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Sample records for ion track structure

  1. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  2. Ion track membranes providing heat pipe surfaces with capillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akapiev, G.N.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Erler, B.; Shirkova, V.V.; Schulz, A.; Pietsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    The microgalvanic method for metal filling of etched ion tracks in organic foils is of particular interest for the fabrication of microsized structures. Microstructures like copper whiskers with a high aspect ratio produced in ion track membranes are suitable for the generation of high-performance heat transfer surfaces. A surface with good heat transfer characteristics is defined as a surface on which a small temperature difference causes a large heat transfer from the surface material to the liquid. It is well-known that a porous surface layer transfers to an evaporating liquid a given quantity of heat at a smaller temperature difference than does a usual smooth surface. Copper whiskers with high aspect ratio and a density 10 5 per cm 2 form such a porous structure, which produces strong capillary forces and therefore a maximum of heat transfer coefficients

  3. Preparation of fluoropolymer-based ion-track membranes. Structure of latent tracks and pretreatment effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Nuryanthi, Nuryanthi; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Sawada, Shinichi; Hakoda, Teruyuki; Hasegawa, Shin; Asano, Masaharu; Maekawa, Yasunari

    2012-01-01

    High-energy heavy-ion induced damage, called latent tracks m organic polymers can sometimes be etched out chemically to give submicro- and nano-sized pores. Our focus is placed on ion-track membranes of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), a type of fluoropolymer, which were previously considered as a matrix of polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes. There have been no optimized methods of preparing the PVDF-based ion-track membranes. We thus examined chemical structures of the defects created in the track, and accordingly, presented a pretreatment technique for achieving more efficient track etching. A 25 μm-thick PVDF film was bombarded with 1.1 GeV 238 U or 450 MeV 129 Xe ions. In the multi-purpose chamber, degradation processes were monitored in-situ by FT-IR spectroscopy and residual gas analysis as a function of the fluence up to 6.0 x 10 11 ions/cm 2 . The films irradiated at 8 ions/cm 2 were etched in a 9 M KOH aqueous solution at 80degC. We also performed the conductometric etching, which allows monitoring of pore evolution versus etching time by recording the electrical conductance through the membrane. At fluences above 1 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 , the film showed two new absorption bands identified as double-bond stretching vibrations of in-chain unsaturations -CH=CF- and fluorinated vinyl groups -CF 2 CH=CF 2 . These defects would result from the evolution of HF. The knowledge of the solubility in a permanganate alkaline solution and our preliminary experiment suggested the importance of oxidized tracks for the easy introduction of the etching agent. We finally found that the pretreatment with ozone could oxidize the double bonds in the tracks, thereby vigorously promoting track etching before breakthrough. (author)

  4. Structure of heavy-ion tracks in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunshausen, G.; Bursill, L.A.; Vetter, J.; Spohr, R.

    1990-01-01

    Gem quality zirconas (ZrSiO 4 ) were irradiated with 14MeV/u Pb ions. Observations of heavy-ion tracks confirmed that fission or heavy-ion irradiation damage is confined to a 50-100 Aangstroem core region, which has undergone a crystalline-glass phase transition. 3 refs., 3 figs

  5. On the structure of etched ion tracks in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Apel, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, APR (2016), s. 106-109 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : polymers * ion tracks * track etching Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.315, year: 2016

  6. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  7. Energy dependent track structure parametrizations for protons and carbon ions based on nano-metric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauke, A.; Wilkens, J.J.; Villagrasa, C.; Rabus, H.

    2015-01-01

    The BioQuaRT project within the European Metrology Research Programme aims at correlating ion track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation and develops measurement and simulation techniques for determining ion track structure on different length scales from about 2 nm to about 10 μm. Within this framework, we investigate methods to translate track-structure quantities derived on a nanometer scale to macroscopic dimensions. Input data sets were generated by simulations of ion tracks of protons and carbon ions in liquid water using the Geant-4 Monte Carlo tool-kit with the Geant-4-DNA processes. Based on the energy transfer points - recorded with nanometer resolution - we investigated parametrizations of overall properties of ion track structure. Three different track structure parametrizations have been developed using the distances to the 10 next neighbouring ionizations, the radial energy distribution and ionisation cluster size distributions. These parametrizations of nanometer-scale track structure build a basis for deriving biologically relevant mean values which are essential in the clinical situation where each voxel is exposed to a mixed radiation field. (authors)

  8. SAXS investigation of latent track structure in HDPE irradiated with high energy Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Yang; Huang, Can [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Mingwang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute of Electronic Engineering, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu, Qi; Wang, Yuzhu; Liu, Yi; Tian, Feng; Lin, Jun [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhu, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhuzhiyong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Semi-crystalline high density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were irradiated with 1.157 GeV {sup 56}Fe ion beams to fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 11} to 6 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The radiation induced changes in nano/microstructure were investigated with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. The scattering contributions from HDPE matrix and ion tracks are successfully separated and analyzed through tilted SAXS measurements with respect to the X-ray beam direction. Lorentz correction, one-dimensional correlation function calculation, fractal nature analysis of the isotropic scattering pattern reveal that HDPE long period polymeric structures are damaged and new materials, possibly clusters of carbon-rich materials, are formed inside the ion tracks. Least square curve fitting of the scattering contribution from the ion track reveals that the track is composed of a core of about 5.3 nm in radius, characterized by a significant density deficit compared to the virgin HDPE, surrounded by a shell of about 4.3 nm in thickness with less density reduction.

  9. Coating and functionalization of high density ion track structures by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mättö, Laura [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Szilágyi, Imre M., E-mail: imre.szilagyi@mail.bme.hu [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); MTA-BME Technical Analytical Research Group, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland)

    2016-10-01

    In this study flexible TiO{sub 2} coated porous Kapton membranes are presented having electron multiplication properties. 800 nm crossing pores were fabricated into 50 μm thick Kapton membranes using ion track technology and chemical etching. Consecutively, 50 nm TiO{sub 2} films were deposited into the pores of the Kapton membranes by atomic layer deposition using Ti({sup i}OPr){sub 4} and water as precursors at 250 °C. The TiO{sub 2} films and coated membranes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Au metal electrode fabrication onto both sides of the coated foils was achieved by electron beam evaporation. The electron multipliers were obtained by joining two coated membranes separated by a conductive spacer. The results show that electron multiplication can be achieved using ALD-coated flexible ion track polymer foils. - Highlights: • Porous Kapton membranes were obtained by ion track technology and chemical etching. • TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by ALD into the pores of the Kapton membranes. • TiO{sub 2} nanotube array was prepared by removing the polymer core. • MCP structures were obtained from the coated membranes. • Electron multiplication was achieved using the ALD-coated Kapton foils.

  10. Controlled ion track etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J.; Irkens, M.; Neumann, S.; Scherer, U. W.; Srivastava, A.; Sinha, D.; Fink, D.

    2006-03-01

    It is a common practice since long to follow the ion track-etching process in thin foils via conductometry, i.e . by measurement of the electrical current which passes through the etched track, once the track breakthrough condition has been achieved. The major disadvantage of this approach, namely the absence of any major detectable signal before breakthrough, can be avoided by examining the track-etching process capacitively. This method allows one to define precisely not only the breakthrough point before it is reached, but also the length of any non-transient track. Combining both capacitive and conductive etching allows one to control the etching process perfectly. Examples and possible applications are given.

  11. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  12. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  13. Thin film growth into the ion track structures in polyimide by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mättö, L.; Malm, J.; Arstila, K.; Sajavaara, T.

    2017-09-01

    High-aspect ratio porous structures with controllable pore diameters and without a stiff substrate can be fabricated using the ion track technique. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal technique for depositing thin films and functional surfaces on complicated 3D structures due to the high conformality of the films. In this work, we studied Al2O3 and TiO2 films grown by ALD on pristine polyimide (Kapton HN) membranes as well as polyimide membranes etched in sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and boric acid (BO3) solution by means of RBS, PIXE, SEM-EDX and helium ion microcopy (HIM). The focus was on the first ALD growth cycles. The areal density of Al2O3 film in the 400 cycle sample was determined to be 51 ± 3 × 1016 at./cm2, corresponding to the thickness of 55 ± 3 nm. Furthermore, the growth per cycle was 1.4 Å/cycle. The growth is highly linear from the first cycles. In the case of TiO2, the growth per cycle is clearly slower during the first 200 cycles but then it increases significantly. The growth rate based on RBS measurements is 0.24 Å/cycle from 3 to 200 cycles and then 0.6 Å/cycle between 200 and 400 cycles. The final areal density of TiO2 film after 400 cycles is 148 ± 3 × 1015 at./cm2 which corresponds to the thickness of 17.4 ± 0.4 nm. The modification of the polyimide surface by etching prior to the deposition did not have an effect on the Al2O3 and TiO2 growth.

  14. Flagged uniform particle splitting for variance reduction in proton and carbon ion track-structure simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Méndez, José; Schuemann, Jan; Incerti, Sebastien; Paganetti, Harald; Schulte, Reinhard; Faddegon, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    Flagged uniform particle splitting was implemented with two methods to improve the computational efficiency of Monte Carlo track structure simulations with TOPAS-nBio by enhancing the production of secondary electrons in ionization events. In method 1 the Geant4 kernel was modified. In method 2 Geant4 was not modified. In both methods a unique flag number assigned to each new split electron was inherited by its progeny, permitting reclassification of the split events as if produced by independent histories. Computational efficiency and accuracy were evaluated for simulations of 0.5-20 MeV protons and 1-20 MeV u-1 carbon ions for three endpoints: (1) mean of the ionization cluster size distribution, (2) mean number of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) classified with DBSCAN, and (3) mean number of SSBs and DSBs classified with a geometry-based algorithm. For endpoint (1), simulation efficiency was 3 times lower when splitting electrons generated by direct ionization events of primary particles than when splitting electrons generated by the first ionization events of secondary electrons. The latter technique was selected for further investigation. The following results are for method 2, with relative efficiencies about 4.5 times lower for method 1. For endpoint (1), relative efficiency at 128 split electrons approached maximum, increasing with energy from 47.2  ±  0.2 to 66.9  ±  0.2 for protons, decreasing with energy from 51.3  ±  0.4 to 41.7  ±  0.2 for carbon. For endpoint (2), relative efficiency increased with energy, from 20.7  ±  0.1 to 50.2  ±  0.3 for protons, 15.6  ±  0.1 to 20.2  ±  0.1 for carbon. For endpoint (3) relative efficiency increased with energy, from 31.0  ±  0.2 to 58.2  ±  0.4 for protons, 23.9  ±  0.1 to 26.2  ±  0.2 for carbon. Simulation results with and without splitting agreed within 1% (2 standard

  15. Etched ion tracks in silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride as charge injection or extraction channels for novel electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Petrov, A.V.; Hoppe, K.; Fahrner, W.R.; Papaleo, R.M.; Berdinsky, A.S.; Chandra, A.; Chemseddine, A.; Zrineh, A.; Biswas, A.; Faupel, F.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of swift heavy ions onto silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride on silicon creates etchable tracks in these insulators. After their etching and filling-up with highly resistive matter, these nanometric pores can be used as charge extraction or injection paths towards the conducting channel in the underlying silicon. In this way, a novel family of electronic structures has been realized. The basic characteristics of these 'TEMPOS' (=tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on silicon) structures are summarized. Their functionality is determined by the type of insulator, the etch track diameters and lengths, their areal densities, the type of conducting matter embedded therein, and of course by the underlying semiconductor and the contact geometry. Depending on the TEMPOS preparation recipe and working point, the structures may resemble gatable resistors, condensors, diodes, transistors, photocells, or sensors, and they are therefore rather universally applicable in electronics. TEMPOS structures are often sensitive to temperature, light, humidity and organic gases. Also light-emitting TEMPOS structures have been produced. About 37 TEMPOS-based circuits such as thermosensors, photosensors, humidity and alcohol sensors, amplifiers, frequency multipliers, amplitude modulators, oscillators, flip-flops and many others have already been designed and successfully tested. Sometimes TEMPOS-based circuits are more compact than conventional electronics

  16. Relation between track structure and LET effect on free radical formation for ion beam-irradiated alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krushev, V.V.; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiromi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yoshida, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    The yield and local concentration of free radicals generated from alanine (α-aminopropionic acid) by irradiation with 3 MeV H + and He + ions were examined by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) and ESR power saturation methods at room temperature. The G-value of the radical formation showed a marked dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions. The G-value for the H + ion (average LET: 28 eV/nm) was almost the same as that for γ-irradiation and it was smaller by a factor of 1/4.7 for the He + ion (average LET: 225eV/nm). Combining the local concentration of the free radicals along the ion tracks with the G-values and the reported ion range, the radius of a track filled with free radicals was estimated to be 4 ∼ 5 nm by assuming a simple rod-shaped track with a constant radius and homogeneous distribution of the free radicals in it. The track radius scarcely depends on the LET within the range examined. The radiation energy deposited in the core region of the ion track was concluded to spread over the rod to generate free radicals. (author)

  17. Track structure in biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation.

  18. New ways of polymeric ion track characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Mueller, M.; Ghosh, S.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cervena, J.; Kobayashi, Y.; Hirata, K.

    1999-01-01

    New ways have been applied for characterization of ion tracks in polymers in the last few years, which are essentially related to depth profile determinations of ions, molecules, or positrons penetrating into these tracks. In combination with tomography, the first three-dimensional results have been obtained. Extensive diffusion simulations accompanying the measurements have enabled us to obtain a better understanding of the transport processes going on in ion tracks. This paper gives an overview about the range of new possibilities accessible by these techniques, and summarizes the presently obtained understanding of ion tracks in polymers

  19. Track structure of protons and other light ions in liquid water: applications of the LIonTrack code at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, G; Galassi, M E; Tilly, N; Ahnesjö, A; Fernández-Varea, J M

    2013-06-01

    The LIonTrack (Light Ion Track) Monte Carlo (MC) code for the simulation of H(+), He(2+), and other light ions in liquid water is presented together with the results of a novel investigation of energy-deposition site properties from single ion tracks. The continuum distorted-wave formalism with the eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS) is employed to generate the initial energy and angle of the electrons emitted in ionizing collisions of the ions with H2O molecules. The model of Dingfelder et al. ["Electron inelastic-scattering cross sections in liquid water," Radiat. Phys. Chem. 53, 1-18 (1998); "Comparisons of calculations with PARTRAC and NOREC: Transport of electrons in liquid water," Radiat. Res. 169, 584-594 (2008)] is linked to the general-purpose MC code PENELOPE/penEasy to simulate the inelastic interactions of the secondary electrons in liquid water. In this way, the extended PENELOPE/penEasy code may provide an improved description of the 3D distribution of energy deposits (EDs), making it suitable for applications at the micrometer and nanometer scales. Single-ionization cross sections calculated with the ab initio CDW-EIS formalism are compared to available experimental values, some of them reported very recently, and the theoretical electronic stopping powers are benchmarked against those recommended by the ICRU. The authors also analyze distinct aspects of the spatial patterns of EDs, such as the frequency of nearest-neighbor distances for various radiation qualities, and the variation of the mean specific energy imparted in nanoscopic targets located around the track. For 1 MeV/u particles, the C(6+) ions generate about 15 times more clusters of six EDs within an ED distance of 3 nm than H(+). On average clusters of two to three EDs for 1 MeV/u H(+) and clusters of four to five EDs for 1 MeV/u C(6+) could be expected for a modeling double strand break distance of 3.4 nm.

  20. Swift-heavy ion track electronics (SITE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Chadderton, L.T.; Hoppe, K.; Fahrner, W.R.; Chandra, A.; Kiv, A.

    2007-01-01

    An overview about the state-of-art of the development of a new type of nanoelectronics based on swift-heavy ions is given. Polymeric as well as silicon-based substrates have been used, and both latent and etched ion tracks play a role. Nowadays the interest has shifted from simple scaling-down of capacitors, magnets, transformers, diodes, transistors, etc. towards new types of ion track-based structures hitherto unknown in electronics. These novel structures, denoted by the acronyms 'TEAMS' (tunable electrically anisotropic material on semiconductor) and 'TEMPOS' (tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on semiconductor), may exhibit properties of tunable resistors, capacitors, diodes, sensors and transistors. Their general current/voltage characteristics are outlined. As these structures are often influenced by ambient physical or chemical parameters they also act as sensors. A peculiarity of these structures is the occurrence of negative differential resistances (NDRs) which makes them feasible for applications in tunable flip-flops, amplifiers and oscillators

  1. Swift-heavy ion track electronics (SITE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D. [Hahn-Meitner-Institute Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: fink@hmi.de; Chadderton, L.T. [Institute of Advanced Studies, ANU Canberra, G.P.O. Box 4, ACT (Australia); Hoppe, K. [South Westfalia University of Applied Sciences, Hagen (Germany); Fahrner, W.R. [Chair of Electronic Devices, Inst. of Electrotechnique, Fernuniversitaet, Hagen (Germany); Chandra, A. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Kiv, A. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel)

    2007-08-15

    An overview about the state-of-art of the development of a new type of nanoelectronics based on swift-heavy ions is given. Polymeric as well as silicon-based substrates have been used, and both latent and etched ion tracks play a role. Nowadays the interest has shifted from simple scaling-down of capacitors, magnets, transformers, diodes, transistors, etc. towards new types of ion track-based structures hitherto unknown in electronics. These novel structures, denoted by the acronyms 'TEAMS' (tunable electrically anisotropic material on semiconductor) and 'TEMPOS' (tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on semiconductor), may exhibit properties of tunable resistors, capacitors, diodes, sensors and transistors. Their general current/voltage characteristics are outlined. As these structures are often influenced by ambient physical or chemical parameters they also act as sensors. A peculiarity of these structures is the occurrence of negative differential resistances (NDRs) which makes them feasible for applications in tunable flip-flops, amplifiers and oscillators.

  2. Creation of nanoscale objects by swift heavy ion track manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Petrov, A.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we give an overview of the possibilities to create new objects with nanoscale dimensions with ion tracks, for future applications. This can be realized in two ways: by manipulation of latent swift heavy ion (SHI) tracks, or by embedding specific structures within etched SHI tracks. In the first case one can make use of irradiation effects such as phase transitions and chemical or structural changes along the tracks. In the latter case, one can fill etched SHI tracks with metals, semiconductors, insulating and conducting polymers, fullerite, or colloides. Wires and tubules with outer diameters, between about 50 nm and 5 μm and lengths of up to about 100 μm can be obtained. The most important production techniques are galvanic and chemical depositions. Ion Transmission Spectrometry has turned out to be an especially useful tool for the characterisation of the produced objects. Present studies aim at the construction of condensers, magnets, diodes, and sensors in etched tracks. An obstacle for the practical realization of smallest-size polymeric ion track devices is the statistical distribution of the ion tracks on the target areas, which yields some pixels without any track, and other pixels even with overlapping tracks on a given sample. In a first test experiment we demonstrate that one can, in principle, overcome that problem by taking self-ordered porous foils as masks for subsequent high-fluence SHI irradiation. (author)

  3. Two lectures on track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of two lectures the principles of track structure theory, developed by Katz and collaborators, are reviewed. The text is intended to serve as an introduction to the theory. Applications of the model to c-hit physical detectors and to biological systems are reviewed. The model relates the signal of a detector after doses of X and gamma radiations to its signal after heavy charged particle irradiations, and is applicable to a variety of physical dosimeters: alanine, thermoluminescence and the Fricke dosimeters, to the inactivation of enzymes and viruses, and to biological systems: description of survival and neoplastic transformations in mammalian cells. Application of the model to heavy-ion cancer radiotherapy and to radiation protection is discussed as well as the controversies around the track structure approach. The model suggests new insights to fundamental research in detector theory and in radiobiology and in their applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. 41 refs., 39 figs. (author)

  4. Structural Sparse Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2015-06-01

    Sparse representation has been applied to visual tracking by finding the best target candidate with minimal reconstruction error by use of target templates. However, most sparse representation based trackers only consider holistic or local representations and do not make full use of the intrinsic structure among and inside target candidates, thereby making the representation less effective when similar objects appear or under occlusion. In this paper, we propose a novel Structural Sparse Tracking (SST) algorithm, which not only exploits the intrinsic relationship among target candidates and their local patches to learn their sparse representations jointly, but also preserves the spatial layout structure among the local patches inside each target candidate. We show that our SST algorithm accommodates most existing sparse trackers with the respective merits. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging benchmark image sequences demonstrate that the proposed SST algorithm performs favorably against several state-of-the-art methods.

  5. Morphology and annealing kinetics of ion tracks in minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewing R. C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the morphology and annealing kinetics of ion tracks in Durango apatite using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. The non-destructive, artefact-free technique enables us to determine the track radii with a resolution of fractions of a nanometre. The tracks were generated using different heavy ions with energies between 185 MeV and 2.6 GeV. The track morphology is consistent with the formation of long cylindrical amorphous tracks. The annealing kinetics, measured by SAXS in combination with ex situ and in situ annealing experiments, suggests structural relaxation followed by recrystallisation of the damaged material. The measurement methodology shown here provides a new means for in-depth studies of ion-track formation in minerals under a wide variety of geological conditions.

  6. Track-structure simulations for charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Monte Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as a surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences compared to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, and light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest.

  7. Classifications of track structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    When ionizing particles interact with matter they produce random topological structures of primary activations which represent the initial boundary conditions for all subsequent physical, chemical and/or biological reactions. There are two important aspects of research on such track structures, namely their experimental or theoretical determination on one hand and the quantitative classification of these complex structures which is a basic pre-requisite for the understanding of mechanisms of radiation actions. This paper deals only with the latter topic, i.e. the problems encountered in and possible approaches to quantitative ordering and grouping of these multidimensional objects by their degrees of similarity with respect to their efficiency in producing certain final radiation effects, i.e. to their ''radiation quality.'' Various attempts of taxonometric classification with respect to radiation efficiency have been made in basic and applied radiation research including macro- and microdosimetric concepts as well as track entities and stopping power based theories. In this paper no review of those well-known approaches is given but rather an outline and discussion of alternative methods new to this field of radiation research which have some very promising features and which could possibly solve at least some major classification problems

  8. Online Simulation of Radiation Track Structure Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik

    2015-01-01

    Space radiation comprises protons, helium and high charged and energy (HZE) particles. High-energy particles are a concern for human space flight, because they are no known options for shielding astronauts from them. When these ions interact with matter, they damage molecules and create radiolytic species. The pattern of energy deposition and positions of the radiolytic species, called radiation track structure, is highly dependent on the charge and energy of the ion. The radiolytic species damage biological molecules, which may lead to several long-term health effects such as cancer. Because of the importance of heavy ions, the radiation community is very interested in the interaction of HZE particles with DNA, notably with regards to the track structure. A desktop program named RITRACKS was developed to simulate radiation track structure. The goal of this project is to create a web interface to allow registered internal users to use RITRACKS remotely.

  9. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    different sets of data obtained for the same cell line and different ions, measured at different laboratories, we have fitted model parameters to a set of carbon-irradiated V79 cells, published by Furusawa et al. (2), and to a set of proton-irradiated V79 cells, published by Wouters et al. (3), separately....... We found that values of model parameters best fitted to the carbon data of Furusawa et al. yielded predictions of V79 survival after proton irradiation which did not match the V79 proton data of Wouters et al. Fitting parameters to both sets combined did not improve the accuracy of model predictions...... carbon irradiation. 1. Katz, R., Track structure in radiobiology and in radiation detection. Nuclear Track Detection 2: 1-28 (1978). 2. Furusawa Y. et al. Inactivation of aerobic and hypoxic cells from three different cell lines by accelerated 3He-, 12C- and 20Ne beams. Radiat Res. 2012 Jan; 177...

  10. RITRACKS: A Software for Simulation of Stochastic Radiation Track Structure, Micro and Nanodosimetry, Radiation Chemistry and DNA Damage for Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, I; Wu, H

    2014-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) has been developed over the last few years at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the effects of ionizing radiations at the microscopic scale, to understand the effects of space radiation at the biological level. The fundamental part of this code is the stochastic simulation of radiation track structure of heavy ions, an important component of space radiations. The code can calculate many relevant quantities such as the radial dose, voxel dose, and may also be used to calculate the dose in spherical and cylindrical targets of various sizes. Recently, we have incorporated DNA structure and damage simulations at the molecular scale in RITRACKS. The direct effect of radiations is simulated by introducing a slight modification of the existing particle transport algorithms, using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe model of ionization cross sections for each molecular orbitals of DNA. The simulation of radiation chemistry is done by a step-by-step diffusion-reaction program based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation]. This approach is also used to simulate the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. The software can be installed independently on PC and tablets using the Windows operating system and does not require any coding from the user. It includes a Graphic User Interface (GUI) and a 3D OpenGL visualization interface. The calculations are executed simultaneously (in parallel) on multiple CPUs. The main features of the software will be presented.

  11. Conducting swift heavy ion track networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Chandra, A.; Saad, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 3 (2010), s. 227-244 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion tracks * negative differential resistance * neural networks Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  12. Temperature annealing of tracks induced by ion irradiation of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Yao, H.J.; Sun, Y.M.; Duan, J.L.; Hou, M.D.; Mo, D.; Wang, Z.G.; Jin, Y.F.; Abe, H.; Li, Z.C.; Sekimura, N.

    2006-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were irradiated by Xe ions of initial kinetic energy of 3 MeV/u. The irradiations were performed at temperatures of 500 and 800 K. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images show that the tracks occasionally have elongated structures under high-temperature irradiation. The track creation yield at 800 K is by three orders of magnitude smaller compared to that obtained during room-temperature irradiation. STM and Raman spectra show that amorphization occurs in graphite samples irradiated at 500 K to higher fluences, but not at 800 K. The obtained experimental results clearly reveal that the irradiation under high temperature causes track annealing

  13. Environment-sensitive ion-track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru

    1996-01-01

    Development of an environment-sensitive porous membrane from ion-track membranes may realize by combining the techniques of ion beam radiation and those of molecular designing and synthesis for intelligent materials. Now, the development of such membrane is progressing with an aim at selecting some specific substances and accurately control its pore size in response to any small environmental stimulus such as temperature change. The authors have been studying the molecular design, synthesis and functional expression of intelligent materials, which are called here as environment-sensitive gels. In this report, the outlines of the apparatus for the production of such porous membrane was described. An organic polymer membrane was irradiated with an ion beam and followed by chemical etching to make ion track pores. Scanning electron microscopic observation for the cross section of the membrane showed that the pore shape varies greatly depending on the ion nuclide used. The characteristics of newly produced porous membranes consisting of CR-30/A-ProDMe and polyethylene-telephtharate were investigated in respect of pore size change responding to temperature. These studies of design, synthesis and functions of such gels would enable to substitute artificial materials for the functions of human sensors. (M.N.). 54 refs

  14. Cluster analysis of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, V.

    1991-01-01

    One of the possibilities of classifying track structures is application of conventional partition techniques of analysis of multidimensional data to the track structure. Using these cluster algorithms this paper attempts to find characteristics of radiation reflecting the spatial distribution of ionizations in the primary particle track. An absolute frequency distribution of clusters of ionizations giving the mean number of clusters produced by radiation per unit of deposited energy can serve as this characteristic. General computation techniques used as well as methods of calculations of distributions of clusters for different radiations are discussed. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  15. Biophysical calculations of cell killing probability by the amorphous track structure model for heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Yuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2007-01-01

    In a treatment planning of heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is necessary to estimate the biological effect of the heavy-ion beams. Physical dose should be associated with the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at each point. Presently, carbon ion radiotherapy has been carried out at the National Institute Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Germany. Both facilities take individual approach for the calculation of the RBE value. At NIRS, the classical LQ model has been used while the local effect model (LEM) has been incorporated into the treatment planning system at GSI. The first aim of this study is to explain the RBE model of NIRS by the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM). In addition, the clarification of similarities and differences between the MKM and the LEM was also investigated. (author)

  16. Recent Developments in the Code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2018-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was developed to simulate detailed stochastic radiation track structures of ions of different types and energies. Many new capabilities were added to the code during the recent years. Several options were added to specify the times at which the tracks appear in the irradiated volume, allowing the simulation of dose-rate effects. The code has been used to simulate energy deposition in several targets: spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical. More recently, density changes as well as a spherical shell were implemented for spherical targets, in order to simulate energy deposition in walled tissue equivalent proportional counters. RITRACKS is used as a part of the new program BDSTracks (Biological Damage by Stochastic Tracks) to simulate several types of chromosome aberrations in various irradiation conditions. The simulation of damage to various DNA structures (linear and chromatin fiber) by direct and indirect effects has been improved and is ongoing. Many improvements were also made to the graphic user interface (GUI), including the addition of several labels allowing changes of units. A new GUI has been added to display the electron ejection vectors. The parallel calculation capabilities, notably the pre- and post-simulation processing on Windows and Linux machines have been reviewed to make them more portable between different systems. The calculation part is currently maintained in an Atlassian Stash® repository for code tracking and possibly future collaboration.

  17. Symplectic Tracking of Multi-Isotopic Heavy-Ion Beams in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; De Maria, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The software SixTrack provides symplectic proton tracking over a large number of turns. The code is used for the tracking of beam halo particles and the simulation of their interaction with the collimators to study the efficiency of the LHC collimation system. Tracking simulations for heavy-ion beams require taking into account the mass to charge ratio of each particle because heavy ions can be subject to fragmentation at their passage through the collimators. In this paper we present the derivation of a Hamiltonian for multi-isotopic heavy-ion beams and symplectic tracking maps derived from it. The resulting tracking maps were implemented in the tracking software SixTrack. With this modification, SixTrack can be used to natively track heavy-ion beams of multiple isotopes through a magnetic accelerator lattice.

  18. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  19. Model of wet chemical etching of swift heavy ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, S. A.; Malakhov, A. I.; Rymzhanov, R. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    A model of wet chemical etching of tracks of swift heavy ions (SHI) decelerated in solids in the electronic stopping regime is presented. This model takes into account both possible etching modes: etching controlled by diffusion of etchant molecules to the etching front, and etching controlled by the rate of a reaction of an etchant with a material. Olivine ((Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4) crystals were chosen as a system for modeling. Two mechanisms of chemical activation of olivine around the SHI trajectory are considered. The first mechanism is activation stimulated by structural transformations in a nanometric track core, while the second one results from neutralization of metallic atoms by generated electrons spreading over micrometric distances. Monte-Carlo simulations (TREKIS code) form the basis for the description of excitations of the electronic subsystem and the lattice of olivine in an SHI track at times up to 100 fs after the projectile passage. Molecular dynamics supplies the initial conditions for modeling of lattice relaxation for longer times. These simulations enable us to estimate the effects of the chemical activation of olivine governed by both mechanisms. The developed model was applied to describe chemical activation and the etching kinetics of tracks of Au 2.1 GeV ions in olivine. The estimated lengthwise etching rate (38 µm · h-1) is in reasonable agreement with that detected in the experiments (24 µm · h-1).

  20. Multiple-lesion track-structure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Shinn, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    A multilesion cell kinetic model is derived, and radiation kinetic coefficients are related to the Katz track structure model. The repair-related coefficients are determined from the delayed plating experiments of Yang et al. for the C3H10T1/2 cell system. The model agrees well with the x ray and heavy ion experiments of Yang et al. for the immediate plating, delaying plating, and fractionated exposure protocols employed by Yang. A study is made of the effects of target fragments in energetic proton exposures and of the repair-deficient target-fragment-induced lesions

  1. Visualization of complex DNA damage along accelerated ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Bulanova, Tatiana; Ježková, Lucie; Zadneprianetc, Mariia; Smirnova, Elena

    2018-04-01

    The most deleterious DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are clustered DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Clustered or complex DNA damage is a combination of a few simple lesions (single-strand breaks, base damage etc.) within one or two DNA helix turns. It is known that yield of complex DNA lesions increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation. For investigation of the induction and repair of complex DNA lesions, human fibroblasts were irradiated with high-LET 15N ions (LET = 183.3 keV/μm, E = 13MeV/n) and low-LET 60Co γ-rays (LET ≈ 0.3 keV/μm) radiation. DNA DSBs (γH2AX and 53BP1) and base damage (OGG1) markers were visualized by immunofluorecence staining and high-resolution microscopy. The obtained results showed slower repair kinetics of induced DSBs in cells irradiated with accelerated ions compared to 60Co γ-rays, indicating induction of more complex DNA damage. Confirming previous assumptions, detailed 3D analysis of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 15N ions tracks revealed more complicated structure of the foci in contrast to γ-rays. It was shown that proteins 53BP1 and OGG1 involved in repair of DNA DSBs and modified bases, respectively, were colocalized in tracks of 15N ions and thus represented clustered DNA DSBs.

  2. Composition dependent thermal annealing behaviour of ion tracks in apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadzri, A., E-mail: allina.nadzri@anu.edu.au [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Schauries, D.; Mota-Santiago, P.; Muradoglu, S. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Gleadow, A.J.W. [School of Earth Science, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Hawley, A. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, VIC 3168 (Australia); Kluth, P. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2016-07-15

    Natural apatite samples with different F/Cl content from a variety of geological locations (Durango, Mexico; Mud Tank, Australia; and Snarum, Norway) were irradiated with swift heavy ions to simulate fission tracks. The annealing kinetics of the resulting ion tracks was investigated using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) combined with ex situ annealing. The activation energies for track recrystallization were extracted and consistent with previous studies using track-etching, tracks in the chlorine-rich Snarum apatite are more resistant to annealing than in the other compositions.

  3. The shape of ion tracks in natural apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Lang, M.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Trautmann, C.; Li, W.; Ewing, R. C.; Kluth, P.

    2014-05-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed on natural apatite of different thickness irradiated with 2.2 GeV Au swift heavy ions. The evolution of the track radius along the full ion track length was estimated by considering the electronic energy loss and the velocity of the ions. The shape of the track is nearly cylindrical, slightly widening with a maximum diameter approximately 30 μm before the ions come to rest, followed by a rapid narrowing towards the end within a cigar-like contour. Measurements of average ion track radii in samples of different thicknesses, i.e. containing different sections of the tracks are in good agreement with the shape estimate.

  4. The shape of ion tracks in natural apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Lang, M.; Rodriguez, M.D.; Trautmann, C.; Li, W.; Ewing, R.C.; Kluth, P.

    2014-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed on natural apatite of different thickness irradiated with 2.2 GeV Au swift heavy ions. The evolution of the track radius along the full ion track length was estimated by considering the electronic energy loss and the velocity of the ions. The shape of the track is nearly cylindrical, slightly widening with a maximum diameter approximately 30 μm before the ions come to rest, followed by a rapid narrowing towards the end within a cigar-like contour. Measurements of average ion track radii in samples of different thicknesses, i.e. containing different sections of the tracks are in good agreement with the shape estimate

  5. Deposition of molecular probes in heavy ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Esser, M

    1999-01-01

    By using polarized fluorescence techniques the physical properties of heavy ion tracks such as the dielectric number, molecular alignment and track radius can be traced by molecular fluorescence probes. Foils of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were used as a matrix for the ion tracks wherein fluorescence probes such as aminostyryl-derivatives can be incorporated using a suitable solvent, e.g. N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) as transport medium. The high sensitivity of fluorescence methods allowed the comparison of the probe properties in ion tracks with the virgin material. From the fluorescence Stokes shift the dielectric constants could be calculated, describing the dielectric surroundings of the molecular probes. The lower dielectric constant in the tracks gives clear evidence that there is no higher accommodation of the highly polar solvent DMF in the tracks compared with the virgin material. Otherwise the dielectric constant in the tracks should be higher than in the virgin material. The orientation of t...

  6. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  7. A simple and rapid method for high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Omichi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prompt determination of spatial points of single-ion tracks plays a key role in high-energy particle induced-cancer therapy and gene/plant mutations. In this study, a simple method for the high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks without etching was developed through the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA-N, N’-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm blend films. One of the steps of the proposed method includes exposure of the irradiated films to water vapor for several minutes. Water vapor was found to promote the cross-linking reaction of PAA and MBAAm to form a bulky cross-linked structure; the ion-track scars were detectable at a nanometer scale by atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrated that each scar is easily distinguishable, and the amount of generated radicals of the ion tracks can be estimated by measuring the height of the scars, even in highly dense ion tracks. This method is suitable for the visualization of the penumbra region in a single-ion track with a high spatial resolution of 50 nm, which is sufficiently small to confirm that a single ion hits a cell nucleus with a size ranging between 5 and 20 μm.

  8. A simple and rapid method for high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omichi, Masaaki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Center for Collaborative Research, Anan National College of Technology, Anan, Tokushima 774-0017 (Japan); Choi, Wookjin; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Seki, Shu, E-mail: seki@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsukuda, Satoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Sugimoto, Masaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Gunma, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Prompt determination of spatial points of single-ion tracks plays a key role in high-energy particle induced-cancer therapy and gene/plant mutations. In this study, a simple method for the high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks without etching was developed through the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-N, N’-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm) blend films. One of the steps of the proposed method includes exposure of the irradiated films to water vapor for several minutes. Water vapor was found to promote the cross-linking reaction of PAA and MBAAm to form a bulky cross-linked structure; the ion-track scars were detectable at a nanometer scale by atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrated that each scar is easily distinguishable, and the amount of generated radicals of the ion tracks can be estimated by measuring the height of the scars, even in highly dense ion tracks. This method is suitable for the visualization of the penumbra region in a single-ion track with a high spatial resolution of 50 nm, which is sufficiently small to confirm that a single ion hits a cell nucleus with a size ranging between 5 and 20 μm.

  9. Thermal spike analysis of highly charged ion tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlušić, M.; Jakšić, M.

    2012-01-01

    The irradiation of material using swift heavy ion or highly charged ion causes excitation of the electron subsystem at nanometer scale along the ion trajectory. According to the thermal spike model, energy deposited into the electron subsystem leads to temperature increase due to electron–phonon coupling. If ion-induced excitation is sufficiently intensive, then melting of the material can occur, and permanent damage (i.e., ion track) can be formed upon rapid cooling. We present an extension of the analytical thermal spike model of Szenes for the analysis of surface ion track produced after the impact of highly charged ion. By applying the model to existing experimental data, more than 60% of the potential energy of the highly charged ion was shown to be retained in the material during the impact and transformed into the energy of the thermal spike. This value is much higher than 20–40% of the transferred energy into the thermal spike by swift heavy ion. Thresholds for formation of highly charged ion track in different materials show uniform behavior depending only on few material parameters.

  10. Anisotropic plastic deformation by viscous flow in ion tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dillen, T; Polman, A; Onck, PR; van der Giessen, E

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the origin of ion beam-induced anisotropic plastic deformation is derived and discussed. It is based on a viscoelastic thermal spike model for viscous flow in single ion tracks derived by Trinkaus and Ryazanov. Deviatoric (shear) stresses, brought about by the rapid thermal

  11. Heavy ion accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, Jacques.

    1977-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerating structure concerned in this invention is of the kind that have a resonance cavity inside which are located at least two longitudinal conducting supports electrically connected to the cavity by one of their ends in such a way that they are in quarter-wavelength resonance and in phase opposition. Slide tubes are electrically connected alternatively to one or the other of the two supports, they being electrically connected respectively to one or the other end of the side wall of the cavity. The feature of the structure is that it includes two pairs of supports symmetrically placed with respect to the centre line of the cavity, the supports of one pair fitted overhanging being placed symmetrically with respect to the centre line of the cavity, each slide tube being connected to the two supports of one pair. These support are connected to the slide wall of the cavity by an insulator located at their electrically free end. The accelerator structure composed of several structures placed end to end, the last one of which is fed by a high frequency field of adjustable amplitude and phase, enables a heavy ion linear accelerator to be built [fr

  12. Etched ion track polymer membranes for sustained drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Vijayalakshmi; Amar, J.V.; Avasthi, D.K.; Narayana Charyulu, R.

    2003-01-01

    The method of track etching has been successfully used for the production of polymer membranes with capillary pores. In the present paper, micropore membranes have been prepared by swift heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC). PC films were irradiated with ions of gold, silicon and oxygen of varying energies and fluence. The ion tracks thus obtained were etched chemically for various time intervals to get pores and these etched films were used as membranes for the drug release. Ciprofloxacine hydrochloride was used as model drug for the release studies. The drug content was estimated spectrophotometrically. Pore size and thus the drug release is dependent on the etching conditions, ions used, their energy and fluence. Sustained drug release has been observed in these membranes. The films can be selected for practical utilization by optimizing the irradiation and etching conditions. These films can be used as transdermal patches after medical treatment

  13. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  14. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  15. Data needs for the track structure of alpha particles and electrons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnamenta, A.

    1983-01-01

    We have made calculations of the ionization spectra for alpha particle and electron tracks in water. We have also computed the number of ions created per micrometre of track length, the energy distribution of the secondaries, and the energy expended per ion pair created. Our aim is less toward theoretical derivations than to obtain a numerically accurate description of the track structure at all energies in a form suitable for biomedical applications. 13 references

  16. VLSI structures for track finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orso, M.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the architecture of a device based on the concept of associative memory designed to solve the track finding problem, typical of high energy physics experiments, in a time span of a few microseconds even for very high multiplicity events. This ''machine'' is implemented as a large array of custom VLSI chips. All the chips are equal and each of them stores a number of ''patterns''. All the patterns in all the chips are compared in parallel to the data coming from the detector while the detector is being read out. (orig.)

  17. Ion track etching revisited: I. Correlations between track parameters in aged polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Munoz, G. H.; García Arellano, H.; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 420, č. 4 (2018), s. 57-68 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion track * polymer * etching Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  18. Ion track etching revisited: II. Electronic properties of aged tracks in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Hernandez, G. M.; Cruz, S. A.; Garcia-Arellano, H.; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 173, 1-2 (2018), s. 148-164 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : polymers * ion tracks * etching * conductometry * rectification * phase shift Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  19. Study of ion tracks by micro-probe ion energy loss spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Havránek, Vladimír; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Horák, Pavel; Fink, Dietmar; Apel, P. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 332, AUG (2014), s. 308-311 ISSN 0168-583X. [21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). Seattle, 23.06.2013-28.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion energy loss spectrometry * single ion track * microprobe * tomography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  20. Ion track etching revisited: II. Electronic properties of aged tracks in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Muñoz Hernández, G.; Cruz, S. A.; Garcia-Arellano, H.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2018-02-01

    We compile here electronic ion track etching effects, such as capacitive-type currents, current spike emission, phase shift, rectification and background currents that eventually emerge upon application of sinusoidal alternating voltages across thin, aged swift heavy ion-irradiated polymer foils during etching. Both capacitive-type currents and current spike emission occur as long as obstacles still prevent a smooth continuous charge carrier passage across the foils. In the case of sufficiently high applied electric fields, these obstacles are overcome by spike emission. These effects vanish upon etchant breakthrough. Subsequent transmitted currents are usually of Ohmic type, but shortly after breakthrough (during the track' core etching) often still exhibit deviations such as strong positive phase shifts. They stem from very slow charge carrier mobility across the etched ion tracks due to retarding trapping/detrapping processes. Upon etching the track's penumbra, one occasionally observes a split-up into two transmitted current components, one with positive and another one with negative phase shifts. Usually, these phase shifts vanish when bulk etching starts. Current rectification upon track etching is a very frequent phenomenon. Rectification uses to inverse when core etching ends and penumbra etching begins. When the latter ends, rectification largely vanishes. Occasionally, some residual rectification remains which we attribute to the aged polymeric bulk itself. Last not least, we still consider background currents which often emerge transiently during track etching. We could assign them clearly to differences in the electrochemical potential of the liquids on both sides of the etched polymer foils. Transient relaxation effects during the track etching cause their eventually chaotic behaviour.

  1. Ion track etching revisited: I. Correlations between track parameters in aged polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Muñoz H., G.; García A., H.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2018-04-01

    Some yet poorly understood problems of etching of pristine and swift heavy ion track-irradiated aged polymers were treated, by applying conductometry across the irradiated foils during etching. The onset times of etchant penetration across pristine foils, and the onset times of the different etched track regimes in irradiated foils were determined for polymers of various proveniences, fluences and ages, as well as their corresponding etching speeds. From the results, correlations of the parameters with each other were deduced. The normalization of these parameters enables one to compare irradiated polymer foils of different origin and treatment with one another. In a number of cases, also polymeric gel formation and swelling occur which influence the track etching behaviour. The polymer degradation during aging influences the track etching parameters, which differ from each other on both sides of the foils. With increasing sample age, these differences increase.

  2. Investigations of heavy ion tracks in polyethylene naphthalate films

    CERN Document Server

    Starosta, W; Sartowska, B; Buczkowski, M

    1999-01-01

    The heavy ion beam (with fluence 3x10 sup 8 ion/cm sup 2) from a cyclotron has been used for irradiation of thin polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) films. Latent tracks in these polymeric films have been sensitized by UV radiation and then chemically etched in NaOH solution. The etching process parameters have been controlled by the electroconductivity method. After etching, parameters of samples have been examined by SEM and bubble point methods (Coulter[reg] Porometer II instrument). Results have shown good quality of PEN track membranes with pore sizes in the range: 0.1 - 0.5 mu m. The described procedure is known for thin polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. Taking into consideration that PEN films have got better mechanical, thermal, gas barrier as well as better chemical resistance properties in comparison with PET films, the possibility of application of such membranes is much wider.

  3. Track structure theory in radiobiology and in radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1978-01-01

    The response of biological cells, and many physical radiation and track detectors to ionizing radiations and to energetic heavily ionizing particles, results from the secondary and higher generation electrons ejected from the atoms and molecules of the detector by the incident primary radiation. The theory uses a calculation of the radial distribution of local dose deposited by secondary electrons (delta-rays) from an energetic heavy ion as a transfer function, relating the dose-response relation measured (or postulated) for a particular detector in a uniform radiation field (gamma-rays) to obtain the radial distribution in response about the ion's path, and thus the structure of the track of a particle. Subsequent calculations yield the response of the detector to radiation fields of arbitrary quality. The models which have been used for detector response arise from target theory, and are of the form of statistical models called multi-hit or multi-target detectors, in which it is assumed that there are sensitive elements (emulsion grains, or biological cell nuclei) which may require many hits (emulsion grains) or single hits in different targets (say, cellular chromosomes) in order to produce the observed end-point. Recent work has demonstrated that many-hit physical detectors do exist. From both emulsion sensitometry and from the structure of tracks of heavy ions, it can be shown that emulsion-developer combinations exist which yield many-hit response. There is also some evidence that the supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters arises from a mixture of 1-hit and 2-hit response, perhaps of different trap structures within the same TLD crystal. These detectors can be expected to mimic the response of biological cells to radiations of different quality. Their patterns of response may help us to understand better the structure of particle tracks in SSNTD's. (author)

  4. Tracks induced by swift heavy ions in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.; Horvath, Z.E.; Pecz, B.; Toth, L.; Paszti, F.

    2002-01-01

    InSb, GaSb, InP, InAs, and GaAs single crystals were irradiated with Pb ions in the range of 385-2170 MeV. The samples were studied by transmission and high-resolution electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering in channeling geometry. The energetic ions induced isolated tracks in all crystals but GaAs. The thermal spike analysis revealed that the variation of the damage cross section with the ion energy is considerably weaker than in insulators. The widths of the thermal spike a(0) was estimated. The analysis was extended to recent C 60 experiments on Ge and Si. A quantitative relation was found between a(0) and the gap energy E g : a(0) is reduced with increasing E g , and its lowest value is close to that found in insulators

  5. A Monte Carlo track structure code for low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Ishikawa, M; Shizuma, K

    2002-01-01

    A code is described for simulation of protons (100 eV to 10 MeV) track structure in water vapor. The code simulates molecular interaction by interaction for the transport of primary ions and secondary electrons in the form of ionizations and excitations. When a low velocity ion collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, the ion may also capture or lose electrons. The probabilities for these processes are described by the quantity cross-section. Although proton track simulation at energies above Bragg peak (>0.3 MeV) has been achieved to a high degree of precision, simulations at energies near or below the Bragg peak have only been attempted recently because of the lack of relevant cross-section data. As the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross-section from that of a proton, charge exchange processes need to be considered in order to calculate stopping power for low energy protons. In this paper, we have used state-of-the-art Monte Carlo track simulation techniques, in conjunction with the pub...

  6. The TL fluence response to heavy charged particles using the track interaction model and track structure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Avila, O.

    2002-01-01

    The extended track interaction model, ETIM, has recently been proposed to explain the TLD-100 fluence response of peak 5 to heavy ions. This model includes the track structure information through the use of the luminescent-centre occupation probability obtained from radial dose distributions produced by the ions as they travel through the dosemeter. In this work an implementation of ETIM using Monte Carlo techniques is presented. The simulation was applied to calculate the response of peak 5 of both sensitised and normal TLD-100 crystals to 2.6 and 6.8 MeV 4 He ions. The simulation shows that the TL-fluence response has a strong dependence on ion energy, in disagreement with experimental observations. In spite of this, good agreement between the simulated TL-fluence response calculated for the 6.8 MeV 4 He radial distributions and the experimental data for the two energies was achieved. (author)

  7. Track structure in radiation biology: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Wilson, W E; Hoshi, M; Goodhead, D T

    1998-04-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic concepts in track structure and the relative merit of various theoretical approaches adopted in Monte-Carlo track-structure codes are examined. In the second part of the paper, a formal cluster analysis is introduced to calculate cluster-distance distributions. Total experimental ionization cross-sections were least-square fitted and compared with the calculation by various theoretical methods. Monte-Carlo track-structure code Kurbuc was used to examine and compare the spectrum of the secondary electrons generated by using functions given by Born-Bethe, Jain-Khare, Gryzinsky, Kim-Rudd, Mott and Vriens' theories. The cluster analysis in track structure was carried out using the k-means method and Hartigan algorithm. Data are presented on experimental and calculated total ionization cross-sections: inverse mean free path (IMFP) as a function of electron energy used in Monte-Carlo track-structure codes; the spectrum of secondary electrons generated by different functions for 500 eV primary electrons; cluster analysis for 4 MeV and 20 MeV alpha-particles in terms of the frequency of total cluster energy to the root-mean-square (rms) radius of the cluster and differential distance distributions for a pair of clusters; and finally relative frequency distribution for energy deposited in DNA, single-strand break and double-strand breaks for 10MeV/u protons, alpha-particles and carbon ions. There are a number of Monte-Carlo track-structure codes that have been developed independently and the bench-marking presented in this paper allows a better choice of the theoretical method adopted in a track-structure code to be made. A systematic bench-marking of cross-sections and spectra of the secondary electrons shows differences between the codes at atomic level, but such differences are not significant in biophysical modelling at the macromolecular level. Clustered-damage evaluation shows: that a substantial proportion of dose ( 30%) is

  8. Etching behaviour of alpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica studied via artificial ion tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, M.; Glasmacher, U.A.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-recoil tracks (ARTs) created by the α-decay of U, Th, and their daughter nuclei, are used by a new dating method to determine the formation age of dark mica bearing Quaternary and Neogene volcanic rocks and the cooling age of plutonic and metamorphic rocks [Chem. Geol. 166 (2000) 127, Science 155 (1967) 1103]. The age equation combines the volumetric density of ARTs with the U and Th contents. Etching latent ARTs (diameter 30-100 nm) in the mica mineral phlogopite by HF and measuring the areal density of triangular etch pits by optical and scanning force microscopy (SFM) leads to a linear growth of ART areal density versus etching time. The ART volume density is a function of the slope of the areal density and the etching rate (v eff ). Therefore, the determination of v eff is essential for the calculation of an age value. To determine the etching parameters such as etching efficiency and v eff , phlogopite samples were irradiated with 80 keV Au ions. Irradiated surfaces were etched with 4% HF at 23±2 deg. C during successive time intervals and after each interval studied with SFM. The etching rate v eff was determined by different techniques. To evaluate the threshold of etchability, the energy losses of the Au ions and α-recoil nuclei in phlogopite were calculated with the SRIM00 code. The etching efficiency of the Au ion tracks was then used to predict the corresponding etching efficiency of the natural radioactive nuclei

  9. Heavy particle track structure parameters for biophysical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Averaged values of physical track structure parameters are important in radiobiology and radiological protection for the expression of damage mechanisms and for quantifying radiation effects. To provide a ready reference, tables of relevant quantities have been compiled for heavy charged particles in liquid water. The full tables will be published elsewhere but here illustrative examples are given of the trends for the most important quantities. In the tables, data are given for 74 types of heavy charged particle ranging from protons to uranium ions at specific energies between 0.1 keV/u and 1 GeV/u. Aggregate effects in liquid water are taken into account implicitly in the calculations. Results are presented for instantaneous particle energies and for averages over the charged particle equilibrium spectrum. The latter are of special relevance to radiation dosimetry. Quality parameters calculated are: β 2 ; z 2 /β 2 ; linear primary ionisation and the mean free path between ionisations; LET; track and dose-restricted LET with 100 eV cut-off; relative variances; delta-ray energies and ranges; ion energies and ranges and kerma factors. Here, the procedures used in the calculations are indicated. Representative results are shown in graphical form. The role of the physical track properties is discussed with regard to optimisation of the design of experiments intended to elucidate biological damage mechanisms in mammalian cells and their relevance to radiological protection. ((orig.))

  10. Secondary particle tracks generated by ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    The Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is a powerful complementary tool to include the effect of low energy electrons and positrons in medical applications of radiation. In particular, for ion-beam cancer treatments provides a detailed description of the role of the secondary electrons abundantly generated around the Bragg peak as well as the possibility of using transmuted positron emitters (C11, O15) as a complement for ion-beam dosimetry. In this study we present interaction probability data derived from IAM-SCAR corrective factors for liquid environments. Using these data, single electron and positron tracks in liquid water and pyrimidine have been simulated providing information about energy deposition as well as the number and type of interactions taking place in any selected ``nanovolume'' of the irradiated area. In collaboration with Francisco Blanco, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Antonio Mu noz, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas and Diogo Almeida, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paulo Lim ao-Vieira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Supported by the Spanish and Portuguese governments.

  11. Ion track annealing in quartz investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Rodriguez, M.D. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Hawley, A. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, VIC 3168 (Australia); Kluth, P. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    We report on the reduction of cross-section and length of amorphous ion tracks embedded within crystalline quartz during thermal annealing. The ion tracks were created via Au ion irradiation with an energy of 2.2 GeV. The use of synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) allowed characterization of the latent tracks, without the need for chemical etching. Temperatures between 900 and 1000 °C were required to see a notable change in track size. The shrinkage in cross-section and length was found to be comparable for tracks aligned perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis.

  12. IODA - a fast, automated and flexible system for ion track analysis on film detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guth, H.; Hellmann, A.

    1995-02-01

    The IODA System (Ion Density Analysis) is used to analyse detector films, resulting from experiments at the pulse power generator KALIF (Karlsruhe Light Ion Facility). The system consists of evaluation software and a microcomputer, which controls a microscope, a video interface, and a multiprocessor subsystem. The segmentation of ion tracks is done automatically by means of digital image processing and pattern recognition. After defining an evaluation range and selecting a suitable analysis method, the film is scanned by the microscope for counting the impacts of the underlying image. According to the appearance of the ion tracks on the film, different methods can be selected. The evaluation results representing the ion density are stored in a matrix. The time needed for an evaluation at a high resolution can be shortened by shipping time consuming pattern recognition calculations to the multiprocessor subsystem. The bottlenecks of the system are the data transfer and the speed of the microscope stage. Simple handling of the system even on alphanumeric terminals had been an important design issue. This was implemented by a logically structured menue system including online help features. This report can be used a s a manual to support the user with system operation. (orig.) [de

  13. Track structure theory in radiobiology and in radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1976-01-01

    The response of biological cells, and many physical radiation and track detectors to ionizing radiations, and to energetic heavily ionizing particles results from the secondary and higher generation electrons ejected from the atoms and molecules of the detector by the incident primary radiation. The models which have been used for detector response arise from target theory, and are of the form of statistical models called multi-hit or multi-target detectors, in which it is assumed that there are sensitive elements (emulsion grains, or biological cell nuclei) which may require many hits (emulsion grains) or single hits in different targets (say, cellular chromosomes) in order to produce the observed endpoint. Physically, a hit is interpreted as a 'registered event' caused by an electron passing through the sensitive site, with an efficiency which depends on the electron's speed. Some knowledge of size of the sensitive volume and of the sensitive target is required to make the transition from gamma-ray response to heavy ion response. Recent work has demonstrated that many-hit physical detectors do exist. From both emulsion sensitometry and from the structure of tracks of heavy ions, we are able to show that emulsion-developer combinations exist which yield many-hit response. There is also some evidence that the supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters arises from a trap structures within the same TLD crystal. These detectors can be expected to mimic the response of biological cells to radiations of different quality. Their patterns of response may help us to understand better the structure of particle tracks in SSNTD's. (orig./ORU) [de

  14. Structure modification of particle track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, H.B.; Gemende, B.; Heinrich, B.

    1991-01-01

    Three different structure modifications were studied in order to improve the flux and dirt loading capacity of particle track membranes without affecting their retention characteristic. Divergent irradiation is a very effective tool for decreasing the number of multiple pores and increasing the porosity up to 20 per cent. The technique leads to a remarkable but not efficient enhancement of the surface porosity. Improved surface porosity produced by a double irradiation technique turns out to be very effective with respect to the filtration performance. (author)

  15. Dynamic vortex dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, V A; Khudyakov, A V; Filinov, V S; Vladimirov, V I; Deputatova, L V; Krutov, D V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from Monte Carlo calculations of the electric charge on dust grains in a plasma produced during the slowing down of radioactive decay products of californium nuclei in neon. The dust grain charging is explained as being due to the drift of electrons and ions in an external electric field. It is shown that the charges of the grains depend on their coordinates and strongly fluctuate with time. The time-averaged grain charges agree with the experimental data obtained on ordered liquid-like dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma. The time-averaged dust grain charges are used to carry out computer modelling of the formation of dynamic vortex structures observed in experiments. Evidence is obtained for the fact that the electrostatic forces experienced by the dust grains are potential in character. The paper is supplemented by a video clip showing the typical dynamics of the simulated vortex dust structure

  16. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales

  17. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  18. The separation of heavy ion tracks in nuclear emulsions by means of the pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopova, A.B.; Magradze, N.V.; Melkumyan, L.V.; Prokhorenko, Y.P.

    1976-01-01

    The pulsed electric field (PEF) technique is developed for the separation of heavy ion tracks from the intense background caused by high energy electrons, protons and γ-radiation. The tracks of Ne, Cr, Ar-ions accelerated at the Dubna Nuclear Reactions Laboratory have been separated from the background, the voltage of the applied PEF being 10 5 V/cm. (orig.) [de

  19. Electrochemical synthesis of metallic microstructures using etched ion tracks in nuclear track filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjeev Kumar; Shyam Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; Chakravarti, K.

    2004-01-01

    Interest in nano/microstructures results from their numerous potential applications in various areas such as materials and biomedical sciences, electronics, optics, magnetism, energy storage and electrochemistry. Materials with micro/nanoscopic dimensions not only have potential technological applications in areas such as device technology and drug delivery, but also are of fundamental interest in that the properties of a material can change in this regime of transition between the bulk and molecular scales. Electrodeposition is a versatile technique combining low processing cost with ambient conditions that can be used to prepare metallic, polymeric and semiconducting microstructures. In the present work ion track membranes of Makrofol (KG) have been used as templates for synthesis of metallic microstructures using the technique of electrodeposition. (author)

  20. Surfactant-controlled etching of ion track nanopores and its practical applications in membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Mamonova, T.I.; Orelovitch, O.L.; Sartowska, B.; Yamauchi, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion tracks in polymers has been studied. It has been shown that surface-active agents added to an alkaline etching solution adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entrances. This reduces the etch rate, which leads to the formation of pores tapered toward the surface. Self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the pore entrance creates a barrier for their penetration into the etched-out nanopores, whereas hydroxide ions diffuse freely. Due to this, the internal pore volume grows faster than the pore surface diameter. The ability to control pore shape is demonstrated with the fabrication of profiled nano- and micropores in polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate. Some earlier published data on small track-etched pores in polycarbonate (in particular, the pore diameter vs. etching time curves measured conductometrically) have been revised in light of the above findings. Adding surfactants to chemical etchants makes it possible to optimize the structure of track membranes, thus improving their retention and permeation properties. Asymmetric membranes with thin skin retention layers have been produced and their performance studied

  1. CR-39 nuclear track detector application for the diagnostics of low energy high power ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opekounov, M S; Pechenkin, S A; Remnev, G E [Nuclear Physics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ivonin, I V [Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The results of investigation of the spectral composition of ion beams generated by the magneto-insulated ion diode of the MUK-M and TEMP accelerators. The energy and mass characteristics of the accelerated ion beam were determined by a Thomson spectrometer with a CR-39 plate detector (MOM - Atomki Nuclear Track Detector, Type MA-ND/p). The accelerated ion energy was from 40 to 240 keV. The ion current density range was from 1 to 10 A/cm{sup 2}. The mass composition contained hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon and aluminum ions. The individual track analysis showed the track form, depth and diameter in dependence on the ion mass and energy. (author). 2 figs., 5 refs.

  2. Structure of ion-implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naramoto, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    The variation of structure of LiF, MgO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 accompanying annealing after ion implantation is explained. The analysis of structure is usually made by the perturbed gamma ray angular correlation, the internal electron Moessbauer method, or the ion scattering method. The results of analyses are discussed for alkali ion implantation, Fe-ion implantation, In-ion implantation, Au-ion implantation, Pt-ion implantation, Pb-ion implantation and transition metal ion implantation. The coupling of the implanted elements with lattice defects and matrix elements, and the compatibility between deposited elements and matrix crystal lattice were studied. The variation of physical properties due to ion implantation such as phase transition, volume change, the control of single crystal region, and the variation of hardness near surface were investigated, and the examples are presented. (Kato, T.)

  3. CR-39 track detector for multi-MeV ion spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, T W; Singh, P K; Scullion, C; Ahmed, H; Hadjisolomou, P; Jeon, C; Yun, H; Kakolee, K F; Borghesi, M; Ter-Avetisyan, S

    2017-05-19

    We present the characteristics of track formation on the front and rear surfaces of CR-39 produced by laser-driven protons and carbon ions. A methodological approach, based on bulk etch length, is proposed to uniquely characterize the particle tracks in CR-39, enabling comparative description of the track characteristics in different experiments. The response of CR-39 to ions is studied based on the energy dependent growth rate of the track diameter to understand the intrinsic particle stopping process within the material. A large non-uniformity in the track diameter is observed for CR-39 with thickness matching with the stopping range of particles. Simulation and experimental results show the imprint of longitudinal range straggling for energetic protons. Moreover, by exploiting the energy dependence of the track diameter, the energy resolution (δE/E) of CR-39 for few MeV protons and Carbon ion is found to be about 3%.

  4. Oxide glass structure evolution under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, C.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.; Moskura, M.; Caraballo, R.; Bouty, O.; Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Jegou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Structure of SHI irradiated glass is similar to the one of a hyper quenched glass. • D2 Raman band associated to 3 members ring is only observed in irradiated glass. • Irradiated state seems slightly different to an equilibrated liquid quenched rapidly. - Abstract: The effects of ion tracks on the structure of oxide glasses were examined by irradiating a silica glass and two borosilicate glass specimens containing 3 and 6 oxides with krypton ions (74 MeV) and xenon ions (92 MeV). Structural changes in the glass were observed by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a multinuclear approach ( 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si). The structure of irradiated silica glass resembles a structure quenched at very high temperature. Both borosilicate glass specimens exhibited depolymerization of the borosilicate network, a lower boron coordination number, and a change in the role of a fraction of the sodium atoms after irradiation, suggesting that the final borosilicate glass structures were quenched from a high temperature state. In addition, a sharp increase in the concentration of three membered silica rings and the presence of large amounts of penta- and hexacoordinate aluminum in the irradiated 6-oxide glass suggest that the irradiated glass is different from a liquid quenched at equilibrium, but it is rather obtained from a nonequilibrium liquid that is partially relaxed by very rapid quenching within the ion tracks

  5. Detection of coloured tracks of heavy ion particles using photographic colour film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, K.; Yasuda, N.; Kumagai, H.; Nakazawa, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Aoki, N.; Hasegawa, A.

    2001-01-01

    A photographic colour film, which was exposed to heavy ions, reveals a coloured dye image of the ion tracks. Since the colour film consists of several layers and different colours appear on each layer, three-dimensional information on the tracks in the layers can be obtained by the colour image. Previously, we have reported the method for which the tracks in different colours represented differences of track depth and we also discussed the disadvantages of using commercial colour films. Here we present the procedure for a self-made photographic coating and the development formula which can overcome the disadvantages

  6. Vibro-acoustic performance of newly designed tram track structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladin, Ivo; Lakušić, Stjepan; Ahac, Maja

    2017-09-01

    Rail vehicles in interaction with a railway structure induce vibrations that are propagating to surrounding structures and cause noise disturbance in the surrounding areas. Since tram tracks in urban areas often share the running surface with road vehicles one of top priorities is to achieve low maintenance and long lasting structure. Research conducted in scope of this paper gives an overview of newly designed tram track structures designated for use on Zagreb tram network and their performance in terms of noise and vibration mitigation. Research has been conducted on a 150 m long test section consisted of three tram track types: standard tram track structure commonly used on tram lines in Zagreb, optimized tram structure for better noise and vibration mitigation and a slab track with double sleepers embedded in a concrete slab, which presents an entirely new approach of tram track construction in Zagreb. Track has been instrumented with acceleration sensors, strain gauges and revision shafts for inspection. Relative deformations give an insight into track structure dynamic load distribution through the exploitation period. Further the paper describes vibro-acoustic measurements conducted at the test site. To evaluate the track performance from the vibro-acoustical standpoint, detailed analysis of track decay rate has been analysed. Opposed to measurement technique using impact hammer for track decay rate measurements, newly developed measuring technique using vehicle pass by vibrations as a source of excitation has been proposed and analysed. Paper gives overview of the method, it’s benefits compared to standard method of track decay rate measurements and method evaluation based on noise measurements of the vehicle pass by.

  7. Robust visual tracking via structured multi-task sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Liu, Si; Ahuja, Narendra

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate object tracking in a particle filter framework as a structured multi-task sparse learning problem, which we denote as Structured Multi-Task Tracking (S-MTT). Since we model particles as linear combinations of dictionary

  8. Coupled chemical reactions in dynamic nanometric confinement: Ag2O membrane formation during ion track etching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernandez, G. M.; Cruz, S. A.; Quintero, R.; Arellano, H. G.; Fink, Dietmar; Alfonta, L.; Mandabi, Y.; Kiv, A.; Vacík, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 9 (2013), s. 675-695 ISSN 1042-0150 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : track * polymers * etching * chemistry * ions * nanostructure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.603, year: 2013

  9. Pygmalion in Instruction? Tracking, Teacher Reward Structures, and Educational Inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran

    2018-01-01

    I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track location. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort...... and achievement across tracks. Differences in grading practices determine incentive structures for student behavior and educational investments and thus may be an important mechanism in explaining track effects on academic achievement. I apply student fixed effects models across tracks to the NELS:88 and find...

  10. Colored tracks of heavy ion particles recorded on photographic color film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, K.; Yasuda, N.; Kumagai, H.; Aoki, N.; Hasegawa, A.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to obtain the three-dimensional information on nuclear tracks was developed using color photography. Commercial color films were irradiated with ion beam and color-developed. The ion tracks were represented with color images in which different depths were indicated by different colors, and the three-dimensional information was obtained from color changes. Details of this method are reported, and advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with a conventional method using a nuclear emulsion

  11. Glucose determination using a re-usable enzyme-modified ion track membrane sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Klinkovich, I.; Bukelman, O.; Marks, R.S.; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Fahrner, W. R.; Alfonta, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 8 (2009), s. 2702-2706 ISSN 0956-5663 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Glucose sensor * etched tracks * Ion track membranes Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.429, year: 2009

  12. Structural response of titanate pyrochlores to swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamblin, Jacob; Tracy, Cameron L.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Li, Weixing; Trautmann, Christina; Lang, Maik

    2016-01-01

    The structure, size, and morphology of ion tracks resulting from irradiation of five different pyrochlore compositions (A 2 Ti 2 O 7 , A = Yb, Er, Y, Gd, Sm) with 2.2 GeV 197 Au ions were investigated by means of synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Radiation-induced amorphization occurred in all five materials analyzed following an exponential rate as a function of ion fluence. XRD patterns showed a general trend of increasing susceptibility of amorphization with increasing ratio of A- to B-site cation ionic radii (r A /r B ) with the exception of Y 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Sm 2 Ti 2 O 7 . This indicates that the track size does not necessarily increase with r A /r B , in contrast with results from previous swift heavy ion studies on Gd 2 Zr 2-x Ti x O 7 pyrochlore materials. For Y 2 Ti 2 O 7 , this effect is attributed to the significantly lower electron density of this material relative to the lanthanide-bearing pyrochlores, thus lowering the electronic energy loss (dE/dx) of the high-energy ions in this composition. An energy loss normalization procedure was performed which reveals an initial increase of amorphous track size with r A /r B that saturates above a cation radius ratio larger than Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 . This is in agreement with previous low-energy ion irradiation experiments and first principles calculations of the disordering energy of titanate pyrochlores indicating that the same trends in disordering energy apply to radiation damage induced in both the nuclear and electronic energy loss regimes. HRTEM images indicate that single ion tracks in Yb 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Er 2 Ti 2 O 7 , which have small A-site cations and low r A /r B , exhibit a core-shell structure with a small amorphous core surrounded by a larger disordered shell. In contrast, single tracks in Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Sm 2 Ti 2 O 7 , have a larger amorphous core with minimal disordered shells.

  13. An ion beam tracking system based on a parallel plate avalanche counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, I. P.; Ramachandran, K.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Rafiei, R.; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.; Cook, K. J.; McNeil, S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Harding, A. B.; Muirhead, A. G.; Tunningley, T.

    2013-01-01

    A pair of twin position-sensitive parallel plate avalanche counters have been developed at the Australian National University as a tracking system to aid in the further rejection of unwanted beam particles from a 6.5 T super conducting solenoid separator named SOLEROO. Their function is to track and identify each beam particle passing through the detectors on an event-by-event basis. In-beam studies have been completed and the detectors are in successful operation, demonstrating the tracking capability. A high efficiency 512-pixel wide-angle silicon detector array will then be integrated with the tracking system for nuclear reactions studies of radioactive ions. (authors)

  14. Measurements of diameters of selectively etchable tracks produced in polymer by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel', P.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    The process of pore formation in polyethyleneterephtalate films irradiated by the 136 Xe, 84 Kr, 40 Ar ions was investigated by measuring the conductivity of the samples during etching. The diameters of the damaged tracks within which the local etching rate was larger than etching rate for non-destroyed polymer were determined. In the case of the 136 Xe ions measurements have been carried out at different ion energies [ru

  15. Irradiation effect of different heavy ions and track section on the silkworm Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Zhenli; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Kenji; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    In order to compare the irradiation effects of different ions, wandering larvae were whole-body exposed or locally irradiated with 50-MeV 4 He 2+ , 220-MeV 12 C 5+ , and 350-MeV 20 Ne 8+ ions, respectively. For the whole-body-exposed individuals, the survival rates at the cocooning, pupation, and emergence stages all decreased as dose increased, and a range-dependent difference was clearly observed. For local irradiation of ovaries, irradiation effects depend very strongly on the projectile range. In the case of local irradiation of dermal cells by different track sections of heavy ions, the closer the target was to the high-LET section of the track, the more pronounced were the radiation effects. These results indicated that by selectively using ion species and adjusting the irradiation depth to the target, heavy-ion radiosurgery on particular tissues or organs of small experimental animals can be performed more accurately

  16. Nuclear tracks in CR-39 produced by carbon, oxygen, aluminium and titanium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, J; Romo, V; Golzarri, J I; Espinosa, G

    2002-01-01

    This work describes the response of CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) to different ions (C, O, Al and Ti) produced by the Instituto de Fisica 3 MV 9SDH-2 Pelletron accelerator and backscattered from a thin Au film on a C support. The ion energies were chosen in series such that the ranges of the different ions in the detector were 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 microm respectively for each series. Once exposed, the detectors were etched with a solution of 6.25 M KOH at 60 degrees C, and the reading was carried out using a digital image analysis system. An analysis of the measured track diameters of all the types of ions indicates that, for a given range, track kinetics are independent of type of ion, energy and stopping power.

  17. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  18. Swift heavy ion irradiation of CaF2 - from grooves to hillocks in a single ion track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Salou, Pierre; Bergen, Lorenz; El Kharrazi, Mourad; Lattouf, Elie; Grygiel, Clara; Wang, Yuyu; Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Levavasseur, Delphine; Rangama, Jimmy; Lebius, Henning; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Schleberger, Marika; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-10-01

    A novel form of ion-tracks, namely nanogrooves and hillocks, are observed on CaF2 after irradiation with xenon and lead ions of about 100 MeV kinetic energy. The irradiation is performed under grazing incidence (0.3°-3°) which forces the track to a region in close vicinity to the surface. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the impact sites with high spatial resolution reveals that the surface track consists in fact of three distinct parts: each swift heavy ion impacting on the CaF2 surface first opens a several 100 nm long groove bordered by a series of nanohillocks on both sides. The end of the groove is marked by a huge single hillock and the further penetration of the swift projectile into deeper layers of the target is accompanied by a single protrusion of several 100 nm in length slowly fading until the track vanishes. By comparing experimental data for various impact angles with results of a simulation, based on a three-dimensional version of the two-temperature-model (TTM), we are able to link the crater and hillock formation to sublimation and melting processes of CaF2 due to the local energy deposition by swift heavy ions.

  19. Funnel-type etched ion tracks in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Munoz, G. H.; Alfonta, L.; Klinkovich, I.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 5 (2010), s. 343-361 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : tracks * polymers * etching Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  20. The seam visual tracking method for large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Qilin; Jiang, Xiaomin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Taobo; Zhu, Yulong

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a compact and flexible weld visual tracking method is proposed. Firstly, there was the interference between the visual device and the work-piece to be welded when visual tracking height cannot change. a kind of weld vision system with compact structure and tracking height is researched. Secondly, according to analyze the relative spatial pose between the camera, the laser and the work-piece to be welded and study with the theory of relative geometric imaging, The mathematical model between image feature parameters and three-dimensional trajectory of the assembly gap to be welded is established. Thirdly, the visual imaging parameters of line structured light are optimized by experiment of the weld structure of the weld. Fourth, the interference that line structure light will be scatters at the bright area of metal and the area of surface scratches will be bright is exited in the imaging. These disturbances seriously affect the computational efficiency. The algorithm based on the human eye visual attention mechanism is used to extract the weld characteristics efficiently and stably. Finally, in the experiment, It is verified that the compact and flexible weld tracking method has the tracking accuracy of 0.5mm in the tracking of large structural parts. It is a wide range of industrial application prospects.

  1. Using music structure to improve beat tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2005-09-01

    Beats are an important feature of most music. Beats are used in music information retrieval systems for genre classification, similarity search, and segmentation. However, beats can be difficult to identify, especially in music audio. Traditional beat trackers attempt to (1) match predicted beats to observations of likely beats, and (2) maintain a fairly steady tempo. A third criterion can be added: when repetitions of musical passages occur, the beats in the first repetition should align with the beats in all other repetitions. This third criterion improves beat tracking performance significantly. Repetitions of musical passages are discovered in audio data by searching for similar sequences of chroma vectors. Beats are ``tracked'' by first locating a sequence of likely beats in the music audio using high frequency energy as an indicator of beat likelihood. This beat sequence is then extended by searching forward and backward for more matching beats, allowing slight variations in tempo, and using a relaxation algorithm to optimize the proposed beat locations with respect to the three criteria. Other high-level music features may offer further improvements in beat identification.

  2. Motion Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Non-Visible Structured Light Tracking Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    We present a system for head motion tracking in 3D brain imaging. The system is based on facial surface reconstruction and tracking using a structured light (SL) scanning principle. The system is designed to fit into narrow 3D medical scanner geometries limiting the field of view. It is tested......, is that it is not necessary to place markers on the patient. This provides a simpler workflow and eliminates uncertainties related to marker attachment and stability. We show proof of concept of a marker less tracking system especially designed for clinical use with promising results....... in a clinical setting on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), Siemens PET scanner with a head phantom and volunteers. The SL system is compared to a commercial optical tracking system, the Polaris Vicra system, from NDI based on translatory and rotary ground truth motions of the head phantom...

  3. Strategies towards advanced ion track-based biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alfonta, L.; Bukelman, O.; Chandra, A.; Fahrner, W. R.; Fink, D.; Fuks, D.; Golovanov, V.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Hoppe, K.; Kiv, A.; Klinkovich, I.; Landau, M.; Morante, J.R.; Tkachenko, N.V.; Vacík, Jiří; Valden, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 164, 7-8 (2009), s. 431-437 ISSN 1042-0150. [2nd International Meeting on Recent Developments in the Study of Radiation Effects in Matters. Fodele, 07.09.2008-11.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : biosensors * etched tracks * enzymes Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2009

  4. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  5. Artificial ion tracks in volcanic dark mica simulating natural radiation damage: A scanning force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, M.; Glasmacher, U.A.; Moine, B.; Mueller, C.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    A new dating technique uses alpha-recoil tracks (ART), formed by the natural α-decay of U, Th and their daughter products, to determine the formation age of Quaternary volcanic rocks ( 6 a). Visualization of etched ART by scanning force microscopy (SFM) enables to access track densities beyond 10 8 cm -2 and thus extend the new ART-dating technique to an age range >10 6 a. In order to simulate natural radiation damage, samples of phlogopite, originating from Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Eifel (Germany) and Kerguelen Islands (Indian Ocean) were irradiated with U, Ni (11.4 MeV/u), Xe, Cr, Ne (1.4 MeV/u) and Bi (200 keV) ions. After irradiation and etching with HF at various etching times, phlogopite surfaces were visualized by SFM. Hexagonal etch pits are typical of U, Xe and Cr ion tracks, but the etch pits of Ni, Ne and Bi ion tracks are triangular. Surfaces irradiated with U, Xe, Cr and Ni ions do not show any significant difference between etch pit density and irradiation fluence, whereas the Ne-irradiated surface show ∼14 times less etch pit density. The etching rate v H (parallel to cleavage) depends on the chemical composition of the phlogopite. The etching rate v T ' (along the track) increases with energy loss

  6. Information structure and reference tracking in complex sentences

    CERN Document Server

    Gijn, Rik van; Matic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses argument marking and reference tracking in Mekens complex clauses and their correlation to information structure. The distribution of pronominal arguments in Mekens simple clauses follows an absolutive pattern with main verbs. Complex clauses maintain the morphological absolutive argument marking, but show a nominative pattern with respect to argument reference tracking, since transitive and intransitive subjects function as syntactic pivots. The language extends the use of argument-marking verb morphology to control the reference of discourse participants across clauses.

  7. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  8. Auger processes in tracks of fast multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katin, V.V.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Yavlinskij, Yu.N.

    1992-01-01

    The fast multicharged ion spends about 40% of energy losses on vacancy creation in the inner electron shells. This energy is transferred to the kinetic energy of electrons due to the cascade of Auger processes during ∼ 10 -14 s whereas the primary excited electrons receive the energy in ∼10 -16 s. (author)

  9. Tracking coherent structures in massively-separated and turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Coherent vortex structures are tracked in simulations of massively-separated and turbulent flows. Topological Lagrangian saddle points are found using intersections of the positive and negative finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges, and these points are then followed in order to track individual coherent structure motion both in a complex interacting three-dimensional flow (turbulent channel) and during vortex formation (two-dimensional bluff body shedding). For a simulation of wall-bounded turbulence in a channel flow, tracking Lagrangian saddles shows that the average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a previously published result based on velocity and pressure correlations, giving validity to the method. When this tracking method is applied in a study of a circular cylinder in cross-flow it shows that Lagrangian saddles rapidly accelerate away from the cylinder surface as the vortex sheds. This saddle behavior is compared with the time-resolved static pressure distribution on the circular cylinder, yielding locations on a cylinder surface where common sensors could detect this phenomenon, which is not available from force measurements or vortex circulation calculations. The current method of tracking coherent structures yields insight into the behavior of the coherent structures in both of the diverse flows presented, highlighting the breadth of its potential application.

  10. Structures and ion conduction pathways of amorphous lithium ion conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    For ( 7 Li 2 S) x (P 2 S 5 ) 100-x glasses (x = 50, 60, and 70) and 7 Li 7 P 3 S 11 metastable crystal, time-of-flight neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed, and three-dimensional structures and conduction pathways of lithium ions were studied using the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling and the bond valence sum (BVS) approach. The conduction pathways of the lithium ions could be classified into two types: lithium 'stable' and 'metastable' regions, respectively. Moreover, it was found that there is a significant relationship between the activation energy of the electrical conduction and the topology of the conduction pathways of the lithium ions. (author)

  11. Structural Measures to Track the Evolution of SNOMED CT Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Duo; Gu, Huanying (Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) is an extensive reference terminology with an attendant amount of complexity. It has been updated continuously and revisions have been released semi-annually to meet users’ needs and to reflect the results of quality assurance (QA) activities. Two measures based on structural features are proposed to track the effects of both natural terminology growth and QA activities based on aspects of the complexity of SNOMED CT. These two measures, called the structural density measure and accumulated structural measure, are derived based on two abstraction networks, the area taxonomy and the partial-area taxonomy. The measures derive from attribute relationship distributions and various concept groupings that are associated with the abstraction networks. They are used to track the trends in the complexity of structures as SNOMED CT changes over time. The measures were calculated for consecutive releases of five SNOMED CT hierarchies, including the Specimen hierarchy. The structural density measure shows that natural growth tends to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a more complex state, whereas the accumulated structural measure shows that QA processes tend to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a less complex state. It is also observed that both the structural density and accumulated structural measures are useful tools to track the evolution of an entire SNOMED CT hierarchy and reveal internal concept migration within it. PMID:26260003

  12. Measurement of energy deposition near heavy ion tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Brady, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Rapkin, M.

    1985-01-01

    In November of 1982 work was begun in collaboration with Columbia University and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to use microdosimetric methods to measure energy deposition of heavy ions produced at LBL's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. Last year the authors reported preliminary results indicating that secondary charged particle equilibrium was probably obtained using this experimental setup, but that there seemed to be poor spatial resolution in the solid state position-sensitive detector. Further analysis of the measurements taken in August 1983 shows that because of this electronic noise in the position-sensitive detector, only the 56 Fe data yielded useful microdosimetric spectra

  13. Influence of asymmetric etching on ion track shapes in polycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clochard, M.-C.; Wade, T.L.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Balanzat, E.

    2007-01-01

    By combining low-energy ion irradiation with asymmetric etching, conical nanopores of controlled geometry can be etched in polycarbonate (PC). Cone bases vary from 0.5 to 1 μm. Top diameters down to 17 nm are reached. When etching from one side, the pH on the other side (bathed in neutral or acidic buffer) was monitored. Etching temperature ranged from 65 deg. C to 80 deg. C. Pore shape characterization was achieved by electro replication combined with SEM observation. The tip shape depended on whether an acidic buffer was used or not on the stopped side

  14. Symphony and cacophony in ion track etching: how to control etching results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Kiv, A.; Cruz, S. A.; Munoz, G. H.; Vacík, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 7 (2012), s. 527-540 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200480702 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion track s * polymers * etching * diodes * resistances Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.502, year: 2012

  15. Large solid angle tracking of Monte Carlo events of heavy ion collisions in TPC magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.P.V.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The BNL/CCNY collaboration has for some time had as its goal the development and use of ≅ 4π solid angle magnetic spectrometer tracking of charged particles produced in heavy ion collision experiments at AGS, and eventually RHIC. (orig./HSI)

  16. High-accuracy fluence determination in ion beams using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinga, J.-M.; Akselrod, M.S.; Herrmann, Rochus

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to use Al2O3:C,Mg-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) and confocal laser scanning microscopy as a semiautomatic tool for fluence measurements in clinical ion beams. The method was found to cover a linear energy transfer (LET) range from at least L∞(Al2O3) = 0...

  17. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Soukup, P.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient’s geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations

  18. Mean range and energy of 28Si ions some Makrofol track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, S.; Mishra, R.; Tripathy, S.P.; Mawar, A.K.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Khathing, D.T.; Srivastava, A.; Avasthi, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of energy loss of the impinging ion as it passes through succeeding layers of the target material gives information regarding the nature of material and helps to calculate the range of the ions in a thick target in which the ions are stopped. Here the range, energy loss of 118 MeV 28 Si were measured in Makrofol-N, Makrofol-G and Makrofol-KG, using nuclear track technique. The experimental range data are compared with the theoretical values obtained from different computer codes. (author)

  19. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  20. Impact of time and space evolution of ion tracks in nonvolatile memory cells approaching nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Murat, M.; Barak, J.; Akkerman, A.; Harboe-Sorensen, R.; Virtanen, A.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Swift heavy ions impacting on matter lose energy through the creation of dense tracks of charges. The study of the space and time evolution of energy exchange allows understanding the single event effects behavior in advanced microelectronic devices. In particular, the shrinking of minimum feature size of most advanced memory devices makes them very interesting test vehicles to study these effects since the device and the track dimensions are comparable; hence, measured effects are directly correlated with the time and space evolution of the energy release. In this work we are studying the time and space evolution of ion tracks by using advanced non volatile memories and Monte Carlo simulations. Experimental results are very well explained by the theoretical calculations.

  1. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs

  2. Recording of heavy ion tracks in silicates. Application to the determination of the abundance of ultra-heavy elements in old solar cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraud, J.-P.

    1978-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine the abundance A(Z) and energy spectrum of the elements of atomic number Z present in cosmic radiation, by means of fossil traces recorded in moon and meteorite minerals. The difficulties due amongst other things to natural annealing are examined in detail in part one, of this paper, the outcome being a thorough study of the processes responsible for the formation, chemical attack and annealing of heavy ion tracks. Part two describes an original approach used here and consisting of a combined analysis as a function of annealing for a given track, of the microscopic structure of the latent track and its attack rate. Part three uses the new rules established beforehand to propose a new method of studying the UH ion (Z>30) to VH ion (20 [fr

  3. Electronic energy loss of the latent track in heavy ion-irradiated polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Youmei; Liu Jie; Zhang Chonghong; Wang Zhiguang; Jin Yunfan; Duan Jinglai; Song Yin

    2005-01-01

    In the interaction process of a swift heavy ion (SHI) and polymer, a latent track with radius of several nanometers appears near the ion trajectory due to the dense ionization and excitation. To describe the role of electronic energy loss (dE/dX) e , multi-layer stacks (with different dE/dX) of polyimide (PI) films were irradiated by different SHIs (1.158 GeV Fe 56 and 1.755 GeV Xe 136 ) under vacuum at room temperature. Chemical changes of modified PI films were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The main feature of SHI irradiation is the degradation of the functional group and creation of alkyne. The chain disruption rate of PI was investigated in the fluence range from 1 x 10 11 to 6 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 and a wider energy stopping power range (2.2 to 5.2 keV/nm for Fe 56 ions and 8.6 to 11.3 keV/nm for Xe 136 ions). Alkyne formation was observed over the electronic energy loss range of interest. Assuming the saturated track model (the damage process only occur in a cylinder of area σ), the mean degradation and alkyne formation radii in tracks were deduced for Fe and Xe ion irradiation, respectively. The results were validated by the thermal spike model and the threshold electronic energy loss of track formation S et in PI was deduced. The analysis of the irradiated PI films shows that the predictions of the thermal spike model are in qualitative agreement with the curve shape of experimental results. (authors)

  4. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: A structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  5. Pygmalion in Instruction? Tracking, Teacher Reward Structures, and Educational Inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran

    2018-01-01

    I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track location. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort...

  6. Tracking of Polycarbonate Films using Low-energy Ions Final Report CRADA No. TC-774-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musket, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Ion tracking is performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping. For the present study, we have examined the results of etching ion tracks created by ions bombarding polycarbonate films with energies corresponding to stopping well below the maximum and just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV /amu and fluences of about 108/cm2 were used to examine the limits for producing etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., -20 nm < SEM hole diameter < -100 nm), we can directly relate the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion to the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results will be discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness the films. These results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications.

  7. Measurement of track opening contours of oblique incident 4He and 7Li-ions in CR-39: Relevance for calculation of track formation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, D.; Reichelt, U.

    2010-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) irradiated in realistic radiation fields exhibits after chemical etching very complex track images resulting from different species of particles and their energy spectra and randomly distributed angles of incidence or emission. Reading out such an etched detector surface with a light microscope, quite different track opening contours are observed. Beside the number of tracks, typically their major and minor axes are measured. In this work following problems arising from such experimental situations will be investigated: ·the measurement of track contour parameters for oblique incident 4 He and 7 Li-ions of different energies and angles in CR-39 detectors ·the theoretical description of the angular variation of both axes. ·the possibility to extract physical and spectroscopic information from major and minor track axes. This analysis is based on an intensive experimental program and the comprehensive study of theoretical models available for description of track revealing processes in CR-39.

  8. Graphitic structure formation in ion implanted polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavenner, E., E-mail: tazman1492@gmail.com [Creative Polymers Pty. Ltd., 41 Wilkinson Street, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Wood, B. [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Curry, M.; Jankovic, A.; Patel, R. [Center for Applied Science and Engineering, Missouri State University, 524 North Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ion implantation is a technique that is used to change the electrical, optical, hardness and biocompatibility of a wide range of inorganic materials. This technique also imparts similar changes to organic or polymer based materials. With polymers, ion implantation can produce a carbon enriched volume. Knowledge as to the nature of this enrichment and its relative concentration is necessary to produce accurate models of the physical properties of the modified material. One technique that can achieve this is X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this study the formation of graphite like structures in the near surface of polyetheretherketone by ion implantation has been elucidated from detailed analysis of the C 1s and valence band peak structures generated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further evidence is given by both Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection.

  9. High-LET dose-response characteristics by track structure theory of heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.W.; Olsen, K.J.

    1981-09-01

    The track structure theory developed by Katz and co-workers ascribes the effect of high-LET radiation to the highly inhomogeneous dose distribution due to low energy Δ-rays ejected from the particle track. The theory predicts the effectiveness of high-LET radiation by using the ion parameters zsub(eff') effective charge of the ion, and β = v/c, the relative ion velocity, together with the characteristic dose D 37 derived from low-LET dose-response characteristic of the detector and the approximate size asub(0) of the sensitive element of the detector. 60 Co gamma-irradiation is used as a reference low-LET radiation, while high-LET radiation ranging from 16 MeV protons to 4 MeV/amu 16 0-ions covering an initial LET range of 30-5500 MeVcm 2 /g is obtained from a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. A thin film (5mg/cm 2 ) radiochromic dye cyanide plastic dosemeter was used as detector with the characteristic dose of 16.8 Mrad and a sensitive element size of 10 -7 cm. Theoretical and experimental effectiveness, RBE, agreed within 10 to 25% depending on LET. (author)

  10. Calculation of electronic stopping power along glancing swift heavy ion tracks in perovskites using ab initio electron density data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmani, O; Duvenbeck, A; Akcoeltekin, E; Meyer, R; Schleberger, M [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Lebius, H [CIMAP, blvd Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen (France)], E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de

    2008-08-06

    In recent experiments the irradiation of insulators of perovskite type with swift (E{approx}100 MeV) heavy ions under glancing incidence has been shown to provide a unique means to generate periodically arranged nanodots at the surface. The physical origin of these patterns has been suggested as stemming from a highly anisotropic electron density distribution within the bulk. In order to show the relevance of the electron density distribution of the target we present a model calculation for the system Xe{sup 23+} {yields} SrTiO{sub 3} that is known to produce the aforementioned surface modifications. On the basis of the Lindhard model of electronic stopping, we employ highly-resolved ab initio electron density data to describe the conversion of kinetic energy into excitation energy along the ion track. The primary particle dynamics are obtained via integration of the Newtonian equations of motion that are governed by a space- and time-dependent frictional force originating from Lindhard stopping. The analysis of the local electronic stopping power along the ion track reveals a pronounced periodic structure. The periodicity length varies strongly with the particular choice of the polar angle of incidence and is directly correlated to the experimentally observed formation of periodic nanodots at insulator surfaces.

  11. A Monte-Carlo code for the detailed simulation of electron and light-ion tracks in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Papamichael, G.; Karava, K.; Androulidakis, I.; Pathak, A.; Phillips, G. W.; Moscovitch, M.; Kostarelos, K.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to understand the basic mechanism of the action of charged particles in solid radiation dosimeters, we extend our Monte-Carlo code (MC4) to condensed media (liquids/solids) and present new track-structure calculations for electrons and protons. Modeling the energy dissipation process is based on a model dielectric function, which accounts in a semi-empirical and self-consistent way for condensed-phase effects which are computationally intractable. Importantly, these effects mostly influence track-structure characteristics at the nano-meter scale, which is the focus of radiation action models. Since the event-by-event scheme for electron transport is impractical above several kilo-electron volts, a condensed-history random-walk scheme has been implemented to transport the energetic delta rays produced by energetic ions. Based on the above developments, new track-structure calculations are presented for two representative dosimetric materials, namely, liquid water and silicon. Results include radial dose distributions in cylindrical and spherical geometries, as well as, clustering distributions, which, among other things, are important in predicting irreparable damage in biological systems and prompt electric-fields in microelectronics. (authors)

  12. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that biological response to radiation is not always restricted to the 'hit' cell but can sometimes be induced in 'un-hit' cells near by

  13. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object\\'s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for non-sparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios, these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object’s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for nonsparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our proposed tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art trackers.

  15. Structure-aware Local Sparse Coding for Visual Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Yuankai

    2018-01-24

    Sparse coding has been applied to visual tracking and related vision problems with demonstrated success in recent years. Existing tracking methods based on local sparse coding sample patches from a target candidate and sparsely encode these using a dictionary consisting of patches sampled from target template images. The discriminative strength of existing methods based on local sparse coding is limited as spatial structure constraints among the template patches are not exploited. To address this problem, we propose a structure-aware local sparse coding algorithm which encodes a target candidate using templates with both global and local sparsity constraints. For robust tracking, we show local regions of a candidate region should be encoded only with the corresponding local regions of the target templates that are the most similar from the global view. Thus, a more precise and discriminative sparse representation is obtained to account for appearance changes. To alleviate the issues with tracking drifts, we design an effective template update scheme. Extensive experiments on challenging image sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm against numerous stateof- the-art methods.

  16. Irradiation effect of different heavy ions and track section on the silkworm Bombyx mori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu Zhenli E-mail: tu514@yahoo.co.jp; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Kenji; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    In order to compare the irradiation effects of different ions, wandering larvae were whole-body exposed or locally irradiated with 50-MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+}, 220-MeV {sup 12}C{sup 5+}, and 350-MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ions, respectively. For the whole-body-exposed individuals, the survival rates at the cocooning, pupation, and emergence stages all decreased as dose increased, and a range-dependent difference was clearly observed. For local irradiation of ovaries, irradiation effects depend very strongly on the projectile range. In the case of local irradiation of dermal cells by different track sections of heavy ions, the closer the target was to the high-LET section of the track, the more pronounced were the radiation effects. These results indicated that by selectively using ion species and adjusting the irradiation depth to the target, heavy-ion radiosurgery on particular tissues or organs of small experimental animals can be performed more accurately.

  17. Beam profile measurement with CR-39 track detector for low-energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, F; Tanaka, T; Iida, T; Yamauchi, T; Oda, K

    1999-01-01

    A CR-39 track detector was successfully used to measure the outline of thin low-energy ion beams. After the etching, the surface of the detector was examined with an observation system composed of a Normarski microscope, a CCD camera and a digital image processing computer. Beam images obtained with the system were in good agreement on the outline of the beam formed with a beam aperture. Also, the resolving power in the beam outline measurement was roughly explained from the consideration of the ion range and the etch-pit growth in the chemical etching for the CR-39 detector.

  18. Interaction mean free path measurements for relativistic heavy ion fragments using CR39 plastic track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drechsel, H.; Brechtmann, C.; Dreute, J.; Sonntag, S.; Trakowski, W.; Beer, J.; Heinrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment measuring the interaction mean free paths for charge changing nuclear collisions of relativistic heavy ion fragments. We use a stack of CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors that was irradiated with 1.8 GeV/nucleon 40 Ar ions at the Berkeley Bevalac. About 1.5 x 10 7 etch cones were measured in this experiment using an automatic measuring system. By tracing the etch cones over successive plastic foils the particle trajectories in the stack were reconstructed. For 14185 trajectories with 6444 nuclear collisions of fragments with charge 9-15 the interaction mean free path in the plastic was determined. (orig.)

  19. Impact of the track structure of heavy charged particles on cytogenetic damage in human blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Sommer, Sylwetster; Hartel, Carola; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia

    In space, astronauts are unavoidably exposed to charged particles from protons to irons. For a better estimate of the health risks of astronauts, further knowledge on the biological effects of charged particles, in particular the induction of cytogenetic damage is required. One im-portant factor that determines the biological response is the track structure of particles, i.e. their microscopic dose deposition in cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of track structure of heavy ions on the yield and the quality of cytogenetic damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes representing normal tissue. Cells were irradiated with 9.5 MeV/u C-ions or 990 MeV/u Fe-ions which have a comparable LET (175 keV/µm and 155 keV/µm, respectively) but a different track radius (2.3 and 6200 µm, respectively). When aberrations were analyzed in first cycle metaphases collected at different post-irradiation times (48-84 h) following fluorescence plus Giemsa staining, an increase in the aberration yield with sampling time was observed for both radiation qualities reflecting a damage dependent cell cycle progression delay to mitosis. The pronounced differences in the aberration frequency per cell are attributable to the stochastic distribution of particle traversals per cell nucleus (radius: 2.8 µm). Following C-ion exposure we found a high fraction of non-aberrant cells in samples collected at 48 h which represent cells not directly hit by a particle and slightly damaged cells that successfully repaired the induced lesions. In addition, at higher C-ion fluences the aberra-tion yield saturated, suggesting that a fraction of lymphocytes receiving multiple particle hits is not able to reach mitosis. On the other hand, at 48 h after Fe-ion exposure the proportion of non-aberrant cells is lower than after C-ion irradiation clearly reflecting the track structure of high energy particles (i.e. more homogeneous dose deposition compared to low energy C-ions

  20. Investigation of Nuclear Fragmentation in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions Using Plastic - Nuclear - Track Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In this experiment CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors will be used which are sensitive to detect relativistic nuclear fragments with charges Z@$>$5. They will be analyzed using an automatic track measuring system which was developed at the University of Siegen.\\\\ \\\\ This allows to measure large quantities of tracks in these passive detectors and to perform high statistics experiments. We intend to measure cross sections for the production of nuclear fragments from heavy ion beams at the SPS. \\\\ \\\\ The energy independence of the cross sections predicted by the idea of limiting fragmentation will be tested at high energies. In exposures with different targets we plan to analyze the factorization of the fragmentation cross sections into a target depending factor and a factor depending on the beam particle and the fragment. The cross sections for one proton remov Coulomb dissociation. \\\\ \\\\ We plan to investigate Coulomb dissociation for different targets and different energies. Fragment and projectile charges ...

  1. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...... the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees...... point clouds are matched to a reference surface using a robust iterative closest point algorithm. A main challenge is the narrow geometry requiring a compact structured light system and an oblique angle of observation. The system is validated using a mannequin head mounted on a rotary stage. We compare...

  2. Diffusion kinetics of the glucose/glucose oxidase system in swift heavy ion track-based biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Dietmar, E-mail: fink@xanum.uam.mx [Nuclear Physics Institute, 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, 09340 México, DF (Mexico); Vacik, Jiri; Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute, 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Muñoz Hernandez, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, 09340 México, DF (Mexico); Garcia Arrelano, H. [Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, División de Ciencias Biológicas y de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Lerma, Av. de las Garzas No. 10, Col. El Panteón, Lerma de Villada, Municipio de Lerma, Estado de México CP 52005 (Mexico); Alfonta, Lital [Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kiv, Arik [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Application of swift heavy ion tracks in biosensing. • Obtaining yet unknown diffusion coefficients of organic matter across etched ion tracks. • Obtaining diffusion coefficients of organics in etched ion tracks of biosensors. • Comparison with Renkin’s equation to predict the effective etched track diameter in the given experiments. - Abstract: For understanding of the diffusion kinetics and their optimization in swift heavy ion track-based biosensors, recently a diffusion simulation was performed. This simulation aimed at yielding the degree of enrichment of the enzymatic reaction products in the highly confined space of the etched ion tracks. A bunch of curves was obtained for the description of such sensors that depend only on the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of the products to that of the analyte within the tracks. As hitherto none of these two diffusion coefficients is accurately known, the present work was undertaken. The results of this paper allow one to quantify the previous simulation and hence yield realistic predictions of glucose-based biosensors. At this occasion, also the influence of the etched track radius on the diffusion coefficients was measured and compared with earlier prediction.

  3. A variable structure tracking controller for robot manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Shin, Hwi Beom

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a continuous variable structure tracking controller is designed for the purpose of the control of robot manipulators to follow a given desired planned trajectory with high accuracy. The robustness and continuity of the algorithm are much improved by means of the feedforward compensation technique based on the disturbance observer without any chattering problem. Also the stability of the algorithm is analyzed in detail, further more the usefulness and good performances are verified through computer simulation studies. (author)

  4. Conductivity enhancement of ion tracks in tetrahedral amorphous carbon by doping with N, B, Cu and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauser, J.; Nix, A.-K.; Gehrke, H.-G.; Hofsäss, H.; Trautmann, C.; Weidinger, A.

    2012-01-01

    Conducting ion tracks are formed when high-energy heavy ions (e.g. 1 GeV Au) pass through tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C). These nanowires with a diameter of about 8 nm are embedded in the insulating ta-C matrix and of interest for various nanotechnological applications. Usually the overall conductivity of the tracks and the current/voltage characteristics (Ohmic or non-Ohmic) vary strongly from track to track, even when measured on the same sample, indicating that the track formation is neither complete nor homogeneous. To improve the track conductivity, doping of ta-C with N, B, Cu, or Fe is investigated. Beneficial changes in track conductivity after doping compete with a conductivity increase of the surrounding matrix material. Best results are achieved by incorporation of 1 at.% Cu, while for different reasons, the improvement of the tracks remains moderate for N, B, and Fe doping. Conductivity enhancement of the tracks is assumed to develop during the ion track formation process by an increased number of localized states which contribute to the current transport.

  5. Robust visual tracking via structured multi-task sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-11-09

    In this paper, we formulate object tracking in a particle filter framework as a structured multi-task sparse learning problem, which we denote as Structured Multi-Task Tracking (S-MTT). Since we model particles as linear combinations of dictionary templates that are updated dynamically, learning the representation of each particle is considered a single task in Multi-Task Tracking (MTT). By employing popular sparsity-inducing lp,q mixed norms (specifically p∈2,∞ and q=1), we regularize the representation problem to enforce joint sparsity and learn the particle representations together. As compared to previous methods that handle particles independently, our results demonstrate that mining the interdependencies between particles improves tracking performance and overall computational complexity. Interestingly, we show that the popular L1 tracker (Mei and Ling, IEEE Trans Pattern Anal Mach Intel 33(11):2259-2272, 2011) is a special case of our MTT formulation (denoted as the L11 tracker) when p=q=1. Under the MTT framework, some of the tasks (particle representations) are often more closely related and more likely to share common relevant covariates than other tasks. Therefore, we extend the MTT framework to take into account pairwise structural correlations between particles (e.g. spatial smoothness of representation) and denote the novel framework as S-MTT. The problem of learning the regularized sparse representation in MTT and S-MTT can be solved efficiently using an Accelerated Proximal Gradient (APG) method that yields a sequence of closed form updates. As such, S-MTT and MTT are computationally attractive. We test our proposed approach on challenging sequences involving heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that S-MTT is much better than MTT, and both methods consistently outperform state-of-the-art trackers. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  6. Applications of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector to ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanasaki, Masato; Hattori, Atsuto; Oda, Keiji; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Yuji; Sakaki, Hironao; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kondo, Kiminori; Kurashima, Satoshi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2012-01-01

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector, which was developed for optical lens, has been applied for various field such as radon surveys, measurement of galactic cosmic ray, cell irradiation experiment and so on. The CR-39 detectors have the great advantages of being insensitive to high energy photons and electrons and capable of detecting only ions in the mixed fields such as laser driven relativistic plasmas. Though there are some analytical methods of CR-39 to diagnose ion beam, unfortunately, only few researchers in the field of plasma know the methods. This article looks at how to use CR-39 detectors and introduce the accomplishment of the joint study JAEA and Kobe Univ. for application of CR-39 detectors to ion beam diagnosis. (author)

  7. Microdosimetry for a carbon ion beam using track-etched detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozova, I.; Ploc, O.; Davidkova, M.; Vondracek, V.; Sefl, M.; Stepan, V.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K.; Incerti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Track-etched detectors (TED) have been used as linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometers in heavy ion beams for many years. LET spectra and depth -dose distribution of a carbon ion beam were measured behind polymethylmethacrylate degraders at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan. The measurements were performed along monoenergetic beam with energy 290 MeV u -1 in different positions: (1) at beam extraction area, (2) at beginning, (3) maximum and (4) behind the Bragg peak region (0, 117, 147 and 151 mm of water-equivalent depth, respectively). The LET spectra inside and outside of the primary ion beam have been evaluated. TED record only heavy charged particles with LET above 8 -10 keV μm -1 , while electrons and ions with lower LET are not detected. The Geant4 simulation toolkit version 4.9.6.P01 has been used to estimate the contribution of non-detected particles to absorbed dose. Presented results demonstrate the applicability of TED for microdosimetry measurements in therapeutic carbon ion beams. (authors)

  8. Hierarchically porous carbon membranes containing designed nanochannel architectures obtained by pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Falk, E-mail: muench@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Seidl, Tim; Rauber, Markus [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Peter, Benedikt; Brötz, Joachim [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Krause, Markus; Trautmann, Christina [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Roth, Christina [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustraße 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Katusic, Stipan [Evonik Industries AG, Rodenbacher Chaussee 4, 63457 Hanau (Germany); Ensinger, Wolfgang [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Well-defined, porous carbon monoliths are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, separation, purification and catalysis. In this work, we present an approach allowing to transfer the remarkable degree of synthetic control given by the ion-track etching technology to the fabrication of carbon membranes with porosity structured on multiple length scales. The carbonization and pore formation processes were examined with Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, while model experiments demonstrated the viability of the carbon membranes as catalyst support and pollutant adsorbent. Using ion-track etching, specifically designed, continuous channel-shaped pores were introduced into polyimide foils with precise control over channel diameter, orientation, density and interconnection. At a pyrolysis temperature of 950 °C, the artificially created channels shrunk in size, but their shape was preserved, while the polymer was transformed to microporous, amorphous carbon. Channel diameters ranging from ∼10 to several 100 nm could be achieved. The channels also gave access to previously closed micropore volume. Substantial surface increase was realized, as it was shown by introducing a network consisting of 1.4 × 10{sup 10} channels per cm{sup 2} of 30 nm diameter, which more than tripled the mass-normalized surface of the pyrolytic carbon from 205 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} to 732 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. At a pyrolysis temperature of 3000 °C, membranes consisting of highly ordered graphite were obtained. In this case, the channel shape was severely altered, resulting in a pronounced conical geometry in which the channel diameter quickly decreased with increasing distance to the membrane surface. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide yields porous carbon membranes. • Hierarchic porosity: continuous nanochannels embedded in a microporous carbon matrix.

  9. Hierarchically porous carbon membranes containing designed nanochannel architectures obtained by pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, Falk; Seidl, Tim; Rauber, Markus; Peter, Benedikt; Brötz, Joachim; Krause, Markus; Trautmann, Christina; Roth, Christina; Katusic, Stipan; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined, porous carbon monoliths are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, separation, purification and catalysis. In this work, we present an approach allowing to transfer the remarkable degree of synthetic control given by the ion-track etching technology to the fabrication of carbon membranes with porosity structured on multiple length scales. The carbonization and pore formation processes were examined with Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, while model experiments demonstrated the viability of the carbon membranes as catalyst support and pollutant adsorbent. Using ion-track etching, specifically designed, continuous channel-shaped pores were introduced into polyimide foils with precise control over channel diameter, orientation, density and interconnection. At a pyrolysis temperature of 950 °C, the artificially created channels shrunk in size, but their shape was preserved, while the polymer was transformed to microporous, amorphous carbon. Channel diameters ranging from ∼10 to several 100 nm could be achieved. The channels also gave access to previously closed micropore volume. Substantial surface increase was realized, as it was shown by introducing a network consisting of 1.4 × 10 10 channels per cm 2 of 30 nm diameter, which more than tripled the mass-normalized surface of the pyrolytic carbon from 205 m 2  g −1 to 732 m 2  g −1 . At a pyrolysis temperature of 3000 °C, membranes consisting of highly ordered graphite were obtained. In this case, the channel shape was severely altered, resulting in a pronounced conical geometry in which the channel diameter quickly decreased with increasing distance to the membrane surface. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide yields porous carbon membranes. • Hierarchic porosity: continuous nanochannels embedded in a microporous carbon matrix. • Freely adjustable meso- or

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Negative Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    This report describes progress made during the final three-year grant period 1997-2000. During this period, we experimentally investigated the structure and dynamics of negative ions by detaching the outermost electron in controlled processes induced by photon-, electron- and heavy particle-impact. In this manner we studied, at a fundamental level, the role of electron correlation in the structure and dynamics of simple, few-particle atomic systems. Our measurements have provided sensitive tests of the ability of theory to go beyond the independent electron model

  11. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ting; Li Fanghua; Liu Qingfang; Bian Po; Wang Jufang; Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun; Li Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and γ-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  12. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ting [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Bian Po, E-mail: bianpo@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Jufang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Wenjian [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  13. MODAL TRACKING of A Structural Device: A Subspace Identification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Franco, S. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruggiero, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Emmons, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez, I. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stoops, L. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Mechanical devices operating in an environment contaminated by noise, uncertainties, and extraneous disturbances lead to low signal-to-noise-ratios creating an extremely challenging processing problem. To detect/classify a device subsystem from noisy data, it is necessary to identify unique signatures or particular features. An obvious feature would be resonant (modal) frequencies emitted during its normal operation. In this report, we discuss a model-based approach to incorporate these physical features into a dynamic structure that can be used for such an identification. The approach we take after pre-processing the raw vibration data and removing any extraneous disturbances is to obtain a representation of the structurally unknown device along with its subsystems that capture these salient features. One approach is to recognize that unique modal frequencies (sinusoidal lines) appear in the estimated power spectrum that are solely characteristic of the device under investigation. Therefore, the objective of this effort is based on constructing a black box model of the device that captures these physical features that can be exploited to “diagnose” whether or not the particular device subsystem (track/detect/classify) is operating normally from noisy vibrational data. Here we discuss the application of a modern system identification approach based on stochastic subspace realization techniques capable of both (1) identifying the underlying black-box structure thereby enabling the extraction of structural modes that can be used for analysis and modal tracking as well as (2) indicators of condition and possible changes from normal operation.

  14. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P.; Barkley, Robert M.; Jones, David N. M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2018-04-01

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H]- ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H]- and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H2O-CO2]- and [M-H-H2O]- displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H2O]- ion from LTB4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H2O]- product ions from LTB4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Nuclear structure and heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1980-10-01

    A series of lectures is presented on experimental studies of heavy-ion fusion reactions with emphasis on the role of nuclear structure in the fusion mechanism. The experiments considered are of three types: the fusion of lighter heavy ions at subcoulomb energies is studied with in-beam γ-ray techniques; the subbarrier fusion of 16 O and 40 Ar with the isotopes of samarium is detected out of beam by x-radiation from delayed activity; and measurements at very high energies, again for the lighter ions, employ direct particle identification of evaporation residues. The experimental data are compared with predictions based on the fusion of two spheres with the only degree of freedom being the separation of the centers, and which interact via potentials that vary smoothly with changes in the mass and charge of the projectile and target. The data exhibit with the isotopes of samarium, a portion of these deviations can be understood in terms of the changing deformation of the target nucleus, but an additional degree of freedom such as neck formation appears necessary. The results on 10 B + 16 O and 12 C + 14 N → 26 Al at high bombarding energies indicate a maximum limiting angular momentum characteristic of the compound nucleus. At lower energies the nuclear structure of the colliding ion seems to affect strongly the cross section for fusion. Measurements made at subbarrier energies for a variety of projectile-target combinations in the 1p and 2s - 1d shell also indicate that the valence nucleons can affect the energy dependence for fusion. About half the systems studied so far have structureless excitation functions which follow a standard prediction. The other half exhibit large variations from this prediction. The possible importance of neutron transfer is discussed. The two-center shell model appears as a promising approach for gaining a qualitative understanding of these phenomena. 95 references, 52 figures, 1 table

  17. Ion structure and sequence of ion formation in acetylene flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionova, I.A.; Fialkov, B.S.; Kalinich, K.YA.; Fialkov, A.B.; Ospanov, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    Results of a study of the ion composition of acetylene-air flames burning at low pressures are reported. Data on ion formation are compared for flames of saturated hydrocarbons, oxygen-containing fuels, and acetylene. It is shown that the characteristics of ion formation in the flame front and directly ahead of it are similar to those observed in flames of other fuels. These characteristics, however, are different in the low-temperature region. 9 refs.

  18. Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based ion track membranes with different pore diameters and shapes. SEM observations and conductometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuryanthi, Nunung; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Asano, Masaharu; Enomoto, Kazuyuki; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Maekawa, Yasunari; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Trautmann, Christina; Neumann, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes with conical and cylindrical nanopores were prepared in a controlled manner by the ion-track technique, which involved heavy-ion beam irradiation and subsequent alkaline etching. The etching behavior mainly depended on the energy deposition of the ion beams, and thus its depth distribution, estimated by theoretical simulation, was successfully applied to control the shapes and diameters of the etched pores. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrolytic conductometry provided an insight into the critical experimental parameters. Interestingly, applying a higher voltage to the conductometry cell promoted track etching up to breakthrough probably because electrophoretic migration of the dissolved products occurred out of each pore. (author)

  19. Synthesis of environmentally responsive organic materials by application of ion track holes in polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omichi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masaru; Asano, Masaharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Katakai, Ryoichi; Spohr, R; Vetter, J

    1997-03-01

    Polymer films were irradiated by heavy ion beams and etched by a concentrated alkali solution to produce particle track membranes (PTMs). Then the PTMs were chemically modified by grafting such monomers as amino acid group containing methacryloyl and N-isopropylacrylamide the polymers of which are known as environmentally responsive hydrogels. The size of pores of the modified PTMs under different temperatures in water was followed by electron microscopy. The pore was controlled from an open state to a completely closed state by changing temperature. The conductivity through the membrane was measured by changing the temperature of the cell. (author)

  20. An explosive-emitter cathode produced using the heavy ion track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akap'ev, G.N.; Korenev, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    A cathode based on thin metallic foils with a homogeneous needle surface is described. The cathode was manufactured using the heavy ion track technique which permits the production of cathodes with an unlimited area and a needle density ranging from about 10 3 to 10 9 needles per cm 2 . An electron gun using this type of cathode has a current of 200-900 A and an energy of 100-300 keV. The cross section of the electron beam is fairly uniform. It is shown that needle emitters of similar shape and size play the principal role in forming a homogeneous cathode plasma

  1. Electronic structures in ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical bond generated by the interaction between low energy ion and base was investigated by ab initio molecular orbital method. The effects of ion charge were studied by calculation of this method. When carbon ion approached to graphite base (C 24 H 12 ), the positive ion and the neutral atom covalently bonded, but the negative ion did not combine with it. When carbon ion was injected into h-BN base (B 12 N 12 H 12 , hexagonal system boron nitride), the positive ion and the neutron atom formed covalent bond and the van der Waals binding, and the negative ion interacted statically with it. (S.Y.)

  2. Reactive ion etching of microphotonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, J.; Glasscock, J.; Vanajek, J.; Savvides, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Fabrication of microphotonic structures such as planar waveguides and other periodic structures based on silicon technology has become increasingly important due to the potential for integration of planar optical devices. We have fabricated various periodic microstructures on silicon wafers using standard optical lithography and reactive ion etching (RIE). For optical applications the surface roughness and the sidewall angle or steepness of microstructures are the most critical factors. In particular, sidewall roughness of the etched waveguide core accounts for most of the optical propagation loss. We show that by varying the main RIE parameters such as gas pressure, RF power and CF 4 /Ar/O 2 gas composition it is possible to produce microstructures with near-vertical sidewalls and very smooth surfaces. In addition to plasma etching conditions, poor edge quality of the mask often causes sidewall roughness. We employed Ni/Cr metal masks in these experiments for deep etching, and used Ar + ion milling instead of wet chemical etching to open the mask. This improves the edge quality of the mask and ultimately results in smooth sidewalls

  3. Effect of the track potential on the motion and energy flow of secondary electrons created from heavy-ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2018-05-01

    Using simulations, we have evaluated the effect of the track potential on the motion and energy flow of secondary electrons, with the goal of determining the spatial distribution of energy deposition due to irradiation with heavy ions. We have simulated this effect as a function of the mean path τ between the incident ion-impact-ionization events at ion energies Eion. Here, the track potential is the potential formed from electric field near this incident ion path. The simulations indicate that this effect is mainly determined by τ and hardly depends on Eion. To understand heavy ion beam science more deeply and to reduce the time required by simulations, we have proposed simple approximation methods that almost reproduce the simulation results here.

  4. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  5. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymzhanov, R.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Medvedev, N.A., E-mail: nikita.medvedev@fzu.cz [Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Laser Plasma Department, Institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Volkov, A.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij pr., 53,119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninskij pr., 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoye sh., 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The ‘effective one-band’ approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott’s atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  6. Modification of track membranes structure by gas discharge etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.N.; Kravets, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the properties of polyethyleneterephthalate track membranes (PET TM) treated with the plasma RF-discharge in air has been performed. The influence of the plasma treatment conditions on the basic properties of the membranes, namely pore size and pore shape, porosity and mechanical strength has been studied. It was arranged that the effect of air plasma on the PET TM results to etching a membrane's surface layer. The membranes' pore size and the form in this case change. It is shown that it is possible to change the structure of track membranes directly by the gas discharge etching method. Depending on the choice of discharge parameters, it is possible to make etching either in a part of the channel or along the whole length of the pore channels. In both cases the membranes with an asymmetric pore shape are formed which possess higher porosity and flow rate. The use of the membranes of such a type allows one to increase drastically the efficiency of the filtration processes. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Hyperfine structure of muonic lithium ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Martynenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of perturbation theory in fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio of electron to muon masses we calculate recoil corrections of order $\\alpha^4 (M_e/M_\\mu$, $\\alpha^4 (M_e/M_\\mu^2\\ln(M_e/M_\\mu$, $\\alpha^4 (M_e/M_\\mu^2$, $\\alpha^5(m_e/m_\\mu\\ln(m_e/m_\\mu$ to hyperfine splitting of the ground state in muonic lithium ions $(\\mu e ^6_3\\mathrm{Li}^+$ and $(\\mu e ^7_3\\mathrm{Li}^+$. We obtain total results for the ground state small hyperfine splittings in $(\\mu e ^6_3\\mathrm{Li}^+$ $\\Delta\

  8. Diffusion kinetics of the glucose/glucose oxidase system in swift heavy ion track-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Dietmar; Vacik, Jiri; Hnatowicz, V.; Muñoz Hernandez, G.; Garcia Arrelano, H.; Alfonta, Lital; Kiv, Arik

    2017-05-01

    For understanding of the diffusion kinetics and their optimization in swift heavy ion track-based biosensors, recently a diffusion simulation was performed. This simulation aimed at yielding the degree of enrichment of the enzymatic reaction products in the highly confined space of the etched ion tracks. A bunch of curves was obtained for the description of such sensors that depend only on the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of the products to that of the analyte within the tracks. As hitherto none of these two diffusion coefficients is accurately known, the present work was undertaken. The results of this paper allow one to quantify the previous simulation and hence yield realistic predictions of glucose-based biosensors. At this occasion, also the influence of the etched track radius on the diffusion coefficients was measured and compared with earlier prediction.

  9. Diffusion kinetics of the glucose/glucose oxidase system in swift heavy ion track-based biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Hernandez, G. M.; Arrelano, H. G.; Alfonta, L.; Kiv, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 398, MAY (2017), s. 21-26 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : etched ion tracks * track radius * polymer * enzyme * diffusion * biosensors Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Bioremediation, diagnostic biotechnologies (DNA chips and biosensing devices) in environmental management Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  10. Measurement of the variable track-etch rate of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen Ions in CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengar, I.; Skvarc, J.; Ilic, R.

    2003-01-01

    The ratio of the track-etch rate to the bulk-etch rate for hydrogen, carbon and oxygen ions was studied for the CR-39 detector with addition of dioctylphthalate. The response was reconstructed from etch-pit growth curves obtained by the multi-step etching technique. A theoretical analysis of the correctness of the method due to the 'missing track segment' is assessed and utilisation of the results obtained for the calibration of fast neutron dosimetry is discussed. (author)

  11. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  12. Ion Elevators and Escalators in Multilevel Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Cox, Jonathan T.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-19

    We describe two approaches based upon ion ‘elevator’ and ‘escalator’ components that allow moving ions to different levels in structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM). Guided by ion motion simulations we designed elevator and escalator components providing essentially lossless transmission in multi-level designs based upon ion current measurements. The ion elevator design allowed ions to efficiently bridge a 4 mm gap between levels. The component was integrated in a SLIM and coupled to a QTOF mass spectrometer using an ion funnel interface to evaluate the m/z range transmitted as compared to transmission within a level (e.g. in a linear section). Mass spectra for singly-charged ions of m/z 600-2700 produced similar mass spectra for both elevator and straight (linear motion) components. In the ion escalator design, traveling waves (TW) were utilized to transport ions efficiently between two SLIM levels. Ion current measurements and ion mobility (IM) spectrometry analysis illustrated that ions can be transported between TW-SLIM levels with no significant loss of either ions or IM resolution. These developments provide a path for the development of multilevel designs providing e.g. much longer IM path lengths, more compact designs, and the implementation of much more complex SLIM devices in which e.g. different levels may operate at different temperatures or with different gases.

  13. Ion Elevators and Escalators in Multilevel Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Hamid, Ahmed M; Cox, Jonathan T; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Smith, Richard D

    2017-02-07

    We describe two approaches based upon ion "elevator" and "escalator" components that allow moving ions to different levels in structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM). Guided by ion motion simulations, we designed elevator and escalator components based upon ion current measurements providing essentially lossless transmission in multilevel designs. The ion elevator design allowed ions to efficiently bridge a 4 mm gap between levels. The component was integrated in a SLIM and coupled to a QTOF mass spectrometer using an ion funnel interface to evaluate the m/z range transmitted as compared to transmission within a level (e.g., in a linear section). The analysis of singly charged ions of m/z 600-2700 produced similar mass spectra for both elevator and straight (linear motion) components. In the ion escalator design, traveling waves (TW) were utilized to transport ions efficiently between two SLIM levels. Ion current measurements and ion mobility (IM) spectrometry analysis illustrated that ions can be transported between TW-SLIM levels with no significant loss of either ions or IM resolution. These developments provide a path for the development of multilevel designs providing, e.g., much longer IM path lengths, more compact designs, and the implementation of much more complex SLIM devices in which, e.g., different levels may operate at different temperatures or with different gases.

  14. Track structure and dose: Alternative conceptual bases for nuclear therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1987-01-01

    As one departs from the island of radiation quality encompassing photons and electrons of initial energy from about 100 keV to about 10 MeV toward increasingly higher LET particle irradiations, and from relatively uniform to inherently non-uniform radiation fields, dose and LET become less useful indices of radiation effect. Isodose profiles are not isoeffect profiles. RBEs vary with end point, with the state of oxygenation, with cell line, with tissue identity and with dose, and are multiple valued functions of LET. Dose, microdose and LET lack the descrimination needed to predict biological end points. RBE calculations made from cellular radiosensitivity parameters are consistent with RBEs measured both in vitro and in vivo. For such calculations, we must know the spectrum of particles and particle energies making up a high LET radiation field. To sharpen the calculations and make them directly relevant to therapy, we need to evaluate radiosensitivity parameters for human tissues. Both physical and biological data are needed for radiobiology and radiotherapy. For the question of hazard evaluation, we need to know the relation between transformations in vitro and cancer production in vivo. Using the same model as was used earlier for cellular inactivations, we have fitted tentative radiosensitivity parameters to recent data for cell transformations. The model is consistent with both gamma ray and fission neutron measurements. But a wider range of irradiations is needed to test these results. Delta rays play an important role in heavy ion radiobiology, but we do not now know either the cross-sections for delta ray production or the radial deposition of their energy with sufficient precision or generality. But it is this, the radial dose deposition, which is the physical basis for the calculation of action cross-sections. Studies for radiobiology and radiotherapy should also include the response of different physical detectors to a range of radiations, especially

  15. Light ion reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the many contributions to the subject 'Light ion reaction mechanism and nuclear structure', a few are selected and reviewed which highlight the present state of the field. Some contributions to the conference dealing with nuclear interactions are briefly outlined in the second section following an introductory section. Lane model calculations are compared with data for 9 Be and results are given showing angular distributions of the cross sections, the analyzing powers and the spin-rotation parameters for p - 40 Ca. Real central potential for d + 32 s resulting from the FB-analysis are compared with frozen density folding and delta-function folding. The third section deals with reaction mechanism. Data are cited which show near-side and far-side contributions to the calculated analyzing powers in the 116 Sn(d,p) 117 Sn (11.2 - ) transition. Calculations are compared with experimental A y and -(A yy + 2)/3. Also given are measurements of the cross sections and analyzing powers of the continuum energy spectra for the 58 Ni(p,p'x), along with relations between the analyzing powers and momentum transfer. The fourth section addresses nuclear structure. Cross sections and analyzing powers measured at 22 MeV for the reaction 208 Pb(p,t) 206 Pb(3 2 + ) are cited and considered. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Determination of ion track and shapes with damage simulations on the base of ellipsometric and backscattering spectrometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, O.; Fried, M.; Khanh, N.; Petrik, P.; Barsony, I. [Research Institute for Technical Phisycs and Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-05-15

    On the base of geometrical and statistical considerations a damage simulator was created in order to determine the ion track-radius and -shape of ion-implantation caused damage in single-crystalline Si. Damage vs. dose curves calculated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) measurements, using different doses of 100 keV Xe implantation, gave information about the damage profile in depth. Both methods are required, because of dose-dependent discrepancies of SE compared with RBS/C [Fried et al., Thin Solid Films 455/456, 404 (2004)]. Different kinds of damage models were investigated to calculate the ion track-radius and to describe the damages in depth and the shape of ion track. Comparing directly the simulated and the measured damage vs. dose curves, the damage function and the other simulation parameters were optimized and hence the ion track size and even the shape can be determined. The dose dependent mean size of the unchanged crystalline regions, obtained from the simulation was correlated with the complex dielectric functions, obtained from the SE analysis. The results clearly show the effect of decreasing size of the unchanged crystalline regions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. New structure for accelerating heavy ions; Une nouvelle structure acceleratrice d'ions lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    A new type of accelerating structure is described which is particular suited to heavy ions (high wavelength, high shunt impedance, small size). Its properties are analyzed and compared to those of other structures (more particularly the lines). It is shown that a mode of operation exists of which the shunt impedance in the station mode has 80 per cent of its value for the progressive mode. Finally results are given obtained with a small experimental apparatus which uses this structure. (author) [French] On decrit un nouveau type de structure acceleratrice, particulierement appropriee aux ions lourds (grande longueur d'onde, forte impedance-shunt, faibles dimensions). Ses proprietes sont analysees et comparees a celles d'autres structures (plus particulierement les lignes). On met en evidence un mode de fonctionnement pour lequel l'impedance shunt en regime stationnaire vaut 80 pour cent de l'impedance shunt en regime progressif. Enfin on decrit les resultats obtenus a l'aide d'une petite machine experimentale mettant en oeuvre cette structure. (auteur)

  18. Grafting of acrylic acid on etched latent tracks induced by swift heavy ions on polypropylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzei, R.; Fernandez, A.; Garcia Bermudez, G.; Torres, A.; Gutierrez, M.C.; Magni, M.; Celma, G.; Tadey, D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to continue with a systematic study that include different polymers and monomers, the residual active sites produced by heavy ion beams, that remain after the etching process, were used to start the grafting process. To produce tracks, foils of polypropylene (PP) were irradiated with 208 Pb of 25.62 MeV/n. Then, these were etched and grafted with acrylic acid (AA) monomers. Experimental curves of grafting yield as a function of grafting time with the etching time as a parameter were measured. Also, the grating yield as a function of the fluence and etching time was obtained. In addition, the permeation of solutions, with different pH, through PP grafted foils was measured

  19. Strategy Selection of Film Irradiation by Accelerated ^{40}Ar^{8+} Ions for Manufacturing of Track Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, Yu N; Kalinichenko, V V; Karamysheva, G A; Fedorenko, S B

    2004-01-01

    The industrial cyclotron CYTRACK is dedicated to the production of the track membranes. It is the basic instrument for the industry of membrane products to be consumed in medicine, biotechnology, pharmacology, microelectronics and many other industries. The cyclotron CYTRACK started working in the August of 2002. Argon ions were accelerated to a project energy of 2.4 MeV/nucleon, the extracted beam intensity was about 200 nA, the extraction efficiency totaled \\sim 50 %. In starting up operation the film was exposed in various controlled ways to charged particles with a view to achieving the values of parameters required for production of "Rosa" membranous plasmafilters. The pore uniformity in transverse direction was provided by beam scanning with a scanning magnet voltage of 73 V, the one in the longitudinal direction was provided by constancy of the film motion rate and stability of beam intensity during all the time of exposition.

  20. Growth and morphological analysis of segmented AuAg alloy nanowires created by pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schubert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multicomponent heterostructure nanowires and nanogaps are of great interest for applications in sensorics. Pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched polymer templates is a suitable method to synthesise segmented nanowires with segments consisting of two different types of materials. For a well-controlled synthesis process, detailed analysis of the deposition parameters and the size-distribution of the segmented wires is crucial.Results: The fabrication of electrodeposited AuAg alloy nanowires and segmented Au-rich/Ag-rich/Au-rich nanowires with controlled composition and segment length in ion-track etched polymer templates was developed. Detailed analysis by cyclic voltammetry in ion-track membranes, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to determine the dependency between the chosen potential and the segment composition. Additionally, we have dissolved the middle Ag-rich segments in order to create small nanogaps with controlled gap sizes. Annealing of the created structures allows us to influence their morphology.Conclusion: AuAg alloy nanowires, segmented wires and nanogaps with controlled composition and size can be synthesised by electrodeposition in membranes, and are ideal model systems for investigation of surface plasmons.

  1. Anomalous effect of ion velocity on track formation in GeS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szenes, G., E-mail: szenesgyorgy@caesar.elte.hu [Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Pécz, B. [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Systematic experiments were performed for studying the effect of the projectile velocity (velocity effect, VE) in GeS which has a highly anisotropic conductivity. The prethinned specimens were irradiated by Bi, Au, W, Xe, Ag, Kr, Ni and Fe ions of about E ≈ 1 MeV/nucleon energy. Track radii were measured by transmission electron microscopy. Compared to previous experiments performed with high velocity projectile, there is a marked VE for S{sub e} > 20 keV/nm (S{sub e} – electronic stopping power). However, the VE is gradually reduced and finally disappears as S{sub e} decreases. This effect is described for the first time. The predictions according to the Analytical Thermal Spike Model are in excellent quantitative agreement with the experiments in the range S{sub e} > 20 keV/nm. The anomalous behavior of track evolution at lower values of S{sub e} is attributed to the combination of semiconducting and insulating properties. An explanation of the VE is given based on the Coulomb explosion model.

  2. Measured and calculated absorptance of tracks of fast heavy ions in Ilford G5 nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.; Mathiesen, O.

    1975-04-01

    A modified form of the delta-ray theory of track formation developed by Katz and coworkers has been used to calculate the absorptance of tracks of fast heavy ions in Ilford G5 nuclear emulsion. The theoretical data have been compared with results of different photometrical investigations reported in the literature. In most cases the theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with experiments. This suggests that the theory can be used in the planning and execution of future experiments, i.e. to optimize the geometry of the photometer and to obtain an absolute charge calibration of the detector. It is shown that the basic photometrical properties of an emulsion stack can be described by a single quantity which can be determined from measurements. Knowing this quantity it is possible to predict the response of the emulsion stack for different types of photometers. The practical limits of the use of the modified theory at high and low levels of energy dose are discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Measured and calculated absorptance of tracks of fast heavy ions in Ilford G5 nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.; Mathiesen, O.

    1976-01-01

    A modified form of the delta-ray theory of track formation developed by Katz and coworkers has been used to calculate the absorptance of tracks of fast heavy ions in Ilford G5 nuclear emulsion. The theoretical data have been compared with results of different photometrical investigations reported in the literature. In most cases the theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with experiments. This suggests that the theory can be used in the planning and execution of future experiments, i.e. to optimize the geometry of the photometer and to obtain an absolute charge calibration of the detector. It is shown that the basic photometrical properties of an emulsion stack can be described by a single quantity which can be determined from measurements. Knowing this quantity it is possible to predict the response of the detector system, for different types of photometers. The practical limits of the use of the modified theory at high and low levels of energy dose are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080–53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. (author)

  5. Structural changes in the polyethylene after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskova, K.; Svorcik, V.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the study of structural changes of the polyethylene after ion implantation. There were used the polyethylene film with thickness 15 μm, and Ar + ions with energy 63 keV and Xe + ions with energy 156 keV with doses 1·10 13 - 3·10 15 cm -2 for experiments. For the study of structural changes of polymer were used methods UV-VIS spectrometry, ESR, Rutherford back scattering

  6. Ion beam characterisation of nanometre structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Leif

    1995-08-01

    Ion beam analysis methods have been applied to the study of technologically important issues in III-V nanometre structure science. In the first application, the incorporation of hydrogen in GaAs during electron cyclotron resonance etching was studied using the {sup 1}H({sup 15}N,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction analysis method. The major part of the work was carried out using mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS). RS was used to study reactions of thin metal films InP reactions. The metals investigated include Cr, Ti, Ni, Pd and Pt and the reactions as a function of temperature were studied to elucidate suitable compounds for contacts and metallization. Using {sup 127}I in the 0.5A to 0.7A MeV region as the projectile, the depth profiles for the different elements were obtained. Complementary measurements with X-ray diffraction to obtain chemical phase information as well as scanning electron microscopy to study the surface morphology were also carried out. 59 refs, 15 figs.

  7. Ion beam characterisation of nanometre structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Leif.

    1995-08-01

    Ion beam analysis methods have been applied to the study of technologically important issues in III-V nanometre structure science. In the first application, the incorporation of hydrogen in GaAs during electron cyclotron resonance etching was studied using the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C reaction analysis method. The major part of the work was carried out using mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS). RS was used to study reactions of thin metal films InP reactions. The metals investigated include Cr, Ti, Ni, Pd and Pt and the reactions as a function of temperature were studied to elucidate suitable compounds for contacts and metallization. Using 127 I in the 0.5A to 0.7A MeV region as the projectile, the depth profiles for the different elements were obtained. Complementary measurements with X-ray diffraction to obtain chemical phase information as well as scanning electron microscopy to study the surface morphology were also carried out. 59 refs, 15 figs

  8. Optically induced structural phase transitions in ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horak, Peter; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures, such as b......We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures...

  9. Measurements of energetic ions produced by high-energy laser pulses by means of solid-state nuclear track detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szydlowski, A.; Badziak, A.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Jungwirth, Karel; Králiková, Božena; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Boody, F. D.; Gammino, S.; Torrisi, L.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2004), s. 327-332 ISSN 1093-3611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : iodine laser * nuclear track detectors * ions Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.194, year: 2004

  10. Ion feedback effect in the multi GEM structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Yong Kyun; Han, Sang Hyo; Ha, Jang Ho; Moon, Byung Soo; Chung, Chong Eun

    2003-01-01

    The feedback of positive ions in a gas electron multiplier (GEM) has to be suppressed to reduce the photocathode degradation in GEM photomultipliers and to prevent the field distortion in a time projection chamber (TPC). The ion feedback dependency on the drift electric field, the transfer field, the asymmetry in the voltages across the GEM, and the effective gain was carefully measured in various gases. The ion feedback is sensitive to the drift field and the effective gain. A model prediction of the ion feedback in a double GEM structure was compared with the measurement. Our systematic study of the ion feedback effect can lead to progress in gas detectors with GEMs.

  11. Structure of cometary atmospheres. II. Ion distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, M [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Space and Aeronautical Science

    1976-04-01

    The distributions of various kinds of molecular ions in the atmospheres of new and old comets made up from dirty ice of the second kind (H/sub 2/O ice and hydrate clathrates of CO and N/sub 2/) have been computed at various heliocentric distances, by taking into account photoionization, ion-molecular reactions, electron-ion recombinations, and some transport effects. The results have been compared with observations and other computations. It is argued that dirty ice of the second kind model will impose a restriction on the theory of the origin of the solar system.

  12. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations.

  13. The structure of the stable negative ion of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.; Compton, R.N.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the Ca/sup /minus// ion has been determined using a crossed laser-ion beams apparatus. The photoelectron detachment spectrum shows that, contrary to earlier expectations, the Ca/sup /minus// ion is stably bound in the (4s 2 4p) 2 p state. The electron affinity of Ca was measured to be 0.043 +- 0.007 eV

  14. Dissociative recombination of interstellar ions: electronic structure calculations for HCO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, W.P.; Hazi, A.U.

    1985-01-01

    The present study of the interstellar formyl ion HCO + is the first attempt to investigate dissociative recombination for a triatomic molecular ion using an entirely theoretical approach. We describe a number of fairly extensive electronic structure calculations that were performed to determine the reaction mechanism of the e-HCO + process. Similar calculations for the isoelectronic ions HOC + and HN 2 + are in progress. 60 refs

  15. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of ∼2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of ∼25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs

  16. Dual linear structured support vector machine tracking method via scale correlation filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weisheng; Chen, Yanquan; Xiao, Bin; Feng, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive tracking-by-detection methods based on structured support vector machine (SVM) performed well on recent visual tracking benchmarks. However, these methods did not adopt an effective strategy of object scale estimation, which limits the overall tracking performance. We present a tracking method based on a dual linear structured support vector machine (DLSSVM) with a discriminative scale correlation filter. The collaborative tracker comprised of a DLSSVM model and a scale correlation filter obtains good results in tracking target position and scale estimation. The fast Fourier transform is applied for detection. Extensive experiments show that our tracking approach outperforms many popular top-ranking trackers. On a benchmark including 100 challenging video sequences, the average precision of the proposed method is 82.8%.

  17. New Low Cost Structure for Dual Axis Mount Solar Tracking System Using Adaptive Solar Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argeseanu, Alin; Ritchie, Ewen; Leban, Krisztina Monika

    2010-01-01

    A solar tracking system is designed to optimize the operation of solar energy receivers. The objective of this paper is proposing a new tracking system structure with two axis. The success strategy of this new project focuses on the economical analysis of solar energy. Therefore it is important...... to determine the most cost effective design, to consider the costs of production and maintenance, and operating. The proposed tracking system uses a new solar sensor position with an adaptive feature....

  18. Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of water in the vicinity of ions in aqueous NaCl solutions. A NAG. 1. , D CHAKRABORTY and A CHANDRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016. 1. Present address: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,.

  19. Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yu Ho; Lu, Yingying; Dobosz, Kerianne M.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-01-01

    particles into medium and high dielectric constant liquids yields electrolytes with unique structure and transport properties. We find that electrostatic repulsion imparted by ion dissociation can be tuned to control the dispersion state and rheology through

  20. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a ...

  1. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  2. Structure-aware Local Sparse Coding for Visual Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Yuankai; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shengping; Huang, Qingming; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2018-01-01

    with the corresponding local regions of the target templates that are the most similar from the global view. Thus, a more precise and discriminative sparse representation is obtained to account for appearance changes. To alleviate the issues with tracking drifts, we

  3. Structure and electron-ion correlation in liquid Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Shuta [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yokota, Yukinobu [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    For liquid Mg at 700 deg. C, structure factors were obtained from both neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements. The bond angle and coordination number distributions were derived from the reverse Monte Carlo analysis. By a combination of both structure factors, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor were deduced.

  4. Micromachining structured optical fibers using focused ion beam milling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martelli, C.; Olivero, P.; Canning, J.; Groothoff, N.; Gibson, B.; Huntington, S.

    2007-01-01

    A focused ion beam is used to mill side holes in air-silica structured fibers. By way of example, side holes are introduced in two types of air-structured fiber, (1) a photonic crystal four-ring fiber and (2) a six-hole single-ring step-index structured fiber. © 2007 Optical Society of America.

  5. Effect of ion velocity on creation of point defects halos of latent tracks in LiF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volkov, A.E.; Schwartz, K.; Medvedev, Nikita; Trautmann, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, Sep (2017), s. 80-85 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15013; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015083 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : swift heavy ion * electronic stopping * track * LiF * color centers * defect halo Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  6. Coupled chemical reactions in dynamic nanometric confinement: VII. Biosensors based on swift heavy ion tracks with membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Munoz, G. H.; García Arellano, H.; Alfonta, L.; Vacík, Jiří; Kiv, A.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 172, 1-2 (2017), s. 159-173 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : biotechnology * tracks * swift heavy ions * polymers * etching Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nano-materials (production and properties) Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  7. Structure of Ion Outflow in the Martian Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D.; Luhmann, J. G.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Suprathermal And Thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) sensor on the MAVEN spacecraft provides a detailed look at the structure of ion outflow in the Martian magnetotail including ion composition, energization, and flow. Mars' magnetotail contains a mixture of cold (multi-species ions, tailward-moving cold multi-species ions, suprathermal ions of a few tens of eV, warm (about 100 eV) proton populations, and heavy (primarily O+) pickup ions at energies from 1 to 10 keV which may display several simultaneous peaks in energy flux. The cold tailward-moving ions represent a significant fraction of the Martian ion loss, perhaps comparable to loses from molecular oxygen dissociation. The suprathermal tail that accompanies the cold ions varies greatly and provides clues to ion escape. The warm protons, on first examination, appear to be of sheath origin, displaying a similar energy distribution and accompanied by a tenuous warm population at M/Q=2 (which could be either solar wind alphas or molecular hydrogen ions of ionospheric origin). STATIC produces a weak ghost peak at M/Q=11-12 when observing molecular hydrogen ions, but not alphas, often allowing the instrument to distinguish the source of protons. Measurements show the warm protons are of ionospheric origin in the central tail and transition to sheath plasma in the umbra. Energetic (1-10 keV) pickup oxygen in the magnetotail is produced on the nightside, near the pole where the IMF convection electric field points toward the planet, the same hemisphere where sputtering occurs. When two spectral peaks are observed, these tailward-moving ions differ in direction by relatively small angles (about 20 degrees). These peaks can persist for tens of minutes indicating approximately time-stationary acceleration, and therefore acceleration in potential fields. Magnetotail structure and geometry can be inferred not only from the local magnetic field, but also from the measured electron distributions which indicate source

  8. Theoretical aspects of the formation and evolution of charged particle tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Miterev, A M

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical ideas on the formation and evolution of charged particle tracks in a condensed medium are discussed. The historical development of the field is briefly reviewed. The distribution of charged particle energies on quantum states and the volume of the absorbing medium are considered. and conditions for the formation of various track structures are discussed. The structures of extended heavy-ion tracks are compared for some ion parameters and track characteristics take to be the same. Relaxation processes in the tracks of multicharged ions ate analyzed. Track effects ate considered and possible mechanisms for the formation of chemically active defects in a latent track are described

  9. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 3. Relating Solution-Phase to Gas-Phase Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study peptide ion conformer establishment during the electrospray process. An explicit water model is used for nanodroplets containing a model peptide and hydronium ions. Simulations are conducted at 300 K for two different peptide ion charge configurations and for droplets containing varying numbers of hydronium ions. For all conditions, modeling has been performed until production of the gas-phase ions and the resultant conformers have been compared to proposed gas-phase structures. The latter species were obtained from previous studies in which in silico candidate structures were filtered according to ion mobility and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) reactivity matches. Results from the present study present three key findings namely (1) the evidence from ion production modeling supports previous structure refinement studies based on mobility and HDX reactivity matching, (2) the modeling of the electrospray process is significantly improved by utilizing initial droplets existing below but close to the calculated Rayleigh limit, and (3) peptide ions in the nanodroplets sample significantly different conformers than those in the bulk solution due to altered physicochemical properties of the solvent. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Ewing, Robert G.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-02-01

    Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection.

  11. Practical approach to determining charge collected in multi-junction structures due to the ion shunt effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.O.; Bhuva, B.; Kerns, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    In order to design semiconductor devices so that they are resistant to single event upsets, a designer needs to know how much charge would be collected at various junctions in the semiconductor structure. For over a decade researchers have studied the physics of charge collection in semiconductor structures, focusing primarily on the charge collected between the p and n regions of a pn junction by drift and diffusion effects -- a process called funneling. However, when an energetic ion penetrates more than one pn junction, funneling is not the only charge collection mechanism. Simulations and experiments on multi-junction structures have shown dramatic change in the charge collected when an ion penetrates two pn junctions. This charge transport between two regions of like conductivity that are ''bridged'' together by the ion track is called the ion shunt effect -- an effect investigated and experimentally proven by Hauser, et al. and Knudson, et al. This paper will present the algorithms and results of a computer program used to determine the charge collected on silicon semiconductor transistors due to the ion shunt effect. The program is unique because it is quick and simple to use and because it uses a general algorithm to determine an accurate initial electron-hole pair distribution in the ion track

  12. Copper ion implantation of polycarbonate matrices: Morphological and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resta, V., E-mail: vincenzo.resta@le.infn.it; Quarta, G.; Maruccio, L.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-15

    The implantation of 1 MeV {sup 63}Cu{sup +} ions in polycarbonate (PC) matrices has been carried out in order to evaluate the morphological and structural modifications induced in the polymer as a function of the ion fluence in the range 5 × 10{sup 13} ions cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2}. Atomic Force Microscopy analysis reveals a significant roughness increase of the polymer surface only for fluences higher than 5 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2} with the presence of hillock structures which surface density increases with increasing the ion fluence. X-ray Diffraction measurements of PC implanted with fluences in the range between 5 × 10{sup 15} at cm{sup −2} and 5 × 10{sup 16} at cm{sup −2} reveal an increase of the disorder inside the PC matrix, as a consequence of the damaging process induced by the ion irradiation. Evidences about the presence of exotic phase structures ascribed to both cubic Cu{sub 2}O and cubic Cu have been found.

  13. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  14. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  15. Visualisation of γH2AX Foci Caused by Heavy Ion Particle Traversal; Distinction between Core Track versus Non-Track Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Brunton, Holly; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Shrikhande, Amruta; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fujimori, Akira; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny; Shibata, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET) damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm) ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci) represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle. PMID:23967070

  16. Electrostatic shock structures in dissipative multi-ion dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkamash, I. S.; Kourakis, I.

    2018-06-01

    A comprehensive analytical model is introduced for shock excitations in dusty bi-ion plasma mixtures, taking into account collisionality and kinematic (fluid) viscosity. A multicomponent plasma configuration is considered, consisting of positive ions, negative ions, electrons, and a massive charged component in the background (dust). The ionic dynamical scale is focused upon; thus, electrons are assumed to be thermalized, while the dust is stationary. A dissipative hybrid Korteweg-de Vries/Burgers equation is derived. An analytical solution is obtained, in the form of a shock structure (a step-shaped function for the electrostatic potential, or an electric field pulse) whose maximum amplitude in the far downstream region decays in time. The effect of relevant plasma configuration parameters, in addition to dissipation, is investigated. Our work extends earlier studies of ion-acoustic type shock waves in pure (two-component) bi-ion plasma mixtures.

  17. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  18. Defect induced modification of structural, topographical and magnetic properties of zinc ferrite thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Lisha [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022 (India); Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi 110067 (India); Joy, P.A. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pune (India); Vijaykumar, B. Varma; Ramanujan, R.V. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Anantharaman, M.R., E-mail: mraiyer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Zinc ferrite films exhibited room temperature ferrimagnetic property. • On ion irradiation amorphisation of films were observed. • The surface morphology undergoes changes with ion irradiation. • The saturation magnetisation decreases on ion irradiation. - Abstract: Swift heavy ion irradiation provides unique ways to modify physical and chemical properties of materials. In ferrites, the magnetic properties can change significantly as a result of swift heavy ion irradiation. Zinc ferrite is an antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 10 K and exhibits anomalous magnetic properties in the nano regime. Ion irradiation can cause amorphisation of zinc ferrite thin films; thus the role of crystallinity on magnetic properties can be examined. The influence of surface topography in these thin films can also be studied. Zinc ferrite thin films, of thickness 320 nm, prepared by RF sputtering were irradiated with 100 MeV Ag ions. Structural characterization showed amorphisation and subsequent reduction in particle size. The change in magnetic properties due to irradiation was correlated with structural and topographical effects of ion irradiation. A rough estimation of ion track radius is done from the magnetic studies.

  19. High energy structures in heavy ion collisions: a multiphonon description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Frascaria, N.

    1984-01-01

    Energy spectra of fragments from the 36 Ar + 208 Pb reaction at 11 MeV/n exhibit structures at high excitation energies. These structures are interpreted in terms of target multi-phonon excitations built from giant resonances. The importance of such processes for the kinetic energy dissipation in heavy ion collisions is emphasized

  20. Structure of liquid alkali metals as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, D.K.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-08-01

    The static structure factor of liquid alkali metals near freezing, and its dependence on temperature and pressure, are evaluated in an electron-ion plasma model from an accurate theoretical determination of the structure factor of the one-component classical plasma and electron-screening theory. Very good agreement is obtained with the available experimental data. (author)

  1. Structural changes in the polyethylene after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskova, K.; Svorcik, V.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the study of the polyethylene (PE) after its modification by ion implantation. In this way the mechanical, optical, magnetic and electric characteristics can be changed. Experiments were processed on PE films with 15 μm thickness. For modification of the surface of PE for implantation the Ar + ions with the energy 63 keV and Xe + ions with the energy 156 keV and with doses from 1·10 13 to 3·10 15 cm +2 were used. The aim of this work was the study of structural changes of modified layer of the PE

  2. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Christophe; Elbast, Mouhamad; Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Ting-Di Wu

    2007-01-01

    The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS 50 ). Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (∼= 10 eV) what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131 I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland. (author)

  3. Atomic structure of highly-charged ions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, A. Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Atomic properties of multiply charged ions have been investigated using excitation of energetic heavy ion beams. Spectroscopy of excited atomic transitions has been applied from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regions to provide accurate atomic structure and transition rate data in selected highly ionized atoms. High-resolution position-sensitive photon detection has been introduced for measurements in the ultraviolet region. The detailed structures of Rydberg states in highly charged beryllium-like ions have been measured as a test of long-range electron-ion interactions. The measurements are supported by multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and by many-body perturbation theory. The high-angular-momentum Rydberg transitions may be used to establish reference wavelengths and improve the accuracy of ionization energies in highly charged systems. Precision wavelength measurements in highly charged few-electron ions have been performed to test the most accurate relativistic atomic structure calculations for prominent low-lying excited states. Lifetime measurements for allowed and forbidden transitions in highly charged few-electron ions have been made to test theoretical transition matrix elements for simple atomic systems. Precision lifetime measurements in laser-excited alkali atoms have been initiated to establish the accuracy of relativistic atomic many-body theory in many-electron systems

  4. On intermediate structures in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptions of the nuclear reaction theory are reinvestigated on the basis of the continuum shell model. The correlation of the resonance states via the continuum can lead to intermediate structures in the cross section. (Auth.)

  5. Evolution of atomic-scale surface structures during ion bombardment: A fractal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.A.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Surfaces of interest in microelectronics have been shown to exhibit fractal topographies on the atomic scale. A model utilizing self-similar fractals to simulate surface roughness has been added to the ion bombardment code TRIM. The model has successfully predicted experimental sputtering yields of low energy (less then 1000 eV) Ar on Si and D on C using experimentally determined fractal dimensions. Under ion bombardment the fractal surface structures evolve as the atoms in the collision cascade are displaced or sputtered. These atoms have been tracked and the evolution of the surface in steps of one monolayer of flux has been determined. The Ar--Si system has been studied for incidence energies of 100 and 500 eV, and incidence angles of 0 degree, 30 degree, and 60 degree. As expected, normally incident ion bombardment tends to reduce the roughness of the surface, whereas large angle ion bombardment increases the degree of surface roughness. Of particular interest though, the surfaces are still locally self-similar fractals after ion bombardment and a steady state fractal dimension is reached, except at large angles of incidence

  6. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  7. External motion tracking for brain imaging: structured light tracking with invisible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The importance of motion correction in 3D medical imaging increases with increasing scanner resolution. It is necessary for scanners with long image acquisition and low contrast images to correct for patient motion in order to optimize image quality. We present a near infrared structured light...... stereo depth map system for head motion estimation inside 3D medical scanners with limited space....

  8. Investigation of optical properties of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowires embedded in etched ion-track template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Lu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yao, Huijun, E-mail: Yaohuijun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan, Jinglai; Chen, Yonghui [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lyu, Shuangbao [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Maaz, Khan [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mo, Dan [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Jie, E-mail: J.Liu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun, Youmei; Hou, Mingdong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram of measurement of extinction spectra of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire arrays embedded in the template after removing the gold/copper substrate. - Highlights: • The optical properties of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire arrays were first investigated by UV/Vis/NIR spectrometer and it was confirmed that the extinction peaks strongly related to the periodicity of the multilayer nanowire. • The Ni segment was thought as a kind of impurity which can change the surface electron distribution and thereby the extinction peaks of nanowire. • Current work supplied the clear layer thickness information of Cu and Ni in Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire with TEM and EDS line-scan profile analysis. - Abstract: For understanding the interaction between light and noble/magnetism multilayer nanowires, Cu/Ni multilayer nanowires are fabricated by a multi-potential step deposition technique in etched ion-track polycarbonate template. The component and the corresponding layer thickness of multilayer nanowire are confirmed by TEM and EDS line-scan analysis. By tailoring the nanowire diameter, the Cu layer thickness and the periodicity of the nanowire, the extinction spectral of nanowire arrays exhibit an extra sensitivity to the change of structural parameters. The resonance wavelength caused by surface plasmon resonance increases obviously with increasing the nanowire diameter, the Cu layer thickness and the periodicity. The observations in our work can be explained by the “impurity effect” and coupled effect and can also be optimized for developing optical devices based on multilayer nanowires.

  9. Applications of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) for fast ion and fusion reaction product measurements in TEXTOR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K.; Malinowska, A. [Association EURTOM-IPPLM Warsaw, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wassenhove, G. Van [EURATOM-Belgium State Association, LPP, ERM/KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Schweer, B. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Institutte of Plasma Physicx, Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The paper reports on measurements of fusion reaction protons which were performed on TEXTOR facility in January 2009. The basic experimental scheme was similar to that applied in the previous measurements [1, 2]. The main experimental tool equipment was a small ion pinhole camera which was equipped with a PM-355 detector sample and was attached to a water cooled manipulator. The camera was placed below the plasma ring in the direction of ion drifts, at a distance of 4.4 cm from LCFS. However, in the described experiment it was aligned at an angle to the mayor TEXTOR radius (contrary to previous experiments), so that the input pinhole was oriented first at {gamma} = 45 degrees (shots 108799 - 108818) and then {gamma} = 600 (shots 108832 - 108847). The discharges were executed with one neutral beam of the total power 0.6 - 1.0 MW. In the first series (Nos 108799 - 108818) the plasma was additionally heated by ICRH of frequency 38 MHz. The irradiated detector samples were subjected to the same interrupted etching procedure as the samples used in the CR-39/PM-355 detector calibration measurements [1, 2]. After that, track density distributions and track diameter histograms were measured under an optical microscope. By the use of the calibration curves, it was possible to distinguish craters produced by protons from other craters and to convert the obtained histograms into proton energy spectra. The craters induced by lower energy ions appeared to be concentrated in narrower areas, whereas higher energy ions were registered in a more diffused detector fields. The paper shows again that the CR-39/PM-355 detector is an useful diagnostic tool for tokamak experiments, for measurement of charged ions. References: [1] A. Szydlowski, A. Malinowska, M. Jaskola, A. Korman, M.J. Sadowski, G. Van Wassenhove, B. Schweer and the TEXTOR team, A. Galkowski, 'Application of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors in TEXTOR Experiment for Measurements

  10. Xe ion beam induced rippled structures on differently oriented single-crystalline Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg; Facsko, Stefan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, PO Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich, E-mail: A.Hanisch@fzd.d [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-03-24

    We report on Xe{sup +} induced ripple formation at medium energy on single-crystalline silicon surfaces of different orientations using substrates with an intentional miscut from the [0 0 1] direction and a [1 1 1] oriented wafer. The ion beam incidence angle with respect to the surface normal was kept fixed at 65{sup 0} and the ion beam projection was parallel or perpendicular to the [1 1 0] direction. By a combination of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy we found that the features of the surface and subsurface rippled structures such as ripple wavelength and amplitude and the degree of order do not depend on the surface orientation as assumed in recent models of pattern formation for semiconductor surfaces. (fast track communication)

  11. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  12. Ion streaming instabilities in pair ion plasma and localized structure with non-thermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, M. Nasir; Qamar, A., E-mail: mnnasirphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, National Center for Physics, Mardan (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A quasi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted. (author)

  13. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespillo, M.L., E-mail: mcrespil@utk.edu [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Agulló-López, F., E-mail: fal@uam.es [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO{sub 3} crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  14. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials.

  15. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  16. Dust grain charges in a nuclear-track plasma and the formation of dynamic vortex dust structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, V.A.; Khudyakov, A.V.; Filinov, V.S.; Vladimirov, V.I.; Deputatova, L.V.; Krutov, D.V.; Nefedov, A.P.; Fortov, V.E.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from Monte Carlo calculations of the electric charge of dust grains in a plasma produced during the slowing down of the radioactive decay products of californium nuclei in neon. The dust grain charging is explained for the first time as being due to the drift of electrons and ions in an external electric field. It is shown that the charges of the grains depend on their coordinates and strongly fluctuate with time. The time-averaged grain charges agree with the experimental data obtained on ordered liquidlike dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma. The time-averaged dust grain charges are used to carry out computer modeling of the formation of dynamic vortex structures observed in experiments. Evidence is obtained of the fact that the electrostatic forces experienced by the dust grains are potential in character

  17. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  18. Structure and size of ions electrochemically doped in conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Hata, Fumito; Uto, Sadahito

    2018-05-01

    Among electroactive polymers (EAPs) for softactuators, conducting polymers have been intensively studied because of the large strain and stress caused by a low voltage operation. A larger deformation is desirable to extend their cycle life by reducing the operation voltage, and this is advantageous for their potential use in wider applications. The deformation is generated by the insertion of ions by electrochemical oxidation; hence, the magnitude of the strain depends on the bulkiness of the ions in the electrolytes. It is important, therefore, to clarify the structure and size of the ions during the electrochemical cycle, in order to achieve better performance of actuation. Anion and cation sizes (radii) in polypyrrole (PPy) film have been estimated using the precise measurement of strain against the amount of charge injected during the electrochemical cycles, assuming isotropic deformation of the film. The anion size was estimated using an anion-drive film, which was electrodeposited in TBABF4/methyl benzoate. The film was electrochemically cycled in sodium electrolytes, and the strain was measured simultaneously using a laser displacement meter. The cation size was obtained using a cation-drive film, being electropolymerized in aqueous dodecylbenzene sulfonic (DBS) acid. The cation-drive film was cycled in chloride electrolytes and measured the strain. The Cl-, Br-, NO3- , BF4- , and ClO4- radii were found to be approximately 235, 245, 250, 270 and 290 pm, respectively. The radii of K+, Na+ and Li+ were approximately 230, 237 and 274 pm, respectively. The results were discussed and took the crystalline ion radius and hydrated ion radius (Stokes radius) into consideration. It was found that the structure and size of the anions were slightly larger than the crystalline ion radius. Contrary to the anions, the cation radii were close to the hydrated ion radius, being larger than the crystalline ion radius.

  19. Cyclotetraphosphinophosphonium ions: synthesis, structures, and pseudorotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyker, C Adam; Riegel, Susanne D; Burford, Neil; Lumsden, Michael D; Decken, Andreas

    2007-06-13

    The first derivatives of catenated cyclotetraphosphinophosphonium cations, [(PhP)4PPhMe]+ (8a), [(MeP)4PMe2]+ (8b), [(CyP)4PPh2]+ (8d), [(CyP)4PMe2]+ (8e), [(PhP)4PPh2]+ (8f), [(PhP)4PMe2]+ (8g), are synthesized as trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate, OSO2CF3-) salts through the reaction of cyclopentaphosphines (PhP)5 (4a) or (MeP)5 (4b) with methyl triflate (MeOTf) or by a net phosphenium ion [PR2+, R = Ph, Me; from R2PCl and trimethylsilyltriflate (Me3SiOTf)] insertion into the P-P bond of either cyclotetraphosphine (CyP)4 (3c) or cyclopentaphosphines (PhP)5 (4a) or (MeP)5 (4b). Although more conveniently prepared from 4a, compound 8a[OTf] can also be formed from (PhP)4 (3a) and MeOTf, and derivatives 8f[OTf] and 8g[OTf] are also accessible through reactions of 3a and R2PCl/Me3SiOTf with R = Ph or Me, respectively. A tetrachlorogallate salt of [(PhP)4PPhtBu]+ (8c) has been synthesized by alkylation of 4a with tBuCl/GaCl3. 31P[1H] NMR parameters for all derivatives of 8 have been determined by iterative simulation of experimental data. Derivatives 8a[OTf], 8b[OTf], 8c[GaCl4], 8e[OTf], 8f[OTf], and 8g[OTf] and have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, showing the most favorable all-trans configuration of substituents for the phosphine centers, thus minimizing steric interactions. Each derivative adopts a unique envelope or twist conformation of C1 symmetry. The effective C2 symmetry observed for 8b, d, e, f, and g in solution, signified by their 31P[1H] NMR AA'BB'X spin systems, implies a rapid conformational exchange for derivatives of 8. The core frameworks of the cations in the solid state are viewed as snapshots of different conformational isomers within the solution-phase pseudorotation process.

  20. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2014-01-01

    The present work describes a molecular dynamics simulation study of structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions in water. Structural properties of the system in terms of radial distribution functions and dynamical characteristics as obtained through velocity autocorrelation function and mean square displacements have been analyzed. The results for radial distribution functions show the oxygen of water to form the first solvation shell at 2.4 Å around the uranium atom, whereas the hydrogen atoms of water are distributed around the uranium atom with the major peak at around 3.0 Å. Analyses of transport behaviors of ions and water through MSD indicates that the diffusion of the uranyl ion is much less as compared to that of the water molecules. It is also observed that the dynamical behavior of water molecules gets modified due to the presence of uranyl ion. The effect of increase in concentration of uranyl ions on the structure and dynamics of water molecules is also studied

  1. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Y., E-mail: sasajima@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Shirakata 162-4, Tokai 319-1106 (Japan); Osada, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen-cho 1-1, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R{sub a} was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS{sub e}, i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S{sub e}: electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R{sub a} and gS{sub e} follows the relation R{sub a}{sup 2}=aln(gS{sub e})+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms.

  2. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R a was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS e , i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S e : electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R a and gS e follows the relation R a 2 =aln(gS e )+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms

  3. Structural and optical modification in 4H-SiC following 30 keV silver ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M.; Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa; Yazdi, G. Reza

    2018-05-01

    The market of high power, high frequency and high temperature based electronic devices is captured by SiC due to its superior properties like high thermal conductivity and high sublimation temperature and also due to the limitation of silicon based electronics in this area. There is a need to investigate effect of ion irradiation on SiC due to its application in outer space as outer space is surrounded both by low and high energy ion irradiations. In this work, effect of low energy ion irradiation on structural and optical property of 4H-SiC is investigated. ATR-FTIR is used to study structural modification and UV-Visible spectroscopy is used to study optical modifications in 4H-SiC following 30 keV Ag ion irradiation. FTIR showed decrease in bond density of SiC along the ion path (track) due to the creation of point defects. UV-Visible absorption spectra showed decrease in optical band gap from 3.26 eV to 2.9 eV. The study showed degradation of SiC crystallity and change in optical band gap following low energy ion irradiation and should be addressed while fabricationg devices based on SiC for outer space application. Additionally, this study provides a platform for introducing structural and optical modification in 4H-SiC using ion beam technology in a controlled manner.

  4. Design and Development of Mechanical Structure and Control System for Tracked Trailing Mobile Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Hongchuan Xu; Jianxing Ren; Rui Zhu; Zhiwei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Along with the science and technology unceasing progress, the uses of tracing robots become more and more widely. Tracked tracing robot was adopted as the research object in this paper, mechanical structure and control system of robot was designed and developmented. In mechanical structure design part, structure designed and positioned  were completed, including design of robot body, wheel, underpan, transmission structure and the positioning of batteries, control panel, sensors, etc, and the...

  5. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Xu, Changsheng; Ahuja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our

  6. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Xu, Changsheng; Ahuja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker

  7. Ion pairs in non-redundant protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ion pairs contribute to several functions including the activity of catalytic triads, fusion of viral membranes, stability in thermophilic proteins and solvent–protein interactions. Furthermore, they have the ability to affect the stability of protein structures and are also a part of the forces that act to hold monomers together.

  8. Structuring of silicon with low energy focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The defect production in silicon induced by focused ion beam irradiation as a function of energy and projectile mass has been investigated and compared to the measured sputter yield. The aim was to find optimal beam parameters for the structuring of semiconductors with a minimum amount of defects produced per removed atom. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  9. Ion-beam induced chemical and structural modification in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guenther, M.; Gerlach, G.; Suchaneck, G.; Sahre, K.; Eichorn, K. J.; Wolf, B.; Deineka, Alexander; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    158-159, - (2002), s. 108-113 ISSN 0257-8972 Grant - others:Ge(DE) 779/6-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : polyimide * polyethersulfone- hardness * conductivity * polymer structure * ion implantation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.267, year: 2002

  10. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  11. Pilot production of track etch membranes (TEMS) using heavy ion beam scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, J.P.; Surendran, P.; Sparrow, Hillary; Ninawe, N.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Acharya, N.; Kulshreshta, V.; Rajesh Kumar; Vijay, Y.K.; Kurup, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Various methods for making TEMs were conducted at Pelletron Accelerator Facility. The technique for production using ion beam scattering was also established. This is an effort to make TEMs on pilot basis at BARC- TIFR Pelletron Accelerator using Heavy Ion Beam Scanner till large rolling mechanism is implemented

  12. Micro structure processing on plastics by accelerated hydrogen molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Nishikawa, H.

    2017-08-01

    A proton has 1836 times the mass of an electron and is the lightest nucleus to be used for accelerator in material modification. We can setup accelerator with the lowest acceleration voltage. It is preferable characteristics of Proton Beam Writer (PBW) for industrial applications. On the contrary ;proton; has the lowest charge among all nuclei and the potential impact to material is lowest. The object of this research is to improve productivity of the PBW for industry application focusing on hydrogen molecular ions. These ions are generated in the same ion source by ionizing hydrogen molecule. There is no specific ion source requested and it is suitable for industrial use. We demonstrated three dimensional (3D) multilevel micro structures on polyester base FPC (Flexible Printed Circuits) using proton, H2+ and H3+. The reactivity of hydrogen molecular ions is much higher than that of proton and coincident with the level of expectation. We can apply this result to make micro devices of 3D multilevel structures on FPC.

  13. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Lange, Kathrin M; Conrad, Gerrit; Yamamoto, Kenji; Schwanke, Christoph; Hodeck, Kai F; Dantz, Marcus; Brandenburg, Tim; Suljoti, Edlira; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-01

    The effect of monovalent cations (Li(+), K(+), NH4 (+), Na(+)) on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  14. Structured Light-Based Motion Tracking in the Limited View of an MR Head Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Conradsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the fac......A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions...

  15. Structuring of material parameters in lithium niobate crystals with low-mass, high-energy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peithmann, K.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Goetze, J.; Haaks, M.; Hattermann, H.; Haubrich, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Jentjens, L.; Mader, W.; Raeth, N. L.; Schmid, H.; Zamani-Meymian, M.-R.; Maier, K.

    2011-10-01

    Ferroelectric lithium niobate crystals offer a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components, tailoring of key material parameters, especially of the refractive index n and the ferroelectric domain landscape, is required. Irradiation of lithium niobate crystals with accelerated ions causes strong structured modifications in the material. The effects induced by low-mass, high-energy ions (such as 3He with 41 MeV, which are not implanted, but transmit through the entire crystal volume) are reviewed. Irradiation yields large changes of the refractive index Δn, improved domain engineering capability within the material along the ion track, and waveguiding structures. The periodic modification of Δn as well as the formation of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) (supported by radiation damage) is described. Two-step knock-on displacement processes, 3He→Nb and 3He→O causing thermal spikes, are identified as origin for the material modifications.

  16. Elastic (stress-strain) halo associated with ion-induced nano-tracks in lithium niobate: role of crystal anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A; Garcia, G; Olivares, J; Crespillo, M L; Agulló-López, F

    2011-01-01

    The elastic strain/stress fields (halo) around a compressed amorphous nano-track (core) caused by a single high-energy ion impact on LiNbO 3 are calculated. A method is developed to approximately account for the effects of crystal anisotropy of LiNbO 3 (symmetry 3m) on the stress fields for tracks oriented along the crystal axes (X, Y or Z). It only considers the zero-order (axial) harmonic contribution to the displacement field in the perpendicular plane and uses effective Poisson moduli for each particular orientation. The anisotropy is relatively small; however, it accounts for some differential features obtained for irradiations along the crystallographic axes X, Y and Z. In particular, the irradiation-induced disorder (including halo) and the associated surface swelling appear to be higher for irradiations along the X- or Y-axis in comparison with those along the Z-axis. Other irradiation effects can be explained by the model, e.g. fracture patterns or the morphology of pores after chemical etching of tracks. Moreover, it offers interesting predictions on the effect of irradiation on lattice parameters.

  17. Surface modification technique of structural ceramics: ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhijian; Miao Hezhuo; Si Wenjie; Qi Longhao; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Through reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of the existed surface modification techniques, a new technique, ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating, was proposed. Using the proposed technique, the surfaces of silicon nitride ceramics were modified by Ti ion implantation, and then three kinds of ternary coatings, (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Zr)N and (Ti,Cr)N, were deposited on the as-implanted ceramics. The coatings prepared by this technique are of high-hardness and well adhesive to the ceramic substrates. The maximal hardness measured by nanoindentation tests is more than 40 GPa. The maximal critical load by nanoscratch tests is more than 60 mN. The cutting tools prepared by this technique with the presented coatings are of excellent performance in industrial applications. The technique may be promising for the surface modification of structural ceramics. (orig.)

  18. Ion track based tunable device as humidity sensor: a neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Sharma, Anuradha; Bhattacherjee, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been applied in statistical model development, adaptive control system, pattern recognition in data mining, and decision making under uncertainty. The nonlinear dependence of any sensor output on the input physical variable has been the motivation for many researchers to attempt unconventional modeling techniques such as neural networks and other machine learning approaches. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational tool inspired by the network of neurons in biological nervous system. It is a network consisting of arrays of artificial neurons linked together with different weights of connection. The states of the neurons as well as the weights of connections among them evolve according to certain learning rules.. In the present work we focus on the category of sensors which respond to electrical property changes such as impedance or capacitance. Recently, sensor materials have been embedded in etched tracks due to their nanometric dimensions and high aspect ratio which give high surface area available for exposure to sensing material. Various materials can be used for this purpose to probe physical (light intensity, temperature etc.), chemical (humidity, ammonia gas, alcohol etc.) or biological (germs, hormones etc.) parameters. The present work involves the application of TEMPOS structures as humidity sensors. The sample to be studied was prepared using the polymer electrolyte (PEO/NH4ClO4) with CdS nano-particles dispersed in the polymer electrolyte. In the present research we have attempted to correlate the combined effects of voltage and frequency on impedance of humidity sensors using a neural network model and results have indicated that the mean absolute error of the ANN Model for the training data was 3.95% while for the validation data it was 4.65%. The corresponding values for the LR model were 8.28% and 8.35% respectively. It was also demonstrated the percentage improvement of the ANN Model with respect to the

  19. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-07-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar16+. (orig.)

  20. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-01-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar 16+ . (orig.)

  1. Functional Annotation of Ion Channel Structures by Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Jemma L; Chelvaniththilan, Sivapalan; Klesse, Gianni; Aryal, Prafulla; Wallace, E Jayne; Tucker, Stephen J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-12-06

    Ion channels play key roles in cell membranes, and recent advances are yielding an increasing number of structures. However, their functional relevance is often unclear and better tools are required for their functional annotation. In sub-nanometer pores such as ion channels, hydrophobic gating has been shown to promote dewetting to produce a functionally closed (i.e., non-conductive) state. Using the serotonin receptor (5-HT 3 R) structure as an example, we demonstrate the use of molecular dynamics to aid the functional annotation of channel structures via simulation of the behavior of water within the pore. Three increasingly complex simulation analyses are described: water equilibrium densities; single-ion free-energy profiles; and computational electrophysiology. All three approaches correctly predict the 5-HT 3 R crystal structure to represent a functionally closed (i.e., non-conductive) state. We also illustrate the application of water equilibrium density simulations to annotate different conformational states of a glycine receptor. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Eye tracking detects disconjugate eye movements associated with structural traumatic brain injury and concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Uzma; Ritlop, Robert; Reyes, Marleen; Nehrbass, Elena; Li, Meng; Lamm, Elizabeth; Schneider, Julia; Shimunov, David; Sava, Maria; Kolecki, Radek; Burris, Paige; Altomare, Lindsey; Mehmood, Talha; Smith, Theodore; Huang, Jason H; McStay, Christopher; Todd, S Rob; Qian, Meng; Kondziolka, Douglas; Wall, Stephen; Huang, Paul

    2015-04-15

    Disconjugate eye movements have been associated with traumatic brain injury since ancient times. Ocular motility dysfunction may be present in up to 90% of patients with concussion or blast injury. We developed an algorithm for eye tracking in which the Cartesian coordinates of the right and left pupils are tracked over 200 sec and compared to each other as a subject watches a short film clip moving inside an aperture on a computer screen. We prospectively eye tracked 64 normal healthy noninjured control subjects and compared findings to 75 trauma subjects with either a positive head computed tomography (CT) scan (n=13), negative head CT (n=39), or nonhead injury (n=23) to determine whether eye tracking would reveal the disconjugate gaze associated with both structural brain injury and concussion. Tracking metrics were then correlated to the clinical concussion measure Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3) in trauma patients. Five out of five measures of horizontal disconjugacy were increased in positive and negative head CT patients relative to noninjured control subjects. Only one of five vertical disconjugacy measures was significantly increased in brain-injured patients relative to controls. Linear regression analysis of all 75 trauma patients demonstrated that three metrics for horizontal disconjugacy negatively correlated with SCAT3 symptom severity score and positively correlated with total Standardized Assessment of Concussion score. Abnormal eye-tracking metrics improved over time toward baseline in brain-injured subjects observed in follow-up. Eye tracking may help quantify the severity of ocular motility disruption associated with concussion and structural brain injury.

  3. A Deep-Structured Conditional Random Field Model for Object Silhouette Tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Shafiee

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce a deep-structured conditional random field (DS-CRF model for the purpose of state-based object silhouette tracking. The proposed DS-CRF model consists of a series of state layers, where each state layer spatially characterizes the object silhouette at a particular point in time. The interactions between adjacent state layers are established by inter-layer connectivity dynamically determined based on inter-frame optical flow. By incorporate both spatial and temporal context in a dynamic fashion within such a deep-structured probabilistic graphical model, the proposed DS-CRF model allows us to develop a framework that can accurately and efficiently track object silhouettes that can change greatly over time, as well as under different situations such as occlusion and multiple targets within the scene. Experiment results using video surveillance datasets containing different scenarios such as occlusion and multiple targets showed that the proposed DS-CRF approach provides strong object silhouette tracking performance when compared to baseline methods such as mean-shift tracking, as well as state-of-the-art methods such as context tracking and boosted particle filtering.

  4. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-11-02

    In this work, we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas phase ion population manipulation, and demonstrate its application for the collapse of the ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventionally traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or ‘stuttered’. This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved S/N ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multi-pass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening due to increasing peak widths.

  5. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy ε n deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 μm thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of ε e HRF =(10.5±1.0) kev nm -1 was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation ε e S a =(12±2) keV nm -1 for the first time extracted for a Ge the characteristic linear behaviour of the

  6. Selective capillary diffusion of equimolar H2/D2 gas mixtures through etched ion track membranes prepared from polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.; Angert, N.; Trautmann, C.

    1996-01-01

    The selective capillary diffusion of equimolar H 2 /D 2 gas mixtures through ion track membranes prepared from polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide was investigated at a temperature of 293 K, a primary pressure of 0.15 MPa and a secondary pressure of 10 -4 MPa. Different values of the separation factor Z(H 2 /D 2 ) between experiment and computer simulation exists in the case of polyethylene terephthalate ion track membranes because of multiple pores. Membranes for which multiple pores were reduced by varying the irradiation angle showed an increased separation factor. The separation factor is a function of the pore diameter. This is shown for polyimide ion track membranes with a pore size in the range of 0.17 and 0.5 μm. After grafting with styrene the separation factor increased, indicating grafting within the pores. (orig.)

  7. Hydrodynamics of layer structured targets impinged by intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, J.; Barrero, A.

    1989-01-01

    To minimize the energy loss in the corona outflow, a layer structured spherical hollow shell has been proposed to be used as target in inertial confinement fusion. For ion beam drivers, the major part of the beam energy is absorbed in the middle layer, which is called either absorber or pusher. The outer layer, called tamper, slows down the outward expansion of the absorbed low density region. The materials of the tamper and pusher are usually in the inner layer. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics of the interaction of an intense beam with a structured target is then an essential point in order to achieve break-even conditions in ion-beam fusion. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  8. Amorphous track predictions in ‘libamtrack’ for alanine relative effectiveness in ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek

    2011-01-01

    and simple dose response, the alanine detector can help to study fundamental assumptions and accuracy in amorphous track modelling. The libamtrack project enabled recently to directly compare various flavours of ATMs. We therefore present here the potential of predictions for alanine from two libamtrack ATMs...... transport and stopping powers hinders a thorough interpretation of the deviation found and stress the necessity for a broader data base at lower particle energies....

  9. Oriented nano-wire formation and selective adhesion on substrates by single ion track reaction in polysilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Seki; Satoshi Tsukuda, Yoichi Yoshida; Seiichi Tagawa; Masaki Sugimoto; Shigeru Tanaka

    2002-01-01

    1-D nano-sized materials such as carbon nanotubes have attracted much attention as ideal quantum wires for future manufacturing techniques of nano-scaled opto-electronic devices. However it is still difficult to control the sizes, spatial distributions, or positions of nanotubes by conventional synthetic techniques to date. The MeV order heavy ion beams causes ultra-high density energy deposition which can not be realized by any other techniques (lasers, H, etc), and penetrate the polymer target straighforward as long as 1∼100 m depth. the energy deposited area produces non-homogeneous field can be controlled by changing the energy deposition rate of incident ions (LET: linear energy transfer, eV/nm). We found that cross-linking reaction of polysilane derivatives was predominantly caused and gave nano-gel in the chemical core, unlike main chain scission occurring at the outside of the area. high density energy deposition by ion beams causes non-homogeneous crosslinking reaction of polysilane derivatives within a nano-sized cylindrical area along an ion trajectory, and gives -SiC based nano-wires of which sizes (length, thickness) and number densities are completely under control by changing the parameters of incident ion beams and molecular sizes of target polymers. based on the concept pf the single track gelation, the present study demonstrates the formation of cross-linked polysilane nano-wires with the fairly controlled sizes. Recently the techniques of position-selective single ion hitting have been developed for MeV order ion beams, however it is not sufficient to control precisely the positions of the nano-wires on the substrates within sub- m area. in the present study, we report the selective adhesion of anno-wires on Si substrates by the surface treatments before coating, which enables the patterning of planted nano-wires on substrates and/or electrodes as candidates for nano-sized field emissive cathodes or electro-luminescent devices. Some examples of

  10. Hydrophobization of track membrane surface by ion-plasma sputtering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, I. E.; Khlebnikov, N. A.; Barashev, N. R.; Serkov, K. V.; Polyakov, E. V.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2017-09-01

    This article reviews the possibility of applying inorganic coatings of metal compounds on PTM by ion-plasma sputtering. The main aim of this research is to increase the contact angle of PTM surfaces and to impart the properties of a hydrophobic material to it. After the modification, the initial contact angle increased from 70° to 120°.

  11. Testing ion structure models with x-ray Thomson scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wünsch K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of various ionic structure models on the interpretation of the X-ray Thomson scattering signal. For the calculation of the ion structure, classical hypernetted chain equations are used applying different effective inter-particle potentials. It is shown that the different models lead to significant discrepancies in the theoretically predicted weight of the Rayleigh peak, in particular for small k-values where correlation effects are important. Here, we propose conditions which might allow for an experimental verification of the theories under consideration of experimental constraints of k-vector blurring.

  12. Track profile and range studies of heavy and light ions in CR-39: effect of thermal pre-treatment on etching characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Najjar, S.A.R.; Bull, R.K.; Durrani, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Sheets of CR 39 have been irradiated with 20 Ne, 32 S, 40 Ar, 56 Fe and 63 Cu ions at normal incidence to the surface of the sheets and at normal incidence to the edges. The profiles of the etched tracks have been observed side-on and measurements made of the variation of V (the ratio of track to bulk etching velocities) along the tracks and of the fully etched range of the tracks. Heating the plastic at 100 0 C prior to etching produces zones within the plastic having different bulk etching rates Vsub(B). An outer zone of low Vsub(B) is followed by a zone of much higher Vsub(B). This allows tracks to be readily etched to very large diameters, comparable in size to the breakdown spots produced by electrochemical etching. (author)

  13. A comparative study of track registration response of Makrofol-(KG, KL and N) polycarbonate to sup 4 sup 0 Ar ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present work a comparative study of track registration response of sup 4 sup 0 Ar ions in different types of Makrofol polycarbonates viz. Makrofol-KG, KL and N have been done. The etched track parameters viz. bulk etch rate, track etch rate, etch rate ratio, cone angle and etching efficiency were calculated. The variation of etching rates with temperature were found to be exponential and follow the Arrhenius equation. The values of activation energy for bulk and track etching were also calculated. Maximum etchable track length/range were also obtained and compared with the theoretical values obtained from computer program RANGE. From the results it is found that the polycarbonates having same chemical composition manufactured by different chemical processes have slightly different behavior

  14. Comparison of DMSP cross-track ion drifts and SuperDARN line-of-sight velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Drayton

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cross-track ion drifts measured by the DMSP satellites are compared with line-of-sight SuperDARN HF velocities in approximately the same directions. Good overall agreement is found for a data set comprising of 209 satellite passes over the field of view of nine SuperDARN radars in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The slope of the best linear fit line relating the SuperDARN and DMSP velocities is of the order of 0.7 with a tendency for SuperDARN velocities to be smaller. The agreement implies that the satellite and radar data can be merged into a common set provided that spatial and temporal variations of the velocity as measured by both instruments are smooth.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Plasma convection; Auroral ionosphere

  15. Hardening and formation of dislocation structures in LiF crystals irradiated with MeV-GeV ions

    CERN Document Server

    Manika, I; Schwartz, K; Trautmann, C

    2002-01-01

    Material modifications of LiF crystals irradiated with Au, Pb and Bi ions of MeV to GeV energy are studied by means of microindentation measurements and dislocation etching. Above a critical irradiation fluence of 10 sup 9 ions/cm sup 2 , the microhardness can improve by a factor of 2 in the bulk and by more than 3 on the surface. Radiation-induced hardening follows the evolution of the energy loss along the ion path. Annealing experiments indicate that complex defect aggregates created in the tracks play a major role for the hardness change. Evidence for severe structural modifications is found when etching indentation impressions in highly irradiated crystals leading to similar pattern as in amorphous or micro-grained materials. Dislocation etching also reveals long-range stress fields extending far beyond the implantation zone deep into the nonirradiated crystal.

  16. State-of-health monitoring of lithium-ion battery modules and packs via incremental capacity peak tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Caihao; Feng, Xuning; Sun, Jing; Peng, Huei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new framework based on ICA is used to monitor SOH on-board for battery packs. • The applicability of the framework is validated through simulation and experiment. • The method can monitor SOH for pack consisting of cells with various aging paths. • On-board incremental capacity analysis is realized by support vector regression. - Abstract: Incremental capacity analysis (ICA) is a widely used technique for lithium-ion battery state-of-health (SOH) evaluation. The effectiveness and robustness of ICA for single cell diagnostics have been reported in many published work. In this study, we extend the ICA based SOH monitoring approach from single cells to battery modules, which consist of battery cells with various aging conditions. In order to achieve on-board implementation, an IC peak tracking approach based on the ICA principles is proposed. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the utility of the IC peak tracking framework on multi-cell battery SOH monitoring and the effects of cell non-uniformity on the proposed method. Results show that the methods developed for single cell capacity estimation can also be used for a module or pack that has parallel-connected cells.

  17. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Femto-clock for the electron kinetics in swift heavy ion tracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medvedev, Nikita; Volkov, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 44 (2017), s. 1-11, č. článku 445302. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15013; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015083 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : swift heavy ions * electron kinetics * femto-clock * femtosecond resolution * spectroscopy * radiative decay Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  19. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Petit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of monovalent cations (Li+, K+, NH4+, Na+ on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS, X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  20. Metallic microwires obtained as replicas of etched ion tracks in polymer matrixes: Microscopy and emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, D.L.; Bedin, S.A.; Oleinikov, V.A.; Polyakov, N.B.; Rybalko, O.G.; Mchedlishvili, B.V.

    2009-01-01

    Specially prepared porous matrixes (with through and dead-end pores of cylindrical or conical forms) were used as the templates for making ensembles of microwires. The process of electrodeposition of metal (Cu) into these pores was investigated. AFM technique was used for studying the 'composite material' (metal microwires embedded into the polymer matrix). It was shown that the combination of different modes of AFM (tapping with phase-contrast mode, contact with lateral force mode) makes it possible to detect metal in the polymer matrix. Additional spread resistance mode in the contact regime allowed to measure the electrical conductivity of a single wire. The ensembles of free-standing microwires (metallic replicas of the pores obtained after removing of the polymer matrix) were used as the substrates (for deposition of the probe) for ion emission in the mass-spectrometer. It was shown that the intensity of formed ion beam increases with increasing of power of the laser pulse and with increasing of the mass of the probe. The intensity of mass-spectra signal on the power of laser pulse has a threshold character with saturation accompanied with the appearance of dimer ions. At the same time this intensity decreases with the increasing of the surface density of wires. The effect of degradation of wires during the laser pulse irradiation was found.

  1. Diode-like single-ion track membrane prepared by electro-stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.Yu.; Korchev, Yu.E.; Siwy, Z.; Spohr, R.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of an asymmetric membrane in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is described, using a combination of chemical and electro-stopping. For this purpose, a single-ion-irradiated PET film is inserted into an electrolytic cell and etched from one side in 9 M sodium hydroxide while bathing the other side in a mixture of 2 M KCl and 2 M HCOOH (1:1 by volume), electrically retracting the OH - ions from the tip of the etch pit during pore break-through. When a preset current has been reached, the etch process is interrupted by replacing the etching solution with acidic 1 M potassium chloride solution. After etching, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic is determined under symmetric bathing conditions, immersing both sides of the membrane in KCl solutions of identical concentration (0.01-1 M) and pH (3-8). The I-V characteristic is strongly non-linear, comparable to that of an electrical diode. If the polarity during etching is reversed, pushing the OH - ions into the tip of the etch pit, the resulting pores are larger and the degree of asymmetry smaller. The importance of electro-stopping is compared with chemical stopping

  2. Effect of electron emission on an ion sheath structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, M K; Phukan, A; Chakraborty, M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the variations of ion sheath structures due to the emission of both hot and cold electrons in the target plasma region of a double plasma device. The ion sheath is produced in front of a negatively biased plate. The plasma is produced by hot filament discharge in the source region, and no discharge is created in the target region of the device. The plate is placed in the target (diffused plasma) region where cold electron emitting filaments are present. These cold electrons are free from maintenance of discharge, which is sustained in the source region. The hot ionizing electrons are present in the source region. Three important parameters are changed by both hot and cold electrons i.e. plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The decrease in plasma potential and the increase in plasma density lead to the contraction of the sheath. (paper)

  3. A Framework for Occupancy Tracking in a Building via Structural Dynamics Sensing of Footstep Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Poston

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Counting the number of occupants in building areas over time—occupancy tracking—provides valuable information for responding to emergencies, optimizing thermal conditions or managing personnel. This capability is distinct from tracking individual building occupants as they move within a building, has lower complexity than conventional tracking algorithms require, and avoids privacy concerns that tracking individuals may pose. The approach proposed here is a novel combination of data analytics applied to measurements from a building’s structural dynamics sensors (e.g., accelerometers or geophones. Specifically, measurements of footstep-generated structural waves provide evidence of occupancy in a building area. These footstep vibrations can be distinguished from other vibrations, and, once identified, the footsteps can be located. These locations, in turn, form the starting point of estimating occupancy in an area. In order to provide a meaningful occupancy count, however, it is first necessary to associate discrete footsteps with individuals. The proposed framework incorporates a tractable algorithm for this association task. The proposed algorithms operate online, updating occupancy count over time as new footsteps are detected. Experiments with measurements from a public building illustrate the operation of the proposed framework. This approach offers an advantage over others based on conventional technologies by avoiding the cost of a separate sensor system devoted to occupancy tracking.

  4. Effective stopping of relativistic structural heavy ions at collisions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    One develops the unperturbed theory of energy losses at collision of atoms with structural high-charged heavy ions moving with relativistic velocity. One derived a simple formula for efficient braking. The structural ions in terms of this paper are considered to mean partially ionized ions of heavy elements compressing ion nucleus and some bound electrons compensating partially for ion nucleus charge. Account of ion charge magnitude is determined to result in essential increase of efficient braking of ion in contrast to braking of point nucleus of Z* charge [ru

  5. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008–2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  6. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  7. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  8. Coupled chemical reactions in dynamic nanometric confinement: IV. Ion transmission spectrometric analysis of nanofluidic behavior and membrane formation during track etching in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Munoz, G. H.; Arellano, H. G.; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 3 (2015), s. 155-174 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ions * etching * tracks Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2015

  9. Coupled chemical reactions in dynamic nanometric confinement: V. The influence of Li+ and F- ions on etching of nuclear tracks in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Hernandez, G. M.; Ruiz, N. L.; Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Garcia-Arellano, H.; Alfonta, L.; Kiv, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 169, č. 5 (2014), s. 396-417 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : tracks * biotechnology * nanostruct * ions * etching Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2014

  10. Modal-space reference-model-tracking fuzzy control of earthquake excited structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan-Soon; Ok, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive modal-space reference-model-tracking fuzzy control technique for the vibration control of earthquake-excited structures. In the proposed approach, the fuzzy logic is introduced to update optimal control force so that the controlled structural response can track the desired response of a reference model. For easy and practical implementation, the reference model is constructed by assigning the target damping ratios to the first few dominant modes in modal space. The numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach successfully achieves not only the adaptive fault-tolerant control system against partial actuator failures but also the robust performance against the variations of the uncertain system properties by redistributing the feedback control forces to the available actuators.

  11. Application of PM-355 track detectors for investigation of the spatial structure of plasma-proton streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, K., E-mail: k.malinowski@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M.J.; Czaus, K. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    The paper describes the use of PM-355 track detectors for studies of spatial structures and energies of pulsed plasma-proton streams generated by an RPI-IBIS accelerator, powered from a 30-kJ condenser bank. Measurements were performed for different operational modes depending on a delay between the gas injection and discharge initiation. To study a spatial structure of the plasma-proton streams we used an ion pinhole camera with PM-355 detectors, placed at the symmetry axis of the experimental chamber, at a distance of 22 cm from electrode ends. To record low-energy (not below 30 keV) protons we did not apply any filter. To select protons of higher energies we used additional absorption filters made of Al-foils of 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 mum in thickness, which eliminated protons of energies below 125, 210 and 345 keV, respectively. The spatial structure of the proton beams was analyzed and their dependence on the initial gas conditions was investigated.

  12. Structural-morphological peculiarities of zirconium oxyhydrate with applicated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunova, N.K.; Sukharev, Yu.I.; Egorov, Yu.V.

    1976-01-01

    Some results of applicated zirconium ozyhydrate investigation by thermography and electronography are considered as well as the results of microscopic and picnometric investigations. Bichromate and polyvanadate ions were used as applicants. It is demonstrated that two kinds of granules are formed: globular and plane-scaly, depending on the method of applicated synthesis of hydrated zirconium dioxide samples (HZD) and the nature of applicants. It was established by electronographycal methods that samples with plane-scaly morphology have an ordered structure. Influence of the HZD granules morphology on the absorption-exchange properties was established. Globular samples are the most sensitive to applicated additions and have better absorption characteristics. The character of the density variation as a function of applicant concentration in solid phase is the same: in the region of applicant concentration 0.15-0.30 g ion/mol ZrO 2 the density is the highest, then samples density is decreasing and increasing once again at applicant concentration 0.5-0.6 g ion/mol ZrO 2

  13. Tracking metal ions with polypyrrole thin films adhesively bonded to diazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Momath; Diaw, Abdou K D; Gningue-Sall, Diariatou; Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Oturan, Mehmet A; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2018-05-09

    Adhesively bonded polypyrrole thin films doped with benzene sulfonic acid (BSA) were electrodeposited on aminobenzenediazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes and further employed for the detection of Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ metal ions in aqueous medium. The aminophenyl (AP) adhesive layer was grafted to ITO by electroreduction of the in situ generated parent diazonium compound. Polypyrrole (PPy) thin films exhibited remarkable adhesion to aminophenyl (ITO-AP). The strongly adherent polypyrrole films exhibited excellent electroactivity in the doped state with BSA which itself served to chelate the metal ions in aqueous medium. The surface of the resulting, modified flexible electrode was characterized by XPS, SEM, and electrochemical methods. The ITO-AP-PPy electrodes were then used for the simultaneous detection of Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The detection limits were 11.1, 8.95, and 0.99 nM for Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ , respectively. In addition, the modified electrodes displayed a good reproducibility, making them suitable for the determination of heavy metals in real wastewater samples.

  14. Deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the nuclear track membrane made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) are investigated in the temperature range from 333 to 473 K. It is shown that the pore size of the membrane can both decrease and increase. The analytical equation based on the Alfrey mechanical approach to the relaxation deformation of polymers describes the experimental data satisfactorily over the whole range of temperatures and pore radii of the membranes. 21 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impact ionization for highly sensitive chemical structure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Energetic cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater were applied to time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry. This gave various advantages including enhancement of SIs required for chemical structure characterization and prevention of charging effects in SI mass spectra for organic targets. We report some characteristic features of TOF SI mass spectrometry using energetic cluster ion impact ionization and discuss two future applications of it.

  16. Last ion engine thrust puts ESA's SMART-1 on the right track for its Moon encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    SMART-1, on its way to the Moon, has now covered more than 80 million kilometres. Its journey started on 27 September 2003, when the spacecraft was launched on board an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Since then, it has been spiralling in progressively larger orbits around Earth, to eventually be captured by the lunar gravity and enter into orbit around the Moon in November this year. The SMART-1 mission was designed to pursue two main objectives. The first is purely technological: to demonstrate and test a number of space techniques to be applied to future interplanetary exploration missions. The second goal is scientific, mainly dedicated to lunar science. It is the technology demonstration goal, in particular the first European flight test of a solar-powered ion engine as a spacecraft’s main propulsion system, that gave shape to the peculiar route and duration (13 months) of the SMART-1 journey to the Moon. The long spiralling orbit around Earth, which is bringing the spacecraft closer and closer to the Moon, is needed for the ion engine to function and be tested over a distance comparable to that a spacecraft would travel during a possible interplanetary trip. The SMART-1 mission is also testing the response of a spacecraft propelled by such an engine during gravity-assisted manoeuvres. These are techniques currently used on interplanetary journeys, which make use of the gravitational pull of celestial objects (e.g. planets) for the spacecraft to gain acceleration and reach its final target while saving fuel. In SMART-1’s case, the Moon’s gravitational pull has been exploited in three “lunar resonance” manoeuvres. The first two successfully took place in August and September 2004. The last resonance manoeuvre was on 12 October, during the last major ion engine thrust, which lasted nearly five days, from 10 to 14 October. Thanks to this final thrust, SMART-1 will make two more orbits around Earth without any further

  17. Simple Ion Channels: From Structure to Electrophysiology and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    A reliable way to establish whether our understanding of a channel is satisfactory is to reproduce its measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages in computer simulations. In molecular dynamics (MD), this can be done by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive, we have developed a markedly more efficient alternative in which MD is combined with the electrodiffusion (ED) equation. In this approach, the assumptions of the ED equation can be rigorously tested, and the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance can be determined. We have demonstrated that the full current/voltage dependence and the underlying free energy profile for a simple channel can be reliably calculated from equilibrium or non-equilibrium MD simulations at a single voltage. To carry out MD simulations, a structural model of a channel has to be assumed, which is an important constraint, considering that high-resolution structures are available for only very few simple channels. If the comparison of calculated ionic conductance with electrophysiological data is satisfactory, it greatly increases our confidence that the structure and the function are described sufficiently accurately. We examined the validity of the ED for several channels embedded in phospholipid membranes - four naturally occurring channels: trichotoxin, alamethicin, p7 from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Vpu from the HIV-1 virus, and a synthetic, hexameric channel, formed by a 21-residue peptide that contains only leucine and serine. All these channels mediate transport of potassium and chloride ions. It was found that the ED equation is satisfactory for these systems. In some of them experimental and calculated electrophysiological properties are in good agreement, whereas in others there are strong indications that the structural models are incorrect.

  18. Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yu Ho

    2014-07-08

    Above a critical surface chemistry-dependent particle loading associated with nanoscale interparticle spacing, ligand-ligand interactions-both electrostatic and steric-come into play and govern the structure and dynamics of charged oligomer-functionalized nanoparticle suspensions. We report in particular on the structure, ion transport, and rheology of suspensions of nanoparticle salts created by cofunctionalization of silica particles with tethered sulfonate salts and oligomers. Dispersion of the hairy ionic particles into medium and high dielectric constant liquids yields electrolytes with unique structure and transport properties. We find that electrostatic repulsion imparted by ion dissociation can be tuned to control the dispersion state and rheology through counterion size (i.e., Li+, Na+, and K+) and dielectric properties of the dispersing medium. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structure factors and the mechanical modulus shows that when the interparticle spacing approaches nanometer dimensions, weakly entangled anchored ligands experience strong and long-lived topological constraints analogous to those normally found in well-entangled polymeric fluids. This finding provides insight into the molecular origins of the surprisingly similar rubbery plateau moduli observed in hairy nanoparticle suspensions and entangled polymers of the same chemistry as the tethered ligands. Additionally, we find that a time-composition superposition (TCS) principle exists for the suspensions, which can be used to substantially extend the observation time over which dynamics are observed in jammed, soft glassy suspensions. Application of TCS reveals dynamical similarities between the suspensions and entangled solutions of linear polymer chains; i.e., a hairy particle trapped in a cage appears to exhibit analogous dynamics to a long polymer chain confined to a tube. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Structure and dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied with the electron beam ion trap in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Hu, Zhimin; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J.; Tong Xiaomin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the structure and the dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied through dielectronic recombination (DR) observations performed with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap. By measuring the energy dependence of the ion abundance ratio in the trap at equilibrium, we have observed DR processes for open shell systems very clearly. Remarkable relativistic effects due to the generalized Breit interaction have been clearly shown in DR for highly charged heavy ions. We also present the first result for the coincidence measurement of two photons emitted from a single DR event.

  20. Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient driven drift waves in pair-ion plasma with nonthermal electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Javaria; Haque, Q.; Khan, Majid; Bhatti, Adnan Mehmood; Kamran, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven waves is investigated in pair-ion plasma comprising ions and nonthermal electrons (kappa, Cairns). By using the transport equations of the Braginskii model, a new set of nonlinear equations are derived. A linear dispersion relation is obtained and discussed analytically as well as numerically. It is shown that the nonthermal population of electrons affects both the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the ITG mode in pair-ion plasma. This work will be useful in tokamaks and stellarators where non-Maxwellian population of electrons may exist due to resonant frequency heating, electron cyclotron heating, runaway electrons, etc.

  1. Determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions by ''Coulomb-explosion'' techniques with fast (MeV) molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ion beams in thin foils suggest a novel alternative approach to the determination of molecular ion structures. In this article we review some recent high-resolution studies on the interactions of fast molecular ion beams with solid and gaseous targets and indicate how such studies may be applied to the problem of determining molecular ion structures. The main features of the Coulomb explosion of fast-moving molecular ion projectiles and the manner in which Coulomb-explosion techniques may be applied to the problem (difficult to attack by more conventional means) of determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions has been described in this paper. Examples have been given of early experiments designed to elicit structure information. The techniques are still in their infancy, and it is to be expected that as both the technology and the analysis are refined, the method will make valuable contributions to the determination of molecular ion structures

  2. Ion induced scintillation in organic solids: development of an average track model,degradation of the scintillation intensity and dosimetric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broggio, D.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with a specific aspect of the ion-matter interaction: the scintillation induced by ions in organic materials. In the first chapter we tackle the issue in a theoretical way by proposing a method to compute the radial doses within the framework of the mean track model. We have developed a model based on the Lewis transport equation and on the Spencer distribution of the loss energy in order to take into account the transport of secondary electrons in a more realistic way. In the second chapter we study the physical mechanisms that trigger ion-induced scintillation. Ion-induced scintillation is featured by the dependence in charge number of the intensity of scintillation for ions with same energy loss and by the saturation of the scintillation efficiency for ions with high stopping-power. We have applied our model of radial doses to ion-induced scintillation. In the third chapter we study the gradual degradation of the scintillation intensity and ion-induced chemical damages. In the last chapter we propose a prototype of dosimeters based on the combination of scintillators and optical fibers that allows the real-time measurement of the dose delivered by a carbon ion beam in therapeutical use conditions. This dosimeter gives the relationship between the dose and the scintillation intensity but its accuracy is not yet sufficient for uses in radiotherapy. (A.C.)

  3. Radial dependence of biological response of spores of Bacillus subtilis around tracks of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facius, R.; Buecker, H.; Reitz, G.; Schaefer, M.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the biological action of heavy cosmic particles from the Biostack I and II experiments had been reported at the two preceeding symposia on microdosimetry. Analysis of these results with respect to spores of Bacillus subtilis indicated that the range of inactivation by a single heavy ion extended to larger impact parameters than to be expected from delta-ray dose only. Improved experimental techniques, as described at the last symposium, were successfully applied for the evaluation of the latest Biostack III experiment during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). These techniques allowed the determination of the impact parameters with an accuracy of down to +-0.2 μm, which is well below the size of a spore. Results of the ASTP experiment will be presented concerning the physical composition of the radiation field and the biological response of the spores in dependence on the impact parameter. These results confirm the previous findings insofar as inactivation of spores reaches out to about 4-5 μm. This finding will be discussed together with results from other Biostack test objects. Comparative accelerator experiments with Bacillus subtilis spores are presented in an additional paper

  4. Incremental Structured Dictionary Learning for Video Sensor-Based Object Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ming; Yang, Hua; Zheng, Shibao; Zhou, Yi; Yu, Zhenghua

    2014-01-01

    To tackle robust object tracking for video sensor-based applications, an online discriminative algorithm based on incremental discriminative structured dictionary learning (IDSDL-VT) is presented. In our framework, a discriminative dictionary combining both positive, negative and trivial patches is designed to sparsely represent the overlapped target patches. Then, a local update (LU) strategy is proposed for sparse coefficient learning. To formulate the training and classification process, a multiple linear classifier group based on a K-combined voting (KCV) function is proposed. As the dictionary evolves, the models are also trained to timely adapt the target appearance variation. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences compared with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm achieves a more favorable performance. We also illustrate its relay application in visual sensor networks. PMID:24549252

  5. Incremental Structured Dictionary Learning for Video Sensor-Based Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To tackle robust object tracking for video sensor-based applications, an online discriminative algorithm based on incremental discriminative structured dictionary learning (IDSDL-VT is presented. In our framework, a discriminative dictionary combining both positive, negative and trivial patches is designed to sparsely represent the overlapped target patches. Then, a local update (LU strategy is proposed for sparse coefficient learning. To formulate the training and classification process, a multiple linear classifier group based on a K-combined voting (KCV function is proposed. As the dictionary evolves, the models are also trained to timely adapt the target appearance variation. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences compared with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm achieves a more favorable performance. We also illustrate its relay application in visual sensor networks.

  6. Structure and electrochemical properties of the track membranes modified by tetrafluoroethane plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, L.I.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Goryacheva, T.A.; Satulu, V.; Mitu, B.; Dinescu, G.

    2010-01-01

    A structure and charge transport properties of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membrane modified by the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane plasma have been studied. It has been found that the polymer deposition on the surface of a track membrane via the plasma polymerization of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane results in the creation of bilayered composite membranes that possess a conductivity asymmetry in electrolyte solutions - a rectification effect similar to that of p-n junction in semiconductors. This effect is caused by an important reduction of the pore diameter in the polymer layer that leads to changing the pore geometry as well as by existence of an interface between two layers with different concentrations of carboxyl groups. Information about the charge transport in the studied membranes has been obtained by the method of impedance spectroscopy

  7. Geometric and electronic structures of molecular ions from high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, K.O.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the characteristics of heavy ion collision and of beam foil spectroscopy. It discusses the kinematic consequences of the high energies and presents results from ''Coulomb explosion'' and structure determination of molecular ions. It demonstrates that studies of molecular ions with accelerators can provide electronic and geometric structure information of molecules or molecular ions and points out that the understanding of the microscopic processes at such high energies is incomplete and needs further experimental and theoretical efforts

  8. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor, acoustic modes, and equation of state of two-temperature warm dense aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, L.; Förster, G. D.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2018-04-01

    The ion-ion dynamical structure factor and the equation of state of warm dense aluminum in a two-temperature quasiequilibrium state, with the electron temperature higher than the ion temperature, are investigated using molecular-dynamics simulations based on ion-ion pair potentials constructed from a neutral pseudoatom model. Such pair potentials based on density functional theory are parameter-free and depend directly on the electron temperature and indirectly on the ion temperature, enabling efficient computation of two-temperature properties. Comparison with ab initio simulations and with other average-atom calculations for equilibrium aluminum shows good agreement, justifying a study of quasiequilibrium situations. Analyzing the van Hove function, we find that ion-ion correlations vanish in a time significantly smaller than the electron-ion relaxation time so that dynamical properties have a physical meaning for the quasiequilibrium state. A significant increase in the speed of sound is predicted from the modification of the dispersion relation of the ion acoustic mode as the electron temperature is increased. The two-temperature equation of state including the free energy, internal energy, and pressure is also presented.

  9. Track detection on the cells exposed to high Linear Energy Transfer heavy-ions by Cr-39 plastic and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase(Td T)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehnati, P.; Keshtkar, A.; Mesbahi, A.; Sasaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    The fatal effect of ionizing radiation on cells depends on Linear Energy Transfer level. The distribution of ionizing radiation is sparse and homogeneous for low Linear Energy Transfer radiations such as X or y, but it is dense and concentrated for high Linear Energy Transfer radiation such as heavy-ions radiation. Materials and Methods: Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) were exposed to 4 Gy Fe-ion 2000 keV/μm. The Cr-39 is a special and sensitive plastic used to verify exact position of heavy-ions traversal. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is an enzyme labeled with [3 H ] d ATP for detection of cellular DNA damage by autoradiography assay. Results: The track of heavy ions traversals presented by pit size was almost similar for all different doses of radiation. No pits to show the track of traversal were found in 20% of the cell nuclei of the irradiation. Apparently these fractions of cells wave not hit by heavy ions. Conclusion: This study indicated the possible usefulness of both the Cr-39 plastics and DNA labeling with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase method for evaluating the biological effect of heavy-ions in comparison with low Linear Energy Transfer ionizing radiation

  10. A novel method for observation by unaided eyes of nitrogen ion tracks and angular distribution in a plasma focus device using 50 Hz–HV electrochemically-etched polycarbonate detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M.; Roshani, G.H.; Ramezani, V.

    2012-01-01

    A novel ion detection method has been developed and studied in this paper for the first time to detect and observe tracks of nitrogen ions and their angular distribution by unaided eyes in the Amirkabir 4 kJ plasma focus device (PFD). The method is based on electrochemical etching (ECE) of nitrogen ion tracks in 1 mm thick large area polycarbonate (PC) detectors. The ECE method employed a specially designed and constructed large area ECE chamber by applying a 50 Hz–high voltage (HV) generator under optimized ECE conditions. The nitrogen ion tracks and angular distribution were efficiently (constructed for this study) amplified to a point observable by the unaided eyes. The beam profile and angular distribution of nitrogen ion tracks in the central axes of the beam and two- and three-dimensional iso-ion track density distributions showing micro-beam spots were determined. The distribution of ion track density along the central axes versus angular position shows double humps around a dip at the 0° angular positions. The method introduced in this paper proved to be quite efficient for ion beam profile and characteristic studies in PFDs with potential for ion detection studies and other relevant dosimetry applications.

  11. Cellular structure formed by ion-implantation-induced point defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, N.; Taniwaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have found that a cellular defect structure is formed on the surface of Sn + ion implanted GaSb at a low temperature and proposed its formation mechanism based on the movement of the induced point defects. This research was carried out in order to examine the validity of the mechanism by clarifying the effect of the mobility of the point defects on the defect formation. The defect structure on the GaSb surfaces implanted at cryogenic temperature and room temperature was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. In the sample implanted at room temperature, the sponge-like structure (a pileup of voids) was formed and the cellular structure, as observed at a low temperature, did not develop. This behavior was explained by the high mobility of the vacancies during implantation at room temperature, and the proposed idea that the defect formation process is dominated by the induced point defects was confirmed

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Nanowire Assemblies by Ion-Track Template Electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Rauber, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The development of methods that allow the organization of nanostructures into integrated arrangements is crucial to realizing applications based on nanowires. Although various such methods exist, the direct synthesis of complex nanowire structures is one of the most suitable approaches for translating a large quantity of nanostructures into micro-/macroscale dimensions. In particular, three-dimensional (3-D) nanowire assemblies with a high integration level and adjustable connecti...

  13. Development of nano-structure controlled polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes by high-energy heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asano, Masaharu; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru; Kobayashi, Misaki; Nomura, Kumiko; Takagi, Shigeharu

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) together with recent worldwide energy demand and environmental issues. In order to develop proton-conductive membranes for PEFCs, we have been using high-energy heavy ion beams from the cyclotron accelerator of Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA. Our strategic focus is centered on using nano-scale controllability of the ion-beam processing; the membrane preparation involves (1) the irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with MeV ions, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into electronically-excited parts along the ion trajectory, called latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. Interestingly, the resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the thickness direction. According to microscopic observations, this is probably because the columnar electrolyte phase extended, with a width of tens-to-hundreds nanometers, through the membrane. Other excellent membrane properties, e.g., sufficient mechanical strength, high dimensional stability, and low gas permeability should be due to such a controlled structure. (author)

  14. Structure, morphology and melting hysteresis of ion-implanted nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, H.H.; Johnson, E.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of nanosized metal and semimetal inclusions produced by ion implantation in aluminium are reviewed. The inclusions are from 1 nm to 15 nm in size and contain from 80 to 100,000 atoms. Embedded crystallites, which are topotactically aligned with the surrounding matrix, may not be produced in this size range by any other method. The inclusions offer unique possibilities for study of the influence of interfaces on the crystal structure of the inclusions as well as on their melting and solidification behaviour. Studies are made with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron- and x-ray diffraction and in situ RBS- channeling measurements. Bi, Cd, In, Pb and Tl inclusions all show a substantial melting/solidification temperature hysteresis, which, in all cases except for Bi, is placed around the bulk melting temperature, while bismuth melts below that temperature. (au) 46 refs

  15. Dependence of wavelength of Xe ion-induced rippled structures on the fluence in the medium ion energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Institute of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ion-beam eroded self-organized nanostructures on semiconductors offer new ways for the fabrication of high density memory and optoelectronic devices. It is known that wavelength and amplitude of noble gas ion-induced rippled structures tune with the ion energy and the fluence depending on the energy range, ion type and substrate. The linear theory by Makeev predicts a linear dependence of the ion energy on the wavelength for low temperatures. For Ar{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} it was observed by different groups that the wavelength grows with increasing fluence after being constant up to an onset fluence and before saturation. In this coarsening regime power-law or exponential behavior of the wavelength with the fluence was monitored. So far, investigations for Xe ions on silicon surfaces mainly concentrated on energies below 1 keV. We found a linear dependence of both the ion energy and the fluence on the wavelength and amplitude of rippled structures over a wide range of the Xe{sup +} ion energy between 5 and 70 keV. Moreover, we estimated the ratio of wavelength to amplitude to be constant meaning a shape stability when a threshold fluence of 2.10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} was exceeded.

  16. Comparison of various structural damage tracking techniques with unknown excitations based on experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongwei; Yang, Jann N.; Zhou, Li

    2009-03-01

    An early detection of structural damages is critical for the decision making of repair and replacement maintenance in order to guarantee a specified structural reliability. Consequently, the structural damage detection, based on vibration data measured from the structural health monitoring (SHM) system, has received considerable attention recently. The traditional time-domain analysis techniques, such as the least square estimation (LSE) method and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach, require that all the external excitations (inputs) be available, which may not be the case for some SHM systems. Recently, these two approaches have been extended to cover the general case where some of the external excitations (inputs) are not measured, referred to as the LSE with unknown inputs (LSE-UI) and the EKF with unknown inputs (EKF-UI). Also, new analysis methods, referred to as the sequential non-linear least-square estimation with unknown inputs and unknown outputs (SNLSE-UI-UO) and the quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (QSSE-UI), have been proposed for the damage tracking of structures when some of the acceleration responses are not measured and the external excitations are not available. In this paper, these newly proposed analysis methods will be compared in terms of accuracy, convergence and efficiency, for damage identification of structures based on experimental data obtained through a series of experimental tests using a small-scale 3-story building model with white noise excitation. The capability of the LSE-UI, EKF-UI, SNLSE-UI-UO and QSSE-UI approaches in tracking the structural damages will be demonstrated.

  17. In Situ Tracking Kinetic Pathways of Li+/Na+ Substitution during Ion-Exchange Synthesis of LixNa1.5-xVOPO4F0.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Uk; Bai, Jianming; Wang, Liping; Yoon, Gabin; Zhang, Wei; Kim, Hyungsub; Lee, Seongsu; Kim, Sung-Wook; Looney, J Patrick; Kang, Kisuk; Wang, Feng

    2017-09-13

    Ion exchange is a ubiquitous phenomenon central to wide industrial applications, ranging from traditional (bio)chemical separation to the emerging chimie douce synthesis of materials with metastable structure for batteries and other energy applications. The exchange process is complex, involving substitution and transport of different ions under non-equilibrium conditions, and thus difficult to probe, leaving a gap in mechanistic understanding of kinetic exchange pathways toward final products. Herein, we report in situ tracking kinetic pathways of Li + /Na + substitution during solvothermal ion-exchange synthesis of Li x Na 1.5-x VOPO 4 F 0.5 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5), a promising multi-Li polyanionic cathode for batteries. The real-time observation, corroborated by first-principles calculations, reveals a selective replacement of Na + by Li + , leading to peculiar Na + /Li + /vacancy orderings in the intermediates. Contradicting the traditional belief of facile topotactic substitution via solid solution reaction, an abrupt two-phase transformation occurs and predominantly governs the kinetics of ion exchange and transport in the 1D polyanionic framework, consequently leading to significant difference of Li stoichiometry and electrochemical properties in the exchanged products. The findings may help to pave the way for rational design of ion exchange synthesis for making new materials.

  18. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  19. Modeling Radiation Effects of Ultrasoft X Rays on the Basis of Amorphous Track Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Tamara; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    There is experimental evidence that ultrasoft X rays (0.1-5 keV) show a higher biological effectiveness than high-energy photons. Similar to high-LET radiation, this is attributed to a rather localized dose distribution associated with a considerably smaller range of secondary electrons, which results in an increasing yield of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and potentially more complex lesions. We previously reported on the application of the Giant LOop Binary LEsion (GLOBLE) model to ultrasoft X rays, in which experimental values of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction were used to show that this increasing DSB yield was sufficient to explain the enhanced effectiveness in the cell inactivation potential of ultrasoft X rays. Complementary to GLOBLE, we report here on a modeling approach to predict the increased DSB yield of ultrasoft X rays on the basis of amorphous track structure formed by secondary electrons, which was derived from Monte Carlo track structure simulations. This procedure is associated with increased production of single-strand break (SSB) clusters, which are caused by the highly localized energy deposition pattern induced by low-energy photons. From this, the RBE of ultrasoft X rays can be determined and compared to experimental data, showing that the inhomogeneity of the energy deposition pattern represents the key variable to describe the increased biological effectiveness of ultrasoft X rays. Thus, this work demonstrates an extended applicability of the amorphous track structure concept and tests its limits with respect to its predictive power. The employed model mechanism offers a possible explanation for how the cellular response to ultrasoft X rays is directly linked to the energy deposition properties on the nanometric scale.

  20. Tracking the Reorganization of Module Structure in Time-Varying Weighted Brain Functional Connectivity Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Piper, Diana; Pester, Britta; Mierau, Andreas; Witte, Herbert

    2018-05-01

    Identification of module structure in brain functional networks is a promising way to obtain novel insights into neural information processing, as modules correspond to delineated brain regions in which interactions are strongly increased. Tracking of network modules in time-varying brain functional networks is not yet commonly considered in neuroscience despite its potential for gaining an understanding of the time evolution of functional interaction patterns and associated changing degrees of functional segregation and integration. We introduce a general computational framework for extracting consensus partitions from defined time windows in sequences of weighted directed edge-complete networks and show how the temporal reorganization of the module structure can be tracked and visualized. Part of the framework is a new approach for computing edge weight thresholds for individual networks based on multiobjective optimization of module structure quality criteria as well as an approach for matching modules across time steps. By testing our framework using synthetic network sequences and applying it to brain functional networks computed from electroencephalographic recordings of healthy subjects that were exposed to a major balance perturbation, we demonstrate the framework's potential for gaining meaningful insights into dynamic brain function in the form of evolving network modules. The precise chronology of the neural processing inferred with our framework and its interpretation helps to improve the currently incomplete understanding of the cortical contribution for the compensation of such balance perturbations.

  1. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Champion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS50. Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (~ 10eV what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland.O impacto mais significante do acidente de Chernobyl é o crescimento da incidência de câncer de tireóide em crianças que foram expostas a radioiodos de vida curta e ao Iodo-131. Na estimativa precisa da dose de radiação fornecida por esses radioiodos, é necessário conhecer onde o iodo está incorporado. Para obtermos esse resultado, a distribuição em nível celular de iodo recentemente organificado na tireóde de ratos imaturos foi realizada usando microscopia de massa iônica secundária (NanoSIMS50. Modelos dosimétricos atuais consideram apenas a energia média das partículas beta dos radioelementos e pode, imperfeitamente descrever a distribuição real de dose ao nível microscópico em torno dos pontos pesquisados. Nossa abordagem

  2. Tracking "apolar" NMe4+ ions within two polyoxothiomolybdates that have the same pores: smaller clathrate and larger highly porous clusters in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, Vladimir S; Boulay, Antoine G; Haouas, Mohamed; Bannani, Fatma; Fedin, Vladimir P; Sokolov, Maxim N; Terazzi, Emmanuel; Garai, Somenath; Müller, Achim; Taulelle, Francis; Marrot, Jérôme; Leclerc, Nathalie; Floquet, Sébastien; Cadot, Emmanuel

    2014-03-10

    Two nanosized polyoxothiometalates were synthesized based on linking oxomolybdate building blocks with {Mo2O2S2}(2+) groups. Remarkably, both compounds are formed selectively primarily upon changing the related concentrations in a logical way; they exhibit common structural features based on the same {Mo9O6S3}-type pores, which result in connections between {Mo6O21} pentagons and {Mo2O2S2}(2+) linkers. Whereas the much larger spherical Mo132-type Keplerate contains twenty pores, the smaller Mo63 -type cluster remarkably contains only two. The two compounds and a similar Keplerate exhibit interesting supramolecular properties related to interactions with the unusual predominantly apolar NMe4(+) cations. Structural characterization of the Mo63 -type compound reveals in the solid state a clathrate-like species that contains four NMe4(+) cations embedded in two types of structurally well-adapted pockets. Related NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution using NMe4(+) as the NMR spectroscopic probe are in agreement with the solid-state description. (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments (1D variable-temperature, 2D total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), exchange spectroscopy (EXSY), and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY)) feature firmly immobilized and mobile NMe4(+) ions in relationship with the type of host-guest arrangements. The use of the (1)H NMR DOSY spectroscopic methodology has been successfully applied to track the interactions of the NMe4(+) cations with the {Mo9O6S3} pores of a sulfurated Keplerate, thereby allowing the first quantitative analysis of this type of plugging process. The stability constant K=(210±20) mol(-1)  L is discussed related to the character of the process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Sheath structure in negative ion sources for fusion (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdams, R.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2012-01-01

    In fusion negative ion sources, the negative ions are formed on the caesiated plasma grid predominantly by hydrogen atoms from the plasma. The space charge of the negative ions leaving the wall is not fully compensated by incoming positive ions and at high enough emission a virtual cathode is formed. This virtual cathode limits the flux of negative ions transported across the sheath to the plasma. A 1D collisionless model of the sheath is presented taking into account the virtual cathode. The model will be applied to examples of the ion source operation. Extension of the model to the bulk plasma shows good agreement with experimental data. A possible role for fast ions is discussed.

  4. Ion-Scale Structure in Mercury's Magnetopause Reconnection Diffusion Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John C.; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Poh, Gangkai; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and time dependence of the electric field in a magnetopause diffusion region relate to the rate of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and a planetary magnetic field. Here we use approximately 150 milliseconds measurements of energetic electrons from the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed over Mercury's dayside polar cap boundary (PCB) to infer such small-scale changes in magnetic topology and reconnection rates. We provide the first direct measurement of open magnetic topology in flux transfer events at Mercury, structures thought to account for a significant portion of the open magnetic flux transport throughout the magnetosphere. In addition, variations in PCB latitude likely correspond to intermittent bursts of approximately 0.3 to 3 millivolts per meter reconnection electric fields separated by approximately 5 to10 seconds, resulting in average and peak normalized dayside reconnection rates of approximately 0.02 and approximately 0.2, respectively. These data demonstrate that structure in the magnetopause diffusion region at Mercury occurs at the smallest ion scales relevant to reconnection physics.

  5. Structural changes and tribological behaviors of nitrogen ion-implanted tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.J.; Wang, T.M.; Wang, X.J.

    1996-01-01

    Single-crystal tantalum sheets were implanted by 110 keV nitrogen ions to a dose of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at a temperature less than 100 C. The structural changes and the concentration depth profiles of the implanted layers were characterized by glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD), selected area diffraction (SAD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively. The microhardness, the friction coefficient and the wear rate of the specimens against hardened GCr15 steel balls were also determined before and after the implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) were used to analyze the wear tracks. The results showed that there exist deviations between the characterization results of AES and GXRD or SAD. The AES measurement suggests the formation of the tantalum nitrides with a maximum N/Ta ratio of 1/2, while the GXRD and SAD reveal the formation of bcc Ta(N), fcc TaN and a trace amount of hcp Ta 2 N. This can be explained by considering the inhomogeneous distribution of nitrogen atoms in micro-regions: the enrichment of nitrogen atoms in local micro-regions leads to the formation of fcc TaN; however, the unfavorable structural compatibility between bcc Ta and hcp Ta 2 N hinders the formation of hcp Ta 2 N in the regions where the N/Ta ratio reaches 1/2. The detected trace amount of the hcp Ta 2 N phase in the implanted layers can be considered as an after effect of nitrogen loss from the originally formed nitrides. The results also showed that the tribological properties of the Ta surfaces were improved due to the implantation. It is believed that the implantation-induced Ta(N), fcc TaN, and hcp Ta 2 N phases are responsible for this improvement. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of applied fields for ion mobility in traveling wave based structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Prabhakaran Nair Syamala Amma, Aneesh; Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-03-21

    Ion mobility (IM) is rapidly gaining attention for the analysis of biomolecules due to the ability to distinguish the shapes of ions. However, conventional constant electric field drift tube IM has limited resolving power, constrained by practical limitations on the path length and maximum applied voltage. The implementation of traveling waves (TW) in IM removes the latter limitation, allowing higher resolution to be achieved using extended path lengths. These can be readily obtainable in structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM), which are fabricated from electric fields that are generated by appropriate potentials applied to arrays of electrodes patterned on two parallel surfaces. In this work we have investigated the relationship between the various SLIM variables, such as electrode dimensions, inter-surface gap, and the TW applied voltages, that directly impact the fields experienced by ions. Ion simulation and theoretical calculations have been utilized to understand the dependence of SLIM geometry and effective electric field. The variables explored impact both ion confinement and the observed IM resolution in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) modules.

  7. MCTBI: a web server for predicting metal ion effects in RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Zhen; Zhang, Jing-Xiang; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2017-08-01

    Metal ions play critical roles in RNA structure and function. However, web servers and software packages for predicting ion effects in RNA structures are notably scarce. Furthermore, the existing web servers and software packages mainly neglect ion correlation and fluctuation effects, which are potentially important for RNAs. We here report a new web server, the MCTBI server (http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/MCTBI), for the prediction of ion effects for RNA structures. This server is based on the recently developed MCTBI, a model that can account for ion correlation and fluctuation effects for nucleic acid structures and can provide improved predictions for the effects of metal ions, especially for multivalent ions such as Mg 2+ effects, as shown by extensive theory-experiment test results. The MCTBI web server predicts metal ion binding fractions, the most probable bound ion distribution, the electrostatic free energy of the system, and the free energy components. The results provide mechanistic insights into the role of metal ions in RNA structure formation and folding stability, which is important for understanding RNA functions and the rational design of RNA structures. © 2017 Sun et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Experimental investigation of the suitability of the track structure theory in describing the relative effectiveness of high-let irradiation of physical radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.W.

    1984-11-01

    The radiation effectiveness of heavy charged particles relative to radiations of fast electrons, x-rays, and gamma rays has been studied experimentally as well as theoretically for detectors of a thin nylon-based radiation-sensitive film and for the amino acid alanine. Experimental data have been compared with calculated data derived from a theoretical model describing the track structure of heavy charged particles. The experimental work comprises dose-response characteristics from 60 Co γ-rays, 4- and 16-MV x-rays, 6-,10-, and 20-MeV electrons, and 3-, 6-, and 16-MeV protons, 10- and 20-MeV α-particles, 21-MeV 7 Li ions, 42-MeV 14 N ions, 64-MeV 16 O ions, and 80-MeV 32 S ions. The theoretical work presented here concerns an investigation and modification of parameters involved in the calculations, based on results obtained through the present experiments and published results from other investigators. This report summarizes results already published or accepted for publication, attaches an appendix, and includes results not previously presented. (author)

  9. Ion irradiation effects in structural and magnetic properties of Co/Cu multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Isao; Okazaki, Satoshi; Koike, Masaki; Honda, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    400 keV Ar ion (the Ar ion) and 50 keV He ion (the He ion) irradiations were performed in order to elucidate roles of Co/Cu interfacial structures in physical origins of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in the [Co (2 nm)/Cu (2 nm)] 30 multilayers (MLs). The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio after the Ar ion irradiation decreases abruptly with increasing Ar ion fluence. On the other hand, the MR ratio after the He ion irradiation decreases slowly with increasing He ion fluence. The Ar ion irradiation induces the decrease in the difference (R max − R sat ) between the maximum resistance (R max ) and the saturated resistance (R sat ) under in-plane magnetic field and the increase in the R sat , although the effect of the He ion irradiation is not remarkable. The decrease in the (R max − R sat ) rather than the increase in the R sat seems to be effective for the decrease in the MR ratios after the Ar ion and the He ion irradiation. The increase in the R sat implies the mixing of Co atoms in Cu layers. The antiferromagnetic coupling fraction (AFF) estimated from the magnetization curves after the Ar ion and the He ion irradiation shows the similar behavior with the MR ratio as a function of ion fluence. Therefore, although the degrees of the irradiation effects by the Ar ion and the He ions are different, we suggest the relation between the GMR and the AFF affected by the ion-induced interfacial structures accompanied with the atomic mixing in the interfacial region.

  10. Statistical tracking of tree-like tubular structures with efficient branching detection in 3D medical image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X; Heimann, T; Meinzer, H P; Wegner, I; Lo, P; Sumkauskaite, M; Puderbach, M; De Bruijne, M

    2012-01-01

    The segmentation of tree-like tubular structures such as coronary arteries and airways is an essential step for many 3D medical imaging applications. Statistical tracking techniques for the extraction of elongated structures have received considerable attention in recent years due to their robustness against image noise and pathological changes. However, most tracking methods are limited to a specific application and do not support branching structures efficiently. In this work, we present a novel statistical tracking approach for the extraction of different types of tubular structures with ringlike cross-sections. Domain-specific knowledge is learned from training data sets and integrated into the tracking process by simple adaption of parameters. In addition, an efficient branching detection algorithm is presented. This approach was evaluated by extracting coronary arteries from 32 CTA data sets and distal airways from 20 CT scans. These data sets were provided by the organizers of the workshop ‘3D Segmentation in the Clinic: A Grand Challenge II-Coronary Artery Tracking (CAT08)’ and ‘Extraction of Airways from CT 2009 (EXACT’09)’. On average, 81.5% overlap and 0.51 mm accuracy for the tracking of coronary arteries were achieved. For the extraction of airway trees, 51.3% of the total tree length, 53.6% of the total number of branches and a 4.98% false positive rate were attained. In both experiments, our approach is comparable to state-of-the-art methods. (paper)

  11. Statistical tracking of tree-like tubular structures with efficient branching detection in 3D medical image data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.; Heimann, T.; Lo, P.

    2012-01-01

    to their robustness against image noise and pathological changes. However, most tracking methods are limited to a specific application and do not support branching structures efficiently. In this work, we present a novel statistical tracking approach for the extraction of different types of tubular structures...... with ringlike cross-sections. Domain-specific knowledge is learned from training data sets and integrated into the tracking process by simple adaption of parameters. In addition, an efficient branching detection algorithm is presented. This approach was evaluated by extracting coronary arteries from 32 CTA data...... for the tracking of coronary arteries were achieved. For the extraction of airway trees, 51.3% of the total tree length, 53.6% of the total number of branches and a 4.98% false positive rate were attained. In both experiments, our approach is comparable to state-of-the-art methods....

  12. Calculation technique of free and impurity ion electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.A.; Sviridov, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    The monograph deals with calculation technique of free and impurity ion spectra with completed nl N -shell. The principles of the theory of irreducible tensor operators, genealogical coefficients, calculation technique of angular and radial parts of matrix elements operators are stated. The correlation accounting methods in free ions are considered in detail. The principles of the theory of crystal field and ligand field, the method of self-consistent field for impurity ions are reported. The technique efficiency based on example of lanthanum and actinium group ions is shown. Experimental data by nf N -ion spectra are given. The tables of angular coefficients, energy values of X-ray lines of rare earth ions and genealogical coefficients are given in the appendix

  13. Biological Membrane Ion Channels Dynamics, Structure, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Shin-Ho; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels are biological nanotubes that are formed by membrane proteins. Because ion channels regulate all electrical activities in living cells, understanding their mechanisms at a molecular level is a fundamental problem in biology. This book deals with recent breakthroughs in ion-channel research that have been brought about by the combined effort of experimental biophysicists and computational physicists, who together are beginning to unravel the story of these exquisitely designed biomolecules. With chapters by leading experts, the book is aimed at researchers in nanodevices and biosensors, as well as advanced undergraduate and graduate students in biology and the physical sciences. Key Features Presents the latest information on the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation through membrane ion channels Uses schematic diagrams to illustrate important concepts in biophysics Written by leading researchers in the area of ion channel investigations

  14. Spatial structure of ion-scale plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNarita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial structure of small-scale plasma turbulence is studied under different conditions of plasma parameter beta directly in the three-dimensional wave vector domain. Two independent approaches are taken: observations of turbulent magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind measured by four Cluster spacecraft, and direct numerical simulations of plasma turbulence using the hybrid code AIKEF, both resolving turbulence on the ion kinetic scales. The two methods provide independently evidence of wave vector anisotropy as a function of beta. Wave vector anisotropy is characterized primarily by an extension of the energy spectrum in the direction perpendicular to the large-scale magnetic field. The spectrum is strongly anisotropic at lower values of beta, and is more isotropic at higher values of beta. Cluster magnetic field data analysis also provides evidence of axial asymmetry of the spectrum in the directions around the large-scale field. Anisotropy is interpreted as filament formation as plasma evolves into turbulence. Axial asymmetry is interpreted as the effect of radial expansion of the solar wind from the corona.

  15. Structure of very heavy few-electron ions - new results from the heavy ion storage ring, ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.; Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Moshammer, R.; Rymuza, P.; Bosch, F.; Kandler, T.

    1993-08-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron/storage ring facility at GSI, SIS/ESR, provides intense beams of cooled, highly-charged ions up to naked uranium (U 92+ ). By electron capture during ion-atom collisions in the gas target of the ESR or by recombination at ion-electron encounters in the ''electron cooler'' excited states are populated. The detailed structure of very heavy one-, two- and three-electron ions is studied. The different mechanisms leading to the excited states are described, as well as the new experimental tools now available for a detailed spectroscopy of these interesting systems. Special emphasis is given to X-ray transitions to the groundstates in H- and He-like systems. For the heaviest species the groundstate Lambshift can now be probed on an accuracy level of better than 10% using solid-state X-ray detectors. Applying dispersive X-ray analyzing techniques, this accuracy will certainly be improved in future. However, utilizing the dielectronic resonances for a spectroscopy, the structure in Li-like heavy ions can already be probed now on the sub eV level. (orig.)

  16. Fishing for radiation quality: chromosome aberrations and the role of radiation track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The yield of chromosome aberrations is not only dependent on dose but also on radiation quality, with high linear energy transfer (LET) typically having a greater biological effectiveness per unit dose than those of low-LET radiation. Differences in radiation track structure and cell morphology can also lead to quantitative differences in the spectra of the resulting chromosomal rearrangements, especially at low doses associated with typical human exposures. The development of combinatorial fluorescent labelling techniques (such as mFISH and mBAND) has helped to reveal the complexity of rearrangements, showing increasing complexity of observed rearrangements with increasing LET but has a resolution limited to ∼10 MBp. High-LET particles have not only been shown to produce clustered sites of DNA damage but also produce multiple correlated breaks along its path resulting in DNA fragments smaller than the resolution of these techniques. Additionally, studies have shown that the vast majority of radiation-induced HPRT mutations were also not detectable using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) techniques, with correlation of breaks along the track being reflected in the complexity of mutations, with intra- and inter-chromosomal insertions, and inversions occurring at the sites of some of the deletions. Therefore, the analysis of visible chromosomal rearrangements observed using current FISH techniques is likely to represent just the tip of the iceberg, considerably underestimating the extent and complexity of radiation induced rearrangements. (author)

  17. Spatial and Temporal Extent of Ion Spectral Structures at the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Reeves, G. D.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    Several ion spectral structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift and loss in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. Their study helps us understand ion access and losses in this region. Several studies have found that these structures vary with geomagnetic activity, local time, and ion species, but their spatial and temporal extent remain undetermined. We use data from the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometers onboard the Van Allen Probes to analyze the spectral structures in the energy range of 1- 50 keV. HOPE measurements on both Van Allen Probes spacecraft enable us to resolve the extent of these ion structures in space and time. As the structures respond to changes in the convection electric field on a variety of time scales, the lapping of the two spacecraft on time scales of minutes to hours helps determine their spatial and temporal evolution.

  18. Nuclear structure studies with low-energy light ions: fundamental and applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, I.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in low and medium energy nuclear physics have been dominated by heavy-ion induced reactions for last five decades. Heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions have enriched our knowledge of the structural evolutions and intricacies of reaction dynamics of the nuclear many-body systems. However, the emergence and rise of heavy-ion physics have seen a general decline in studies with low- and medium-energy light-ion beams. The harsh reality of dwindling number of low-energy light ion facilities adversely affect research in nuclear physics. Very low-energy and high current light-ion facilities immediately conjures up in our minds the studies in nuclear astrophysics. Measurements of light-ion capture cross sections and astrophysical S factors are the major themes of research at most of the light-ion facilities. However, the importance low energy light-ion beams is multifarious. A variety of measurements providing vital support and inputs to heavy-ion research can only be carried out at the low-energy, light-ion facilities. Light-ion beams are also useful for generation of mono-energetic neutron beams. In this talk I will draw from some of our recent measurements to show the importance of light-ion beams in nuclear astrophysics and also in applied nuclear physics. (author)

  19. FINE-SCALE STRUCTURES OF FLUX ROPES TRACKED BY ERUPTING MATERIAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-06-20

    We present Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of two flux ropes tracked out by material from a surge and a failed filament eruption on 2012 July 29 and August 4, respectively. For the first event, the interaction between the erupting surge and a loop-shaped filament in the east seems to 'peel off' the filament and add bright mass into the flux rope body. The second event is associated with a C-class flare that occurs several minutes before the filament activation. The two flux ropes are, respectively, composed of 85 {+-} 12 and 102 {+-} 15 fine-scale structures, with an average width of about 1.''6. Our observations show that two extreme ends of the flux rope are rooted in opposite polarity fields and each end is composed of multiple footpoints (FPs) of fine-scale structures. The FPs of the fine-scale structures are located at network magnetic fields, with magnetic fluxes from 5.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} Mx to 8.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx. Moreover, almost half of the FPs show converging motion of smaller magnetic structures over 10 hr before the appearance of the flux rope. By calculating the magnetic fields of the FPs, we deduce that the two flux ropes occupy at least 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx and 7.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx magnetic fluxes, respectively.

  20. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  1. Auroral ion acceleration from lower hybrid solitary structures: A summary of sounding rocket observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. A.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Schuck, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Coffey, V.

    In this paper we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen in nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) in lower hybrid solitary structures (LHSS). The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90° pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a few hundred meters across B. The acceleration process does not affect the thermal core of the ambient distribution and does not directly create a measurable effect on the ambient ion population outside the LHSS themselves. This precludes observation with these data of any nonlinear feedback between the ion acceleration and the existence or evolution of the density irregularities on which these LHSS events grow. Within the LHSS region the acceleration process creates a high-energy tail beginning at a few times the thermal ion speed. The ion acceleration events are closely associated with localized wave events. Accelerated ions bursts are also seen without a concurrent observation of a localized wave event, for two possible reasons. In some cases, the pitch angles of the accelerated tail ions are elevated above perpendicular; that is, the acceleration occurred below the observer and the mirror force has begun to act upon the distribution, moving it upward from the source. In other cases, the accelerated ion structure is spatially larger than the wave event structure, and the observation catches only the ion event. The occurrence rate of these ion acceleration events is related to the ambient environment in two ways: its altitude dependence can be modeled with the parameter B2/ne, and it is highest in regions of intense VLF activity. The cumulative ion outflow from these LHSS TAI is

  2. Nanocomposites with embedded structures for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zichao

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been widely employed in portable electronics and are rapidly expanding into emerging markets such as hybrid and electric vehicles and potentially electric grid storage. These new opportunities create new challenges for LIBs and further improvement of specific energy, cycling performance and rate capability are required. A major strategy in performance enhancement for the electrode materials involves the creation of carbon composites to provide mechanical buffering of active material and to improve electrical conductivity. In the current work, a platform is developed for creating functional hybrid materials by copolymerization of organic molecules and inorganic compounds followed by thermal pyrolysis, and the approach yields nanostructured composites in which nanoparticles are uniformly embedded in a porous, partially graphitic carbon matrix. Depending upon the chemistry of the starting materials, nanocomposites with embedded structures created using the approach are attractive as anode or cathode materials for next-generation rechargeable lithium battery systems. The platform is very versatile and through ex situ conversion or utilization of multiple precursors, can be applied to various classes of materials including metal oxides (single or mixed), metals, metal sulfides, alloys, metalloids, phosphates, etc. The approach also lends itself to the development of scalable processes for production of nanostructured battery materials. Mechanistic analysis was performed and reveals that the performance enhancement of the embedded nanocomposite configuration is mainly brought about by the mechanical buffering effect offered by the carbon matrix. The active material loading was shown to be an important factor in the design of the composites as electrode materials. In addition to the polymerization-based approach, other in situ methods such as one based on spray pyrolysis are also explored and demonstrate the versatility of the in situ

  3. Structure modulates similarity-based interference in sluicing: An eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Harris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines, as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don’t know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity of retrieval cues.

  4. Vibronic-structure tracking: A shortcut for vibrationally resolved UV/Vis-spectra calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Dennis; König, Carolin; Neugebauer, Johannes, E-mail: j.neugebauer@uni-muenster.de [Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut and Center for Multiscale Theory and Computation, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 40, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-10-28

    The vibrational coarse structure and the band shapes of electronic absorption spectra are often dominated by just a few molecular vibrations. By contrast, the simulation of the vibronic structure even in the simplest theoretical models usually requires the calculation of the entire set of normal modes of vibration. Here, we exploit the idea of the mode-tracking protocol [M. Reiher and J. Neugebauer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1634 (2003)] in order to directly target and selectively calculate those normal modes which have the largest effect on the vibronic band shape for a certain electronic excitation. This is achieved by defining a criterion for the importance of a normal mode to the vibrational progressions in the absorption band within the so-called “independent mode, displaced harmonic oscillator” (IMDHO) model. We use this approach for a vibronic-structure investigation for several small test molecules as well as for a comparison of the vibronic absorption spectra of a truncated chlorophyll a model and the full chlorophyll a molecule. We show that the method allows to go beyond the often-used strategy to simulate absorption spectra based on broadened vertical excitation peaks with just a minimum of computational effort, which in case of chlorophyll a corresponds to about 10% of the cost for a full simulation within the IMDHO approach.

  5. Gamma irradiation effects on the thermal, optical and structural properties of Cr-39 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Said, A.F.; Atta, M.R.; EL-Mellegy, W.M.; EL-Meniawi, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 KGy. Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermo-gravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to obtain the activation energy of decomposition and the transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. The variation of onset temperature of decomposition (To) thermal activation energy of decomposition (Ea) melting temperature (Tm) refractive index (n) and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase with the gamma dose were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation and cross linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose gave an advantage for increasing the correlation between the thermal stability of CR-39 polymer and the bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation

  6. Opto-structural characterization of gamma irradiated Bayfol polymer track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayel, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Zaki, M.F., E-mail: moha1016@yahoo.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Abu Zaabal, Cairo (Egypt); El Basaty, A.B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Hegazy, Tarek M. [Physics Department, College of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-11-15

    Bayfol CR 1-4 is one of polymeric solid state nuclear track detector which has numerous applications due to its outstanding optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In the present study, Bayfol polymer is irradiated with different doses of gamma rays ranging from 0 to 1000 KGy. The effects of gamma irradiations on the optical, structural and chemical properties of Bayfol were studied using Ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The UV–Vis spectra of irradiated samples show that the absorption edge is shifted towards longer wavelength comparing to pristine sample spectrum. This behavior indicates that there is a decrease in the band gap after irradiation. The maximum decrease in the band gap is about 0.8 eV. The XRD patterns of amorphous halo of pristine and irradiated samples show a fluctuation of integrated intensity of amorphous halo. This indicates a change in the structure due to gamma irradiation. In order to understand that structure change mechanism, we used the FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. Development of porous structures in GaSb by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, C.C.; Steinbach, T.; Wesch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Ion irradiation of GaSb causes not only defect formation but also leads to the formation of a porous structure. To study the behaviour of this structural modification, GaSb was irradiated with 6 MeV Iodine ions and ion fluences from 5 × 10 12 to 6 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . The samples were investigated by step height measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experiments were performed with two different procedures: (CI) Continuous Irradiation of samples followed by measurements of the step height in air and (SI) Stepwise Irradiation of samples with measurements of the step height in air between subsequent irradiations. Samples irradiated continuously, show a linear increase of the step height with increasing ion fluence up to 1.5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 followed by a steeper, linear increase for higher ion fluences up to a step height of 32 μm. This swelling is induced by a formation of voids, and the two different slopes can be explained by a transformation from isolated voids to a rod like structure. For samples irradiated accordingly to procedure (SI), the step height shows the same behaviour up to an ion fluence of 1.5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 resulting in a step height of ≈3 μm but then decreases with further irradiation. The latter effect is caused by a compaction of the porous structure.

  8. Effect of ion irradiation on the surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Ali, Nisar; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Yousaf, Daniel; Faizan-ul-Haq; Naeem, Athar; Ahmad, Riaz; Khlaeeq-ur-Rahman, M.

    2014-04-01

    Modifications to the surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass after ion irradiation have been investigated. Brass targets were bombarded by carbon ions of 2 MeV energy from a Pelletron linear accelerator for various fluences ranging from 56 × 1012 to 26 × 1013 ions/cm2. A scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer were utilized to analyze the surface morphology and crystallographic structure respectively. To explore the mechanical properties e.g., yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of irradiated brass, an universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester were used. Scanning electron microscopy results revealed an irregular and randomly distributed sputter morphology for a lower ion fluence. With increasing ion fluence, the incoherently shaped structures were transformed into dendritic structures. Nano/micro sized craters and voids, along with the appearance of pits, were observed at the maximum ion fluence. From X-ray diffraction results, no new phases were observed to be formed in the brass upon irradiation. However, a change in the peak intensity and higher and lower angle shifting were observed, which represents the generation of ion-induced defects and stresses. Analyses confirmed modifications in the mechanical properties of irradiated brass. The yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and hardness initially decreased and then increased with increasing ion fluence. The changes in the mechanical properties of irradiated brass are well correlated with surface and crystallographic modifications and are attributed to the generation, augmentation, recombination and annihilation of the ion-induced defects.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of ion-implanted superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, H.; Nedellec, P.

    1980-01-01

    Recent work on ion implanted superconductors is reviewed. In situ x-ray, channeling, resistivity, and electron tunneling experiments now approach the relation between lattice order (or disorder) and superconductivity

  10. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran ... check the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. ... tional changes of modified surfaces as a function of ion dose.

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modification of structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Physics, Salipur College, Salipur 754 103, India. 2Department of ... Ion irradiation; nanoparticles; atomic force microscopy; BiFeO3. 1. Introduction .... and to understand their possible origin, a study on power spectral density ...

  12. Optimization of the electrostatic structure of the ion microprobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Ignat'ev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization data obtained for an immersion probe-forming system of the ion microprobe to be used in 3 MeV H+ ion accelerator generating 0,4 μm beam spot for normalized acceptance of 7 μm2 · mrad2 · MeV. To achieve higher microprobe resolution it is intended to place an electrostatic lens between the collimators and the accelerating tube.

  13. DYNAMICS OF HIGH ENERGY IONS AT A STRUCTURED COLLISIONLESS SHOCK FRONT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedalin, M. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y., E-mail: gedalin@bgu.ac.il [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-10

    Ions undergoing first-order Fermi acceleration at a shock are scattered in the upstream and downstream regions by magnetic inhomogeneities. For high energy ions this scattering is efficient at spatial scales substantially larger than the gyroradius of the ions. The transition from one diffusive region to the other occurs via crossing the shock, and the ion dynamics during this crossing is mainly affected by the global magnetic field change between the upstream and downstream region. We study the effects of the fine structure of the shock front, such as the foot-ramp-overshoot profile and the phase-standing upstream and downstream magnetic oscillations. We also consider time dependent features, including reformation and large amplitude coherent waves. We show that the influence of the spatial and temporal structure of the shock front on the dependence of the transition and reflection on the pitch angle of the ions is already weak at ion speeds five times the speed of the upstream flow.

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morshed, Nader [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A method to automatically identify possible elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly improved sensitivity over manually encoded heuristics. In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  15. The structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Or; Steiner, Ariel; Szekely, Pablo; Amit, Einav; Asor, Roi; Tamburu, Carmen; Raviv, Uri

    2011-06-21

    In pure water, zwitterionic lipids form lamellar phases with an equilibrium water gap on the order of 2 to 3 nm as a result of the dominating van der Waals attraction between dipolar bilayers. Monovalent ions can swell those neutral lamellae by a small amount. Divalent ions can adsorb onto dipolar membranes and charge them. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied how the structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes. We found that unlike monovalent ions that weakly interact with all of the examined dipolar membranes, divalent and trivalent ions adsorb onto membranes containing lipids with saturated tails, with an association constant on the order of ∼10 M(-1). One double bond in the lipid tail is sufficient to prevent divalent ion adsorption. We suggest that this behavior is due to the relatively loose packing of lipids with unsaturated tails that increases the area per lipid headgroup, enabling their free rotation. Divalent ion adsorption links two lipids and limits their free rotation. The ion-dipole interaction gained by the adsorption of the ions onto unsaturated membranes is insufficient to compensate for the loss of headgroup free-rotational entropy. The ion-dipole interaction is stronger for cations with a higher valence. Nevertheless, polyamines behave as monovalent ions near dipolar interfaces in the sense that they interact weakly with the membrane surface, whereas in the bulk their behavior is similar to that of multivalent cations. Advanced data analysis and comparison with theory provide insight into the structure and interactions between ion-induced regulated charged interfaces. This study models biologically relevant interactions between cell membranes and various ions and the manner in which the lipid structure governs those interactions. The ability to monitor these interactions creates a tool for probing systems that are more complex and forms the basis for controlling the interactions between dipolar

  16. Photonic guiding structures in lithium niobate crystals produced by energetic ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng

    2009-10-01

    A range of ion beam techniques have been used to fabricate a variety of photonic guiding structures in the well-known lithium niobate (LiNbO3 or LN) crystals that are of great importance in integrated photonics/optics. This paper reviews the up-to-date research progress of ion-beam-processed LiNbO3 photonic structures and reports on their fabrication, characterization, and applications. Ion beams are being used with this material in a wide range of techniques, as exemplified by the following examples. Ion beam milling/etching can remove the selected surface regions of LiNbO3 crystals via the sputtering effects. Ion implantation and swift ion irradiation can form optical waveguide structures by modifying the surface refractive indices of the LiNbO3 wafers. Crystal ion slicing has been used to obtain bulk-quality LiNbO3 single-crystalline thin films or membranes by exfoliating the implanted layer from the original substrate. Focused ion beams can either generate small structures of micron or submicron dimensions, to realize photonic bandgap crystals in LiNbO3, or directly write surface waveguides or other guiding devices in the crystal. Ion beam-enhanced etching has been extensively applied for micro- or nanostructuring of LiNbO3 surfaces. Methods developed to fabricate a range of photonic guiding structures in LiNbO3 are introduced. Modifications of LiNbO3 through the use of various energetic ion beams, including changes in refractive index and properties related to the photonic guiding structures as well as to the materials (i.e., electro-optic, nonlinear optic, luminescent, and photorefractive features), are overviewed in detail. The application of these LiNbO3 photonic guiding structures in both micro- and nanophotonics are briefly summarized.

  17. Small scale structure of magnetospheric electron density through on-line tracking of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higel, B.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma resonance phenomena observed at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) by the GEOS-1 S-301 relaxation sounder are identified through a pattern recognition software process implemented in a mini-computer which receives on-line the compressed data. First, this processing system distributes in real time fsub(pe) and fsub(ce) measurements to the ground media. Second, it drives and controls automatically the S-301 on-board experiment by sending appropriate telecommands: the tracking of resonances is performed by shortening the frequency sweeps to a narrow range centered on the resonance location. Examples of such tracking sequences are presented, exhibiting sampling rates of the electron density measurements from once every 22s (slowest rate) to once every 86 ms (highest rate available). The results give evidence of the existence of very small scale structures in the magnetospheric density, having characteristic sizes of the order of a few 10 2 m or/and a few 10 -1 s. The relative amplitude of these density fluctuations is typically 1%. Because of satellite spinning, fixed frequency sounding sequences allow to measure in a few seconds the directivity features of the plasma resonance signals. Examples of directional patterns in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are presented: the electrostatic nature of the waves received at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) being consistent with these patterns, the corresponding k vector orientations become available. The Bernstein modes properties are used to interpret the nfsub(ce) and fsub(qn) results. (Auth.)

  18. Effect of ion irradiation on the surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk; Ali, Nisar; Umm-i-Kalsoom,; Yousaf, Daniel; Faizan-ul-Haq,; Naeem, Athar; Ahmad, Riaz; Khlaeeq-ur-Rahman, M.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Brass targets were exposed to carbon ions of energy 2 MeV. • The effect of ion dose has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • XRD analysis is performed to reveal structural modification. • Mechanical properties were investigated by tensile testing and microhardness testing. - Abstract: Modifications to the surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass after ion irradiation have been investigated. Brass targets were bombarded by carbon ions of 2 MeV energy from a Pelletron linear accelerator for various fluences ranging from 56 × 10{sup 12} to 26 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. A scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer were utilized to analyze the surface morphology and crystallographic structure respectively. To explore the mechanical properties e.g., yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of irradiated brass, an universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester were used. Scanning electron microscopy results revealed an irregular and randomly distributed sputter morphology for a lower ion fluence. With increasing ion fluence, the incoherently shaped structures were transformed into dendritic structures. Nano/micro sized craters and voids, along with the appearance of pits, were observed at the maximum ion fluence. From X-ray diffraction results, no new phases were observed to be formed in the brass upon irradiation. However, a change in the peak intensity and higher and lower angle shifting were observed, which represents the generation of ion-induced defects and stresses. Analyses confirmed modifications in the mechanical properties of irradiated brass. The yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and hardness initially decreased and then increased with increasing ion fluence. The changes in the mechanical properties of irradiated brass are well correlated with surface and crystallographic modifications and are attributed to the generation

  19. Irradiation effects on secondary structure of protein induced by keV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, F.Z.; Lin, Y.B.; Zhang, D.M.; Tian, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Protein secondary structure changes by low-energy ion irradiation are reported for the first time. The selected system is 30 keV N + irradiation on bovine serum albumin (BSA). After irradiation at increasing fluences from 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 16 ion/cm 2 , Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis was conducted. It was found that the secondary structures of BSA molecules were very sensitive to ion irradiation. Secondary conformations showed different trends of change during irradiation. With the increase of ion fluence from 0 to 2.5x10 16 ion/cm 2 , the fraction of α-helix and β-turns decreased from 17 to 12%, and from 40 to 31%, respectively, while that of random coil and β-sheet structure increased from 18 to 27%, and from 25 to 30%, respectively. Possible explanations for the secondary conformational changes of protein are proposed. (author)

  20. Structural investigations of amorphised iron and nickel by high-fluence metalloid ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Otto, G.; Hohmuth, K.; Heera, V.

    1987-01-01

    Boron, phosphorus and arsenic ions have been implanted into evaporated iron and nickel thin films at room temperature, and the implantation-induced microstructure has been investigated by high-voltage electron microscopy and transmission high energy electron diffraction. The metal films were implanted with ions to a constant dose of 1 x 10 17 and 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 respectively at energy of 50 keV. An amorphous layer was produced by boron and phosphorus ion implantation. Information on the atomic structure of the amorphous layers was obtained from the elastically diffracted electron intensity. On the basis of the correct scattering curves, the total interference function and the pair correlation function were determined. Finally, the atomic arrangement of the implantation-induced amorphous layers is discussed and structure produced by ion irradiation is compared with amorphous structures formed with other techniques. (author)

  1. Conduction Mechanisms and Structure of Ionomeric Single-Ion Conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Ralph H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Maranas, Janna K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Mueller, Karl T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Runt, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Winey, Karen I. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Our team has designed using DFT (Gaussian) and synthesized low glass transition temperature single-ion conductors that are either polyanions that conduct small cations Li+, Na+, Cs+ or polycations that conduct small anions F-, OH-, Br-. We utilize a wide range of complimentary experimental materials characterization tools to understand ion transport; differential scanning calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, linear viscoelasticity, X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The glass transition temperature Tg needs to be as low as possible to facilitate ion transport, so the nonionic parts of the polymer need to be polar, flexible and have strong solvation interactions with the ions. The lowest Tg we have managed for polyanions conducting Li+ is -60 °C. In contrast, polysiloxanes with PEO side chains and tetrabutylphosphonium cationic side groups have Tg ≈ -75 °C that barely increases with ion content, as anticipated by DFT. A survey of all polyanions in the literature suggests that Tg < -80 °C is needed to achieve the 10-4 S/cm conductivity needed for battery separators.

  2. TURBULENT DYNAMICS IN SOLAR FLARE SHEET STRUCTURES MEASURED WITH LOCAL CORRELATION TRACKING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D. E., E-mail: mckenzie@physics.montana.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    High-resolution observations of the Sun's corona in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays have revealed a new world of complexity in the sheet-like structures connecting coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the post-eruption flare arcades. This article presents initial findings from an exploration of dynamic flows in two flares observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA. The flows are observed in the hot ({approx}> 10 MK) plasma above the post-eruption arcades and measured with local correlation tracking. The observations demonstrate significant shears in velocity, giving the appearance of vortices and stagnations. Plasma diagnostics indicate that the plasma {beta} exceeds unity in at least one of the studied events, suggesting that the coronal magnetic fields may be significantly affected by the turbulent flows. Although reconnection models of eruptive flares tend to predict a macroscopic current sheet in the region between the CME and the flare arcade, it is not yet clear whether the observed sheet-like structures are identifiable as the current sheets or 'thermal halos' surrounding the current sheets. Regardless, the relationship between the turbulent motions and the embedded magnetic field is likely to be complicated, involving dynamic fluid processes that produce small length scales in the current sheet. Such processes may be crucial for triggering, accelerating, and/or prolonging reconnection in the corona.

  3. Positron follow-up in liquid water: I. A new Monte Carlo track-structure code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Le Loirec, C

    2006-04-07

    When biological matter is irradiated by charged particles, a wide variety of interactions occur, which lead to a deep modification of the cellular environment. To understand the fine structure of the microscopic distribution of energy deposits, Monte Carlo event-by-event simulations are particularly suitable. However, the development of these track-structure codes needs accurate interaction cross sections for all the electronic processes: ionization, excitation, positronium formation and even elastic scattering. Under these conditions, we have recently developed a Monte Carlo code for positrons in water, the latter being commonly used to simulate the biological medium. All the processes are studied in detail via theoretical differential and total cross-section calculations performed by using partial wave methods. Comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental data in terms of stopping powers, mean energy transfers and ranges show very good agreements. Moreover, thanks to the theoretical description of positronium formation, we have access, for the first time, to the complete kinematics of the electron capture process. Then, the present Monte Carlo code is able to describe the detailed positronium history, which will provide useful information for medical imaging (like positron emission tomography) where improvements are needed to define with the best accuracy the tumoural volumes.

  4. Advanced ion trap structures with integrated tools for qubit manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Clark, C. R.; Haltli, R.; Highstrete, C.; Nordquist, C. D.; Scott, S.; Stevens, J. E.; Tabakov, B. P.; Tigges, C. P.; Moehring, D. L.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    We survey the ion trap fabrication technologies available at Sandia National Laboratories. These include four metal layers, precision backside etching, and low profile wirebonds. We demonstrate loading of ions in a variety of ion traps that utilize these technologies. Additionally, we present progress towards integration of on-board filtering with trench capacitors, photon collection via an optical cavity, and integrated microwave electrodes for localized hyperfine qubit control and magnetic field gradient quantum gates. [4pt] This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Semi-empirical calculations on the structure of the uronium ion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, Sybolt

    1972-01-01

    Semi-empirical calculations (CNDO/2) on the structure of the uronium ion are presented. Assuming a planar ion with fixed bond lengths, the bond angles involving the heavy atoms can be calculated with fair accuracy. Changes in bond length and angles, which occur upon protonation of the urea molecule,

  6. Ion Mobility Separations of Isomers based upon Long Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Aly, Noor A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Hamid, Ahmed M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zhang, Xing [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Garimella, Sandilya V. B. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Webb, Ian K. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Prost, Spencer A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Sandoval, Jeremy A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Norheim, Randolph V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Anderson, Gordon A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Tolmachev, Aleksey V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based multi-omic measurements, including proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics, are increasingly transforming our ability to characterize and understand biological systems, but, presently have limitations due to the chemical diversity and range of abundances of biomolecules in complex samples. Advances addressing these challenges increasingly are based upon the ability to quickly separate, react and otherwise manipulate sample components for analysis by MS. Here we report on a new approach using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) to enable long serpentine path ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations followed by MS analyses. This approach provides previously unachieved mobility biomolecule isomer separations for biomolecular species, in conjunction with more effective ion utilization, and producing a basis for the improved characterization of very small samples.

  7. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pepin, R.; Laszlo, K. J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, B.; Bush, M. F.; Lavanant, H.; Afonso, C.; Tureček, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2016), s. 1647-1660 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : peptide ions * ion mobility * collisional cross sections * density functional theory calculations * ion structures * polar effects Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.786, year: 2016

  8. Nonlinear electrostatic structures in homogeneous and inhomogeneous pair-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.; Ur-Rehman, H.; Shah, A.; Haque, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear electrostatic structures such as solitons, shocks were studied in homogeneous, unmagnetized pair-ion plasma. The dissipation in the system was taken through kinematic viscosities of both pair-ion species. The one dimensional (Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers) KdVB equation was derived using reductive perturbation method. The analytical solution of KdVB equation was obtained using tanh method. It was found that solitons and monotonic shocks structures were formed in such type of plasmas depending on the value of dissipation in the system. Both compressive and refractive structures of solitons and monotonic shocks were obtained depending on the temperatures of negative and positive ions. The oscillatory shock structures in pair-ion plasmas were also obtained and its necessary conditions of formation were discussed. The acoustic solitons were also investigated in inhomogeneous unmagnetized pair-ion plasmas. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) like equation with an additional term due to density gradients was obtained by employing the reductive perturbation technique. It was found that amplitude of both compressive and refractive solitons was found to be enhanced as the density gradient parameter was increased. The Landau damping rates of electrostatic ion waves were studied for non-Maxwellian or Lorentzian pair-ion plasmas. The Val sov equation was solved analytically for weak damping effects in pair-ion plasma. It was found that Landau damping rate of ion plasma wave was increased in Lorentzian case in comparison with Maxwellian pair-ion plasmas. The numerical results were obtained by taking into account the parameters of pair-ion plasmas produced in laboratory experiments in Japan. (orig./A.B.)

  9. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules

  10. Experimental data from irradiation of physical detectors disclose weaknesses in basic assumptions of the δ ray theory of track structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K. J.; Hansen, Jørgen-Walther

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of track structure theory has been tested by comparing predictions based on the theory with experimental high-LET dose-response data for an amino acid alanine and a nylon based radiochromic dye film radiation detector. The linear energy transfer LET, has been varied from 28...

  11. On the consistency of Monte Carlo track structure DNA damage simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.pater@mail.mcgill.ca; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Bernal, Mario A. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas 13083-859 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo track structures (MCTS) simulations have been recognized as useful tools for radiobiological modeling. However, the authors noticed several issues regarding the consistency of reported data. Therefore, in this work, they analyze the impact of various user defined parameters on simulated direct DNA damage yields. In addition, they draw attention to discrepancies in published literature in DNA strand break (SB) yields and selected methodologies. Methods: The MCTS code Geant4-DNA was used to compare radial dose profiles in a nanometer-scale region of interest (ROI) for photon sources of varying sizes and energies. Then, electron tracks of 0.28 keV–220 keV were superimposed on a geometric DNA model composed of 2.7 × 10{sup 6} nucleosomes, and SBs were simulated according to four definitions based on energy deposits or energy transfers in DNA strand targets compared to a threshold energy E{sub TH}. The SB frequencies and complexities in nucleosomes as a function of incident electron energies were obtained. SBs were classified into higher order clusters such as single and double strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) based on inter-SB distances and on the number of affected strands. Results: Comparisons of different nonuniform dose distributions lacking charged particle equilibrium may lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the effect of energy on relative biological effectiveness. The energy transfer-based SB definitions give similar SB yields as the one based on energy deposit when E{sub TH} ≈ 10.79 eV, but deviate significantly for higher E{sub TH} values. Between 30 and 40 nucleosomes/Gy show at least one SB in the ROI. The number of nucleosomes that present a complex damage pattern of more than 2 SBs and the degree of complexity of the damage in these nucleosomes diminish as the incident electron energy increases. DNA damage classification into SSB and DSB is highly dependent on the definitions of these higher order structures and their

  12. On the consistency of Monte Carlo track structure DNA damage simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam; Bernal, Mario A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo track structures (MCTS) simulations have been recognized as useful tools for radiobiological modeling. However, the authors noticed several issues regarding the consistency of reported data. Therefore, in this work, they analyze the impact of various user defined parameters on simulated direct DNA damage yields. In addition, they draw attention to discrepancies in published literature in DNA strand break (SB) yields and selected methodologies. Methods: The MCTS code Geant4-DNA was used to compare radial dose profiles in a nanometer-scale region of interest (ROI) for photon sources of varying sizes and energies. Then, electron tracks of 0.28 keV–220 keV were superimposed on a geometric DNA model composed of 2.7 × 10 6 nucleosomes, and SBs were simulated according to four definitions based on energy deposits or energy transfers in DNA strand targets compared to a threshold energy E TH . The SB frequencies and complexities in nucleosomes as a function of incident electron energies were obtained. SBs were classified into higher order clusters such as single and double strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) based on inter-SB distances and on the number of affected strands. Results: Comparisons of different nonuniform dose distributions lacking charged particle equilibrium may lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the effect of energy on relative biological effectiveness. The energy transfer-based SB definitions give similar SB yields as the one based on energy deposit when E TH ≈ 10.79 eV, but deviate significantly for higher E TH values. Between 30 and 40 nucleosomes/Gy show at least one SB in the ROI. The number of nucleosomes that present a complex damage pattern of more than 2 SBs and the degree of complexity of the damage in these nucleosomes diminish as the incident electron energy increases. DNA damage classification into SSB and DSB is highly dependent on the definitions of these higher order structures and their implementations. The authors

  13. Enhanced quantum sensing with multi-level structures of trapped ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aharon, N.; Drewsen, Michael; Retzker, A.

    2017-01-01

    , robustness to both external and controller noise is achieved. We consider trapped-ion based implementation via the dipole transitions, which is relevant for several types of ions, such as the $^{40}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$, $^{88}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$, and the $^{138}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$ ions. Taking experimental errors...... of magnitude of the sensitivity. In addition, we present a microwave based sensing scheme that is suitable for ions with a hyperfine structure, such as the $^{9}{\\rm{Be}}^{+}$,$^{25}{\\rm{Mg}}^{+}$,$^{43}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$,$^{87}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$,$^{137}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$,$^{111}{\\rm{Cd}}^{+}$,$^{171}{\\rm...

  14. Mechanical and Structural Properties of Fluorine-Ion-Implanted Boron Suboxide

    OpenAIRE

    Machaka, Ronald; Mwakikunga, Bonex W.; Manikandan, Elayaperumal; Derry, Trevor E.; Sigalas, Iakovos; Herrmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Results on a systematic study on the effects of ion implantation on the near-surface mechanical and structural properties of boron suboxide (B 6O) prepared by uniaxial hot pressing are reviewed. 150keV fluorine ions at fluences of up to 5.0 × 10 16ions/cm 2 were implanted into the ultrahard ceramic material at room temperature and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Evidence of ion-beam-as...

  15. Low energy ion beam systems for surface analytical and structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of low energy ion beam systems for surface analytical and structural studies. Areas where analytical methods which utilize ion beams can provide a unique insight into materials problems are discussed. The design criteria of ion beam systems for performing materials studies are described and the systems now being used by a number of laboratories are reviewed. Finally, several specific problems are described where the solution was provided at least in part by information provided by low energy ion analysis techniques

  16. High energy Xe{sup +} ion beam induced ripple structures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg; Facsko, Stefan; Winkler, Ingolf [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute for Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Grigorian, Souren; Pietsch, Ullrich [University of Siegen (Germany). Institute of Physics

    2008-07-01

    Ion beam bombardment on semiconductor surfaces leads to well-defined morphological structures in the nanoscale range. Due to the impact of ions a self-organized wave-like surface structure develops. Ion bombardment causes an amorphization of a surface-adjacent layer of several nanometers and creates a periodical structure on the surface as well as at the amorphous-crystalline interface. We investigate the dependence of the periodicity on the crystallography of (100) silicon bombarded with Xe{sup +} ions, the ion beam incidence and the azimutal angle of the sample surface. So far we found that the ripple wavelength scales with the ion energy in a range of 5 to 70 keV. In order to understand the initiation of the ripple formation we also ask the question which role the initial surface structure plays. Therefore we investigate the formation of ripples on pre-structured and rough surfaces such as wafers with an intentional miscut. Therefore, we not only introduce a certain initial roughness but also vary the orientation of the (100) lattice plane in respect to the surface. We distinguish between ion beam induced surface effects (sputter erosion) and the influence of the crystalline Si lattice (strain) on the ripple formation.

  17. Determination of absorbed dose to water in a clinical carbon ion beam by means of fluorescent nuclear track detectors, ionization chambers, and water calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga-Blaettermann, Julia-Maria

    2016-12-20

    Until now, dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the threefold higher uncertainty of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor of ionization chambers, which is derived by calculations due to a lack of experimental data. The current thesis comprises two major aims with respect to the dosimetry of carbon ion beams: first, the investigation of the potential of fluorescent nuclear track detectors for fluence-based dosimetry and second, the experimental determination of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor. The direct comparison of fluence- and ionization-based measurements has shown a significant discrepancy of 4.5 %, which re-opened the discussion on the accuracy of calculated k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factors. Therefore, absorbed dose to water measurements by means of water calorimetry have been performed allowing for the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus for the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}. For the first time it could be shown that the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for carbon ion beams is achievable with a standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8 %. This corresponds to a threefold reduction of the uncertainty compared to calculated values and therefore enables to significantly decrease the overall uncertainty related to ionization-based dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams.

  18. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions

  19. Structure and potential energy function for Pu22+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quan; Huang Hui; Li Daohua

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical study on Pu 2 2+ using density functional method shows that the molecular ion is metastable. Ground electronic state is 13 Σ g for Pu 2 2+ , the analytic potential energy function is in well agreement with the Z-W function, and the force constants and spectroscopic data have been worked out for the first time

  20. Structural characterization of swift heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lakhwant; Samra, Kawaljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Makrofol-N polycarbonate thin films were irradiated with copper (50 MeV) and nickel (86 MeV) ions. The modified films were analyzed by UV-VIS, FTIR and XRD techniques. The experimental data was used to evaluate the formation of chromophore groups (conjugated system of bonds), degradation cross-section of the special functional groups, the alkyne formation and the amorphization cross-section. The investigation of UV-VIS spectra shows that the formation of chromophore groups is reduced at larger wavelength, however its value increases with the increase of ion fluence. Degradation cross-section for the different chemical groups present in the polycarbonate chains was evaluated from the FTIR data. It was found that there was an increase of degradation cross-section of chemical groups with the increase of electronic energy loss in polycarbonate. The alkyne and alkene groups were found to be induced due to swift heavy ion irradiation in polycarbonate. The radii of the alkyne production of about 2.74 and 2.90 nm were deduced for nickel (86 MeV) and copper (50 MeV) ions respectively. XRD analysis shows the decrease of the main XRD peak intensity. Progressive amorphization process of Makrofol-N with increasing fluence was traced by XRD measurements

  1. Magnetothermoelectric properties of layered structures for ion impurity scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figarova, S. R.; Huseynov, H. I.; Figarov, V. R.

    2018-05-01

    In the paper, longitudinal and transverse thermoelectric powers are considered in a magnetic field parallel to the layer plane for scattering of charge carriers by weakly screened impurity ions. Based on the semiclassical approximation, it is obtained that, depending on the position of the Fermi level relative to the miniband top and superlattice period, the thermoelectric power can change sign and amplify.

  2. Particle track membranes with higher porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, B.; Gemende, B.; Lueck, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Possibilities of improvement of flux and dirt loading capacity of particle track membranes have been examined. Three different ways were investigated: using a divergent ion beam for the irradiation; enlarging the surface porosity through a conical pore shape; creating an asymmetrical membrane structure with two different porosities. Mathematical models and experimental results have been discussed. 9 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-04-06

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb25+, in SiO2/Si is also discussed.

  4. Proceedings of the sixth structural engineering convent ion. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Nagesh R.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.; Samuel Knight, G.M.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the developments taking place at present in India and abroad in the field of structural engineering have been captured in this sixth Structural Engineering Convention. The areas covered are: (i) Advances in Concrete Structures, (ii) Advances in Steel Structures, (iii) Advances in Computational Structural Mechanics, (iv) Testing and Evaluation of Structures/Structural components, (v) New Materials of Construction, (vi) Analysis and Design of Structures against Natural Hazards, (vii) Health Monitoring of Structures, (viii) Repair, Retrofit and Rehabilitation of Structures, (ix) Advances in Construction Techniques/Practices and Guidelines and Codal Recommendations (x) Behaviour of Structures under Blast/Impact Loading and (xi) Fatigue and Fracture. About 200 papers that include contributory, invited, keynote and plenary papers are included in the proceedings. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Modification of the poly(ethylene) terephthalate track membrane structure and surface in the plasma of non-polymerized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, L.I.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Apel, P.Y.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the properties of poly(ethylene) terephthalate track membranes (PETTMs) treated with a plasma RF-discharge in non-polymerized gases has been performed. The influence of the plasma treatment conditions on the basic properties of the membranes has been studied. It was arranged that the effect of non-polymerized gases plasma on the PETTMs results to etching a membrane's surface layer. The membranes' pore size and the form in this case change. It is shown that it is possible to change the structure of track membranes directly by gas discharge etching

  6. Helium Ion Microscopy of proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrode structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiriaev, Serguei; Dam Madsen, Nis; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2017-01-01

    electrode interface structure dependence on ionomer content, systematically studied by Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM). A special focus was on acquiring high resolution images of the electrode structure and avoiding interface damage from irradiation and tedious sample preparation. HIM demonstrated its....... In the hot-pressed electrodes, we found more closed contact between the electrode components, reduced particle size, polymer coalescence and formation of nano-sized polymer fiber architecture between the particles. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM...

  7. Challenges of fabricating plasmonic and photonic structures with Neon ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Fiutowski, Jacek; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    -established electron beam lithography and focussed ion beam milling (FIB) using Gallium ions. These techniques, however, are to some extend limited in their resolution, and in addition Gallium and Carbon are implanted and deposited into the plasmonic structures during FIB process, potentially changing plasmonic...... properties. We are currently studying the capabilities of focussed Helium and Neon ion beam milling for the fabricating of plasmonic and photonic devices. We found that Neon ion beam milling enables us to prepare plasmonic structures, such as trenches (see Fig. 1) and V-grooves without doping and alloying...... effects specific to Galium FIB. Neon FIB milling is superior to Helium FIB milling in terms of the processing speed and smaller levels of implanted ions. From our perspective it is the most promising technique for the fabrication of individual plasmonic devices with a few nanometers precision. The main...

  8. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  9. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Webb, Ian K.; Attah, Isaac K.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-05-25

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also their subsequent efficient compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a long serpentine path TW SLIM region after which CRIMP allows the large ion populations to be ‘squeezed’. The compression process occurs at an interface between two SLIM regions, one operating conventionally and the second having an intermittently pausing or ‘stuttering’ TW, allowing the contents of multiple bins of ions from the first region to be merged into a single bin in the second region. In this initial work stationary voltages in the second region were used to block ions from exiting the first (trapping) region, and the resumption of TWs in the second region allows ions to exit, and the population to also be compressed if CRIMP is applied. In our initial evaluation we show that the number of charges trapped for a 40 s accumulation period was ~5×109, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity using an ion funnel trap. We also show that over 1×109 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device, and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Lower compression ratios allow increased IM peak heights without significant loss of signal, while excessively large compression ratios can lead to ion losses and other artifacts. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP and multiple passes provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-high resolution IM separations using SLIM.

  10. Tracking of Nuclear Cable Insulation Polymer Structural Changes using the Gel Fraction and Uptake Factor Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Miguel; Huang, Qian; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2018-04-11

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation samples were exposed to heat and gamma radiation at a series of temperatures, dose rates, and exposure times to evaluate the effects of these variables on material degradation. The samples were tested using the solvent incubation method to collect gel fraction and uptake factor data in order to assess the crosslinking and chain scission occurring in polymer samples with aging. Consistent with previous reports, gel fraction values were observed to increase and uptake factor values to decrease with radiation and thermal exposure. The trends seen were also more prominent as exposure time increased, suggesting this to be a viable method of tracking structural changes in the XLPE-insulated cable material over extended periods. For the conditions explored, the cable insulation material evaluated did not indicate signs of anomalous aging such as inverse temperature effect in which radiation-induced aging is more severe at lower temperature. Ongoing aging under identical radiation conditions and at lower temperature will further inform conclusions regarding the importance of inverse temperature effects for this material under these conditions.

  11. A discriminative structural similarity measure and its application to video-volume registration for endoscope three-dimensional motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-06-01

    Endoscope 3-D motion tracking, which seeks to synchronize pre- and intra-operative images in endoscopic interventions, is usually performed as video-volume registration that optimizes the similarity between endoscopic video and pre-operative images. The tracking performance, in turn, depends significantly on whether a similarity measure can successfully characterize the difference between video sequences and volume rendering images driven by pre-operative images. The paper proposes a discriminative structural similarity measure, which uses the degradation of structural information and takes image correlation or structure, luminance, and contrast into consideration, to boost video-volume registration. By applying the proposed similarity measure to endoscope tracking, it was demonstrated to be more accurate and robust than several available similarity measures, e.g., local normalized cross correlation, normalized mutual information, modified mean square error, or normalized sum squared difference. Based on clinical data evaluation, the tracking error was reduced significantly from at least 14.6 mm to 4.5 mm. The processing time was accelerated more than 30 frames per second using graphics processing unit.

  12. Investigation of structural materials of reactors using high-energy heavy-ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2007-01-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials of fission/fusion reactors is mainly attributed to the evolution of intensive atom displacement damage induced by energetic particles (n, α and/or fission fragments) and high-rate helium doping by direct α particle bombardments and/or (n, α) reactions. It can cause severe degradation of reactor structural materials such as surface blistering, bulk void swelling, deformation, fatigue, embrittlement, stress erosion corrosion and so on that will significantly affect the operation safety of reactors. However, up to now, behavior of structural materials at the end of their service can hardly be fully tested in a real reactor. In the present work, damage process in reactor structural materials is briefly introduced, then the advantages of energetic ion implantation/irradiation especially high-energy heavy ion irradiation are discussed, and several typical examples on simulation of radiation effects in reactor candidate structural materials using high-energy heavy ion irradiations are pronounced. Experimental results and theoretical analysis suggested that irradiation with energetic particles especially high-energy heavy ions is very useful technique for simulating the evolution of microstructures and macro-properties of reactor structural materials. Furthermore, an on-going plan of material irradiation experiments using high energy H- and He-ions based on the Heavy Ion Research Facilities in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is also briefly interpreted. (authors)

  13. Temporal Evolution of Ion Spectral Structures During a Geomagnetic Storm: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2018-01-01

    Using the Van Allen Probes/Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron mass spectrometer, we perform a case study of the temporal evolution of ion spectral structures observed in the energy range of 1 to 50 keV throughout the geomagnetic storm of 2 October 2013. The ion spectral features are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and are signatures of fresh transport from the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. We find that the characteristics of the ion structures are determined by the intensity of the convection electric field. Prior to the beginning of the storm, the plasma sheet inner edge exhibits narrow nose spectral structures that vary little in energy across L values. Ion access to the inner magnetosphere during these times is limited to the nose energy bands. As convection is enhanced and large amounts of plasma are injected from the plasma sheet during the main phase of the storm, ion access occurs at a wide energy range, as no nose structures are observed. As the magnetosphere recovers from the storm, single noses and then multiple noses are observed once again. We use a model of ion drift and losses due to charge exchange to simulate the ion spectra and gain insight into the main observed features.

  14. Void structure of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere observed by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Tanaka, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument observed a new type of enhancement of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere during substorms. As the satellite moved outward in the premidnight sector, the flux of the O+ ions with energy 10 keV appeared first in the energy-time spectrograms. Then, the enhancement of the flux spread toward high and low energies. The enhanced flux of the O+ ions with the highest energy remained, whereas the flux of the ions with lower energy vanished near apogee, forming what we call the void structure. The structure cannot be found in the H+ spectrogram. We studied the generation mechanism of this structure by using numerical simulation. We traced the trajectories of O+ ions in the electric and magnetic fields from the global magnetohydrodynamics simulation and calculated the flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere in accordance with the Liouville theorem. The simulated spectrograms are well consistent with the ones observed by Van Allen Probes. We suggest the following processes. (1) When magnetic reconnection starts, an intensive equatorward and tailward plasma flow appears in the plasma lobe. (2) The flow transports plasma from the lobe to the plasma sheet where the radius of curvature of the magnetic field line is small. (3) The intensive dawn-dusk electric field transports the O+ ions earthward and accelerates them nonadiabatically to an energy threshold; (4) the void structure appears at energies below the threshold.

  15. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.K.; Herberg, J.L.; Wu, Y.; Schwegler, E.; Mehta, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  16. Precise small-angle X-ray scattering evaluation of the pore structures in track-etched membranes: Comparison with other convenient evaluation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tsukasa, E-mail: t_miyazaki@cross.or.jp [Neutron Science and Technology Center, Comprehensive Research Organization for Science and Society, 162-1, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Takenaka, Mikihito [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Gradual School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2017-03-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)-based track-etched membranes (TMs) with pore sizes ranging from few nanometers to approximately 1 μm are used in various applications in the biological field, and their pore structures are determined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These TMs with the nanometer-sized cylindrical pores aligned parallel to the film thickness direction are produced by chemical etching of the track in the PET films irradiated by heavy ions with the sodium hydroxide aqueous solution. It is well known that SAXS allows us to precisely and statistically estimate the pore size and the pore size distribution in the TMs by using the form factor of a cylinder with the extremely long pore length relative to the pore diameter. The results obtained were compared with those estimated with scanning electron microscopy and gas permeability measurements. The result showed that the gas permeability measurement is convenient to evaluate the pore size of TMs within a wide length scale, and the SEM observation is also suited to estimate the pore size, although SEM observation is usually limited above approximately 30 nm.

  17. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachan, Ritesh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Cooper, Valentino R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Liu, Bin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Voas, Brian K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Lang, Maik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ou, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Functional Material for Informatics; Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany). Dept. of Materials Science; Zhang, Yanwen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Chisholm, Matthew F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Weber, William J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effect on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.

  18. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissel, Tobias, E-mail: wissel@rob.uni-luebeck.de [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Erdmann, Christian [Institute for Neuroradiology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Deutz, Christin-Sophie [Clinic for Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Sack, Benjamin [Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Manit, Jirapong [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  19. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, Tobias; Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin; Bruder, Ralf; Erdmann, Christian; Deutz, Christin-Sophie; Sack, Benjamin; Manit, Jirapong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  20. Vortex structures in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Q [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: qamar_haque@hotmail.com

    2009-11-15

    A linear dispersion relation for electrostatic quantum drift and acoustic waves has been found for dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas. Both the fermion and thermal temperature effects have been considered for electrons and positrons. In the nonlinear regime, a stationary solution in the form of dipolar vortices has been obtained. For illustration, the results were applied to the astrophysical plasma of the atmosphere of neutron stars/pulsars.

  1. Evolution of structural and magnetic properties of Co-doped TiO2 thin films irradiated with 100 MeV Ag7+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, P; Singh, V P; Rath, Chandana; Mishra, N C; Ojha, S; Kanjilal, D

    2014-01-01

    In continuation to our earlier studies where we have shown room temperature ferromagnetism observed in TiO 2 and Co-doped TiO 2 (CTO) thin films independent of their phase (Mohanty et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 325301), here the modifications in structure and magnetic properties in CTO thin films using 100 MeV Ag 7+ ion irradiation are reported. Owing to the important role of defects in tailoring the magnetic properties of the material, we vary the ion fluence from 5 × 10 11 to 1 × 10 12  ions cm −2 to create post-deposition defects. While the film deposited under 0.1 mTorr oxygen partial pressure retains its crystallinity showing radiation-resistant behaviour even at a fluence of 1 × 10 12  ions cm −2 , films deposited under 1 to 300 mTorr oxygen partial pressure becomes almost amorphous at the same fluence. Using Poisson's law, the diameter of the amorphized region surrounding the ion path is calculated to be ∼4.2 nm from the x-ray diffraction peak intensity ((1 1 0) for rutile phase) as a function of ion fluence. The saturation magnetization (M s ) decreases exponentially similar to the decrease in x-ray peak intensity with fluence, indicating magnetic disordered region surrounding the ion path. The diameter of the magnetic disordered region is found to be ∼6.6 nm which is larger than the diameter of the amorphized latent track. Therefore, it is confirmed that swift heavy ion irradiation induces a more significant magnetic disorder than the structural disorder. (paper)

  2. The influence of target structure on topographical features produced by ion beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitton, J.L.; Grant, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ion beam erosion of solid surfaces often results in the development of distinctive topographical features. The relationship between the type of features formed by ion erosion and target structure has been investigated. Single crystals of copper and nickel and the amorphous alloy Metglas have been bombarded to high doses (approx. >=10 19 ions cm -2 ) with 40 keV Ar + and P + . Topography changes were monitored using SEM and structural changes by TEM. Targets that retain their long range crystallinity show sharply defined, regular features that are related to the target structure. Targets that are highly disordered, either intrinsically or as a result of the ion bombardment, produce diffuse, smaller features. Those differences are observed at all stages in topographical evolution. (orig.)

  3. Evidence of diketopiperazine and oxazolone structures for HA b2+ ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Brittany R; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Gucinski, Ashley C; Somogyi, Arpád; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2009-12-09

    Peptide fragmentation can lead to an oxazolone or diketopiperazine b(2)(+) ion structure. IRMPD spectroscopy combined with computational modeling and gas-phase H/D exchange was used to study the structure of the b(2)(+) ion from protonated HAAAA. The experimental spectrum of the b(2)(+) ion matches both the experimental spectrum for the protonated cyclic dipeptide HA (a commercial diketopiperazine) and the theoretical spectrum for a diketopiperazine protonated at the imidazole pi nitrogen. A characteristic band at 1875 cm(-1) and increased abundance of the peaks at 1619 and 1683 cm(-1) indicate a second population corresponding to an oxazolone species. H/D exchange also shows a mixture of two populations consistent with a mixture of b(2)(+) ion diketopiperazine and oxazolone structures.

  4. Structural modifications of swift heavy ion irradiated PEN probed by optical and thermal measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgan, Kusum; Singh, Lakhwant; Samra, Kawaljeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The present paper reports the effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on Polyethylene Naphthalate (PEN). • Swift heavy ion irradiation introduces structural modification and degradation of PEN at different doses. • Lower irradiation doses in PEN result in modification of structural properties and higher doses lead to complete degradation. • Strong correlation between structural, optical, and thermal properties. - Abstract: The effects of swift heavy ion irradiation on the structural characteristics of Polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) were studied. Samples were irradiated in vacuum at room temperature by lithium (50 MeV), carbon (85 MeV), nickel (120 MeV) and silver (120 MeV) ions with the fluence in the range of 1×10 11 –3×10 12 ions cm −2 . Ion induced changes were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR), UV–visible spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Cross-linking was observed at lower doses resulting in modification of structural properties, however higher doses lead to the degradation of the investigated polymeric samples

  5. Destruction mechanism of the internal structure in Lithium-ion batteries used in aviation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swornowski, Paweł J.

    2017-01-01

    In the article, the reasons for destruction of the internal structure in Lithium-ion batteries used in aviation industry have been explained. They manifest themselves in the battery's overheating, and in extreme cases they result in explosion. The report presents the results of experiments, which consisted in subjecting the tested Lithium-ion battery to vibration over a specified period of time and observing the changes of temperature inside it with the use of a thermal infrared camera. Another focal point of the study was the influence of vibrations on voltage change in relation to variable current load, and the influence of ambient temperature change on the Lithium-ion battery's voltage change. It has also been demonstrated that vibrations can damage the control electronics of the Lithium-ion battery. Moreover, the mechanism by which potentially dangerous thermal hot spots are formed in a Lithium-ion battery has been presented, as well as an uncertainty analysis of all measurement results. - Highlights: • The causes of internal destruction of Lithium-ion batteries are external vibrations. • The influence of vibrations on the change of a Lithium-ion battery's most parameters. • The mechanism leading to the explosion of a Lithium-ion battery was demonstrated. • The conclusions ensuring safe exploitation of a Lithium-ion battery were presented.

  6. Ion implantation induced structural changes in reactively sputtered Cr-N layers on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.; Popovic, M.; Perusko, D.; Milinovic, V.; Radovic, I.; Bibic, N.; Mitric, M.; Milosavljevic, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the structure and composition of reactively sputtered Cr-N layers as a function of deposition parameters, and the effects of ion implantation on these structures. The layers were deposited on (1 0 0) Si substrates to a thickness of 240-280 nm, at different nitrogen partial pressure, and subsequently irradiated with 120 keV Ar ions. Structural characterisation of the samples was performed with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. We also measured their electrical resistivity with a four point probe. It was found that the layers grow in form of columnar structures, and their composition, Cr 2 N or CrN, strongly depends on the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. Ion irradiation induces local micro-structural changes, formation of nano-particles and defects, which can be nicely correlated to the measured electrical resistivity

  7. Effect of calcium/sodium ion exchange on the osmotic properties and structure of polyelectrolyte gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the main findings of a long-term research program exploring the consequences of sodium/calcium ion exchange on the macroscopic osmotic and elastic properties, and the microscopic structure of representative synthetic polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylate, (polyacrylic acid)) and biopolymer gels (DNA). A common feature of these gels is that above a threshold calcium ion concentration, they exhibit a reversible volume phase transition. At the macroscopic level, the concentration dependence of the osmotic pressure shows that calcium ions influence primarily the third-order interaction term in the Flory-Huggins model of polymer solutions. Mechanical tests reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unaffected by the presence of calcium ions, indicating that ion bridging does not create permanent cross-links. At the microscopic level, small-angle neutron scattering shows that polyacrylic acid and DNA gels exhibit qualitatively similar structural features in spite of important differences (e.g. chain flexibility and chemical composition) between the two polymers. The main effect of calcium ions is that the neutron scattering intensity increases due to the decrease in the osmotic modulus. At the level of the counterion cloud around dissolved macroions, anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering measurements made on DNA indicate that divalent ions form a cylindrical sheath enveloping the chain, but they are not localized. Small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering provide complementary information on the structure and interactions in polymer solutions and gels. © IMechE 2015.

  8. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structural and optical properties of indium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M., E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Kumar, Pravin [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Khan, Sameen Ahmed [Department of Mathematics and Sciences, College of Arts and Applied Sciences (CAAS) Dhofar University, Salalah, Sultanate of Oman (Oman)

    2016-06-10

    : We report here synthesis and subsequent nitrogen ion implantation of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films. The films were implanted with 25 keV N{sup +} beam for different ion doses between 3E15 to 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}. The resulting changes in structural and optical properties were investigated using XRD, SEM-EDAX and UV-Vis Spectrometry. XRD studies reveal decrease in crystallite size from 20.06 to 12.42 nm with increase in ion dose. SEM micrographs show an increase in the grain size from 0.8 to 1.35 µm with increase in ion dose because of the agglomeration of the grains. Also, from EDAX data on pristine and N-implanted thin films the presence of indium and oxygen without any traces of impurity elements could be seen. However, at lower ion doses such as 3E15 and 5E15 ions/cm{sup 2}, no evidence of the presence of nitrogen ion was seen. However, for the ion dose of 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}, evidence of presence of nitrogen can be seen in the EDAX data. Band gap calculations reveal a decrease in band gap from 3.54 to 3.38 eV with increasing ion dose. However, the band gap was found to again show an increase to 3.58 eV at the highest ion dose owing to quantum confinement effect.

  9. Structural Changes in Polymer Films by Fast Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, M. A.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Muntele, C.; Muntele, I.; De Almeida, A.; Ila, D.

    2006-11-01

    In applications from food wrapping to solar sails, polymers films can be subjected to intense charged panicle bombardment and implantation. ETFE (ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) with high impact resistance is used for pumps, valves, tie wraps, and electrical components. PFA (tetrafluoroethylene-per-fluoromethoxyethylene) and FEP (tetrafluoroethylene-hexa-fluoropropylene) are sufficiently biocompatible to be used as transcutaneous implants since they resist damage from the ionizing space radiation, they can be used in aerospace engineering applications. PVDC (polyvinyllidene-chloride) is used for food packaging, and combined with others plastics, improves the oxygen barrier responsible for the food preservation. Fluoropolymers are also known for their radiation dosimetry applications, dependent on the type and energy of the radiation, as well as of the beam intensity. In this work ETFE, PFA, FEP and PVDC were irradiated with ions of keV and MeV energies at several fluences and were analyzed through techniques as RGA, OAP, FTIR, ATR and Raman spectrophotometry. CF3 is the main specie emitted from PFA and FEP when irradiated with MeV protons. H and HF are released from ETFE due to the broken C-F and C-H bonds when the polymer is irradiated with keV Nitrogen ions and protons. At high fluence, especially for keV Si and N, damage due to carbonization is observed with the formation of hydroperoxide and polymer dehydroflorination. The main broken bonds in PVDC are C-O and C-Cl, with the release of Cl and the formation of double carbon bonds. The ion fluence that causes damage, which could compromise fluoropolymer film applications, has been determined.

  10. Latent track structure in polymers as observed by a highly sensitive electrolytical conductivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, M.; Schulz, A.; Trofimov, V.V.; Prokert, K.

    1994-01-01

    First results of a new electrolytical conductivity cell are reported concerning the initial stage of the pore opening process during track etching in vitreous solids. On the basis of the soft mode (low energy excitation) model for track etching, a distribution function for the number of performed micropores as function of time is calculated. The results account for the radial etch rate as function of the effective pore radius. ((orig.))

  11. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  12. Focused ion beam structuring of low melting polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmied, R.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on heating effects during focused ion beam (FIB) processing of low melting polymers. The combined approach using experiments and simulations identifies the in part massive local temperatures as a convolution between intrinsic ion-matter effects and a considerable, technically-induced heating component. While the former is invariable, the latter has been minimized by an alternative process strategy which massively improves the morphological stability and minimizes chemical damage during FIB processing, thus opening new possibilities for application on sensitive, low melting materials. The study starts with systematic experimental investigations which strongly suggested the existence of a technically-induced heating component as a consequence of classically-used serpentine or raster-like patterning strategies. Based on these results, a combined simulation approach of ion trajectories and thermal spike model calculations have been employed to get a deeper insight into spatial and temporal temperature evolution. The results were then combined with the thermodynamic behavior of polymers by means of melting and volatizing temperatures. The comparison of these simulationbased predictions with real FIB experiments revealed very good agreement, proving the applicability of the approach used to describe the temperature evolution from a fundamental point of view. As a next step, these simulations were then applied to the dierent scanning strategies which further con rmed the existence of a technically-induced heating component via classically-used patterning approaches. Due to the deep insight gained via simulations, an alternative patterning strategy was developed, which was expected to minimize these avoidable influences. This new strategy was then evaluated using a multi-technique approach, which revealed strongly reduced chemical damage together with increasing morphological stabilities even for temperature-sensitive polymers. Finally, this alternative

  13. Extending Correlation Filter-Based Visual Tracking by Tree-Structured Ensemble and Spatial Windowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Erhan; Ozkan, Huseyin; Alatan, A Aydin

    2017-11-01

    Correlation filters have been successfully used in visual tracking due to their modeling power and computational efficiency. However, the state-of-the-art correlation filter-based (CFB) tracking algorithms tend to quickly discard the previous poses of the target, since they consider only a single filter in their models. On the contrary, our approach is to register multiple CFB trackers for previous poses and exploit the registered knowledge when an appearance change occurs. To this end, we propose a novel tracking algorithm [of complexity O(D) ] based on a large ensemble of CFB trackers. The ensemble [of size O(2 D ) ] is organized over a binary tree (depth D ), and learns the target appearance subspaces such that each constituent tracker becomes an expert of a certain appearance. During tracking, the proposed algorithm combines only the appearance-aware relevant experts to produce boosted tracking decisions. Additionally, we propose a versatile spatial windowing technique to enhance the individual expert trackers. For this purpose, spatial windows are learned for target objects as well as the correlation filters and then the windowed regions are processed for more robust correlations. In our extensive experiments on benchmark datasets, we achieve a substantial performance increase by using the proposed tracking algorithm together with the spatial windowing.

  14. In-situ kinetics of modifications induced by swift heavy ions in Al2O3: Colour centre formation, structural modification and amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygiel, C.; Moisy, F.; Sall, M.; Lebius, H.; Balanzat, E.; Madi, T.; Been, T.; Marie, D.; Monnet, I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details in-situ studies of modifications induced by swift heavy ion irradiation in α-Al2O3. This complex behaviour is intermediary between the behaviour of amorphizable and non-amorphizable materials, respectively. A unique combination of irradiation experiments was performed at the IRRSUD beam line of the GANIL facility, with three different characterisation techniques: in-situ UV–Vis absorption, in-situ grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction and ex-situ transmission electron microscopy. This allows a complete study of point defects, and by depth profile of structural and microstructural modifications created on the trajectory of the incident ion. The α-Al2O3 crystals have been irradiated by 92 MeV Xenon and 74 MeV Krypton ions, the irradiation conditions have been chosen rather similar with an energy range where the ratio between electronic and nuclear stopping power changes dramatically as function of depth penetration. The main contribution of electronic excitation, above the threshold for track formation, is present beneath the surface to finally get almost only elastic collisions at the end of the projected range. Amorphization kinetics by the overlapping of multiple ion tracks is observed. In the crystalline matrix, long range strains, unit-cell swelling, local microstrain, domain size decrease, disordering of oxygen sublattice as well as colour centre formation are found. This study highlights the relationship between ion energy losses into a material and its response. While amorphization requires electronic stopping values above a certain threshold, point defects are predominantly induced by elastic collisions, while some structural modifications of the crystalline matrix, such as unit-cell swelling, are due to contribution of both electronic and nuclear processes.

  15. Tracking studies on the effects of magnet multipoles on the aperture of the RHIC heavy ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, G.F.; Parzen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Tracking studies including the effects of random multipoles resulting from construction errors have been made for RHIC with two independent tracking programs at three different tunes. The studies were made using ten different sets of random errors for each of the programs. The aperture was defined as the worst case, and the results of the two programs are in good agreement. A second set of studies was made for which the number of dipoles was doubled to determine whether doubling the number of independent random errors results in a reduction of the effects or random multipoles. The results for the two cases, one dipole per half cell and two dipoles per half cell, indicate there is little difference in dynamic aperture. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  17. High-spin nuclear structure studies with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktash, C.

    1992-01-01

    Two important developments in the sixties, namely the advent of heavy-ion accelerators and fabrication of Ge detectors, opened the way for the experimental studies of nuclear properties at high angular momentum. Addition of a new degree of freedom, namely spin, made it possible to observe such fascinating phenomena as occurrences and coexistence of a variety of novel shapes, rise, fall and occasionally rebirth of nuclear collectivity, and disappearance of pairing correlations. Today, with the promise of development of radioactive ion beams (RIB) and construction of the third-generation Ge-detection systems (GAMMASPHERE and EUROBALL), nuclear physicists are poised to explore new and equally fascinating phenomena that have been hitherto inaccessible. With the addition of yet another dimension, namely the isospin, they will be able to observe and verify predictions for exotic shapes as varied as rigid triaxiality, hyperdeformation and triaxial-octupole shapes, or to investigate the T=O pairing correlations. In this paper, the author reviews, separately for neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei, these and a few other new high-spin physics opportunities that may be realized with RIB. Following this discussion, a list of the beam species, intensities and energies that are needed to fulfill these goals is presented. The paper concludes with a description of the experimental techniques and instrumentations that are required for these studies

  18. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  19. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  20. Ripple structures on surfaces and underlying crystalline layers in ion beam irradiated Si wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenzer, J.; Muecklich, A. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, A.; Grigorian, S.A.; Pietsch, U. [Institute of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    We report on the formation of ion beam induced ripples in Si(001) wafers when bombarded with Ar+ ions at an energy of 60 keV. A set of samples varying incidence and azimuthal angles of the ion beam with respect to the crystalline surface orientation was studied by two complementary near surface sensitive techniques, namely atomic force microscopy and depth-resolved X-ray grazing incidence diffraction (GID). Additionally, cross-section TEM investigations were carried out. The ripple-like structures are formed at the sample surface as well as at the buried amorphous-crystalline interface. Best quality of the ripple pattern was found when the irradiating ion beam was aligned parallel to the (111) planes. The quality decreases rapidly if the direction of the ion beam deviates from (111). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    We employ atomistic simulations to consider how mono- (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) salt affects properties of inner and outer membranes of mitochondria. We find that the influence of salt on structural properties is rather minute, only weakly affecting lipid packing, conformational ordering......, and membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral...... diffusion of lipids is slowed down rather considerably for increasing concentration of CaCl(2). Both findings for dynamic properties can be traced to the binding of ions with lipid head groups and the related changes in interaction patterns in the headgroup region, where the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions...

  2. Ion assisted deposition of refractory oxide thin film coatings for improved optical and structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, N.K.; Thakur, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Das, N.C.

    1999-03-01

    Ion assisted deposition technique (IAD) has emerged as a powerful tool to control the optical and structural properties of thin film coatings. Keeping in view the complexity of the interaction of ions with the films being deposited, sophisticated ion sources have been developed that cater to the need of modern optical coatings with stringent spectral and environmental specifications. In the present work, the results of ion assisted deposition (IAD) of two commonly used refractory oxides, namely TiO 2 and ZrO 2 , using cold cathode ion source (CC-102R) are presented. Through successive feedback and calibration techniques, various ion beams as well as deposition parameters have been optimized to achieve the best optical and structural film properties in the prevalent deposition geometry of the coating system. It has been possible to eliminate the unwanted optical and structural inhomogeneities from these films using and optimized set of process parameters. Interference modulated spectrophotometric and phase modulated ellipsometric techniques have been very successfully utilized to analyze the optical and structural parameters of the films. Several precision multilayer coatings have been developed and are being used for laser and spectroscopic applications. (author)

  3. A GEM-TPC in twin configuration for the Super-FRS tracking of heavy ions at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, F.; Grahn, T.; Hoffmann, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kaya, C.; Kunkel, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Risch, H.; Rusanov, I.; Schmidt, C. J.; Simon, H.; Simons, C.; Turpeinen, R.; Voss, B.; Äystö, J.; Winkler, M.

    2018-03-01

    The GEM-TPC described herein will be part of the standard beam-diagnostics equipment of the Super-FRS. This chamber will provide tracking information for particle identification at rates up to 1 MHz on an event-by-event basis. The key requirements of operation for these chambers are: close to 100% tracking efficiency under conditions of high counting rate, spatial resolution below 1 mm and a superb large dynamic range covering projectiles from Z = 1 up to Z = 92. The current prototype consists of two GEM-TPCs inside a single vessel, which are operating independently and have electrical drift fields in opposite directions. The twin configuration is done by flipping one of the GEM-TPCs on the middle plane with respect to the second one. In order to put this development in context, the evolution of previous prototypes will be described and its performances discussed. Finally, this chamber was tested at the University of Jyväskylä accelerator with proton projectiles and at GSI with Uranium, Xenon, fragments and Carbon beams. The results obtained have shown a position resolution between 120 to 300 μm at moderate counting rate under conditions of full tracking efficiency.

  4. Ion diffusion related to structure in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    A model first developed by Zwanzig to derive transport coefficients in cold dense fluids directly from the Green-Kubo time correlation formulae allows one to relate macroscopic diffusion coefficients to the local fluid structure. Applications to various ionic diffusion processes in molten salts are reviewed. Consequences of partial structural quenching are also discussed. (author). 28 refs, 3 tabs

  5. Fabrication of submicron structures in nanoparticle/polymer composite by holographic lithography and reactive ion etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A. Ping; He, Sailing; Kim, Kyoung Tae; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Burzynski, Ryszard; Samoc, Marek; Prasad, Paras N.

    2008-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of nanoparticle/polymer submicron structures by combining holographic lithography and reactive ion etching. Silica nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in a (SU8) polymer matrix at a high concentration, and in situ polymerization (cross-linking) is used to form a nanoparticle/polymer composite. Another photosensitive SU8 layer cast upon the nanoparticle/SU8 composite layer is structured through holographic lithography, whose pattern is finally transferred to the nanoparticle/SU8 layer by the reactive ion etching process. Honeycomb structures in a submicron scale are experimentally realized in the nanoparticle/SU8 composite.

  6. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojkumar, P.A., E-mail: manoj@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chirayath, V.A.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Low energy nitrogen ion implantation in titanium was studied. • Chemical and defect states were analyzed using SIMS, XPS and PAS. • SIMS and depth resolved XPS data showed good agreement. • Depth resolved defect and chemical states information were revealed. • Formation of 3 layers of defect states proposed to fit PAS results. - Abstract: Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  7. Fine structures of atomic excited states: precision atomic spectroscopy and electron-ion collision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Li Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research fields for future energies such as inertial confinement fusion researches and astrophysics studies especially with satellite observatories advance into stages of precision physics. The relevant atomic data are not only enormous but also of accuracy according to requirements, especially for both energy levels and the collision data. The fine structure of high excited states of atoms and ions can be measured by precision spectroscopy. Such precision measurements can provide not only knowledge about detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions but also a bench mark examination of the accuracy of electron-ion collision data, especially incorporating theoretical computations. We illustrate that by using theoretical calculation methods which can treat the bound states and the adjacent continua on equal footing. The precision spectroscopic measurements of excited fine structures can be served as stringent tests of electron-ion collision data. (authors)

  8. Fabrication of micromechanical structures on substrates selectively etched using a micropatterned ion-implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shizuka; Nakagawa, Sachiko; Ishikawa, Haruo; Ogiso, Hisato

    2001-01-01

    An advanced micromachining technique using ion implantation to modify materials was studied. Gold ion implantation into silicon decreased the etching rate when the silicon was etched in potassium hydroxide solution after the ion implantation; the implanted region remained, thus forming the microstructure. Observation of the cross-section of the resulting etched structure by transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure was made only from the ion-implanted region, and that gold was precipitated on the surface. To clarify the mechanism involved in the decrease in the etching rate, we varied the etching conditions. Our results show that precipitation of implanted gold on the surface decreased the etching rate, because solubility of gold is lower

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Water on Aqueous Barium Ion and the {001} Barite Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Rustad, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of water and its dynamics affect a number of fundamental properties of an interface. Yet, these properties are often inaccessible experimentally and computational studies including solvent are comparatively few. Here, we estimate the structure and kinetics of water exchange of aqueous barium ions and barium ions within the {001} barite surface using molecular dynamics and the reactive flux method. For the aqueous ion, the Ba-O distance to water in the first hydration shell was found to be 280 pm with a coordination number of 8.3, and the best estimate of the exchange rate constant is 4.8 x 10 9 s -1 , closely matching experimental estimates. For the barite surface, the first shell water distance was 282 pm, with a coordination number of 0.9 and the best estimate of the rate constant for exchange is 1.7 x 10 10 s -1 , 3.5 times faster than that of the aqueous ion.

  10. Track structure analysis illustrating the prominent role of low-energy electrons in radiobiological effects of low-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Monte Carlo track structure methods have been used to illustrate the importance of low-energy electrons produced by low-LET radiations. It is shown that these low-energy secondary electrons contribute substantially to the dose in all low-LET irradiations and are particularly efficient at producing highly localized clusters of atomic damage which may be responsible for a major part of the biological effectiveness of low-LET radiations. The data generated by Monte Carlo track structure techniques and by earlier semi-analytical methods based on the LET concept have been compared in terms of cumulative and differential fractions of total dose absorbed as a function of electron energy. The data show that low-energy secondary electrons account for up to nearly 50% of the total dose imparted to a medium when irradiated with electrons or photons. (author)

  11. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Repeatability and reproducibility of parts produced by selective laser melting is a standing issue, and coupled with a lack of standardized quality control presents a major hindrance towards maturing of selective laser melting as an industrial scale process. Consequently, numerical process...... modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures.In this paper, a systematic approach towards...... establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters...

  12. The micro-magnetic structures of Mn sup + ion-implanted GaSb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Fu Qiang; Liu Zhi Kai

    2003-01-01

    The micro-magnetic structures of Mn sup + ion-implanted GaSb are studied using a magnetic force microscope (MFM). MFM images reveal that there are many magnetic domains with different magnetization directions in our samples. The magnetic domain structures and the magnetization direction of typical MFM patterns are analyzed by numeric simulation. (author)

  13. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of GaAs ion-implanted structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privalov E. N.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A noniterative numerical method is proposed to calculate the barrier capacitance of GaAs ion-implanted structures as a function of the Schottky barrier bias. The features of the low- and high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics of these structures which are due to the presence of deep traps are elucidated.

  14. Fractal structure formation on the surfaces of solids subjected to high intensity electron and ion treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altajskij, M.V.; Ivanov, V.V.; Korenev, S.A.; Orelovich, O.L.; Puzynin, I.V.; Chernik, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the results of scanning electron microscopy of surfaces of the solids subjected to high intensity electron and ion beam treatment. The appearance of fractal structures on the modified surfaces is shown. The fractal dimensions of these structures were estimated by box-counting algorithm

  15. Structural disorder in sapphire induced by 90.3 MeV xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, A.; Meftah, A.; Stoquert, J.P.; Toulemonde, M.; Monnet, I.; Izerrouken, M.

    2010-01-01

    In our previous work , we have evidenced, using RBS-C, two effects in the aluminium sublattice of sapphire irradiated with 90.3 MeV xenon ions: a partial disorder creation that saturates at ∼40% followed above a threshold fluence by a highly disordered layer appearing behind the surface. In this work, by RBS-C analysis of the oxygen sublattice, we have observed only one regime of partial disorder creation that saturates at ∼60% in tracks of cross-section double of that found for the aluminium sublattice. Complementary analysis by X-ray diffraction shows that the lattice strain increases with the fluence until a maximum is reached about 7.5 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 . For higher fluences, strain decreases first indicating a little stress relaxation in the material and tends afterwards, to remain constant. This stress relaxation is found to be related to the aluminium sublattice high disorder.

  16. Simulating radial dose of ion tracks in liquid water simulated with Geant4-DNA: A comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Incerti, S.; Psaltaki, M.; Gillet, P.; Barberet, P.; Bardies, M.; Bernal, M. A.; Bordage, M. C.; Breton, V.; Davídková, Marie; Delage, E.; El Bitar, Z.; Francis, Z.; Guatelli, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Karamitros, M.; Lee, S. B.; Maigne, L.; Meylan, S.; Murakami, K.; Nieminen, P.; Payno, H.; Perrot, Y.; Petrovic, I.; Pham, Q. T.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Santin, G.; Sasaki, T.; Seznec, H.; Shin, J. I.; Štěpán, Václav; Tran, H. N.; Villagrasa, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 333, AUG (2014), s. 92-98 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Monte-Carlo- Simulation * Tissue-Equivalent gas * heavy-ion * Alpha-Beams * Particles * Dosimetry * Protons * Models * Codes * Path Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  17. Hydroxyl radical yields in the tracks of high energy 13C6+ and 36Ar18+ ions in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchino, G.; Vigneron, G.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Pin, S.; Mialocq, J.-C.; Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the determination of the OH · radiolytic yields in water irradiated by high energy C 6+ and Ar 18+ ions with LET values of 32 ± 2 and 280 ± 10 eV nm -1 . The time evolution of the yields between 9 x 10 -11 and 9 x 10 -8 s was deduced using the scavenging method with SCN - and Br - and pulse radiolysis with pulses of 5 and 10 μs. The thiocyanate chemical system is less affected with the local high dose rates specific to the high LET particles than the bromide system. At 32 eV nm -1 with C 6+ ions, G(OH · ) reaches a maximum of 1.5 x 10 -7 mol J -1 at 1 ns and decreases at earlier times. With Ar 18+ ions of 280 eV nm -1 G(OH · ) is always increasing at early times up to 1.6 x 10 -7 mol J -1 at 9 x 10 -11 s. In this case the evolution of the hydroxyl radical yields agrees with the high local concentrations obtained with Ar 18+ and C 6+ ions and depicted in recent literature with the yields of the hydrated electron in the ns range

  18. Ion beam irradiation effects in strontium zirconium phosphate with NZP-structure type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Daniel J.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thorogood, Gordon J.; Davis, Joel; Bell, Benjamin D.C.; Jackson, Matthew; Dayal, Pranesh; Ionescu, Mihail; Triani, Gerry; Short, Ken; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Vance, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics with the sodium zirconium phosphate or NZP type structure have potential as nuclear waste form and inert matrix materials. For both applications the material will be subjected to self-radiation damage from α-decay of the incorporated actinides. In this study, ion-beam irradiation using Au- and He-ions has been used to simulate the consequences of α-decay and the effects of irradiation on the structural and macroscopic properties (density and hardness) have been investigated. Irradiation by Au-ions resulted in a significant volume contraction of ∼7%, a reduction in hardness of ∼30% and a loss in long-range order at fluences above 10 14 Au-ions/cm 2 . In contrast, little effect on the material properties was noted for samples irradiated with He-ions up to a fluence of 10 17 ions/cm 2 . Thermal annealing was investigated for the highest fluence Au-ion irradiated sample and significant decomposition was observed

  19. Ion beam assisted deposition of nano-structured C:Ni films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrasonis, G.; Muecklich, A.; Heller, R.; Heinig, K.H.; Gemming, S.; Moeller, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krause, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Physics, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructures influence material properties dramatically due to size, shape and interface effects. Thus the control of the structure at the nanoscale is a key issue in nanomaterials science. The interaction of hyperthermal ions with solids is confined to the nanometer scale. Thus, it can be used to control the morphology evolution during multiphase film deposition. Ion-induced displacements occur in a thin surface layer of the growing film where they increase the atomic mobility for the phase separation. Here the growth-structure relationship of C:Ni (15 at.%) nanocomposite films grown by oblique incidence (45 ) ion beam assisted deposition is reported. The influences of the flux of an assisting Ar+ ion beam (0-140 eV) as well as of an elevated substrate temperature have been studied. The formation of elongated nickel nanoparticles is strongly promoted by the ion beam assistance. Moreover, the metal nanocolumns no longer align with the advancing surface, but with the incoming ions. A window of conditions is established within which the ion assistance leads to the formation of regular composition modulations with a well defined periodicity and tilt. As the dominating driving force for the pattern formation is of physical origin, this approach might be applicable to other immiscible systems.

  20. Tribological properties and surface structures of ion implanted 9Cr18Mo stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengbin, Liu; Guohao, Fu; Yan, Cui; Qiguo, Sun; Min, Qu; Yi, Sun

    2013-07-01

    The polished quenched-and-tempered 9Cr18Mo steels were implanted with N ions and Ti ions respectively at a fluence of 2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by using nanoindenter and tribometer. The results showed that the ion implantations would improve the nanohardness and tribological property, especially N ion implantation. The surface analysis of the implanted samples was carried out by using XRD, XPS and AES. It indicated that the surface exhibits graded layers after ion implantation. For N ion implantation, the surface about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of supersaturated interstitial N solid solution, oxynitrides, CrxCy phase and metal nitrides. In the subsurface region, the metal nitrides dominate and the other phases disappear. For Ti ion implantation, the surface of about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of titanium oxides and carbon amorphous phase, the interstitial solid solution of Ti in Fe is abundant in the subsurface region. The surface components and structures have significant contributions to the improved mechanical properties.

  1. Tribological properties and surface structures of ion implanted 9Cr18Mo stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fengbin, Liu; Guohao, Fu; Yan, Cui; Qiguo, Sun; Min, Qu; Yi, Sun

    2013-01-01

    The polished quenched-and-tempered 9Cr18Mo steels were implanted with N ions and Ti ions respectively at a fluence of 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by using nanoindenter and tribometer. The results showed that the ion implantations would improve the nanohardness and tribological property, especially N ion implantation. The surface analysis of the implanted samples was carried out by using XRD, XPS and AES. It indicated that the surface exhibits graded layers after ion implantation. For N ion implantation, the surface about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of supersaturated interstitial N solid solution, oxynitrides, Cr x C y phase and metal nitrides. In the subsurface region, the metal nitrides dominate and the other phases disappear. For Ti ion implantation, the surface of about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of titanium oxides and carbon amorphous phase, the interstitial solid solution of Ti in Fe is abundant in the subsurface region. The surface components and structures have significant contributions to the improved mechanical properties

  2. Slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shaukat Ali; Imtiaz, Nadia

    2018-05-01

    The properties of ion acoustic double layer (IADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with electron trapping are investigated by using the quasi-potential analysis. The κ-distributed trapped electrons number density expression is truncated to some finite order of the electrostatic potential. By utilizing the reductive perturbation method, a modified Schamel equation which describes the evolution of the slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) with the modified speed due to the presence of bi-ion species is investigated. The Sagdeev-like potential has been derived which accounts for the effect of the electron trapping and superthermality in a bi-ion plasma. It is found that the superthermality index, the trapping efficiency of electrons, and ion to electron temperature ratio are the inhibiting parameters for the amplitude of the slow electron acoustic double layers (SEADLs). However, the enhanced population of the cold ions is found to play a supportive role for the low frequency DLs in bi-ion plasmas. The illustrations have been presented with the help of the bi-ion plasma parameters in the Earth's ionosphere F-region.

  3. Direct observation of the vacancy structure of depleted zones in tungsten ion irradiated at 100K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.Y.; Seidman, D.N.

    1978-12-01

    The structure of depleted zones (DZs) created by the in-situ irradiation of tungsten specimens, at 10 0 K, with 30 keV W + , Mo + or Cr + ions has been studied by field-ion microscopy. As the mass of the 30 keV ion was decreased the following observations were made: (1) the spatial extent of the DZs increased; (2) the vacancy concentration within the DZs decreased; (3) the fraction of isolated monovacancies increased; and (4) subcascades formed within the DZs

  4. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  5. Structure and reactivity of molybdenum oxide cluster ions in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.B.; Fialko, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    A set of cluster ions of molybdenum oxides Mo x O y + (x = 1-5, y = 1-15) was prepared using a combination of the ionic cyclotron resonance method and Knudsen effusion source. Dependence of concentration of different molybdenum oxide ions on the time of retention and their interaction with carbon monoxide was studied. It is shown that Mo x O y + ions with x>3 contain cyclic fragment Mo 3 O 9 in their structure. Oxygen binding energies within ionic clusters Mo x O y + were estimated [ru

  6. Can Cu(II) ions be doped into the crystal structure of potassium hydrogen tartrate?

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Remesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    The differing binding preferences of the hydrogen tartrate ligand (HC4H4O6)- namely {\\mu}7-octadentate mode for potassium ion and bidentate mode for cupric ion rules out the doping (incorporation) of any Cu(II) ion into the crystal structure of potassium hydrogen tartrate. Hence, the claim of growth of copper doped potassium hydrogen tartrate viz. K0.96Cu0.04C4H5O6 by Mathivanan and Haris, Indian J Pure App Phys 51 (2013) 851-859 is untenable.

  7. Modification of structure and properties of tin – fullerite films irradiated by boron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, L.V.

    2013-01-01

    By methods of raster electronic, atomic force and electronic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction the research of change of structure, phase composition and local electronic properties of the tin - fullerite films, subjected to implantation by B + ions (E = 80 keV, F = 5×10 17 ions/cm 2 ) are submitted. It is established, that as a result of boron ion implantation of two-layered tin - fullerite films, tin and fullerite interfusion on sues, that is the solid-phase interaction and as a result of which forms the heterophase with heterogeneous local electric properties. (authors)

  8. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  9. Review of high excitation energy structures in heavy ion collisions: target excitations and three body processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frascaria, N.

    1987-09-01

    A review of experimental results on high excitation energy structures in heavy ion inelastic scattering is presented. The contribution to the spectra of the pick-up break-up mechanism is discussed in the light of the data obtained with light heavy ion projectiles. Recent results obtained with 40 Ar beams at various energies will show that target excitations contribute strongly to the measured cross section

  10. Effect of ion irradiation on the structure and the surface topography of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligacheva, E.A.; Galyaeva, L.V.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Belykh, T.A.; Ligachev, A.E.; Sokhoreva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of C + ion irradiation (40 keV, 10 15 - 10 19 cm -2 ) on the structure and surface topography of high-module carbon fibers is investigated. Interplanar distance and internal stress values are found to be minimal at a radiation dose of 10 17 cm -2 , the height of a layer pack being practically unchanged. The relief of ion irradiated carbon fiber surface constitutes regularly repetitive valleys and ridges spaced parallel with the fiber axis [ru

  11. A structural study of nepheline hydrate I, an inorganic ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structures of nepheline hydrates I, Na 3 Al 3 Si 3 O 12 x 2H 2 O, and three compounds produced by ion exchange with aqueous KCl, RbCl and CsCl at 80 degrees C, have been studied using X-ray diffraction methods. This synthetic silicate has a tetrahedral framework with a two-dimensional pore system consisting of perpendicular 8-ring and 6-ring channels. The long-range ordering of Si and Al into adjacent tetrahedra is well developed. Some aspects of the topology, geometry and bonding of the tetrahedral frame are discussed. Related framework types are derived by unit cell twinning of the idealized cristobalite structure. A limit in the ion exchange is observed when about 1/3 of the Na + ions have been replaced. This behaviour is explained by the restricted volume of two Na sites situated in the 6-ring channel. The readily exchangeable ions and water molecules in the 8-ring channels an arrangement which gradually changes when the size of the alkali metal-ion increases. Most K + -exchanged crystals have a unit cell which is determined by the translational symmetry of the framework, while the original Na form has a two-fold superstructure and the Rb + -exchanged form has a five-fold superstructure. Caesium-ion-exchanged crystals have incommensurate structures. The occurrence of superstructures is related to long-range ordering of the species in the 8-ring channels. (author)

  12. Solvation structure determination of nickel(II) ion in six nitriles using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Yasuhiro; Funahashi, Shigenobu

    1997-01-01

    The solvation structures of the nickel(II) ion in six nitriles have been determined using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The coordination number and the Ni-N bond length are 6 and 206.9 ± 0.6 pm in acetonitrile, 5.9 ± 0.2 and 206.9 ± 0.6 pm in propionitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in butyronitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in isobutyronitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in valeronitrile, and 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.5 ± 0.7 pm in benzonitrile, respectively. The structure parameters around the nickel(II) ion in all the nitriles are not affected by the bulkiness of the nitrile molecules. On the basis of the obtained structure parameters, we have discussed the structural characteristics around the nickel(II) ion with nitrogen and oxygen donor solvents and the reaction mechanisms for nitrile exchange on the nickel(II) ion. (author)

  13. Tracking nuclear wave-packet dynamics in molecular oxygen ions with few-cycle infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Thumm, U.; Cocke, C. L.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have tracked nuclear wave-packet dynamics in doubly charged states of molecular oxygen using few-cycle infrared laser pulses. Bound and dissociating wave packets were launched and subsequently probed via a pair of 8-fs pulses of 790 nm radiation. Ionic fragments from the dissociating molecules were monitored by velocity-map imaging. Pronounced oscillations in the delay-dependent kinetic energy release spectra were observed. The occurrence of vibrational revivals permits us to identify the potential curves of the O 2 dication which are most relevant to the molecular dynamics. These studies show the accessibility to the dynamics of such higher-charged molecules.

  14. Grafting on nuclear tracks using the active sites that remain after the etching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzei, R.; Bermudez, G. Garcia; Chappa, V.C.; Grosso, M.F. del; Fernandez, A.

    2006-01-01

    Poly(propylene) foils were irradiated with Ag ions and then chemically etched to produce samples with structured surfaces. After the etching procedure the active sites that remain on the latent track were used to graft acrylic acid. Nuclear tracks before grafting were visualised using a transmission electron microscope. The grafting yields were determined by weight measurements as a function of ion fluence, etching and grafting time, and were also analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both measurements suggest that the acrylic acid was grafted on etched tracks using the active sites produced by the swift heavy ion beam

  15. Grafting on nuclear tracks using the active sites that remain after the etching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzei, R. [Unidad de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Agropecuarias, CNEA, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: mazzei@cae.cnea.gov.ar; Bermudez, G. Garcia [U. A. de Fisica, Tandar, CNEA, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, 1653 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Chappa, V.C. [U. A. de Fisica, Tandar, CNEA, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grosso, M.F. del [U. A. de Fisica, Tandar, CNEA, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); U. A. de Materiales, CNEA, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-09-15

    Poly(propylene) foils were irradiated with Ag ions and then chemically etched to produce samples with structured surfaces. After the etching procedure the active sites that remain on the latent track were used to graft acrylic acid. Nuclear tracks before grafting were visualised using a transmission electron microscope. The grafting yields were determined by weight measurements as a function of ion fluence, etching and grafting time, and were also analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both measurements suggest that the acrylic acid was grafted on etched tracks using the active sites produced by the swift heavy ion beam.

  16. Multiparametric electronic devices based on nuclear tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D. [HMI Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: FINK@HMI.DE; Saad, A. [HMI Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Basic Science Department, Faculty of Science, Al Balqa University, Salt (Jordan); Dhamodaran, S. [HMI Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Chandra, A. [HMI Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Fahrner, W.R. [Chair of Electronic Devices, Institute of Electrotechnique, Fernuniversitaet, Hagen (Germany); Hoppe, K. [South Westfalia University of Applied Sciences, Hagen (Germany); Chadderton, L.T. [Institute of Advanced Studies, ANU Canberra, GPO Box 4, ACT (Australia)

    2008-08-15

    An overview is given on a family of novel electronic devices consisting of an insulating layer containing conducting or semiconducting nuclear tracks, deposited on a semiconducting substrate, and connected by at least one back and two surface contacts. Conducting and semiconducting latent tracks may emerge directly from swift heavy ion irradiation. Etched tracks in insulators can be filled with adequate materials to make them conducting or semiconducting. For this purpose metallic or semiconducting nanoclusters were deposited. We have denoted termed these devices made with latent tracks as 'tunable electronic anisotropic material on semiconductor' (TEAMS), if based on latent ion tracks, and as 'tunable electronic material in pores in oxide on semiconductor' (TEMPOS), if based on etched tracks. Depending on the band-to-band transition between tracks and substrate and on the ratio of surface to track conductivity, the current/voltage characteristics of TEAMS and TEMPOS structures can be modified in many different ways leading to tunable resistors, capacitors and diodes. Both devices show negative differential resistances. This should enable tunable tunneldiodes. TEAMS or TEMPOS structures can be controlled by various external physical and/or chemical parameters leading to sensors. It is even possible to combine different input currents and/or external parameters according to AND/OR logics. The currents through a clustered layer on a TEMPOS structure can be described by the Barbasi-Albert model of network theory enabling to calculate a 'radius of influence'r{sub ROI} around each surface contact, beyond which neighboring contacts do not influence each other. The radius of influence can be well below 1{mu}m leading to nanometric TEMPOS structures.

  17. Multiparametric electronic devices based on nuclear tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Saad, A.; Dhamodaran, S.; Chandra, A.; Fahrner, W.R.; Hoppe, K.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2008-01-01

    An overview is given on a family of novel electronic devices consisting of an insulating layer containing conducting or semiconducting nuclear tracks, deposited on a semiconducting substrate, and connected by at least one back and two surface contacts. Conducting and semiconducting latent tracks may emerge directly from swift heavy ion irradiation. Etched tracks in insulators can be filled with adequate materials to make them conducting or semiconducting. For this purpose metallic or semiconducting nanoclusters were deposited. We have denoted termed these devices made with latent tracks as 'tunable electronic anisotropic material on semiconductor' (TEAMS), if based on latent ion tracks, and as 'tunable electronic material in pores in oxide on semiconductor' (TEMPOS), if based on etched tracks. Depending on the band-to-band transition between tracks and substrate and on the ratio of surface to track conductivity, the current/voltage characteristics of TEAMS and TEMPOS structures can be modified in many different ways leading to tunable resistors, capacitors and diodes. Both devices show negative differential resistances. This should enable tunable tunneldiodes. TEAMS or TEMPOS structures can be controlled by various external physical and/or chemical parameters leading to sensors. It is even possible to combine different input currents and/or external parameters according to AND/OR logics. The currents through a clustered layer on a TEMPOS structure can be described by the Barbasi-Albert model of network theory enabling to calculate a 'radius of influence'r ROI around each surface contact, beyond which neighboring contacts do not influence each other. The radius of influence can be well below 1μm leading to nanometric TEMPOS structures

  18. Elucidating distinct ion channel populations on the surface of hippocampal neurons via single-particle tracking recurrence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Grzegorz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Gajda, Janusz; Solé, Laura; Akin, Elizabeth J.; Tamkun, Michael M.; Krapf, Diego

    2017-12-01

    Protein and lipid nanodomains are prevalent on the surface of mammalian cells. In particular, it has been recently recognized that ion channels assemble into surface nanoclusters in the soma of cultured neurons. However, the interactions of these molecules with surface nanodomains display a considerable degree of heterogeneity. Here, we investigate this heterogeneity and develop statistical tools based on the recurrence of individual trajectories to identify subpopulations within ion channels in the neuronal surface. We specifically study the dynamics of the K+ channel Kv1.4 and the Na+ channel Nav1.6 on the surface of cultured hippocampal neurons at the single-molecule level. We find that both these molecules are expressed in two different forms with distinct kinetics with regards to surface interactions, emphasizing the complex proteomic landscape of the neuronal surface. Further, the tools presented in this work provide new methods for the analysis of membrane nanodomains, transient confinement, and identification of populations within single-particle trajectories.

  19. Evolution of heavy ions (He{sup 2+}, H{sup +}) radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen vs. ''Track-Segment'' LET values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crumiere, Francis; Vandenborre, Johan; Blain, Guillaume; Fattahi, Massoud [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Haddad, Ferid [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Cyclotron Arronax, Saint Herblain (France)

    2017-08-01

    Ionizing radiation's effects onto water molecules lead to the ionization and/or the excitation of them. Then, these phenomena are followed by the formation of radicals and molecular products. The linear energy transfer (LET), which defines the energy deposition density along the radiation length, is different according to the nature of ionizing particles. Thus, the values of radiolytic yields, defined as the number of radical and molecular products formed or consumed by unit of deposited energy, evolve according to this parameter. This work consists in following the evolution of radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen and ferric ions according to the ''Track-Segment'' LET of ionizing particles (protons, helions). Concerning G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, it seems that the energy deposited into the Bragg peak does not play the main role for the Fe{sup 3+} radiolytic formation, whereas for the G(H{sub 2}) it is the case with a component around 40% of the Bragg peak in the dihydrogen production. Therefore, as main results of this work, for high energetic Helion and Proton beams, the G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, which can be used for further dosimetry studies for example during the α radiolysis experiments, and the primary g(H{sub 2}) values for the Track-Segment LET, which can be used to determine the dihydrogen production by α-emitters, are published.

  20. Tailoring the structural and optical properties of TiN thin films by Ag ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popović, M., E-mail: majap@vinca.rs; Novaković, M.; Rakočević, Z.; Bibić, N.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Changes in structural and optical properties of TiN films induced by Ag ions. • The formation of Ag metallic clusters inside of TiN layers was observed. • The SPR of Ag particles was confirmed by a broad band in the spectra. • As the Ag ions fluence increases the n also increase and k values decrease. • With increasing ion fluence the TiN film becomes more metallic. - Abstract: Titanium nitride (TiN) thin films thickness of ∼260 nm prepared by dc reactive sputtering were irradiated with 200 keV silver (Ag) ions to the fluences ranging from 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to 20 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation TiN layers were annealed 2 h at 700 °C in a vacuum. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural changes were examined by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, while the surface topography was observed using atomic force microscopy. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was employed to get insights on the optical and electronic properties of TiN films with respect to their microstructure. The results showed that the irradiations lead to deformation of the lattice, increasing disorder and formation of new Ag phase. The optical results demonstrate the contribution of surface plasmon resonace (SPR) of Ag particles. SPR position shifted in the range of 354.3–476.9 nm when Ag ion fluence varied from 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to 20 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Shift in peak wavelength shows dependence on Ag particles concentration, suggesting that interaction between Ag particles dominate the surface plasmon resonance effect. Presence of Ag as second metal in the layer leads to overall decrease of optical resistivity of TiN.

  1. Ab initio theory of the electronic structure of nf-ions in solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In the books and papers we developed the self-consistent field theory of nl- ions in Me+n:[L]k- clusters, where k is number of ligands - L, by ion-ligands distance - R. The results which were obtained for all RE and AC ions for Me+n:[L]k, where L - F - , O -2 and so on ligands, are closely corresponded to experimental data. The expression for energy of the cluster may be write as: E = E 0 + kE 1 + k'(E z + E c + E e + E ex ), (Eq.1), where E 0 and E 1 are the energies of the free nl-ion and surrounding one; E z , E c and E e are the energy of electrons interaction with 'strange' nucleus, Coulomb electron-electron interaction and exchange one. E ex is the energy of the interaction of electrons and nucleus with external field. The equations for the radial one-electron wave functions of the ions in the cluster were obtained by minimizing the Eq. 1 for the radial orbitals of the central ion and ligand one. We have received the general system of equations of the self-consistent field for cluster in liquids and solid states. The results of calculations of the energy structure of clusters and values of the standard radial integrals (spectroscopy parameters) for Ac-ions in 1-2-3 superconductors and RE-ions in garnet crystals by different values of R are qualitatively and quantitatively correct. We've got the best results for pressure dependence of Nd ions spectra, change of optical and X-Ray spectra after irradiation of garnets. We explained the nature of anomalous in SrTiO 3 and separate lasers crystals by used of results of the calculations. In the framework of our approach we obtained the best accuracy for the energy of X- Ray lines for all nf- ions in solids and liquids

  2. The Challenge of Interpreting Glutamate-Receptor Ion-Channel Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Mark L

    2017-11-21

    Ion channels activated by glutamate mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Similar to other ligand-gated ion channels, their gating cycle begins with transitions from a ligand-free closed state to glutamate-bound active and desensitized states. In an attempt to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying gating, numerous structures for glutamate receptors have been solved in complexes with agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators, and auxiliary proteins. The embarrassingly rich library of structures emerging from this work reveals very dynamic molecules with a more complex conformational spectrum than anticipated from functional studies. Unanticipated conformations solved for complexes with competitive antagonists and a lack of understanding of the structural basis for ion channel subconductance states further highlight challenges that have yet to be addressed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Role of structure in ion movement of glasses. Final report, July 1, 1990--December 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, H.

    1996-05-01

    The ion movement in inorganic glasses is key to their optimum use in various applications such as solid electrolytes, durable nuclear waste form, stable insulation in electronic devices etc. The primary objective of this project was to understand ion movement in relation to the physical structure of inorganic glasses. Five different glass forming systems were selected for systematically varying different aspects of the structure and determining their influence on ion dynamics: (1) binary Rb and K germanate glass series; (2) mixed (Rb, Ag) and (Rb, K) germanate glass series (3) high purity quartz amorphized by neutron irradiation (4) sodium triborate glasses with different melt conditions and (5) heavy metal fluoride glasses. A two-pronged research program was developed: on the one hand dc ionic conductivity and ac relaxation were measured for a variety of oxide and fluoride glasses as a function of composition, temperature and frequency to characterize long and short range ion transport phenomena. The ion movement was also observed in terms of nuclear spin relaxation rate at University of Dortmund, Germany. On the other hand, the structure was characterized by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at Lehigh, infra-red (IR) and Raman spectroscopy at National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The most significant results of the project are briefly summarized

  4. FTIR spectroscopy structural analysis of the interaction between Lactobacillus kefir S-layers and metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, E.; Mobili, P.; Tymczyszyn, E.; Fausto, R.; Gómez-Zavaglia, A.

    2011-02-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to structurally characterize the interaction of S-layer proteins extracted from two strains of Lactobacillus kefir (the aggregating CIDCA 8348 and the non-aggregating JCM 5818) with metal ions (Cd +2, Zn +2, Pb +2 and Ni +2). The infrared spectra indicate that the metal/protein interaction occurs mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of Asp and Glut residues, with some contribution of the NH groups belonging to the peptide backbone. The frequency separation between the νCOO - anti-symmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations in the spectra of the S-layers in presence of the metal ions was found to be ca. 190 cm -1 for S-layer CIDCA 8348 and ca. 170 cm -1 for JCM 5818, denoting an unidentate coordination in both cases. Changes in the secondary structures of the S-layers induced by the interaction with the metal ions were also noticed: a general trend to increase the amount of β-sheet structures and to reduce the amount of α-helices was observed. These changes allow the proteins to adjust their structure to the presence of the metal ions at minimum energy expense, and accordingly, these adjustments were found to be more important for the bigger ions.

  5. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of ion implantation of polymers. Numerous published studies of polymers modified by ion beams are analysed. General aspects of ion stopping, latent track formation and changes of structure and composition of organic materials...... are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...... is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  6. Ion Beam Etching: Replication of Micro Nano-structured 3D Stencil Masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Mikhailov, Serguei; Bruegger, Juergen; Villanueva, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam LIGA allows the etching of 3D nano-structures by direct writing with a nano-sized beam. However, this is a relatively time consuming process. We propose here another approach for etching structures on large surfaces and faster, compared to the direct writing process. This approach consists of replicating 3D structured masks, by scanning an unfocused ion beam. A polymer substrate is placed behind the mask, as in UV photolithography. But the main advantage is that the 3D structure of the mask can be replicated into the polymer. For that purpose, the masks (developped at LMIS1, EPFL) are made of a silicon nitride membrane 100 nm thick, on which 3D gold structures up to 200 nm thick, are deposited. The 3D Au structures are made with the nanostencil method, based on successive gold deposition. The IMA institute, from HE-Arc, owns a High Voltage Engineering 1.7 MV Tandetron with both solid and gaseous negative ion sources, able to generate ions from almost every chemical element in a broad range of energies comprised between 400 keV and 6.8 MeV. The beam composition and energy are chosen in such a way, that ions lose a significant fraction of their energy when passing through the thickest regions of the mask. Ions passing through thinner regions of the mask loose a smaller fraction of their energy and etch the polymer with larger thicknesses, allowing a replication of the mask into the polymer. For our trials, we have used a carbon beam with an energy of 500 keV. The beam was focussed to a diameter of 5 mm with solid slits, in order to avoid border effects and thus ensure a homogeneous dose distribution on the beam diameter. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated, allowing industrial applications for micro-mould fabrication, micro-fluidics and micro-optics.

  7. Does sound structure affect word learning? An eye-tracking study of Danish learning toddlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trecca, Fabio; Bleses, Dorthe; Madsen, Thomas O.

    2018-01-01

    closely related languages. In support of this hypothesis, recent work has shown that the phonetic properties of Danish negatively affect online language processing in young Danish children. In this study, we used eye-tracking to investigate whether the challenges associated with processing Danish also...

  8. Multifunctional structural lithium ion batteries for electrical energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Atif; Zeshan Ali, Muhammad

    2018-05-01

    Multifunctional structural batteries based on carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites are fabricated that can bear mechanical loads and act as electrochemical energy storage devices simultaneously. Structural batteries, containing woven carbon fabric anode; lithium cobalt oxide/graphene nanoplatelets coated aluminum cathode; filter paper separator and cross-linked polymer electrolyte, were fabricated through resin infusion under flexible tooling (RIFT) technique. Compression tests, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and impedance spectroscopy were done on the cross-linked polymer electrolytes while cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and in-plane shear tests were conducted on the fabricated structural batteries. A range of solid polymer electrolytes with increasing concentrations of lithium perchlorate salt in crosslinked polymer epoxies were formulated. Increased concentrations of electrolyte salt in cross-linked epoxy increased the ionic conductivity, although the compressive properties were compromised. A structural battery, exhibiting simultaneously a capacity of 0.16 mAh L‑1, an energy density of 0.32 Wh L‑1 and a shear modulus of 0.75 GPa have been reported.

  9. Computational multiobjective topology optimization of silicon anode structures for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah L.; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    This study utilizes computational topology optimization methods for the systematic design of optimal multifunctional silicon anode structures for lithium-ion batteries. In order to develop next generation high performance lithium-ion batteries, key design challenges relating to the silicon anode structure must be addressed, namely the lithiation-induced mechanical degradation and the low intrinsic electrical conductivity of silicon. As such this work considers two design objectives, the first being minimum compliance under design dependent volume expansion, and the second maximum electrical conduction through the structure, both of which are subject to a constraint on material volume. Density-based topology optimization methods are employed in conjunction with regularization techniques, a continuation scheme, and mathematical programming methods. The objectives are first considered individually, during which the influence of the minimum structural feature size and prescribed volume fraction are investigated. The methodology is subsequently extended to a bi-objective formulation to simultaneously address both the structural and conduction design criteria. The weighted sum method is used to derive the Pareto fronts, which demonstrate a clear trade-off between the competing design objectives. A rigid frame structure was found to be an excellent compromise between the structural and conduction design criteria, providing both the required structural rigidity and direct conduction pathways. The developments and results presented in this work provide a foundation for the informed design and development of silicon anode structures for high performance lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Deming; Sun, Li; Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10 15 –1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp 2 carbon clusters. The sp 2 carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature

  11. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Sun, Li [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116023 (China); Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10{sup 15}–1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp{sup 2} carbon clusters. The sp{sup 2} carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature.

  12. Modification of mechanical properties of single crystal aluminum oxide by ion beam induced structural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, W.; Nowak, R.; Horino, Y.; Baba, K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of ceramics is essentially determined by their surface qualities. As a surface modification technique, ion implantation provides the possibility to modify the mechanical properties of ceramics. Highly energetic ions are implanted into the near-surface region of a material and modify its composition and structure. Ions of aluminum, oxygen, nickel and tantalum were implanted into single-crystal α-aluminum oxide. Three-point bending tests showed that an increase in flexural strength of up to 30% could be obtained after implantation of aluminum and oxygen. Nickel and tantalum ion implantation increased the fracture toughness. Indentation tests with Knoop and Vickers diamonds and comparison of the lengths of the developed radial cracks showed that ion implantation leads to a reaction in cracking. The observed effects are assigned to radiation induced structural changes of the ceramic. Ion bombardment leads to radiation damage and formation of compressive stress. In case of tantalum implantation, the implanted near-surface zone becomes amorphous. These effects make the ceramic more resistant to fracture. (orig.)

  13. Structural and electrical characterization of ion beam synthesized and n-doped SiC layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serre, C.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. Electronica; Panknin, D.; Koegler, R.; Skorupa, W. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Esteve, J.; Acero, M.C. [CSIC, Bellaterra (Spain). Centre Nacional de Microelectronica

    2001-07-01

    This work reports preliminary data on the ion beam synthesis of n-doped SiC layers. For this, two approaches have been studied: (i) doping by ion implantation (with N{sup +}) of ion beam synthesized SiC layers and (ii) ion beam synthesis of SiC in previously doped (with P) Si wafers. In the first case, the electrical data show a p-type overcompensation of the SiC layer in the range of temperatures between -50 C and 125 C. The structural (XRD) and in-depth (SIMS, Spreading Resistance) analysis of the samples suggest this overcompensation to be induced by p-type active defects related to the N{sup +} ion implantation damage, and therefore the need for further optimization their thermal processing. In contrast, the P-doped SiC layers always show n-type doping. This is also accompanied by a higher structural quality, being the spectral features of the layers similar to those from the not doped material. Electrical activation of P in the SiC lattice is about one order of magnitude lower than in Si. These data constitute, to our knowledge, the first results reported on the doping of ion beam synthesized SiC layers. (orig.)

  14. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  15. Ion-beam enhanced etching for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gischkat, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the usage of the ion-beam enhanced etching (IBEE) for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ).Hereby the approach of the enhancement of the wet-chemical etching rate due to the irradiation with energetic ions is pursued. This method is very success promising for the realization of micro- and nanostructures with perpendicular structural walls as well as small roughnesses. The aim of this thesis consisted therein to form the foundations for the realization of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures (for instance: Layer systems and photonic crystals) in LiNbO 3 with high optical quality and to demonstrate on selected examples. Conditions for the success of the IBEE structuration technique is first of all the understanding of the defect formation under ion irradiation as well as the radiation-induced structure changes in the crystal and the change of the chemical resistance connected with this. For this the defect formation was studied in dependence on th ion mass, the ion energy, and the irradiation temperature. Thermally induced influences and effects on the radiation damage, as they can occur in intermediate steps in the complex processing, must be known and were studied by means of subsequent temperature treatment. The results from the defect studies were subsequently applied for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures in LiNbO 3 . Shown is the realization of lateral structure with nearly perpendicular structure walls as well as the realization of thin membranes and slits. The subsequent combination of lateral structuration with the fabrication of thin membranes and slits allowed the three-dimensional structuration of LiNbO 3 . This is exemplarily shown for a microresonator and for a 2D photonic crystal with below lying air slit. [de

  16. Growth of surface structures correlated with structural and mechanical modifications of brass by laser-induced Si plasma ions implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, M. Shahid; Yousaf, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Laser-produced Si plasma is employed as an ion source for implantation on the brass substrate for its surface, structural, and mechanical modifications. Thomson parabola technique is employed for the measurement of energy and flux of Si ions using CR-39. In response to stepwise increase in number of laser pulses from 3000 to 12000, four brass substrates were implanted by laser-induced Si plasma ions of energy 290 keV at different fluxes ranging from 45 × 1012 to 75 × 1015 ions/cm2. SEM analysis reveals the formation of nano/micro-sized irregular shaped cavities and pores for the various ion fluxes for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 9000. At the maximum ion flux for 12,000 pulses, distinct and organized grains with hexagonal and irregular shaped morphology are revealed. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis exhibits that a new phase of CuSi (311) is identified which confirms the implantation of Si ions in brass substrate. A significant decrease in mechanical properties of implanted brass, such as Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS), and hardness, with increasing laser pulses from 3000 to 6000 is observed. However, with increasing laser pulses from 9000 to a maximum value of 12,000, an increase in mechanical properties like hardness, YS, and UTS is observed. The generation as well as annihilation of defects, recrystallization, and intermixing of Si precipitates with brass matrix is considered to be responsible for variations in surface, structural, and mechanical modifications of brass.

  17. COMPARISON OF SOLAR SURFACE FLOWS INFERRED FROM TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY AND COHERENT STRUCTURE TRACKING USING HMI/SDO OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Švanda, Michal; Roudier, Thierry; Rieutord, Michel; Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time-distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides two-dimensional horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time-distance inversions estimate the full three-dimensional velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations as input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the three-dimensional time-distance inversion.

  18. Focused-ion-beam nano-structured rib channel waveguides in KY(WO4)2 for laser applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardillou, F.; Romanyuk, Y.E.; Pavius, M.; Borca, C.N.; Salathé, R.P.; Pollnau, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Bulk $KY(WO_4)_2$ (hereafter KYW) laser crystals doped with rare-earth ions are recognized to be among the most promising host materials for obtaining novel solid-state lasers. The rare-earth ions $RE^{3+}$ are easily incorporated in the KYW structure by replacing the $Y{3+}$ ions, resulting in a

  19. Electronic structure and dynamics of ordered clusters with ME or RE ions on oxide surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulagin, N.A., E-mail: nkulagin@bestnet.kharkov.u [Kharkiv National University for Radio Electronics, Avenue Shakespeare 6-48, 61045 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    Selected data of ab initio simulation of the electronic structure and spectral properties of either cluster with ions of iron, rare earth or actinium group elements have been presented here. Appearance of doped Cr{sup +4} ions in oxides, Cu{sup +2} in HTSC, Nd{sup +2} in solids has been discussed. Analysis of experimental data for plasma created ordered structures of crystallites with size of about 10{sup -9} m on surface of separate oxides are given, too. Change in the spectroscopic properties of clusters and nano-structures on surface of strontium titanate crystals discussed shortly using the X-ray line spectroscopy experimental results. - Research highlights: External influence and variation of technology induce changes in valence of nl ions in compounds. Wave function of cluster presented as anti-symmetrical set of ions wave functions. The main equation describes the self-consistent field depending on state of all electrons of cluster. Level scheme of Cr{sup 4+} ions in octo- and tetra-site corresponds to doped oxides spectra after treatment. Plasma treatment effects in appearance of systems of unit crystallites with size of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -9} m.

  20. Electronic structure and dynamics of ordered clusters with ME or RE ions on oxide surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Selected data of ab initio simulation of the electronic structure and spectral properties of either cluster with ions of iron, rare earth or actinium group elements have been presented here. Appearance of doped Cr +4 ions in oxides, Cu +2 in HTSC, Nd +2 in solids has been discussed. Analysis of experimental data for plasma created ordered structures of crystallites with size of about 10 -9 m on surface of separate oxides are given, too. Change in the spectroscopic properties of clusters and nano-structures on surface of strontium titanate crystals discussed shortly using the X-ray line spectroscopy experimental results. - Research highlights: → External influence and variation of technology induce changes in valence of nl ions in compounds. → Wave function of cluster presented as anti-symmetrical set of ions wave functions. → The main equation describes the self-consistent field depending on state of all electrons of cluster. → Level scheme of Cr 4+ ions in octo- and tetra-site corresponds to doped oxides spectra after treatment. → Plasma treatment effects in appearance of systems of unit crystallites with size of about 10 -6 -10 -9 m.

  1. High dislocation density structures and hardening produced by high fluency pulsed-ion-beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkeev, Yu.P.; Didenko, A.N.; Kozlov, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a review of experimental data on the ''long-range effect'' (a change in dislocation structure and in physicomechanical properties at distances considerably greater than the ion range value in ion-implanted metallic materials and semiconductors). Our results of electron microscopy studies of high density dislocation structure in ion-implanted metallic materials with different initial states are given. It has been shown that the nature of the dislocation structure and its quantitative characteristics in the implanted metals and alloys depend on the target initial state, the ion type and energy and the retained dose. The data obtained by different workers are in good agreement both with our results and with each other as well as with the results of investigation of macroscopic characteristics (wear resistance and microhardness). It has been established that the ''long-range effect'' occurs in metallic materials with a low yield point or high plasticity level and with little dislocation density in their initial state prior to ion implantation. ((orig.))

  2. Use of low energy alkali ion scattering as a probe of surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbury, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of low energy ion scattering as a probe of surface structure with emphasis on work done using alkali ions. Various schemes for extracting structural information from the ion energy and angle distributions are discussed in terms of advantages and disadvantages of each. The scattering potential which is the primary non-structural parameter needed for analysis, is discussed in terms of recent experimental results. The structure of clean and reconstructed surfaces are discussed, with examples of measurements of layer relaxations on the Mo(111) surface and missing row reconstructions on the Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces. Studies of adsorbate covered surfaces are presented with respect to location of the adsorbate and its effect on the structure of the underlying substrate. Finally, examples are given which demonstrate the sensitivity of ion scattering to surface defects and disordering on reconstructed Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces and unreconstructed Mo(111) surfaces, and to ordering of adsorbates on Mo(001). 47 refs., 12 figs

  3. Study of ion plating parameters, coating structure, and corrosion protection for aluminum coatings on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egert, C.M.; Scott, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A study of ion-plating parameters (primarily deposition rate and substrate bias voltage), coating structure, and the corrosion protection provided by aluminum coatings on uranium is presented. Ion plating at low temperatures yields a variety of aluminum coating structures on uranium. For example, aluminum coatings produced at high deposition rates and low substrate bias voltages are columnar with voids between columns, as expected for high-rate vapor deposition at low temperatures. On the other hand, low deposition rate and high bias voltage produce a modified coating with a dense, noncolumnar structure. These results are not in agreement with other studies that have found no relationship between deposition rate and coating structure in ion plating. This discrepancy is probably due to the high deposition rates used in these studies. An accelerated, water vapor corrosion test indicates that the columnar aluminum coatings provide some corrosion protection despite their porous nature; however, the dense noncolumnar coatings provide significantly greater protection. These results indicate that ion-plated aluminum coatings produced at low deposition rates and high substrate bias voltages creates dense coating structures that are most effective in protecting uranium from corrosion

  4. Coupling structure calculations for ion cyclotron heating of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannelier, P.

    1986-12-01

    Two structures are studied: antennas and waveguides. After some recalls on transmission lines with losses, the theory is applied to antennas with inner adaptation: the problem is to calculate the impedance necessary for complete adaptation of antenna to the power line and the generator. The Faraday screen role is detailed and studied: the per-unit length loss resistance due to ohmic losses in the screen which lower the plasma-coupled maximum power. Waveguide coupling theory is also presented. Coupling between wave guide and plasma is evaluated [fr

  5. Surface and local electronic structure modification of MgO film using Zn and Fe ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jitendra Pal; Lim, Weon Cheol; Lee, Jihye; Song, Jonghan; Lee, Ik-Jae; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2018-02-01

    Present work is motivated to investigate the surface and local electronic structure modifications of MgO films implanted with Zn and Fe ions. MgO film was deposited using radio frequency sputtering method. Atomic force microscopy measurements exhibit morphological changes associated with implantation. Implantation of Fe and Zn ions leads to the reduction of co-ordination geometry of Mg2+ ions in host lattice. The effect is dominant at bulk of film rather than surface as the large concentration of implanted ions resides inside bulk. Moreover, the evidences of interaction among implanted ions and oxygen are not being observed using near edge fine structure measurements.

  6. Effect of ion beam irradiation on the structure of ZnO films deposited by a dc arc plasmatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Lee, Heon-Ju; Plaksin, Vadim Yu; Ko, Min Gook; Joa, Sang Beom; Yim, Chan Joo

    2008-02-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline ZnO film on a cold substrate was performed by using a plasmatron in rough vacuum condition. Low energy oxygen ion beam generated by a cold cathode ion source was introduced during the deposition process. The change of film property on the ion beam energy was checked. It is shown that irradiation by 200 eV ions improves crystalline structure of the film. Increasing of ion beam energy up to 400 eV leads to the degradation of a crystalline structure and decreases the deposition rate.

  7. Effects of C3+ ion irradiation on structural, electrical and magnetic properties of Ni nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D. I.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Kadyrzhanov, K. K.; Uglov, V. V.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Shumskaya, E. E.; Kaniukov, E. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Ion irradiation is an attractive method for obtaining nanostructures that can be used under extreme conditions. Also, it is possible to control the technological process that allows obtaining nanomaterials with new properties at ion irradiation. In this paper, we study the effect of irradiation with 28 MeV C3+ ions and fluences up to 5 × 1011 cm-2 on the structure and properties of template-synthesized nickel nanotubes with a length of 12 μm, with diameters of 400 nm, and a wall thickness of 100 nm. It is demonstrated that the main factor influencing the degradation of nanostructures under irradiation in PET template is the processes of mixing the material of nanostructures with the surrounding polymer. The influence of irradiation with various fluences on the crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties of nickel nanotubes is studied.

  8. Crystal structure of TiNi nanoparticles obtained by Ar ion beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A. Torres; Cuellar, E. Lopez; Mendez, U. Ortiz; Yacaman, M. Jose

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a state of matter that have properties different from either molecules or bulk solids, turning them into a very interesting class of materials to study. In the present work, the crystal structure of TiNi nanoparticles obtained by ion beam deposition is characterized. TiNi nanoparticles were obtained from TiNi wire samples by sputtering with Ar ions using a Gatan precision ion polishing system. The TiNi nanoparticles were deposited on a Lacey carbon film that was used for characterization by transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field imaging, electron diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results of nanodiffraction seem to indicate that the nanoparticles keep the same B2 crystal structure as the bulk material but with a decreased lattice parameter

  9. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  10. Factors controlling the oxide ion conductivity of fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Lybye, D.; Bonanos, N.

    2004-01-01

    Many metal oxides of fluorite and perovskite related structures are oxide ion conductors, which have practical applications in devices such as oxygen sensors, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and electrolysers. Several structural and thermodynamic parameters such as (1) critical radius of the pathway...... such parameters for fluorite and perovskite oxides by considering their sensitivities to the individual ionic radii. Based on experimental data available in the literature, it is argued that lattice distortion (lattice stress and deviation from cubic symmetry) due to ion radii mismatch determines the ionic...... conductivity to a very large extent, and that lattice distortion is of much greater importance than many other proposed parameters. In case of the perovskites, the charge of the B-site ion is also of major importance. (C) 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  11. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  12. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  13. Ion Transport and Structure in Polymer Electrolytes with Applications in Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintapalli, Mahati

    When mixed with lithium salts, polymers that contain more than one chemical group, such as block copolymers and endgroup-functionalized polymers, are promising electrolyte materials for next-generation lithium batteries. One chemical group can provide good ion solvation and transport properties, while the other chemical group can provide secondary properties that improve the performance characteristics of the battery. Secondary properties of interest include non-flammability for safer lithium ion batteries and high mechanical modulus for dendrite resistance in high energy density lithium metal batteries. Block copolymers and other materials with multiple chemical groups tend to exhibit nanoscale heterogeneity and can undergo microphase separation, which impacts the ion transport properties. In block copolymers that microphase separate, ordered self-assembled structures occur on longer length scales. Understanding the interplay between structure at different length scales, salt concentration, and ion transport is important for improving the performance of multifunctional polymer electrolytes. In this dissertation, two electrolyte materials are characterized: mixtures of endgroup-functionalized, short chain perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) salt, and mixtures of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO; SEO) and LiTFSI. The PFPE/LiTFSI electrolytes are liquids in which the PFPE backbone provides non-flammability, and the endgroups resemble small molecules that solvate ions. In these electrolytes, the ion transport properties and nanoscale heterogeneity (length scale 1 nm) are characterized as a function of endgroup using electrochemical techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and wide angle X-ray scattering. Endgroups, especially those containing PEO segments, have a large impact on ionic conductivity, in part because the salt distribution is not homogenous; we find that salt partitions

  14. Kinetic Modeling of the Lif:Mg,Ti TL System including Defect Creation: Implications to, and Development of Track Structure Theory Calculations of Heavy Charged Particle Radiation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliyahu, Ian

    2015-01-01

    In this research, various kinetic models were developed for LiF:Mg,Ti crystals, both in the irradiation and recombination stages. The models were later used to improve on track structure theory, which attempts to describe radiation effects of Heavy charged particle. To achieve this goal, the research focused on three main areas of endeavor. 1. In the first experimental measurements of optical absorption on LiF:Mg,Ti following low ionization density radiation (photons) and high ionization density protons and He ions were carried out in order to investigate the degree of applicability of track structure theory to the prediction of heavy charged particle induced effects of radiation. These measurements are described below. a) Photon induced optical absorption (OA) dose response was measured over an extended dose-range from 10 Gy to 105 Gy for the main OA bands in LiF:Mg,Ti, i.e., the 4.0 eV band (trapping center associated with glow peak 5 in the thermoluminescence glow curve), 4.77 eV band , 5.08 eV (F band) and 5.45 eV band. The extended dose-range allowed the unambiguous determination of linear/exponentially saturation behavior for all the OA bands. For the two main OA bands of interest at 4.0 eV and 5.08 eV, the dose filling factor was determined to be 5 ± 0.6.10-4 Gy-1 and 6.1 ± 0.4 × 10-5 Gy-1 respectively. The surprising, previously unexplained, linear/exponentially saturating dose response of the F band even though vacancies/F centers are being created by the radiation was explained in a kinetic analysis also described in the following. b) Heavy charged particle (HCP) optical absorption was carried out for 1.4 MeV protons and 4 MeV He ions at the SARAF, RARAF and BINA accelerators. Fluence response was measured over the extended range from 1010 cm-2 to 2.1014 cm-2. The low fluence region from 1010 cm-2 to 1011 cm-2 in the no-track-overlap regime allows a comparison of the experimental measurements and the track structure theory (TST) evaluations of the

  15. Structural changes of DNA in heavy ion-induced mutants on Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tano, S.; Shikazono, N.; Tanaka, A.; Yokota, Y.; Watanabe, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to investigate the frequency of structural changes induced by high LET radiation in plants, a comparison was made between DNA fragments amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from C ion- and electron-induced Arabidopsis mutants at GL and TT loci. (orig./MG)

  16. Modification and structuring of conducting polymer films on insulating substrates by ion beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmus, T.; Wolf, Gerhard K.

    2000-01-01

    Besides the commonly used procedures of UV-, X-ray and electron beam lithography, surface structuring by ion beam processes represents an alternative route to receive patterns in the nanometre-micrometre scale. In this work we focused on changes of surface properties of the polymer materials induced by ion irradiation and on reproducing hexagonal and square patterns in the micrometre scale. To achieve a better understanding of modification and structuring of insulating and conducting polymers by ion beam treatment we investigated effects of 14 keV Ar + bombardment on thin films of doped conducting polyethoxithiophene (PEOT) and polyethylenedioxithiophene (PEDT) on polyethersulfone (PES) as insulating substrate within the fluence range from 10 14 to 10 17 ions/cm 2 . Changes of surface properties like wettability, solubility, topology and electrochemical behaviour have been studied by contact angle technique, AFM/LFM, cyclovoltammetry and electrochemical microelectrode. By irradiation through copper masks structured patterns were achieved. These patterns can be converted by galvanic or electroless copper deposition in structured metal layers

  17. Experimental modeling of high burn-up structure in SIMFUEL with ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Isaenkova, M.; Lunev, A.; Tenishev, A.; Khlunov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments are conducted to simulate high burn-up structure in accelerator conditions. Three ion irradiation schemes are used: 1. Xe 27+ 160 MeV up to 5x10 15 cm -2 (thermal spikes). 2. Xe 16+ 320 keV up to 1x10 17 cm -2 (collision cascades). 3. He + 20 keV up to 5,5x10 17 cm -2 (implantation stage). Structural characterization performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis and atomic force microscopy revealed prominent grain refinement in case of Xe 27+ irradiation. Artificial energy variation for incident ions showed varying size of subgrains. At maximum energy of incident ions, subgrain size amounts ∼ 320 nm. Moving to the edge of irradiated region changes the size to ∼ 170 nm. Typical size of coherent scattering regions matches subgrain size for high-energy irradiation. Low-energy irradiation results in less significant structural changes: flaky structure at random sites for samples irradiated with low-energy xenon ions and bubble nucleation for helium irradiation. Dislocation density increases significantly, and it is shown that a single fluence dependence exists for low- and high-energy irradiation. (authors)

  18. Structures and Fragmentation Mechanisms of the Ions of Ethanol by Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-15

    structural information contained in deuterated sp ies is readily obtainable. Eth 1 ions ty stdied tnc) Vde (CH3CHOH?’., [CH CHOHJ. (CH2COH]r-% [CH 2COF...high and low energy systems involves electronic 18 and vibrational 19 excitation respectively, the amount of energy thus deposited must be approximately

  19. Structural changes of DNA in heavy ion-induced mutants on Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, S; Shikazono, N; Tanaka, A; Yokota, Y; Watanabe, H [Japan Atomic Research Research Inst., Watanuki, Takasaki (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate the frequency of structural changes induced by high LET radiation in plants, a comparison was made between DNA fragments amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from C ion- and electron-induced Arabidopsis mutants at GL and TT loci. (orig./MG)

  20. The structure of quasi-molecular KX-ray spectra from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.-N.; Frank, W.; Manfrass, P.

    1976-01-01

    In the experiments with Ge, Nb, Kr and La ions continuum X-ray spectra having a two-component structure have been observed. Both components atr interpreted as quasi-molecular X-radiation caused by transitions to the 2psigma and 1ssigma states in the quasimolecule