous ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at T = 308.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shiqiang [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Deng Tianlong [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); College of Materials, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)], E-mail: dtl@cdut.edu.cn

    2008-06-15

    The solubility and the density in the aqueous ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at T = 308.15 K were determined by the isothermal evaporation. Our experimental results permitted the construction of the phase diagram and the plot of density against composition. It was found that there is one eutectic point for (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} . H{sub 2}O + MgSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O), two univariant curves, and two crystallization regions corresponding to lithium sulphate monohydrate (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} . H{sub 2}O) and epsomite (MgSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O). The system belongs to a simple co-saturated type, and neither double salts nor solid solution was found. Based on the Pitzer ion-interaction model and its extended HW models of aqueous electrolyte solution, the solubility of the ternary system at T = 308.15 K has been calculated. The predicted solubility agrees well with the experimental values.

  16. Densities and apparent molar volumes of HClO4(aq) and Yb(ClO4)3(aq) at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakin, Andrew W.; Lukacs, Michael J.; Jin Lianliu

    2004-01-01

    Relative densities have been measured for acidified aqueous solutions of ytterbium perchlorate {Yb(ClO 4 ) 3 } at approximately T=(348.15, 373.15, 398.15, and 423.15) K and p=(10.0, 20.0, and 30.0) MPa over the concentration range 0.01624≤m 2 /(mol · kg -1 ) ≤ 0.2531 using an optically coupled vibrating tube densimeter (OCVTD). Experimental apparent molar volumes have been calculated from the density measurements, and apparent molar volumes for the aqueous perchlorate salt have been calculated using Young's rule. The application of Young's rule requires apparent molar volumes for aqueous perchloric acid (HClO 4 ) solutions over extended temperature and pressure ranges. These values were calculated from densities for aqueous HClO 4 solutions that were measured using the OCVTD at the same temperatures and pressures as those used to investigate the density surface of the acidified aqueous Yb(ClO 4 ) 3 solutions. The temperature, pressure, and composition surfaces of the apparent molar volumes for Yb(ClO 4 ) 3 (aq) and HClO 4 (aq) have been modelled using Pitzer ion-interaction equations. Apparent molar volumes at infinite dilution obtained from these models have been compared to those which can be calculated using the semi-empirical Helgeson, Kirkham, and Flowers equations of state. Values for the apparent molar volume at infinite dilution of the ytterbium trivalent cation have also been calculated using simple additivity principles

  17. Activity coefficients of NaF in (glucose+water) and (sucrose+water) mixtures at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Luis, Felipe [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)]. E-mail: ffhelu@ull.es; Galleguillos, Hector R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Vazquez, Mario V. [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2004-11-01

    The activity coefficients of NaF in (glucose+water) and (sucrose+water) mixtures were experimentally determined at 298.15 K from electromotive force measurements of the following electrochemical cell containing two ion selective electrodes (ISEs):Na-ISE|NaF(m),sugar(Y),H2O(100-Y)|F-ISEThe molality (m) varied between ca. 0.01 mol.kg{sup -1} and saturation, while the mass fractions of sugar in the mixture (Y) were 0, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30 and 0.40. The values for electromotive force were analyzed using different models for describing the variations of the activity coefficients with concentration, including an extended Debye-Huckel, the Pitzer and the Scatchard equations. Results obtained with the different models were in good agreement. Once E{sup -}bar was determined, the mean coefficients of ionic activity for NaF, the free energy of transference from the water to the (sugar+water) mixture, and the primary NaF hydration number were calculated. The variation of these magnitudes with the composition of the mixture is comparative discussed in terms of the ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions with results from the literature for NaCl in (glucose+water) and (sucrose+water) systems.

  18. Aqueous partial molar heat capacities and volumes for NaReO4 and NaTcO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Campbell, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, data are required to model the equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of key radionuclides at temperatures above 25 degree C. A flow microcalorimeter/densimeter system has been commissioned to measure heat capacities and densities of solutions containing radioactive species. Measurements for solutions of aqueous NaReO 4 (a common analogue for NaTcO 4 ) were made at seven temperatures (15 to 100 degree C) over the concentration range 0.05 to 0.2 mol·kg -1 . Subsequently, measurements were made for NaTcO 4 solutions under similar conditions. The heat capacity and density data are analyzed using Pitzer's ion-interaction model, and values of the NaReO 4 partial molar heat capacities are compared to literature values based on integral heats of solution. The agreement between the two sets of NaReO 4 data is good below 75 degree C, but only fair at the higher temperatures. Values of the partial molar volumes have also been derived. The uncertainties introduced by using thermodynamic data for ReO 4 - , in the absence of data for TcO 4 - , are discussed

  19. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and

  20. Densities and apparent molar volumes for aqueous solutions of HNO3-UO2(NO3)2 at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Xin Yu; Tie-Zhu Bao; Guang-Hua Gao; Yi-Gui Li

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain the exact information of atomic number density in the ternary system of HNO 3 -UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 -H 2 O, the densities were measured with an Anton-Paar DMA60/602 digital density meter thermostated at 298.15±0.01 K. The apparent molal volumes for the systems were calculated from the experimental data. The present measured apparent molar volumes have been fitted to the Pitzer ion-interaction model, which provides an adequate representation of the experimental data for mixed aqueous electrolyte solutions up to 6.2 mol/kg ionic strength. This fit yields θ V , and Ψ V , which are the first derivatives with respect to pressure of the mixing interaction parameters for the excess free energy. With the mixing parameters θ V , and ψ V , the densities and apparent molar volumes of the ternary system studied in this work can be calculated with good accuracy, as shown by the standard deviations. (author)

  1. Solid-liquid stable phase equilibria of the ternary systems MgCl2 + MgB6O10+ H2O AND MgSO4 + MgB6O10 + H2O at 308.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingzong Meng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The solubilities and the relevant physicochemical properties of the ternary systems MgCl2 + MgB6O10 + H2O and MgSO4 + MgB6O10 + H2O at 308.15 K were investigated using an isothermal dissolution method. It was found that there is one invariant point, two univariant curves, and two crystallization regions of the systems. The systems belong to a simple co-saturated type, and neither double salts nor solid solutions were found. Based on the extended HW model and its temperature-dependent equations, the single-salt Pitzer parameters β(0, β(1, β(2 and CØ for MgCl2, MgSO4, and Mg(B6O7(OH6, the mixed ion-interaction parameters θCl,B6O10, θSO4,B6O10, ΨMg,Cl,B6O10, ΨMg,SO4,B6O10 of the systems at 308.15 K were fitted, In addition, the average equilibrium constants of the stable equilibrium solids at 308.15 K were obtained by a method using the activity product constant. Then the solubilities of the ternary systems are calculated. The calculated solubilities agree well with the experimental values.

  2. Kinetic Framework for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Polar Wind System: Modeling Ion Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.; Eccles, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Kistler, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    A Kinetic Framework for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Polar Wind System is being developed in order to provide a rigorous approach to modeling the interaction of hot and cold particle interactions. The framework will include ion and electron kinetic species in the ionosphere, plasmasphere and polar wind, and kinetic ion, super-thermal electron and fluid electron species in the magnetosphere. The framework is ideally suited to modeling ion outflow from the ionosphere and plasmasphere, where a wide range for fluid and kinetic processes are important. These include escaping ion interactions with (1) photoelectrons, (2) cusp/auroral waves, double layers, and field-aligned currents, (3) double layers in the polar cap due to the interaction of cold ionospheric and hot magnetospheric electrons, (4) counter-streaming ions, and (5) electromagnetic wave turbulence. The kinetic ion interactions are particularly strong during geomagnetic storms and substorms. The presentation will provide a brief description of the models involved and discuss the effect that kinetic processes have on the ion outflow.

  3. Generalized correlation of latent heats of vaporization of coal liquid model compounds between their freezing points and critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, A.; Kobuyashi, R.; Mayee, J.W.

    1984-02-01

    Based on Pitzer's three-parameter corresponding states principle, the authors have developed a correlation of the latent heat of vaporization of aromatic coal liquid model compounds for a temperature range from the freezing point to the critical point. An expansion of the form L = L/sub 0/ + ..omega..L /sub 1/ is used for the dimensionless latent heat of vaporization. This model utilizes a nonanalytic functional form based on results derived from renormalization group theory of fluids in the vicinity of the critical point. A simple expression for the latent heat of vaporization L = D/sub 1/epsilon /SUP 0.3333/ + D/sub 2/epsilon /SUP 0.8333/ + D/sub 4/epsilon /SUP 1.2083/ + E/sub 1/epsilon + E/sub 2/epsilon/sup 2/ + E/sub 3/epsilon/sup 3/ is cast in a corresponding states principle correlation for coal liquid compounds. Benzene, the basic constituent of the functional groups of the multi-ring coal liquid compounds, is used as the reference compound in the present correlation. This model works very well at both low and high reduced temperatures approaching the critical point (0.02 < epsilon = (T /SUB c/ - T)/(T /SUB c/- 0.69)). About 16 compounds, including single, two, and three-ring compounds, have been tested and the percent root-mean-square deviations in latent heat of vaporization reported and estimated through the model are 0.42 to 5.27%. Tables of the coefficients of L/sub 0/ and L/sub 1/ are presented. The contributing terms of the latent heat of vaporization function are also presented in a table for small increments of epsilon.

  4. Comparison of physics model for 600 MeV protons 290 MeV·{sup n-}1 oxygen ions on carbon in MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Arim; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Nam Suk; Oh, Joo Hee [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, Leila Mokhtari [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    With the increase in the number of particle accelerator facilities under either operation or construction, the accurate calculation using Monte Carlo codes become more important in the shielding design and radiation safety evaluation of accelerator facilities. The calculations with different physics models were applied in both of cases: using only physics model and using the mix and match method of MCNPX code. The issued conditions were the interactions of 600 MeV proton and 290 MeV·{sup n-}1 oxygen with a carbon target. Both of cross-section libraries, JENDL High Energy File 2007 (JENDL/HE-2007) and LA150, were tested in this calculation. In the case of oxygen ion interactions, the calculation results using LAQGSM physics model and JENDL/HE-2007 library were compared with D. Satoh's experimental data. Other Monte Carlo calculations using PHITS and FLUKA codes were also carried out for further benchmarking study. It was clearly found that the physics models, especially intra-nuclear cascade model, gave a great effect to determine proton-induced secondary neutron spectrum in MCNPX code. The variety of physics models related to heavy ion interactions did not make big difference on the secondary particle productions. The variations of secondary neutron spectra and particle transports depending on various physics models in MCNPX code were studied and the result of this study can be used for the shielding design and radiation safety evaluation.

  5. Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  6. Modelling of crevice corrosion induced failure of nuclear waste containers. Abstract 389

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppner, K.L.; Evitts, R.W.; Postlethwaite, J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)]. E-mail: klh117@mail.usask.ca; rwe380@engr.usask.ca; jack@dvinci.usask.ca

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' Alloys which are used for nuclear waste containment applications are selected based upon their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, alloys which are resistant to uniform corrosion, such as titanium alloys, are susceptible to crevice corrosion when exposed to geochemical brines. Passive metals, such as Grade-2 titanium alloy, form a tenacious oxide surface film that protects the metal from corrosion. For a crevice with a very small opening, oxygen reduction inside the crevice may occur faster than oxygen diffusion into the crevice, a condition that leads to crevice solution deoxygenation. Crevice deoxygenation causes oxygen reduction to occur only outside the crevice. Thus, the anode and cathode are physically separated and this causes an acid chloride crevice solution to form by two mechanisms. First, the separated anode and cathode forms an electrical potential gradient. The potential gradient drives the migration of chloride ions into the crevice. Second, metal ions released by dissolution are hydrolyzed to produce metal hydroxides and hydrogen ions. The pH of the crevice solution drops because oxygen reduction, which produces hydroxide ions to neutralize the acidity, no longer occurs inside the crevice. If a solution of sufficiently low pH and sufficiently high chloride ion concentration develops, the protective passive film is dissolved. The time at which this occurs is the incubation period. In this work, a moderately dilute electrolyte mass transport model is coupled with Pitzer's Equations to predict the chemical composition of a Grade-2 titanium alloy crevice solution immersed in a Na-K-Cl brine. The results indicate that the incubation period is highly dependent upon the size of the crevice opening and the temperature of the brine. (author)

  7. EQ3/6, a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems: Package overview and installation guide (Version 7.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolery, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    EQ3/6 is a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. This report describes version 7.0. The major components of the package include: EQ3NR, a speciation-solubility code; EQ6, a reaction path code which models water/rock interaction or fluid mixing in either a pure reaction progress mode or a time mode; EQPT, a data file preprocessor, EQLIB, a supporting software library; and five supporting thermodynamic data files. The software deals with the concepts of thermodynamic equilibrium, thermodynamic disequilibrium, and reaction kinetics. The five supporting data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three support the use of the Davies or B equations for the activity coefficients; the other two support the use of Pitzer's equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on the data files varies from 25 degree C only to 0--300 degree C. EQPT takes a formatted data file (a data0 file) and writes an unformatted near-equivalent called a datal file, which is actually the form read by EQ3NR and EQ6. EQ3NR is useful for analyzing groundwater chemistry data, calculating solubility limits, and determining whether certain reactions are in states of partial equilibrium or disequilibrium. It is also required to initialize an EQ6 calculation. EQ6 models the consequences of reacting an aqueous solution with a set of reactants which react irreversibly. It can also model fluid mixing and the consequences of changes in temperature. This code operates both in a pure reaction progress frame and in a time frame

  8. EQPT, a data file preprocessor for the EQ3/6 software package: User`s guide and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daveler, S.A.; Wolery, T.J.

    1992-12-17

    EQPT is a data file preprocessor for the EQ3/6 software package. EQ3/6 currently contains five primary data files, called datao files. These files comprise alternative data sets. These data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three (com, sup, and nea) support the use of the Davies or B-dot equations for the activity coefficients; the other two (hmw and pit) support the use of Pitzer`s (1973, 1975) equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on these data files varies from 25{degrees}C only to 0-300{degrees}C. The principal modeling codes in EQ3/6, EQ3NR and EQ6, do not read a data0 file, however. Instead, these codes read an unformatted equivalent called a data1 file. EQPT writes a datal file, using the corresponding data0 file as input. In processing a data0 file, EQPT checks the data for common errors, such as unbalanced reactions. It also conducts two kinds of data transformation. Interpolating polynomials are fit to data which are input on temperature adds. The coefficients of these polynomials are then written on the datal file in place of the original temperature grids. A second transformation pertains only to data files tied to Pitzer`s equations. The commonly reported observable Pitzer coefficient parameters are mapped into a set of primitive parameters by means of a set of conventional relations. These primitive form parameters are then written onto the datal file in place of their observable counterparts. Usage of the primitive form parameters makes it easier to evaluate Pitzer`s equations in EQ3NR and EQ6. EQPT and the other codes in the EQ3/6 package are written in FORTRAN 77 and have been developed to run under the UNIX operating system on computers ranging from workstations to supercomputers.

  9. Uncertainty in geochemical modelling of CO2 and calcite dissolution in NaCl solutions due to different modelling codes and thermodynamic databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, Christoph; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 and calcite dissolution is calculated. • The codes PHREEQC, Geochemist’s Workbench, EQ3/6, and FactSage are used. • Comparison with Duan and Li (2008) shows lowest deviation using phreeqc.dat and wateq4f.dat. • Using Pitzer databases does not improve accurate calculations. • Uncertainty in dissolved CO 2 is largest using the geochemical models. - Abstract: A prognosis of the geochemical effects of CO 2 storage induced by the injection of CO 2 into geologic reservoirs or by CO 2 leakage into the overlaying formations can be performed by numerical modelling (non-invasive) and field experiments. Until now the research has been focused on the geochemical processes of the CO 2 reacting with the minerals of the storage formation, which mostly consists of quartzitic sandstones. Regarding the safety assessment the reactions between the CO 2 and the overlaying formations in the case of a CO 2 leakage are of equal importance as the reactions in the storage formation. In particular, limestone formations can react very sensitively to CO 2 intrusion. The thermodynamic parameters necessary to model these reactions are not determined explicitly through experiments at the total range of temperature and pressure conditions and are thus extrapolated by the simulation code. The differences in the calculated results lead to different calcite and CO 2 solubilities and can influence the safety issues. This uncertainty study is performed by comparing the computed results, applying the geochemical modelling software codes The Geochemist’s Workbench, EQ3/6, PHREEQC and FactSage/ChemApp and their thermodynamic databases. The input parameters (1) total concentration of the solution, (2) temperature and (3) fugacity are varied within typical values for CO 2 reservoirs, overlaying formations and close-to-surface aquifers. The most sensitive input parameter in the system H 2 O–CO 2 –NaCl–CaCO 3 for the calculated range of dissolved calcite and CO 2 is the

  10. Explicit ions/implicit water generalized Born model for nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2018-05-01

    The ion atmosphere around highly charged nucleic acid molecules plays a significant role in their dynamics, structure, and interactions. Here we utilized the implicit solvent framework to develop a model for the explicit treatment of ions interacting with nucleic acid molecules. The proposed explicit ions/implicit water model is based on a significantly modified generalized Born (GB) model and utilizes a non-standard approach to define the solute/solvent dielectric boundary. Specifically, the model includes modifications to the GB interaction terms for the case of multiple interacting solutes—disconnected dielectric boundary around the solute-ion or ion-ion pairs. A fully analytical description of all energy components for charge-charge interactions is provided. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by calculating the potential of mean force for Na+-Cl- ion pair and by carrying out a set of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of mono- and trivalent ions interacting with DNA and RNA duplexes. The monovalent (Na+) and trivalent (CoHex3+) counterion distributions predicted by the model are in close quantitative agreement with all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics simulations used as reference. Expressed in the units of energy, the maximum deviations of local ion concentrations from the reference are within kBT. The proposed explicit ions/implicit water GB model is able to resolve subtle features and differences of CoHex distributions around DNA and RNA duplexes. These features include preferential CoHex binding inside the major groove of the RNA duplex, in contrast to CoHex biding at the "external" surface of the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA duplex; these differences in the counterion binding patters were earlier shown to be responsible for the observed drastic differences in condensation propensities between short DNA and RNA duplexes. MC simulations of CoHex ions interacting with the homopolymeric poly(dA.dT) DNA duplex with modified (de

  11. Thermodynamics of proton binding and weak (Cl−, Na+ and K+) species formation, and activity coefficients of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (deferiprone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretti, Clemente; Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; Lando, Gabriele; Sammartano, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Trend of the deferiprone protonation constant (log K 1 H ) vs. ionic strength (in the molal concentration scale) in NaCl (□), KCl (Δ) and (CH 3 ) 4 NCl (○), at T = 298.15 K. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics, solubility and distribution of deferiprone in NaCl, KCl and (CH 3 ) 4 NCl. • Deferiprone total solubility is 0.100 mol · dm −3 in pure water and shows salting out. • The protonation process is entropic for the first step and enthalpic for the second. • Debye–Hückel, SIT and Pitzer approaches used for modelling of protonation constants. • Formation constants of three weak species were determined, Nadef, Kdef and H 2 defCl. - Abstract: The acid base properties of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (also known as deferiprone, def, figure 1), together with the solubility and the distribution ratio have been studied potentiometrically at different temperatures and ionic strengths in NaCl, KCl and in (CH 3 ) 4 NCl aqueous solutions. The total solubility of deferiprone is fairly high (0.100 mol · dm −3 in pure water) and decreases with increasing salt concentration (salting out effect); this behaviour is greater in NaCl than in (CH 3 ) 4 NCl aqueous solutions. From the analysis of the solubility and the distribution measurements it was possible to determine the Setschenow and the activity coefficients of the neutral species. Deferiprone shows two protonation steps, whose protonation constants are logK 1 H =10.088 and logK 2 H =3.656 at infinite dilution and T = 298.15 K. The ionic strength dependence of the protonation constants was interpreted both in terms of variation of the activity coefficients, using the Debye–Hückel, the SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) and the Pitzer approaches, or considering the formation of weak species with the ions of the supporting electrolyte (e.g. Na + , K + and Cl − ). Moreover, temperature gradients were provided for the two protonation constants. The stepwise protonation enthalpy

  12. Activity coefficients in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) from T=(278.15 to 328.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Rabindra N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)]. E-mail: rroy@drury.edu; Roy, Lakshmi N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Tabor, Bennett J. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Richards, Sarah J. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Cummins, Mason P. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Himes, Curtis A. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Gibbs, Stephanie N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Christiansen, Edward B. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Activity coefficients of HCl in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) have been calculated from the observed e.m.f.s using the Nernst equation. The temperatures ranged from (278.15 to 328.15) K at 5 K intervals and at constant total ionic strengths of (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) mol.kg{sup -1}. Electromotive-force measurements were made on the cell without liquid junction of the type:Pt vertical bar H{sub 2}(g,p=101.325kPa) vertical bar HCl(m{sub A}),HoCl{sub 3}(m{sub B}) vertical bar AgCl(s), vertical bar Ag(s) The results of the activity coefficients of HCl for this mixed electrolyte mixture have been interpreted in terms of the simpler Harned's equations and the ion-interaction model of Pitzer. Results show that the quadratic term is sufficient for the full range of Y{sub B} (the ionic strength fraction of the salt) to 0.9 at all the ionic strengths studied. The Pitzer's mixing parameters S{sub {theta}}{sub H,Ho} and {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl} (including higher order electrostatic effects) and {theta}{sub H,Ho} and {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl} (excluding higher order electrostatic effects) have been determined. These values at T=298.15 K are: S{sub {theta}}{sub H},{sub Ho}=0.115, {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl}=-.071; and {theta}{sub H,Ho}=-.663, {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl}=0.165. The parameters obtained in this study reproduce the activity coefficients of HCl in the mixtures within 0.015 over the entire range of ionic strengths and within 0.009 for I>=0.05 mol.kg{sup -1} over the entire temperature range.

  13. Gas/aerosol Partitioning Parameterisation For Global Modelling: A Physical Interpretation of The Relationship Between Activity Coefficients and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Dentener, F. J.; Lelieveld, J.; Pandis, S. N.

    A computationally efficient model (EQSAM) to calculate gas/aerosol partitioning ofsemi-volatile inorganic aerosol components has been developed for use in global- atmospheric chemistry and climate models; presented at the EGS 2001.We introduce and discuss here the physics behind the parameterisation, upon whichthe EQuilib- rium Simplified Aerosol Model EQSAM is based. The parameterisation,which ap- proximates the activity coefficient calculation sufficiently accurately forglobal mod- elling, is based on a method that directly relates aerosol activitycoefficients to the ambient relative humidity, assuming chemical equilibrium.It therefore provides an interesting alternative for the computationally expensiveiterative activity coefficient calculation methods presently used in thermodynamicgas/aerosol equilibrium mod- els (EQMs). The parameterisation can be used,however, also in dynamical models that calculate mass transfer between theliquid/solid aerosol phases and the gas/phase explicitly; dynamical models oftenincorporate an EQM to calculate the aerosol com- position. The gain of theparameterisation is that the entire system of the gas/aerosol equilibrium partitioningcan be solved non-iteratively, a substantial advantage in global modelling.Since we have already demonstrated at the EGS 2001 that EQSAM yields similarresults as current state-of-the-art equilibrium models, we focus here on a dis- cussionof our physical interpretation of the parameterisation; the identification of theparameters needed is crucial. Given the lag of reliable data, the best way tothor- oughly validate the parameterisation for global modelling applications is theimple- mentation in current state-of-the-art gas/aerosol partitioning routines, whichare embe- ded in e.g. a global atmospheric chemistry transport model, by comparingthe results of the parameterisation against the ones based on the widely used activitycoefficient calculation methods (i.e. Bromley, Kussik-Meissner or Pitzer). Then

  14. Description of input and examples for PHREEQC version 3: a computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Appelo, C.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    PHREEQC version 3 is a computer program written in the C and C++ programming languages that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC implements several types of aqueous models: two ion-association aqueous models (the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory model and WATEQ4F), a Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model, and the SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) aqueous model. Using any of these aqueous models, PHREEQC has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations; (2) batch-reaction and one-dimensional (1D) transport calculations with reversible and irreversible reactions, which include aqueous, mineral, gas, solid-solution, surface-complexation, and ion-exchange equilibria, and specified mole transfers of reactants, kinetically controlled reactions, mixing of solutions, and pressure and temperature changes; and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for differences in composition between waters within specified compositional uncertainty limits. Many new modeling features were added to PHREEQC version 3 relative to version 2. The Pitzer aqueous model (pitzer.dat database, with keyword PITZER) can be used for high-salinity waters that are beyond the range of application for the Debye-Hückel theory. The Peng-Robinson equation of state has been implemented for calculating the solubility of gases at high pressure. Specific volumes of aqueous species are calculated as a function of the dielectric properties of water and the ionic strength of the solution, which allows calculation of pressure effects on chemical reactions and the density of a solution. The specific conductance and the density of a solution are calculated and printed in the output file. In addition to Runge-Kutta integration, a stiff ordinary differential equation solver (CVODE) has been included for kinetic calculations with multiple rates that occur at widely different time scales

  15. Vapour pressures and osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate with alcohols at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gonzalez, Begona; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2009-01-01

    Osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol) and the ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate were determined at T = 323.15 K. Vapour pressure and activity coefficients of the studied systems were calculated from experimental data. The extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, and the modified NRTL model (MNRTL) were used to correlate the experimental data, obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.012 and 0.031, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy of the studied binary mixtures were calculated from the parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model of Archer.

  16. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2005-01-01

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO 3 + CH 3 OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic φ and activity coefficients γ; and activity of solvent a s have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  17. Ammonium ion interaction with conditioned natural zeolite with silver and its effect on the disinfection of polluted water in front of a consortium of gram (+) and gram (-) microorganisms; Interaccion del ion amonio con zeolita natural acondicionada con plata y su efecto sobre la desinfeccion de agua contaminada frente a un consorcio de microorganismos gram (+) y gram (-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga G, V. E.

    2013-07-01

    Clinoptilolite zeolite material is a relative abundance in Mexico, which has ion exchange properties, therefore, has the ability to retain metal ions giving it an application in the process of disinfecting of water contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. In this research, we conducted a study of disinfection of water contaminated with a microbial consortium, from a zeolite rock clinoptilolite from a deposit located in the State of Guerrero. Initially, the zeolite prepared by the grinding and sieving, for conditioning with NaCl and subsequently with AgNO{sub 3}, finally to be characterized using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Tests using columns packed with zeolite material, the effect of zeolite bactericidal conditioned with silver (ZGAg) against a microbial consortium consisting of Escherichia coli and Sthapyloccocus aureus in aqueous solution in the presence of ammonium ions used to increase the ion exchange with zeolite fitted with silver. To describe curves disinfecting a continuous flow system is adapted Gu pta model, which describes the kinetics and equilibrium adsorption process, considering the microorganisms as the adsorbate and the sanitizing agent (conditioned with silver zeolite) as the adsorbent. Characterization results show that in the scanning electron microscopy (Sem), no changes were obtained on the morphology of typical clinoptilolite crystals before and after that was modified with sodium and then with silver, it is worth mentioning however that fitted with silver zeolite (ZGAg), small particles are seen on the zeolite material which when analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), we found a high concentration of Ag +. The disinfection period is increased as the concentration increased ammonium ions, this behavior is attributed to the ion exchange that occurs between the ammonium ions and silver ions. A lower percentage of inactivation is due, therefore, to a lesser amount of money available to

  18. Deterministic models for energy-loss straggling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.; Gleicher, F.; Dunham, G.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Inelastic ion interactions with target electrons are dominated by extremely small energy transfers that are difficult to resolve numerically. The continuous-slowing-down (CSD) approximation is then commonly employed, which, however, only preserves the mean energy loss per collision through the stopping power, S(E) = ∫ 0 ∞ dEprime (E minus Eprime) σ s (E → Eprime). To accommodate energy loss straggling, a Gaussian distribution with the correct mean-squared energy loss (akin to a Fokker-Planck approximation in energy) is commonly used in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes. Although this model has the unphysical feature that ions can be upscattered, it nevertheless yields accurate results. A multigroup model for energy loss straggling was recently presented for use in multigroup Monte Carlo codes or in deterministic codes that use multigroup data. The method has the advantage that the mean and mean-squared energy loss are preserved without unphysical upscatter and hence is computationally efficient. Results for energy spectra compared extremely well with Gaussian distributions under the idealized conditions for which the Gaussian may be considered to be exact. Here, the authors present more consistent comparisons by extending the method to accommodate upscatter and, further, compare both methods with exact solutions obtained from an analog Monte Carlo simulation, for a straight-ahead transport problem

  19. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alan R.; May, Sylvio

    2014-03-01

    Ionic mixtures, such as electrolyte and polyelectrolyte solutions, have attracted much attention recently for their rich and challenging combination of electrostatic and non-electrostatic interparticle forces and their practical importance, from battery technologies to biological systems. Hydration of ions in aqueous solutions is known to entail ion-specific effects, including variable solubility of organic molecules, as manifested in the classic Hofmeister series for salting-in and salting-out of proteins. The physical mechanism by which the solvent (water) mediates effective interactions between ions, however, is still poorly understood. Starting from a microscopic model of a polyelectrolyte solution, we apply a perturbation theory to derive a coarse-grained model of ions interacting through both long-range electrostatic and short-range solvent-induced pair potentials. Taking these effective interactions as input to molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous ionic solutions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  20. Determination and modeling for the solubility of Na_2WO_4·2H_2O and Na_2MoO_4·2H_2O in the (Na"+ + MoO_4"2"− + WO_4"2"− + SO_4"2"− + H_2O) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Pengge; Xu, Weifeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of Na_2MoO_4·2H_2O and Na_2WO_4·2H_2O in Na_2MoO_4–Na_2WO_4–Na_2SO_4–H_2O were performed. • The solubility of sodium tungstate dihydrate in Na_2WO_4–Na_2SO_4–H_2O was determined. • The new model was established via regressing the published and the determined data. • The Pitzer parameter and the solubility product constant of the salt in solution were calculated. • The model was used to estimate the solubility of the sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate. - Abstract: The solubility of sodium tungstate dihydrate and sodium molybdate dihydrate in the (Na_2MoO_4 + Na_2WO_4 + Na_2SO_4 + H_2O) system was studied using experimental and calculated methods. The osmotic coefficient of sodium tungstate was fitted to calculate the thermodynamics parameters of (Na_2WO_4 + H_2O) system. The solubility of sodium tungstate dihydrate was determined using the dynamic method in Na_2WO_4–Na_2SO_4–H_2O to establish the new model which can provide an estimate the solubility of sodium tungstate dihydrate in various conditions, combined with the data published, the solubility of sodium tungstate dihydrate and the sodium molybdate dihydrate in quaternary system of (Na_2MoO_4 + Na_2WO_4 + Na_2SO_4 + H_2O) was estimated using the parameters of the two ternary systems of (Na_2WO_4 + Na_2SO_4 + H_2O) and (Na_2MoO_4 + Na_2SO_4 + H_2O). The results show that the AARD is always small and the calculated value is basically consistent with the experimental values for the system studied.

  1. Modeling of Mid-IR Amplifier Based on an Erbium-Doped Chalcogenide Microsphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical amplifier based on a tapered fiber and an Er3+-doped chalcogenide microsphere is designed and optimized. A dedicated 3D numerical model, which exploits the coupled mode theory and the rate equations, is used. The main transitions among the erbium energy levels, the amplified spontaneous emission, and the most important secondary transitions pertaining to the ion-ion interactions have been considered. Both the pump and signal beams are efficiently injected and obtained by a suitable design of the taper angle and the fiber-microsphere gap. Moreover, a good overlapping between the optical signals and the rare-earth-doped region is also obtained. In order to evaluate the amplifier performance in reduced computational time, the doped area is partitioned in sectors. The obtained simulation results highlight that a high-efficiency midinfrared amplification can be obtained by using a quite small microsphere.

  2. Thermal stability and modeling of lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botte, Gerardine Gabriela

    2000-10-01

    First-principles mathematical models were developed to examine the effect of the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles on the performance of a lithium foil cell. Two different models were developed: the chemical potential model (CPM) that includes the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles and the diffusion model (DIM) that does not include the interactions. Significant differences in the thermal and electrochemical performance of the cell were observed between the two approaches. The temperature of the cell predicted by the DFM is higher than the one predicted by the CPM at a given capacity. The discharge time of the cell predicted by the DFM is shorter than the one predicted by the CPM. The results indicate that the cell needs to be modeled using the CPM approach especially at high discharge rates. An evaluation of the numerical techniques, control volume formulation (CVF) and finite difference method (FDM), used for the models was performed. It is shown that the truncation error is the same for both methods when the boundary conditions are of the Dirichlet type, the system of equations are linear and represented in Cartesian coordinates. A new technique to analyze the accuracy of the methods is presented. The only disadvantage of the FDM is that it failed to conserve mass for a small number of nodes when both boundary conditions include a derivative term whereas the CVF did conserve mass for these cases. However, for a large number of nodes the FDM provides mass conservation. It is important to note that the CVF has only (DeltaX) order of accuracy for a Neumann type boundary condition whereas the FDM has (DeltaX) 2 order. The second topic of this dissertation presents a study of the thermal stability of LiPF6 EC:EMC electrolyte for lithium ion batteries. A differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to perform the study of the electrolyte. For first time, the effect of different variables on its thermal stability

  3. Densities and apparent molar volumes of HClO{sub 4}(aq) and Yb(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq) at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakin, Andrew W. E-mail: hakin@uleth.ca; Lukacs, Michael J.; Jin Lianliu

    2004-09-01

    Relative densities have been measured for acidified aqueous solutions of ytterbium perchlorate {l_brace}Yb(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}{r_brace} at approximately T=(348.15, 373.15, 398.15, and 423.15) K and p=(10.0, 20.0, and 30.0) MPa over the concentration range 0.01624{<=}m{sub 2}/(mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) {<=} 0.2531 using an optically coupled vibrating tube densimeter (OCVTD). Experimental apparent molar volumes have been calculated from the density measurements, and apparent molar volumes for the aqueous perchlorate salt have been calculated using Young's rule. The application of Young's rule requires apparent molar volumes for aqueous perchloric acid (HClO{sub 4}) solutions over extended temperature and pressure ranges. These values were calculated from densities for aqueous HClO{sub 4} solutions that were measured using the OCVTD at the same temperatures and pressures as those used to investigate the density surface of the acidified aqueous Yb(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3} solutions. The temperature, pressure, and composition surfaces of the apparent molar volumes for Yb(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}(aq) and HClO{sub 4}(aq) have been modelled using Pitzer ion-interaction equations. Apparent molar volumes at infinite dilution obtained from these models have been compared to those which can be calculated using the semi-empirical Helgeson, Kirkham, and Flowers equations of state. Values for the apparent molar volume at infinite dilution of the ytterbium trivalent cation have also been calculated using simple additivity principles.

  4. Vapor pressures and isopiestic molalities of concentrated CaCl{sub 2}(aq), CaBr{sub 2}(aq), and NaCl(aq) to T = 523 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500S MS-6110, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 (United States)]. E-mail: gruszkiewicz@ornl.gov; Simonson, John M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500S MS-6110, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 (United States)]. E-mail: simonsonjm@ornl.gov

    2005-09-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory high-temperature isopiestic apparatus was outfitted with precise pressure gauges to allow for direct vapor pressure measurements. Vapor pressures over concentrated solutions of CaCl{sub 2}(aq), and CaBr{sub 2}(aq) were measured at temperatures between (380.15 and 523.15) K in the range of water activities between 0.2 and 0.85. Isopiestic molalities were used to determine osmotic coefficients at the conditions where NaCl reference standard solutions remained undersaturated. The main goal of this work was to improve the accuracy of isopiestic comparisons based on the calcium chloride reference standard. Osmotic coefficients for CaCl{sub 2}(aq) and CaBr{sub 2}(aq) calculated from both isopiestic and direct vapor pressure results were combined with the literature data and used to build general thermodynamic models based on a variant of extended Pitzer ion-interaction equations and valid at the saturation pressure of water. While these empirical models approach the accuracy of the experimental data in a wider range of concentrations and temperatures than any previously published equations, considerable amounts of accurate data and a substantial effort are required in order to obtain a satisfactory representation using power series-based virial equations. The effect of experimental uncertainties on the accuracy of the direct vapor pressure results is discussed, including in particular the error caused by the presence in the apparatus of a small amount of CO{sub 2}. The substantial decrease of the solubility product of CaCO{sub 3} in concentrated chloride solutions at temperatures above 423 K is a serious defect of calcium chloride as a water activity reference standard.

  5. Vapor pressures and isopiestic molalities of concentrated CaCl2(aq), CaBr2(aq), and NaCl(aq) to T = 523 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Simonson, John M.

    2005-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory high-temperature isopiestic apparatus was outfitted with precise pressure gauges to allow for direct vapor pressure measurements. Vapor pressures over concentrated solutions of CaCl 2 (aq), and CaBr 2 (aq) were measured at temperatures between (380.15 and 523.15) K in the range of water activities between 0.2 and 0.85. Isopiestic molalities were used to determine osmotic coefficients at the conditions where NaCl reference standard solutions remained undersaturated. The main goal of this work was to improve the accuracy of isopiestic comparisons based on the calcium chloride reference standard. Osmotic coefficients for CaCl 2 (aq) and CaBr 2 (aq) calculated from both isopiestic and direct vapor pressure results were combined with the literature data and used to build general thermodynamic models based on a variant of extended Pitzer ion-interaction equations and valid at the saturation pressure of water. While these empirical models approach the accuracy of the experimental data in a wider range of concentrations and temperatures than any previously published equations, considerable amounts of accurate data and a substantial effort are required in order to obtain a satisfactory representation using power series-based virial equations. The effect of experimental uncertainties on the accuracy of the direct vapor pressure results is discussed, including in particular the error caused by the presence in the apparatus of a small amount of CO 2 . The substantial decrease of the solubility product of CaCO 3 in concentrated chloride solutions at temperatures above 423 K is a serious defect of calcium chloride as a water activity reference standard

  6. Electrochemical and visco metric studies on some copolymer/ homopolymer poly electrolytes and transition metal ion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabi, F. H.; Frahani, B. V.

    2003-01-01

    Some random three-component copolymers have been prepared by condensing of formaldehyde with various aromatic amines. The compositions of the copolymers have been determined by known methods. selective complexation of copolymers have been carried out with PAA, PEI, PVP and some transition metal ions (e.g., Cu 2+ )by adding the components in various sequences. The relative complexation ability of different -NH 2 groups, associated with the various comonomer units, has been interpreted in terms of the these complexes has been studied by conductometry. potentiometry and viscometry techniques. A scheme has presented to explain the mode of interaction of the various components

  7. Metal-ion interactions and the structural organization of Sepia eumelanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Simon, John D

    2005-02-01

    The structural organization of melanin granules isolated from ink sacs of Sepia officinalis was examined as a function of metal ion content by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Exposing Sepia melanin granules to ethelenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution or to metal salt solutions changed the metal content in the melanin, but did not alter granular morphology. Thus ionic forces between the organic components and metal ions in melanin are not required to sustain the natural morphology once the granule is assembled. However, when aqueous suspensions of Sepia melanin granules of varying metal content are ultra-sonicated, EDTA-washed and Fe-saturated melanin samples lose material to the solution more readily than the corresponding Ca(II) and Mg(II)-loaded samples. The solubilized components are found to be 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA)-rich constituents. Associated with different metal ions, Na(I), Ca(II) and Mg(II) or Fe(III), these DHICA-rich entities form distinct two-dimensional aggregation structures when dried on the flat surface of mica. The data suggest multiply-charged ions play an important role in assisting or templating the assembly of the metal-free organic components to form the three-dimensional substructure distributed along the protein scaffold within the granule.

  8. Investigation of lanthanum- and neodymium ion interaction with potassium polyphosphate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhova, Zh.A.; Tananaev, I.V.; Koval', E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made on the interaction in the LaCl 3 -KPO 3 -H 2 O and NdCl 3 -KPO 3 -H 2 O systems at 0 deg C by methods of solubility of residual concentrations and measurement of the pH value. The formation of binary KLa 2 (PO 3 ) 7 x10H 2 O and KLa(PO 3 ) 4 X5H 2 O lanthanum- and potassium polyphosphates, as well as KNd 2 (PO 3 ) 7 X10H 2 O and KNd(PO 3 ) 4 X5H 2 O neodymium- apd potassiUm polyphasphates was established. Chemical, paper-chromatographic, infrared spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analyses of the prepared compoUnds were conducted. Anhydrous binary lanthanum- and neodymium polyphosphates with potassium-=Kla(PO 3 ) 4 , KNd(PO 3 ) 4 , KLa 2 (PO 3 ) 7 and KNd 2 x(PO 3 ) 7 - eere prepared

  9. Study of relativistic heavy-ion interactions and antiproton annihilation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, D.; Roy, J.; Sengupta, R.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of 12 C-AgBr interaction at 4.5-GeV · c -1 · nucleon -1 incident momentum are studied by means of the photoemulsion technique, to search for shock-wave phenomena. The angular distributions indicate an anisotropic process in the nuclear matter. The results are compared with the antiproton -AgBr reaction observations of Breivik et al. (1983) at 1.4 GeV · c -1

  10. A MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY ON SLOW ION INTERACTIONS WITH THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MOLECULE ANTHRACENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Atomic collisions with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are astrophysically particularly relevant for collision energies of less than 1 keV. In this regime, the interaction dynamics are dominated by elastic interactions. We have employed a molecular dynamics simulation based on

  11. Silicon ion interactions measured in the E-810 TPC at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, W.A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Roberts, J.B.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The tracking detector of AGS Experiment 810 is a three-piece Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which measures all charged tracks in the forward hemisphere of the nucleon-nucleon center of mass system, i.e. forward of 20 degrees in the lab. A cut at multiplicity 50 was used to select more central collisions, yielding 2291 events from the gold sample, 2170 from the copper. This corresponds to cross sections of 0.59 and 0.20 barns, respectively, defining the 'central' sample for the charged particle distributions presented here. (orig./HSI)

  12. A photochemical study of uranyl ion interaction with the Triton X-100 micellar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Ganguly, B.N.

    1996-01-01

    This is a report on the spectroscopic characteristics of UO 2 2+ in the excited state in Triton X-100 micellar medium. It also indicates some important results of viscosity and surface tension measurements of the system which have direct relevance to the spectroscopic investigation in the excited state. The quenching of the UO 2 2+ fluorescence due to Triton X-100, upon micellization in the aqueous medium, reveals two kinds of microenvironments of the fluorophore from the Stern-Volmer plot. This has been verified by flash photolytic measurements. A blue shift of the quenched emission spectrum is ascribed to the collisional encounter of UO 2 1 + with the head groups of Triton X-100

  13. Structural dynamics of PAH molecules upon energetic photon or ion interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclische aromatische koolwaterstoffen (PAHs) vormen een hele bijzondere familie van moleculen. PAHs bestaan uit ringen van koolstofatomen en hebben waterstofatomen op de randen. Zo ontstaan platte en heel erg stabiele moleculen. Deze moleculen komen overal voor, bijvoorbeeld in uitlaatgassen en

  14. Electron ion interactions in crystal channels: Collisions in ultra-dense electron media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Krause, H.F.; Rosseel, T.M.; Vane, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Dielectronic excitation of H-like S, Ca and Ti is shown to occur in the dense electron gas of a crystal channel. Cross sections for collisional ionization of the short lived excited states can then be determined. Ionic excitation can also be achieved by resonant coherent excitation in which case specific m states can be excited for further study. 12 refs., 8 figs

  15. Specific potassium ion interactions facilitate homocysteine binding to betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mládková, Jana; Hladílková, Jana; Diamond, C. E.; Tryon, K.; Yamada, K.; Garrow, T. A.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Koutmos, M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 10 (2014), s. 2552-2564 ISSN 0887-3585 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/1277; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : BHMT * homocysteine * potassium * crystal structure * molecular dynamics * simulations * enzyme kinetics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.627, year: 2014

  16. Calculation of ion storage in electron beams with account of ion-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Shirkov, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Ion storage in relativistic electron beams was calculated taking account of ion-ion charge exchange and ionization. The calculations were made for nitrogen ion storage from residual gas during the compression of electron rings in the adhezator of the JINR heavy ion accelerator. The calculations were made for rings of various parameters and for various pressures of the residual gas. The results are compared with analogous calculations made without account of ion-ion processes. It is shown that at heavy loading of a ring by ions ion-ion collisions play a significant part, and they should be taken into account while calculating ion storage

  17. Fluorescent derivatives of nucleotides. Metal ion interactions and pH dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkooi, J M; Weiss, C J; Woodrow, G V

    1979-02-01

    The fluorescence parameters of ethenoadenosine derivatives are influenced by metal cations and pH, as summarized here. The pH profile of ethenoadenosine determined by fluorescence intensity gives a normal titration curve and is not affected by ionic strength. In contrast, the pH titration curves of etheno-ATP, etheno ADP, and etheno AMP depend upon ionic strength. At high ionic strength normal curves are obtained, whereas at low ionic strength anomalies are obtained; this suggests that the phosphates can interact with the ring, possibly by hydrogen binding to the ring nitrogens. The room temperature fluorescence of ethenoadenosine occurs from the base form, although excitation of either the acid or base forms can contribute to the emission. This result can be explained if the excited state pK is lower than the ground state pK, and if deprotonation occurs within the time scale of the excited state. At low pH values the fluorescence lifetime of the base form is dependent upon the buffer concentration, indicating that the reverse reaction, protonation, occurs. The affinity constants for the binding of metals to the ethenoadenosine phosphates resemble those for the corresponding adenosine phosphates. Ni(II) and Co(II) are more effective than Mn(II) in quenching the fluorescence of ethenoadenosine phosphates; this result is predicted by Förster's theory for energy transfer based upon the overlap between donor emission spectrum and acceptor absorption spectrum. The diamagnetic ions Mg(II), Ca(II), and Zn(II) do not appear to affect the fluorescence of the ethenoadenosine phosphates directly, but rather to affect the conformation of the molecule, thereby affecting the quantum yield.

  18. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment.

  19. Copper(II) ions interactions in the systems with triamines and ATP. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R; Gasowska, A; Zalewska, A; Lomozik, L

    2017-12-01

    The mode of interaction and thermodynamic stability of complexes formed in binary and ternary Cu(II)/ATP/triamines systems were studied using potentiometric and spectroscopic (NMR, EPR, UV-Vis) methods. It was found that in binary metal-free systems ATP/H x PA species are formed (PA: Spd=spermidine or 3,3-tri=1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane) where the phosphate groups from nucleotides are preferred negative centers and protonated amine groups of amines are positive centers of reaction. In the ternary systems Cu/ATP/H x (PA) as well as Cu/(ATP)(PA) species are formed. The type of the formed Cu(II) complexes depends on pH of the solution. For a low pH value the complexation appears between Cu(II) and ATP molecules via oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. For a very high pH value, where ATP is hydrolyzed, the Cu(II) ions are bound to the nitrogen atoms of polyamine molecules. We did not detect any direct coordination of the N7 nitrogen atom of adenosine to Cu(II) ions. It means that the CuN7 interaction is an indirect type and can be due to noncovalent interplay including water molecule. EPR studies were performed at glassy state (77K) after a fast freezing both for binary and ternary systems. The glassy state EPR spectra do not reflect species identified in titration studies indicating significant effect of rapid temperature decrease on equilibrium of Cu(II) complexes. We propose the molecular structure of all the studied complexes at the glassy state deduced from EPR and optical spectroscopy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NMR and spectroscopic studies on uranyl ion interaction with aspartic acid and asparagine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, H.; Kozlowski, H.

    1980-01-01

    The carboxyl groups of peptides or proteins are quite effective in the binding of UO 2 +2 ion and as the first step in studies in that field aspartic acid has been chosen as the bi-carboxylic ligand. The data for UO 2 +2 -asparagine system are also presented in this communication as they complete the results obtained for the UO 2 +2 -aspartic acid system. (author)

  1. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments

  2. Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of Pr(NO3)3(aq), Gd(NO3)3(aq), Ho(NO3)3(aq), and Y(NO3)3(aq) at T (288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakin, Andrew W.; Liu Jinlian; Erickson, Kristy; Munoz, Julie-Vanessa; Rard, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities have been measured for acidified solutions of Y(NO 3 ) 3 (aq), Pr(NO 3 ) 3 (aq), and Gd(NO 3 ) 3 (aq) at T = (288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa. In addition, relative densities and massic heat capacities have been measured at the same temperatures and pressure for Y(NO 3 ) 3 (aq) and Ho(NO 3 ) 3 (aq) solutions without excess acid (n.b. measurements at T = 328.15 K for Ho(NO 3 ) 3 (aq) were not performed due to the limited volume of solution available). Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities for the aqueous salt solutions have been calculated from the experimental apparent molar properties of the acidified solutions using Young's rule, whereas the apparent molar properties of the solutions without excess acid were calculated directly from the measured densities and massic heat capacities. The two sets of data for the Y(NO 3 ) 3 (aq) systems provide a check of the internal consistency of the Young's rule approach we have utilised. The concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of the aqueous salt solutions have been modelled at each investigated temperature using the Pitzer ion interaction equations to yield apparent molar properties at infinite dilution. Complex formation within the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems is discussed qualitatively by probing the concentration dependence of apparent molar volumes and heat capacities. In spite of the complex formation in the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems, there is a high degree of self-consistency between the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution reported in this manuscript and those previously reported for aqueous rare earth perchlorates

  3. Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), and Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) at T (288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakin, Andrew W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada)]. E-mail: hakin@uleth.ca; Liu Jinlian [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Erickson, Kristy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Munoz, Julie-Vanessa [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Rard, Joseph A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities have been measured for acidified solutions of Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), and Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) at T = (288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa. In addition, relative densities and massic heat capacities have been measured at the same temperatures and pressure for Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) and Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) solutions without excess acid (n.b. measurements at T = 328.15 K for Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) were not performed due to the limited volume of solution available). Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities for the aqueous salt solutions have been calculated from the experimental apparent molar properties of the acidified solutions using Young's rule, whereas the apparent molar properties of the solutions without excess acid were calculated directly from the measured densities and massic heat capacities. The two sets of data for the Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) systems provide a check of the internal consistency of the Young's rule approach we have utilised. The concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of the aqueous salt solutions have been modelled at each investigated temperature using the Pitzer ion interaction equations to yield apparent molar properties at infinite dilution. Complex formation within the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems is discussed qualitatively by probing the concentration dependence of apparent molar volumes and heat capacities. In spite of the complex formation in the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems, there is a high degree of self-consistency between the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution reported in this manuscript and those previously reported for aqueous rare earth perchlorates.

  4. Isopiestic Investigation of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of {yMgCl2 + (1 - y)MgSO4}(aq) and the Osmotic Coefficients of Na2SO4.MgSO4(aq) at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miladinovic, J; Ninkovic, R; Todorovic, M; Rard, J A

    2007-06-06

    Isopiestic vapor pressure measurements were made for {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions with MgCl{sub 2} ionic strength fractions of y = 0, 0.1997, 0.3989, 0.5992, 0.8008, and (1) at the temperature 298.15 K, using KCl(aq) as the reference standard. These measurements for the mixtures cover the ionic strength range I = 0.9794 to 9.4318 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. In addition, isopiestic measurements were made with NaCl(aq) as reference standard for mixtures of {l_brace}xNa{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1-x)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) with the molality fraction x = 0.50000 that correspond to solutions of the evaporite mineral bloedite (astrakanite), Na{sub 2}Mg(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O(cr). The total molalities, m{sub T} = m(Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + m(MgSO{sub 4}), range from m{sub T} = 1.4479 to 4.4312 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} (I = 5.0677 to 15.509 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}), where the uppermost concentration is the highest oversaturation molality that could be achieved by isothermal evaporation of the solvent at 298.15 K. The parameters of an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model for MgCl2(aq) at 298.15 K, which were required for an analysis of the {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) mixture results, were evaluated up to I = 12.025 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} from published isopiestic data together with the six new osmotic coefficients obtained in this study. Osmotic coefficients of {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions from the present study, along with critically-assessed values from previous studies, were used to evaluate the mixing parameters of the extended ion-interaction model.

  5. Rapidity distributions of hadrons in the HydHSD hybrid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S., E-mail: hvorost@theor.jinr.ru; Toneev, V. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    A multistage hybrid model intended for describing heavy-ion interactions in the energy region of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna is proposed. The model combines the initial, fast, interaction stage described by the model of hadron string dynamics (HSD) and the subsequent evolution that the expanding system formed at the first stage experiences at the second stage and which one treats on the basis of ideal hydrodynamics; after the completion of the second stage, the particles involved may still undergo rescattering (third interaction stage). The model admits three freeze-out scenarios: isochronous, isothermal, and isoenergetic. Generally, the HydHSD hybrid model developed in the present study provides fairly good agreement with available experimental data on proton rapidity spectra. It is shown that, within this hybrid model, the two-humped structure of proton rapidity distributions can be obtained either by increasing the freeze-out temperature and energy density or by more lately going over to the hydrodynamic stage. Although the proposed hybrid model reproduces rapidity spectra of protons, it is unable to describe rapidity distributions of pions, systematically underestimating their yield. It is necessary to refine the model by including viscosity effects at the hydrodynamic stage of evolution of the system and by considering in more detail the third interaction stage.

  6. Excess Volumes of Mixing of Cl– and Br– with Na+ and K+ at 308.15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    cross square rule (CSR). The deviation from the CSR increased with increasing ionic strength and is considered to arise from the appreciable contribution of triplet interactions and preferential solvation of the ions and ion-clusters in the mixed solvent system. KEYWORDS. Excess volumes of mixing, Friedman model, Pitzer ...

  7. Modelling reactive material transport in the near field of a repository for radioactive waste. Coupling the EMOS near field modules CLAYPOS and LOPOS with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moog, H.C.; Keesmann, S.M.

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports on the project ''Coupling transport models with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations'' - short title EQLINK, promotion code number 02 E 9723 - in the which the scope for coupling thermodynamic equilibrium model calculations with EMOS was expanded and improved. The first step was to inquire into the current state of research on radiolytic processes. It transpired that there is currently no conclusive description of radiolytic processes. The existing descriptions are too complex and too narrowly geared to specific scenarios to allow a general view on radiolytic processes, which would be a prerequisite for creating suitable long-term geochemical safety analysis modules. It appears that the approximation calculations implemented in EMOS tend to overestimate rather than underestimate radiolytic gas formation. The thermodynamic database which is used at GRS (Society for Plant and Reactor Safety) as a basis for coupled transport calculations has been updated. For this purpose the radionuclide database of the Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE = Institute for Nuclear Disposal) was converted to an in-house format which permits creating parameter files for specific requirements. The data of the INE comprise thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants, Gibbs free enthalpies of formation, enthalpies and entropies of formation and Pitzer parameters, which are required for model calculations on high-saline solutions. The database for low-saline solutions which had been developed by PSI/NAGRA for calculations with CLAYPOS was also adopted. Both parameter sets were subjected to test calculations to detect any errors that might have occurred during the data transfer. It is thus now possible to perform coupled transport calculations with the EMOS modules LOPOS and CLAYPOS according to the state of the art of geochemical research. The EQLINK interface which had been developed in an earlier project, titled ''Development of a model for describing the

  8. Thermodynamic studies of (RbF + RbCl + H2O) and (CsF + CsCl + H2O) ternary systems from potentiometric measurements at T = 298.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaoting; Li, Shu’ni; Zhai, Quanguo; Jiang, Yucheng; Hu, Mancheng

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties, such as mean activity coefficients, osmotic coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies, of the RbF + RbCl + H 2 O and CsF + CsCl + H 2 O ternary systems were determined from potentiometric measurement at 298.2 K. The Pitzer model and the Harned rule were used to fit the experimental data. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic properties of RbF + RbCl + H 2 O and CsF + CsCl + H 2 O ternary systems were determined. • The Pitzer model and the Harned rule were used to correlate the experimental data. • The mean activity coefficients, osmotic coefficients, and the excess Gibbs free energy were also obtained. - Abstract: Thermodynamic properties of (RbF + RbCl + H 2 O) and (CsF + CsCl + H 2 O) systems were determined by the potentiometric method for different ionic strength fractions y B of RbCl/CsCl at 298.2 K. The Pitzer model and the Harned rule were used to fit the experimental values. The Pitzer mixing parameters and the Harned coefficients were evaluated. In addition, the mean ionic activity coefficients of RbF/CsF and RbCl/CsCl, the osmotic coefficients, and the excess Gibbs energies of the systems studied were calculated.

  9. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zuend

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl, Br, NO3, HSO4, and SO42−. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization

  10. Poisson-Boltzmann-Nernst-Planck model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qiong; Wei Guowei

    2011-01-01

    The Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model is based on a mean-field approximation of ion interactions and continuum descriptions of concentration and electrostatic potential. It provides qualitative explanation and increasingly quantitative predictions of experimental measurements for the ion transport problems in many areas such as semiconductor devices, nanofluidic systems, and biological systems, despite many limitations. While the PNP model gives a good prediction of the ion transport phenomenon for chemical, physical, and biological systems, the number of equations to be solved and the number of diffusion coefficient profiles to be determined for the calculation directly depend on the number of ion species in the system, since each ion species corresponds to one Nernst-Planck equation and one position-dependent diffusion coefficient profile. In a complex system with multiple ion species, the PNP can be computationally expensive and parameter demanding, as experimental measurements of diffusion coefficient profiles are generally quite limited for most confined regions such as ion channels, nanostructures and nanopores. We propose an alternative model to reduce number of Nernst-Planck equations to be solved in complex chemical and biological systems with multiple ion species by substituting Nernst-Planck equations with Boltzmann distributions of ion concentrations. As such, we solve the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann and Nernst-Planck (PBNP) equations, instead of the PNP equations. The proposed PBNP equations are derived from a total energy functional by using the variational principle. We design a number of computational techniques, including the Dirichlet to Neumann mapping, the matched interface and boundary, and relaxation based iterative procedure, to ensure efficient solution of the proposed PBNP equations. Two protein molecules, cytochrome c551 and Gramicidin A, are employed to validate the proposed model under a wide range of bulk ion concentrations and external

  11. Poisson–Boltzmann–Nernst–Planck model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The Poisson–Nernst–Planck (PNP) model is based on a mean-field approximation of ion interactions and continuum descriptions of concentration and electrostatic potential. It provides qualitative explanation and increasingly quantitative predictions of experimental measurements for the ion transport problems in many areas such as semiconductor devices, nanofluidic systems, and biological systems, despite many limitations. While the PNP model gives a good prediction of the ion transport phenomenon for chemical, physical, and biological systems, the number of equations to be solved and the number of diffusion coefficient profiles to be determined for the calculation directly depend on the number of ion species in the system, since each ion species corresponds to one Nernst–Planck equation and one position-dependent diffusion coefficient profile. In a complex system with multiple ion species, the PNP can be computationally expensive and parameter demanding, as experimental measurements of diffusion coefficient profiles are generally quite limited for most confined regions such as ion channels, nanostructures and nanopores. We propose an alternative model to reduce number of Nernst–Planck equations to be solved in complex chemical and biological systems with multiple ion species by substituting Nernst–Planck equations with Boltzmann distributions of ion concentrations. As such, we solve the coupled Poisson–Boltzmann and Nernst–Planck (PBNP) equations, instead of the PNP equations. The proposed PBNP equations are derived from a total energy functional by using the variational principle. We design a number of computational techniques, including the Dirichlet to Neumann mapping, the matched interface and boundary, and relaxation based iterative procedure, to ensure efficient solution of the proposed PBNP equations. Two protein molecules, cytochrome c551 and Gramicidin A, are employed to validate the proposed model under a wide range of bulk ion concentrations

  12. Poisson-Boltzmann-Nernst-Planck model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-05-21

    The Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model is based on a mean-field approximation of ion interactions and continuum descriptions of concentration and electrostatic potential. It provides qualitative explanation and increasingly quantitative predictions of experimental measurements for the ion transport problems in many areas such as semiconductor devices, nanofluidic systems, and biological systems, despite many limitations. While the PNP model gives a good prediction of the ion transport phenomenon for chemical, physical, and biological systems, the number of equations to be solved and the number of diffusion coefficient profiles to be determined for the calculation directly depend on the number of ion species in the system, since each ion species corresponds to one Nernst-Planck equation and one position-dependent diffusion coefficient profile. In a complex system with multiple ion species, the PNP can be computationally expensive and parameter demanding, as experimental measurements of diffusion coefficient profiles are generally quite limited for most confined regions such as ion channels, nanostructures and nanopores. We propose an alternative model to reduce number of Nernst-Planck equations to be solved in complex chemical and biological systems with multiple ion species by substituting Nernst-Planck equations with Boltzmann distributions of ion concentrations. As such, we solve the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann and Nernst-Planck (PBNP) equations, instead of the PNP equations. The proposed PBNP equations are derived from a total energy functional by using the variational principle. We design a number of computational techniques, including the Dirichlet to Neumann mapping, the matched interface and boundary, and relaxation based iterative procedure, to ensure efficient solution of the proposed PBNP equations. Two protein molecules, cytochrome c551 and Gramicidin A, are employed to validate the proposed model under a wide range of bulk ion concentrations and external

  13. Radial Flow in a Multiphase Transport Model at FAIR Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Sarkar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Azimuthal distributions of radial velocities of charged hadrons produced in nucleus-nucleus (AB collisions are compared with the corresponding azimuthal distribution of charged hadron multiplicity in the framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT model at two different collision energies. The mean radial velocity seems to be a good probe for studying radial expansion. While the anisotropic parts of the distributions indicate a kind of collective nature in the radial expansion of the intermediate “fireball,” their isotropic parts characterize a thermal motion. The present investigation is carried out keeping the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment to be held at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR in mind. As far as high-energy heavy-ion interactions are concerned, CBM will supplement the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC and Large Hadron Collider (LHC experiments. In this context our simulation results at high baryochemical potential would be interesting, when scrutinized from the perspective of an almost baryon-free environment achieved at RHIC and LHC.

  14. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Sik Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst–Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  15. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Sik [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst-Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  16. Protein structure analysis using the resonant recognition model and wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Q.; Cosic, I.

    1998-01-01

    An approach based on the resonant recognition model and the discrete wavelet transform is introduced here for characterising proteins' biological function. The protein sequence is converted into a numerical series by assigning the electron-ion interaction potential to each amino acid from N-terminal to C-terminal. A set of peaks is found after performing a wavelet transform onto a numerical series representing a group of homologous proteins. These peaks are related to protein structural and functional properties and named characteristic vector of that protein group. Further more, the amino acids contributing mostly to a protein's biological functions, the so-called 'hot spots' amino acids, are predicted by the continuous wavelet transform. It is found that the hot spots are clustered around the protein's cleft structure. The wavelets approach provides a novel methods for amino acid sequence analysis as well as an expansion for the newly established macromolecular interaction model: the resonant recognition model. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  17. OSMOTIC COEFFICIENTS, SOLUBILITIES, AND DELIQUESCENCE RELATIONS IN MIXED AQUEOUS SALT SOLUTIONS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.S. Gruszkiewicz; D.A. Palmer

    2006-01-01

    -pressure measurements were also made at elevated temperatures. The project included multicomponent mixtures useful for verification of models, and a set of binary solutions with common ions (such as KNO 3 + NaNO 3 , KNO 3 + Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , NaNO 3 + Na 2 SO 4 , and KNO 3 + K 2 SO 4 ) needed for determination of the mixing parameters in the Pitzer ion-interaction model for mixtures. The results are compared with existing experimental results and model predictions

  18. Prediction of mineral scale formation in wet gas condensate pipelines and in MEG (mono ethylene glycol) regeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandengen, Kristian

    2006-12-20

    Gas hydrate formation is a serious problem in the oil and gas industry, since its formation can plug wells and prevent production. The gas hydrate is a crystalline solid with a natural gas molecule surrounded by a cage of water molecules. It forms at high pressures and low temperatures. This is a problem for offshore gas wells, where the temperature is low in transport lines from well to the production facilities. Mono Ethylene Glycol (MEG) is commonly used as hydrate inhibitor. Classified as a thermodynamic inhibitor, this additive functions just as antifreeze in an automotive radiator. When producing oil and gas there will in most cases also be produced some water, which can contain dissolved salts. These salts may precipitate and they tend to deposit on surfaces. Deposition of inorganic minerals from brine is called scale. Generally MEG has the adverse effect of lowering the solubility of most salts. A common method to prevent corrosion in flow lines is to increase pH by adding basic agents (e.g. NaOH, NaHCO{sub 3}) to the MEG stream. In such cases, carbonate salts are particularly troublesome since an increase in pH by one unit, will reduce the solubility by two orders of magnitude. Thus there will be a trade off between good corrosion protection (high pH) and scale control (low pH). The aim of this work has been to develop a model that can predict mineral solubility in the presence of MEG. Experimental solubility data, together with thermodynamic data taken from literature, have been utilized to construct empirical functions for the influence of MEG on mineral scale formation. These functions enabled the expansion of an already existing aqueous scale model into a model valid for water+MEG mixed solutions. The aqueous scale model combines an equation of state (gas+oil phase) with the Pitzer ion interaction model (water phase) to describe the multiphase behaviour of gas-oil-water systems. This work summarizes the theoretical foundation and proposes how to work

  19. Modelling the coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baechler, S.; Croise, J.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Fine-grained saturated porous materials can act as a semi-permeable osmotic membrane when exposed to a solute concentration gradient. The ions diffusion is hindered while water movement towards higher concentrations takes place in the semi-permeable membrane. The capacity of the fine-grained porous material to act as a semi permeable osmotic membrane is referred to as the osmotic efficiency (its value is 1 when the membranes is ideal, less than 1 when the membrane is leaky, allowing diffusion). The efficiency to retain ions in solution is dependent on the thickness of the diffuse double layer which itself depends on the solution concentration in the membrane. Clay rich formations have been shown to act as non-ideal semi-permeable membrane. Andra is investigating the Callovo-Oxfordian clay as a host rock for intermediate-level to high-level radioactive waste. In this context, it has been feared that osmotic water flows generated by the release of sodium nitrate salt in high concentrations, out of intermediate radioactive bituminous waste, could induce important over-pressures. The latest would eventually lead to fracturing of the host rock around the waste disposal drifts. The purpose of the present study was to develop a simulation code with the capacity to assess the potential impact of osmosis on: the re-saturation of the waste disposal drifts, the pressure evolution and the solute transport in and around a waste disposal drift. A chemo-osmotic coupled flow and transport model was implemented using the FlexPDE-finite element library. Our model is based on the chemo-osmotic formulation developed by Bader and Kooi, 2005. The model has been extended to highly concentrated solutions based on Pitzer's equation. In order to assess the impact of osmotic flow on the re-saturation time, the model was also designed to allow unsaturated flow modelling. The model configuration consists of an initially unsaturated 2D

  20. Coupling R and PHREEQC: an interactive and extensible environment for efficient programming of geochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    PHREEQC [1] is a widely used non-interactive open source software for speciation, batch-reactions, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical caclulations. It represents the tool of choice for many researchers and practicioners for a broad set of geochemical problems, underground CO2 storage among others. Its open source nature, the flexibility to program arbitrary kinetic laws for the chemical reactions, as well as a thorough implementation of the Pitzer formalism explain its success and longevity. However, its non-interactive architecture make it cumbersome to couple PHREEQC to transport programs to achieve reactive transport simulations [2], but also to overcome the limitations of PHREEQC itself regarding the setup of large numbers of simulations - for example exploring wide ranges of conditions - and the graphical evaluation of the results. This has been the main motivation leading to the development of an interface with the high level language and environment for statistical computing and graphics GNU R [3]. The interface consists of minor modifications in PHREEQC's C source code, only affecting data I/O, plus on the R side a bunch of helper functions used to setup the simulations - basically automated manipulation of PHREEQC's input files, which are text files - and to collect and visualize the results. The most relevant subset of PHREEQC's capabilities and features are fully usable through the interface. Illustratory examples for the utility of this programmable interface were given in the framework of the research project this developement originated from: CLEAN [4], a project investigating the feasibility of enhanced gas recovery combined with CO2 storage. This interface allowed us to successfully and easily manipulate, compare and refit chemical databases, perform sensitivity analysis by combinatory variations of parameters, and all that in an environment which is both scriptable and interactive, with all results directly available for further

  1. Osmotic coefficients of aqueous solutions of four ionic liquids at T = (313.15 and 333.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Begona; Calvar, Noelia; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of osmotic coefficients of BmimCl (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride), HmimCl (1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride), MmimMeSO 4 (1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylsulfate), and BmimMeSO 4 (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate) with water at T = (313.15 and 333.15) K are reported in this work. Vapour pressure and activity data of all the studied binary systems are obtained from experimental data. The osmotic coefficients data are correlated using the extended Pitzer model of Archer and the modified NRTL (MNRTL) model and standard deviations obtained with both models are given too. The parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients

  2. Osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures of four ionic liquids with ethanol or water at T = (313.15 and 333.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gonzalez, Begona; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of osmotic coefficients of BmimCl (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) and HmimCl (1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) with ethanol and EmimEtSO 4 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate) and EmpyEtSO 4 (1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate) with water at T = (313.15 and 333.15) K are reported in this work. Vapour pressure and activity results of the studied binary systems are obtained from experimental measurements. The results for the osmotic coefficients are correlated using the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer and the modified NRTL (MNRTL) model. The standard deviations obtained with both models are also given. The parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients

  3. State-selective charge transfer and excitation in ion-ion interactions at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, R; Purkait, M

    2012-01-01

    Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation and Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) methods are applied to calculate the charge transfer and excitation cross sections for ion-ion collisions.

  4. Deconstructing the Effects of Flow on DOC, Nitrate, and Major Ion Interactions Using a High-Frequency Aquatic Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, L. E.; Shattuck, M. D.; Snyder, L. E.; Potter, J. D.; McDowell, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    Streams provide a physical linkage between land and downstream river networks, delivering solutes derived from multiple catchment sources. We analyzed high-frequency time series of stream solutes to characterize the timing and magnitude of major ion, nutrient, and organic matter transport over event, seasonal, and annual timescales as well as to assess whether nitrate (NO3-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport are coupled in catchments, which would be expected if they are subject to similar biogeochemical controls throughout the watershed. Our data set includes in situ observations of NO3-, fluorescent dissolved organic matter (DOC proxy), and specific conductance spanning 2-4 years in 10 streams and rivers across New Hampshire, including observations of nearly 700 individual hydrologic events. We found a positive response of NO3- and DOC to flow in forested streams, but watershed development led to a negative relationship between NO3- and discharge, and thus a decoupling of the overall NO3- and DOC responses to flow. On event and seasonal timescales, NO3- and DOC consistently displayed different behaviors. For example, in several streams, FDOM yield was greatest during summer storms while NO3- yield was greatest during winter storms. Most streams had generalizable storm NO3- and DOC responses, but differences in the timing of NO3- and DOC transport suggest different catchment sources. Further, certain events, including rain-on-snow and summer storms following dry antecedent conditions, yielded disproportionate NO3- responses. High-frequency data allow for increased understanding of the processes controlling solute variability and will help reveal their responses to changing climatic regimes.

  5. Further evidences for enhanced nuclear cross-sections observed in 44 GeV carbon ion interactions with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.; Abdullaev, I.G.; Adloff, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The work of enhanced nuclear cross-sections of secondary fragments produced in the interaction of 44 GeV 12 C with copper has been deepened and extended. The earlier experiment on the emission of secondary fragments into large angles producing enhanced amounts of 24 Na in copper (Phys. Rev. C, 45, 1194(1992)) was confirmed and refined both experimentally and theoretically. In this context, one looked for another signature of such enhanced production, namely for enhanced neutron production. In order to search for this, a 20 cm thick massive copper target was irradiated with 18 and 44 GeV 12 C-ions. Secondary fragments already described could interact again with copper. Outside the metallic target, secondary neutrons got moderated and low energy nuclear reactions were studied in La and U radiochemically via (n,γ)-reactions and also with various solid state nuclear track detectors. One observed an indication, however not yet significant, of enhanced production rates for low energy nuclear reactions only with 44 GeV 12 C, when compared to 18 GeV 12 C-ions. Besides some proton irradiations at SATURNE, Saclay (France) at 2.6 GeV and at PSI, Villigen (Switzerland) at 0.6 GeV all other irradiations were carried out at the Synchrophasotron, LHE, JINR, Dubna (Russia). 46 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  6. Sugar-metal ion interactions: The coordination behavior of cesium ion with lactose, D-arabinose and L-arabinose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Xue, Junhui; Wen, Xiaodong; Zhai, Yanjun; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Kou, Kuan; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-04-01

    The novel cesium chloride-lactose complex (CsCl·C12H22O10 (Cs-Lac), cesium chloride-D-arabinose and L-arabinose complexes (CsCl·C5H10O5, Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectroscopies. Cs+ is 9-coordinated to two chloride ions and seven hydroxyl groups from five lactose molecules in Cs-Lac. In the structures of CsCl-D-arabinose and CsCl-L-arabinose complexes, two kinds of Cs+ ions coexist in the structures. Cs1 is 10-coordinated with two chloride ions and eight hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecule; Cs2 is 9-coordinated to three chloride ions and six hydroxyl groups from five arabinose molecules. Two coordination modes of arabinose coexist in the structures. α-D-arabinopyranose and α-L-arabinopyranose appear in the structures of Cs-D-Ara and Cs-L-Ara complexes. FTIR and Raman results indicate variations of hydrogen bonds and the conformation of the ligands after complexation. FIR and THz spectra also confirm the formation of Cs-complexes. Crystal structure, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectra provide detailed information on the structure and coordination of hydroxyl groups to metal ions in the cesium chloride-lactose, cesium chloride-D- and L-arabinose complexes.

  7. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, E.; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 9 (2015), s. 1563-1567 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion pairing * molecular dynamics * neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00060

  8. CHICSi - a 3π multi-detector system for studying heavy ion interactions inside a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Fokin, A.; Jakobsson, J.; Murin, Yu.; Maartensson, J.; Oskarsson, A.; van Veldhuizen, E.J.; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    CHICSi - a 3π multi-detector system is presented. The setup consists of 576 ultra high vacuum compatible telescopes to study intermediate energy heavy ion as well as proton induced collisions at storage rings operating in slow ramping mode. Primary it will be installed at the gas-jet target station of the CELSIUS facility at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. (orig.)

  9. Metal ion interaction of an oligopeptide fragment representing the regulatory metal binding site of a CueR protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szokolai, Hajnalka; Roszahegyi, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Metalloregulatory proteins of the MerR family are transcriptional activators that sense/control the concentration of various metal ions inside bacteria.1 The Cu+ efflux regulator CueR, similarly to other MerR proteins, possesses a short multiple Cys-containing metal binding loop close to the C...... of cognate metal ions.2 Nevertheless, it is an interesting question whether the same sequence, when removed from the protein, shows a flexibility to adopt different coordination environments and may efficiently bind metal ions having preferences for larger coordination numbers....

  10. Experimental status of the search for the quark-gluon plasma in ultra-relativistic heavy ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmeron, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The deconfinement of quarks, antiquarks and gluons, and the phase transition from a hadron phase to a quark-gluon plasma phase are presented after recalling some elementary notions about normal nuclear matter. Eight proposed signatures of the quark-gluon plasma are described and a summary is given of the experiments concerning three of them: Bose-Einstein interference, the suppression of the J/ψ production and strange particles production. (author)

  11. Vapour pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for binary mixtures containing (1-ethylpyridinium ethylsulfate + several alcohols) at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gomez, Elena; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2010-01-01

    Osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing several primary and secondary alcohols (1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and 1-pentanol) and the pyridinium-based ionic liquid 1-ethylpyridinium ethylsulfate were determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapour pressure osmometry technique. From the experimental results, vapour pressure and activity coefficients can be determined. For the correlation of osmotic coefficients, the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, and the modified NRTL (MNRTL) model were used, obtaining deviations lower than 0.017 and 0.047, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the binary mixtures studied were determined from the parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer.

  12. 2nd-order optical model of the isotopic dependence of heavy ion absorption cross sections for radiation transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yan, Congchong; Saganti, Premkumar B.

    2018-01-01

    Heavy ion absorption cross sections play an important role in radiation transport codes used in risk assessment and for shielding studies of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures. Due to the GCR primary nuclei composition and nuclear fragmentation leading to secondary nuclei heavy ions of charge number, Z with 3 ≤ Z ≥ 28 and mass numbers, A with 6 ≤ A ≥ 60 representing about 190 isotopes occur in GCR transport calculations. In this report we describe methods for developing a data-base of isotopic dependent heavy ion absorption cross sections for interactions. Calculations of a 2nd-order optical model solution to coupled-channel solutions to the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus scattering amplitude are compared to 1st-order optical model solutions. The 2nd-order model takes into account two-body correlations in the projectile and target ground-states, which are ignored in the 1st-order optical model. Parameter free predictions are described using one-body and two-body ground state form factors for the isotopes considered and the free nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude. Root mean square (RMS) matter radii for protons and neutrons are taken from electron and muon scattering data and nuclear structure models. We report on extensive comparisons to experimental data for energy-dependent absorption cross sections for over 100 isotopes of elements from Li to Fe interacting with carbon and aluminum targets. Agreement between model and experiments are generally within 10% for the 1st-order optical model and improved to less than 5% in the 2nd-order optical model in the majority of comparisons. Overall the 2nd-order optical model leads to a reduction in absorption compared to the 1st-order optical model for heavy ion interactions, which influences estimates of nuclear matter radii.

  13. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  14. Modelling of phase equilibria in CH4–C2H6–C3H8–nC4H10–NaCl–H2O systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhigang; Luo, Xiaorong; Li, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model was established for the phase equilibria of C1–C2–C3–nC4–brine systems. • The model can reproduce of hydrocarbon–brine equilibria to high T&P and salinity. • The model can well predict H 2 O solubility in light hydrocarbon rich phases. - Abstract: A thermodynamic model is presented for the mutual solubility of CH 4 –C 2 H 6 –C 3 H 8 –nC 4 H 10 –brine systems up to high temperature, pressure and salinity. The Peng–Robinson model is used for non-aqueous phase fugacity calculations, and the Pitzer model is used for aqueous phase activity calculations. The model can accurately reproduce the experimental solubilities of CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 and nC 4 H 10 in water or NaCl solutions and H 2 O solubility in the non-aqueous phase. The experimental data of mutual solubility for the CH 4 –brine subsystem are sufficient for temperatures exceeding 250 °C, pressures exceeding 1000 bar and NaCl molalities greater than 6 molal. Compared to the CH 4 –brine system, the mutual solubility data of C 2 H 6 –brine, C 3 H 8 –brine and nC 4 H 10 –brine are not sufficient. Based on the comparison with the experimental data of H 2 O solubility in C 2 H 6 -, C 3 H 8 - or nC 4 H 10 -rich phases, the model has an excellent capability for the prediction of H 2 O solubility in hydrocarbon-rich phases, as these experimental data were not used in the modelling. Predictions of hydrocarbon solubility (at temperatures up to 200 °C, pressures up to 1000 bar and NaCl molalities greater than 6 molal) were made for the C 2 H 6 –brine, C 3 H 8 –brine and nC 4 H 10 –brine systems. The predictions suggest that increasing pressure generally increases the hydrocarbon solubility in water or brine, especially in the lower-pressure region. Increasing temperature usually decreases the hydrocarbon solubility at lower temperatures but increases the hydrocarbon solubility at higher temperatures. Increasing water salinity dramatically decreases

  15. About dynamic model of limiting fragmentation of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchin, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: As is known, during last years defined progress in understanding of static aspect of a dynamic structure organization of massive nuclei was reached. The offered model of a 'crystalline' structure of the nucleus generalizes drop, shell and cluster models in a natural way. Now increased interest induces the phenomenon of limiting fragmentation of heavy nuclei. There is a hope, that clearing up the general regularities of a soft disintegration of the massive nuclei on nucleons, component it, in a broad range of high energies can give a valuable information about dynamics of origin of nuclear structures and nature of their qualitative difference from a quark system structure, i.e. from nucleons. The key for understanding the indicated phenomenon can be it's study in connection with other aspects of disintegration of the nuclei - Coulomb and diffraction dissociation, fission etc. The sequential analysis of all these a processes from a single point of view is possible only within the framework of results and methods of the dynamic system theory. The purpose of the present research is clearing up a possibility to understand the nature of limiting fragmentation as a consequence of development of dynamic instability in a system of the nuclei as a result of ions interaction at high energy. In the analysis we based on data of the phenomenological analysis of heavy ion interactions at ultra-relativistic energies obtained by many authors for a number of years. As a result we came to a conclusion about general stochastic nature of an investigated phenomenon. In it development the fragmentation passes three different stages. On the first there is a process of preparation of chaos at a quantum level in an outcome of a Coulomb dissociation of the approaching nuclei and isotopic recharge of their nucleons, carrying a random character. A dominant here - viscous dissociation of nuclei under an operation of Coulomb forces. (A two body initial state). Then the multiparticle

  16. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2006-01-01

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH and ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a s and osmotic φ coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg -1 and for the ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  17. Study of vapour pressure of lithium nitrate solutions in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Safarov, Javid [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net; Bich, Eckard [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Hassel, Egon [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Fakultaet Maschinenbau und Schiffstechnik, Universitaet Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 2, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Heintz, Andreas [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Vapour pressure p of (LiNO{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, osmotic, activity coefficients ({phi}, {gamma}) and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in the molality range m = (0.19125 to 2.21552) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empirical description of the experimental vapour pressure results and the (Pitzer + Mayorga) model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of the Archer for the extended Pitzer model was used for the evaluation of activity coefficients.

  18. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, Huseyn Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2005-12-15

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic {phi} and activity coefficients {gamma}; and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  19. Controls on the pH of hyper-saline lakes - A lesson from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Rotem; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The pH of aqueous environments is determined by the dominant buffer systems of the water, defined operationally as total alkalinity (TA). The major buffer systems in the modern ocean are carbonic and boric acids of which the species bicarbonate, carbonate and borate make up about 77%, 19% and 4% of the TA, respectively. During the course of seawater evaporation (e.g. lagoons) the residual brine loses considerable portion of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and carbonate alkalinity (CA) already at the early stages of evaporation. DIC and CA decrease due to massive precipitation of CaCO3, while total boron (TB) increases conservatively, turning borate to the dominant alkalinity species in marine derived brines. In the present work we assess the apparent dissociation constant value of boric acid (KB‧) in saline and hypersaline waters, using the Dead Sea (DS) as a case study. We explain the DS low pH (∼6.3) and the effect of the boric and carbonic acid pK‧-s on the behavior of the brine's buffer system, including the pH increase that results from brine dilution. The KB‧ in DS was estimated from TB, TA, DIC and pH data measured in this study and early empirical data on artificial DS brines containing just carbonic acid. The KB‧ value was corroborated by Pitzer ion interaction model calculations using PHREEQC thermodynamic code applied to the chemical composition of the DS. Our results show that KB‧ increases considerably with the brine's ionic strength, reaching in the DS to a factor of 100 higher than in ;mean; seawater. Based on theoretical calculations and analyses of other natural brines it is suggested that brines' composition is a major factor in determining the KB‧ value and in turn the pH of such brines. We show that the higher the proportion of divalent cations in the brine the higher the dissociation constants of the weak acids (presumably due to formation of complexes). The low pH of the Dead Sea is accordingly explained by its extremely

  20. Energy consumption in desalinating produced water from shale oil and gas extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Tow, Emily W.; Chung, Hyung Won; Lienhard, John H.; Thiel, Gregory Parker; Banchik, Leonardo David

    2014-01-01

    On-site treatment and reuse is an increasingly preferred option for produced water management in unconventional oil and gas extraction. This paper analyzes and compares the energetics of several desalination technologies at the high salinities and diverse compositions commonly encountered in produced water from shale formations to guide technology selection and to inform further system development. Produced water properties are modeled using Pitzer's equations, and emphasis is placed on how t...

  1. Thermodynamic Study of Solid-Liquid Equilibrium in NaCl-NaBr-H2O System at 288.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Meng, Ling-zong; Deng, Tian-long; Guo, Ya-fei; Fu, Qing-Tao

    2018-06-01

    The solubility data, composition of the solid solution and refractive indices of the NaCl-NaBr-H2O system at 288.15 K were studied with the isothermal equilibrium dissolution method. The solubility diagram and refractive index diagram of this system were plotted at 288.15 K. The solubility diagram consists of two crystallization zones for solid solution Na(Cl,Br) · 2H2O and Na(Cl,Br), one invariant points cosaturated with two solid solution and two univariant solubility isothermal curves. On the basis of Pitzer and Harvie-Weare (HW) chemical models, the composition equations and solubility equilibrium constant equations of the solid solutions at 288.15 K were acquired using the solubility data, the composition of solid solutions, and binary Pitzer parameters. The solubilities calculated using the new method combining the equations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...

  3. Leadership Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Thomas J.

    This paper discusses six different models of organizational structure and leadership, including the scalar chain or pyramid model, the continuum model, the grid model, the linking pin model, the contingency model, and the circle or democratic model. Each model is examined in a separate section that describes the model and its development, lists…

  4. A thermodynamic reference database for nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendler, V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Altmaier, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Moog, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Voigt, W. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Wilhelm, S. [AF Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Safety analysis for a geological repository for radioactive waste as well as remediation measures for uranium mining and processing legacies share an essential: the need for a reliable, traceable and accurate assessment of potential migration of toxic constituents into the biosphere. The respective computational codes require site-independent thermodynamic data concerning aqueous speciation, solubility limiting solid phases and ion-interaction parameters. Such databases, however, show several constraints: - Incompleteness in terms of major and trace elements - Inconsistencies between species considered and corresponding formation constants - Restricted variation ranges of intensive parameters (temperature, density, pressure) - Limitations with respect to solution compositions (ionic strength). To overcome these limitations to a significant degree, an ambitious database project - THEREDA - has been launched in 2006 by institutions leading in the field of safety research for nuclear waste disposal in Germany. The main objective is a centrally administrated and maintained database of verified thermodynamic parameters for environmental applications in general and radiochemical issues in particular. During the last year, the most important point was the official release of four more datasets (adding carbonate, An(III), Np(V) and Cs to the hexary system of oceanic salts), all based on the Pitzer model describing the ion-ion interactions. They can all be downloaded as separate files from the project web site www.thereda.de (navigation menu: THEREDA Data Query → Tailored Databases) as generic ASCII type, and in formats specific to the geochemical speciation codes PhreeqC, EQ3/6, ChemApp and Geochemist Workbench. Moreover, access to data records is now also possible through interactive forms (menu: THEREDA Data Query → Single Data Query // Complex Systems), both with export options as CSV or MS Excel file. Additional releases of thermodynamic data for Th(IV), U(IV) and

  5. A thermodynamic reference database for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendler, V.; Altmaier, M.; Moog, H.; Voigt, W.; Wilhelm, S.

    2015-01-01

    Safety analysis for a geological repository for radioactive waste as well as remediation measures for uranium mining and processing legacies share an essential: the need for a reliable, traceable and accurate assessment of potential migration of toxic constituents into the biosphere. The respective computational codes require site-independent thermodynamic data concerning aqueous speciation, solubility limiting solid phases and ion-interaction parameters. Such databases, however, show several constraints: - Incompleteness in terms of major and trace elements - Inconsistencies between species considered and corresponding formation constants - Restricted variation ranges of intensive parameters (temperature, density, pressure) - Limitations with respect to solution compositions (ionic strength). To overcome these limitations to a significant degree, an ambitious database project - THEREDA - has been launched in 2006 by institutions leading in the field of safety research for nuclear waste disposal in Germany. The main objective is a centrally administrated and maintained database of verified thermodynamic parameters for environmental applications in general and radiochemical issues in particular. During the last year, the most important point was the official release of four more datasets (adding carbonate, An(III), Np(V) and Cs to the hexary system of oceanic salts), all based on the Pitzer model describing the ion-ion interactions. They can all be downloaded as separate files from the project web site www.thereda.de (navigation menu: THEREDA Data Query → Tailored Databases) as generic ASCII type, and in formats specific to the geochemical speciation codes PhreeqC, EQ3/6, ChemApp and Geochemist Workbench. Moreover, access to data records is now also possible through interactive forms (menu: THEREDA Data Query → Single Data Query // Complex Systems), both with export options as CSV or MS Excel file. Additional releases of thermodynamic data for Th(IV), U(IV) and

  6. Models and role models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of action and was also utilized for the formulation of oral care products. In addition, we made use of intra-oral (in situ) models to study other features of the oral environment that drive the de/remineralization balance in individual patients. This model addressed basic questions, such as how enamel and dentine are affected by challenges in the oral cavity, as well as practical issues related to fluoride toothpaste efficacy. The observation that perhaps fluoride is not sufficiently potent to reduce dental caries in the present-day society triggered us to expand our knowledge in the bacterial aetiology of dental caries. For this we developed the Amsterdam Active Attachment biofilm model. Different from studies on planktonic ('single') bacteria, this biofilm model captures bacteria in a habitat similar to dental plaque. With data from the combination of these models, it should be possible to study separate processes which together may lead to dental caries. Also products and novel agents could be evaluated that interfere with either of the processes. Having these separate models in place, a suggestion is made to design computer models to encompass the available information. Models but also role models are of the utmost importance in bringing and guiding research and researchers. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Model(ing) Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kerstin

    The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was the first and most celebrated of a wave of international criminal tribunals (ICTs) built in the 1990s designed to advance liberalism through international criminal law. Model(ing) Justice examines the case law of the ICTY...

  8. Models and role models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of

  9. Modified-surface-energy methods for deriving heavy-ion potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierk, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a modified-surface-energy approach for the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials is discussed. It is not possible to simultaneously fit elastic scattering, ion interaction barriers, and fission barriers with the same set of constants in this model. Possible explanations of this deficiency are discussed

  10. EQPT, a data file preprocessor for the EQ3/6 software package: User's guide and related documentation (Version 7.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daveler, S.A.; Wolery, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    EQPT is a data file preprocessor for the EQ3/6 software package. EQ3/6 currently contains five primary data files, called datao files. These files comprise alternative data sets. These data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three (com, sup, and nea) support the use of the Davies or B equations for the activity coefficients; the other two (hmw and pit) support the use of Pitzer's (1973, 1975) equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on these data files varies from 25 degrees C only to 0-300 degrees C. The principal modeling codes in EQ3/6, EQ3NR and EQ6, do not read a data0 file, however. Instead, these codes read an unformatted equivalent called a data1 file. EQPT writes a datal file, using the corresponding data0 file as input. In processing a data0 file, EQPT checks the data for common errors, such as unbalanced reactions. It also conducts two kinds of data transformation. Interpolating polynomials are fit to data which are input on temperature adds. The coefficients of these polynomials are then written on the datal file in place of the original temperature grids. A second transformation pertains only to data files tied to Pitzer's equations. The commonly reported observable Pitzer coefficient parameters are mapped into a set of primitive parameters by means of a set of conventional relations. These primitive form parameters are then written onto the datal file in place of their observable counterparts. Usage of the primitive form parameters makes it easier to evaluate Pitzer's equations in EQ3NR and EQ6. EQPT and the other codes in the EQ3/6 package are written in FORTRAN 77 and have been developed to run under the UNIX operating system on computers ranging from workstations to supercomputers

  11. Fixation of Cs to marine sediments estimated by a stochastic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børretzen, Peer; Salbu, Brit

    2002-01-01

    Dumping of nuclear waste in the Kara Sea represents a potential source of radioactive contamination to the Arctic Seas in the future. The mobility of 137Cs ions leached from the waste will depend on the interactions with sediment particles. Whether sediments will act as a continuous permanent sink for released 137Cs, or contaminated sediments will serve as a diffuse source of 137Cs in the future, depends on the interaction kinetics and binding mechanisms involved. The main purpose of this paper is to study the performance of different stochastic models using kinetic information to estimate the time needed for Cs ions to become irreversibly fixed within the sediments. The kinetic information was obtained from 134Cs tracer sorption and desorption (sequential extractions) experiments, conducted over time, using sediments from the Stepovogo Fjord waste dumping site, on the east coast of Novaya Zemlya. Results show that 134Cs ions interact rapidly with the surfaces of the Stepovogo sediment, with an estimated distribution coefficient Kd(eq) of 300 ml/g (or 13m2/g), and the 134Cs ions are increasingly irreversibly fixed to the sediment over time. For the first time, stochastic theory has been utilised for sediment-seawater systems to estimate the mean residence times (MRTs) of Cs ions in operationally defined sediment phases described by compartment models. In the present work, two different stochastic models (i) a Markov process model (MP) being analogous to deterministic compartment models, and (ii) a semi-Markov process model (SMP) which should be physically more relevant for inhomogeneous systems, have been compared. As similar results were obtained using the two models, the less complicated MP model was utilised to predict the time needed for an average Cs ion to become irreversibly fixed in the Stepovogo sediments. According the model, approximately 1100 days of contact time between Cs ions and sediments is needed before 50% of the 134Cs ion becomes fixed in the

  12. Modelling SDL, Modelling Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Piefel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Today's software systems are too complex to implement them and model them using only one language. As a result, modern software engineering uses different languages for different levels of abstraction and different system aspects. Thus to handle an increasing number of related or integrated languages is the most challenging task in the development of tools. We use object oriented metamodelling to describe languages. Object orientation allows us to derive abstract reusable concept definitions (concept classes from existing languages. This language definition technique concentrates on semantic abstractions rather than syntactical peculiarities. We present a set of common concept classes that describe structure, behaviour, and data aspects of high-level modelling languages. Our models contain syntax modelling using the OMG MOF as well as static semantic constraints written in OMG OCL. We derive metamodels for subsets of SDL and UML from these common concepts, and we show for parts of these languages that they can be modelled and related to each other through the same abstract concepts.

  13. Modelling the models

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  14. Ion spectroscopy for improvement of the physical beam model for therapy planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arico, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Helium and carbon ions enable a more conformal dose distribution, narrower penumbra and higher relative biological effectiveness than photon and proton radiotherapy. However, they may undergo nuclear fragmentation in the patient tissues and the arising secondary fragments affect the delivered biological dose distributions. Currently there is a lack of data regarding ion nuclear fragmentation. One reason is the large size (up to some meters) of the experimental setups required for the investigations. In this thesis a new method is presented, which makes use of versatile pixelated semiconductor detectors (Timepix). This method is based on tracking of single particles and pattern recognition of their signals in the detectors. Measurements were performed at the HIT facility. The mixed radiation field arising from 430 MeV/u carbon ion beams and 221 MeV/u helium ion beams in water and in PMMA targets was investigated. The amounts of primary (carbon or helium) ions detected behind targets with the same water equivalent thickness (WET) were found to be in agreement within the statistical uncertainties. However, more fragments (differences up to 20% in case of H) and narrower lateral particle distributions were measured behind the PMMA than the water targets. The spectra of ions behind tissue surrogates and corresponding water targets with the same WET were analysed. The results obtained with adipose and inner bone surrogates and with the equivalent water phantoms were found to be consistent within the uncertainties. Significant differences in the results were observed in the case of lung and cortical bone surrogates when compared to the water phantoms. The experimental results were compared to FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. This comparison could contribute to enhance the ion interaction models currently implemented for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ion beams.

  15. Technical Work Plan for: Thermodynamic Databases for Chemical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.F. Jovecolon

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the work scope covered by this Technical Work Plan (TWP) is to correct and improve the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) thermodynamic databases, to update their documentation, and to ensure reasonable consistency among them. In addition, the work scope will continue to generate database revisions, which are organized and named so as to be transparent to internal and external users and reviewers. Regarding consistency among databases, it is noted that aqueous speciation and mineral solubility data for a given system may differ according to how solubility was determined, and the method used for subsequent retrieval of thermodynamic parameter values from measured data. Of particular concern are the details of the determination of ''infinite dilution'' constants, which involve the use of specific methods for activity coefficient corrections. That is, equilibrium constants developed for a given system for one set of conditions may not be consistent with constants developed for other conditions, depending on the species considered in the chemical reactions and the methods used in the reported studies. Hence, there will be some differences (for example in log K values) between the Pitzer and ''B-dot'' database parameters for the same reactions or species

  16. Secondary Neutron Production from Space Radiation Interactions: Advances in Model and Experimental Data Base Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Braley, G. Scott; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    For humans engaged in long-duration missions in deep space or near-Earth orbit, the risk from exposure to galactic and solar cosmic rays is an important factor in the design of spacecraft, spacesuits, and planetary bases. As cosmic rays are transported through shielding materials and human tissue components, a secondary radiation field is produced. Neutrons are an important component of that secondary field, especially in thickly-shielded environments. Calculations predict that 50% of the dose-equivalent in a lunar or Martian base comes from neutrons, and a recent workshop held at the Johnson Space Center concluded that as much as 30% of the dose in the International Space Station may come from secondary neutrons. Accelerator facilities provide a means for measuring the effectiveness of various materials in their ability to limit neutron production, using beams and energies that are present in cosmic radiation. The nearly limitless range of beams, energies, and target materials that are present in space, however, means that accelerator-based experiments will not provide a complete database of cross sections and thick-target yields that are necessary to plan and design long-duration missions. As such, accurate nuclear models of neutron production are needed, as well as data sets that can be used to compare with, and verify, the predictions from such models. Improvements in a model of secondary neutron production from heavy-ion interactions are presented here, along with the results from recent accelerator-based measurements of neutron-production cross sections. An analytical knockout-ablation model capable of predicting neutron production from high-energy hadron-hadron interactions (both nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions) has been previously developed. In the knockout stage, the collision between two nuclei result in the emission of one or more nucleons from the projectile and/or target. The resulting projectile and target remnants, referred to as

  17. Modelling Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan

    This report provides an overview of the existing models of global manufacturing, describes the required modelling views and associated methods and identifies tools, which can provide support for this modelling activity.The model adopted for global manufacturing is that of an extended enterprise s...

  18. Document Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Malykh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the concept of locally simple models is considered. Locally simple models are arbitrarily complex models built from relatively simple components. A lot of practically important domains of discourse can be described as locally simple models, for example, business models of enterprises and companies. Up to now, research in human reasoning automation has been mainly concentrated around the most intellectually intensive activities, such as automated theorem proving. On the other hand, the retailer business model is formed from ”jobs”, and each ”job” can be modelled and automated more or less easily. At the same time, the whole retailer model as an integrated system is extremely complex. In this paper, we offer a variant of the mathematical definition of a locally simple model. This definition is intended for modelling a wide range of domains. Therefore, we also must take into account the perceptual and psychological issues. Logic is elitist, and if we want to attract to our models as many people as possible, we need to hide this elitism behind some metaphor, to which ’ordinary’ people are accustomed. As such a metaphor, we use the concept of a document, so our locally simple models are called document models. Document models are built in the paradigm of semantic programming. This allows us to achieve another important goal - to make the documentary models executable. Executable models are models that can act as practical information systems in the described domain of discourse. Thus, if our model is executable, then programming becomes redundant. The direct use of a model, instead of its programming coding, brings important advantages, for example, a drastic cost reduction for development and maintenance. Moreover, since the model is well and sound, and not dissolved within programming modules, we can directly apply AI tools, in particular, machine learning. This significantly expands the possibilities for automation and

  19. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, CC

    2012-01-01

    Model theory deals with a branch of mathematical logic showing connections between a formal language and its interpretations or models. This is the first and most successful textbook in logical model theory. Extensively updated and corrected in 1990 to accommodate developments in model theoretic methods - including classification theory and nonstandard analysis - the third edition added entirely new sections, exercises, and references. Each chapter introduces an individual method and discusses specific applications. Basic methods of constructing models include constants, elementary chains, Sko

  20. Modeling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models are widely used in all types of hydrologic studies, and many of these models can be used to estimate recharge. Models can provide important insight into the functioning of hydrologic systems by identifying factors that influence recharge. The predictive capability of models can be used to evaluate how changes in climate, water use, land use, and other factors may affect recharge rates. Most hydrological simulation models, including watershed models and groundwater-flow models, are based on some form of water-budget equation, so the material in this chapter is closely linked to that in Chapter 2. Empirical models that are not based on a water-budget equation have also been used for estimating recharge; these models generally take the form of simple estimation equations that define annual recharge as a function of precipitation and possibly other climatic data or watershed characteristics.Model complexity varies greatly. Some models are simple accounting models; others attempt to accurately represent the physics of water movement through each compartment of the hydrologic system. Some models provide estimates of recharge explicitly; for example, a model based on the Richards equation can simulate water movement from the soil surface through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Recharge estimates can be obtained indirectly from other models. For example, recharge is a parameter in groundwater-flow models that solve for hydraulic head (i.e. groundwater level). Recharge estimates can be obtained through a model calibration process in which recharge and other model parameter values are adjusted so that simulated water levels agree with measured water levels. The simulation that provides the closest agreement is called the best fit, and the recharge value used in that simulation is the model-generated estimate of recharge.

  1. Galactic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchler, J.R.; Gottesman, S.T.; Hunter, J.H. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on galactic models are presented. Individual topics addressed include: observations relating to galactic mass distributions; the structure of the Galaxy; mass distribution in spiral galaxies; rotation curves of spiral galaxies in clusters; grand design, multiple arm, and flocculent spiral galaxies; observations of barred spirals; ringed galaxies; elliptical galaxies; the modal approach to models of galaxies; self-consistent models of spiral galaxies; dynamical models of spiral galaxies; N-body models. Also discussed are: two-component models of galaxies; simulations of cloudy, gaseous galactic disks; numerical experiments on the stability of hot stellar systems; instabilities of slowly rotating galaxies; spiral structure as a recurrent instability; model gas flows in selected barred spiral galaxies; bar shapes and orbital stochasticity; three-dimensional models; polar ring galaxies; dynamical models of polar rings

  2. Model-model Perencanaan Strategik

    OpenAIRE

    Amirin, Tatang M

    2005-01-01

    The process of strategic planning, used to be called as long-term planning, consists of several components, including strategic analysis, setting strategic direction (covering of mission, vision, and values), and action planning. Many writers develop models representing the steps of the strategic planning process, i.e. basic planning model, problem-based planning model, scenario model, and organic or self-organizing model.

  3. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  4. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test...

  5. Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Piccolo, Chiara; Heitzig, Martina

    2011-01-01

    covered, illustrating several models such as the Wilson equation and NRTL equation, along with their solution strategies. A section shows how to use experimental data to regress the property model parameters using a least squares approach. A full model analysis is applied in each example that discusses...... the degrees of freedom, dependent and independent variables and solution strategy. Vapour-liquid and solid-liquid equilibrium is covered, and applications to droplet evaporation and kinetic models are given....

  6. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  7. Application of thermodynamic data from THEREDA with THROUHREACT; Anwendung thermodynamischer Daten aus THEREDA mit TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seher, Holger; Weyand, Torben; Bracke, Guido

    2017-02-15

    Codes from the TOUGH family are used by GRS for many issues of the final radioactive waste disposal. For geochemical modeling in highly saline solutions the project THEREDA offers qualified thermodynamic data sets with Pitzer parameters that can be used as input data for specific systems and geochemical codes. For the application of thermodynamic data base from THEREDA in model calculations with THROUGHREACT a tool for the reformatting of the data sets was developed. THROUGHREACT will be used in the future for modeling of reactive transport in final radioactive waste repositories including complex processes.

  8. Hydrological models are mediating models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  9. ICRF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.

    1985-12-01

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs

  10. Modelling in Business Model design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonse, W.L.

    2013-01-01

    It appears that business model design might not always produce a design or model as the expected result. However when designers are involved, a visual model or artefact is produced. To assist strategic managers in thinking about how they can act, the designers challenge is to combine strategy and

  11. EQ3/6: status and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T.J.; Isherwood, D.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Delany, J.M.; Puigdomenech, I.

    1984-12-01

    EQ3/6 is a set of related computer codes and data files for use in geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. The EQ3/6 package centers around two large computer codes, EQ3NR and EQ6, which are supported by a common thermodynamic data base. EQ3NR is a speciation-solubility code, whose function is to compute a model of the state of an aqueous solution. This code is very flexible in terms of the input that it will accept. EQ6 is a reaction-path code, which calculates models of changes in aqueous systems as they proceed toward a state of overall chemical equilibrium. EQ3/6 prior to FY83 had no capability for modeling brines, because the approximations for calculating the thermodynamic activity of water and the activity coefficients of the solute species were restricted to low ionic strengths ({le} 1.0 molal). An option has been added to use Pitzer`s equations for such calculations. At present, EQ3/6 contains two alternate Pitzer coefficient data bases. Several improvements have been made to the EQ6 code. Prior to FY83, the code could run models of mineral dissolution kinetics, but could not calculate models of precipitation kinetics. This problem has been overcome by additional code development. The speed of non-kinetic EQ6 calculations has recently been enhanced by the creation of two new calculational modes, economy mode and super economy mode. A calculational mode to simulate systems open to large gas reservoirs has also been developed. 34 references.

  12. Eclipse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    Three existing eclipse models for the PSR 1957 + 20 pulsar are discussed in terms of their requirements and the information they yield about the pulsar wind: the interacting wind from a companion model, the magnetosphere model, and the occulting disk model. It is shown out that the wind model requires an MHD wind from the pulsar, with enough particles that the Poynting flux of the wind can be thermalized; in this model, a large flux of energetic radiation from the pulsar is required to accompany the wind and drive the wind off the companion. The magnetosphere model requires an EM wind, which is Poynting flux dominated; the advantage of this model over the wind model is that the plasma density inside the magnetosphere can be orders of magnitude larger than in a magnetospheric tail blown back by wind interaction. The occulting disk model also requires an EM wind so that the interaction would be pushed down onto the companion surface, minimizing direct interaction of the wind with the orbiting macroscopic particles

  13. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future

  14. Physicochemical analysis of zinc and cadmium ions interaction with unithiol; Fiziko-khimicheskij analiz vzaimodejstviya ionov tsinka i kadmiya s unitiolom v vodykh rastvorakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinina, L K; Shejkkh, M A; Ospanov, Kh K; Gemanova, L N [Kazakhskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan)

    1995-01-01

    Zinc and cadmium interaction with sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate in aqueous solution is studied by means of physicochemical analysis techniques (pH-metry, conductometry, viscosimetry, volumetry). Cadmium is determined to form 1:1 and 1:2 composition complex compounds. Formation constants of complex ions are determined. Mechanism of interaction of initial reagents is suggested. 7 refs.; 1 fig.

  15. Comparative Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Heavy Ion Interactions at a Few GeV to a Few Hundred GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Bhoumik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the multifractality of pion emission process in 16O-AgBr interactions at 2.1 AGeV  and  60 AGeV, 12C-AgBr  and  24Mg-AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV, and 32S-AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV using Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA method which is capable of extracting the actual multifractal property filtering out the average trend of fluctuation. The analysis reveals that the pseudorapidity distribution of the shower particles is multifractal in nature for all the interactions; that is, pion production mechanism has inbuilt multiscale self-similarity property. We have employed MFDFA method for randomly generated events for 32S-AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV. Comparison of expt. results with those obtained from randomly generated data set reveals that the source of multifractality in our data is the presence of long range correlation. Comparing the results obtained from different interactions, it may be concluded that strength of multifractality decreases with projectile mass for the same projectile energy and for a particular projectile it increases with energy. The values of ordinary Hurst exponent suggest that there is long range correlation present in our data for all the interactions.

  16. Local particle densities and global multiplicities in central heavy ion interactions at 3.7, 14.6, 60 and 200 A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Aggarwal, M.M.

    1992-03-01

    The energy and centrality dependence of local particle pseudorapidity densities as well as validity of various parametrizations of the distributions are examined. The dispersion, σ, of the rapidity density distribution of produced particles varies slowly with centrality and is 0.80, 0.98, 1.21 and 1.41 for central interactions at 3.7, 14.6, 60 and 200 A GeV incident energy, respectively. σ is found to be independent of the size of the interacting system at fixed energy. A novel way of representing the window dependence of the multiplicity as normalized variance versus inverse average multiplicity is outlined. (au)

  17. Biopharmaceutical characterisation of ciprofloxacin-metallic ion interactions: Comparative study into the effect of aluminium, calcium, zinc and iron on drug solubility and dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Aleksandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin bioavailability may be reduced when ciprofloxacin is co-administered with metallic ion containing preparations. In our previous study, physicochemical interaction between ciprofloxacin and ferrous sulphate was successfully simulated in vitro. In the present work, comparative in vitro ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution studies were performed in the reactive media containing aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate or zinc sulphate. Solid phases collected from the dissolution vessel with aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate and zinc sulphate were investigated for their properties. The results obtained indicate that different types of adducts may form and retard ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution. In the case of aluminium, no phase changes were observed. The solid phase generated in the presence of calcium carbonate was identified as hydrated ciprofloxacin base. Similarly to iron, a new complex consistent with Zn(SO42(Cl2(ciprofloxacin2 × nH2O stoichiometry was generated in the presence of relatively high concentrations of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and zinc sulphate, indicating that small volume dissolution experiments can be useful for biorelevant dissolution tests.

  18. Peculiarity of deuterium ions interaction with tungsten surface in the condition imitating combination of normal operation with plasma disruption in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I. E-mail: martyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Vasiliev, V.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Khirpunov, B.I.; Korshunov, S.N.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Strunnikov, V.N.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Zatekin, V.V.; Litnovsky, A.M

    2001-03-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the ITER divertor. For the simulation of ITER normal operation conditions in combination with plasma disruptions samples of various types of tungsten were exposed to both steady-state and high power pulsed deuterium plasmas. Tungsten samples were first exposed in a steady-state plasma with an ion current density {approx}10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} up to a dose of 10{sup 25} m{sup -2} at a temperature of 770 K. The energy of deuterium ions was 150 eV. The additional exposure of the samples to 10 pulses of deuterium plasma was performed in the electrodynamical plasma accelerator with an energy flux 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} per pulse. Samples of four types of tungsten (W-1%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, W-13I, monocrystalline W(1 1 1) and W-10%Re) were investigated. The least destruction of the surface was observed for W(1 1 1). The concentration of retained deuterium in tungsten decreased from 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} to 1.07x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} (for W(1 1 1)) as a result of the additional pulsed plasma irradiation. Investigation of the tungsten erosion products after the high power pulsed plasma shots was also carried out.

  19. The role of radiative de-excitation in the neutralization process of highly charged ions interacting with a single layer of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwestka, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Gruber, E.; Heller, R.; Kozubek, R.; Schleberger, M.; Facsko, S.; Aumayr, F.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray emission of slow (graphene. To discriminate against X-ray emission originating from the graphene's support grid a coincidence technique is used. X-ray emission of 75 keV Ar17+ and Ar18+ ions with either one or two K-shell vacancies is recorded. Using a windowless Bruker XFlash detector allows us to measure additionally Ar KLL and KLM Auger electrons and determine the branching ratio of radiative vs. non-radiative decay of Ar K-shell holes. Furthermore, X-ray spectra for 100 keV Xe22+-Xe35+ ions are compared, showing a broad M-line peak for all cases, where M-shell vacancies are present. All these peaks are accompanied by emission lines at still higher energies indicating the presence of a hollow atom during X-ray decay. We report a linear shift of the main M-line peak to higher energies for increasing incident charge state, i.e. increasing number of M-shell holes.

  20. Local particle densities and global multiplicities in central heavy ion interactions at 3.7, 14.6, 60 and 200 A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Larionova, V.G.; Maslennikova, N.V.; Orlova, G.I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Rappoport, V.M.; Salmanova, N.A.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Arora, R.; Bhatia, V.S.; Mittra, I.S.; Andreeva, N.P.; Anson, Z.V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Eligbaeva, G.Z.; Eremenko, L.E.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Kalyachkina, G.S.; Kanygina, E.K.; Lepetan, V.N.; Shakhova, T.I.; Avetyan, F.A.; Marutyan, N.A.; Sarkisova, L.G.; Sarkisyan, V.R.; Badyal, S.K.; Bhasin, A.; Gupta, V.K.; Kachroo, S.; Kaul, G.L.; Kitroo, S.; Mangotra, L.K.; Rao, N.K.; Basova, E.; Nasrulaeva, H.; Nasyrov, S.H.; Petrov, N.V.; Qarshiev, D.A.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.; Bhalla, K.B.; Gupta, S.K.; Kumar, V.; Lal, P.; Lokanathan, S.; Mookerjee, S.; Palsania, H.S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Bogdanaov, V.G.; Plyushchev, V.A.; Solovjeva, Z.I.; Burnett, T.H.; Grote, J.; Lord, J.; Skelding, D.; Wilkes, R.J.; Chernova, L.P.; Gulamov, K.G.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Navotny, V.S.; Saidkhanov, N.; Shpilev, S.N.; Surin, E.L.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Zhochova, S.I.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Rhee, J.T.; Garpman, S.; Jakobsson, B.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Soederstroem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Heckman, H.H.; Cai, X.; Huang, H.; Liu, L.S.; Qian, W.Y.; Wang, H.Q.; Zhou, D.C.; Judek, B.; Just, L.; Tothova, M.; Karabova, M.; Vokal, S.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kulikova, S.; Maksimkina, T.N.; Shabratova, G.S.; Tolstov, K.D.; Luo, S.B.; Qin, Y.M.; Zhang, D.H.; Weng, Z.Q.; Xia, Y.L.; Xu, G.F.; Zheng, P.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The energy and centrality dependence of local particle pseudorapidity densities as well as validity of various parameterizations of the distributions are examined. The dispersion, σ, of the rapidity density distribution of produced particles varies slowly with centrality and is 0.80, 0.98, 1.21 and 1.41 for central interactions at 3.7, 14.6, 60 and 200 A GeV incident energy, respectively, σ is found to be independent of the size of the interacting system at fixed energy. A novel, way of representing the window dependence of the multiplicity as normalized variance versus inverse average multiplicity is outlined. (orig.)

  1. Biopharmaceutical characterisation of ciprofloxacin-metallic ion interactions: comparative study into the effect of aluminium, calcium, zinc and iron on drug solubility and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Aleksandra; Tajber, Lidia; Paluch, Krzysztof J; Djurić, Zorica; Parojčić, Jelena; Corrigan, Owen I

    2014-03-01

    Ciprofloxacin bioavailability may be reduced when ciprofloxacin is co-administered with metallic ion containing preparations. In our previous study, physicochemical interaction between ciprofloxacin and ferrous sulphate was successfully simulated in vitro. In the present work, comparative in vitro ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution studies were performed in the reactive media containing aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate or zinc sulphate. Solid phases collected from the dissolution vessel with aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate and zinc sulphate were investigated for their properties. The results obtained indicate that different types of adducts may form and retard ciprofloxacin solubility and dissolution. In the case of aluminium, no phase changes were observed. The solid phase generated in the presence of calcium carbonate was identified as hydrated ciprofloxacin base. Similarly to iron, a new complex consistent with Zn(SO4)2(Cl)2(ciprofloxacin)2 × nH2O stoichiometry was generated in the presence of relatively high concentrations of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and zinc sulphate, indicating that small volume dissolution experiments can be useful for biorelevant dissolution tests.

  2. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.; Priniski, C.; Zatz, I.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (∼ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a 'gas shield' may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  3. Study of deep inelastic collisions in the heavy-ion interaction of (14.0MeV/u){sup 208}Pb+{sup 238}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluch, J J [Department of Physics, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan); Khan, E U [Physics Research Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Tahseen, R [Department of Physics, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan); Qureshi, I E [Physics Research Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Nasir, Tabassum [Department of Physics, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan); Hassan, Najam ul [Department of Physics, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan)

    2006-02-15

    Using mica as a passive detector and employing the 2{pi}-geometry technique (14.0MeV/u) {sup 208}Pb+{sup 238}U heavy-ion nuclear interaction has been studied. The particle tracks were converted into their actual lengths and polar angles through simple geometry. The elastic binary events so bifurcated were used to deduce the coefficients to analyze the three prong events. The relative velocities of the correlated fission fragments were calculated at the second stage of the reaction in order to construct the intermediate stage of the reaction, and hence, determine the pre-fission masses integrated over all angles and energies. The angular distribution of fission fragments within the reaction plane provided the information about the speed of the reaction and proximity effect.

  4. Study of deep inelastic collisions in the heavy-ion interaction of (14.0MeV/u)208Pb+238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baluch, J.J.; Khan, E.U.; Tahseen, R.; Qureshi, I.E.; Nasir, Tabassum; Hassan, Najam ul

    2006-01-01

    Using mica as a passive detector and employing the 2π-geometry technique (14.0MeV/u) 208 Pb+ 238 U heavy-ion nuclear interaction has been studied. The particle tracks were converted into their actual lengths and polar angles through simple geometry. The elastic binary events so bifurcated were used to deduce the coefficients to analyze the three prong events. The relative velocities of the correlated fission fragments were calculated at the second stage of the reaction in order to construct the intermediate stage of the reaction, and hence, determine the pre-fission masses integrated over all angles and energies. The angular distribution of fission fragments within the reaction plane provided the information about the speed of the reaction and proximity effect

  5. Mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Developing competences for setting up, analysing and criticising mathematical models are normally seen as relevant only from and above upper secondary level. The general belief among teachers is that modelling activities presuppose conceptual understanding of the mathematics involved. Mathematical...... roots for the construction of important mathematical concepts. In addition competences for setting up, analysing and criticising modelling processes and the possible use of models is a formative aim in this own right for mathematics teaching in general education. The paper presents a theoretical...... modelling, however, can be seen as a practice of teaching that place the relation between real life and mathematics into the centre of teaching and learning mathematics, and this is relevant at all levels. Modelling activities may motivate the learning process and help the learner to establish cognitive...

  6. Mathematical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough introduction to the challenge of applying mathematics in real-world scenarios. Modelling tasks rarely involve well-defined categories, and they often require multidisciplinary input from mathematics, physics, computer sciences, or engineering. In keeping with this spirit of modelling, the book includes a wealth of cross-references between the chapters and frequently points to the real-world context. The book combines classical approaches to modelling with novel areas such as soft computing methods, inverse problems, and model uncertainty. Attention is also paid to the interaction between models, data and the use of mathematical software. The reader will find a broad selection of theoretical tools for practicing industrial mathematics, including the analysis of continuum models, probabilistic and discrete phenomena, and asymptotic and sensitivity analysis.

  7. Model : making

    OpenAIRE

    Bottle, Neil

    2013-01-01

    The Model : making exhibition was curated by Brian Kennedy in collaboration with Allies & Morrison in September 2013. For the London Design Festival, the Model : making exhibition looked at the increased use of new technologies by both craft-makers and architectural model makers. In both practices traditional ways of making by hand are increasingly being combined with the latest technologies of digital imaging, laser cutting, CNC machining and 3D printing. This exhibition focussed on ...

  8. Model building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly seen at HERA

  9. Model building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly seen at HERA. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Modeling Documents with Event Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhui Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently deep learning has made great breakthroughs in visual and speech processing, mainly because it draws lessons from the hierarchical mode that brain deals with images and speech. In the field of NLP, a topic model is one of the important ways for modeling documents. Topic models are built on a generative model that clearly does not match the way humans write. In this paper, we propose Event Model, which is unsupervised and based on the language processing mechanism of neurolinguistics, to model documents. In Event Model, documents are descriptions of concrete or abstract events seen, heard, or sensed by people and words are objects in the events. Event Model has two stages: word learning and dimensionality reduction. Word learning is to learn semantics of words based on deep learning. Dimensionality reduction is the process that representing a document as a low dimensional vector by a linear mode that is completely different from topic models. Event Model achieves state-of-the-art results on document retrieval tasks.

  11. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  12. Battery Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the capacity of the employed batteries. The battery lifetime determines how long one can use a device. Battery modeling can help to predict, and possibly extend this lifetime. Many different battery models have been developed over the years. However,

  13. Didactical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas; Hansen, Rune

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Didactical Modelling as a research methodology in mathematics education. We compare the methodology with other approaches and argue that Didactical Modelling has its own specificity. We discuss the methodological “why” and explain why we find it useful...

  14. Design modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, van A.; Kok, H.; Wagter, H.

    1992-01-01

    In Computer Aided Drafting three groups of three-dimensional geometric modelling can be recognized: wire frame, surface and solid modelling. One of the methods to describe a solid is by using a boundary based representation. The topology of the surface of a solid is the adjacency information between

  15. Education models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, Sybilla; Sloep, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Educational models describes a case study on a complex learning object. Possibilities are investigated for using this learning object, which is based on a particular educational model, outside of its original context. Furthermore, this study provides advice that might lead to an increase in

  16. VENTILATION MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Chipman

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses

  17. Modelling Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    , these notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult......There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add most...

  18. STEREOMETRIC MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grimaldi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : – the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program; – the shot visualization in two distinct windows – the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  19. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C α RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Osmotic properties of binary mixtures 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide and 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride with water: Effect of aggregation of ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Chatterjee, Aninda; Maity, Banibrata; Seth, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Osmotic properties of binary mixture of two ionic liquids (ILs): 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium dicyanamide and 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride with water was reported by using vapour pressure osmometry (VPO) method. - Highlights: • Osmotic properties of binary mixture of ionic liquids (ILs) with water by using vapour pressure osmometry (VPO) method. • The experimental osmotic coefficients were well correlated by Archer extension of Pitzer model. • From the experimental osmotic coefficient data the critical micellar concentration (cmc) of the ILs in water was estimated. • Mean molar activity coefficient and the excess Gibbs free energy was determine for the (ILs + water) binary mixture. - Abstract: In this work, the osmotic properties of the binary mixture of ionic liquids (ILs) and water were studied by using vapour pressure osmometry (VPO) method. We have used two ILs: 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium dicyanamide and 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride. The aqueous solution of NaCl was used as the reference solution to precisely measure the osmotic coefficients of the above systems. We have calculated the activity of water in the above systems and the change of vapour pressure of water due to the addition of ILs in water. The experimental osmotic coefficients were correlated by the Archer extension of Pitzer model. The parameters of this Archer extension of Pitzer model were found from this data fitting. From the experimental osmotic coefficient value we have estimated the critical micellar concentration (cmc) of ILs in water. The experimental values of osmotic coefficient in the above systems were compared with the literature and the reason of variation was explained, in terms of the aggregation of ILs in water

  1. Graphical Rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Svend; Christensen, Karl Bang

    Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models......Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models...

  2. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; California, University, Livermore, CA); Weaver, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the Ni-56 produced therein is reviewed. The expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra for this model of type I explosions and a model for type II explosions are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed. While the theoretical results of existing models are predicated upon the assumption of a successful core bounce calculation and the neglect of such two-dimensional effects as rotation and magnetic fields the new model suggests an entirely different scenario in which a considerable portion of the energy carried by an equatorially ejected blob is deposited in the red giant envelope overlying the mantle of the star

  3. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Wilfrid

    1993-01-01

    An up-to-date and integrated introduction to model theory, designed to be used for graduate courses (for students who are familiar with first-order logic), and as a reference for more experienced logicians and mathematicians.

  4. Markov model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2School of Water Resources, Indian Institute of Technology,. Kharagpur ... the most accepted method for modelling LULCC using current .... We used UTM coordinate system with zone 45 .... need to develop criteria for making decision about.

  5. Paleoclimate Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Computer simulations of past climate. Variables provided as model output are described by parameter keyword. In some cases the parameter keywords are a subset of all...

  6. Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  7. Linear Models

    CERN Document Server

    Searle, Shayle R

    2012-01-01

    This 1971 classic on linear models is once again available--as a Wiley Classics Library Edition. It features material that can be understood by any statistician who understands matrix algebra and basic statistical methods.

  8. Ventilation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaret, Eimund

    Calculation procedures, used in the design of ventilating systems, which are especially suited for displacement ventilation in addition to linking it to mixing ventilation, are addressed. The two zone flow model is considered and the steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Different methods of supplying air are discussed, and different types of air flow are considered: piston flow, plane flow and radial flow. An evaluation model for ventilation systems is presented.

  9. Model uncertainty: Probabilities for models?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Like any other type of uncertainty, model uncertainty should be treated in terms of probabilities. The question is how to do this. The most commonly-used approach has a drawback related to the interpretation of the probabilities assigned to the models. If we step back and look at the big picture, asking what the appropriate focus of the model uncertainty question should be in the context of risk and decision analysis, we see that a different probabilistic approach makes more sense, although it raise some implementation questions. Current work that is underway to address these questions looks very promising

  10. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO4 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO 4 up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25 degrees C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na + -HOx - , Na + -Ox - , AmOx + -ClO 4 - , and Na + -Am(Ox) 2 - interactions obtained by fitting the data

  11. Solubility diagrams in ternary aqueous-salt systems with yttrium, barium and copper nitrates at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrenko, S.V.; Lyashchenko, A.K.; Karataeva, I.M.; Mozhaev, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Solubility diagrams in Cu(NO 3 ) 2 -Y(NO 3 ) 3 -H 2 O, Y(NO 3 ) 3 -Ba(NO 3 ) 2 -H 2 O and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 -Ba(NO 3 ) 2 -H 2 O systems are studied at 25 deg C based on experimental determinations of salt solubility, isopiestic measurements and data of the calculation-experimental method in the framework of the Pitzer model. Binary and ternary parameters of interionic interactions are calculated; applicability of the method to the given systems is shown. Salts of complex composition and structure are absent in them; mutual salting out of components is also observed

  12. (p,Vm,T,x) measurements for aqueous LiNO3 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulagatov, I.M.; Azizov, N.D.

    2004-01-01

    (p,V m ,T,x) properties of four aqueous LiNO 3 solutions (0.181, 0.526, 0.963, and 1.728) mol · kg -1 H 2 O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made for 10 isotherms between (298 and 573) K. The range of pressure was from (2 to 40) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements were estimated to be less than 0.06 %, 0.05 %, 10 mK, and 0.014 %, respectively. The values of saturated density were determined by extrapolating experimental (p,ρ) data to the vapor-pressure at fixed temperature and composition using an interpolating equation. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method from the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.02 %. Measured values of solution density were compared with values calculated from Pitzer's ion-interaction equation. The agreement is within (0.2 to 0.4) % depending of concentration range

  13. (p,V{sub m},T,x) measurements for aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions[Density; Concentration; Electrolyte solutions; Equation of state; Lithium nitrate; Saturated density; Saturated pressure; Temperature; Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulagatov, I.M. E-mail: ilmutdin@boulder.nist.govmangur@datacom.ru; Azizov, N.D. E-mail: Nazim_Azizov@yahoo.com

    2004-01-01

    (p,V{sub m},T,x) properties of four aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions (0.181, 0.526, 0.963, and 1.728) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} H{sub 2}O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made for 10 isotherms between (298 and 573) K. The range of pressure was from (2 to 40) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements were estimated to be less than 0.06 %, 0.05 %, 10 mK, and 0.014 %, respectively. The values of saturated density were determined by extrapolating experimental (p,{rho}) data to the vapor-pressure at fixed temperature and composition using an interpolating equation. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method from the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.02 %. Measured values of solution density were compared with values calculated from Pitzer's ion-interaction equation. The agreement is within (0.2 to 0.4) % depending of concentration range.

  14. Thermocouple modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, M.O.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature measurements provided by thermocouples (TCs) are important for the operation of pressurized water reactors. During severe inadequate core cooling incidents, extreme temperatures may cause type K thermocouples (TCs) used for core exit temperature monitoring to perform poorly. A model of TC electrical behavior has been developed to determine how TCs react under extreme temperatures. The model predicts the voltage output of the TC and its impedance. A series of experiments were conducted on a length of type K thermocouple to validate the model. Impedance was measured at several temperatures between 22 0 C and 1100 0 C and at frequencies between dc and 10 MHz. The model was able to accurately predict impedance over this wide range of conditions. The average percentage difference between experimental data and the model was less than 6.5%. Experimental accuracy was +-2.5%. There is a sriking difference between impedance versus frequency plots at 300 0 C and at higher temperatures. This may be useful in validating TC data during accident conditions

  15. Photoionization Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T.

    2010-01-01

    Warm absorber spectra are characterized by the many lines from partially ionized intermediate-Z elements, and iron, detected with the grating instruments on Chandra and XMM-Newton. If these ions are formed in a gas which is in photoionization equilibrium, they correspond to a broad range of ionization parameters, although there is evidence for certain preferred values. A test for any dynamical model for these outflows is to reproduce these properties, at some level of detail. In this paper we present a statistical analysis of the ionization distribution which can be applied both the observed spectra and to theoretical models. As an example, we apply it to our dynamical models for warm absorber outflows, based on evaporation from the molecular torus.

  16. Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Cooper, K.; Randolph, M.

    1984-01-01

    A classical description of the one dimensional radiative transfer treatment of vegetation canopies was completed and the results were tested against measured prairie (blue grama) and agricultural canopies (soybean). Phase functions are calculated in terms of directly measurable biophysical characteristics of the canopy medium. While the phase functions tend to exhibit backscattering anisotropy, their exact behavior is somewhat more complex and wavelength dependent. A Monte Carlo model was developed that treats soil surfaces with large periodic variations in three dimensions. A photon-ray tracing technology is used. Currently, the rough soil surface is described by analytic functions and appropriate geometric calculations performed. A bidirectional reflectance distribution function is calculated and, hence, available for other atmospheric or canopy reflectance models as a lower boundary condition. This technique is used together with an adding model to calculate several cases where Lambertian leaves possessing anisotropic leaf angle distributions yield non-Lambertian reflectance; similar behavior is exhibited for simulated soil surfaces.

  17. Mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Eck, Christof; Knabner, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical models are the decisive tool to explain and predict phenomena in the natural and engineering sciences. With this book readers will learn to derive mathematical models which help to understand real world phenomena. At the same time a wealth of important examples for the abstract concepts treated in the curriculum of mathematics degrees are given. An essential feature of this book is that mathematical structures are used as an ordering principle and not the fields of application. Methods from linear algebra, analysis and the theory of ordinary and partial differential equations are thoroughly introduced and applied in the modeling process. Examples of applications in the fields electrical networks, chemical reaction dynamics, population dynamics, fluid dynamics, elasticity theory and crystal growth are treated comprehensively.

  18. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modelingof brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2005-11-15

    Coupled modelling of fluid flow and reactive transport ingeothermal systems is challenging because of reservoir conditions such ashigh temperatures, elevated pressures and sometimes high salinities ofthe formation fluids. Thermal hydrological-chemical (THC) codes, such asFRACHEM and TOUGHREACT, have been developed to evaluate the long-termhydrothermal and chemical evolution of exploited reservoirs. In thisstudy, the two codes were applied to model the same geothermal reservoir,to forecast reservoir evolution using respective thermodynamic andkinetic input data. A recent (unreleased) TOUGHREACT version allows theuse of either an extended Debye-Hu?ckel or Pitzer activity model forcalculating activity coefficients, while FRACHEM was designed to use thePitzer formalism. Comparison of models results indicate that differencesin thermodynamic equilibrium constants, activity coefficients andkinetics models can result in significant differences in predictedmineral precipitation behaviour and reservoir-porosity evolution.Differences in the calculation schemes typically produce less differencein model outputs than differences in input thermodynamic and kineticdata, with model results being particularly sensitive to differences inion-interaction parameters for highsalinity systems.

  19. Modelling language

    CERN Document Server

    Cardey, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    In response to the need for reliable results from natural language processing, this book presents an original way of decomposing a language(s) in a microscopic manner by means of intra/inter‑language norms and divergences, going progressively from languages as systems to the linguistic, mathematical and computational models, which being based on a constructive approach are inherently traceable. Languages are described with their elements aggregating or repelling each other to form viable interrelated micro‑systems. The abstract model, which contrary to the current state of the art works in int

  20. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  1. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the 56 Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed

  2. Densities and apparent molar volumes of atmospherically important electrolyte solutions. 1. The solutes H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, Na2SO4, NaNO3, NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, and NH4Cl from 0 to 50 °C, including extrapolations to very low temperature and to the pure liquid state, and NaHSO4, NaOH, and NH3 at 25 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S L; Wexler, A S

    2011-04-21

    Calculations of the size and density of atmospheric aerosols are complicated by the fact that they can exist at concentrations highly supersaturated with respect to dissolved salts and supercooled with respect to ice. Densities and apparent molar volumes of solutes in aqueous solutions containing the solutes H(2)SO(4), HNO(3), HCl, Na(2)SO(4), NaNO(3), NaCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), and NH(4)Cl have been critically evaluated and represented using fitted equations from 0 to 50 °C or greater and from infinite dilution to concentrations saturated or supersaturated with respect to the dissolved salts. Using extrapolated densities of high-temperature solutions and melts, the relationship between density and concentration is extended to the hypothetical pure liquid solutes. Above a given reference concentration of a few mol kg(-1), it is observed that density increases almost linearly with decreasing temperature, and comparisons with available data below 0 °C suggest that the fitted equations for density can be extrapolated to very low temperatures. As concentration is decreased below the reference concentration, the variation of density with temperature tends to that of water (which decreases as temperature is reduced below 3.98 °C). In this region below the reference concentration, and below 0 °C, densities are calculated using extrapolated apparent molar volumes which are constrained to agree at the reference concentrations with an equation for the directly fitted density. Calculated volume properties agree well with available data at low temperatures, for both concentrated and dilute solutions. Comparisons are made with literature data for temperatures of maximum density. Apparent molar volumes at infinite dilution are consistent, on a single ion basis, to better than ±0.1 cm(3) mol(-1) from 0 to 50 °C. Volume properties of aqueous NaHSO(4), NaOH, and NH(3) have also been evaluated, at 25 °C only. In part 2 of this work (ref 1 ) an ion interaction (Pitzer

  3. Painting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  4. Entrepreneurship Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger Lakes Regional Education Center for Economic Development, Mount Morris, NY.

    This guide describes seven model programs that were developed by the Finger Lakes Regional Center for Economic Development (New York) to meet the training needs of female and minority entrepreneurs to help their businesses survive and grow and to assist disabled and dislocated workers and youth in beginning small businesses. The first three models…

  5. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of probabil...

  6. Eclipse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of, if one overlooks their idiosyncratic difficulties, what could be learned from the various models about the pulsar wind? The wind model requires an MHD wind from the pulsar, namely, one with enough particles that the Poynting flux of the wind can be thermalized. Otherwise, there is no shock and the pulsar wind simply reflects like a flashlight beam. Additionally, a large flux of energetic radiation from the pulsar is required to accompany the wind and drive the wind off the companion. The magnetosphere model probably requires an EM wind, which is Poynting flux dominated. Reflection in this case would arguably minimize the intimate interaction between the two flows that leads to tail formation and thereby permit a weakly magnetized tail. The occulting disk model also would point to an EM wind so that the interaction would be pushed down onto the companion surface (to form the neutral fountain) and so as to also minimize direct interaction of the wind with the orbiting macroscopic particles

  7. (SSE) model

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simple analytic polynomials have been proposed for estimating solar radiation in the traditional Northern, Central and Southern regions of Malawi. There is a strong agreement between the polynomials and the SSE model with R2 values of 0.988, 0.989 and 0.989 and root mean square errors of 0.061, 0.057 and 0.062 ...

  8. Successful modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    Tichelaar and Ruff [1989] propose to “estimate model variance in complicated geophysical problems,” including the determination of focal depth in earthquakes, by means of unconventional statistical methods such as bootstrapping. They are successful insofar as they are able to duplicate the results from more conventional procedures.

  9. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  10. Cadastral Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2005-01-01

    to the modeling of an industrial sector, as it aims at rendering the basic concepts that relate to the domain of real estate and the pertinent human activities. The palpable objects are pieces of land and buildings, documents, data stores and archives, as well as persons in their diverse roles as owners, holders...

  11. The Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    About the reconstruction of Palle Nielsen's (f. 1942) work The Model from 1968: a gigantic playground for children in the museum, where they can freely romp about, climb in ropes, crawl on wooden structures, work with tools, jump in foam rubber, paint with finger paints and dress up in costumes....

  12. Biotran model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Gallegos, A.F.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The BIOTRAN model was developed at Los Alamos to help predict short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment. It is a dynamic model that simulates on a daily and yearly basis the flux of biomass, water, and radionuclides through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Biomass, water, and radionuclides are driven within the ecosystems by climate variables stochastically generated by BIOTRAN each simulation day. The climate variables influence soil hydraulics, plant growth, evapotranspiration, and particle suspension and deposition. BIOTRAN has 22 different plant growth strategies for simulating various grasses, shrubs, trees, and crops. Ruminants and humans are also dynamically simulated by using the simulated crops and forage as intake for user-specified diets. BIOTRAN has been used at Los Alamos for long-term prediction of health effects to populations following potential accidental releases of uranium and plutonium. Newly developed subroutines are described: a human dynamic physiological and metabolic model; a soil hydrology and irrigation model; limnetic nutrient and radionuclide cycling in fresh-water lakes. 7 references

  13. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  14. Hydroballistics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    thai h’liathe0in antd is finaull’ %IIIrd alt %tramlit And drohlttle. Mike aplpars Ito inua•,e upward in outler a rei and dowoi. ward it %iunr areli, Oil...fiducial marks should be constant and the edges phobic nor hydrophilic is better for routine sharpl ) defined. model testing. Before each launching in

  15. Molecular Modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular Docking. Rama Rao Nadendla. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 51-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Criticality Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaed, A.

    2004-01-01

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  17. Building Models and Building Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj; Skauge, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    I rapportens indledende kapitel beskrives de primære begreber vedrørende bygningsmodeller og nogle fundamentale forhold vedrørende computerbaseret modulering bliver opstillet. Desuden bliver forskellen mellem tegneprogrammer og bygnings­model­lerings­programmer beskrevet. Vigtige aspekter om comp...

  18. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....... on this subject, this book makes essential reading for anyone considering new ways of thinking about architecture. In drawing upon both historical and contemporary perspectives this book provides evidence of the ways in which relations between representation and the represented continue to be reconsidered...

  19. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....... on this subject, this book makes essential reading for anyone considering new ways of thinking about architecture. In drawing upon both historical and contemporary perspectives this book provides evidence of the ways in which relations between representation and the represented continue to be reconsidered...

  20. Acyclic models

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Acyclic models is a method heavily used to analyze and compare various homology and cohomology theories appearing in topology and algebra. This book is the first attempt to put together in a concise form this important technique and to include all the necessary background. It presents a brief introduction to category theory and homological algebra. The author then gives the background of the theory of differential modules and chain complexes over an abelian category to state the main acyclic models theorem, generalizing and systemizing the earlier material. This is then applied to various cohomology theories in algebra and topology. The volume could be used as a text for a course that combines homological algebra and algebraic topology. Required background includes a standard course in abstract algebra and some knowledge of topology. The volume contains many exercises. It is also suitable as a reference work for researchers.

  1. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  2. RNICE Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin; Stritch, Justin Michael

    2018-01-01

    Replication studies relate to the scientific principle of replicability and serve the significant purpose of providing supporting (or contradicting) evidence regarding the existence of a phenomenon. However, replication has never been an integral part of public administration and management...... research. Recently, scholars have issued calls for more replication, but academic reflections on when replication adds substantive value to public administration and management research are needed. This concise article presents a conceptual model, RNICE, for assessing when and how a replication study...... contributes knowledge about a social phenomenon and advances knowledge in the public administration and management literatures. The RNICE model provides a vehicle for researchers who seek to evaluate or demonstrate the value of a replication study systematically. We illustrate the practical application...

  3. Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in set theory and readily available software have enabled social science researchers to bridge the variable-centered quantitative and case-based qualitative methodological paradigms in order to analyze multi-dimensional associations beyond the linearity assumptions, aggregate...... effects, unicausal reduction, and case specificity. Based on the developments in set theoretical thinking in social sciences and employing methods like Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA), and set visualization techniques, in this position paper, we propose...... and demonstrate a new approach to maturity models in the domain of Information Systems. This position paper describes the set-theoretical approach to maturity models, presents current results and outlines future research work....

  4. Modelling Defiguration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork Petersen, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    advantageous manner. Stepping on the catwalk’s sloping, moving surfaces decelerates the models’ walk and makes it cautious, hesitant and shaky: suddenly the models lack exactly the affirmative, staccato, striving quality of motion, and the condescending expression that they perform on most contemporary......For the presentation of his autumn/winter 2012 collection in Paris and subsequently in Copenhagen, Danish designer Henrik Vibskov installed a mobile catwalk. The article investigates the choreographic impact of this scenography on those who move through it. Drawing on Dance Studies, the analytical...... focus centres on how the catwalk scenography evokes a ‘defiguration’ of the walking models and to what effect. Vibskov’s mobile catwalk draws attention to the walk, which is a key element of models’ performance but which usually functions in fashion shows merely to present clothes in the most...

  5. Cheating models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnoldi, Jakob

    The article discusses the use of algorithmic models for so-called High Frequency Trading (HFT) in finance. HFT is controversial yet widespread in modern financial markets. It is a form of automated trading technology which critics among other things claim can lead to market manipulation. Drawing....... The article analyses these challenges and argues that we witness a new post-social form of human-technology interaction that will lead to a reconfiguration of professional codes for financial trading....

  6. Biomimetic modelling.

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Julian F V

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetics is seen as a path from biology to engineering. The only path from engineering to biology in current use is the application of engineering concepts and models to biological systems. However, there is another pathway: the verification of biological mechanisms by manufacture, leading to an iterative process between biology and engineering in which the new understanding that the engineering implementation of a biological system can bring is fed back into biology, allowing a more compl...

  7. Ozone modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIllvaine, C M

    1994-07-01

    Exhaust gases from power plants that burn fossil fuels contain concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), particulate matter, hydrocarbon compounds and trace metals. Estimated emissions from the operation of a hypothetical 500 MW coal-fired power plant are given. Ozone is considered a secondary pollutant, since it is not emitted directly into the atmosphere but is formed from other air pollutants, specifically, nitrogen oxides (NO), and non-methane organic compounds (NMOQ) in the presence of sunlight. (NMOC are sometimes referred to as hydrocarbons, HC, or volatile organic compounds, VOC, and they may or may not include methane). Additionally, ozone formation Alternative is a function of the ratio of NMOC concentrations to NO{sub x} concentrations. A typical ozone isopleth is shown, generated with the Empirical Kinetic Modeling Approach (EKMA) option of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Ozone Isopleth Plotting Mechanism (OZIPM-4) model. Ozone isopleth diagrams, originally generated with smog chamber data, are more commonly generated with photochemical reaction mechanisms and tested against smog chamber data. The shape of the isopleth curves is a function of the region (i.e. background conditions) where ozone concentrations are simulated. The location of an ozone concentration on the isopleth diagram is defined by the ratio of NMOC and NO{sub x} coordinates of the point, known as the NMOC/NO{sub x} ratio. Results obtained by the described model are presented.

  8. Ozone modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIllvaine, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Exhaust gases from power plants that burn fossil fuels contain concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), particulate matter, hydrocarbon compounds and trace metals. Estimated emissions from the operation of a hypothetical 500 MW coal-fired power plant are given. Ozone is considered a secondary pollutant, since it is not emitted directly into the atmosphere but is formed from other air pollutants, specifically, nitrogen oxides (NO), and non-methane organic compounds (NMOQ) in the presence of sunlight. (NMOC are sometimes referred to as hydrocarbons, HC, or volatile organic compounds, VOC, and they may or may not include methane). Additionally, ozone formation Alternative is a function of the ratio of NMOC concentrations to NO x concentrations. A typical ozone isopleth is shown, generated with the Empirical Kinetic Modeling Approach (EKMA) option of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Ozone Isopleth Plotting Mechanism (OZIPM-4) model. Ozone isopleth diagrams, originally generated with smog chamber data, are more commonly generated with photochemical reaction mechanisms and tested against smog chamber data. The shape of the isopleth curves is a function of the region (i.e. background conditions) where ozone concentrations are simulated. The location of an ozone concentration on the isopleth diagram is defined by the ratio of NMOC and NO x coordinates of the point, known as the NMOC/NO x ratio. Results obtained by the described model are presented

  9. Animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ellen A

    2010-01-01

    As clinical studies reveal that chemotherapeutic agents may impair several different cognitive domains in humans, the development of preclinical animal models is critical to assess the degree of chemotherapy-induced learning and memory deficits and to understand the underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, the effects of various cancer chemotherapeutic agents in rodents on sensory processing, conditioned taste aversion, conditioned emotional response, passive avoidance, spatial learning, cued memory, discrimination learning, delayed-matching-to-sample, novel-object recognition, electrophysiological recordings and autoshaping is reviewed. It appears at first glance that the effects of the cancer chemotherapy agents in these many different models are inconsistent. However, a literature is emerging that reveals subtle or unique changes in sensory processing, acquisition, consolidation and retrieval that are dose- and time-dependent. As more studies examine cancer chemotherapeutic agents alone and in combination during repeated treatment regimens, the animal models will become more predictive tools for the assessment of these impairments and the underlying neural mechanisms. The eventual goal is to collect enough data to enable physicians to make informed choices about therapeutic regimens for their patients and discover new avenues of alternative or complementary therapies that reduce or eliminate chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits.

  10. Modeling biomembranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimpton, Steven James; Heffernan, Julieanne; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Frink, Laura J. Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the properties and behavior of biomembranes is fundamental to many biological processes and technologies. Microdomains in biomembranes or ''lipid rafts'' are now known to be an integral part of cell signaling, vesicle formation, fusion processes, protein trafficking, and viral and toxin infection processes. Understanding how microdomains form, how they depend on membrane constituents, and how they act not only has biological implications, but also will impact Sandia's effort in development of membranes that structurally adapt to their environment in a controlled manner. To provide such understanding, we created physically-based models of biomembranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using these models were applied to phenomena such as microdomain formation, membrane fusion, pattern formation, and protein insertion. Because lipid dynamics and self-organization in membranes occur on length and time scales beyond atomistic MD, we used coarse-grained models of double tail lipid molecules that spontaneously self-assemble into bilayers. DFT provided equilibrium information on membrane structure. Experimental work was performed to further help elucidate the fundamental membrane organization principles.

  11. Model visionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, Graham

    2011-03-15

    Ken Dedeluk is the president and CEO of Computer Modeling Group (CMG). Dedeluk started his career with Gulf Oil in 1972, worked in computer assisted design; then joined Imperial Esso and Shell, where he became international operations' VP; and finally joined CMG in 1998. CMG made a decision that turned out to be the company's turning point: they decided to provide intensive support and service to their customer to better use their technology. Thanks to this service, their customers' satisfaction grew as well as their revenues.

  12. Osmotic coefficients and apparent molar volumes of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid in alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, Emilio J.; Calvar, Noelia; Macedo, Eugénia A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Physical and osmotic properties of [HMim][TfO] in alcohols are reported. • Apparent molar properties and osmotic coefficients were obtained. • Apparent molar volumes were fitted using a Redlich–Meyer type equation. • The osmotic coefficients were modeled with the Extended Pitzer and the MNRTL models. -- Abstract: In this work, density for the binary mixtures of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate in alcohols (1-propanol, or 2-propanol, or 1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol) was measured at T = 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. From this property, the corresponding apparent molar volumes were calculated and fitted to a Redlich–Meyer type equation. For these mixtures, the osmotic and activity coefficients, and vapor pressures of these binary systems were also determined at the same temperature using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The experimental osmotic coefficients were modeled by the Extended Pitzer model of Archer. The parameters obtained in this correlation were used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures

  13. Model integration and a theory of models

    OpenAIRE

    Dolk, Daniel R.; Kottemann, Jeffrey E.

    1993-01-01

    Model integration extends the scope of model management to include the dimension of manipulation as well. This invariably leads to comparisons with database theory. Model integration is viewed from four perspectives: Organizational, definitional, procedural, and implementational. Strategic modeling is discussed as the organizational motivation for model integration. Schema and process integration are examined as the logical and manipulation counterparts of model integr...

  14. ALEPH model

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    A wooden model of the ALEPH experiment and its cavern. ALEPH was one of 4 experiments at CERN's 27km Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) that ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel. The cavern and detector are in separate locations - the cavern is stored at CERN and the detector is temporarily on display in Glasgow physics department. Both are available for loan.

  15. modelling distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Love

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance predicting functions may be used in a variety of applications for estimating travel distances between points. To evaluate the accuracy of a distance predicting function and to determine its parameters, a goodness-of-fit criteria is employed. AD (Absolute Deviations, SD (Squared Deviations and NAD (Normalized Absolute Deviations are the three criteria that are mostly employed in practice. In the literature some assumptions have been made about the properties of each criterion. In this paper, we present statistical analyses performed to compare the three criteria from different perspectives. For this purpose, we employ the ℓkpθ-norm as the distance predicting function, and statistically compare the three criteria by using normalized absolute prediction error distributions in seventeen geographical regions. We find that there exist no significant differences between the criteria. However, since the criterion SD has desirable properties in terms of distance modelling procedures, we suggest its use in practice.

  16. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-02-09

    Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

  17. Vapour pressures and osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing alcohol and pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, N.; Domínguez, Á.; Macedo, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Osmotic coefficients of alcohols with pyrrolidinium ILs are determined. • Experimental data were correlated with extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. • Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. • The results have been interpreted in terms of interactions. -- Abstract: The osmotic and activity coefficients and vapour pressures of mixtures containing primary (1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol) and secondary (2-propanol and 2-butanol) alcohols with pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 4 MpyrNTf 2 , and 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate, C 4 MpyrTFO) have been experimentally determined at T = 323.15 K. For the experimental measurements, the vapour pressure osmometry technique has been used. The results on the influence of the structure of the alcohol and of the anion of the ionic liquid on the determined properties have been discussed and compared with literature data. For the correlation of the osmotic coefficients obtained, the Extended Pitzer model of Archer and the Modified Non-Random Two Liquids model were applied. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs energy for the studied mixtures were calculated from the parameters obtained in the correlation

  18. Thermodynamics of the CSCl-H{sub 2}O system at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnin, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France). Lab. de Geochimie; Dubois, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 59 - Villeneuve d`Ascq (France). Lab. de Sedimentologie et Geodynamique

    1999-05-01

    The interpretation of fluid-inclusion data requires knowledge of phase diagrams at low (subfreezing) temperatures. From the example of the CsCl-H{sub 2}O system, we here investigate the possibility to build such diagrams from thermodynamic models of aqueous solutions parameterized at higher temperatures. Holmes and Mesmer (1983) have built a model for the thermodynamic properties of CsCl(aq) based on Pitzer`s equation fit to thermodynamic data mainly at temperatures above 0 C along with a few freezing-point-depression data down to -8 C. We show how this model can be used along with the published water-ice equilibrium constant and thermodynamic data at 25 C for Cs{sup +}(aq), Cl{sup -}(aq) and CsCl(s), to predict with confidence the ice-liquid-vapor (ILV) and the salt-liquid-vapor (SLV) curves down to the eutectic temperature for the CsCl-H{sub 2}O system. (orig.)

  19. Comparison: Binomial model and Black Scholes model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ahmad Dar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binomial Model and the Black Scholes Model are the popular methods that are used to solve the option pricing problems. Binomial Model is a simple statistical method and Black Scholes model requires a solution of a stochastic differential equation. Pricing of European call and a put option is a very difficult method used by actuaries. The main goal of this study is to differentiate the Binominal model and the Black Scholes model by using two statistical model - t-test and Tukey model at one period. Finally, the result showed that there is no significant difference between the means of the European options by using the above two models.

  20. Computational Modeling | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    cell walls and are the source of biofuels and biomaterials. Our modeling investigates their properties . Quantum Mechanical Models NREL studies chemical and electronic properties and processes to reduce barriers Computational Modeling Computational Modeling NREL uses computational modeling to increase the

  1. Acoustic, volumetric and osmotic properties of binary mixtures containing the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide mixed with primary and secondary alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; González, Emilio J.; Domínguez, Ángeles; Macedo, Eugénia A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Physical and osmotic properties of binary mixtures {alcohol + [BMim][dca]} were measured. ► From experimental data, apparent molar properties and osmotic coefficients were calculated. ► The apparent properties were fitted using a Redlich–Meyer type equation. ► The osmotic coefficients were correlated using the Extended Pitzer and the MNRTL models. - Abstract: In this paper, densities and speeds of sound for five binary systems {alcohol + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide} were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and atmospheric pressure. From these experimental data, apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression have been calculated and fitted to a Redlich–Meyer type equation. This fit was also used to calculate the apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression at infinite dilution for the studied binary mixtures. Moreover, the osmotic and activity coefficients and vapor pressures of these binary mixtures were also determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The experimental osmotic coefficients were correlated using the Extended Pitzer model of Archer. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures were calculated from the parameters obtained in the correlation.

  2. Osmotic and apparent molar properties of binary mixtures alcohol + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, Emilio J.; Calvar, Noelia; Domínguez, Ángeles; Macedo, Eugénia A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Osmotic and physical properties of binary mixtures {alcohol + [BMim][TfO]} were measured. ► From experimental data, apparent molar properties and osmotic coefficients were calculated. ► The apparent properties were fitted using a Redlich–Meyer type equation. ► The osmotic coefficients were correlated using the Extended Pitzer model. -- Abstract: In this work, physical properties (densities and speeds of sound) for the binary systems {1-propanol, or 2-propanol, or 1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate} were experimentally measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. These data were used to calculate the apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression which were fitted to a Redlich–Meyer type equation. This fit was used to obtain the corresponding apparent molar properties at infinite dilution. On the other hand, the osmotic and activity coefficients and vapor pressures of these binary mixtures were also determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The Extended Pitzer model of Archer was employed to correlate the experimental osmotic coefficients. From the parameters obtained in the correlation, the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures were calculated

  3. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2006-03-15

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH and ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a {sub s} and osmotic {phi} coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg{sup -1} and for the ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  4. Implementation of equilibrium aqueous speciation and solubility (EQ3 type) calculations into Cantera for electrolyte solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level capability for modeling brine thermodynamic properties using the open-source code Cantera. This implementation into Cantera allows for the application of chemical thermodynamics to describe the interactions between a solid and an electrolyte solution at chemical equilibrium. The formulations to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes are based on Pitzer's model to calculate molality-based activity coefficients using a real equation-of-state (EoS) for water. In addition, the thermodynamic properties of solutes at elevated temperature and pressures are computed using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) EoS for ionic and neutral aqueous species. The thermodynamic data parameters for the Pitzer formulation and HKF EoS are from the thermodynamic database compilation developed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) used with the computer code EQ3/6. We describe the adopted equations and their implementation within Cantera and also provide several validated examples relevant to the calculations of extensive properties of electrolyte solutions.

  5. Essays on model uncertainty in financial models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing

    2018-01-01

    This dissertation studies model uncertainty, particularly in financial models. It consists of two empirical chapters and one theoretical chapter. The first empirical chapter (Chapter 2) classifies model uncertainty into parameter uncertainty and misspecification uncertainty. It investigates the

  6. Vector models and generalized SYK models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Cheng [Department of Physics, Brown University,Providence RI 02912 (United States)

    2017-05-23

    We consider the relation between SYK-like models and vector models by studying a toy model where a tensor field is coupled with a vector field. By integrating out the tensor field, the toy model reduces to the Gross-Neveu model in 1 dimension. On the other hand, a certain perturbation can be turned on and the toy model flows to an SYK-like model at low energy. A chaotic-nonchaotic phase transition occurs as the sign of the perturbation is altered. We further study similar models that possess chaos and enhanced reparameterization symmetries.

  7. Modeling styles in business process modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinggera, J.; Soffer, P.; Zugal, S.; Weber, B.; Weidlich, M.; Fahland, D.; Reijers, H.A.; Mendling, J.; Bider, I.; Halpin, T.; Krogstie, J.; Nurcan, S.; Proper, E.; Schmidt, R.; Soffer, P.; Wrycza, S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on quality issues of business process models has recently begun to explore the process of creating process models. As a consequence, the question arises whether different ways of creating process models exist. In this vein, we observed 115 students engaged in the act of modeling, recording

  8. The IMACLIM model; Le modele IMACLIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document provides annexes to the IMACLIM model which propose an actualized description of IMACLIM, model allowing the design of an evaluation tool of the greenhouse gases reduction policies. The model is described in a version coupled with the POLES, technical and economical model of the energy industry. Notations, equations, sources, processing and specifications are proposed and detailed. (A.L.B.)

  9. From Product Models to Product State Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Holm

    1999-01-01

    A well-known technology designed to handle product data is Product Models. Product Models are in their current form not able to handle all types of product state information. Hence, the concept of a Product State Model (PSM) is proposed. The PSM and in particular how to model a PSM is the Research...

  10. Quaternary (liquid + liquid) equilibria of aqueous two-phase polyethylene glycol, poly-N-vinylcaprolactam, and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}: Experimental and the generalized Flory-Huggins theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Enghelab Ave., Tehran 14155-6455 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Zarrabi, Mona [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Enghelab Ave., Tehran 14155-6455 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    A quaternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium study was performed to focus attention on the interaction parameters between poly-N-vinylcaprolactam (PVCL) and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) as well as between other species. At first, the new experimental data of (liquid + liquid) equilibria for aqueous two-phase systems containing PEG, KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, and PVCL at T = 303.15 K have been determined. Then the Flory-Huggins theory with two electrostatic terms (the Debye-Huckel and the Pitzer-Debye-Huckel equations) has been generalized to correlate the phase behavior of the quaternary system. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data from both models especially from the Pitzer-Debye-Huckel equation. Also an effort was done to compare the effect of temperature as well as addition of PVCL on the binodal curves of PEG, KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, and water. The effect of the type of salt on the binodals has been also studied, and the salting out power of the salts has been determined.

  11. Modelling live forensic acquisition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, MM

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of a South African model for Live Forensic Acquisition - Liforac. The Liforac model is a comprehensive model that presents a range of aspects related to Live Forensic Acquisition. The model provides forensic...

  12. Models in architectural design

    OpenAIRE

    Pauwels, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Whereas architects and construction specialists used to rely mainly on sketches and physical models as representations of their own cognitive design models, they rely now more and more on computer models. Parametric models, generative models, as-built models, building information models (BIM), and so forth, they are used daily by any practitioner in architectural design and construction. Although processes of abstraction and the actual architectural model-based reasoning itself of course rema...

  13. Rotating universe models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozini, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Concept Modeling vs. Data modeling in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    This chapter shows the usefulness of terminological concept modeling as a first step in data modeling. First, we introduce terminological concept modeling with terminological ontologies, i.e. concept systems enriched with characteristics modeled as feature specifications. This enables a formal...... account of the inheritance of characteristics and allows us to introduce a number of principles and constraints which render concept modeling more coherent than earlier approaches. Second, we explain how terminological ontologies can be used as the basis for developing conceptual and logical data models....... We also show how to map from the various elements in the terminological ontology to elements in the data models, and explain the differences between the models. Finally the usefulness of terminological ontologies as a prerequisite for IT development and data modeling is illustrated with examples from...

  15. inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, Mora K. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Hiemstra, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Van Riemsdijk, Willem H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL

    2009-01-01

    Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  16. Inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Moira K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.; Machesky, Michael L.

    2009-04-01

    Acid-base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multi-component mineral-aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 1 1 0 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Předota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Bénézeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile-water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  17. Model-to-model interface for multiscale materials modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Perry Edward [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-12-17

    A low-level model-to-model interface is presented that will enable independent models to be linked into an integrated system of models. The interface is based on a standard set of functions that contain appropriate export and import schemas that enable models to be linked with no changes to the models themselves. These ideas are presented in the context of a specific multiscale material problem that couples atomistic-based molecular dynamics calculations to continuum calculations of fluid ow. These simulations will be used to examine the influence of interactions of the fluid with an adjacent solid on the fluid ow. The interface will also be examined by adding it to an already existing modeling code, Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) and comparing it with our own molecular dynamics code.

  18. Cognitive models embedded in system simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, A.I.; Wolf, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    If we are to discuss and consider cognitive models, we must first come to grips with two questions: (1) What is cognition; (2) What is a model. Presumably, the answers to these questions can provide a basis for defining a cognitive model. Accordingly, this paper first places these two questions into perspective. Then, cognitive models are set within the context of computer simulation models and a number of computer simulations of cognitive processes are described. Finally, pervasive issues are discussed vis-a-vis cognitive modeling in the computer simulation context

  19. Thermodynamic model of Ni(II) solubility, hydrolysis and complex formation with ISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Siso, Maria Rosa; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi [Amphos21, Barcelona (Spain); Gaona, Xavier; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2018-04-01

    The solubility of β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) was investigated at T=(22±2) C in the absence and presence of α-isosaccharinic acid (ISA), the main degradation product of cellulose under alkaline pH conditions. Batch solubility experiments were performed from undersaturation conditions under inert gas (Ar) atmosphere. Solubility experiments in the absence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 and 3.0 M NaCl-NaOH solutions at 7.5 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13 (with pH{sub m} = -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}]). XRD analyses of selected solid phases collected after completing the solubility experiments (∼300 days) confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) remains as solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in all investigated conditions. Based on the slope analysis (log{sub 10}[Ni] vs. pH{sub m}) of the solubility data and solid phase characterization, the equilibrium reactions β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr)+2 H{sup +} <=> Ni{sup 2+}+2 H{sub 2}O(l) and β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) <=> Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were identified as controlling the solubility of Ni(II) within the investigated pH{sub m} region. The conditional equilibrium constants determined from the solubility experiments at different ionic strengths were evaluated with the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). In contrast to the current thermodynamic selection in the NEA-TDB, solubility data collected in the present work does not support the formation of the anionic hydrolysis species Ni(OH){sub 3}{sup -} up to pH{sub m} ≤ 13.0. Solubility experiments in the presence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 M NaCl-NaOH-NaISA solutions with 0.01 M ≤ [NaISA] ≤ 0.2 M and 9 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13. XRD analyses confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) is also the solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in the presence of ISA. Solubility data of all investigated systems can be properly explained with chemical and thermodynamic models including the formation of the complexes NiOHISA(aq), Ni(OH){sub 2}ISA{sup -} and Ni(OH){sub 3}ISA{sup 2-}. The reported data confirm

  20. Model Manipulation for End-User Modelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad

    , and transformations using their modeling notation and editor of choice. The VM* languages are implemented via a single execution engine, the VM* Runtime, built on top of the Henshin graph-based transformation engine. This approach combines the benefits of flexibility, maturity, and formality. To simplify model editor......End-user modelers are domain experts who create and use models as part of their work. They are typically not Software Engineers, and have little or no programming and meta-modeling experience. However, using model manipulation languages developed in the context of Model-Driven Engineering often...... requires such experience. These languages are therefore only used by a small subset of the modelers that could, in theory, benefit from them. The goals of this thesis are to substantiate this observation, introduce the concepts and tools required to overcome it, and provide empirical evidence in support...

  1. Air Quality Dispersion Modeling - Alternative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models, not listed in Appendix W, that can be used in regulatory applications with case-by-case justification to the Reviewing Authority as noted in Section 3.2, Use of Alternative Models, in Appendix W.

  2. Topological massive sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we construct topological sigma models which include a potential and are related to twisted massive supersymmetric sigma models. Contrary to a previous construction these models have no central charge and do not require the manifold to admit a Killing vector. We use the topological massive sigma model constructed here to simplify the calculation of the observables. Lastly it is noted that this model can be viewed as interpolating between topological massless sigma models and topological Landau-Ginzburg models. ((orig.))

  3. Business Model Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Dodgson, Mark; Gann, David; Phillips, Nelson; Massa, Lorenzo; Tucci, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The chapter offers a broad review of the literature at the nexus between Business Models and innovation studies, and examines the notion of Business Model Innovation in three different situations: Business Model Design in newly formed organizations, Business Model Reconfiguration in incumbent firms, and Business Model Innovation in the broad context of sustainability. Tools and perspectives to make sense of Business Models and support managers and entrepreneurs in dealing with Business Model ...

  4. [Bone remodeling and modeling/mini-modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio

    Modeling, adapting structures to loading by changing bone size and shapes, often takes place in bone of the fetal and developmental stages, while bone remodeling-replacement of old bone into new bone-is predominant in the adult stage. Modeling can be divided into macro-modeling(macroscopic modeling)and mini-modeling(microscopic modeling). In the cellular process of mini-modeling, unlike bone remodeling, bone lining cells, i.e., resting flattened osteoblasts covering bone surfaces will become active form of osteoblasts, and then, deposit new bone onto the old bone without mediating osteoclastic bone resorption. Among the drugs for osteoporotic treatment, eldecalcitol(a vitamin D3 analog)and teriparatide(human PTH[1-34])could show mini-modeling based bone formation. Histologically, mature, active form of osteoblasts are localized on the new bone induced by mini-modeling, however, only a few cell layer of preosteoblasts are formed over the newly-formed bone, and accordingly, few osteoclasts are present in the region of mini-modeling. In this review, histological characteristics of bone remodeling and modeling including mini-modeling will be introduced.

  5. A Model of Trusted Measurement Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Zhili; Wang Zhihao; Dai Liang; Zhu Xiaoqin

    2017-01-01

    A model of Trusted Measurement supporting behavior measurement based on trusted connection architecture (TCA) with three entities and three levels is proposed, and a frame to illustrate the model is given. The model synthesizes three trusted measurement dimensions including trusted identity, trusted status and trusted behavior, satisfies the essential requirements of trusted measurement, and unified the TCA with three entities and three levels.

  6. Modelling binary data

    CERN Document Server

    Collett, David

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Some Examples The Scope of this Book Use of Statistical Software STATISTICAL INFERENCE FOR BINARY DATA The Binomial Distribution Inference about the Success Probability Comparison of Two Proportions Comparison of Two or More Proportions MODELS FOR BINARY AND BINOMIAL DATA Statistical Modelling Linear Models Methods of Estimation Fitting Linear Models to Binomial Data Models for Binomial Response Data The Linear Logistic Model Fitting the Linear Logistic Model to Binomial Data Goodness of Fit of a Linear Logistic Model Comparing Linear Logistic Models Linear Trend in Proportions Comparing Stimulus-Response Relationships Non-Convergence and Overfitting Some other Goodness of Fit Statistics Strategy for Model Selection Predicting a Binary Response Probability BIOASSAY AND SOME OTHER APPLICATIONS The Tolerance Distribution Estimating an Effective Dose Relative Potency Natural Response Non-Linear Logistic Regression Models Applications of the Complementary Log-Log Model MODEL CHECKING Definition of Re...

  7. Modelling freight transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.A.; Jong, G. de

    2014-01-01

    Freight Transport Modelling is a unique new reference book that provides insight into the state-of-the-art of freight modelling. Focusing on models used to support public transport policy analysis, Freight Transport Modelling systematically introduces the latest freight transport modelling

  8. Semantic Business Process Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Markovic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a process-oriented business modeling framework based on semantic technologies. The framework consists of modeling languages, methods, and tools that allow for semantic modeling of business motivation, business policies and rules, and business processes. Quality of the proposed modeling framework is evaluated based on the modeling content of SAP Solution Composer and several real-world business scenarios.

  9. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  10. Model-Independent Diffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Könemann, Patrick

    just contain a list of strings, one for each line, whereas the structure of models is defined by their meta models. There are tools available which are able to compute the diff between two models, e.g. RSA or EMF Compare. However, their diff is not model-independent, i.e. it refers to the models...

  11. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  12. Environmental Satellite Models for a Macroeconomic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, F.; Grinderslev, D.; Werner, M.

    2003-01-01

    To support national environmental policy, it is desirable to forecast and analyse environmental indicators consistently with economic variables. However, environmental indicators are physical measures linked to physical activities that are not specified in economic models. One way to deal with this is to develop environmental satellite models linked to economic models. The system of models presented gives a frame of reference where emissions of greenhouse gases, acid gases, and leaching of nutrients to the aquatic environment are analysed in line with - and consistently with - macroeconomic variables. This paper gives an overview of the data and the satellite models. Finally, the results of applying the model system to calculate the impacts on emissions and the economy are reviewed in a few illustrative examples. The models have been developed for Denmark; however, most of the environmental data used are from the CORINAIR system implemented in numerous countries

  13. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  14. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and

  15. Carbonate mineral solubility at low temperatures in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Giles M.

    2001-06-01

    Carbonate minerals have played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Earth, and may have also played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Mars and Europa. Several models have been published in recent years that describe chloride and sulfate mineral solubilities in concentrated brines using the Pitzer equations. Few of these models are parameterized for subzero temperatures, and those that are do not include carbonate chemistry. The objectives of this work are to estimate Pitzer-equation bicarbonate-carbonate parameters and carbonate mineral solubility products and to incorporate them into the FREZCHEM model to predict carbonate mineral solubilities in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system at low temperatures (≤25°C) with a special focus on subzero temperatures. Most of the Pitzer-equation parameters and equilibrium constants are taken from the literature and extrapolated into the subzero temperature range. Solubility products for 14 sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium bicarbonate and carbonate minerals are included in the model. Most of the experimental data are at temperatures ≥ -8°C; only for the NaHCO 3-NaCl-H 2O and Na 2CO 3-NaCl-H 2O systems are there bicarbonate and carbonate data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. In general, the fit of the model to the experimental data is good. For example, calculated eutectic temperatures and compositions for NaHCO 3, Na 2CO 3, and their mixtures with NaCl and Na 2SO 4 salts are in good agreement with experimental data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. Application of the model to eight saline, alkaline carbonate waters give predicted pHs ranging from 9.2 to 10.2, in comparison with measured pHs that range from 8.7 to 10.2. The model suggests that the CaCO 3 mineral that precipitates during seawater freezing is probably calcite and not ikaite. The model demonstrates that a proposed salt assemblage for the icy surface of Europa consisting of highly hydrated MgSO 4

  16. Lapse rate modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Giovanni, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    prepayment models for mortgage backed securities, this paper builds a Rational Expectation (RE) model describing the policyholders' behavior in lapsing the contract. A market model with stochastic interest rates is considered, and the pricing is carried out through numerical approximation...

  17. Lapse Rate Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Giovanni, Domenico

    prepayment models for mortgage backed securities, this paper builds a Rational Expectation (RE) model describing the policyholders' behavior in lapsing the contract. A market model with stochastic interest rates is considered, and the pricing is carried out through numerical approximation...

  18. Multivariate GARCH models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    This article contains a review of multivariate GARCH models. Most common GARCH models are presented and their properties considered. This also includes nonparametric and semiparametric models. Existing specification and misspecification tests are discussed. Finally, there is an empirical example...

  19. Collaborative networks: Reference modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative Networks: Reference Modeling works to establish a theoretical foundation for Collaborative Networks. Particular emphasis is put on modeling multiple facets of collaborative networks and establishing a comprehensive modeling framework that captures and structures diverse perspectives of

  20. Models in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Joakim

    This thesis is about mathematical modelling and technology development. While mathematical modelling has become widely deployed within a broad range of scientific practices, it has also gained a central position within technology development. The intersection of mathematical modelling and technol...

  1. Business Model Canvas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Souza, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Presentatie gegeven op 13 mei 2013 op de bijeenkomst "Business Model Canvas Challenge Assen".
    Het Business Model Canvas is ontworpen door Alex Osterwalder. Het model werkt zeer overzichtelijk en bestaat uit negen bouwstenen.

  2. Energy modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry has turned to energy modelling in order to assist them in reducing the amount of energy consumed by buildings. However, while the energy loads of buildings can be accurately modelled, energy models often under...

  3. Wildfire Risk Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The model combines three modeled fire behavior parameters (rate of spread, flame length, crown fire potential) and one modeled ecological health measure (fire regime...

  4. Mathematical Modeling Using MATLAB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, Donovan

    1998-01-01

    .... Mathematical Modeling Using MA MATLAB acts as a companion resource to A First Course in Mathematical Modeling with the goal of guiding the reader to a fuller understanding of the modeling process...

  5. Analytic Modeling of Insurgencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Counterinsurgency, Situational Awareness, Civilians, Lanchester 1. Introduction Combat modeling is one of the oldest areas of operations research, dating...Army. The ground-breaking work of Lanchester in 1916 [1] marks the beginning of formal models of conflicts, where mathematical formulas and, later...Warfare model [3], which is a Lanchester - based mathematical model (see more details about this model later on), and McCormick’s Magic Diamond model [4

  6. Computational neurogenetic modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Benuskova, Lubica

    2010-01-01

    Computational Neurogenetic Modeling is a student text, introducing the scope and problems of a new scientific discipline - Computational Neurogenetic Modeling (CNGM). CNGM is concerned with the study and development of dynamic neuronal models for modeling brain functions with respect to genes and dynamic interactions between genes. These include neural network models and their integration with gene network models. This new area brings together knowledge from various scientific disciplines, such as computer and information science, neuroscience and cognitive science, genetics and molecular biol

  7. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  8. Multilevel modeling using R

    CERN Document Server

    Finch, W Holmes; Kelley, Ken

    2014-01-01

    A powerful tool for analyzing nested designs in a variety of fields, multilevel/hierarchical modeling allows researchers to account for data collected at multiple levels. Multilevel Modeling Using R provides you with a helpful guide to conducting multilevel data modeling using the R software environment.After reviewing standard linear models, the authors present the basics of multilevel models and explain how to fit these models using R. They then show how to employ multilevel modeling with longitudinal data and demonstrate the valuable graphical options in R. The book also describes models fo

  9. Cosmological models without singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, W.

    1981-01-01

    A previously studied theory of gravitation in flat space-time is applied to homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models. There exist two different classes of models without singularities: (i) ever-expanding models, (ii) oscillating models. The first class contains models with hot big bang. For these models there exist at the beginning of the universe-in contrast to Einstein's theory-very high but finite densities of matter and radiation with a big bang of very short duration. After short time these models pass into the homogeneous and isotropic models of Einstein's theory with spatial curvature equal to zero and cosmological constant ALPHA >= O. (author)

  10. TRACKING CLIMATE MODELS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CLAIRE MONTELEONI*, GAVIN SCHMIDT, AND SHAILESH SAROHA* Climate models are complex mathematical models designed by meteorologists, geophysicists, and climate...

  11. Phase Equilibrium Studies of Savannah River Tanks and Feed Streams for the Salt Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-06-19

    A chemical equilibrium model is developed and used to evaluate supersaturation of tanks and proposed feed streams to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The model uses Pitzer's model for activity coefficients and is validated by comparison with a variety of thermodynamic data. The model assesses the supersaturation of 13 tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), indicating that small amounts of gibbsite and or aluminosilicate may form. The model is also used to evaluate proposed feed streams to the Salt Waste Processing Facility for 13 years of operation. Results indicate that dilutions using 3-4 M NaOH (about 0.3-0.4 L caustic per kg feed solution) should avoid precipitation and reduce the Na{sup +} ion concentration to 5.6 M.

  12. XUV Absorption by Solid Density Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, C A

    2009-09-21

    An inverse bremsstrahlung model for plasmas and simple metals that approximates the cold, solid Al experimental data below the L-edge is applied to matter conditions relevant to XUV laser applications. The model involves an all-order calculation using a semi-analytical effective electron-ion interaction. The predicted increases in XUV absorption with rising temperature occur via two effects: increased availability of final states from reduced electron degeneracy and a stronger electron-ion interaction from reduced screening. Discrepancies in the temperature dependence as well as other details between the present approach and a recently proposed absorption model are discussed.

  13. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS MandO 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  14. Integrated Site Model Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Site Model (ISM) provides a framework for discussing the geologic features and properties of Yucca Mountain, which is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for the disposal of nuclear waste. The ISM is important to the evaluation of the site because it provides 3-D portrayals of site geologic, rock property, and mineralogic characteristics and their spatial variabilities. The ISM is not a single discrete model; rather, it is a set of static representations that provide three-dimensional (3-D), computer representations of site geology, selected hydrologic and rock properties, and mineralogic-characteristics data. These representations are manifested in three separate model components of the ISM: the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Rock Properties Model (RPM), and the Mineralogic Model (MM). The GFM provides a representation of the 3-D stratigraphy and geologic structure. Based on the framework provided by the GFM, the RPM and MM provide spatial simulations of the rock and hydrologic properties, and mineralogy, respectively. Functional summaries of the component models and their respective output are provided in Section 1.4. Each of the component models of the ISM considers different specific aspects of the site geologic setting. Each model was developed using unique methodologies and inputs, and the determination of the modeled units for each of the components is dependent on the requirements of that component. Therefore, while the ISM represents the integration of the rock properties and mineralogy into a geologic framework, the discussion of ISM construction and results is most appropriately presented in terms of the three separate components. This Process Model Report (PMR) summarizes the individual component models of the ISM (the GFM, RPM, and MM) and describes how the three components are constructed and combined to form the ISM

  15. ECONOMIC MODELING STOCKS CONTROL SYSTEM: SIMULATION MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Климак, М.С.; Войтко, С.В.

    2016-01-01

    Considered theoretical and applied aspects of the development of simulation models to predictthe optimal development and production systems that create tangible products andservices. It isproved that theprocessof inventory control needs of economicandmathematical modeling in viewof thecomplexity of theoretical studies. A simulation model of stocks control that allows make managementdecisions with production logistics

  16. Modelling bankruptcy prediction models in Slovak companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacova Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An intensive research from academics and practitioners has been provided regarding models for bankruptcy prediction and credit risk management. In spite of numerous researches focusing on forecasting bankruptcy using traditional statistics techniques (e.g. discriminant analysis and logistic regression and early artificial intelligence models (e.g. artificial neural networks, there is a trend for transition to machine learning models (support vector machines, bagging, boosting, and random forest to predict bankruptcy one year prior to the event. Comparing the performance of this with unconventional approach with results obtained by discriminant analysis, logistic regression, and neural networks application, it has been found that bagging, boosting, and random forest models outperform the others techniques, and that all prediction accuracy in the testing sample improves when the additional variables are included. On the other side the prediction accuracy of old and well known bankruptcy prediction models is quiet high. Therefore, we aim to analyse these in some way old models on the dataset of Slovak companies to validate their prediction ability in specific conditions. Furthermore, these models will be modelled according to new trends by calculating the influence of elimination of selected variables on the overall prediction ability of these models.

  17. Better models are more effectively connected models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Bielders, Charles; Darboux, Frederic; Fiener, Peter; Finger, David; Turnbull-Lloyd, Laura; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    The concept of hydrologic and geomorphologic connectivity describes the processes and pathways which link sources (e.g. rainfall, snow and ice melt, springs, eroded areas and barren lands) to accumulation areas (e.g. foot slopes, streams, aquifers, reservoirs), and the spatial variations thereof. There are many examples of hydrological and sediment connectivity on a watershed scale; in consequence, a process-based understanding of connectivity is crucial to help managers understand their systems and adopt adequate measures for flood prevention, pollution mitigation and soil protection, among others. Modelling is often used as a tool to understand and predict fluxes within a catchment by complementing observations with model results. Catchment models should therefore be able to reproduce the linkages, and thus the connectivity of water and sediment fluxes within the systems under simulation. In modelling, a high level of spatial and temporal detail is desirable to ensure taking into account a maximum number of components, which then enables connectivity to emerge from the simulated structures and functions. However, computational constraints and, in many cases, lack of data prevent the representation of all relevant processes and spatial/temporal variability in most models. In most cases, therefore, the level of detail selected for modelling is too coarse to represent the system in a way in which connectivity can emerge; a problem which can be circumvented by representing fine-scale structures and processes within coarser scale models using a variety of approaches. This poster focuses on the results of ongoing discussions on modelling connectivity held during several workshops within COST Action Connecteur. It assesses the current state of the art of incorporating the concept of connectivity in hydrological and sediment models, as well as the attitudes of modellers towards this issue. The discussion will focus on the different approaches through which connectivity

  18. Generalized latent variable modeling multilevel, longitudinal, and structural equation models

    CERN Document Server

    Skrondal, Anders; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia

    2004-01-01

    This book unifies and extends latent variable models, including multilevel or generalized linear mixed models, longitudinal or panel models, item response or factor models, latent class or finite mixture models, and structural equation models.

  19. Biosphere Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Wu

    2003-07-16

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  20. Biosphere Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  1. Biosphere Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. W. Wu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7)

  2. AIDS Epidemiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  3. A Model for Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses models. It examines what models are, the roles models perform and suggests various intentions that underlie their construction and use. It discusses how models act as a conversational partner, and how they support various forms of conversation within the conversational activity...

  4. HRM: HII Region Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Kepley, Amanda K.; Balser, Dana S.

    2017-07-01

    HII Region Models fits HII region models to observed radio recombination line and radio continuum data. The algorithm includes the calculations of departure coefficients to correct for non-LTE effects. HII Region Models has been used to model star formation in the nucleus of IC 342.

  5. Lumped-parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.

    2006-12-15

    A lumped-parameter model represents the frequency dependent soil-structure interaction of a massless foundation placed on or embedded into an unbounded soil domain. In this technical report the steps of establishing a lumped-parameter model are presented. Following sections are included in this report: Static and dynamic formulation, Simple lumped-parameter models and Advanced lumped-parameter models. (au)

  6. The Moody Mask Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarke Alexander; Andkjær, Kasper Ingdahl; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new relation model, called "The Moody Mask model", for Interactive Digital Storytelling (IDS), based on Franceso Osborne's "Mask Model" from 2011. This, mixed with some elements from Chris Crawford's Personality Models, is a system designed for dynamic interaction between ch...

  7. Efficient polarimetric BRDF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renhorn, Ingmar G E; Hallberg, Tomas; Boreman, Glenn D

    2015-11-30

    The purpose of the present manuscript is to present a polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model suitable for hyperspectral and polarimetric signature modelling. The model is based on a further development of a previously published four-parameter model that has been generalized in order to account for different types of surface structures (generalized Gaussian distribution). A generalization of the Lambertian diffuse model is presented. The pBRDF-functions are normalized using numerical integration. Using directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements, three of the four basic parameters can be determined for any wavelength. This simplifies considerably the development of multispectral polarimetric BRDF applications. The scattering parameter has to be determined from at least one BRDF measurement. The model deals with linear polarized radiation; and in similarity with e.g. the facet model depolarization is not included. The model is very general and can inherently model extreme surfaces such as mirrors and Lambertian surfaces. The complex mixture of sources is described by the sum of two basic models, a generalized Gaussian/Fresnel model and a generalized Lambertian model. Although the physics inspired model has some ad hoc features, the predictive power of the model is impressive over a wide range of angles and scattering magnitudes. The model has been applied successfully to painted surfaces, both dull and glossy and also on metallic bead blasted surfaces. The simple and efficient model should be attractive for polarimetric simulations and polarimetric remote sensing.

  8. Validation of HEDR models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Eslinger, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid

  9. Composite hadron models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    Composite models of hadrons are considered. The main attention is paid to the Sakata, S model. In the framework of the model it is presupposed that proton, neutron and Λ particle are the fundamental particles. Theoretical studies of unknown fundamental constituents of a substance have led to the creation of the quark model. In the framework of the quark model using the theory of SU(6)-symmetry the classification of mesons and baryons is considered. Using the quark model relations between hadron masses, their spins and electromagnetic properties are explained. The problem of three-colour model with many flavours is briefly presented

  10. Modeller af komplicerede systemer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J.

    emphasizes their use in relation to technical systems. All the presented models, with the exception of the types presented in chapter 2, are non-theoretical non-formal conceptual network models. Two new model types are presented: 1) The System-Environment model, which describes the environments interaction...... with conceptual modeling in relation to process control. It´s purpose is to present classify and exemplify the use of a set of qualitative model types. Such model types are useful in the early phase of modeling, where no structured methods are at hand. Although the models are general in character, this thesis......This thesis, "Modeller af komplicerede systemer", represents part of the requirements for the Danish Ph.D.degree. Assisting professor John Nørgaard-Nielsen, M.Sc.E.E.Ph.D. has been principal supervisor and professor Morten Lind, M.Sc.E.E.Ph.D. has been assisting supervisor. The thesis is concerned...

  11. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  12. The Hospitable Meal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Overgaard, Svend Skafte

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an analytical model that aims to conceptualize how meal experiences are framed when taking into account a dynamic understanding of hospitality: the meal model is named The Hospitable Meal Model. The idea behind The Hospitable Meal Model is to present a conceptual model...... that can serve as a frame for developing hospitable meal competencies among professionals working within the area of institutional foodservices as well as a conceptual model for analysing meal experiences. The Hospitable Meal Model transcends and transforms existing meal models by presenting a more open......-ended approach towards meal experiences. The underlying purpose of The Hospitable Meal Model is to provide the basis for creating value for the individuals involved in institutional meal services. The Hospitable Meal Model was developed on the basis of an empirical study on hospital meal experiences explored...

  13. Applied stochastic modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Byron JT; Tanner, Martin Abba; Carlin, Bradley P

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and Examples Introduction Examples of data sets Basic Model Fitting Introduction Maximum-likelihood estimation for a geometric model Maximum-likelihood for the beta-geometric model Modelling polyspermy Which model? What is a model for? Mechanistic models Function Optimisation Introduction MATLAB: graphs and finite differences Deterministic search methods Stochastic search methods Accuracy and a hybrid approach Basic Likelihood ToolsIntroduction Estimating standard errors and correlations Looking at surfaces: profile log-likelihoods Confidence regions from profiles Hypothesis testing in model selectionScore and Wald tests Classical goodness of fit Model selection biasGeneral Principles Introduction Parameterisation Parameter redundancy Boundary estimates Regression and influence The EM algorithm Alternative methods of model fitting Non-regular problemsSimulation Techniques Introduction Simulating random variables Integral estimation Verification Monte Carlo inference Estimating sampling distributi...

  14. Calibrated Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, C.F.; Liu, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions

  15. Calibrated Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, C.; Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions

  16. Business Models and Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai J.; Saebi, Tina

    2018-01-01

    While research on business models and business model innovation continue to exhibit growth, the field is still, even after more than two decades of research, characterized by a striking lack of cumulative theorizing and an opportunistic borrowing of more or less related ideas from neighbouring...

  17. Wake modelling combining mesoscale and microscale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Jake; Volker, Patrick; Prospathospoulos, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the basis for introducing thrust information from microscale wake models into mesocale model wake parameterizations will be described. A classification system for the different types of mesoscale wake parameterizations is suggested and outlined. Four different mesoscale wake paramet...

  18. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  19. Business Model Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Zagorsek, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Business model describes the company’s most important activities, proposed value, and the compensation for the value. Business model visualization enables to simply and systematically capture and describe the most important components of the business model while the standardization of the concept allows the comparison between companies. There are several possibilities how to visualize the model. The aim of this paper is to describe the options for business model visualization and business mod...

  20. Latent classification models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2005-01-01

    parametric family ofdistributions.  In this paper we propose a new set of models forclassification in continuous domains, termed latent classificationmodels. The latent classification model can roughly be seen ascombining the \\NB model with a mixture of factor analyzers,thereby relaxing the assumptions...... classification model, and wedemonstrate empirically that the accuracy of the proposed model issignificantly higher than the accuracy of other probabilisticclassifiers....

  1. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: External Accumulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrabi, K.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the External Accumulation Model that predicts accumulation of fissile materials in fractures and lithophysae in the rock beneath a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. (Lithophysae are voids in the rock having concentric shells of finely crystalline alkali feldspar, quartz, and other materials that were formed due to entrapped gas that later escaped, DOE 1998, p. A-25.) The intended use of this model is to estimate the quantities of external accumulation of fissile material for use in external criticality risk assessments for different types of degrading WPs: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The scope of the model validation is to (1) describe the model and the parameters used to develop the model, (2) provide rationale for selection of the parameters by comparisons with measured values, and (3) demonstrate that the parameters chosen are the most conservative selection for external criticality risk calculations. To demonstrate the applicability of the model, a Pu-ceramic WP is used as an example. The model begins with a source term from separately documented EQ6 calculations; where the source term is defined as the composition versus time of the water flowing out of a breached waste package (WP). Next, PHREEQC, is used to simulate the transport and interaction of the source term with the resident water and fractured tuff below the repository. In these simulations the primary mechanism for accumulation is mixing of the high pH, actinide-laden source term with resident water; thus lowering the pH values sufficiently for fissile minerals to become insoluble and precipitate. In the final section of the model, the outputs from PHREEQC, are processed to produce mass of accumulation

  2. Pavement Aging Model by Response Surface Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzano-Ramírez A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, surface course aging was modeled by Response Surface Methodology (RSM. The Marshall specimens were placed in a conventional oven for time and temperature conditions established on the basis of the environment factors of the region where the surface course is constructed by AC-20 from the Ing. Antonio M. Amor refinery. Volatilized material (VM, load resistance increment (ΔL and flow resistance increment (ΔF models were developed by the RSM. Cylindrical specimens with real aging were extracted from the surface course pilot to evaluate the error of the models. The VM model was adequate, in contrast (ΔL and (ΔF models were almost adequate with an error of 20 %, that was associated with the other environmental factors, which were not considered at the beginning of the research.

  3. Modelling of an homogeneous equilibrium mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard-Champmartin, A.; Poujade, O.; Mathiaud, J.; Mathiaud, J.; Ghidaglia, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present here a model for two phase flows which is simpler than the 6-equations models (with two densities, two velocities, two temperatures) but more accurate than the standard mixture models with 4 equations (with two densities, one velocity and one temperature). We are interested in the case when the two-phases have been interacting long enough for the drag force to be small but still not negligible. The so-called Homogeneous Equilibrium Mixture Model (HEM) that we present is dealing with both mixture and relative quantities, allowing in particular to follow both a mixture velocity and a relative velocity. This relative velocity is not tracked by a conservation law but by a closure law (drift relation), whose expression is related to the drag force terms of the two-phase flow. After the derivation of the model, a stability analysis and numerical experiments are presented. (authors)

  4. Model Validation Status Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M and O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and

  5. Modeling for Battery Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Goebel, Kai; Khasin, Michael; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    For any battery-powered vehicles (be it unmanned aerial vehicles, small passenger aircraft, or assets in exoplanetary operations) to operate at maximum efficiency and reliability, it is critical to monitor battery health as well performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL). To fulfil these needs, it is important to capture the battery's inherent characteristics as well as operational knowledge in the form of models that can be used by monitoring, diagnostic, and prognostic algorithms. Several battery modeling methodologies have been developed in last few years as the understanding of underlying electrochemical mechanics has been advancing. The models can generally be classified as empirical models, electrochemical engineering models, multi-physics models, and molecular/atomist. Empirical models are based on fitting certain functions to past experimental data, without making use of any physicochemical principles. Electrical circuit equivalent models are an example of such empirical models. Electrochemical engineering models are typically continuum models that include electrochemical kinetics and transport phenomena. Each model has its advantages and disadvantages. The former type of model has the advantage of being computationally efficient, but has limited accuracy and robustness, due to the approximations used in developed model, and as a result of such approximations, cannot represent aging well. The latter type of model has the advantage of being very accurate, but is often computationally inefficient, having to solve complex sets of partial differential equations, and thus not suited well for online prognostic applications. In addition both multi-physics and atomist models are computationally expensive hence are even less suited to online application An electrochemistry-based model of Li-ion batteries has been developed, that captures crucial electrochemical processes, captures effects of aging, is computationally efficient

  6. Product and Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian T.; Gani, Rafiqul

    . These approaches are put into the context of life cycle modelling, where multiscale and multiform modelling is increasingly prevalent in the 21st century. The book commences with a discussion of modern product and process modelling theory and practice followed by a series of case studies drawn from a variety......This book covers the area of product and process modelling via a case study approach. It addresses a wide range of modelling applications with emphasis on modelling methodology and the subsequent in-depth analysis of mathematical models to gain insight via structural aspects of the models...... to biotechnology applications, food, polymer and human health application areas. The book highlights to important nature of modern product and process modelling in the decision making processes across the life cycle. As such it provides an important resource for students, researchers and industrial practitioners....

  7. Dimension of linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the proper dimension of a given linear model is one of the most important tasks in the applied modeling work. We consider here eight criteria that can be used to determine the dimension of the model, or equivalently, the number of components to use in the model. Four of these cri......Determination of the proper dimension of a given linear model is one of the most important tasks in the applied modeling work. We consider here eight criteria that can be used to determine the dimension of the model, or equivalently, the number of components to use in the model. Four...... the basic problems in determining the dimension of linear models. Then each of the eight measures are treated. The results are illustrated by examples....

  8. Model Validation Status Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-11-28

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and

  9. Modeling volatility using state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, J; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    In time series problems, noise can be divided into two categories: dynamic noise which drives the process, and observational noise which is added in the measurement process, but does not influence future values of the system. In this framework, we show that empirical volatilities (the squared relative returns of prices) exhibit a significant amount of observational noise. To model and predict their time evolution adequately, we estimate state space models that explicitly include observational noise. We obtain relaxation times for shocks in the logarithm of volatility ranging from three weeks (for foreign exchange) to three to five months (for stock indices). In most cases, a two-dimensional hidden state is required to yield residuals that are consistent with white noise. We compare these results with ordinary autoregressive models (without a hidden state) and find that autoregressive models underestimate the relaxation times by about two orders of magnitude since they do not distinguish between observational and dynamic noise. This new interpretation of the dynamics of volatility in terms of relaxators in a state space model carries over to stochastic volatility models and to GARCH models, and is useful for several problems in finance, including risk management and the pricing of derivative securities. Data sets used: Olsen & Associates high frequency DEM/USD foreign exchange rates (8 years). Nikkei 225 index (40 years). Dow Jones Industrial Average (25 years).

  10. Empirical Model Building Data, Models, and Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, James R

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "This...novel and highly stimulating book, which emphasizes solving real problems...should be widely read. It will have a positive and lasting effect on the teaching of modeling and statistics in general." - Short Book Reviews This new edition features developments and real-world examples that showcase essential empirical modeling techniques Successful empirical model building is founded on the relationship between data and approximate representations of the real systems that generated that data. As a result, it is essential for researchers who construct these m

  11. Modeling Guru: Knowledge Base for NASA Modelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, M. S.; Wojcik, G. S.; van Aartsen, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Modeling Guru is an on-line knowledge-sharing resource for anyone involved with or interested in NASA's scientific models or High End Computing (HEC) systems. Developed and maintained by the NASA's Software Integration and Visualization Office (SIVO) and the NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS), Modeling Guru's combined forums and knowledge base for research and collaboration is becoming a repository for the accumulated expertise of NASA's scientific modeling and HEC communities. All NASA modelers and associates are encouraged to participate and provide knowledge about the models and systems so that other users may benefit from their experience. Modeling Guru is divided into a hierarchy of communities, each with its own set forums and knowledge base documents. Current modeling communities include those for space science, land and atmospheric dynamics, atmospheric chemistry, and oceanography. In addition, there are communities focused on NCCS systems, HEC tools and libraries, and programming and scripting languages. Anyone may view most of the content on Modeling Guru (available at http://modelingguru.nasa.gov/), but you must log in to post messages and subscribe to community postings. The site offers a full range of "Web 2.0" features, including discussion forums, "wiki" document generation, document uploading, RSS feeds, search tools, blogs, email notification, and "breadcrumb" links. A discussion (a.k.a. forum "thread") is used to post comments, solicit feedback, or ask questions. If marked as a question, SIVO will monitor the thread, and normally respond within a day. Discussions can include embedded images, tables, and formatting through the use of the Rich Text Editor. Also, the user can add "Tags" to their thread to facilitate later searches. The "knowledge base" is comprised of documents that are used to capture and share expertise with others. The default "wiki" document lets users edit within the browser so others can easily collaborate on the

  12. Models for Dynamic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Heitzig, Martina

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers aspects of the dynamic modelling and simulation of several complex operations that include a controlled blending tank, a direct methanol fuel cell that incorporates a multiscale model, a fluidised bed reactor, a standard chemical reactor and finally a polymerisation reactor...... be applied to formulate, analyse and solve these dynamic problems and how in the case of the fuel cell problem the model consists of coupledmeso and micro scale models. It is shown how data flows are handled between the models and how the solution is obtained within the modelling environment....

  13. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider.

  14. Models of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.; Khanna, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of what constitutes a physical model and what is known about the free nucleon-nucleon interaction are considered. A time independent formulation of the basic equations is chosen. Construction of the average field in which particles move in a general independent particle model is developed, concentrating on problems of defining the average spherical single particle field for any given nucleus, and methods for construction of effective residual interactions and other physical operators. Deformed shell models and both spherical and deformed harmonic oscillator models are discussed in detail, and connections between spherical and deformed shell models are analyzed. A section on cluster models is included. 11 tables, 21 figures

  15. Holographic Twin Higgs Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-01

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at mKK , naturally allowing for mKK beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider.

  16. Five models of capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides analyzing capitalist societies historically and thinking of them in terms of phases or stages, we may compare different models or varieties of capitalism. In this paper I survey the literature on this subject, and distinguish the classification that has a production or business approach from those that use a mainly political criterion. I identify five forms of capitalism: among the rich countries, the liberal democratic or Anglo-Saxon model, the social or European model, and the endogenous social integration or Japanese model; among developing countries, I distinguish the Asian developmental model from the liberal-dependent model that characterizes most other developing countries, including Brazil.

  17. Wastewater treatment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    description of biological phosphorus removal, physicalchemical processes, hydraulics and settling tanks. For attached growth systems, biofilm models have progressed from analytical steady-state models to more complex 2D/3D dynamic numerical models. Plant-wide modeling is set to advance further the practice......The state-of-the-art level reached in modeling wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is reported. For suspended growth systems, WWTP models have evolved from simple description of biological removal of organic carbon and nitrogen in aeration tanks (ASM1 in 1987) to more advanced levels including...

  18. Wastewater Treatment Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2008-01-01

    description of biological phosphorus removal, physical–chemical processes, hydraulics, and settling tanks. For attached growth systems, biofilm models have progressed from analytical steady-state models to more complex 2-D/3-D dynamic numerical models. Plant-wide modeling is set to advance further......The state-of-the-art level reached in modeling wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is reported. For suspended growth systems, WWTP models have evolved from simple description of biological removal of organic carbon and nitrogen in aeration tanks (ASM1 in 1987) to more advanced levels including...

  19. Microsoft tabular modeling cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Braak, Paul te

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook style with recipes explaining the steps for developing analytic data using Business Intelligence Semantic Models.This book is designed for developers who wish to develop powerful and dynamic models for users as well as those who are responsible for the administration of models in corporate environments. It is also targeted at analysts and users of Excel who wish to advance their knowledge of Excel through the development of tabular models or who wish to analyze data through tabular modeling techniques. We assume no prior knowledge of tabular modeling

  20. Thermodynamics of the CSCl-H2O system at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnin, C.; Dubois, M.

    1999-01-01

    The interpretation of fluid-inclusion data requires knowledge of phase diagrams at low (subfreezing) temperatures. From the example of the CsCl-H 2 O system, we here investigate the possibility to build such diagrams from thermodynamic models of aqueous solutions parameterized at higher temperatures. Holmes and Mesmer (1983) have built a model for the thermodynamic properties of CsCl(aq) based on Pitzer's equation fit to thermodynamic data mainly at temperatures above 0 C along with a few freezing-point-depression data down to -8 C. We show how this model can be used along with the published water-ice equilibrium constant and thermodynamic data at 25 C for Cs + (aq), Cl - (aq) and CsCl(s), to predict with confidence the ice-liquid-vapor (ILV) and the salt-liquid-vapor (SLV) curves down to the eutectic temperature for the CsCl-H 2 O system. (orig.)

  1. Biosphere Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  2. Biosphere Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7)

  3. Modelling of Innovation Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kijek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Bass model in 1969, research on the modelling of the diffusion of innovation resulted in a vast body of scientific literature consisting of articles, books, and studies of real-world applications of this model. The main objective of the diffusion model is to describe a pattern of spread of innovation among potential adopters in terms of a mathematical function of time. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art in mathematical models of innovation diffusion and procedures for estimating their parameters. Moreover, theoretical issues related to the models presented are supplemented with empirical research. The purpose of the research is to explore the extent to which the diffusion of broadband Internet users in 29 OECD countries can be adequately described by three diffusion models, i.e. the Bass model, logistic model and dynamic model. The results of this research are ambiguous and do not indicate which model best describes the diffusion pattern of broadband Internet users but in terms of the results presented, in most cases the dynamic model is inappropriate for describing the diffusion pattern. Issues related to the further development of innovation diffusion models are discussed and some recommendations are given. (original abstract

  4. Nonlinear Modeling by Assembling Piecewise Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full order system over a parameters range of interest, we propose a simple modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise local solutions, including the first-order Taylor series terms expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions. The assembly of these local approximations is accomplished by assigning nonlinear weights, through radial basis functions in this study. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving at different Mach numbers and pitching motions, under which the flow exhibits prominent nonlinear behaviors. All results confirm that our nonlinear model is accurate and stable for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robustness-accurate for inputs considerably different from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling preserves nonlinearity of the problems considered in a rather simple and accurate manner.

  5. Integrated Medical Model – Chest Injury Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) developed the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) to forecast the resources...

  6. Traffic & safety statewide model and GIS modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Several steps have been taken over the past two years to advance the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) safety initiative. Previous research projects began the development of a hierarchical Bayesian model to analyze crashes on Utah roadways. De...

  7. OPEC model : adjustment or new model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayoub, A.

    1994-01-01

    Since the early eighties, the international oil industry went through major changes : new financial markets, reintegration, opening of the upstream, liberalization of investments, privatization. This article provides answers to two major questions : what are the reasons for these changes ? ; do these changes announce the replacement of OPEC model by a new model in which state intervention is weaker and national companies more autonomous. This would imply a profound change of political and institutional systems of oil producing countries. (Author)

  8. Solid Waste Projection Model: Model user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, D.L.; Crow, V.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) specifically to address solid waste management issues at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC). This document, one of six documents supporting the SWPM system, contains a description of the system and instructions for preparing to use SWPM and operating Version 1 of the model. 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse (EMCH) supports and promotes emissions modeling activities both internal and external to the EPA. Through this site, the EPA...

  10. Radiobilogical cell survival models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackrisson, B.

    1992-01-01

    A central issue in clinical radiobiological research is the prediction of responses to different radiation qualities. The choice of cell survival and dose-response model greatly influences the results. In this context the relationship between theory and model is emphasized. Generally, the interpretations of experimental data depend on the model. Cell survival models are systematized with respect to their relations to radiobiological theories of cell kill. The growing knowlegde of biological, physical, and chemical mechanisms is reflected in the formulation of new models. The present overview shows that recent modelling has been more oriented towards the stochastic fluctuations connected to radiation energy deposition. This implies that the traditional cell surivival models ought to be complemented by models of stochastic energy deposition processes and repair processes at the intracellular level. (orig.)

  11. The Cap Pele Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneau, Diane; Chouinard, Omer; Arsenault, Charline

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a model of environmental education that aims to encourage greater attachment to the bioregion of Arcadia. The model results from cooperation within a village community and addresses the environmental education of people of all ages. (DDR)

  12. World Magnetic Model 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  13. World Magnetic Model 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  14. CCF model comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkinen, U.

    2004-04-01

    The report describes a simple comparison of two CCF-models, the ECLM, and the Beta-model. The objective of the comparison is to identify differences in the results of the models by applying the models in some simple test data cases. The comparison focuses mainly on theoretical aspects of the above mentioned CCF-models. The properties of the model parameter estimates in the data cases is also discussed. The practical aspects in using and estimating CCFmodels in real PSA context (e.g. the data interpretation, properties of computer tools, the model documentation) are not discussed in the report. Similarly, the qualitative CCF-analyses needed in using the models are not discussed in the report. (au)

  15. Snow model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a new snow model and a database which warehouses geometric, weather and traffic : data on New Jersey highways. The complexity of the model development lies in considering variable road : width, different spreading/plowing pattern...

  16. A costal dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahm, L.; Nyberg, L.; Gidhagen, L.

    1990-01-01

    A dispersion model to be used off costal waters has been developed. The model has been applied to describe the migration of radionuclides in the Baltic sea. A summary of the results is presented here. (K.A.E)

  17. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  18. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to a...

  19. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  20. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  1. Modeling Philosophies and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    All models begin with a framework and a set of assumptions and limitations that go along with that framework. In terms of fracing and RA, there are several places where models and parameters must be chosen to complete hazard identification.

  2. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  3. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  4. Modelling of wastewater systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Henrik

    to analyze and quantify the effect of the Aeration Tank Settling (ATS) operating mode, which is used during rain events. Furthermore, the model is used to propose a control algorithm for the phase lengths during ATS operation. The models are mainly formulated as state space model in continuous time......In this thesis, models of pollution fluxes in the inlet to 2 Danish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as well as of suspended solids (SS) concentrations in the aeration tanks of an alternating WWTP and in the effluent from the aeration tanks are developed. The latter model is furthermore used...... at modelling the fluxes in terms of the multiple correlation coefficient R2. The model of the SS concentrations in the aeration tanks of an alternating WWTP as well as in the effluent from the aeration tanks is a mass balance model based on measurements of SS in one aeration tank and in the common outlet...

  5. Graphical Models with R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsgaard, Søren; Edwards, David; Lauritzen, Steffen

    Graphical models in their modern form have been around since the late 1970s and appear today in many areas of the sciences. Along with the ongoing developments of graphical models, a number of different graphical modeling software programs have been written over the years. In recent years many...... of these software developments have taken place within the R community, either in the form of new packages or by providing an R ingerface to existing software. This book attempts to give the reader a gentle introduction to graphical modeling using R and the main features of some of these packages. In addition......, the book provides examples of how more advanced aspects of graphical modeling can be represented and handled within R. Topics covered in the seven chapters include graphical models for contingency tables, Gaussian and mixed graphical models, Bayesian networks and modeling high dimensional data...

  6. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  7. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  8. Modelling arithmetic operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabanov-kushnarenk, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of modelling finite alphabetic operators using formal intelligence theory, is explored, with the setting up of models of a 3-digit adder and a multidigit subtractor, as examples. 2 references.

  9. Hierarchical Bass model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new model about diffusion of a product which includes a memory of how many adopters or advertisements a non-adopter met, where (non-)adopters mean people (not) possessing the product. This effect is lacking in the Bass model. As an application, we utilize the model to fit the iPod sales data, and so the better agreement is obtained than the Bass model

  10. TENCompetence Domain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    This is the version 1.1 of the TENCompetence Domain Model (version 1.0 released at 19-6-2006; version 1.1 at 9-11-2008). It contains several files: a) a pdf with the model description, b) three jpg files with class models (also in the pdf), c) a MagicDraw zip file with the model itself, d) a release

  11. Optimization modeling with spreadsheets

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    An accessible introduction to optimization analysis using spreadsheets Updated and revised, Optimization Modeling with Spreadsheets, Third Edition emphasizes model building skills in optimization analysis. By emphasizing both spreadsheet modeling and optimization tools in the freely available Microsoft® Office Excel® Solver, the book illustrates how to find solutions to real-world optimization problems without needing additional specialized software. The Third Edition includes many practical applications of optimization models as well as a systematic framework that il

  12. Model Checking Feature Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Olsen, Petur; Pedersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an offline approach to analyzing feature interactions in embedded systems. The approach consists of a systematic process to gather the necessary information about system components and their models. The model is first specified in terms of predicates, before being refined to t...... to timed automata. The consistency of the model is verified at different development stages, and the correct linkage between the predicates and their semantic model is checked. The approach is illustrated on a use case from home automation....

  13. Physical modeling of rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheney, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The problems of statisfying similarity between a physical model and the prototype in rock wherein fissures and cracks place a role in physical behavior is explored. The need for models of large physical dimensions is explained but also testing of models of the same prototype over a wide range of scales is needed to ascertain the influence of lack of similitude of particular parameters between prototype and model. A large capacity centrifuge would be useful in that respect

  14. On Modeling Risk Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorofeenko, Victor; Lee, Gabriel; Salyer, Kevin; Strobel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of a financial accelerator model, we model time-varying uncertainty (i.e. risk shocks) through the use of a mixture Normal model with time variation in the weights applied to the underlying distributions characterizing entrepreneur productivity. Specifically, we model capital producers (i.e. the entrepreneurs) as either low-risk (relatively small second moment for productivity) and high-risk (relatively large second moment for productivity) and the fraction of both types is...

  15. Hierarchical Bass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new model about diffusion of a product which includes a memory of how many adopters or advertisements a non-adopter met, where (non-)adopters mean people (not) possessing the product. This effect is lacking in the Bass model. As an application, we utilize the model to fit the iPod sales data, and so the better agreement is obtained than the Bass model.

  16. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  17. GARCH Modelling of Cryptocurrencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Chu; Stephen Chan; Saralees Nadarajah; Joerg Osterrieder

    2017-01-01

    With the exception of Bitcoin, there appears to be little or no literature on GARCH modelling of cryptocurrencies. This paper provides the first GARCH modelling of the seven most popular cryptocurrencies. Twelve GARCH models are fitted to each cryptocurrency, and their fits are assessed in terms of five criteria. Conclusions are drawn on the best fitting models, forecasts and acceptability of value at risk estimates.

  18. GARCH Modelling of Cryptocurrencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Chu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the exception of Bitcoin, there appears to be little or no literature on GARCH modelling of cryptocurrencies. This paper provides the first GARCH modelling of the seven most popular cryptocurrencies. Twelve GARCH models are fitted to each cryptocurrency, and their fits are assessed in terms of five criteria. Conclusions are drawn on the best fitting models, forecasts and acceptability of value at risk estimates.

  19. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  20. Differential models in ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barco Gomez, Carlos; Barco Gomez, German

    2002-01-01

    The models mathematical writings with differential equations are used to describe the populational behavior through the time of the animal species. These models can be lineal or no lineal. The differential models for unique specie include the exponential pattern of Malthus and the logistical pattern of Verlhust. The lineal differential models to describe the interaction between two species include the competition relationships, predation and symbiosis