WorldWideScience

Sample records for ion radiotherapy mri

  1. MRI-based treatment plan simulation and adaptation for ion radiotherapy using a classification-based approach

    Rank, Christopher M; Tremmel, Christoph; Hünemohr, Nora; Nagel, Armin M; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    In order to benefit from the highly conformal irradiation of tumors in ion radiotherapy, sophisticated treatment planning and simulation are required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of MRI for ion radiotherapy treatment plan simulation and adaptation using a classification-based approach. Firstly, a voxelwise tissue classification was applied to derive pseudo CT numbers from MR images using up to 8 contrasts. Appropriate MR sequences and parameters were evaluated in cross-validation studies of three phantoms. Secondly, ion radiotherapy treatment plans were optimized using both MRI-based pseudo CT and reference CT and recalculated on reference CT. Finally, a target shift was simulated and a treatment plan adapted to the shift was optimized on a pseudo CT and compared to reference CT optimizations without plan adaptation. The derivation of pseudo CT values led to mean absolute errors in the range of 81 - 95 HU. Most significant deviations appeared at borders between air and different tissue classes and originated from partial volume effects. Simulations of ion radiotherapy treatment plans using pseudo CT for optimization revealed only small underdosages in distal regions of a target volume with deviations of the mean dose of PTV between 1.4 - 3.1% compared to reference CT optimizations. A plan adapted to the target volume shift and optimized on the pseudo CT exhibited a comparable target dose coverage as a non-adapted plan optimized on a reference CT. We were able to show that a MRI-based derivation of pseudo CT values using a purely statistical classification approach is feasible although no physical relationship exists. Large errors appeared at compact bone classes and came from an imperfect distinction of bones and other tissue types in MRI. In simulations of treatment plans, it was demonstrated that these deviations are comparable to uncertainties of a target volume shift of 2 mm in two directions indicating that especially

  2. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen; Jaekel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  3. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  4. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. On-line MRI guidance for Radiotherapy

    Crijns, S.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy has the potential to increase success of treatment by decreasing uncertainties concerning tumour position and shape. MRI is the modality of choice when it comes to imaging for tumour delineation and characterisation, set-up correction, treatment plan adaptation, response

  6. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections

  7. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Jaekel, O. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: o.jaekel@dkfz.de; Schulz-Ertner, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, C.P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heeg, P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  8. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists

  9. MRI of occult sacral insufficiency fractures following radiotherapy

    Mammone, J.F.; Schweitzer, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Following radiation therapy, marrow abnormalities noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequent and may mimic metastases. Specific radiotherapy changes are usually easily identifiable; however, traumatic lesions cause more interpretive difficulties. We assessed the incidence and MRI characteristics of insufficiency fractures in this population. During a 5-year span (1987-1991), 546 patients received pelvic radiotherapy for primary malignancies. MRI was performed in 25 of these patients at least 3 months after treatment. The mean dose in this group was 53 Gy. These MRI scans were retrospectively reviewed for the appearance of the sacrum with particular attention to the presence of insufficiency fractures. This was correlated with clinical course and scintigraphic findings. Presumed insufficiency fractures on MRI paralleled the sacral side of the sacroiliac joint, enhanced with Gd-DTPA, were most prominent or initially seen anteriorly, and had ill-defined margins on all imaging sequences. The incidence of occult sacral insufficiency fractures was at least 20%. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum in the post-radiotherapy patient are a relatively frequent occurrence which can mimic metastases. Consideration of this phenomenon and knowledge of differential features may avoid overdiagnosis of osseous metastases. (orig.)

  10. Carbon ion radiotherapy for sarcomas

    Imai, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Principles of heavy ion therapy, its application to bone and soft tissue sarcomas and outline of its general state are described. The heavy ion therapy has advantages of its high dose distribution to the target and strong biological effect due to the Bragg peak formation and high linear energy transfer, respectively. The authors use carbon ion generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for the therapy of performance state 0-2 patients with the sarcomas unresectable, diagnosed pathologically, and of 60 y, 45% and teens, 8%) have been treated, whose tumor site has been the pelvis in 73%, volume >600 mL in 63%, tissue type of bone tumor in 70% (where cordoma has amounted to>200 cases). Five-year local control rate is found 71% and survival, 59%. In 175 therapeutically fresh cases with sacral cordoma of median age 67 y, with median clinical target volume 9 cm, treated with median dose 70.4 GyE/16 irradiations, the 8-y local control rate is found to be 69% and survival, 74%, within the median follow-up 54 months; with severe skin ulcer in 2 cases and deterioration of nervous dysfunction in 15 cases; suggesting the therapy is as effective and useful as surgical resection. At present, the therapy is not applicable to Japan health insurance. In the author's hospital, the heavy ion therapy has been conducted to total of >6,000 patients, which amounting to the largest number in the world. Now, 3 Japanese facilities can do the therapy as well and 3 countries in the world.(T.T.)

  11. Motion compensation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Glitzner, M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy aims to deliver a lethal radiation dose to cancer cells immersed in the body using a high energetic photon beam. Due to physiologic motion of the human anatomy (e.g. caused by filling of internal organs or breathing), the target volume is under permanent motion during irradiation,

  12. MRI assessment of cervical cancer for adaptive radiotherapy

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schirl, Gertrude; Baldinger, Anja; Poetter, Richard; Helbich, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of the information obtained from MRI for adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 49 patients with cervix cancer, treated by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and MRI-assisted high-dose-rate brachytherapy ± concomitant cisplatin, underwent MRI at diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy fractions. 190 MRI examinations were performed. Pretreatment scans were correlated with clinical examination (CE) findings. Measurements in 3-D of the tumor extension and also of the distance from the tumor to the pelvic side wall were performed using both MRI and CE. The tumor volume regression induced initially by EBRT and the subsequent regression after each brachytherapy fraction were assessed. Results: MRI and CE showed 92% agreement in overall parametrial staging and 73% agreement in terms of vaginal involvement. There was, however, disagreement in parametrial side (right/left) classification in 25% of the parametria examined. These were patients with unilateral displacement of the cervix and contralateral invasion of the parametrium. The mean tumor volume on the pretreatment MRI scan (GTVD) was 61 cm 3 . At the time of the four brachytherapy fractions the mean was 16 cm 3 , 10 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 , and 8 cm 3 , defined as the GTVBT plus the gray zones in the parametria. Conclusion: CE and MRI findings agree well in terms of overall staging. The clinical assessment of side-specific parametrial invasion improved when having access to the additional knowledge obtained from MRI. The greatest decrease in tumor volume occurs during EBRT, whereas tumor regression between the first and subsequent brachytherapy fractions is minor. (orig.)

  13. Review of potential improvements using MRI in the radiotherapy workflow

    Torresin, Alberto; Brambilla, Maria Grazia; Monti, Angelo F.; Moscato, Alessio; Brockmann, Marc A.; University Medical Center Mannheim; Schad, Lothar; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Lohr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The goal of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a lethal amount of dose to tissue volumes that contain a significant amount of tumour cells while sparing surrounding unaffected or healthy tissue. Online image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound, fiducial-based planar X-ray imaging or helical/conebeam CT has dramatically improved the precision of radiotherapy, with moving targets still posing some methodical problems regarding positioning. Therefore, requirements for precise target delineation and identification of functional body structures to be spared by high doses become more evident. The identification of areas of relatively radioresistant cells or areas of high tumor cell density is currently under development. This review outlines the state of the art of MRI integration into treatment planning and its importance in follow up and the quantification of biological effects. Finally the current state of the art of online imaging for patient positioning will be outlined and indications will be given what the potential of integrated radiotherapy/online MRI systems is.

  14. A criterion for the reliable use of MRI-only radiotherapy

    Elgaard Korsholm Nielsen, Marie; Waring, Line Winther; Edmund, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MRI-only radiotherapy will eliminate the systematic registration errors introduced when transferring MRI information to the CT. However, challenges concerning the missing information on electron density, necessary for dose calculation and patient setup on bony anatomy are introduced. ...

  15. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  16. Review on heavy ion radiotherapy facilities and related ion sources (invited)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ion radiotherapy awakens worldwide interest recently. The clinical results obtained by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan have clearly demonstrated the advantages of carbon ion radiotherapy. Presently, there are four facilities for heavy ion radiotherapy in operation, and several new facilities are under construction or being planned. The most common requests for ion sources are a long lifetime and good stability and reproducibility. Sufficient intensity has been achieved by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the present facilities.

  17. WE-G-BRD-09: Novel MRI Compatible Electron Accelerator for MRI-Linac Radiotherapy

    Whelan, B; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gierman, S; Schmerge, J [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Holloway, L [Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Fahrig, R [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy is a rapidly growing field; however current linacs are not designed to operate in MRI fringe fields. As such, current MRI- Linac systems require magnetic shielding, impairing MR image quality and system flexibility. Here, we present a bespoke electron accelerator concept with robust operation in in-line magnetic fields. Methods: For in-line MRI-Linac systems, electron gun performance is the major constraint on accelerator performance. To overcome this, we propose placing a cathode directly within the first accelerating cavity. Such a configuration is used extensively in high energy particle physics, but not previously for radiotherapy. Benchmarked computational modelling (CST, Darmstadt, Germany) was employed to design and assess a 5.5 cell side coupled accelerator with a temperature limited thermionic cathode in the first accelerating cell. This simulation was coupled to magnetic fields from a 1T MRI model to assess robustness in magnetic fields for Source to Isocenter Distance between 1 and 2 meters. Performance was compared to a conventional electron gun based system in the same magnetic field. Results: A temperature limited cathode (work function 1.8eV, temperature 1245K, emission constant 60A/K/cm{sup 2}) will emit a mean current density of 24mA/mm{sup 2} (Richardson’s Law). We modeled a circular cathode with radius 2mm and mean current 300mA. Capture efficiency of the device was 43%, resulting in target current of 130 mA. The electron beam had a FWHM of 0.2mm, and mean energy of 5.9MeV (interquartile spread of 0.1MeV). Such an electron beam is suitable for radiotherapy, comparing favourably to conventional systems. This model was robust to operation the MRI fringe field, with a maximum current loss of 6% compared to 85% for the conventional system. Conclusion: The bespoke electron accelerator is robust to operation in in-line magnetic fields. This will enable MRI-Linacs with no accelerator magnetic shielding, and minimise

  18. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  19. Towards real-time plan adaptation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Kontaxis, Charis

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid MRI and linear accelerator (MRI-linac) machines enables the online volumetric imaging during radiation delivery with the superior soft tissue contrast of the diagnostic quality MRI. In this context, conventional radiotherapy workflow will gradually transfer from an offline

  20. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    Serizawa, Itsuko; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Okada, Tohru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm 3 and 1,194 cm 3 (median 525 cm 3 ). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.

  1. The role of MRI for radiotherapy of brain tumors

    Aoki, Yoshiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) was performed on 10 patients with intracranial tumors, before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA(Gd-DTPA). After administration of Gd-DTPA(0.1 mmol/kg), increased signal intensity from the tumors was observed in all patients. T1 value(300/1000, matrix; 128 x 128) was measured in sequence after administration of Gd-DTPA, whose enhancement efficacy was examined by two exponential model. Two cases of pituitary adenoma were examined by this model before and after radiotherapy. The difference of the two exponential curve between these two cases were considered to indicate the changes of the capillary walls in the irradiated tumors. (author)

  2. MRI after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer; correlation with histopathology and the role of volumetry

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Lindholm, Johan; Glimelius, Bengt; Martling, Anna; Cedermark, Bjoern

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to assess if tumor size after radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer can be assessed by a second magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), after radiotherapy prior to surgery and to correlate changes observed on MRI with findings at histopathology at surgery. Twenty-five patients with MRI before and after radiotherapy were included. Variables studied were changes in tumor size, T-staging and distance to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). RVs was measured as tumor volume at surgery (Vs) divided by tumor volume at the initial MRI (Vi) in percent. RVm was defined as the tumor volume at the second MRI (Vm) divided by Vi in percent. The ypT-stage was the same or more favorable than the initial MRI T-stage in 24 of 25 patients. The second MRI was not more accurately predictive than the initial MRI for ypT-staging or distance to CRM (p > 0.05). Vm correlated significantly to Vs, as did RVs to RVm, although the former was always smaller than the latter. Vm and RVm correlated well with ypT-stage (p < 0.001). Volumetry seems to correlate with ypT-stage after preoperative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer. The value of a second MRI after radiotherapy for assessment of distance to CRM and ypT-staging is, however, not apparent. (orig.)

  3. What's next in carbon ion radiotherapy at NIRS?

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Since its launch by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in 1994, cancer therapy using heavy ion beams (carbon ion beams) has been used in approximately 5,500 patients. Accumulated clinical experience has identified certain types of malignant tumors that respond exclusively to this treatment. It has also been made clear that this therapy is capable of treating several other types of cancers safely in a relatively short period of time, effecting remission and/or cure without pain or discomfort in a few days or weeks. We can reasonably state that heavy ion radiotherapy has been established as a safe and effective treatment method. NIRS researchers are continuing to make every effort to develop more effective, efficient, and patient-friendly heavy ion irradiation systems. The result of this research and development is also expected to slash the attendant costs of heavy ion radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Integration of Diagnostic and Interventional MRI for the Study of Persistent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    Menard, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    .... We primarily hypothesize that the integration of diagnostic and interventional MRI enables needle biopsy targeting to foci of tumor recurrence after radiotherapy, and will enable a determination...

  5. Integration of Diagnostic and Interventional MRI for the Study of Persistent Prostate Cancer after External Beam Radiotherapy

    Menard, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    .... We primarily hypothesize that the integration of diagnostic and interventional MRI enables needle biopsy targeting to foci of tumor recurrence after radiotherapy, and will enable a determination...

  6. Beam modulation for heavy ion radiotherapy

    Kanai, T.; Minohara, S.; Sudou, M.

    1993-01-01

    The first clinical trial of heavy ion radiation therapy is scheduled in 1994 by using the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In order to start the clinical trial, first, it is necessary to know the physical characteristics of high energy heavy ions in human bodies, for example, dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distribution. Also the knowledge on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions is required. Based on these biophysical properties of heavy ions, monoenergetic heavy ion beam should be modulated so as to make the spread Bragg peak suitable to heavy ion radiation therapy. In order to establish a methodology to obtain the most effective spread Bragg peak for heavy ion radiation therapy, a heavy ion irradiation port at the RIKEN ring cyclotron facility was constructed. By using a 135 MeV/u carbon beam, the biophysical properties of the heavy ions were investigated, and a range modulator was designed to have uniform biological response in the spread Bragg peak. The physical and biological rationality of the spread Bragg peak were investigated. The dose, LET and biological effect of a monoenergetic heavy ion beam, the design of the range modulator, and the distributions of LET and biological dose for the spread Bragg peak are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Longitudinal diffusion MRI for treatment response assessment: Preliminary experience using an MRI-guided tri-cobalt 60 radiotherapy system.

    Yang, Yingli; Cao, Minsong; Sheng, Ke; Gao, Yu; Chen, Allen; Kamrava, Mitch; Lee, Percy; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lamb, James; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel; Hu, Peng

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate the preliminary feasibility of a longitudinal diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategy for assessing patient response to radiotherapy at 0.35 T using an MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). Six patients (three head and neck cancer, three sarcoma) who underwent fractionated radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. A 2D multislice spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging diffusion pulse sequence was implemented on the ViewRay system and tested in phantom studies. The same pulse sequence was used to acquire longitudinal diffusion data (every 2-5 fractions) on the six patients throughout the entire course of radiotherapy. The reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements was assessed using reference regions and the temporal variations of the tumor ADC values were evaluated. In diffusion phantom studies, the ADC values measured on the ViewRay system matched well with reference ADC values with ViewRay MRI. Larger patient cohort studies are warranted to correlate the longitudinal diffusion measurements to patient outcomes. Such an approach may enable response-guided adaptive radiotherapy.

  8. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon-ion

  9. Carbon ion radiotherapy in bone and soft tissue sarcomas

    Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Kagei, Kenji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing capability. In June 1996, clinical research for the treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas was begun using carbon ions generated by the HIMAC. As of February 2006, a total of the 278 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma had been enrolled into the clinical trial. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trial revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in bone and soft tissue sarcomas that were hard to cure with other modalities. (author)

  10. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  11. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    Lagendijk, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  12. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  13. CT and MRI matching for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer

    Rasch, C; Keus, R; Touw, A; Lebesque, J; Van Herk, M [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of matched CT and MRI information on target delineation in radiotherapy planning for head and neck tumors. MRI images of eight patients with head and neck cancer in supine position, not necessarily obtained in radiotherapy treatment position were matched to the CT scans made in radiotherapy position using automatic three-dimensional chamfer-matching of bony structures. Four independent observers delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in CT scans and axial and sagittal MR scans. The GTV`s were compared, overlapping volumes and non-overlapping volumes between the different datasets and observers were determined. In all patients a good match of CT and MRI information was accomplished in the head region. The combined information provided a better visualisation of the GTV, oedema and normal tissues compared with CT or MRI alone. Determination of overlapping and non-overlapping volumes proved to be a valuable tool to measure uncertainties in the determination of the GTV. CT-MRI matching in patients with head and neck tumors is feasible and makes a more accurate irradiation with higher tumor doses and less normal tissue complications possible. Remaining uncertainties in the determination of the GTV can be quantified using the combined information of MRI and CT.

  14. Treatment planning for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Scholz, D.; Weber, U.; Jaekel, O.

    2001-01-01

    The GSI facility realizes for the first time a combination of an active field shaping, using a scanned beam, with an active energy variation of the beam, thus making full use of the advantages of heavy charged particles for therapy. This novel irradiation technique requires a method for dose calculation and optimization which is radically different from conventional approaches used for example in photon and even proton therapy, due to the strong dependence of the RBE on particle charge, energy and absorbed dose. A prerequisite is the development of a physical beam model as well as a radiobiological model to describe the interactions of ion beams with biological material. (orig.)

  15. MRI findings in patients with severe trismus following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Bhatia, Kunwar S.S.; King, Ann D.; Paunipagar, Bhawan K.; Abrigo, Jill; Ahuja, Anil T.; Vlantis, Alexander C.; Leung, Sing F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to document MRI findings in masticator structures in patients with trismus developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). MRI neck examinations were reviewed in 35 patients with marked trismus, defined as an interincisal gap of 25 mm or less, post-radiotherapy for NPC. Patients with trismus before treatment, infiltration of masticator structures at the time of trismus, or previous surgery involving the masticator structures were excluded. Sixteen patients had no significant abnormality in their masticator structures (46%). Nineteen patients (54%) had abnormalities comprising radiotherapy-induced masticator muscle fibrosis (n = 19), denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles secondary to mandibular nerve damage (n = 1), mandibular ramus signal abnormalities (n = 5), mandibular condyle sclerosis with or without capsular thickening (n = 5), perimasticator fibrosis extending into the masticator space (n = 3) and inflammation secondary to severe sinusitis extending into the masticator space (n = 2). Nine patients (26%) had more than one type of abnormality. Twenty-two patients (63%) had concomitant skull base osteoradionecrosis which extended into the pterygoid bases in 16 patients (45%). The presence of several MRI abnormalities in the masticator structures of patients with trismus after radiotherapy suggests that trismus is multifactorial. This study advances the understanding of mechanisms behind this debilitating side effect of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. TU-F-BRB-01: Resolving and Characterizing Breathing Motion for Radiotherapy with MRI

    Tryggestad, E. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The current clinical standard of organ respiratory imaging, 4D-CT, is fundamentally limited by poor soft-tissue contrast and imaging dose. These limitations are potential barriers to beneficial “4D” radiotherapy methods which optimize the target and OAR dose-volume considering breathing motion but rely on a robust motion characterization. Conversely, MRI imparts no known radiation risk and has excellent soft-tissue contrast. MRI-based motion management is therefore highly desirable and holds great promise to improve radiotherapy of moving cancers, particularly in the abdomen. Over the past decade, MRI techniques have improved significantly, making MR-based motion management clinically feasible. For example, cine MRI has high temporal resolution up to 10 f/s and has been used to track and/or characterize tumor motion, study correlation between external and internal motions. New MR technologies, such as 4D-MRI and MRI hybrid treatment machines (i.e. MR-linac or MR-Co60), have been recently developed. These technologies can lead to more accurate target volume determination and more precise radiation dose delivery via direct tumor gating or tracking. Despite all these promises, great challenges exist and the achievable clinical benefit of MRI-based tumor motion management has yet to be fully explored, much less realized. In this proposal, we will review novel MR-based motion management methods and technologies, the state-of-the-art concerning MRI development and clinical application and the barriers to more widespread adoption. Learning Objectives: Discuss the need of MR-based motion management for improving patient care in radiotherapy. Understand MR techniques for motion imaging and tumor motion characterization. Understand the current state of the art and future steps for clinical integration. Henry Ford Health System holds research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored in part by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.

  17. TU-F-BRB-01: Resolving and Characterizing Breathing Motion for Radiotherapy with MRI

    Tryggestad, E.

    2015-01-01

    The current clinical standard of organ respiratory imaging, 4D-CT, is fundamentally limited by poor soft-tissue contrast and imaging dose. These limitations are potential barriers to beneficial “4D” radiotherapy methods which optimize the target and OAR dose-volume considering breathing motion but rely on a robust motion characterization. Conversely, MRI imparts no known radiation risk and has excellent soft-tissue contrast. MRI-based motion management is therefore highly desirable and holds great promise to improve radiotherapy of moving cancers, particularly in the abdomen. Over the past decade, MRI techniques have improved significantly, making MR-based motion management clinically feasible. For example, cine MRI has high temporal resolution up to 10 f/s and has been used to track and/or characterize tumor motion, study correlation between external and internal motions. New MR technologies, such as 4D-MRI and MRI hybrid treatment machines (i.e. MR-linac or MR-Co60), have been recently developed. These technologies can lead to more accurate target volume determination and more precise radiation dose delivery via direct tumor gating or tracking. Despite all these promises, great challenges exist and the achievable clinical benefit of MRI-based tumor motion management has yet to be fully explored, much less realized. In this proposal, we will review novel MR-based motion management methods and technologies, the state-of-the-art concerning MRI development and clinical application and the barriers to more widespread adoption. Learning Objectives: Discuss the need of MR-based motion management for improving patient care in radiotherapy. Understand MR techniques for motion imaging and tumor motion characterization. Understand the current state of the art and future steps for clinical integration. Henry Ford Health System holds research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored in part by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant

  18. Prediction of clinical course of glioblastomas by MRI during radiotherapy

    Leitzen, Christina; Schild, Hans H.; Bungart, Birgitta; Luetter, Christiana; Muedder, Thomas; Wilhelm-Buchstab, Timo; Schueller, Heinrich; Herrlinger, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Determine the value of MR studies in patients undergoing radiotherapy for glioblastomas pre and during radiotherapy to predict the clinical course. Patients and Methods: MR follow-up studies were performed in 33 patients with glioblastomas before radiotherapy, after 30 Gy, after 60 Gy, and in the treatment follow-up. Findings on MR were categorized into: definite progress, questionable progress, status idem. Patients were followed clinically (median for 11 months). Results: After 30 Gy 23/33 (70%) of the MR examination showed status idem. 10/33 (30%) demonstrated definite (n = 6) or questionable (n = 4) progress. Further tumor progress was faster in these patients and patients succumb to their disease earlier (9 vs. 22 months). The 60 Gy study showed definite (n = 8) and questionable (n = 6) progress in 14/33 (42%) cases. All these tumors were progressing faster and were associated with a comparatively reduced life expectancy. Conclusion: MR follow-up studies after 30 Gy in patients undergoing radiotherapy for glioblastomas allow for prognostic appraisal, and potentially early modification of treatment. (orig.)

  19. Feasibility study on 3D image reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Kipritidis, John; Whelan, Brendan; Greer, Peter B; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2018-02-11

    In-room MRI is a promising image guidance strategy in external beam radiotherapy to acquire volumetric information for moving targets. However, limitations in spatio-temporal resolution led several authors to use 2D orthogonal images for guidance. The aim of this work is to present a method to concurrently compensate for non-rigid tumour motion and provide an approach for 3D reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices for MRI-guided treatments. Free-breathing sagittal/coronal interleaved 2D cine-MRI were acquired in addition to a pre-treatment 3D volume in two patients. We performed deformable image registration (DIR) between cine-MRI slices and corresponding slices in the pre-treatment 3D volume. Based on an extrapolation of the interleaved 2D motion fields, the 3D motion field was estimated and used to warp the pre-treatment volume. Due to the lack of a ground truth for patients, the method was validated on a digital 4D lung phantom. On the phantom, the 3D reconstruction method was able to compensate for tumour motion and compared favourably to the results of previously adopted strategies. The difference in the 3D motion fields between the phantom and the extrapolated motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm for tumour and 0.8 ± 1.5 mm for whole anatomy, demonstrating feasibility of performing a 3D volumetric reconstruction directly from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices. Application of the method to patient data confirmed the feasibility of utilizing this method in real world scenarios. Preliminary results on phantom and patient cases confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach in an MRI-guided scenario, especially for non-rigid tumour motion compensation. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H; Geertsen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospect......An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later....... In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point...

  1. TH-F-202-02: Current Applications of MRI in Radiotherapy

    Li, G.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  2. TH-F-202-02: Current Applications of MRI in Radiotherapy

    Li, G. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  3. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Sako, T., E-mail: takayuki1.sako@toshiba.co.jp; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T. [Cancer Research Center, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  4. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  5. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  6. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype C 6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4

  7. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T1-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods...... based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results:The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric......Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan...

  8. Reduction of dose delivered to the rectum and bulb of the penis using MRI delineation for radiotherapy of the prostate

    Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Deurloo, Kirsten E. I.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Lebesque, Joos V.; van Herk, Marcel; Rasch, Coen R. N.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The prostate volume delineated on MRI is smaller than on CT. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of MRI- vs. CT-based prostate delineation using multiple observers on the dose to the target and organs at risk during external beam radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT

  9. MRI target delineation may reduce long-term toxicity after prostate radiotherapy.

    Sander, Lotte; Langkilde, Niels Christian; Holmberg, Mats; Carl, Jesper

    2014-06-01

    Aiming for minimal toxicity after radical prostate cancer (PC) radiotherapy (RT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) target delineation could be a possible benefit knowing that clinical target volumes (CTV) are up to 30% smaller, when CTV delineation on MRI is compared to standard computed tomography (CT). This study compares long-term toxicity using CT or MRI delineation before PC RT. Urinary and rectal toxicity assessments 36 months after image-guided RT (78 Gy) using CTC-AE scores in two groups of PC patients. Peak symptom score values were registered. One group of patients (n=72) had standard CT target delineation and gold markers as fiducials. Another group of patients (n=73) had MRI target delineation and a nickel-titanium stent as fiducial. At 36 months no difference in overall survival (92% in both groups, p=0.29) or in PSA-relapse free survival was found between the groups (MRI=89% and CT=94%, p=0.67). A significantly smaller CTV was found in the MRI group (p=0.02). Urinary retention and frequency were significantly reduced in the MRI group (p=0.03 in the matter of both). The overall urinary and rectal toxicity did not differ between the two groups. MRI delineation leads to a significantly reduced CTV. Significantly lower urinary frequency and urinary retention toxicity scores were observed following MRI delineation. The study did not find significant differences in overall urinary or rectal toxicity between the two groups. PSA-relapse survival did not differ between the two groups at 36 months.

  10. 23Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M.; Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R.; Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - 23 Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced 1 H-MRI and 18 F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up 1 H-MRI and a 18 F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved 23 Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, 23 Na content, and increased uptake in the 18 F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the 23 Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the 18 F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower 23 Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. 23 Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to 18 F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional 1 H-MRI. Still, 23 Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  11. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Cervino, Laura I; Jiang, Steve B [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technology and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3960 Health Sciences Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0865 (United States); Du, Jiang, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 West Arbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error e and the error at 95% confidence level e{sub 95} were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to e = 1.5 mm and e{sub 95} = 4.2 mm, while TM led to e = 0.6 mm and e{sub 95} = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  12. SU-G-BRA-01: A Real-Time Tumor Localization and Guidance Platform for Radiotherapy Using US and MRI

    Bednarz, B; Culberson, W; Bassetti, M; McMillan, A; Matrosic, C; Shepard, A; Zagzebski, J; Smith, S; Lee, W; Mills, D; Cao, K; Wang, B; Fiveland, E; Darrow, R; Foo, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a real-time motion management platform for radiotherapy that directly tracks tumor motion using ultrasound and MRI. This will be a cost-effective and non-invasive real-time platform combining the excellent temporal resolution of ultrasound with the excellent soft-tissue contrast of MRI. Methods: A 4D planar ultrasound acquisition during the treatment that is coupled to a pre-treatment calibration training image set consisting of a simultaneous 4D ultrasound and 4D MRI acquisition. The image sets will be rapidly matched using advanced image and signal processing algorithms, allowing the display of virtual MR images of the tumor/organ motion in real-time from an ultrasound acquisition. Results: The completion of this work will result in several innovations including: a (2D) patch-like, MR and LINAC compatible 4D planar ultrasound transducer that is electronically steerable for hands-free operation to provide real-time virtual MR and ultrasound imaging for motion management during radiation therapy; a multi- modal tumor localization strategy that uses ultrasound and MRI; and fast and accurate image processing algorithms that provide real-time information about the motion and location of tumor or related soft-tissue structures within the patient. Conclusion: If successful, the proposed approach will provide real-time guidance for radiation therapy without degrading image or treatment plan quality. The approach would be equally suitable for image-guided proton beam or heavy ion-beam therapy. This work is partially funded by NIH grant R01CA190298

  13. SU-G-BRA-01: A Real-Time Tumor Localization and Guidance Platform for Radiotherapy Using US and MRI

    Bednarz, B; Culberson, W; Bassetti, M; McMillan, A; Matrosic, C; Shepard, A; Zagzebski, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Smith, S; Lee, W; Mills, D; Cao, K; Wang, B; Fiveland, E; Darrow, R; Foo, T [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a real-time motion management platform for radiotherapy that directly tracks tumor motion using ultrasound and MRI. This will be a cost-effective and non-invasive real-time platform combining the excellent temporal resolution of ultrasound with the excellent soft-tissue contrast of MRI. Methods: A 4D planar ultrasound acquisition during the treatment that is coupled to a pre-treatment calibration training image set consisting of a simultaneous 4D ultrasound and 4D MRI acquisition. The image sets will be rapidly matched using advanced image and signal processing algorithms, allowing the display of virtual MR images of the tumor/organ motion in real-time from an ultrasound acquisition. Results: The completion of this work will result in several innovations including: a (2D) patch-like, MR and LINAC compatible 4D planar ultrasound transducer that is electronically steerable for hands-free operation to provide real-time virtual MR and ultrasound imaging for motion management during radiation therapy; a multi- modal tumor localization strategy that uses ultrasound and MRI; and fast and accurate image processing algorithms that provide real-time information about the motion and location of tumor or related soft-tissue structures within the patient. Conclusion: If successful, the proposed approach will provide real-time guidance for radiation therapy without degrading image or treatment plan quality. The approach would be equally suitable for image-guided proton beam or heavy ion-beam therapy. This work is partially funded by NIH grant R01CA190298.

  14. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Tada-aki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Oono, Tatsuya; Yamada, Shigeru; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-01-01

    Until February 2003, a total of 1,463 patients were enrolled in clinical trials of carbon ion radiotherapy. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities. In this study, quality of life (QOL) outcomes of patients with unresectable bone and soft tissue sarcoma after carbon ion radiotherapy are investigated. (author)

  15. Evolution of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

    Mohamad, Osama; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-06

    Charged particles can achieve better dose distribution and higher biological effectiveness compared to photon radiotherapy. Carbon ions are considered an optimal candidate for cancer treatment using particles. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan was the first radiotherapy hospital dedicated for carbon ion treatments in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, the NIRS has pioneered this therapy with more than 69 clinical trials so far, and hundreds of ancillary projects in physics and radiobiology. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of carbon ion radiotherapy at the NIRS and some of the current and future projects in the field.

  16. SU-E-J-153: MRI Based, Daily Adaptive Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Contour Adaptation

    Kleijnen, J; Burbach, M; Verbraeken, T; Weggers, R; Zoetelief, A; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Asselen, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A major hurdle in adaptive radiotherapy is the adaptation of the planning MRI's delineations to the daily anatomy. We therefore investigate the accuracy and time needed for online clinical target volume (CTV) adaptation by radiation therapists (RTT), to be used in MRI-guided adaptive treatments on a MRI-Linac (MRL). Methods: Sixteen patients, diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer, underwent a T2-weighted MRI prior to each fraction of short-course radiotherapy, resulting in 4–5 scans per patient. On these scans, the CTV was delineated according to guidelines by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and considered to be the gold standard. For each patient, the first MRI was considered as the planning MRI and matched on bony anatomy to the 3–4 daily MRIs. The planning MRI's CTV delineation was rigidly propagated to the daily MRI scans as a proposal for adaptation. Three RTTs in training started the adaptation of the CTV conform guidelines, after a two hour training lecture and a two patient (n=7) training set. To assess the inter-therapist variation, all three RTTs altered delineations of 3 patients (n=12). One RTT altered the CTV delineations (n=53) of the remaining 11 patients. Time needed for adaptation of the CTV to guidelines was registered.As a measure of agreement, the conformity index (CI) was determined between the RTTs' delineations as a group. Dice similarity coefficients were determined between delineations of the RTT and the RO. Results: We found good agreement between RTTs' and RO's delineations (average Dice=0.91, SD=0.03). Furthermore, the inter-observer agreement between the RTTs was high (average CI=0.94, SD=0.02). Adaptation time reduced from 10:33 min (SD= 3:46) to 2:56 min (SD=1:06) between the first and last ten delineations, respectively. Conclusion: Daily CTV adaptation by RTTs, seems a feasible and safe way to introduce daily, online MRI-based plan adaptation for a MRL

  17. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  18. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  19. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons

  20. MRI findings of radiation encephalopathy of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    Liang Changhong; Li Guoye; Huang Biao; Huang Meiping; Zheng Junhui; Tan Shaoheng; Zeng Qiongxin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study MRI findings and clinical manifestation of radiation encephalopathy (RE) of brain stem. Methods: MRI findings and clinical symptoms in 51 patients with RE of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer were reviewed. Results: Clinical symptoms included number weakness or paralysis in the limbs and symptoms of damaged cranial nerves. All lesions appeared hypo- or iso-intense on spin echo(SE) T 1 -weighted images and inhomogeneous and mixed hyper- and iso-intense on Turbo spin echo (TSE) T 2 -weighted images. The lesions were located in mesencephalon, pons, medulla, basilar part of pons, basilar part of pons and medulla oblongata in 2,7,3,9 and 30 patients respectively. The enhancement patterns included irregular rings in 39 patients, spotty in 3 and no enhancement in 9 patients. Mass effect was minimal in all patients. On follow-up MRI, the lesions disappeared in 4 patients, did not change in size and shape in 8 patients and enlarged in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI could demonstrate the characteristic findings of RE of brain stem. MRI findings sometimes are not consistent with the clinical symptoms

  1. Assessment of renal function after conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy by functional {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 23}Na-MRI

    Haneder, S.; Michaely, H.J.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L.R. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer-Assisted Clinical Medicine; Siebenlist, K.; Wertz, H.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Boda-Heggemann, J. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCHT) improves survival of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) results in ablative doses to a significant amount of the left kidney, while image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) provides excellent target coverage with improved kidney sparing. Few long-term results on IMRT for gastric cancer, however, have been published. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3.0 T including blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and, for the first time, {sup 23}Na imaging was used to evaluate renal status after radiotherapy with 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT. Patients and methods Four disease-free patients (2 after 3D-CRT and 2 after IMRT; FU for all patients > 5 years) were included in this feasibility study. Morphological sequences, axial DWI images, 2D-gradient echo (GRE)-BOLD images, and {sup 23}Na images were acquired. Mean values/standard deviations for ({sup 23}Na), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and R2{sup *} values were calculated for the upper/middle/lower parts of both kidneys. Corticomedullary {sup 23}Na-concentration gradients were determined. Results: Surprisingly, IG-IMRT patients showed no morphological alterations and no statistically significant differences of ADC and R2{sup *} values in all renal parts. Values for mean corticomedullary {sup 23}Na-concentration matched those for healthy volunteers. Results were similar in 3D-CRT patients, except for the cranial part of the left kidney. This was atrophic and presented significantly reduced functional parameters (p = 0.001 - p = 0.033). Reduced ADC values indicated reduced cell density and reduced extracellular space. Cortical and medullary R2{sup *} values of the left cranial kidney in the 3D-CRT group were higher, indicating more deoxygenated hemoglobin due to reduced blood flow/oxygenation. ({sup 23}Na) of the renal cranial parts in

  2. Assessment of renal function after conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy by functional 1H-MRI and 23Na-MRI

    Haneder, S.; Michaely, H.J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L.R.; Siebenlist, K.; Wertz, H.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Boda-Heggemann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCHT) improves survival of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) results in ablative doses to a significant amount of the left kidney, while image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) provides excellent target coverage with improved kidney sparing. Few long-term results on IMRT for gastric cancer, however, have been published. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3.0 T including blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and, for the first time, 23 Na imaging was used to evaluate renal status after radiotherapy with 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT. Patients and methods Four disease-free patients (2 after 3D-CRT and 2 after IMRT; FU for all patients > 5 years) were included in this feasibility study. Morphological sequences, axial DWI images, 2D-gradient echo (GRE)-BOLD images, and 23 Na images were acquired. Mean values/standard deviations for ( 23 Na), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and R2 * values were calculated for the upper/middle/lower parts of both kidneys. Corticomedullary 23 Na-concentration gradients were determined. Results: Surprisingly, IG-IMRT patients showed no morphological alterations and no statistically significant differences of ADC and R2 * values in all renal parts. Values for mean corticomedullary 23 Na-concentration matched those for healthy volunteers. Results were similar in 3D-CRT patients, except for the cranial part of the left kidney. This was atrophic and presented significantly reduced functional parameters (p = 0.001 - p = 0.033). Reduced ADC values indicated reduced cell density and reduced extracellular space. Cortical and medullary R2 * values of the left cranial kidney in the 3D-CRT group were higher, indicating more deoxygenated hemoglobin due to reduced blood flow/oxygenation. ( 23 Na) of the renal cranial parts in the 3D-CRT group was significantly reduced

  3. Commissioning and quality control of a dedicated wide bore 3T MRI simulator for radiotherapy planning

    Aitang Xing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a practical approach to commissioning and quality assurance (QA of a dedicated wide-bore 3 Tesla (3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for radiotherapy planning.Methods: A comprehensive commissioning protocol focusing on radiotherapy (RT specific requirements was developed and performed. RT specific tests included: uniformity characteristics of radio-frequency (RF coil, couch top attenuation, geometric distortion, laser and couch movement and an end-to-end radiotherapy treatment planning test. General tests for overall system performance and safety measurements were also performed.Results: The use of pre-scan based intensity correction increased the uniformity from 61.7% to 97% (body flexible coil, from 50% to 90% (large flexible coil and from 51% to 98% (small flexible coil. RT flat top couch decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by an average of 42%. The mean and maximum geometric distortion was found to be 1.25 mm and 4.08 mm for three dimensional (3D corrected image acquisition, 2.07 mm and 7.88 mm for two dimensional (2D corrected image acquisition over 500 mm × 375 mm × 252 mm field of view (FOV. The accuracy of the laser and couch movement was less than ±1 mm. The standard deviation of registration parameters for the end-to-end test was less than 0.41 mm. An on-going QA program was developed to monitor the system’s performance.Conclusion: A number of RT specific tests have been described for commissioning and subsequent performance monitoring of a dedicated MRI simulator (MRI-Sim. These tests have been important in establishing and maintaining its operation for RT planning.

  4. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  5. The possibility of heavy ion radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among malignant tumors in Japan and statisticians predict that the death rate by lung cancer will increase twice or 2.5 times within 10 years. Early detection and early resection are the first task to decrease the death rate, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be improved. In this paper, the present status of surgical treatment for lung cancer was summarized and the possibility of heavy ion therapy for lung cancer was discussed in comparison with surgical result. Overall 5-year survival rates in stages I, II, III and IV were 78%, 42% 29% and 16% respectively. The survival rate in stage I was correlated with tumor size and that in lung cancer of tumor size 2 cm or less was about 90%. If lung cancer is found at early stage, lung cancer can be cured. Limitation of detection of lung cancer is 2.3 mm in hilar squamous cell carcinoma by autofluorescence bronchoscopy and 5-10 mm in peripheral adenocarcinoma by high resolution CT. Less invasive surgery by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was applied to stage I lung cancer and the result was satisfactory. However, most lung cancer patients are heavy smokers with underlying lung diseases including chronic obstructive plumonary disease (COPD) and there are many patients not indicative for less invasive surgery. Preliminary results of heavy ion therapy showed remarkable improvement compared with that with conventional radiation therapy. Three-year survival rate of stage I in Protocol 9802 is 80%, almost the same with that in surgical result, indicating the possibility becoming the established therapeutic modality in stage I lung cancers, in patients with marginal biological function for surgical treatment, in particular. (authors)

  6. Interobserver Delineation variation using CT versus combined CT + MRI in intensity- modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Vaerenbergh, K. van; Vakaet, L.; Bral, S.; Claus, F.; Neve, W.J. de; Meerleer, G.O. de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify interobserver variation of prostate and seminal vesicle delineations using CT only versus CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. Material and methods: the prostate and seminal vesicles of 13 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively delineated by three radiation oncologists on CT only and on CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. The volumes and margin positions were calculated and intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed for the clinical target volume (CTV), seminal vesicles, prostate and three prostatic subdivisions (apical, middle and basal third). Results: using CT + MRI as compared to CT alone, the mean CTV, prostate and seminal vesicle volumes significantly decreased by 6.54%, 5.21% and 10.47%, respectively. More importantly, their standard deviations significantly decreased by 63.06%, 62.65% and 44.83%, respectively. The highest level of variation was found at the prostatic apex, followed by the prostatic base and seminal vesicles. Conclusion: addition of MRI to CT in consensus reading with a radiologist results in a moderate decrease of the CTV, but an important decrease of the interobserver delineation variation, especially at the prostatic apex. (orig.)

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibition sensitizes osteosarcoma to heavy ion radiotherapy

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Thiemann, Markus; Dittmar, Anne; Roth, Eva; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Ehemann, Volker; Weichert, Wilko; Huber, Peter E.; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Minimal improvements in treatment or survival of patients with osteosarcoma have been achieved during the last three decades. Especially in the case of incomplete tumor resection, prognosis remains poor. Heavy ion radiotherapy (HIT) and modern anticancer drugs like histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising effects in osteosarcoma in vitro. In this study, we tested the effect of HIT and the combination of HIT and the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in a xenograft mouse model. Osteosarcoma xenografts were established by subcutaneous injection of KHOS-24OS cells and treated with either vehicle (DMSO), SAHA, HIT or HIT and SAHA. Tumor growth was determined and tumor necrosis, proliferation rate, apoptotic rate as well as vessel density were evaluated. Here, we show that the combination of HIT and SAHA induced a significant delay of tumor growth through increased rate of apoptosis, increased expression of p53 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 , inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis compared to tumors treated with HIT only. HIT and in particular the combination of HIT and histone deacetylase inhibition is a promising treatment strategy in OS and may be tested in clinical trials

  8. Tumor shrinkage assessed by volumetric MRI in the long-term follow-up after stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Theodorou, Marilena; Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Kopp, Christine; Molls, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Auer, Florian [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor volume reduction in the follow-up of meningiomas after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or linac radiosurgery (RS) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and Methods: In 59 patients with skull base meningiomas, gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-en-hanced MRI before and median 50 months (range 11-92 months) after stereotactic radiotherapy. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6 mm slice thickness without gap (3D-MRI). Results were compared to the reports of diagnostic findings. Results: Mean tumor size of all 59 meningiomas was 13.9 ml (0.8-62.9 ml) before treatment. There was shrinkage of the treated meningiomas in all but one patient. Within a median volumetric follow-up of 50 months (11-95 months), an absolute mean volume reduction of 4 ml (0-18 ml) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared to the volume before radiotherapy was 27% (0-73%). Shrinkage measured by 3D-MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. The mean size reduction was 17%, 23%, and 30% (at < 24 months, 24-48 months, and 48-72 months). Conclusion: By using 3D-MRI in almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy of a meningioma, tumor shrinkage is detected. The data presented here demonstrate that volumetric assessment from 3D-MRI provides additional information to routinely used radiologic response measurements. After FSRT or RS, a mean size reduction of 25-45% can be expected within 4 years. (orig.)

  9. {sup 23}Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter [Heidelberg University, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - {sup 23}Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 18}F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up {sup 1}H-MRI and a {sup 18}F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved {sup 23}Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, {sup 23}Na content, and increased uptake in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the {sup 23}Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower {sup 23}Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. {sup 23}Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to {sup 18}F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional {sup 1}H-MRI. Still, {sup 23}Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  10. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Edmund, Jens M. [Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy based only on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), knowledge about tissue electron densities must be derived from the MRI. This can be achieved by converting the MRI scan to the so-called pseudo-computed tomography (pCT). An obstacle is that the voxel intensities in conventional MRI scans are not uniquely related to electron density. The authors previously demonstrated that a patch-based method could produce accurate pCTs of the brain using conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans. The method was driven mainly by local patch similarities and relied on simple affine registrations between an atlas database of the co-registered MRI/CT scan pairs and the MRI scan to be converted. In this study, the authors investigate the applicability of the patch-based approach in the pelvis. This region is challenging for a method based on local similarities due to the greater inter-patient variation. The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level. Methods: The data consisted of CT and T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAE{sub vox}) and the deviation in water-equivalent path lengths. Furthermore, the dosimetric accuracy was tested for a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan using dose–volume histogram (DVH) point deviations and γ-index analysis. Results: The patch-based approach had an average MAE{sub vox} of 54 HU; median deviations of less than 0.4% in relevant DVH points and a γ-index pass rate of 0.97 using a 1%/1 mm criterion. The patch-based approach showed a significantly better

  11. Technical Note: MRI only prostate radiotherapy planning using the statistical decomposition algorithm

    Siversson, Carl; Nordström, Fredrik; Nilsson, Terese; Nyholm, Tufve; Jonsson, Joakim; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Olsson, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In order to enable a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only workflow in radiotherapy treatment planning, methods are required for generating Hounsfield unit (HU) maps (i.e., synthetic computed tomography, sCT) for dose calculations, directly from MRI. The Statistical Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is a method for automatically generating sCT images from a single MR image volume, based on automatic tissue classification in combination with a model trained using a multimodal template material. This study compares dose calculations between sCT generated by the SDA and conventional CT in the male pelvic region. Methods: The study comprised ten prostate cancer patients, for whom a 3D T2 weighted MRI and a conventional planning CT were acquired. For each patient, sCT images were generated from the acquired MRI using the SDA. In order to decouple the effect of variations in patient geometry between imaging modalities from the effect of uncertainties in the SDA, the conventional CT was nonrigidly registered to the MRI to assure that their geometries were well aligned. For each patient, a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created for the registered CT (rCT) and recalculated for both the sCT and the conventional CT. The results were evaluated using several methods, including mean average error (MAE), a set of dose-volume histogram parameters, and a restrictive gamma criterion (2% local dose/1 mm). Results: The MAE within the body contour was 36.5 ± 4.1 (1 s.d.) HU between sCT and rCT. Average mean absorbed dose difference to target was 0.0% ± 0.2% (1 s.d.) between sCT and rCT, whereas it was −0.3% ± 0.3% (1 s.d.) between CT and rCT. The average gamma pass rate was 99.9% for sCT vs rCT, whereas it was 90.3% for CT vs rCT. Conclusions: The SDA enables a highly accurate MRI only workflow in prostate radiotherapy planning. The dosimetric uncertainties originating from the SDA appear negligible and are notably lower than the uncertainties

  12. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  13. Lung tumor motion change during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): an evaluation using MRI

    Olivier, Kenneth R.; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Newlin, Heather E.; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Kyogoku, Shinsuke; Dempsey, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in lung tumor internal target volume during stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment (SBRT) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten lung cancer patients (13 tumors) undergoing SBRT (48 Gy over four consecutive days) were evaluated. Each patient underwent three lung MRI evaluations: before SBRT (MRI‐1), after fraction 3 of SBRT (MRI‐3), and three months after completion of SBRT (MRI‐3m). Each MRI consisted of T1‐weighted images in axial plane through the entire lung. A cone‐beam CT (CBCT) was taken before each fraction. On MRI and CBCT taken before fractions 1 and 3, gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured and differences between the two volumes were compared. Median tumor size on CBCT before fractions 1 (CBCT‐1) and 3 (CBCT‐3) was 8.68 and 11.10 cm3, respectively. In 12 tumors, the GTV was larger on CBCT‐3 compared to CBCT‐1 (median enlargement, 1.56 cm3). Median tumor size on MRI‐1, MRI‐3, and MRI‐3m was 7.91, 11.60, and 3.33 cm3, respectively. In all patients, the GTV was larger on MRI‐3 compared to MRI‐1 (median enlargement, 1.54 cm3). In all patients, GTV was smaller on MRI‐3m compared to MRI‐1 (median shrinkage, 5.44 cm3). On CBCT and MRI, all patients showed enlargement of the GTV during the treatment week of SBRT, except for one patient who showed minimal shrinkage (0.86 cm3). Changes in tumor volume are unpredictable; therefore, motion and breathing must be taken into account during treatment planning, and image‐guided methods should be used, when treating with large fraction sizes. PACS number: 87.53.Ly PMID:24892328

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and conformal radiotherapy: Characterization of MRI alone simulation for conformal radiotherapy. Development and evaluation of an automatic volumes of interest segmentation tool for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Pasquier, David

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a curative treatment of malignant tumours. Radiotherapy techniques considerably evolved last years with the increasing integration of medical images in conformal radiotherapy. This technique makes it possible to elaborate a complex ballistics conforming to target volume and sparing healthy tissues. The examination currently used to delineate volumes of interest is Computed Tomography (CT), on account of its geometrical precision and the information that it provides on electronic densities needed to dose calculation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ensures a more precise delineation of target volumes in many locations, such as pelvis and brain. For pelvic tumours, the use of MRI needs image registration, which complicates treatment planning and poses the problem of the lack of in vivo standard method of validation. The obstacles in the use of MRI alone in treatment planning were evaluated. Neither geometrical distortion linked with the system and the patient nor the lack of information on electronic densities represent stumbling obstacles. Distortion remained low even in edge of large field of view on modern machines. The assignment of electronic densities to bone structures and soft tissues in MR images permitted to obtain equivalent dosimetry to that carried out on the original CT, with a good reproducibility and homogeneous distribution within target volume. The assignment of electronic densities could not be carried out using 20 MV photons and suitable ballistics. The development of Image Guided Radiotherapy could facilitate the use of MRI alone in treatment planning. Target volumes and organ at risk delineation is a time consuming task in radiotherapy planning. We took part in the development and evaluated a method of automatic and semi automatic delineation of volumes of interest from MRI images for prostate cancer radiotherapy. For prostate and organ at risk automatic delineation an organ model-based method and a seeded region growing method

  15. Evaluation of beam wobbling methods for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Takei, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Koikegami, Hajime; Tomita, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has extensively studied carbon-ion radiotherapy at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with some positive outcomes, and has established its efficacy. Therefore, efforts to distribute the therapy to the general public should be made, for which it is essential to enable direct application of clinical and technological experiences obtained at NIRS. For widespread use, it is very important to reduce the cost through facility downsizing with minimal acceleration energy to deliver the HIMAC-equivalent clinical beams. For the beam delivery system, the requirement of miniaturization is translated to reduction in length while maintaining the clinically available field size and penetration range for range-modulated uniform broad beams of regular fields that are either circular or square for simplicity. In this paper, we evaluate the various wobbling methods including original improvements, especially for application to the compact facilities through the experimental and computational studies. The single-ring wobbling method used at HIMAC is the best one including a lot of experience at HIMAC but the residual range is a fatal problem in the case of a compact facility. On the other hand, uniform wobbling methods such as the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods are effective and suitable for a compact facility. Furthermore, these methods can be applied for treatment with passive range modulation including respiratory gated irradiation. In theory, the choice between the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods depends on the shape of the required irradiation field. However, we found that it is better to use the zigzag wobbling method with transformation of the wobbling pattern even when a circular uniform irradiation field is required, because it is difficult to maintain the stability of the wobbler magnet due to the rapid change of the wobbler current in the spiral wobbling method. The regulated wobbling method

  16. Brain abnormalities on MRI in non-functioning pituitary adenoma patients treated with or without postoperative radiotherapy

    Sattler, Margriet G. A.; Meiners, Linda C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    Background and purpose: To assess and compare brain abnormalities on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in non-functioning pituitary macro-adenoma (NFA) patients treated with or without postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods: In 86 NFA patients, treated between 1987 and 2008 at the

  17. Supine MRI for regional breast radiotherapy: imaging axillary lymph nodes before and after sentinel-node biopsy

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Eschbach-Zandbergen, Debora; Hoekstra, Nienke; van Asselen, Bram; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Waard, Stephanie N.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Regional radiotherapy (RT) is increasingly used in breast cancer treatment. Conventionally, computed tomography (CT) is performed for RT planning. Lymph node (LN) target levels are delineated according to anatomical boundaries. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable individual LN delineation. The purpose was to evaluate the applicability of MRI for LN detection in supine treatment position, before and after sentinel-node biopsy (SNB). Twenty-three female breast cancer patients (cTis-3N0M0) underwent 1.5 T MRI, before and after SNB, in addition to CT. Endurance for MRI was monitored. Axillary levels were delineated. LNs were identified and delineated on MRI from before and after SNB, and on CT, and compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. LN locations and LN-based volumes were related to axillary delineations and associated volumes. Although postoperative effects were visible, LN numbers on postoperative MRI (median 26 LNs) were highly reproducible compared to preoperative MRI when adding excised sentinel nodes, and higher than on CT (median 11, p  <  0.001). LN-based volumes were considerably smaller than respective axillary levels. Supine MRI of LNs is feasible and reproducible before and after SNB. This may lead to more accurate RT target definition compared to CT, with potentially lower toxicity. With the MRI techniques described here, initiation of novel MRI-guided RT strategies aiming at individual LNs could be possible.

  18. Neurovascular bundle–sparing radiotherapy for prostate cancer using MRI-CT registration: A dosimetric feasibility study

    Cassidy, R.J., E-mail: richardjcassidy@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yang, X.; Liu, T.; Thomas, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nour, S.G. [Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, A.B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer remains an important late adverse toxicity. The neurovascular bundles (NVB) that lie posterolaterally to the prostate are typically spared during prostatectomy, but in traditional radiotherapy planning they are not contoured as an organ-at-risk with dose constraints. Our goal was to determine the dosimetric feasibility of “NVB-sparing” prostate radiotherapy while still delivering adequate dose to the prostate. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with prostate cancer (with no extraprostatic disease on pelvic magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) who that were treated with external beam radiotherapy, with the same primary planning target volume margins, to a dose of 79.2 Gy were evaluated. Pelvic MRI and simulation computed tomography scans were registered using dedicated software to allow for bilateral NVB target delineation on T2-weighted MRI. A volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated using the NVB bilaterally with 2 mm margin as an organ to spare and compared to the patient’s previously delivered plan. Dose-volume histogram endpoints for NVB, rectum, bladder, and planning target volume 79.2 were compared between the 2 plans using a 2-tailed paired t-test. Results: The V70 for the NVB was significantly lower on the NVB-sparing plan (p <0.01), while rectum and bladder endpoints were similar. Target V100% was similar but V{sub 105%} was higher for the NVB-sparing plans (p <0.01). Conclusions: “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is dosimetrically feasible using CT-MRI registration, and for volumetric modulated arc therapy technology — target coverage is acceptable without increased dose to other normal structures, but with higher target dose inhomogeneity. The clinical impact of “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is currently under study at our institution.

  19. An optimized workflow for the integration of biological information into radiotherapy planning: experiences with T1w DCE-MRI

    Neff, T; Kiessling, F; Brix, G; Baudendistel, K; Zechmann, C; Giesel, F L; Bendl, R

    2005-01-01

    Planning of radiotherapy is often difficult due to restrictions on morphological images. New imaging techniques enable the integration of biological information into treatment planning and help to improve the detection of vital and aggressive tumour areas. This might improve clinical outcome. However, nowadays morphological data sets are still the gold standard in the planning of radiotherapy. In this paper, we introduce an in-house software platform enabling us to combine images from different imaging modalities yielding biological and morphological information in a workflow driven approach. This is demonstrated for the combination of morphological CT, MRI, functional DCE-MRI and PET data. Data of patients with a tumour of the prostate and with a meningioma were examined with DCE-MRI by applying pharmacokinetic two-compartment models for post-processing. The results were compared with the clinical plans for radiation therapy. Generated parameter maps give additional information about tumour spread, which can be incorporated in the definition of safety margins

  20. Radiotherapy

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  1. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Zelyak, O.; Fallone, B. G.; St-Aubin, J.

    2018-01-01

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low-density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  3. Corrigendum to "Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy".

    Zelyak, Oleksandr; Fallone, B Gino; St-Aubin, Joel

    2018-03-12

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  4. Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    Zelyak, O; Fallone, B G; St-Aubin, J

    2017-12-14

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low-density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  5. MRI-based treatment planning for radiotherapy: Dosimetric verification for prostate IMRT

    Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A.; Wang Lu; Li Jinsheng; Qin Lihong; McNeeley, Shawn; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Freedman, Gary M.; Pollack, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) image fusion with CT-based dose calculation is the gold standard for prostate treatment planning. MR and CT fusion with CT-based dose calculation has become a routine procedure for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The use of MRI alone for treatment planning (or MRI simulation) will remove any errors associated with image fusion. Furthermore, it will reduce treatment cost by avoiding redundant CT scans and save patient, staff, and machine time. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric accuracy of MRI-based treatment planning for prostate IMRT. Methods and materials: A total of 30 IMRT plans for 15 patients were generated using both MRI and CT data. The MRI distortion was corrected using gradient distortion correction (GDC) software provided by the vendor (Philips Medical System, Cleveland, OH). The same internal contours were used for the paired plans. The external contours were drawn separately between CT-based and MR imaging-based plans to evaluate the effect of any residual distortions on dosimetric accuracy. The same energy, beam angles, dose constrains, and optimization parameters were used for dose calculations for each paired plans using a treatment optimization system. The resulting plans were compared in terms of isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Hybrid phantom plans were generated for both the CT-based plans and the MR-based plans using the same leaf sequences and associated monitor units (MU). The physical phantom was then irradiated using the same leaf sequences to verify the dosimetry accuracy of the treatment plans. Results: Our results show that dose distributions between CT-based and MRI-based plans were equally acceptable based on our clinical criteria. The absolute dose agreement for the planning target volume was within 2% between CT-based and MR-based plans and 3% between measured dose

  6. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  7. Hybrid adaptive radiotherapy with on-line MRI in cervix cancer IMRT

    Oh, Seungjong; Stewart, James; Moseley, Joanne; Kelly, Valerie; Lim, Karen; Xie, Jason; Fyles, Anthony; Brock, Kristy K.; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Substantial organ motion and tumor shrinkage occur during radiotherapy for cervix cancer. IMRT planning studies have shown that the quality of radiation delivery is influenced by these anatomical changes, therefore the adaptation of treatment plans may be warranted. Image guidance with off-line replanning, i.e. hybrid-adaptation, is recognized as one of the most practical adaptation strategies. In this study, we investigated the effects of soft tissue image guidance using on-line MR while varying the frequency of off-line replanning on the adaptation of cervix IMRT. Materials and method: 33 cervical cancer patients underwent planning and weekly pelvic MRI scans during radiotherapy. 5 patients of 33 were identified in a previous retrospective adaptive planning study, in which the coverage of gross tumor volume/clinical target volume (GTV/CTV) was not acceptable given single off-line IMRT replan using a 3 mm PTV margin with bone matching. These 5 patients and a randomly selected 10 patients from the remaining 28 patients, a total of 15 patients of 33, were considered in this study. Two matching methods for image guidance (bone to bone and soft tissue to dose matrix) and three frequencies of off-line replanning (none, single, and weekly) were simulated and compared with respect to target coverage (cervix, GTV, lower uterus, parametrium, upper vagina, tumor related CTV and elective lymph node CTV) and OAR sparing (bladder, bowel, rectum, and sigmoid). Cost (total process time) and benefit (target coverage) were analyzed for comparison. Results: Hybrid adaptation (image guidance with off-line replanning) significantly enhanced target coverage for both 5 difficult and 10 standard cases. Concerning image guidance, bone matching was short of delivering enough doses for 5 difficult cases even with a weekly off-line replan. Soft tissue image guidance proved successful for all cases except one when single or more frequent replans were utilized in the difficult cases

  8. Commercial Prospect of Hadronic Radiotherapy Using Ion Accelerator in Indonesia

    Kunto-Wiharto; N-Supriana; R-Susworo; G-Suyitno

    2000-01-01

    In order to anticipate the construction of accelerator based laboratory of which one of its applications is for radiotherapy of cancer patients at Research and Development Center for Advanced Technology belonging to National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta, in the next 7th. Five Year Development Plan (Repelita VII), it is considered important to perform a study on its commercial prospect. It is found, through calculations based on the available data and realistic assumptions, that patients from neighboring countries are needed to make the operation of radiotherapy facility effective and efficient. (author)

  9. Haralick textural features on T2 -weighted MRI are associated with biochemical recurrence following radiotherapy for peripheral zone prostate cancer.

    Gnep, Khémara; Fargeas, Auréline; Gutiérrez-Carvajal, Ricardo E; Commandeur, Frédéric; Mathieu, Romain; Ospina, Juan D; Rolland, Yan; Rohou, Tanguy; Vincendeau, Sébastien; Hatt, Mathieu; Acosta, Oscar; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    To explore the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including Haralick textural features, and biochemical recurrence following prostate cancer radiotherapy. In all, 74 patients with peripheral zone localized prostate adenocarcinoma underwent pretreatment 3.0T MRI before external beam radiotherapy. Median follow-up of 47 months revealed 11 patients with biochemical recurrence. Prostate tumors were segmented on T 2 -weighted sequences (T 2 -w) and contours were propagated onto the coregistered apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) images. We extracted 140 image features from normalized T 2 -w and ADC images corresponding to first-order (n = 6), gradient-based (n = 4), and second-order Haralick textural features (n = 130). Four geometrical features (tumor diameter, perimeter, area, and volume) were also computed. Correlations between Gleason score and MRI features were assessed. Cox regression analysis and random survival forests (RSF) were performed to assess the association between MRI features and biochemical recurrence. Three T 2 -w and one ADC Haralick textural features were significantly correlated with Gleason score (P recurrence (P recurrence following prostate cancer radiotherapy. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:103-117. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  11. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  12. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc

  13. Radiotherapy

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  14. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  15. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M.; Keall, Paul J.; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90 % tungsten and 0 and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy tungsten alloys

  16. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy

    Taylor, Jordan [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, Thomas [Huddersfield U.; Green, Stuart [Birmingham U.; Johnstone, Carol [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.

  17. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  18. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  19. SU-F-J-169: A Feasibility Study of Using MRI Alone in Abdominal Radiotherapy

    Zawisza, I; Hsu, S; Peng, Q; Tome, W [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a MRI alone workflow to support treatment planning and image guidance for abdominal radiotherapy. Methods: Abdominal MR images (in-phase/out-phase/fat/water) were acquired for a patient with breath-hold using a Dixon pulse sequence. Air masks were created on in-phase images using intensity thresholding and morphological processing methods in order to separate air from bone. Pseudo-CT and DRRs were generated using a published method. To investigate the effect of heterogeneity corrections on dose calculations using pseudo-CT, three different plans (3-field 3D, 5-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were performed to mimic pancreatic treatments (1.8Gy/fraction over 28 fractions). Results: The DRRs created from pseudo-CT were of comparable quality as those created from CT. Comparing dose calculations with and without heterogeneity corrections between the 3 different plans, the biggest dosimetric differences were seen in the VMAT plan where modulation must occur across air-tissue interfaces such as those of the stomach and bowel. The DVHs for the VMAT plan showed ∼84cc difference at V50Gy in the small bowel. In terms of pseudo-CT quality, some small volumes of air in the bowel and stomach were misclassified as bone. The VMAT plan was re-optimized on pseudo-CT with 0 HU in the misclassified areas. The V50Gy in the small bowel differed by ∼90cc between the new VMAT plan with and without heterogeneity corrections. Conclusion: We found that the use of MRI alone is feasible for abdominal treatment planning and image guidance. A difference between calculations with and without heterogeneity corrections was found that is most pronounced for VMAT where the traversal of air-tissue interfaces is unavoidable. Future work will be performed to minimize misclassification between bone and air.

  20. SU-F-J-169: A Feasibility Study of Using MRI Alone in Abdominal Radiotherapy

    Zawisza, I; Hsu, S; Peng, Q; Tome, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a MRI alone workflow to support treatment planning and image guidance for abdominal radiotherapy. Methods: Abdominal MR images (in-phase/out-phase/fat/water) were acquired for a patient with breath-hold using a Dixon pulse sequence. Air masks were created on in-phase images using intensity thresholding and morphological processing methods in order to separate air from bone. Pseudo-CT and DRRs were generated using a published method. To investigate the effect of heterogeneity corrections on dose calculations using pseudo-CT, three different plans (3-field 3D, 5-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were performed to mimic pancreatic treatments (1.8Gy/fraction over 28 fractions). Results: The DRRs created from pseudo-CT were of comparable quality as those created from CT. Comparing dose calculations with and without heterogeneity corrections between the 3 different plans, the biggest dosimetric differences were seen in the VMAT plan where modulation must occur across air-tissue interfaces such as those of the stomach and bowel. The DVHs for the VMAT plan showed ∼84cc difference at V50Gy in the small bowel. In terms of pseudo-CT quality, some small volumes of air in the bowel and stomach were misclassified as bone. The VMAT plan was re-optimized on pseudo-CT with 0 HU in the misclassified areas. The V50Gy in the small bowel differed by ∼90cc between the new VMAT plan with and without heterogeneity corrections. Conclusion: We found that the use of MRI alone is feasible for abdominal treatment planning and image guidance. A difference between calculations with and without heterogeneity corrections was found that is most pronounced for VMAT where the traversal of air-tissue interfaces is unavoidable. Future work will be performed to minimize misclassification between bone and air.

  1. Radiotherapy

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  2. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  3. Uterine cervix cancer treatment in IIB, IIIA and IIIB stages with external radiotherapy versus external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose. ION SOLCA. Years 1998-2000

    Sanchez, Doris; Falquez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We realized study of retrospective accomplished in course of years 1998-2000, reviewing clinical charts of statistical department of ION SOLCA. We reviewed 544 cases in 1998, 603 patients in 1999, and 630 cases in 2000. In the radiotherapy service, 133 patients received treatment with external radiotherapy between February 1998 to February 1999 in IIB, IIIA, IIIB stages and only 80 patients were treated with external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose rate in the same stages between March 1999 to March 2000. (The author)

  4. Physical, biological and clinical basis of light ions using in radiotherapy: EULIMA project

    Chauvel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of radiotherapy is a constant concern in oncology: more than half of the patients who contract cancer receive radiotherapy at some stage. Use of charged particles in radiotherapy represents indisputable progress in localization of the dose delivered to tumour masses, thereby allowing reduction of dose received by adjacent healthy tissues. Protons improve the physical selectivity of the irradiation, i.e. the dose distribution. High-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) radiations produce different biological effects, decreasing the differences in radiosensitivity, and allowing radiation therapy to control radioresistant tumours. Fast neutrons represent the most known of these high-LET particles, but they suffer of a relatively poor physical selectivity. The two approaches (physical selectivity and biological advantages) are joined in by light ions (Carbon, Oxygen, Neon). Highly selective high-LET radiation therapy can be performed for radioresistant tumours without damage to healthy tissues. Preliminary results obtained in Berkeley (USA) demonstrate an improved local control of unresectable, slowly growing tumours, confirming what could be extrapolated from proton and neutrontherapy. Furthermore, radioactive light ion beams can be used to verify the accuracy of treatment planning by checking the range of the particle with a PET camera, and in the future for the treatment itself. In the framework of its programme Europe against Cancer, the Commission of the European Communities participates in the funding of the EULIMA (European Light Ion Medical Accelerator) project feasibility study, aiming to design an hospital-based light ion therapy facility in Europe [fr

  5. SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy

    Sabouri, P; Sawant, A; Arai, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sparse sampling and reconstruction-based MRI techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve sufficiently high image acquisition speed while maintaining image quality for the task of radiotherapy guidance. In this study, we examine rapid dynamic MRI using a sparse sampling sequence k-t BLAST in capturing motion-induced, cycle-to-cycle variations in tumor position. We investigate the utility of long-term MRI-based motion monitoring as a means of better characterizing respiration-induced tumor motion compared to a single-cycle 4DCT. Methods: An MRI-compatible, programmable, deformable lung motion phantom with eleven 1.5 ml water marker tubes was placed inside a 3.0 T whole-body MR scanner (Philips Ingenia). The phantom was programmed with 10 lung tumor motion traces previously recorded using the Synchrony system. 2D+t image sequences of a coronal slice were acquired using a balanced-SSFP sequence combined with k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5 mm3; acquisition time = 110 ms/slice). kV fluoroscopic (ground truth) and 4DCT imaging was performed with the same phantom setup and motion trajectories. Marker positions in all three modalities were segmented and tracked using an opensource deformable image registration package, NiftyReg. Results: Marker trajectories obtained from rapid MRI exhibited <1 mm error compared to kv Fluoro trajectories in the presence of complex motion including baseline shifts and changes in respiratory amplitude, indicating the ability of MRI to monitor motion with adequate geometric fidelity for the purpose of radiotherapy guidance. In contrast, the trajectory derived from 4DCT exhibited significant errors up to 6 mm due to cycle-to-cycle variations and baseline shifts. Consequently, 4DCT was found to underestimate the range of marker motion by as much as 50%. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for radiotherapy motion management as it permits for longterm, dose-free, soft-tissue-based monitoring of motion

  6. SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy

    Sabouri, P; Sawant, A [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Arai, T [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Sparse sampling and reconstruction-based MRI techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve sufficiently high image acquisition speed while maintaining image quality for the task of radiotherapy guidance. In this study, we examine rapid dynamic MRI using a sparse sampling sequence k-t BLAST in capturing motion-induced, cycle-to-cycle variations in tumor position. We investigate the utility of long-term MRI-based motion monitoring as a means of better characterizing respiration-induced tumor motion compared to a single-cycle 4DCT. Methods: An MRI-compatible, programmable, deformable lung motion phantom with eleven 1.5 ml water marker tubes was placed inside a 3.0 T whole-body MR scanner (Philips Ingenia). The phantom was programmed with 10 lung tumor motion traces previously recorded using the Synchrony system. 2D+t image sequences of a coronal slice were acquired using a balanced-SSFP sequence combined with k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5 mm3; acquisition time = 110 ms/slice). kV fluoroscopic (ground truth) and 4DCT imaging was performed with the same phantom setup and motion trajectories. Marker positions in all three modalities were segmented and tracked using an opensource deformable image registration package, NiftyReg. Results: Marker trajectories obtained from rapid MRI exhibited <1 mm error compared to kv Fluoro trajectories in the presence of complex motion including baseline shifts and changes in respiratory amplitude, indicating the ability of MRI to monitor motion with adequate geometric fidelity for the purpose of radiotherapy guidance. In contrast, the trajectory derived from 4DCT exhibited significant errors up to 6 mm due to cycle-to-cycle variations and baseline shifts. Consequently, 4DCT was found to underestimate the range of marker motion by as much as 50%. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for radiotherapy motion management as it permits for longterm, dose-free, soft-tissue-based monitoring of motion

  7. Distortion-free diffusion MRI using an MRI-guided Tri-Cobalt 60 radiotherapy system: Sequence verification and preliminary clinical experience.

    Gao, Yu; Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Cao, Minsong; Kaprealian, Tania; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Chenyang; Neylon, John; Low, Daniel A; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring tumor response during the course of treatment and adaptively modifying treatment plan based on tumor biological feedback may represent a new paradigm for radiotherapy. Diffusion MRI has shown great promises in assessing and predicting tumor response to radiotherapy. However, the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) technique suffers from limited resolution, severe distortion, and possibly inaccurate ADC at low field strength. The purpose of this work was to develop a reliable, accurate and distortion-free diffusion MRI technique that is practicable for longitudinal tumor response evaluation and adaptive radiotherapy on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). A spatial integrity phantom was used to quantitate and compare the geometric accuracy of the two diffusion sequences for three orthogonal orientations. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy was evaluated on a diffusion phantom under both 0 °C and room temperature to cover a diffusivity range between 0.40 × 10 -3 and 2.10 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Ten room temperature measurements repeated on five different days were conducted to assess the ADC reproducibility of DP-TSE. Two glioblastoma (GBM) and six sarcoma patients were included to examine the in vivo feasibility. The target registration error (TRE) was calculated to quantitate the geometric accuracy where structural CT or MR images were co-registered to the diffusion images as references. ADC maps from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI were calculated and compared. A tube phantom was placed next to patients not treated on ViewRay, and ADCs of this reference tube were also compared. The proposed DP-TSE passed the spatial integrity test (< 1 mm within 100 mm radius and < 2 mm within 175 mm radius

  8. Five-year quality of life assessment after carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Maruyama, Katsuya; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiya, Takuma; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Akakura, Koichiro; Shimazaki, Jun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively assess 5-year health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. A total of 417 patients received carbon ion radiotherapy at a total dose of 63–66 Gray-equivalents (GyE) in 20 fractions over 5 weeks, and neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were administered for intermediate and high-risk patients. A HRQOL assessment was performed at five time points (immediately before the initiation of C-ion RT, immediately after, and at 12, 36 and 60 months after completion of C-ion RT) using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) questionnaires. FACT-G and FACT-P scores were significantly decreased; however, the absolute change after 60 months was minimal. The transient decreases in the Trial Outcome Index (TOI) score returned to their baseline levels. Use of ADT, presence of adverse events, and biochemical failure were related to lower scores. Scores of subdomains of FACT instruments indicated characteristic changes. The pattern of HRQOL change after C-ion RT was similar to that of other modalities. Further controlled studies focusing on a HRQOL in patients with prostate cancer are warranted.

  9. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 23 (2007), s. 6813-6830 ISSN 0031-9155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Bragg peak * light ions * hadron * hadron radiotherapy * biological effectiveness * treatment planning Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2007

  10. Radiotherapy

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  11. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-01-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3 He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in 'nested'-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3 He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment

  12. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M. N.; Hamm, R. W.; Adler, R. J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-12-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery — with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use and innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data is also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in "nested"-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  13. Radiotherapy.

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  14. Radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base with carbon ions

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver; Thilmann, Christoph; Kraemer, Michael; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kraft, Gerhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Compared to photon irradiation, carbon ions provide physical and biologic advantages that may be exploited in chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2000, 37 patients with chordomas (n=24) and chondrosarcomas (n=13) were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy within a Phase I/II trial. Tumor conformal application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with pulse-to-pulse energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included biologic plan optimization. The median tumor dose was 60 GyE (GyE Gy x relative biologic effectiveness). Results: The mean follow-up was 13 months. The local control rate after 1 and 2 years was 96% and 90%, respectively. We observed 2 recurrences outside the gross tumor volume in patients with chordomas. Progression-free survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 83% for chordomas at 2 years. Partial remission after carbon ion radiotherapy was observed in 6 patients. Treatment toxicity was mild. Conclusion: These are the first data demonstrating the clinical feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of scanning beam delivery of ion beams in patients with skull base tumors. The preliminary results in patients with skull base chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas are encouraging, although the follow-up was too short to draw definite conclusions concerning outcome. In the absence of major toxicity, dose escalation might be considered

  15. Simulating demand for innovative radiotherapies: An illustrative model based on carbon ion and proton radiotherapy

    Pommier, Pascal; Lievens, Yolande; Feschet, Fabien; Borras, Josep M.; Baron, Marie Helene; Shtiliyanova, Anastasiya; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Innovative therapies are not only characterized by major uncertainties regarding clinical benefit and cost but also the expected recruitment of patients. An original model was developed to simulate patient recruitment to a costly particle therapy by varying layout of the facility and patient referral (one vs. several countries) and by weighting the treated indication by the expected benefit of particle therapy. Material and methods: A multi-step probabilistic spatial model was used to allocate patients to the optimal treatment strategy and facility taking into account the estimated therapeutic gain from the new therapy for each tumour type, the geographical accessibility of the facilities and patient preference. Recruitment was simulated under different assumptions relating to the demand and supply. Results: Extending the recruitment area, reducing treatment capacity, equipping all treatment rooms with a carbon ion gantry and inclusion of proton protocols in carbon ion facilities led to an increased proportion of indications with the highest expected benefit. Assuming the existence of a competing carbon ions facility, lower values of therapeutic gain, and a greater unwillingness of patients to travel for treatment increased the proportion of indications with low expected benefit. Conclusions: Modelling patient recruitment may aid decision-making when planning new and expensive treatments.

  16. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features

  17. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-01

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n 40 Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets

  18. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-15

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n {sup 40}Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets.

  19. Potential application of garlic on heavy ion radiotherapy

    Xu Shuai; Zhang Hong; Liu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Garlic has beneficial effects to protect against many diseases. It can not only protect normal cells from lesion, but also prevent tumorigenesis, proliferation, adhesion, invasion and metastasis. In this paper, the mechanisms of these functions of garlic were summarized and compared with radioprotector and radiosensitizer. We presented that garlic has both radioprotective effect on normal cells and radiosensitive effect on tumor cells. By right of its superiority, garlic can improve biological effect in the therapy of heavy ion. Therefore, it has potential value in clinical practice. That is worth for us to explore whether garlic has radioprotective and radiosensitive effect or not. (authors)

  20. Health-related quality of life after carbon-ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A 3-year prospective study

    Katoh, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    To assess 3-year health-related quality of life of patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 213 patients received carbon-ion radiotherapy at a total dose of 66 Gy equivalent in 20 fractions over 5 weeks, and neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy were administered for high-risk patients for at least 12 months. A health-related quality of life assessment was carried out at four time-points (immediately before the initiation of carbon-ion radiotherapy, immediately after, 12 and 36 months after completion of carbon-ion radiotherapy) using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General and for Prostate Cancer Patients. The evaluable response rates among all responses were more than 94%. Overall, a significant decrease in the scores of the health-related quality of life 12 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy returned to their baseline levels at 36 months. Additionally, no significant decrease was observed in the scores at any of the assessment time-points compared with their baseline scores in the group of carbon-ion radiotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy; however, the presence of morbidity and biochemical failure significantly worsened the scores, and the decreases in the scores did not improve even at 36 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy. An assessment based on a subjective scoring system shows a significant decrease in health-related quality of life at 12 months after carbon-ion radiation therapy, which tends to return to baseline levels at 36 months. The presence of morbidity and bio-chemical failure significantly worsen health-related quality of life scores. Further controlled studies focusing on health-related quality of life assessment in patients with prostate cancer are warranted. (author)

  1. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    Edmund, Jens M.; Kjer, Hans M.; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon AL; Andreasen, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, so-called MRI-only RT, would remove the systematic registration error between MR and computed tomography (CT), and provide co-registered MRI for assessment of treatment response and adaptive RT. Electron densities, however, need to be assigned to the MRI images for dose calculation and patient setup based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Here, we investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance for a number of popular voxel-based methods to generate a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). Five patients receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation and (3) statistical regression. Each approach contained two methods. Approach 1 used bulk density assignment of MRI voxels into air, soft tissue and bone based on logical masks and the transverse relaxation time T2 of the bone. Approach 2 used similar bulk density assignments with Bayesian statistics including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT agreement with the pCT of each method was quantified and compared with the other methods geometrically and dosimetrically using both a number of reported metrics and introducing some novel metrics. The best geometrical agreement with CT was obtained with the statistical regression methods which performed significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI

  2. TH-CD-202-11: Implications for Online Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Radiotherapy of Gastic and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancers Using MRI-Guided Radiotherapy

    Mittauer, K; Geurts, M; Toya, R; Bassetti, M; Harari, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) tumors commonly requires large margins due to deformation, motion and variable changes of the stomach anatomy, at the risk of increased normal tissue toxicities. This work quantifies the interfraction variation of stomach deformation from daily MRI-guided radiotherapy to allow for a more targeted determination of margin expansion in the treatment of gastric and GEJ tumors. Methods: Five patients treated for gastric (n=3) and gastroesophageal junction (n=2) cancers with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy underwent daily MR imaging on a clinical MR-IGRT system. Treatment planning and contours were performed based on the MR simulation. The stomach was re-contoured on each daily volumetric setup MR. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) of the daily stomach were computed to evaluate the stomach interfraction deformation. To evaluate the stomach margin, the maximum Hausdorff distance (HD) between the initial and fractional stomach surface was measured for each fraction. The margin expansion, needed to encompass all fractions, was evaluated from the union of all fractional stomachs. Results: In total, 94 fractions with daily stomach contours were evaluated. For the interfraction stomach differences, the average DSC was 0.67±0.1 for gastric and 0.62±0.1 for GEJ cases. The maximum HD of each fraction was 3.5±2.0cm (n=94) with mean HD of 0.8±0.4cm (across all surface voxels for all fractions). The margin expansion required to encompass all individual fractions (averaged across 5 patients) was 1.4 cm(superior), 2.3 cm(inferior), 2.5 cm(right), 3.2 cm(left), 3.7 cm(anterior), 3.4 cm(posterior). Maximum observed difference for margin expansion was 8.7cm(posterior) among one patient. Conclusion: We observed a notable interfractional change in daily stomach shape (i.e., mean DSC of 0.67, p<0.0001) in both gastric and GEJ patients, for which adaptive radiotherapy is indicated. A minimum PTV margin of 3

  3. TH-CD-202-11: Implications for Online Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Radiotherapy of Gastic and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancers Using MRI-Guided Radiotherapy

    Mittauer, K; Geurts, M; Toya, R; Bassetti, M; Harari, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) tumors commonly requires large margins due to deformation, motion and variable changes of the stomach anatomy, at the risk of increased normal tissue toxicities. This work quantifies the interfraction variation of stomach deformation from daily MRI-guided radiotherapy to allow for a more targeted determination of margin expansion in the treatment of gastric and GEJ tumors. Methods: Five patients treated for gastric (n=3) and gastroesophageal junction (n=2) cancers with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy underwent daily MR imaging on a clinical MR-IGRT system. Treatment planning and contours were performed based on the MR simulation. The stomach was re-contoured on each daily volumetric setup MR. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) of the daily stomach were computed to evaluate the stomach interfraction deformation. To evaluate the stomach margin, the maximum Hausdorff distance (HD) between the initial and fractional stomach surface was measured for each fraction. The margin expansion, needed to encompass all fractions, was evaluated from the union of all fractional stomachs. Results: In total, 94 fractions with daily stomach contours were evaluated. For the interfraction stomach differences, the average DSC was 0.67±0.1 for gastric and 0.62±0.1 for GEJ cases. The maximum HD of each fraction was 3.5±2.0cm (n=94) with mean HD of 0.8±0.4cm (across all surface voxels for all fractions). The margin expansion required to encompass all individual fractions (averaged across 5 patients) was 1.4 cm(superior), 2.3 cm(inferior), 2.5 cm(right), 3.2 cm(left), 3.7 cm(anterior), 3.4 cm(posterior). Maximum observed difference for margin expansion was 8.7cm(posterior) among one patient. Conclusion: We observed a notable interfractional change in daily stomach shape (i.e., mean DSC of 0.67, p<0.0001) in both gastric and GEJ patients, for which adaptive radiotherapy is indicated. A minimum PTV margin of 3

  4. SU-G-BRA-03: PCA Based Imaging Angle Optimization for 2D Cine MRI Based Radiotherapy Guidance

    Chen, T; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an imaging angle optimization methodology for orthogonal 2D cine MRI based radiotherapy guidance using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of target motion retrieved from 4DCT. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 4DCT of 6 patients with lung tumor. A radiation oncologist manually contoured the target volume at the maximal inhalation phase of the respiratory cycle. An object constrained deformable image registration (DIR) method has been developed to track the target motion along the respiration at ten phases. The motion of the center of the target mass has been analyzed using the PCA to find out the principal motion components that were uncorrelated with each other. Two orthogonal image planes for cineMRI have been determined using this method to minimize the through plane motion during MRI based radiotherapy guidance. Results: 3D target respiratory motion for all 6 patients has been efficiently retrieved from 4DCT. In this process, the object constrained DIR demonstrated satisfactory accuracy and efficiency to enable the automatic motion tracking for clinical application. The average motion amplitude in the AP, lateral, and longitudinal directions were 3.6mm (min: 1.6mm, max: 5.6mm), 1.7mm (min: 0.6mm, max: 2.7mm), and 5.6mm (min: 1.8mm, max: 16.1mm), respectively. Based on PCA, the optimal orthogonal imaging planes were determined for cineMRI. The average angular difference between the PCA determined imaging planes and the traditional AP and lateral imaging planes were 47 and 31 degrees, respectively. After optimization, the average amplitude of through plane motion reduced from 3.6mm in AP images to 2.5mm (min:1.3mm, max:3.9mm); and from 1.7mm in lateral images to 0.6mm (min: 0.2mm, max:1.5mm), while the principal in plane motion amplitude increased from 5.6mm to 6.5mm (min: 2.8mm, max: 17mm). Conclusion: DIR and PCA can be used to optimize the orthogonal image planes of cineMRI to minimize the through plane motion during radiotherapy

  5. SU-G-BRA-03: PCA Based Imaging Angle Optimization for 2D Cine MRI Based Radiotherapy Guidance

    Chen, T; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Zhang, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging angle optimization methodology for orthogonal 2D cine MRI based radiotherapy guidance using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of target motion retrieved from 4DCT. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 4DCT of 6 patients with lung tumor. A radiation oncologist manually contoured the target volume at the maximal inhalation phase of the respiratory cycle. An object constrained deformable image registration (DIR) method has been developed to track the target motion along the respiration at ten phases. The motion of the center of the target mass has been analyzed using the PCA to find out the principal motion components that were uncorrelated with each other. Two orthogonal image planes for cineMRI have been determined using this method to minimize the through plane motion during MRI based radiotherapy guidance. Results: 3D target respiratory motion for all 6 patients has been efficiently retrieved from 4DCT. In this process, the object constrained DIR demonstrated satisfactory accuracy and efficiency to enable the automatic motion tracking for clinical application. The average motion amplitude in the AP, lateral, and longitudinal directions were 3.6mm (min: 1.6mm, max: 5.6mm), 1.7mm (min: 0.6mm, max: 2.7mm), and 5.6mm (min: 1.8mm, max: 16.1mm), respectively. Based on PCA, the optimal orthogonal imaging planes were determined for cineMRI. The average angular difference between the PCA determined imaging planes and the traditional AP and lateral imaging planes were 47 and 31 degrees, respectively. After optimization, the average amplitude of through plane motion reduced from 3.6mm in AP images to 2.5mm (min:1.3mm, max:3.9mm); and from 1.7mm in lateral images to 0.6mm (min: 0.2mm, max:1.5mm), while the principal in plane motion amplitude increased from 5.6mm to 6.5mm (min: 2.8mm, max: 17mm). Conclusion: DIR and PCA can be used to optimize the orthogonal image planes of cineMRI to minimize the through plane motion during radiotherapy

  6. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2{+-}0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5{+-}0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0{+-}0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5{+-}0.6 vs. 2.0{+-}0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7{+-}0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  7. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Plathow, Christian; Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine; Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2±0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5±0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0±0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5±0.6 vs. 2.0±0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7±0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  8. Radiotherapy

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  9. Feasibility of carbon-ion radiotherapy for re-irradiation of locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors.

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Karube, Masataka; Nakajima, Mio; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-02

    Intrathoracic recurrence after carbon-ion radiotherapy for primary or metastatic lung tumors remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. However, treatment options are limited. Herein, we report on the toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. Data of 95 patients with prior intrathoracic carbon-ion radiotherapy who were treated with re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy at our institution between 2006 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Seventy-three patients (76.8%) had primary lung tumors and 22 patients (23.2%) had metastatic lung tumors. The median dose of initial carbon-ion radiotherapy was 52.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) and the median dose of re-irradiation was 66.0 Gy (relative biological effectiveness). None of the patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period after re-irradiation was 18 months. In terms of grade ≥3 toxicities, one patient experienced each of the following: grade 5 bronchopleural fistula, grade 4 radiation pneumonitis, grade 3 chest pain, and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 54.0% and 61.9%, respectively. In conclusion, re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy was associated with relatively low toxicity and moderate efficacy. Re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy might be an effective treatment option for patients with locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    Korhonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.p.korhonen@hus.fi [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS, Finland and Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Kapanen, Mika [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital, POB-2000, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Keyriläinen, Jani; Seppälä, Tiina; Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360° volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each

  11. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  12. MRI-based measurements of respiratory motion variability and assessment of imaging strategies for radiotherapy planning

    Blackall, J M; Ahmad, S; Miquel, M E; McClelland, J R; Landau, D B; Hawkes, D J

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory organ motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer. Currently widespread techniques, such as 4D-computed tomography (4DCT), cannot be used to measure variability of this motion from one cycle to the next. In this paper, we describe the use of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility of respiratory motion and also to estimate the level of errors that may be introduced into treatment delivery by using various breath-hold imaging strategies during lung RT planning. A reference model of respiratory motion is formed to enable comparison of different breathing cycles at any arbitrary position in the respiratory cycle. This is constructed by using free-breathing images from the inhale phase of a single breathing cycle, then co-registering the images, and thereby tracking landmarks. This reference model is then compared to alternative models constructed from images acquired during the exhale phase of the same cycle and the inhale phase of a subsequent cycle, to assess intra- and inter-cycle variability ('hysteresis' and 'reproducibility') of organ motion. The reference model is also compared to a series of models formed from breath-hold data at exhale and inhale. Evaluation of these models is carried out on data from ten healthy volunteers and five lung cancer patients. Free-breathing models show good levels of intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility across the tidal breathing range. Mean intra-cycle errors in the position of organ surface landmarks of 1.5(1.4)-3.5(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-5.2(5.2) mm for patients. Equivalent measures of inter-cycle variability across this range are 1.7(1.0)-3.9(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-3.3(2.2) mm for patients. As expected, models based on breath-hold sequences do not represent normal tidal motion as well as those based on free-breathing data, with mean errors of 4

  13. 15 years experience with helium ion radiotherapy for uveal melanoma

    Castro, J.R.; Char, D.H.; Petti, P.L.; Daftari, I.K.; Quivey, J.M.; Singh, R.P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In this study we review our long term experience with helium ion therapy in treating uveal melanoma. Materials and Methods: At UCSF-LBL, 347 patients with uveal melanoma were treated with helium ions from December 1978 - May 1992. A non randomized dose searching study was undertaken beginning with 80 GyE in 5 fractions and subsequently lowered through several levels to 48 GyE in 4 fractions. The treatment period ranged from 3 to 15 days, with a mean of 7 days. The various dose groups were similar in tumor characteristics and size. Results: An overall local control rate of 96% has been achieved, with no dose response being seen at 80, 70, 60 or 50 GyE in 5 fxs. At the lowest dose level of 48 GyE in 4 fxs, the local control rate fell to 87%. Fifteen patients (4%) had local failure in the eye requiring enucleation (12 pts), laser (1 pt) or reirradiation (2 pts). The time of appearance of local failures ranges from 4 to 64 months with most occurring within 2 years. Eight of the 15 patients with local failure are dead of distant metastases. Of the 347 patients, 308 had (20(200)) vision or better in the affected eye prior to treatment. Of these, 125 (41%) have retained at least(20(200)) vision in the treated eye. Patients with tumors greater than 5 mm in ultrasound height or close to the optic nerve or fovea have a reduced chance of retaining useful vision. The total enucleation rate is 15%, 1% for local failure and 14% because of complications of the helium RT, mostly secondary to severe glaucoma. Of the 347 patients, 230 are still alive. The median follow up is 75 months, range 3-206 months. Kaplan-Maier (K-M) survival for all 347 patients was 80% at 5 years, 77% at 10 years and 68% at 15 years post treatment. Results for patients whose tumor involves the ciliary body is much worse with a 15 year K-M survival of 42%, whereas patients not having ciliary involvement have a 15 year K-M survival of 75%. The K-M survival in patients with local failure in

  14. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)—viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells—is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule. (paper)

  15. Clinical Impact of Re-irradiation with Carbon-ion Radiotherapy for Lymph Node Recurrence of Gynecological Cancers.

    Shiba, Shintaro; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Kato, Shingo; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Karasawa, Kumiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for lymph node recurrence of gynecological cancers after definitive radiotherapy. Data regarding patients with unresectable and isolated recurrent lymph node from gynecological cancer after definitive radiotherapy were analyzed. Total dose of C-ion RT was 48-57.6 Gy (RBE) in 12 or 16 fractions. Sixteen patients received re-irradiation by C-ion RT were analyzed. Median follow-up was 37 months. Median tumor size was 27 mm. None developed Grade 1 or higher acute toxicities and Grade 3 or higher late toxicities. The 3-year overall survival, local control and disease-free survival rates after C-ion RT were 74%, 94% and 55%, respectively. Re-irradiation with C-ion RT for lymph node recurrence of gynecological cancers after definitive radiotherapy can be safe and effective. This result suggested that C-ion RT could be a curative treatment option for conventionally difficult-to-cure patients. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. The role of diffusion-weighted MRI: In assessment of response to radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Manal H. Wahba

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: With the use of a 1.5-T MR scanner, our preliminary results suggest that ADC values may be useful as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring therapeutic response of prostate cancer to radiotherapy.

  17. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B0 field strength

    Wachowicz, K.; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E.; Volotovskyy, V.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B 0 . This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B 0 that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B 0 -dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B 0 field (specifically the T 1 time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B 0 fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T 1 contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B 0 reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  18. Prognostic Value of Subclassification Using MRI in the T4 Classification Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    Chen Lei [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Liu Lizhi [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Chen Mo; Li Wenfei; Yin Wenjing [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Lin Aihua [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Sun Ying [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Li Li [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ma Jun, E-mail: majun2@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To subclassify patients with the T4 classification nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), according to the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to evaluate the prognostic value of subclassification after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 140 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated classification T4 NPC received IMRT as their primary treatment and were included in this retrospective study. T4 patients were subclassified into two grades: T4a was defined as a primary nasopharyngeal tumor with involvement of the masticator space only; and T4b was defined as involvement of the intracranial region, cranial nerves, and/or orbit. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rate for T4a patients (82.5% and 87.0%, respectively), were significantly higher than for T4b patients (62.6% and 66.8%; p = 0.033 and p = 0.036, respectively). The T4a/b subclassification was an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio = 2.331, p = 0.032) and DMFS (hazard ratio = 2.602, p = 0.034), and had no significant effect on local relapse-free survival. Conclusions: Subclassification of T4 patients, as T4a or T4b, using MRI according to the site of invasion, has prognostic value for the outcomes of IMRT treatment in NPC.

  19. A case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Yamamoto, Tatsuhito; Tokunou, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Hisato; Kamei, Ryoji; Kitamura, Yoshinori; Ando, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy that was successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy. A 68-year-old woman received SSPPD for pancreatic head cancer. Gemcitabine (GEM) was administered for a year as postoperative chemotherapy. One year 8 months after surgery, abdominal CT showed a 20 mm solid mass in the stump of the remnant pancreas and dilation of the distal pancreatic duct. FDG-PET revealed a solitary tumor without any recurrence. We diagnosed the patient with a solitary recurrence of pancreatic cancer. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy were performed. After treatment, the lesion was not detected on CT or FDG-PET. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer seems to be effective and there might result in a survival benefit. (author)

  20. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  1. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10"−"3mm"2/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with excellent

  2. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10{sup −3}mm{sup 2}/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with

  3. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: The CINDERELLA trial

    Combs, Stephanie E; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Burkholder, Iris; Edler, Lutz; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Haselmann, Renate; Unterberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons. First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD) of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy. Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. The Cinderella trial is the first study to evaluate carbon ion

  4. Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy. Theoretical modelling for H and N tumours

    Antonovic, Laura; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Dasu, Alexandru; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D 50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments. (author)

  5. The clinical rationale for MRI-guided radiotherapy : the dawn of a new era

    Kerkhof, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Current radiotherapy treatment machines use the treatment beam or the integrated cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) functionality for patient positioning based on bony structures or implanted tumour markers. The University Medical Center Utrecht, in cooperation with Elekta and Philips, is

  6. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  7. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Evaluation of Textural Feature Extraction for Radiotherapy Response Assessment of Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Using Diffusion Weighted MRI and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    Xie, Y; Wang, C; Horton, J; Chang, Z [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b = 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.

  8. Past, present and future aspects of studies of heavy ion radiotherapy. 2. Future view of clinical studies of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamata, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of clinical studies of heavy ion radiotherapy (HIR, using carbon beam) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is, in treatment of cancers, to elucidate its potential and significance for establishing the methodology for curing the disease safely and reliably to further spread the therapy. Here is presented a future view of clinical studies of HIR based on the past results and along authorities' medical policy. NIRS has treated 3,100 or more cancer patients in about 50 clinical trials from the start of HIR in 1994. In those studies, curing the intractable malignancies has become possible in a short term of therapy, and the irradiating machine is being miniaturized (actually under construction in Gunma Univ.). At the end of 2006, about 4,000 patients have been treated with HIR globally: the impact of NIRS HIR. There are such future HIR plans as the promotion of clinical trials, development of irradiation technology, promotion and efficient practice as an advanced frontier medicare, imaging diagnosis for the aim of treatment, biological studies, and comparative studies to elucidate the usefulness. Cooperation of NIRS, manufacturers and authorities will make HIR a more useful, less burdensome mean to treat patients with more intractable cancers. (R.T.)

  9. Helium ions for radiotherapy? Physical and biological verifications of a novel treatment modality

    Krämer, Michael, E-mail: m.kraemer@gsi.de; Scifoni, Emanuele; Schuy, Christoph; Rovituso, Marta; Maier, Andreas; Kaderka, Robert; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Application (TIFPA-INFN), 38123, via Sommarive 14, Trento (Italy); Brons, Stephan; Tessonnier, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikums Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Parodi, Katia [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikums Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Department of Medical Physics, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Munich (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Modern facilities for actively scanned ion beam radiotherapy allow in principle the use of helium beams, which could present specific advantages, especially for pediatric tumors. In order to assess the potential use of these beams for radiotherapy, i.e., to create realistic treatment plans, the authors set up a dedicated {sup 4}He beam model, providing base data for their treatment planning system TRiP98, and they have reported that in this work together with its physical and biological validations. Methods: A semiempirical beam model for the physical depth dose deposition and the production of nuclear fragments was developed and introduced in TRiP98. For the biological effect calculations the last version of the local effect model was used. The model predictions were experimentally verified at the HIT facility. The primary beam attenuation and the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depth in water were investigated using {sup 4}He ion beams of 200 MeV/u. The nuclear charge of secondary fragments was identified using a ΔE/E telescope. 3D absorbed dose distributions were measured with pin point ionization chambers and the biological dosimetry experiments were realized irradiating a Chinese hamster ovary cells stack arranged in an extended target. Results: The few experimental data available on basic physical processes are reproduced by their beam model. The experimental verification of absorbed dose distributions in extended target volumes yields an overall agreement, with a slight underestimation of the lateral spread. Cell survival along a 4 cm extended target is reproduced with remarkable accuracy. Conclusions: The authors presented a simple simulation model for therapeutical {sup 4}He beams which they introduced in TRiP98, and which is validated experimentally by means of physical and biological dosimetries. Thus, it is now possible to perform detailed treatment planning studies with {sup 4}He beams, either exclusively or in

  10. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  11. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  12. Characterizing spatiotemporal information loss in sparse-sampling-based dynamic MRI for monitoring respiration-induced tumor motion in radiotherapy

    Arai, Tatsuya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nofiele, Joris; Yuan, Qing [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Sawant, Amit, E-mail: amit.sawant@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Sparse-sampling and reconstruction techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve faster image acquisition speeds, while maintaining adequate spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors investigate the use of one such sequence, broad-use linear acquisition speed-up technique (k-t BLAST) in monitoring tumor motion for thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy and examine the potential trade-off between increased sparsification (to increase imaging speed) and the potential loss of “true” information due to greater reliance on a priori information. Methods: Lung tumor motion trajectories in the superior–inferior direction, previously recorded from ten lung cancer patients, were replayed using a motion phantom module driven by an MRI-compatible motion platform. Eppendorf test tubes filled with water which serve as fiducial markers were placed in the phantom. The modeled rigid and deformable motions were collected in a coronal image slice using balanced fast field echo in conjunction with k-t BLAST. Root mean square (RMS) error was used as a metric of spatial accuracy as measured trajectories were compared to input data. The loss of spatial information was characterized for progressively increasing acceleration factor from 1 to 16; the resultant sampling frequency was increased approximately from 2.5 to 19 Hz when the principal direction of the motion was set along frequency encoding direction. In addition to the phantom study, respiration-induced tumor motions were captured from two patients (kidney tumor and lung tumor) at 13 Hz over 49 s to demonstrate the impact of high speed motion monitoring over multiple breathing cycles. For each subject, the authors compared the tumor centroid trajectory as well as the deformable motion during free breathing. Results: In the rigid and deformable phantom studies, the RMS error of target tracking at the acquisition speed of 19 Hz was approximately 0.3–0

  13. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  14. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  15. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Oborn, B; Bode, F; Liney, G; Hunold, P; Rades, D; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior-inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior-posterior), and 2 mm (left-right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the ideal scenario, compromising

  16. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  17. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  18. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  19. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes

    Antonovic, Laura; Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    , using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER...... was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related...... to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high...

  20. Carbon ion radiotherapy for oligo-recurrent lung metastases from colorectal cancer: a feasibility study

    Takahashi, Wataru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for oligo-recurrent lung tumors from colorectal cancer (CRC). From May 1997 to October 2012, 34 consecutive patients with oligo-recurrent pulmonary metastases from CRC were treated with CIRT. The patients were not surgical candidates for medical reasons or patient refusal. Using a respiratory-gated technique, carbon ion therapy was delivered with curative intent using 4 coplanar beam angles. A median dose of 60 GyE (range, 44–64.8 GyE) was delivered to the planning target volume (PTV), with a median daily dose of 15 GyE (range, 3.6–44 GyE). Treatment outcome was analyzed in terms of local control rate (LCR), survival rate, and treatment-related complications. In total, 34 patients with 44 oligo-recurrent pulmonary lesions were treated with CIRT. Median follow-up period was 23.7 months. The 2- and 3-year actuarial LCRs of the treated patients were 85.4% ± 6.2% and 85.4% ± 6.2%, respectively. Overall survival was 65.1% ± 9.5% at 2 years, and 50.1% ± 10.5% at 3 years. Although survival rates were relatively worse in the subsets of patients aged < 63 years or with early metastasis (< 36 months after resection of primary site), these factors were not significantly correlated with overall survival (P = 0.13 and 0.19, respectively). All treatment-related complications were self-limited, without any grade 3–5 toxicity. CIRT is one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for colorectal lung metastases, which are relatively resistant to stereotactic body radiotherapy. CIRT is considered to be the least invasive approach even in patients who have undergone repeated prior thoracic metastasectomies

  1. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  2. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  3. Comparative sensitivities of functional MRI sequences in detection of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiotherapy.

    Roy, Catherine; Foudi, Fatah; Charton, Jeanne; Jung, Michel; Lang, Hervé; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the respective accuracies of three types of functional MRI sequences-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, and 3D (1)H-MR spectroscopy (MRS)-in the depiction of local prostate cancer recurrence after two different initial therapy options. From a cohort of 83 patients with suspicion of local recurrence based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics who were imaged on a 3-T MRI unit using an identical protocol including the three functional sequences with an endorectal coil, we selected 60 patients (group A, 28 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; group B, 32 patients who underwent external-beam radiation) who had local recurrence ascertained on the basis of a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results and a reduction in PSA level after salvage therapy. All patients presented with a local relapse. Sensitivity with T2-weighted MRI and 3D (1)H-MRS sequences was 57% and 53%, respectively, for group A and 71% and 78%, respectively, for group B. DCE-MRI alone showed a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, respectively, for groups A and B. DWI alone had a higher sensitivity for group B (96%) than for group A (71%). The combination of T2-weighted imaging plus DWI plus DCE-MRI provided a sensitivity as high as 100% in group B. The performance of functional imaging sequences for detecting recurrence is different after radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. DCE-MRI is a valid and efficient tool to detect prostate cancer recurrence in radical prostatectomy as well as in external-beam radiotherapy. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI is highly efficient after radiation therapy. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS needs to be improved. Even though it is not accurate enough, T2-weighted imaging remains essential for the morphologic analysis of the area.

  4. Evaluation of multi-modality CT-MRI-SPECT registration tools for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes

    Bianchini, S.; Alfonso, R.; Castillo, J.; Coca, M.; Torres, L.

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative comparison of registration CT-CT, CT-MR and CT-SPECT performed by the different software and algorithms studies is presented. Only two studied software were full DICOM RT compatible while accepting DICOM images in any layout. Quantitative results of fiducial displacement errors were calculated for all software and available registration methods. The presented methodology demonstrated being effective for assessing the quality of studied image registration tools in the radiotherapy planning context, provided the images are free of significant geometric deformation. When implementing this methodology in real patients, the use of immobilization devices, such as thermoplastic masks, is recommended for enhanced quality of image registration. (Author)

  5. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Edmund, Jens M.

    2016-01-01

    . The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level....... The data consisted of CT and T 1-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAEvox) and the deviation in water...... showed that a patch-based method based on affine registrations and T 1-weighted MRI could generate accurate pCTs of the pelvis. The main source of differences between pCT and CT was positional changes of air pockets and body outline....

  6. Bone marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joints after pelvic radiotherapy mimicking metastases on MRI

    Kanberoglu, K.; Mihmanli, I.; Kurugoglu, S.; Ogut, G.; Kantarci, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey)

    2001-09-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the sacroiliac joints mimicking metastases on MR images were evaluated. Twelve patients who received radiotherapy to the pelvic region due to pelvic malignancy were included in the study. All patients had undergone external beam radiation therapy to the pelvic region, and 2 patients received supplementary internal radiation. The changes in the sacroiliac joints were evaluated. Computed-tomography-guided core bone biopsy from the bone marrow was taken from their corresponding MR sections in 5 of the patients. T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas with ill-defined margins in the bone marrow adjacent to the sacroiliac joints were observed in all patients. On bone scintigraphy all the lesions demonstrated increased activity. Other radiological modalities excluded fracture, soft tissue mass, and osseous destruction. Bone biopsies demonstrated peritrabecular fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Patients receiving radiotherapy to the pelvis may demonstrate T1 hypointense/T2 hyperintense, ill-defined postradiotherapeutic benign changes in the sacroiliac joints. In the absence of any other signs of disease progression and when the imaging pattern is typical, close radiological follow-up should be sufficient to rule out metastases. (orig.)

  7. The stratification of severity of acute radiation proctopathy after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma using diffusion-weighted MRI

    Li, Xiang Sheng, E-mail: lxsheng500@163.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Fang, Hong, E-mail: hongfang196808@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Song, Yunlong, E-mail: yunlongsong010@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Li, Dechang, E-mail: dechangli1972@sina.com [Department of Pathology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Wang, Yingjie, E-mail: wangyj19710813@sina.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Zhu, Hongxian, E-mail: hongxian0102@sina.cn [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Meng, Limin, E-mail: liminmeng1977@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pingwang1978@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Wang, Dong, E-mail: dongwang1964@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China); Fan, Hongxia, E-mail: fanhongxia1975@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Air Force General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100142 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Objective: To determine whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be used for quantitatively evaluating severity of acute radiation proctopathy after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty-four patients with cervical carcinoma underwent MR examination including DWI before and after radiotherapy. Acute radiation proctopathy was classified into three groups (grade 0, grade I–II and grade III–IV) according to Toxicity Criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The pretreatment ADC (ADC{sub pre}), ADC after treatment (ADC{sub post}) and ADC change (ΔADC) were compared among three groups. In addition, acute radiation proctopathy was classified into good-prognosis group and poor-prognosis group. ADC{sub pre}, ADC{sub post} and ΔADC were compared between two groups. For DWI parameter that had significant difference, discriminatory capability of the parameter was determined using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Results: ADC{sub post} and ΔADC were higher in grade I–II group than in grade 0 group (p < 0.05), yielding a sensitivity of 79.3% and specificity of 69.4% for ADC{sub post}, and 85.1%, 72.3% for ΔADC for discrimination between two groups. ADC{sub post} and ΔADC were higher in grade III–IV group than in grade I–II group (p < 0.05), yielding a sensitivity of 80.3% and specificity of 72.5% for ADC{sub post}, and 84.1%, 74.5% for ΔADC for discrimination between two groups. ADC{sub post} and ΔADC were higher in poor-prognosis group than in good-prognosis group (p < 0.05), yielding a sensitivity of 79.5% and specificity of 73.4% for ADC{sub post}, and 87.2%, 78.3% for ΔADC for discrimination between two groups. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted MRI can be used for quantitative stratification of severity of acute radiation proctopathy, which serves as an important basis for appropriate timely adjustment of radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma in order to maximally reduce the

  8. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Rischke, Hans Christian; Schäfer, Arnd O; Nestle, Ursula; Volegova-Neher, Natalja; Henne, Karl; Benz, Matthias R; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Langer, Mathias; Grosu, Anca L

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) without endorectal coil (EC) in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT). At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27) months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. In 22/33 patients (67%) early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL) compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL) (p<0.001). All post-RT DCE-MRI images showed complete resolution of initial suspicious lesions. A pre-RT PSA cut-off value of ≥0.54 ng/ml readily predicted a positive DCE-MRI finding. This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL

  9. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  10. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  11. How precise is manual CT-MRI registration for cranial radiotherapy planning?

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; South, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    Manual fusion is a readily available image registration technique that does not require matching algorithms. The operator performs rigid-body transformations interactively. The precision of Manual fusion (as implemented on the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system) was required for cranial CT-MR images used in radiotherapy planning for typical centrally located planning target volumes . Materials and Methods: A multi-stage Manual fusion procedure was developed which 11 observers followed to match the head contour, bones, soft tissues and contoured structures for 5 patient image-sets. Registration parameters were calculated by solving the transformation matrix following a consistent order of translations (T) and rotations (R). The mean position of centre of each planning target volumes averaged over all observers was used as the reference. The effect of mis registration on the planning target volumes co-ordinates and the volume increase resulting from application of a margin for registration uncertainty were calculated. Results: Mean intra- and inter-observer T/R SDs were 0.5 mm/ 0.4 d ig a nd 1.1 mm/ 1.0 d ig , respectively. Mean intra- and inter-observer registration error (3D distance of each planning target volumes centre from the mean position for all observers) was 0.7 ±0.3 mm (1 SD) and 1.6±0.7 mm respectively, the latter reducing to 1.4±0.6 mm excluding the 3 least experienced operators. A subsequent 2 mm margin for mis registration on average increased the planning target volume by 27%. Conclusion: Moderately trained operators produced clinically acceptable results while experienced operators improved the precision. Manual fusion still has an important role in the registration of cranial CT and MR images for radiotherapy planning especially for under-resourced centers

  12. MRI gel dosimetry for verification of mono-isocentric junction doses in head and neck radiotherapy

    Back, S.A.J.; Jayasekera, P.M.; Lepage, M.; Baldock, C.; Menzies, N.; Back, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The use of independent collimators in the abutment of two adjacent treatment volumes, as in head and neck radiation treatments, consists typically of positioning the collimator rotation axis (CRA) at the junction of the volumes, and offsetting each field by its half-field width. This has the effect of positioning one of the collimator jaws at the CRA for each field. However, misalignment of the jaws can lead to variations in dose uniformity in the junction region. We have used gel dosimetry to measure junction doses in three dimensions. PAG gel MRI was used to investigate junction dosimetry for a mono-isocentriic treatment of two orthogonal pairs of opposed (ant/post and lateral) 6 MV x-ray beams. PAG gels in an 11cm diameter cylindrical gel phantom were imaged using a Siemens Vision 1.5 T MRI. The exposures were made using a Philips SL 20 linear accelerator with independent jaws that were known to overlap at the isocentre for sequential abutting offset (within manufacturer's specifications for symmetric fields). X-Omat V films were exposed in mono-directional beams, and optically scanned for comparison. Measurements of off-axis ratios and of relative depth profiles using gel MRI and perpendicular film were in excellent agreement with each other. Measurements through the multi-directional junction at the isocentre are illustrated in the graph, for orthogonal planes centred at the isocentre of the neck phantom. They demonstrate a minimum dose of 75 % of that of the adjacent 'treatment' regions, which agrees closely with the results measured (72%) in the mono-directional case with film. We conclude that this measurement confirms that junction dosimetry at the isocentre measured with perpendicular film for a single direction is a good approximation to the situation in multiple directions. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  13. Development and clinical application of respiration gated irradiation system (ReGIS) in heavy ion radiotherapy

    Osaka, Yasuhiro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    1999-01-01

    In order to achieve maximal radiation dose concentration for thoraco-abdominal tumors and spare normal surrounding tissue in heavy ion therapy, compensation for respiration-related movement is desirable. Hence, a respiration-gated irradiation system (ReGIS) was introduced to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in June 1996. In this report, the development and clinical application of ReGIS, as well as the analysis of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volumes are described. When using ReGIS, a sensor emitting infrared rays is attached to the thoracic or abdominal wall to measure respiratory movement. A position-sensitive device (camera) senses these rays to detect sensor locations and data are forwarded to a computer system. A curve representing respiratory cycles is displayed, upon which a trigger level that is part of a respiratory cycle (about a fourth or fifth of the expiratory phase). Beams can be delivered while the respiratory curve is under the trigger level. Thirty-five patients involving 37 irradiated sites (19 lung cancers, 13 hepatomas, 2 mediastinal tumors, and 3 metastatic lung tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Target volumes were reduced an average of 29.5% (11.0 to 57.9%) using ReGIS. Average tumor respiration-related movement in gated phase was 3.7 mm (0 mm to 14.6 mm). Although irradiation using ReGIS took more time to perform (average 1.62 times non-gated irradiation), it was considered to be acceptable for routine heavy ion therapy. ReGIS has proved to be useful for compensation of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volume in radiotherapy, and this method is sufficiently simple for practical clinical application. (author)

  14. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  15. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  16. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bleddyn.Jones@rob.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  17. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp; Kanematsu, N. [Medical Physics Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T. [Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  18. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    Walker, Amy, E-mail: aw554@uowmail.edu.au; Metcalfe, Peter [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia and Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Liney, Gary [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); South West Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); South West Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australian E-Health Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  19. MRI

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  20. SU-E-J-240: Development of a Novel 4D MRI Sequence for Real-Time Liver Tumor Tracking During Radiotherapy

    Zhuang, L; Burmeister, J [Department of Oncology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Ye, Y [Department of Radiology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Novel 4D MRI Technique that is feasible for realtime liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy. Methods: A volunteer underwent an abdominal 2D fast EPI coronal scan on a 3.0T MRI scanner (Siemens Inc., Germany). An optimal set of parameters was determined based on image quality and scan time. A total of 23 slices were scanned to cover the whole liver in the test scan. For each scan position, the 2D images were retrospectively sorted into multiple phases based on breathing signal extracted from the images. Consequently the 2D slices with same phase numbers were stacked to form one 3D image. Multiple phases of 3D images formed the 4D MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle. Results: The optimal set of scan parameters were: TR= 57ms, TE= 19ms, FOV read= 320mm and flip angle= 30°, which resulted in a total scan time of 14s for 200 frames (FMs) per slice and image resolution of (2.5mm,2.5mm,5.0mm) in three directions. Ten phases of 3D images were generated, each of which had 23 slices. Based on our test scan, only 100FMs were necessary for the phase sorting process which may lower the scan time to 7s/100FMs/slice. For example, only 5 slices/35s are necessary for a 4D MRI scan to cover liver tumor size ≤ 2cm leading to the possibility of tumor trajectory tracking every 35s during treatment. Conclusion: The novel 4D MRI technique we developed can reconstruct a 4D liver MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle (7s/ slice) without an external monitor. This technique can potentially be used for real-time liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy.

  1. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with max ]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D max ) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D 2 ) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON

  2. TU-AB-BRA-11: Indications for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy Based On Dosimetric Consequences of Interfractional Pancreas-To-Duodenum Motion in MRI-Guided Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    Mittauer, K; Rosenberg, S; Geurts, M; Bassetti, M; Wojcieszynski, A; Harari, P; Labby, Z; Hill, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J; Chen, I; Henke, L; Kashani, R; Parikh, P; Olsen, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose limiting structures, such as the duodenum, render the treatment of pancreatic cancer challenging. In this multi-institutional study, we assess dosimetric differences caused by interfraction pancreas-to-duodenum motion using MR-IGRT to determine the potential impact of adaptive replanning. Methods: Ten patients from two institutions undergoing MRI-guided radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (n=5) or SBRT (n=5) for pancreatic cancer were included. Initial plans were limited by duodenal dose constraints of 50 Gy (0.5 cc)/31 Gy (0.1 cc) for conventional/SBRT with prescriptions of 30 Gy/5 fractions (SBRT) and 40–50 Gy/25 fractions (conventional). Daily volumetric MR images were acquired under treatment conditions on a clinical MR-IGRT system. The correlation was assessed between interfractional GTV-to-duodenum positional variation and daily recalculations of duodenal dose metrics. Positional variation was quantified as the interfraction difference in Hausdorff distance from simulation baseline (ΔHD) between the GTV and proximal duodenal surface, or volume overlap between GTV and duodenum for cases with HD_0=0 (GTV abutting duodenum). Adaptation was considered indicated when daily positional variations enabled dose escalation to the target while maintaining duodenal constraints. Results: For fractions with ΔHD>0 (n=14, SBRT only), the mean interfraction duodenum dose decrease from simulation to treatment was 44±53 cGy (maximum 136 cGy). A correlation was found between ΔHD and dosimetric difference (R"2=0.82). No correlation was found between volume of overlap and dosimetric difference (R"2=0.31). For 89% of fractions, the duodenum remained overlapped with the target and the duodenal dose difference was negligible. The maximum observed indication for adaptation was for interfraction ΔHD=11.6 mm with potential for adaptive dose escalation of 136 cGy. Conclusion: This assessment showed that Hausdorff distance was a reasonable metric to use to

  3. TU-AB-BRA-11: Indications for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy Based On Dosimetric Consequences of Interfractional Pancreas-To-Duodenum Motion in MRI-Guided Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    Mittauer, K; Rosenberg, S; Geurts, M; Bassetti, M; Wojcieszynski, A; Harari, P; Labby, Z; Hill, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Chen, I; Henke, L; Kashani, R; Parikh, P [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Olsen, J [University of Colorado- Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dose limiting structures, such as the duodenum, render the treatment of pancreatic cancer challenging. In this multi-institutional study, we assess dosimetric differences caused by interfraction pancreas-to-duodenum motion using MR-IGRT to determine the potential impact of adaptive replanning. Methods: Ten patients from two institutions undergoing MRI-guided radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (n=5) or SBRT (n=5) for pancreatic cancer were included. Initial plans were limited by duodenal dose constraints of 50 Gy (0.5 cc)/31 Gy (0.1 cc) for conventional/SBRT with prescriptions of 30 Gy/5 fractions (SBRT) and 40–50 Gy/25 fractions (conventional). Daily volumetric MR images were acquired under treatment conditions on a clinical MR-IGRT system. The correlation was assessed between interfractional GTV-to-duodenum positional variation and daily recalculations of duodenal dose metrics. Positional variation was quantified as the interfraction difference in Hausdorff distance from simulation baseline (ΔHD) between the GTV and proximal duodenal surface, or volume overlap between GTV and duodenum for cases with HD{sub 0}=0 (GTV abutting duodenum). Adaptation was considered indicated when daily positional variations enabled dose escalation to the target while maintaining duodenal constraints. Results: For fractions with ΔHD>0 (n=14, SBRT only), the mean interfraction duodenum dose decrease from simulation to treatment was 44±53 cGy (maximum 136 cGy). A correlation was found between ΔHD and dosimetric difference (R{sup 2}=0.82). No correlation was found between volume of overlap and dosimetric difference (R{sup 2}=0.31). For 89% of fractions, the duodenum remained overlapped with the target and the duodenal dose difference was negligible. The maximum observed indication for adaptation was for interfraction ΔHD=11.6 mm with potential for adaptive dose escalation of 136 cGy. Conclusion: This assessment showed that Hausdorff distance was a reasonable

  4. MRI

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  5. Effect of age-dependent bone electron density on the calculated dose distribution from kilovoltage and megavoltage photon and electron radiotherapy in paediatric MRI-only treatment planning.

    Zeinali-Rafsanjani, B; Faghihi, R; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Saeedi-Moghadam, M; Jalli, R; Sina, S

    2018-01-01

    MRI-only treatment planning (TP) can be advantageous in paediatric radiotherapy. However, electron density extraction is necessary for dose calculation. Normally, after bone segmentation, a bulk density is assigned. However, the variation of bone bulk density in patients makes the creation of pseudo CTs challenging. This study aims to assess the effects of bone density variations in children on radiation attenuation and dose calculation for MRI-only TP. Bone contents of <15-year-old children were calculated, and substituted in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory paediatric phantoms. The percentage depth dose and beam profile of 150 kVp and 6 MV photon and 6 MeV electron beams were then calculated using Xcom, MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-particle version X) and ORLN phantoms. Using 150 kVp X-rays, the difference in attenuation coefficient was almost 5% between an 11-year-old child and a newborn, and ~8% between an adult and a newborn. With megavoltage radiation, the differences were smaller but still important. For an 18 MV photon beam, the difference of radiation attenuation between an 11-year-old child and a newborn was 4% and ~7.4% between an adult and a newborn. For 6 MeV electrons, dose differences were observed up to the 2 cm depth. The percentage depth dose difference between 1 and 10-year-olds was 18.5%, and between 10 and 15-year-olds was 24%. The results suggest that for MRI-only TP of photon- or electron-beam radiotherapy, the bone densities of each age group should be defined separately for accurate dose calculation. Advances in knowledge: This study highlights the need for more age-specific determination of bone electron density for accurate dose calculations in paediatric MRI-only radiotherapy TP.

  6. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Vertebral Compression Fracture after Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Primary Spinal and Paraspinal Sarcoma

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT was effective therapy for inoperable spinal and paraspinal sarcomas. However, a significant adverse event following radiotherapies is vertebral compression fractures (VCFs. In this study, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for post-C-ion RT VCFs in patients with spinal or paraspinal sarcomas. Material and Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with spinal or paraspinal sarcomas treated with C-ion RT were retrospectively reviewed. Various clinical parameters and the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS were used to evaluate the risk factors for post-C-ion RT VCFs. Results. The overall incidence of VCFs was 23% (median time: 7 months. Patients with VCFs showed a markedly higher SINS score (median value, 9 points than those without VCF (5 points. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the SINS score was 0.88, and the optimum SINS cut-off score was 8 points. The cumulative incidence of VCFs at 1 year was 9% for patients with a SINS score under 8 points, versus 80% for those with a SINS score of 8 points or higher (p<0.0001. Conclusions. In patients with a SINS score of 8 points or higher, referral to a spine surgeon for stabilization and multidisciplinary discussion is appropriate.

  7. Comparison of clinical and functional outcome between surgical treatment and carbon ion radiotherapy for pelvic chondrosarcoma.

    Outani, Hidetatsu; Hamada, Kenichiro; Imura, Yoshinori; Oshima, Kazuya; Sotobori, Tsukasa; Demizu, Yusuke; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Joyama, Susumu; Imai, Reiko; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Naka, Norifumi; Kudawara, Ikuo; Ueda, Takafumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Kamada, Tadashi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    As there are no reports of studies in patients with pelvic chondrosarcoma treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis. The medical records of 31 patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis treated either by surgical resection or by CIRT between 1983 and 2014 were reviewed. There were 22 males and 9 females with a median age of 43 years (range 16-77 years). The median duration of follow-up was 66 months (range 5-289 months). Twenty-four patients underwent surgery, and 7 patients received CIRT (70.4 GyE in 16 fractions over 4 weeks). The overall local recurrence rate was 32 %, and the estimated overall 5- and 10-year survival rates were 72 and 57 %, respectively. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional score was 59 %. The treatment procedures (surgery or CIRT) did not affect overall survival (P = 0.347). However, the patients who underwent surgery had impaired function compared with those who received CIRT (P = 0.03). Although more patients need to be monitored to assess the clinical and functional outcomes of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis, this treatment might offer an acceptable alternative.

  8. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QoL) of medically inoperable bone and soft tissue sarcoma treated carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifty-eight patients followed over 1 year were reviewed in this report. The questionnaire, European Organaization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC-QLQ-C30) was assessed before the start of CIRT, and subsequently at the end of CIRT, 3, 6, 12, 24 months after CIRT. During follow-up, it was send to the patients by mail. The compliance was 98% for all follow-up period in this study. The scores about QoL and functioning did not significantly change for 1 year. QoL scores tended to decrease in large clinical target volume (CTV) (>600 cc) group compared to small CTV group. CIRT could keep QoL levels of patients with medically inoperable bone and soft tissue tumors. (author)

  9. Precision high-dose radiotherapy with helium-ion beams: treatment of malignant tumors in humans

    Saunders, W.S.; Castro, J.R.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Zink, S.R.; Capra-Young, D.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.; Pascale, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages of the Bragg peak and sharp penumbra of the helium-ion beam emphasize its importance in radiotherapy. Perhaps the best example of this type of treatment is that for the treatment of malignant melanoma of the eye. The authors treated 181 such patients, 46 in the last 12 months. They continue to have very encouraging results in this group. Only eight patients have had a recurrence of their tumor, and in all eight a second treatment, usually removal of the eye, has apparently cured the tumor. They have generally been able to preserve the pretreatment visual acuity as long as the edge of the tumor is at least 3-4 mm away from the optic disc or macula. Four different tumor doses have been used since this program was begun. The first 20 patients received 70 GyE; the dose was then raised to 80 GyE for the next 69 patients. The group of patients treated with 80 GyE began to develop an unacceptable incidence of glaucoma in the treated eye, so the dose was then decreased to 60 GyE. So far, 4 of 61 patients (or 7%) in the 60-GyE group have developed glaucoma

  10. Regional MLEM reconstruction strategy for PET-based treatment verification in ion beam radiotherapy

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Baselli, Giuseppe; Baroni, Guido; Bauer, Julia; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; De Bernardi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, PET-based treatment verification provides a consistency check of the delivered treatment with respect to a simulation based on the treatment planning. In this work the region-based MLEM reconstruction algorithm is proposed as a new evaluation strategy in PET-based treatment verification. The comparative evaluation is based on reconstructed PET images in selected regions, which are automatically identified on the expected PET images according to homogeneity in activity values. The strategy was tested on numerical and physical phantoms, simulating mismatches between the planned and measured β + activity distributions. The region-based MLEM reconstruction was demonstrated to be robust against noise and the sensitivity of the strategy results were comparable to three voxel units, corresponding to 6 mm in numerical phantoms. The robustness of the region-based MLEM evaluation outperformed the voxel-based strategies. The potential of the proposed strategy was also retrospectively assessed on patient data and further clinical validation is envisioned. (paper)

  11. SU-G-JeP2-03: Automatic Quantification of MLC Positional Accuracy in An MRI Guided Radiotherapy System

    Li, X; Studenski, M; Yang, F; Dogan, N; Lamichhane, N; Padgett, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided-radiotherapy (MRIGRT) systems lack many features of traditional Linac based RT systems and specialized tests need to be developed to evaluate MLC performance. This work describes automatic tools for the analysis of positional accuracy of an MLC equipped MRIGRT system. Methods: This MLC analysis tool was developed for the MRIdian™ RT system which has three Co-60 equipped treatment heads each with a double focused MLC containing 30 leaf pairs, leaf thickness is 1.05cm defined at isocenter (SAD 105 cm). For MLC positional analysis a picket fence test was performed using a 25.4cm × 25.4cm Gafchromic™ RTQA2 film placed between 5cm solidwater and a 30cm × 30cm × 1cm jigwire phantom with seven embedded parallel metal strips 4cm apart. A plan was generated to deliver 2Gy per field and seven 23.1cm × 2cm fields centered over each wire in the phantom. For each leaf pair the center of the radiation profile was determined by fitting the horizontal profile with a Gaussian model and determining the center of the FWHM. This was compared with the metal strip location to determine any deviation. The following metrics were used to evaluate the deviations per gantry angle including maximum, minimum, mean, Kurtosis, and skewness. Results: The identified maximum/mean leaf deviations are, 1.32/0.55 mm for gantry 0°, 1.59/0.76 mm for gantry 90°, and 1.19/0.39 mm for gantry 270°. The percentage of leaf deviation less than 1mm are 90.0% at 0°, 74.6% at 90°, and 97.0% at 270°. Kurtosis/skewness of the leaf deviation are 2.41/0.14 at 0°, 2.53/0.23 at 90°, 3.33/0.83 at 270°, respectively. Conclusion: This work presents an automatic tool for evaluation of the MLC position accuracy of the MRIdian™ radiotherapy system which can be used to benchmark the performance of the MLC system for each treatment head and track the results longitudinally.

  12. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A comparison between two modalities.

    Seppälä, Tiina; Visapää, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Beule, Annette; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion.

  13. Structural MRI research in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma following radiotherapy: A DTI and VBM study.

    Leng, Xi; Fang, Peng; Lin, Huan; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Donglin; Shen, Wen; Qiu, Shijun

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the microstructural characteristics of the brain lobes following radiotherapy (RT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) at distinct times. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and 3D-T1-weighted imaging was performed in 70 age- and sex-matched subjects, 24 of whom were pre-treatment patients. The patients were divided into three groups, according to the time following completion of RT. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and gray matter (GM) volume were determined. The DTI data were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics and the GM volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Compared with the pre-RT group, the mean FA values in the left parietal lobe white matter (WM) and right cerebellum decreased significantly in the post-RT 0-6 month group (P<0.05). In addition, the mean FA values in the right parietal lobe WM decreased significantly in the post-RT 6-12 month group (P<0.05), compared with the pre-RT group. The FA level in the right temporal lobe remained significantly decreased, compared with that in the pre-RT group (P<0.05) for 1 year after RT. Furthermore, compared with pre-RT group, the GM volume in the bilateral frontal lobe, right occipital lobe, left parietal lobe, right temporal lobe and left cerebellum decreased significantly in the post-RT 0-6 month group (P<0.05), and in the bilateral temporal lobe, parietal lobe, right frontal lobe and left cerebellum, the GM volume decreased significantly in the post-RT 6-12 month group (P<0.05). The GM volume in the right temporal lobe, bilateral frontal lobe and bilateral cerebellum remained significantly decreased compared with that in the pre-RT group (P<0.05) for 1 year after RT. A combination of DTI and VBM may be used to determine radiation-induced brain injury in patients treated for NPC.

  14. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Cheng, Yi-Kan; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Dan; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Li; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun; Liu, Li-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p [de

  15. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Kamada, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Michiya

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were ≥60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with ≥62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors ≥6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy

  16. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  17. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    Arabi, H.; Koutsouvelis, N.; Rouzaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial t......-CT images from conventional Dixon MRI sequences with improved bone extraction accuracy. The approach is promising for potential use in PET AC and MRI-only or hybrid PET/MRI-guided RT treatment planning. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial...... the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas...

  18. Customized mouthpieces designed to reduce tongue mucositis in carbon-ion radiotherapy for tumors of the nasal and paranasal sinuses

    Atsushi Musha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mouthpieces are used to fix the positions of the lower jaw and teeth during carbon-ion radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. We used a customized mouthpiece to reduce radiation mucositis by displacing the tongue. Acute radiation mucositis gradually increased for the palate and tongue after approximately six irradiation fractions (maximal mean grade: palate, 2.5 during radiation fractions 15; tongue, 0.8 during radiation fractions 12 and 13. The mean grade of mucositis was significantly lower for the tongue than for the palate from irradiation fraction six until two weeks after irradiation.

  19. Ethical aspect of the clinical research. Informed consent in the clinical research for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer

    Murata, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    The research center for heavy ion therapy of cancer was decided to be built in 1984 as a part of the national 10-year anticancer campaign, and construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) was completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in 1993. The HIMAC is the first heavy ion accelerator for only medical use in the world, and the clinical research of cancer radiotherapy was begun in 1994 using carbon ion generated by HIMAC. The purposes of the clinical research are to evaluate the safety and usefulness of carbon ion for cancer treatment, and to establish carbon ion therapy as a new and valuable tool for cancer therapy. Therefore, to obtain exact data in ethical aspect as well as scientific aspect of the clinical research, many special committees have been organized like as the committees of protocol planning for each organ, clinical study groups for each organ, evaluating committee of clinical data, and the ethical committee. Each clinical research is performed according to the research protocol of each organ, in which study purpose, rationale, patient condition, end-point of the study, adverse reaction are described. The document of informed consent (IC) contains study purpose, patient condition, method, predicted effect and demerit, protection of privacy, etc.. IC to each patient is done precisely by the doctor, and the freely-given IC of the patient is obtained. After the IC was completed, judgement of propriety for carbon ion therapy is done by the ethical committee for IC of each patient. Since 1994 carbon ion therapy has been performed over 1300 patients with cancer in various organs, and its safety and usefulness for cancer treatment has been clarified gradually. The carbon ion therapy is thought to be a new and promising tool for cancer treatment near future. (authors)

  20. Research on a new oral contrast agent for abdominal MRI using free manganese ion

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujita, Osamu; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Narabayashi, Isamu; Komba, Toshinori; Hamamura, Yoshinori.

    1996-01-01

    Manganese chloride (Mn: 3 mg/100 g) aqueous solution with hydragenated oligosaccharide and xanthan gum (T 1 : 0.1 sec, T 2 : 0.03 sec at 0.5T) functions in gut as a positive contrast agent on MR T 1 -weighted images and a low signal component on MR T 2 -weighted images. The manganese in the solution functions as a contrast agent under free manganese ion (Mn 2+ ). Further, the solution has special characteristics in terms of MRI signal intensity and relaxation time that are equal to those of blueberry juice, which performs as an effective contrast agent on T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images, and functions as a contrast agent in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  1. Changes in Prostate Shape and Volume and Their Implications for Radiotherapy After Introduction of Endorectal Balloon as Determined by MRI at 3T

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Visser, Andries G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the changes in prostate shape and volume after the introduction of an endorectal coil (ERC) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. Methods and materials: A total of 44 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent separate MRI examinations at 3T with a body array coil and subsequently with an ERC inflated with 50 mL of fluid. Prospectively, two experienced readers independently evaluated all data sets in random order. The maximal anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal prostate diameters, as well as the total prostate and peripheral zone and central gland volumes were measured before and after ERC introduction. The changes in prostate shape and volume were analyzed using Wilcoxon's test for paired samples. Results: The introduction of the ERC significantly changed the prostate shape in all three directions, with mean changes in the anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal diameters of 15.7% (5.5 mm), 7.7% (3.5 mm), and 6.3% (2.2 mm), respectively. The mean total prostate, peripheral zone, and central gland volume decreased significantly after ERC introduction by 17.9% (8.3 cm 3 ), 21.6% (4.8 cm 3 ), and 14.2% (3.4 cm 3 ), respectively. Conclusion: ERC introduction as observed by 3T MRI changed the prostate shape and volume significantly. The mean anteroposterior diameter was reduced by nearly one-sixth of its original diameter, and the mean total prostate volume was decreased by approximately 18%. This could cause difficulties and should be considered when using ERC-based MRI for MRI-computed tomography fusion and radiotherapy planning.

  2. Carbon ion radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Results in 67 patients

    Schulz-Ertner, D.; Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, A.; Thilmann, C.; Jaekel, O.; Karger, C. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G. [Dept. of Biophysics, German Ion Research Center (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Debus, J. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate outcome and toxicity after carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) in chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1998 and December 2001, 74 patients were treated for chordomas and chondrosarcomas with carbon ion RT at the ''Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung'' (GSI). Seven patients reirradiated with reduced carbon ion doses after conventional RT were excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 evaluable patients (44 chordomas and 23 chondrosarcomas) who received a full course of carbon ion therapy. Tumor-conform application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with active energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included intensity modulation and biological plan optimization. A median dose of 60 GyE was applied to the target volume within 20 consecutive days at a dose of 3.0 GyE per fraction. Results: Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-46 months). At 3 years, actuarial local control was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 87% for chordomas, respectively. Partial tumor remission was observed in 14/44 (31%) chordoma patients and in 4/23 (17%) chondrosarcoma patients. At 3 years, actuarial overall survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 89% for chordomas, respectively. No severe side effects > CTC III have been observed. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the clinical efficiency and safety of scanning beam delivery of carbon ion beams in patients with skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. The observation of tumor regressions at a dose level of 60 GyE may indicate that the biological effectiveness of carbon ions in chordomas and chondrosarcomas is higher than initially estimated. (orig.)

  3. Carbon ion radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Results in 67 patients

    Schulz-Ertner, D.; Wannenmacher, M.; Nikoghosyan, A.; Thilmann, C.; Jaekel, O.; Karger, C.; Haberer, T.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.; Debus, J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate outcome and toxicity after carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) in chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1998 and December 2001, 74 patients were treated for chordomas and chondrosarcomas with carbon ion RT at the ''Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung'' (GSI). Seven patients reirradiated with reduced carbon ion doses after conventional RT were excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 evaluable patients (44 chordomas and 23 chondrosarcomas) who received a full course of carbon ion therapy. Tumor-conform application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with active energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included intensity modulation and biological plan optimization. A median dose of 60 GyE was applied to the target volume within 20 consecutive days at a dose of 3.0 GyE per fraction. Results: Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-46 months). At 3 years, actuarial local control was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 87% for chordomas, respectively. Partial tumor remission was observed in 14/44 (31%) chordoma patients and in 4/23 (17%) chondrosarcoma patients. At 3 years, actuarial overall survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 89% for chordomas, respectively. No severe side effects > CTC III have been observed. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the clinical efficiency and safety of scanning beam delivery of carbon ion beams in patients with skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. The observation of tumor regressions at a dose level of 60 GyE may indicate that the biological effectiveness of carbon ions in chordomas and chondrosarcomas is higher than initially estimated. (orig.)

  4. Combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio- and hypoxia-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have started to investigate the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing E 9ns-2 /cytomegalovirus (CMV) chimeric promoter (Scott et al: 2003) in p53-gene therapy. Our study in the first year, however, suggested the uselessness of E 9ns-2 /CMV chimeric promoter. Then we applied E 9ns-2 /Epo5/CMV-radio and hypoxia-sensitizing chimeric promoter to amplify p53 gene exopression. P53 gene with E 9ns2 /Epo5/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 1 Gy of high linear energy transfer (LET)-carbon ion beam or low-LET X-ray under various hypoxic conditions. The result suggested the possible role of 1 Gy of high LET-carbon ion beam as a ''useful trigger'' to enhance a selective anti-tumor effect toward glioma under hypoxic condition through amplification of p53 gene expression. (author)

  5. Contribution of secondary particles to the dose in 12C radiotherapy and other heavy ion beams

    Jadrníčková, Iva; Spurný, František; Molokanov, A. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 126, 1-4 (2007), s. 657-659 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : secondery particles * radiotherapy * LET spectrometer Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  6. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  7. WE-FG-202-07: An MRI-Based Approach to Quantify Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury Applied to Trismus After Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    Thor, M; Tyagi, N; Saleh, Z; Deasy, J [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Nyc, NY (United States); Hazoglou, V [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Riaz, N; Lee, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NYC, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate if quantitative MRI-derived metrics from four masticatory muscles could explain mouth-opening limitation/trismus following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods: Fifteen intensity-based MRI metrics were derived from the masseter, lateral and medial pterygoid, and temporalis in T1-weighted scans acquired pre- and post gadolinium injection (T1Pre, T1Post) of 16, of in total 20, patients (8 symptomatic; 8 asymptomatic age/sex/tumor location-matched) treated with IMRT to 70 Gy (median) for HNC in 2005–2009. Trismus was defined as “≥decreased range of motion without impaired eating” (CTCAE.v.3: ≥Grade 1). Trismus status was monitored and MRI scans acquired within 1y post-RT. All MRI-derived metrics were assessed as ΔS=S(T1Pre)-S(T1Post)/S(T1Pre), and were normalized to the corresponding metric of a non-irradiated volume defined in each scan. The T1Pre structures were propagated onto the RT dose distribution, and the max and mean dose (Dmax, Dmean) were extracted. The MRI-derived metrics, Dmax, and Dmean were compared between trismus and non-trismus patients. A two-sided Wilcoxon Signed rank test-based p-value≤0.05 denoted significance. Results: For all four muscles the population mean of Dmax and Dmean was higher for patients with trismus compared to patients without trismus (ΔDmax=2.3–4.9 Gy; ΔDmean=and 2.0–3.8 Gy). The standard deviation (SD), the variance, and the minimum value (min) of ΔS were significantly (p=0.04–0.05) different between patients with and without trismus with trismus patients having significantly lower SD (population median: −0.53 vs. −0.31) and variance (−2.09 vs. −0.73) of the masseter, and significantly lower min of the medial pterygoid (−0.36 vs. −0.19). Conclusion: Quantitative MRI-derived metrics of two masticatory muscles were significantly different between patients with and without trismus following RT for HNC

  8. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Kjer, Hans Martin; Van Leemput, Koen

    2014-01-01

    including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT...... receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation...... significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI comparison. The mean dosimetric deviation for photons and protons compared to the CT was about 2% and highest in the gradient dose...

  9. Superior target delineation for stereotactic body radiotherapy of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma on MRI compared to CT

    Prins, Fieke M.; Van Der Velden, Joanne M.; Gerlich, Anne S.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Eppinga, Wietse S.C.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Verlaan, Jorrit J.; Pameijer, Frank A.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) there has been a treatment shift towards targeted therapy, which has resulted in improved overall survival. Therefore, there is a need for better local control of the tumor and its metastases. Image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in

  10. Evaluating uncertainties in the cross-calibration of parallel ion chambers used in electron beam radiotherapy

    Anderson, Ernani; Travassos, Paulo; Ferreira, Max da Silva; Carvalho, Samira Marques de; Silva, Michele Maria da; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira; Salmon Junior, Helio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimative the combined standard uncertainty for a detector parallel plate used for dosimetry of electron beams in linear accelerators for radiotherapy, which has been calibrated by the cross-calibration method. Keeping the combined standard uncertainty next of the uncertainty informed in the calibration certificate of the reference chamber, become possible establish the calibration factor of the detector. The combined standard uncertainty obtained in this study was 2.5 %. (author)

  11. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  12. SU-F-J-145: MRI-Guided Interventional Boost Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Investigating the Feasibility of Adapting the Anatomy

    Kleijnen, J J E; Couwenberg, A M; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J J W; Intven, M; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The recent development of an MRI-linac allows adaptation of treatments to the anatomy of the moment. This anatomy, in turn, could be altered into a more favorable situation for radiotherapy purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential dosimetric benefits of manipulating rectal anatomy in MRI-guided interventional external-beam radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: For this retrospective analysis, four patients (1M/3F) diagnosed with rectal cancer were included. These underwent MR-imaging using sonography transmission gel as endorectal contrast at time of diagnosis and standard, non-contrast, MR-imaging prior to radiotherapy planning. In the contrast scan, the rectum is inflated by the inserted contrast gel, thereby potentially increasing the distance between tumor and the organs-at-risk (OAR). Both anatomies were delineated and 7- beam IMRT-plans were calculated for both situations (RT-standard and RT-inflated), using in-house developed treatment planning software. Each plan was aimed to deliver 15Gy to the planning target volume (PTV; tumor+3mm margin) with a D99>95% and Dmax<120% of the planned dose. The D2cc dose to the OAR were then compared for both situations. Results: At equal (or better) target coverage, we found a mean reduction in D2cc of 4.1Gy/237% [range 2.6Gy–6.3Gy/70%–621%] for the bladder and of 2.0Gy/145% [range −0.7Gy–7.9Gy/−73%–442%] for the small-bowel, for the RT-inflated compared to the RT-standard plans. For the three female patients, a reduction in D2cc of 5.2Gy/191% [range 3.2Gy–9.2Gy/44%–475%] for the gynecological organs was found. We found all D2cc doses to be better for the RT-inflated plans, except for one patient for whom the bladder D2cc dose was slightly increased. Conclusion: Reduction of OAR dose by manipulation of anatomy is feasible. Inflation of the rectum results in more distance between OAR and PTV. This leads to a substantial reduction in dose to OAR at equal or better target

  13. Development of electronic clinical path for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    Ebisutani, Asuka; Okabe, Satsuki; Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an electronic clinical path for patients with head and neck (H and N) tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) focusing on acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin. Between January and July, 2002, fifteen patients with H and N tumor had been treated with carbon ion radiotherapy including oral cavity in the RT fields. Acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin were analyzed together with face scales (FS) that is an indicator of quality of life obtained daily from patients during RT courses. Medical interventions including prescription for mucositis or dermatitis, nursing care, and changes of meal were also analyzed. Average period of being in hospital was 42.6±3.6 days and that of radiation was 27.0±1.9 days. Radiation mucositis appeared 5 days (10.8 GyE) after start of carbon ion RT, reached a maximum reaction at 20 days (Grade 1: 7%, Grade 2: 33%, Grade 3: 60%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 44 days on average. Radiation dermatitis also appeared 8 days (18 GyE), reached a maximum at 33 days (Grade 1: 47%, Grade 2: 40%, Grade 3: 13%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 51 days on average. Changes of FS showed deterioration 23 days after start of therapy. At the latter half of RT courses, mucositis, FS, and dermatitis reached a maximum in that order. Through analyses of the time-score plots, the change of FS seemed corresponding to that of dermatitis. The required medical interventions were change of meal in 10, analgesics in 8, and gargles in 15 patients. Based on these results, we established a clinical path as a trial piece. We confirmed that there was a specific pattern in ups and downs of acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin during a RT course. We concluded that a clinical path is useful for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion RT. (author)

  14. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-05: Toward MRI-Only Radiotherapy: Novel Tissue Segmentation and Pseudo-CT Generation Techniques Based On T1 MRI Sequences

    Aouadi, S; McGarry, M; Hammoud, R; Torfeh, T; Perkins, G; Al-Hammadi, N [Hamad Medical Corporation, NCCCR, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a 4 class tissue segmentation approach (air cavities, background, bone and soft-tissue) on T1 -weighted brain MRI and to create a pseudo-CT for MRI-only radiation therapy verification. Methods: Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fast-spin-echo sequences (TR = 756ms, TE= 7.152ms), acquired on a 1.5T GE MRI-Simulator, are used.MRIs are firstly pre-processed to correct for non uniformity using the non parametric, non uniformity intensity normalization algorithm. Subsequently, a logarithmic inverse scaling log(1/image) is applied, prior to segmentation, to better differentiate bone and air from soft-tissues. Finally, the following method is enrolled to classify intensities into air cavities, background, bone and soft-tissue:Thresholded region growing with seed points in image corners is applied to get a mask of Air+Bone+Background. The background is, afterward, separated by the scan-line filling algorithm. The air mask is extracted by morphological opening followed by a post-processing based on knowledge about air regions geometry. The remaining rough bone pre-segmentation is refined by applying 3D geodesic active contours; bone segmentation evolves by the sum of internal forces from contour geometry and external force derived from image gradient magnitude.Pseudo-CT is obtained by assigning −1000HU to air and background voxels, performing linear mapping of soft-tissue MR intensities in [-400HU, 200HU] and inverse linear mapping of bone MR intensities in [200HU, 1000HU]. Results: Three brain patients having registered MRI and CT are used for validation. CT intensities classification into 4 classes is performed by thresholding. Dice and misclassification errors are quantified. Correct classifications for soft-tissue, bone, and air are respectively 89.67%, 77.8%, and 64.5%. Dice indices are acceptable for bone (0.74) and soft-tissue (0.91) but low for air regions (0.48). Pseudo-CT produces DRRs with acceptable clinical visual agreement to CT

  15. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B{sub 0} field strength

    Wachowicz, K., E-mail: keith.wachowicz@albertahealthservices.ca; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Volotovskyy, V. [Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Health Services, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B{sub 0}. This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B{sub 0} that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B{sub 0}-dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B{sub 0} field (specifically the T{sub 1} time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B{sub 0} fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T{sub 1} contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B{sub 0} reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  16. MRI imaging of cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤的MRI表现

    曹慧芳; 李惠明; 彭杰; 胡姣; 魏娜

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤的原因及其MRI表现.方法 选择临床和MRI资料完整的36例患者进行回顾性分析,采用1.5T MR行头颅、鼻咽部横轴位、冠状位和矢状位平扫以及增强扫描成像,对MRI图像进行分析.结果 ①脑神经第Ⅵ、Ⅴ、Ⅹ、Ⅻ对损害占前四位;②鼻咽癌局部复发引起脑神经损伤17例,单纯放射性神经损害12例,复发与放射性脑病并存的7例.结论 鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤有肿瘤复发、放射性脑病和两者共存三方面原因.MRI检查能早期、准确显示脑神经损伤.%Objective To explore cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Methods 36 cases with whole clinical data and MRI data were selected.We applied 1.5 T MRI scaner and T1WI,T2WI,FS T2WI,GD-DTPA contrast medium enhancement scan to every patients with axial,coronal and sagittal tomography and contrast enhancement of head and nasopharynx.Results ① The damage of Ⅵ,Ⅴ,Ⅹ,Ⅻ cranial nerves was the most common;②17 cases had local recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and injure cranial nerve.12 cases only had radioactive nerve damage.7 cases had both.Conclusion There are three reasons of Cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma:recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and invasion of the cranial nerve,radioactive nerve damage,and or both.MRI can early and accurately diagnose the cranial nerve involvement.

  17. Studies on advantages of heavy ions in radiotherapy compared with γ-rays

    Guo Chuanling; Wang Jufang; Jin Xiaodong; Jing Xigang; Li Renmin; Wei Wei; Li Wenjian

    2007-01-01

    Hepatoma and melanoma cells were exposed to 12 C 6+ beams generated by HIRFL facility and γ-rays and the cell response was studied by colony assays as well as the analysis of RBE of carbon ions was evolved. The survival curves of cells irradiated by heavy ions were different from those of cells irradiated by γ-rays. And two kinds of cell showed the obvious discrepancy in response to the photon and ion irradiation. The results showed that heavy ions have special physical properties and mighty potency to kill cell in both single and fractional irradiation meanwhile it can kill tumor cells with high radioresistance more efficiently. When involved in clinical therapy, heavy ions will enhance the therapy efficiency and decrease the suffering of patients because it can impair the repair for sublethal damage of cells which can lead to fewer irradiation fractions

  18. SU-F-J-17: Patient Localization Using MRI-Guided Soft Tissue for Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Indication for Margin Reduction and Its Feasibility

    Qi, X; Yang, Y; Jack, N; Santhanam, A; Yang, L; Chen, A; Low, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: On-board MRI provides superior soft-tissue contrast, allowing patient alignment using tumor or nearby critical structures. This study aims to study H&N MRI-guided IGRT to analyze inter-fraction patient setup variations using soft-tissue targets and design appropriate CTV-to-PTV margin and clinical implication. Methods: 282 MR images for 10 H&N IMRT patients treated on a ViewRay system were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic mask on a customized headrest fitted in a radiofrequency coil and positioned to soft-tissue targets. The inter-fraction patient displacements were recorded to compute the PTV margins using the recipe: 2.5∑+0.7σ. New IMRT plans optimized on the revised PTVs were generated to evaluate the delivered dose distributions. An in-house dose deformation registration tool was used to assess the resulting dosimetric consequences when margin adaption is performed based on weekly MR images. The cumulative doses were compared to the reduced margin plans for targets and critical structures. Results: The inter-fraction displacements (and standard deviations), ∑ and σ were tabulated for MRI and compared to kVCBCT. The computed CTV-to-PTV margin was 3.5mm for soft-tissue based registration. There were minimal differences between the planned and delivered doses when comparing clinical and the PTV reduced margin plans: the paired t-tests yielded p=0.38 and 0.66 between the planned and delivered doses for the adapted margin plans for the maximum cord and mean parotid dose, respectively. Target V95 received comparable doses as planned for the reduced margin plans. Conclusion: The 0.35T MRI offers acceptable soft-tissue contrast and good spatial resolution for patient alignment and target visualization. Better tumor conspicuity from MRI allows soft-tissue based alignments with potentially improved accuracy, suggesting a benefit of margin reduction for H&N radiotherapy. The reduced margin plans (i.e., 2 mm) resulted

  19. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. A comparison between two modalities

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Visapaeae, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland); Beule, Annette [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Studie war es, die Umstellung der Strahlentherapieplanung des Prostatakarzinoms von CT-gestuetzter in ausschliesslich MR-gestuetzte Zieldefinition zu untersuchen. Bei 30 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden eine CT und eine MRT unter Planungsbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Zwei Untersucher konturierten die Prostata in CT- und T2-gewichteten MR-Bildern. Mit Hilfe der Position von Goldstiften und der anatomischen Grenzen der Prostata wurden die CT- und MR-Bilder koregistriert. Es wurden die Genauigkeit der Koregistrierung sowie die Unterschiede der Zielvolumina und der

  20. DW-MRI as a biomarker to compare therapeutic outcomes in radiotherapy regimens incorporating temozolomide or gemcitabine in glioblastoma.

    Stefanie Galbán

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the radiosensitizer gemcitabine (GEM was evaluated in a mouse glioma along with the imaging biomarker diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI for early detection of treatment effects. A genetically engineered murine GBM model [Ink4a-Arf(-/- Pten(loxP/loxP/Ntv-a RCAS/PDGF(+/Cre(+] was treated with gemcitabine (GEM, temozolomide (TMZ +/- ionizing radiation (IR. Therapeutic efficacy was quantified by contrast-enhanced MRI and DW-MRI for growth rate and tumor cellularity, respectively. Mice treated with GEM, TMZ and radiation showed a significant reduction in growth rates as early as three days post-treatment initiation. Both combination treatments (GEM/IR and TMZ/IR resulted in improved survival over single therapies. Tumor diffusion values increased prior to detectable changes in tumor volume growth rates following administration of therapies. Concomitant GEM/IR and TMZ/IR was active and well tolerated in this GBM model and similarly prolonged median survival of tumor bearing mice. DW-MRI provided early changes to radiosensitization treatment warranting evaluation of this imaging biomarker in clinical trials.

  1. Radiotherapy for spinal metastases from breast cancer with emphasis on local disease control and pain response using repeated MRI

    Marta D. Switlyk

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: RT provided excellent local tumor control in patients with SM. Most patients benefit from RT even in cases of progressive vertebral fracture. Pain response was not associated with imaging findings and MRI cannot be used to select patients at risk of not responding to RT.

  2. Combination of Heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing promoter-E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter (Scott et al:2003) in p53-gene therapy. First, EGFP reporter gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in C6 rat glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 3, 5, 10 Gy respectively with charged carbon particle (290 MeV/nucleon). The light upregulation of EGFP was observed in 24 hours after 5 Gy irradiation. On the basis of this result, p53 gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 5 Gy. There was, however, no obvious p53-upregulation at any time-point, so far. Further investigation is needed to clarify the appropriate experimental system. (author)

  3. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  4. MRI before and after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer: The feasibility of monitoring of radiation-induced tissue changes using a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence

    Franiel, Tobias; Luedemann, Lutz; Taupitz, Matthias; Boehmer, Dirk; Beyersdorff, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify and quantify suitable pharmacokinetic MRI parameters for monitoring tissue changes after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Six patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer (initial PSA, 6.0-81.4 ng/ml) underwent MRI at 1.5 T using a combined endorectal/body phased-array coil and a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence (T1/T2*w; 1.65 s temporal resolution). MRI was performed before and immediately after radiotherapy, at 3 months and at 1 year. Perfusion, blood volume, mean transit time, delay, dispersion, interstitial volume, and extraction coefficient were calculated in prostate cancer and normal prostate for all four time points using a sequential 3-compartment model. Results: Prostate cancer and normal prostate tissue showed a statistically significant decrease in perfusion (p = 0.006, p = 0.001) and increase in extraction coefficient (p = 0.004, p 3 min, p = 0.028) and a smaller extraction coefficient (0.42 vs. 0.64, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Two pharmacokinetic parameters, perfusion and extraction coefficient, appear to be suitable candidates for monitoring the response to percutaneous intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  5. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Cheng, Yi-Kan; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Dan; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Li; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Li-Zhi [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund der Fortschritte der bildgebenden Verfahren und der Strahlentherapie muss der prognostische Wert der Invasion des nasopharyngealen Karzinoms (NPC) in die Schaedelbasis erneut bewertet werden. Unser Ziel ist die Definition eines Klassifikationssystems und die Untersuchung des prognostischen Werts der Klassifikation der MRT-ermittelten Invasion des mit

  6. Technical Note: Multipurpose CT, ultrasound, and MRI breast phantom for use in radiotherapy and minimally invasive interventions

    Ruschin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ruschin@sunnybrook.ca; Chin, Lee; Ravi, Ananth; McCann, Claire [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Davidson, Sean R. H. [Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Phounsy, William [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Yoo, Tae Sun [Institute of Health Policy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M6 (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a multipurpose gel-based breast phantom consisting of a simulated tumor with realistic imaging properties in CT, ultrasound and MRI, or a postsurgical cavity on CT. Applications for the phantom include: deformable image registration (DIR) quality assurance (QA), autosegmentation validation, and localization testing and training for minimally invasive image-guided procedures such as those involving catheter or needle insertion. Methods: A thermoplastic mask of a typical breast patient lying supine was generated and then filled to make an array of phantoms. The background simulated breast tissue consisted of 32.4 g each of ballistic gelatin (BG) powder and Metamusil™ (MM) dissolved in 800 ml of water. Simulated tumors were added using the following recipe: 12 g of barium sulfate (1.4% v/v) plus 0.000 14 g copper sulfate plus 0.7 g of MM plus 7.2 g of BG all dissolved in 75 ml of water. The phantom was evaluated quantitatively in CT by comparing Hounsfield units (HUs) with actual breast tissue. For ultrasound and MRI, the phantoms were assessed based on subjective image quality and signal-difference to noise (SDNR) ratio, respectively. The stiffness of the phantom was evaluated based on ultrasound elastography measurements to yield an average Young’s modulus. In addition, subjective tactile assessment of phantom was performed under needle insertion. Results: The simulated breast tissue had a mean background value of 24 HU on CT imaging, which more closely resembles fibroglandular tissue (40 HU) as opposed to adipose (−100 HU). The tumor had a mean CT number of 45 HU, which yielded a qualitatively realistic image contrast relative to the background either as an intact tumor or postsurgical cavity. The tumor appeared qualitatively realistic on ultrasound images, exhibiting hypoechoic characteristics compared to background. On MRI, the tumor exhibited a SDNR of 3.7. The average Young’s modulus was computed to be 15.8 ± 0.7 kPa (1 SD

  7. A semi-analytical model of biological effectiveness for treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2007), s. 2654-2654 ISSN 0094-2405. [AAPM Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, 22.07.2007-26.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : treatment planning * light-ion therapy * radiobiological models Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2007

  8. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  9. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  10. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  11. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced primary or postoperative recurrent epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland

    Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Toyama, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakayama, Yuko; Mizota, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion beams for the treatment of carcinoma of the lacrimal gland with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and materials: Between April 2002 and January 2011, 21 patients with locally advanced primary epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical trial of carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Acute radiation toxicity was the primary endpoint of this dose-escalation study and the late toxicity, local control, and overall survival were additionally evaluated as secondary endpoints. Of the 21 subjects enrolled, all patients were followed for more than 6 months and analyzed. Results: The radiation dose was increased from the initial dose of 48.0 Gy equivalents (GyE)/12 fractions at 10% increments up to 52.8 GyE. Of the 21 patients, five received a total dose of 48.0 GyE, and 16 received a total dose of 52.8 GyE. No patient developed grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. As late ocular/visual toxicity, three patients had grade 3 retinopathy and seven patients lost their vision. Among the 10 patients treated until May 2005, five patients had local recurrence, three of whom had marginal recurrence. Therefore, the margin for the CTV (clinical target volume) was set to a range according to the orbital exenteration since June 2005. After the application of the extended margin, no local recurrence has been observed. The three-year overall survival and local control rates were 82.2% and 79.0%, respectively. Conclusion: CIRT can be applied for primary epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland, with a borderline acceptable morbidity and sufficient antitumor effect when an extended margin is adopted

  12. submitter Dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy: How to compare two different RBE-weighted dose calculation systems

    Molinelli, Silvia; Mairani, Andrea; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Mirandola, Alfredo; Russo, Stefania; Mastella, Edoardo; Hasegawa, Azusa; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Vischioni, Barbara; Vitolo, Viviana; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ciocca, Mario; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: In carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the use of different relative biological effectiveness (RBE) models in the RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ calculation can lead to deviations in the physical dose $(D_{phy})$ delivered to the patient. Our aim is to reduce target $D_{phy}$ deviations by converting prescription dose values. Material and methods: Planning data of patients treated at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) were collected, with prescribed doses per fraction ranging from 3.6 Gy (RBE) to 4.6 Gy (RBE), according to the Japanese semi-empirical model. The $D_{phy}$ was Monte Carlo (MC) re-calculated simulating the NIRS beamline. The local effect model (LEM)_I was then applied to estimate $D_{RBE}$. Target median $D_{RBE}$ ratios between MC + LEM_I and NIRS plans determined correction factors for the conversion of prescription doses. Plans were re-optimized in a LEM_I-based commercial system, prescribing the NIRS uncorrected and corrected $D_{RBE}$. Results: The MC ...

  13. TU-H-BRA-09: Relationship Between B0 and the Contrast-To-Noise Ratio (CNR) of Tumour to Background for MRI/Radiotherapy Hybrids

    Wachowicz, K; DeZanche, N; Fallone, B [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Yip, E [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Volotovskyy, V [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship in MRI between B{sub 0} and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of various tumour/normal tissue pairs. This study is motivated by the current interest in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids, for which multiple magnetic field strengths have been proposed. CNR is the single most important parameter governing the ability of a system to identify a tumour in real time for treatment guidance. The MRI community has long since recognized that the SNR of a well-designed MR system is roughly proportional to B{sub 0}, the polarizing magnetic field. However, the CNR between two tissues is much more complicated - dependent not only on this signal behavior, but also on the different relaxation properties of the tissues. Methods: Experimentally-based models of B{sub 0}-dependant relaxation for various tumour and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid realtime imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumours for spoiled-gradient echo (SGE) and balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequences. Results: In all cases there was an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumour sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e. bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney and liver tumours). Conclusion: Due to the variation of tissue relaxation parameters with field, lower B{sub 0} fields have been shown to perform as well or better (in terms of CNR) than higher fields for some tumour sites. In other sites this effect was less pronounced. It is the complex relationship between CNR and B{sub 0} that leads to greater CNR at 0.5 T for certain tumour types studied here for fast imaging. B. Gino Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi

  14. Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability in heavy-ion radiotherapy

    Wen Xiaoqiong; Li Qiang; Zhou Guangming; Li Wenjian; Wei Zengquan

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the influence of the un-uniform dose distribution on the clinical treatment result, the Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability was investigated. Basing on the formula deduced previously for survival fraction of cells irradiated by the un-uniform heavy-ion irradiation field and the theory of tumor control probability, the tumor control probability was calculated for a tumor mode exposed to different dose distribution homogeneity. The results show that the tumor control probability responding to the same total dose will decrease if the dose distribution homogeneity gets worse. In clinical treatment, the dose distribution homogeneity should be better than 95%

  15. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Habermehl, Daniel; Kieser, Meinhard; Dreher, Constantin; Werner, Jens; Haselmann, Renate; Jäkel, Oliver; Jäger, Dirk; Büchler, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  16. Non-randomized therapy trial to determine the safety and efficacy of heavy ion radiotherapy in patients with non-resectable osteosarcoma

    Bischof Marc

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. For effective treatment, local control of the tumor is absolutely critical, because the chances of long term survival are EURAMOS1. Local photon radiotherapy has previously been used in small series and in an uncontrolled, highly individualized fashion, which, however, documented that high dose radiotherapy can, in principle, be used to achieve local control. Generally the radiation dose that is necessary for a curative approach can hardly be achieved with conventional photon radiotherapy in patients with non-resectable tumors that are usually located near radiosensitive critical organs such as the brain, the spine or the pelvis. In these cases particle Radiotherapy (proton therapy (PT/heavy ion therapy (HIT may offer a promising new alternative. Moreover, compared with photons, heavy ion beams provide a higher physical selectivity because of their finite depth coverage in tissue. They achieve a higher relative biological effectiveness. Phase I/II dose escalation studies of HIT in adults with non-resectable bone and soft tissue sarcomas have already shown favorable results. Methods/Design This is a monocenter, single-arm study for patients ≥ 6 years of age with non-resectable osteosarcoma. Desired target dose is 60-66 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (Gy E with 45 Gy PT (proton therapy and a carbon ion boost of 15-21 GyE. Weekly fractionation of 5-6 × 3 Gy E is used. PT/HIT will be administered exclusively at the Ion Radiotherapy Center in Heidelberg. Furthermore, FDG-PET imaging characteristics of non-resectable osteosarcoma before and after PT/HIT will be investigated prospectively. Systemic disease before and after PT/HIT is targeted by standard chemotherapy protocols and is not part of this trial. Discussion The primary objectives of this trial are the determination of feasibility and toxicity of HIT. Secondary objectives are tumor response

  17. SU-C-17A-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration Methods Between MRI and CT for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Zhong, H; Chin, K; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Liu, M; Siddiqui, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the performance of two commercially available and one open source B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms between T2-weighted MRI and treatment planning CT using the DICE indices. Methods: CT simulation (CT-SIM) and MR simulation (MR-SIM) for four prostate cancer patients were conducted on the same day using the same setup and immobilization devices. CT images (120 kVp, 500 mAs, voxel size = 1.1x1.1x3.0 mm3) were acquired using an open-bore CT scanner. T2-weighted Turbo Spine Echo (T2W-TSE) images (TE/TR/α = 80/4560 ms/90°, voxel size = 0.7×0.7×2.5 mm3) were scanned on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM. Prostates, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladders were delineated on both T2W-TSE and CT images by the attending physician. T2W-TSE images were registered to CT images using three DIR algorithms, SmartAdapt (Varian), Velocity AI (Velocity) and Elastix (Klein et al 2010) and contours were propagated. DIR results were evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively by image comparison and calculating organ DICE indices. Results: Significant differences in the contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were observed between MR and CT. On average, volume changes of the propagated contours were 5%, 2%, 160% and 8% for the prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder and rectum respectively. Corresponding mean DICE indices were 0.7, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.7. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.9 among three algorithms for the Dice indices. Conclusion: Three DIR algorithms for CT/MR registration yielded similar results for organ propagation. Due to the different soft tissue contrasts between MRI and CT, organ delineation of prostate and SVs varied significantly, thus efforts to develop other DIR evaluation metrics are warranted. Conflict of interest: Submitting institution has research agreements with Varian Medical System and Philips Healthcare

  18. SU-C-17A-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration Methods Between MRI and CT for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Zhong, H; Chin, K; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Liu, M; Siddiqui, S [I Chetty, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the performance of two commercially available and one open source B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms between T2-weighted MRI and treatment planning CT using the DICE indices. Methods: CT simulation (CT-SIM) and MR simulation (MR-SIM) for four prostate cancer patients were conducted on the same day using the same setup and immobilization devices. CT images (120 kVp, 500 mAs, voxel size = 1.1x1.1x3.0 mm3) were acquired using an open-bore CT scanner. T2-weighted Turbo Spine Echo (T2W-TSE) images (TE/TR/α = 80/4560 ms/90°, voxel size = 0.7×0.7×2.5 mm3) were scanned on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM. Prostates, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladders were delineated on both T2W-TSE and CT images by the attending physician. T2W-TSE images were registered to CT images using three DIR algorithms, SmartAdapt (Varian), Velocity AI (Velocity) and Elastix (Klein et al 2010) and contours were propagated. DIR results were evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively by image comparison and calculating organ DICE indices. Results: Significant differences in the contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were observed between MR and CT. On average, volume changes of the propagated contours were 5%, 2%, 160% and 8% for the prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder and rectum respectively. Corresponding mean DICE indices were 0.7, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.7. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.9 among three algorithms for the Dice indices. Conclusion: Three DIR algorithms for CT/MR registration yielded similar results for organ propagation. Due to the different soft tissue contrasts between MRI and CT, organ delineation of prostate and SVs varied significantly, thus efforts to develop other DIR evaluation metrics are warranted. Conflict of interest: Submitting institution has research agreements with Varian Medical System and Philips Healthcare.

  19. Carbon ion radiotherapy for localized primary sarcoma of the extremities: Results of a phase I/II trial

    Sugahara, Shinji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kameda, Noriaki; Okada, Tohru; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shinichirou

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities in a prospective study. Patients and materials: From April 2000 to May 2010, 17 (male/female: 12/5) patients with localized primary sarcoma of the extremities received CIRT. The median age was 53 years (range: 14–87 years). Nine patients had primary diseases and eight had recurrent diseases. Of the 17 patients, eight refused amputation, and the remaining nine refused surgical resection. Tumors were located in the upper limbs in four patients and lower limbs in 13. Histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma in three patients, liposarcoma in two, synovial sarcoma in two, rhabdomyosarcoma in two, pleomorphic sarcoma in two, and miscellaneous in six. The CIRT dose to the limb was 52.8 GyE for one patient, 64 GyE for three, 70.4 GyE for 13 in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Records were reviewed and outcomes including radiologic response, local control (progression-free), and survival were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range: 11–97 months). Radiological response rate was 65% (PR in 11, SD in 5, and PD in 1). The local control rate at 5 years was 76%. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 56%. Of the 17 patients, 10 survived without disease progression. Four patients had local recurrences, one was salvaged by repeated CIRT and the other three died due to systemic diseases. Distant failure was observed in six patients. One patient suffered from femoral fracture (grade 3) and received surgical fixation 27 months after CIRT. No other severe reactions (grade 3) were observed. Conclusions: CIRT is suggested to be an effective and safe treatment for patients who refuse surgery for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities.

  20. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Ammazzalorso, F; Jelen, U; Bednarz, T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  1. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy with a focal boost to the MRI-visible tumor as monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer: early results

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter van; Hoogeman, Mischa; Kirkels, Wim; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; Bangma, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that prostate cancer (PC) cells are more sensitive to high fraction dose in hypofractionation schemes. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy is established to be a good treatment option for PC using extremely hypofractionated schemes. This hypofractionation can also be achieved with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We report results on toxicity, PSA response, and quality of life (QOL) in patients treated with SBRT for favorable-risk PC. Over the last 4 years, 50 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk PC were treated with SBRT to a total dose of 38 Gy delivered in four daily fractions of 9.5 Gy. An integrated boost to 11 Gy per fraction was applied to the dominant lesion if visible on MRI. Toxicity and QoL was assessed prospectively using validated questionnaires. Median follow-up was 23 months. The 2-year actuarial biochemical control rate was 100%. Median PSA nadir was 0.6 ng/ml. Median International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was 9/35 before treatment, with a median increase of 4 at 3 months and remaining stable at 13/35 thereafter. The EORTC/RTOG toxicity scales showed grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity in 12% and 2%, respectively. The late grade 2 GI toxicity was 3% during 24 months FU. Genitourinary (GU) grade 2, 3 toxicity was seen in 15%, 8%, in the acute phase and 10%, 6% at 24 months, respectively. The urinary, bowel and sexual domains of the EORTC-PR25 scales recovered over time, showing no significant changes at 24 months post-treatment. SBRT to 38 Gy in 4 daily fractions for low- and intermediate-risk PC patients is feasible with low acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Longer follow-up preferably within randomized studies, is required to compare these results with standard fractionation schemes

  3. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with α r = 0.764 Gy −1 and β = 0.0615 Gy −2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  4. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  5. Fluorescent, MRI, and colorimetric chemical sensors for the first-row d-block metal ions.

    Zhu, Hao; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Benhua; Peng, Xiaojun

    2015-07-07

    Transition metals (d-blocks) are recognized as playing critical roles in biology, and they most often act as cofactors in diverse enzymes; however, improper regulation of transition metal stores is also connected to serious disorders. Therefore, the monitoring and imaging of transition metals are significant for biological research as well as clinical diagnosis. In this article, efforts have been made to review the chemical sensors that have been developed for the detection of the first-row d-block metals (except Cu and Zn): Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. We focus on the development of fluorescent sensors (fall into three classes: "turn-off", "turn-on", and ratiometric), colorimetric sensors, and responsive MRI contrast agents for these transition metals (242 references). Future work will be likely to fill in the blanks: (1) sensors for Sc, Ti, and V; (2) MRI sensors for Cr, Mn, Co, Ni; (3) ratiometric fluorescent sensors for Cr(6+), Mn(2+), and Ni(2+), explore new ways of sensing Fe(3+) or Cr(3+) without the proton interference, as well as extend applications of MRI sensors to living systems.

  6. Technical Note: Dose effects of 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on tissue interfaces in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phil; Chen, Guang-Pei; Schultz, Christopher J.; Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The integration of MRI with a linear accelerator (MR-linac) offers great potential for high-precision delivery of radiation therapy (RT). However, the electron deflection resulting from the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF) can affect the dose distribution, particularly the electron return effect (ERE) at tissue interfaces. The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose effects of ERE at air-tissue and lung-tissue interfaces during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Methods: IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for representative pancreas, lung, breast, and head and neck (HN) cases were generated following commonly used clinical dose volume (DV) criteria. In each case, three types of plans were generated: (1) the original plan generated without a TMF; (2) the reconstructed plan generated by recalculating the original plan with the presence of a TMF of 1.5 T (no optimization); and (3) the optimized plan generated by a full optimization with TMF = 1.5 T. These plans were compared using a variety of DV parameters, including V{sub 100%}, D{sub 95%}, DHI [dose heterogeneity index: (D{sub 20%}–D{sub 80%})/D{sub prescription}], D{sub max}, and D{sub 1cc} in OARs (organs at risk) and tissue interface. All the optimizations and calculations in this work were performed on static data. Results: The dose recalculation under TMF showed the presence of the 1.5 T TMF can slightly reduce V{sub 100%} and D{sub 95%} for PTV, with the differences being less than 4% for all but one lung case studied. The TMF results in considerable increases in D{sub max} and D{sub 1cc} on the skin in all cases, mostly between 10% and 35%. The changes in D{sub max} and D{sub 1cc} on air cavity walls are dependent upon site, geometry, and size, with changes ranging up to 15%. The VMAT plans lead to much smaller dose effects from ERE compared to fixed-beam IMRT in pancreas case. When the TMF is considered in the plan optimization, the

  7. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe 2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  8. Changes in prostate shape and volume and their implications for radiotherapy after introduction of endorectal balloon as determined by MRI at 3T.

    Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Visser, A.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the changes in prostate shape and volume after the introduction of an endorectal coil (ERC) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 44 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent separate MRI examinations at 3T

  9. Tumour control in ion beam radiotherapy with different ions in the presence of hypoxia: an oxygen enhancement ratio model based on the microdosimetric kinetic model

    Strigari, L.; Torriani, F.; Manganaro, L.; Inaniwa, T.; Dalmasso, F.; Cirio, R.; Attili, A.

    2018-03-01

    Few attempts have been made to include the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in treatment planning for ion beam therapy, and systematic studies to evaluate the impact of hypoxia in treatment with the beam of different ion species are sorely needed. The radiobiological models used to quantify the OER in such studies are mainly based on the dose-averaged LET estimates, and do not explicitly distinguish between the ion species and fractionation schemes. In this study, a new type of OER modelling, based on the microdosimetric kinetic model, taking into account the specificity of the different ions, LET spectra, tissues and fractionation schemes, has been developed. The model has been benchmarked with published in vitro data, HSG, V79 and CHO cells in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, for different ion irradiation. The model has been included in the simulation of treatments for a clinical case (brain tumour) using proton, lithium, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams. A study of the tumour control probability (TCP) as a function of oxygen partial pressure, dose per fraction and primary ion type has been performed. The modelled OER depends on both the LET and ion type, also showing a decrease for an increased dose per fraction with a slope that depends on the LET and ion type, in good agreement with the experimental data. In the investigated clinical case, a significant increase in TCP has been found upon increasing the ion charge. Higher OER variations as a function of dose per fraction have also been found for low-LET ions (up to 15% varying from 2 to 8 Gy(RBE) for protons). This model could be exploited in the identification of treatment condition optimality in the presence of hypoxia, including fractionation and primary particle selection.

  10. In vitro evaluation of photon and raster-scanned carbon ion radiotherapy in combination with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Shafie, Rami A. El; Habermehl, Daniel; Rieken, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, being responsible for 6% of all cancer-related deaths. Conventional radiotherapy with or without additional chemotherapy has been applied in the past in the context of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy concepts with only modest results, however new radiation modalities, such as particle therapy with promising physical and biological characteristics, present an alternative treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer. Up until now the raster scanning technique employed at our institution for the application of carbon ions has been unique, and no radiobiological data using pancreatic cancer cells has been available yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects that can be achieved by treating pancreatic cancer cell lines with combinations of X-rays and gemcitabine, or alternatively with carbon ion irradiation and gemcitabine, respectively. Human pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 were irradiated with photons and carbon ions at various doses and treated with gemcitabine. Photon irradiation was applied with a biological cabin X-ray irradiator, and carbon ion irradiation was applied with an extended Bragg peak (linear energy transfer (LET) 103 keV/μm) using the raster scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells to the treatment was measured by clonogenic survival. Clonogenic survival curves were then compared to predicted curves that were calculated employing the local effect model (LEM). Cell survival curves were calculated from the surviving fractions of each combination experiment and compared to a drug control that was only irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions, without application of gemcitabine. In terms of cytotoxicity, additive effects were achieved for the cell lines Panc-1 and BxPC-3, and a slight radiosensitizing effect was observed for AsPC-1. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon

  11. MRI-guided single fraction ablative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer : a brachytherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry study

    Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; van Ommen, Anne-Mar L N; de Vries, Wilfred J H; Scholten, Vincent; Moerland, Rien; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Schokker, Rogier I; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, B; van den Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A radiosurgical treatment approach for early-stage breast cancer has the potential to minimize the patient's treatment burden. The dosimetric feasibility for single fraction ablative radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an

  12. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  13. Heart MRI

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  14. Radiotherapy physics

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  15. Light-dependant intraretinal ion regulation by melanopsin in young awake and free moving mice evaluated with manganese-enhanced MRI

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Roberts, Robin; Bissig, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that in young, functionally blind mice, light-dependent intraretinal ion regulation occurs via melanopsin. Methods Postnatal day (P) 7 wild type (WT, C57Bl/6) and melanopsin knockout (KO, opn4−/−, B6129) mice were light or dark adapted. Awake and freely moving animals were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with MnCl2. Four hours later, the mice in both groups were anesthetized and studied with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to measure the extent of intraretinal up...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  17. A preliminary Monte Carlo study for the treatment head of a carbon-ion radiotherapy facility using TOPAS

    Liu, Hongdong; Zhang, Lian; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang; Xu, Xie George

    2017-09-01

    In medical physics it is desirable to have a Monte Carlo code that is less complex, reliable yet flexible for dose verification, optimization, and component design. TOPAS is a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation tool which combines extensive radiation physics libraries available in Geant4 code, easyto-use geometry and support for visualization. Although TOPAS has been widely tested and verified in simulations of proton therapy, there has been no reported application for carbon ion therapy. To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of TOPAS simulations for carbon ion therapy, a licensed TOPAS code (version 3_0_p1) was used to carry out a dosimetric study of therapeutic carbon ions. Results of depth dose profile based on different physics models have been obtained and compared with the measurements. It is found that the G4QMD model is at least as accurate as the TOPAS default BIC physics model for carbon ions, but when the energy is increased to relatively high levels such as 400 MeV/u, the G4QMD model shows preferable performance. Also, simulations of special components used in the treatment head at the Institute of Modern Physics facility was conducted to investigate the Spread-Out dose distribution in water. The physical dose in water of SOBP was found to be consistent with the aim of the 6 cm ridge filter.

  18. A Comparative Evaluation of 3 Different Free-Form Deformable Image Registration and Contour Propagation Methods for Head and Neck MRI: The Case of Parotid Changes During Radiotherapy.

    Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Belli, Maria Luisa; Logghe, Gerlinde; Verellen, Dirk; Moriconi, Stefano; Chiara, Anna; Palmisano, Anna; Mellone, Renata; Fiorino, Claudio; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    To validate and compare the deformable image registration and parotid contour propagation process for head and neck magnetic resonance imaging in patients treated with radiotherapy using 3 different approaches-the commercial MIM, the open-source Elastix software, and an optimized version of it. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer previously treated with radiotherapy were considered. Deformable image registration and parotid contour propagation were evaluated by considering the magnetic resonance images acquired before and after the end of the treatment. Deformable image registration, based on free-form deformation method, and contour propagation available on MIM were compared to Elastix. Two different contour propagation approaches were implemented for Elastix software, a conventional one (DIR_Trx) and an optimized homemade version, based on mesh deformation (DIR_Mesh). The accuracy of these 3 approaches was estimated by comparing propagated to manual contours in terms of average symmetric distance, maximum symmetric distance, Dice similarity coefficient, sensitivity, and inclusiveness. A good agreement was generally found between the manual contours and the propagated ones, without differences among the 3 methods; in few critical cases with complex deformations, DIR_Mesh proved to be more accurate, having the lowest values of average symmetric distance and maximum symmetric distance and the highest value of Dice similarity coefficient, although nonsignificant. The average propagation errors with respect to the reference contours are lower than the voxel diagonal (2 mm), and Dice similarity coefficient is around 0.8 for all 3 methods. The 3 free-form deformation approaches were not significantly different in terms of deformable image registration accuracy and can be safely adopted for the registration and parotid contour propagation during radiotherapy on magnetic resonance imaging. More optimized approaches (as DIR_Mesh) could be preferable for critical

  19. A study on the precise examination needed to decide an optimal planning target volume for carbon ion radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu; Kandatsu, Susumu; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Minohara, Shinichi; Ohto, Masao

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make two pictures of the randomly-selected cross section of the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion using three dimensional (3D) image data obtained from the three dimensional computed tomography (CT) and the three dimensional ultrasonography (US), and to prove their identity as an image of the same cross section. Using the measurement system of three inclined angles of a cross section from the three planes, a horizontal plane and two vertical planes in the three dimensional space, we obtained two images of the same cross section of the HCC lesion originating from 3D-US and 3D-CT image data (US-CT 3D-dual image). To prove the identity of the two images of the US-CT 3D-dual image, 3D-US and 3D-CT images, we compared the two images to the original cross section of the resected HCC specimen. We could visually prove the identity of the two images consisting in the US-CT 3D-dual image originating from the 3D-US image data and 3D-CT image data. The US-CT 3D-dual image seems to be effective to make an exact treatment plan of carbon ion radiotherapy for HCC. (author)

  20. Correlation between surrogates of bladder dosimetry and dose–volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Chietera, Andreina; Perna, Lucia; Gianolini, Stefano; Maggio, Angelo; Botti, Andrea; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Fiorino, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The correlation between bladder dose–wall-histogram (DWH) and dose–volume-histogram (DVH), dose–surface-histogram (DSH), and DVH-5/10 was investigated in a group of 28 patients; bladder walls were drawn on T2-MRI. DVH showed the poorest correlation with DWH; DSH or DVH-5/10 should be preferred in planning; absolute DVH may be used for radical patients, although less robust.

  1. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  2. TH-EF-BRA-05: A Method of Near Real-Time 4D MRI Using Volumetric Dynamic Keyhole (VDK) in the Presence of Respiratory Motion for MR-Guided Radiotherapy

    Lewis, B; Kim, S; Kim, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel method that enables 4D MR imaging in near real-time for continuous monitoring of tumor motion in MR-guided radiotherapy. Methods: This method is mainly based on an idea of expanding dynamic keyhole to full volumetric imaging acquisition. In the VDK approach introduced in this study, a library of peripheral volumetric k-space data is generated in given number of phases (5 and 10 in this study) in advance. For 4D MRI at any given time, only volumetric central k-space data are acquired in real-time and combined with pre-acquired peripheral volumetric k-space data in the library corresponding to the respiratory phase (or amplitude). The combined k-space data are Fourier-transformed to MR images. For simulation study, an MRXCAT program was used to generate synthetic MR images of the thorax with desired respiratory motion, contrast levels, and spatial and temporal resolution. 20 phases of volumetric MR images, with 200 ms temporal resolution in 4 s respiratory period, were generated using balanced steady-state free precession MR pulse sequence. The total acquisition time was 21.5s/phase with a voxel size of 3×3×5 mm 3 and an image matrix of 128×128×56. Image similarity was evaluated with difference maps between the reference and reconstructed images. The VDK, conventional keyhole, and zero filling methods were compared for this simulation study. Results: Using 80% of the ky data and 70% of the kz data from the library resulted in 12.20% average intensity difference from the reference, and 21.60% and 28.45% difference in threshold pixel difference for conventional keyhole and zero filling, respectively. The imaging time will be reduced from 21.5s to 1.3s per volume using the VDK method. Conclusion: Near real-time 4D MR imaging can be achieved using the volumetric dynamic keyhole method. That makes the possibility of utilizing 4D MRI during MR-guided radiotherapy.

  3. Visualization of Fluoride Ions In Vivo Using a Gadolinium(III)-Coumarin Complex-Based Fluorescence/MRI Dual-Modal Probe.

    Wang, Yue; Song, Renfeng; Feng, Huan; Guo, Ke; Meng, Qingtao; Chi, Haijun; Zhang, Run; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-12-16

    A new Gadolinium(III)-coumarin complex, DO3A-Gd- CA , was designed and prepared as a dual-modal probe for simultaneous fluorescence and relaxivity responses to fluoride ions (F - ) in aqueous media and mice. DO3A-Gd- CA was designed by using Gd(III) center as an MRI signal output unit and fluoride binding site, and the 4-(diethylamino)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid ( CA ) as a fluorescence reporter. Upon the addition of fluoride ions to the solution of DO3A-Gd- CA , the liberation of the coordinated CA ligand led to a 5.7-fold fluorescence enhancement and a 75% increase in the longitudinal relaxivity ( r ₁). The fluorescent detection limit for fluoride ions was determined to be 8 μM based on a 3 σ / slope . The desirable features of the proposed DO3A-Gd- CA , such as high sensitivity and specificity, reliability at physiological pH and low cytotoxicity enable its application in visualization of fluoride ion in mice. The successful in vivo imaging indicates that DO3A-Gd- CA could be potentially used in biomedical diagnosis fields.

  4. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with Cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in combination with a carbon ion boost for locally advanced tumours of the oro-, hypopharynx and larynx - TPF-C-HIT

    Mavtratzas Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term locoregional control in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN remains challenging. While recent years have seen various approaches to improve outcome by intensification of treatment schedules through introduction of novel induction and combination chemotherapy regimen and altered fractionation regimen, patient tolerance to higher treatment intensities is limited by accompanying side-effects. Combined radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as well as modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and carbon ion therapy (C12 are able to limit toxicity while maintaining treatment effects. In order to achieve maximum efficacy with yet acceptable toxicity, this sequential phase II trial combines induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. We expect this approach to result in increased cure rates with yet manageable accompanying toxicity. Methods/design The TPF-C-HIT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, open-label, non-randomized phase II trial evaluating efficacy and toxicity of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 50 patients with histologically proven locally advanced SCCHN following TPF induction chemotherapy. Patients receive 24 GyE carbon ions (8 fractions and 50 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is locoregional control at 12 months, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late radiation effects as well as any adverse events of the treatment as well as quality of life (QoL analyses. Discussion The primary objective of TPF-C-HIT is to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in combination with combined IMRT/carbon ion therapy following TPF induction in locally advanced SCCHN. Trial Registration

  5. The brachytherapy vaginal cuff boost in patients with cervix cancer IB1-IB2 that have been treated with surgery plus pelvic radiotherapy in ION SOLCA, Guayaquil Ecuador from November 1 to October 2002

    Gamboa, Eugenia; Falquez, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    To determine if the additional vaginal cuff irradiation is necessary or not in patients with cervix cancer, stages IB 1- IB 2, that has been treated previously with radical hysterectomies and pelvic radiotherapy, to get better local control and global survival versus presence of complications. We studied 54 patients from Radiation Oncology Department of ION SOLCA Guayaquil Ecuador, with cervix cancer stages IB1 - IB2, that have been treated with surgery plus pelvic radiotherapy plus or not brachytherapy. They have been divides into two arms, group one included surgery plus Rx T (radiotherapy) plus BxT (Brachytherapy), and group two included those patients with surgery plus external RxT alone. We studied, aged, histologic type, surgery type, doses and techniques of teletherapy and brachytherapy and we analyzed the presence of complications. Conclusions: The brachytherapy vaginal cuff boost in patients with cervix cancer IB1-IB2 that have been treated with surgery plus pelvic radiotherapy is not useful to get better local control and global survival in some patients carefully chosen without desfavorable factors, because this therapy represent and increase in the complication. (The author)

  6. Whither radiotherapy

    Ross, W M

    1987-03-01

    The 1986 Glyn Evans Memorial Lecture, given at the Joint Provincial Meeting of the Royal College of Radiologists, Sheffield, September 1986, sketches an outline of the history of radiotherapy and discusses the future development of the art. Topics included are siting of centres, training needs, the relationship of radiotherapy to other medical specialities, and the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy practitioners forming a separate medical College. (U.K.)

  7. The feasibility of utilizing pseudo CT-data for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of spinal bone metastases

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J; Van der Velden, Joanne M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what pseudo-CT (pCT) strategy is sufficient for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation of a stereotactic treatment for spinal bone metastases. For this purpose, the dosimetric accuracy of five increasingly complex pCT strategies was evaluated using the planning CT data of 20 patients suffering from spinal metastases. For each pCT, a treatment plan was developed and simulated on both the pCT and the original CT data of the patient. The two resulting dose distributions were compared using gamma analysis of 2%/2 mm. In this paper, a Gamma Pass Rate (GPR) of ⩾95% within the Target Volume (TV) was considered clinically acceptable. We additionally demonstrated in this paper the automatic generation of each investigated pCT strategy with the use of dedicated MRI data complemented with pre-treatment CT data of a patient in treatment position. The dosimetric accuracy of a pCT increases when additional bulk densities are utilized for a pCT. However, the dosimetric accuracy of even the most complex ‘bulk density’ pCT strategy used in this study had an average GPR of only 78% within the TV. However, if information on the heterogeneous electron density distribution within the affected vertebral body was available, a clinically acceptable 99% mean GPR was observed. All pCTs could successfully be generated using the MRI data in combination with the CT data of a patient in treatment position. The results presented in this study show that a simple ‘bulk density’ pseudo-CT strategy is not feasible for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for spinal bone metastases. However, a clinically acceptable result is generated if the information on the heterogeneous electron density (ED) distribution within the affected vertebral bone is available. Therefore, any pCT strategy for this tumor site should include a method which can estimate the heterogeneous ED of the affected vertebral bone. (paper)

  8. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose–volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose–volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Perna, Lucia; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose–wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose–surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose–volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose–volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80–0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66–0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001). (note)

  9. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  10. Changes in Rectal Dose Due to Alterations in Beam Angles for Setup Uncertainty and Range Uncertainty in Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Yoshiki Kubota

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer is challenging in patients with metal implants in one or both hips. Problems can be circumvented by using fields at oblique angles. To evaluate the influence of setup and range uncertainties accompanying oblique field angles, we calculated rectal dose changes with oblique orthogonal field angles, using a device with fixed fields at 0° and 90° and a rotating patient couch.Dose distributions were calculated at the standard angles of 0° and 90°, and then at 30° and 60°. Setup uncertainty was simulated with changes from -2 mm to +2 mm for fields in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and cranial-caudal directions, and dose changes from range uncertainty were calculated with a 1 mm water-equivalent path length added to the target isocenter in each angle. The dose distributions regarding the passive irradiation method were calculated using the K2 dose algorithm.The rectal volumes with 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° field angles at 95% of the prescription dose were 3.4±0.9 cm3, 2.8±1.1 cm3, 2.2±0.8 cm3, and 3.8±1.1 cm3, respectively. As compared with 90° fields, 30° and 60° fields had significant advantages regarding setup uncertainty and significant disadvantages regarding range uncertainty, but were not significantly different from the 90° field setup and range uncertainties.The setup and range uncertainties calculated at 30° and 60° field angles were not associated with a significant change in rectal dose relative to those at 90°.

  11. A systematic review of the precision and accuracy of dose measurements in photon radiotherapy using polymer and Fricke MRI gel dosimetry

    MacDougall, N.D.; Pitchford, W.G.; Smith, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to undertake a critical appraisal of the evidence in the published literature concerning the basic parameters of accuracy and precision associated with the use of Fricke and polymer gels (in conjunction with MR imaging) as radiation dosimeters in photon radiotherapy, condensing and analysing the body of published information (to the end of April 2002). A systematic review was undertaken addressing specific issues of precision and accuracy asking defined questions of the published literature. Accuracy and precision in relation to gel dosimetry were defined. Information was obtained from published, peer-reviewed journals. A defined search strategy utilizing MeSH headings and keywords, with extensive use of cross-referencing, identified 115 references dealing with gel dosimetry. Exclusion criteria were used to select only data from publications which would give unequivocal evidence. For accuracy, results had to be compared with an ionization chamber as gold standard and all gel samples had to be manufactured in the same batch. For precision, in addition to gels being from the same batch, samples must all have been irradiated at the same time and scanned simultaneously (or within a short time frame). Many results were found demonstrating 'dose mapping' examples using gels. However, there were very few publications containing firm evidence of precision and accuracy. There was no evidence which fulfilled our criteria about accuracy or precision using Fricke gels. For polymer gels only one paper was found for accuracy (4% (Low et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 1542-51)) and precision (1.7% (Baldock et al 1998 Phys. Med. Biol. 43 695-702)); however, both were carried out at only one dose level. If the exclusion criteria were relaxed to include accuracy results comparing gel to a non gold standard dosimeter (e.g. TLD), results give a median accuracy of 10% (range 8-23.5%) for polymer gel (Cosgrove et al 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 1195-210, De Deene et al

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy for effective radiotherapy delivery

    Karlsson, Ulf Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is a new radiotherapy technology that combines the rapid dose fall off associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and daily tumor imaging allowing for high precision tumor dose delivery and effective sparing of surrounding normal organs. The new radiation technology requires close collaboration between radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists to avoid marginal miss. Modern diagnostic imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, positron emission tomography with Computed Tomograpgy (PET-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows the radiation oncologist to target the positive tumor with high accuracy. As the tumor is well visualized during radiation treatment, the margins required to avoid geographic miss can be safely reduced , thus sparing the normal organs from excessive radiation. When the tumor is located close to critical radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord, IGRT can deliver a high dose of radiatio...

  13. The impact of MRI steady-state sequences as an additional assessment modality in vestibular schwannoma patients after LINAC stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery.

    Sauer, Julian P; Kinfe, Thomas M; Pintea, Bogdan; Schäfer, Andreas; Boström, Jan P

    2018-05-23

    Data concerning the clinical usefulness of steady-state sequences (SSS) for vestibular schwannomas (VS) after linear accelerator (LINAC) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are scarce. The aim of the study was to investigate whether SSS provide an additional useful follow-up (FU) tool to the established thin-layered T1 sequences with contrast enhancement. Pre- and post-treatment SSS were identified in 45 consecutive VS patients (2012-2016) with a standardized FU protocol including SSS at 2-3 months and 6 months/yearly in our prospective database and were retrospectively re-evaluated. The SSS were used throughout for the segmentation of the cochlea and partly of the trigeminal nerve in the treatment planning. Data analysis included signal conversion in SSS and possible correlation with neuro-otological outcome and volumetric assessment after a certain time interval. The series included 42 SRS and 3 SRT patients (31 female/14 male; mean age 59.3 years, range: 25-81 years). An SSS signal conversion was observed in 20 tumors (44.4%) within a mean time of 11 months (range: 7-15 months). Mean FU time was 26 months (median of 4 FU visits) and demonstrated tumor volume shrinkage in 29 cases (64.4%) correlating with FU time (p = 0.07). The incidence rate of combined shrinkage and signal conversion (48.3%) compared to those without signal conversion (51.7%) did not differ significantly (p = 0.49). In case of an early signal conversion at the first FU, a weak statistical significance (p = 0.05) for a higher shrinkage rate of VS with signal conversion was found. Side effects in cases with signal conversion (9/20, 45%) were more frequently than without signal conversion (6/25, 24%) without reaching statistical significance (p = 0.13). Our data confirmed the usefulness of SSS for anatomical segmentation of VS in LINAC-SRS/SRT treatment planning and add data supporting their potential as an adjunctive FU option in

  14. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose

  15. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose

  16. WE-G-18C-07: Accelerated Water/fat Separation in MRI for Radiotherapy Planning Using Multi-Band Imaging Techniques

    Crijns, S; Stemkens, B; Sbrizzi, A; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den; Andreychenko, A [UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dixon sequences are used to characterize disease processes, obtain good fat or water separation in cases where fat suppression fails and to obtain pseudo-CT datasets. Dixon's method uses at least two images acquired with different echo times and thus requires prolonged acquisition times. To overcome associated problems (e.g., for DCE/cine-MRI), we propose to use a method for water/fat separation based on spectrally selective RF pulses. Methods: Two alternating RF pulses were used, that imposes a fat selective phase cycling over the phase encoding lines, which results in a spatial shift for fat in the reconstructed image, identical to that in CAIPIRINHA. Associated aliasing artefacts were resolved using the encoding power of a multi-element receiver array, analogous to SENSE. In vivo measurements were performed on a 1.5T clinical MR-scanner in a healthy volunteer's legs, using a four channel receiver coil. Gradient echo images were acquired with TE/TR = 2.3/4.7ms, flip angle 20°, FOV 45×22.5cm{sup 2}, matrix 480×216, slice thickness 5mm. Dixon images were acquired with TE,1/TE,2/TR=2.2/4.6/7ms. All image reconstructions were done in Matlab using the ReconFrame toolbox (Gyrotools, Zurich, CH). Results: RF pulse alternation yields a fat image offset from the water image. Hence the water and fat images fold over, which is resolved using in-plane SENSE reconstruction. Using the proposed technique, we achieved excellent water/fat separation comparable to Dixon images, while acquiring images at only one echo time. Conclusion: The proposed technique yields both inphase water and fat images at arbitrary echo times and requires only one measurement, thereby shortening the acquisition time by a factor 2. In future work the technique may be extended to a multi-band water/fat separation sequence that is able to achieve single point water/fat separation in multiple slices at once and hence yields higher speed-up factors.

  17. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  18. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  19. Radiotherapy apparatus

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  20. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay incorporated, Oakwood Village, Ohio (United States); Ruan, S [University of Rouen, QuantIF - EA 4108 LITIS, Rouen (France); Low, D [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  1. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H; Victoria, J; Dempsey, J; Ruan, S; Low, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  2. Interstitial radiotherapy

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  3. Palliative Radiotherapy

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  4. Physical and biological basis of hadron radiotherapy. Book of abstracts

    2011-09-01

    The Workshop was a satellite event of the 14 th International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR-2011). It was held in Cracow, Poland, on the 2 and 3 September 2011, at the Collegium Novum of the Jagiellonian University. The Workshop organized, jointly by the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Polish Radiation Research Society, would provide its participants with an opportunity to discuss current topics in proton and carbon radiotherapy, clinical aspects of ion radiotherapy, ion beam dosimetry, unwanted patient exposure, radiobiology for ion radiotherapy and other relevant subjects. Book of Abstracts contains abstracts of 33 oral presentations and 12 posters.

  5. Chest MRI

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  6. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  7. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  8. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977. [Planning for use for radiotherapy and as radiation source for diagnostic radiography

    Elam, S. (ed.)

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery.

  9. MRI finding of hemangioblastomas

    Park, Seung Cheol; Oh, Min Cheol; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Seol, Hye Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of posterior fossa hemanangioblastoma and usefulness of contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. Seven patients with posterior fossa hemangioblastoma were studied with both pre- and post-enhanced MRI. The MR images were reviewed regarding the location, size, signal intensities of cysts and mural nodules, and their contrast enhancement pattern. Five tumors were located in cerebellar hemisphere, one in vermis, and one in posterior part of medulla. One patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease had a medullary hemangioblastoma with multiple pancreatic cysts. In 6 cases, the major portion of the tumor was cysts and had small mulkal nodules. The solid portion was relatively lange in one cases, cemprising half of the tumor cysts were oval shaped and their sized were 3-6.7 cm in diameter. In five cases(71%), septations were noted within the cysts. Cysts were isointense or slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on T2- weighted image compared with cerebrospinal fluid. Mural nodules were oval or rounded radiotherapy had better prognosis than those treated with radiotherapy alwas 0.5-2.5 cm in diameter. Mural nodules were isointense to gray matter. They were detected in five cases on T1-weighted images and one case on T2-weighted images. In two cases, vascular signal void area was noted in mural nodules. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, all mural nodules were intensely enhanced. MRI provide to be a good diagnostic method to detect and characterize posterior fossa hemangioblastoma. The most common finding is Cystic posterior fossa lesion with enhancing mural nodule. Contrast enhancement is essential for specific diagnosis

  10. External radiotherapy of pituitary adenomas

    Zierhut, Dietmar; Flentje, Michael; Adolph, Juergen; Erdmann, Johannes; Raue, Friedhelm; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate therapeutic outcome and side effects of radiotherapy in pituitary adenomas as sole or combined treatment. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 138 patients (74 male, 64 female) irradiated for pituitary adenoma from 1972 to 1991 was performed. Mean age was 49.7 years (15-80 years). Regular follow-up (in the mean 6.53 ± 3.99 years) included radiodiagnostical [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), x-ray], endocrinological, and ophthalmological examinations. Seventy patients suffered from nonfunctional pituitary adenoma, 50 patients suffered from growth-hormone producing adenomas, 11 had prolactinomas, and 7 patients had adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) producing pituitary adenomas. In 99 patients surgery was followed by radiotherapy in case of suspected remaining tumor (invasive growth of the adenoma, assessment of the surgeon, pathologic CT after surgery, persisting hormonal overproduction). Twenty-three patients were treated for recurrence of disease after surgery and 16 patients received radiation as primary treatment. Total doses from 40-60 Gy (mean: 45.5 Gy) were given with single doses of 2 Gy 4 to five times a week. Results: Tumor control was achieved in 131 patients (94.9%). In seven patients, recurrence of disease was diagnosed in the mean 2.9 years (9-98 months) after radiotherapy and salvaged by surgery. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found in favor of doses ≥ 45 Gy. Ninety percent of the patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas had a benefit from radiotherapy in means of complete termination (38%) or at least reduction (52%) of hormonal overproduction. Partial or complete hypopituitarism after radiotherapy developed, depending on hormonal axis, in 12 (prolactin) to 27% (follicle-stimulating hormone FSH) of patients who had not already had hypopituitarism prior to radiation. Two out of 138 patients suffered reduction of visual acuity, which was, in part

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  12. WE-EF-BRD-04: MR in the OR: The Growth and Applications of MRI for Interventional Radiology and Surgery

    Fahrig, R. [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  13. WE-EF-BRD-02: Battling Maxwell’s Equations: Physics Challenges and Solutions for Hybrid MRI Systems

    Keall, P. [University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  14. WE-EF-BRD-02: Battling Maxwell’s Equations: Physics Challenges and Solutions for Hybrid MRI Systems

    Keall, P.

    2015-01-01

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php

  15. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  16. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    feasibility to generate real-time VC-MRI for on-board localization of moving targets in radiotherapy. PMID:27131085

  17. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas%基于11C-MET PET-CT与MRI对脑胶质瘤精确放疗GTV勾画的比较研究

    王如; 钱立庭; 汪世存; 刘伟; 罗文广; 张洪波; 李广虎; 胡智刚; 刘磊

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨11C-MET PET-CT和MRI图像对脑胶质瘤GTV确定的差异.方法 选取6例经病理证实为胶质瘤患者的术前MRI及11C-MET PET-CT图像,分别由我科5位医师在两种图像资料上勾画GTV,比较两者差异.结果 在MRI11C-MET PET-CT上勾画的GTV体积相似(P=0.917),GTV变异系数也相似(P =0.600).勾画的GTV重合度最大为73.0%、最小为51.8%.方差分析显示不同勾画者之间在两种图像资料上勾画的GTV相似(P =0.709),但PET-CT组GTV最大差值为27.66 cm3,而MRI组的为40.37 cm3.结论 MRI与PET-CT显示的肿瘤边界存在差异,不同勾画者勾画的GTV相似,PET-CT组的GTV最大差值较MRI组的小,11C-MET PET-CT显示GTV较为直观.%Objective To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas.Methods Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation.Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT images of these patients.The GTVs based on the two methods were compared.Results There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT (P =0.917),and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P =0.600).The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients,with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%.GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P =0.709) ; the biggest difference was 27.66 cm3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm3 on MRI.Conclusions The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different.The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar,and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI,which suggests that 11C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV.

  18. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy of branchogenic carcinoma comprises; palliative treatment, postoperative or pre-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy as part of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell carcinoma and curative radiotherapy of non-operable non-small cell carcinoma. Atelectasis and obstruction are indications for palliative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is given only in cases of incomplete resection or mediastinal metastases. In the treatment of small cell carcinoma by combined irradiation and chemotherapy the mediastinum and primary tumour are irradiated, generally after chemotherapy, and the C.N.S. receives prophylactic radiotherapy. Curative radiotherapy is indicated in cases of non-operable small cell carcinoma. Irradiation with doses of 60-70 Gy produced 5-years-survival rates of 10-14% in cases classified as T 1 -T 2 N 0 M 0 . (orig.) [de

  19. Radiotherapy-induced cerebral abnormalities in patients with low-grade glioma

    Postma, TJ; Klein, M; Verstappen, CCP; Bromberg, JEC; Swennen, M; Langendijk, JA; Taphoorn, MJB; Scheltens, P; Slotman, BJ; van der Ploeg, HM; Aaronson, NK; Heimans, JJ

    2002-01-01

    Abnormalities on CT or MRI and neuropsychological performance in patients with low-grade glioma, with (n = 23) or without (n = 16) prior cerebral radiotherapy, were evaluated. Cerebral atrophy was observed in 14 of 23 patients (61%) treated with prior radiotherapy, and in 1 of 16 patients (6%)

  20. submitter Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break ...

  1. Study of diffusion weighted MRI as a predictive biomarker of response during radiotherapy for high and intermediate risk squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx: The MeRInO study

    C Paterson

    2017-02-01

    Discussion: The use of DW-MRI as a predictive biomarker during RT for SCC H&N is in its infancy but studies to date have found that response to treatment may indeed be predicted by comparison of DW-MRI carried out before and during treatment. However, previous studies have included all sub-sites and biological sub-types. Establishing ADC thresholds that predict for local failure is an essential step towards using DW-MRI to improve the therapeutic ratio in treating SCC H&N. This would be done most robustly in a specific H&N sub-site and in sub-types with similar biological behaviour. The MeRInO study will help establish these thresholds in OPSCC.

  2. Effectiveness of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with audio-visual biofeedback for synchrotron-based scanned heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Ma, Yuanyuan

    2016-12-01

    A synchrotron-based heavy-ion accelerator operates in pulse mode at a low repetition rate that is comparable to a patient’s breathing rate. To overcome inefficiencies and interplay effects between the residual motion of the target and the scanned heavy-ion beam delivery process for conventional free breathing (FB)-based gating therapy, a novel respiratory guidance method was developed to help patients synchronize their breathing patterns with the synchrotron excitation patterns by performing short breath holds with the aid of personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment precision, efficiency and reproducibility of the respiratory guidance method in scanned heavy-ion beam delivery mode. Using 96 breathing traces from eight healthy volunteers who were asked to breathe freely and guided to perform short breath holds with the aid of BFB, a series of dedicated four-dimensional dose calculations (4DDC) were performed on a geometric model which was developed assuming a linear relationship between external surrogate and internal tumor motions. The outcome of the 4DDCs was quantified in terms of the treatment time, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose homogeneity index. Our results show that with the respiratory guidance method the treatment efficiency increased by a factor of 2.23-3.94 compared with FB gating, depending on the duty cycle settings. The magnitude of dose inhomogeneity for the respiratory guidance methods was 7.5 times less than that of the non-gated irradiation, and good reproducibility of breathing guidance among different fractions was achieved. Thus, our study indicates that the respiratory guidance method not only improved the overall treatment efficiency of respiratory-gated scanned heavy-ion beam delivery, but also had the advantages of lower dose uncertainty and better reproducibility among fractions.

  3. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    Burke, B.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-02-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts.

  4. Comparison between Electronic Portal Imaging Devices and ion chamber matrix for intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance; Comparacao entre Dispositivos Eletronicos de Imagens Portais e matriz de camaras de ionizacao para garantia da qualidade de radioterapia de intensidade modulada

    Silveira, Thiago B.; Rosa, Luiz A.R., E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Marilia B., E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica Medica

    2012-08-15

    The treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) demands an individual and specific quality assurance procedure. The use of ion chamber matrix is a well establish method to dose distribution verifications, despite the lower spatial resolution. An alternative method arising is the use of the Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs). The aim of this paper is to validate the EPID use for quality assurance of IMRT comparing it to the previous method employing an ion chamber matrix. We analyzed 10 treatment planning for different tumor sites and photons energies of the linac Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems). We used Sliding-window IMRT and the measurements were acquired in EPID and in Physikalisch-Technische Werkstaetten (PTW) 2D Array seven29. Two different software were used to analyze the data: Verisoft version 4.0, for Array data; and Eclipse 8.6 with Portal Dosimetry for EPID data. The evaluation of concordance levels between measured and predicted images used the Gamma Index tool with 3% of dose difference and 3 mm of distance to agreement. The EPID showed worse results for approval percentiles, in average 2.17%, and bigger values of average gamma index, although its analysis confirmed the approvals of all planning. This happens because of the better sensitivity generated by the higher spatial resolution of the EPID, 0,784 mm against 1,0 cm of the Array, so it has bigger capacity to identify small dose variations. The EPID, jointly with the Portal Dosimetry, proved to be excellent tools to perform pre-treatment IMRT verifications, providing significant gain in dose distribution analysis. Also, the EPID is easier for positioning, for images manipulation, for data acquisition and analysis and has detection area 60% bigger. (author)

  5. Seizure control following radiotherapy in patients with diffuse gliomas: a retrospective study

    Rudà, Roberta; Magliola, Umberto; Bertero, Luca; Trevisan, Elisa; Bosa, Chiara; Mantovani, Cristina; Ricardi, Umberto; Castiglione, Anna; Monagheddu, Chiara; Soffietti, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Little information is available regarding the effect of conventional radiotherapy on glioma-related seizures. Methods In this retrospective study, we analyzed the seizure response and outcome following conventional radiotherapy in a cohort of 43 patients with glioma (33 grade II, 10 grade III) and medically intractable epilepsy. Results At 3 months after radiotherapy, seizure reduction was significant (≥50% reduction of frequency compared with baseline) in 31/43 patients (72%) of the whole series and in 25/33 patients (76%) with grade II gliomas, whereas at 12 months seizure reduction was significant in 26/34 (76%) and in 19/25 (76%) patients, respectively. Seizure reduction was observed more often among patients displaying an objective tumor response on MRI, but patients with no change on MRI also had a significant seizure reduction. Seizure freedom (Engel class I) was achieved at 12 months in 32% of all patients and in 38% of patients with grade II tumors. Timing of radiotherapy and duration of seizures prior to radiotherapy were significantly associated with seizure reduction. Conclusions This study showed that a high proportion of patients with medically intractable epilepsy from diffuse gliomas derive a significant and durable benefit from radiotherapy in terms of epilepsy control and that this positive effect is not strictly associated with tumor shrinkage as shown on MRI. Radiotherapy at tumor progression seems as effective as early radiotherapy after surgery. Prospective studies must confirm and better characterize the response to radiotherapy. PMID:23897633

  6. Out-of-field dose measurements in radiotherapy

    Kaderka, Robert

    2011-07-13

    This thesis describes the results from measurements of the out-of-field dose in radiotherapy. The dose outside the treatment volume has been determined in a water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements were performed with linac photons, passively delivered protons, scanned protons, passively delivered carbon ions as well as scanned carbon ions. It was found that the use of charged particles for radiotherapy reduces the out-of-field dose by up to three orders of magnitude compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons.

  7. Effect of radiation in radiotherapy

    Hirata, Hideki; Fujibuchi, Toshio; Saito, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained for the deterministic effect, secondary cancer formation and case reports of accidental exposure at radiotherapy. For the deterministic effect, the dose-effect relationship is sigmoidal in normal and cancer tissues, and the more separated are their curves, the more favorable is the radiotherapy. TD 5/5 is the tolerable dose to yield <5% of irreversible radiation injury to the normal tissue within 5 years after the therapy and is generally dose-limiting. The curves are of various shapes depending on the tissue composition that its functional subunit (FSU) is parallel like lobules of the liver, or in series like neuron. Symptoms appear complicated on these factors. Recent development of CT-based therapeutic planning has made it possible to analyze the partial tissue volume to be irradiated and its absorbed dose by the relationship (dose volume histogram, DVH) between the electron density vs CT value regardless to anatomy. The normal tissue complication probability is a model composed from the physical DVH and biological factors of FSU composition and cellular radiation susceptibility, and is a measure of the irreversible late effect manifested in normal tissues. Epidemiology has shown the increased risk of secondary cancer formation by radiotherapy. Children are highly susceptible to this, and in adults undergoing the therapy of a certain cancer, it is known that the risk of radiation carcinogenesis is increased in the particular tissue. There are presented such case reports of accidental excessive exposure at radiotherapy as caused by an inappropriate use of detector, partial loss of data in a therapeutic planning device, reading of reversed MRI image, and too much repeated use of the old-type electric portal imaging device. (T.T.)

  8. Cancer therapy with ions

    Mandrillon, P.

    1993-01-01

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to 'light ions' (Carbon, Oxygen, Neon) has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. The rationale for this new radiotherapy, the accelerators and the beam delivery systems needed are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  9. Long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Evaluation of tumor control and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy

    Tsuchida, Emiko; Sakai, Kunio; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sugita, Tadashi; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the results of conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas assessed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endpoints include tumor control, normalization of hormone levels in functioning adenomas, and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy as an adverse effect. Forty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy from 1982 to 1995 at Niigata University Hospital. Forty patients were irradiated after surgery because of residual adenomas in 33 patients and tumor regrowth in 7 patients. One patient was treated with radiotherapy alone, and the remaining 1 patient was treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Tumor size and extension were evaluated using CT or MRI, and all tumors were macroadenomas. They consisted of 18 non-functioning and 24 functioning adenomas (growth hormone (GH)-secreting: 11, prolactinomas: 7, concomitant GH and prolactin (PRL)-secreting: 5, gonadotropin-secreting: 1). Treatment was given in 200 cGy daily fraction size and a total dose of 50 Gy was given to most patients. Sixteen patients with GH- and/or PRL-secreting adenomas received bromocriptine. Tumor progression was determined by increase in tumor size as shown by CT or MRI. Hypopituitarism after radiotherapy was evaluated using the functions of corticotropin (ACTH), thyrotropin (TSH), and gonadotropin. Median follow-up time from the end of radiotherapy was 103 months. Tumor progression occurred in 2 out of 42 patients and 10-year progression-free rate for all patients was 93.7%. Normalization of GH levels was obtained in 12 of 16 GH-secreting adenomas with a mean time of 27 months after radiotherapy, and 9 of 12 PRL-secreting adenomas achieved normalization of PRL levels with a mean time of 34 months. One gonadotropin-secreting adenoma achieved normalization of gonadotropin level at 21 months after radiotherapy. The incidence of hypopituitarism after radiotherapy increased with time, and cumulative risk of deficiencies of ACTH, TSH, and gonadotropin at 10

  10. Radiation therapy using high-energy heavy-ion

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    1995-01-01

    The clinical trial of the heavy-ion radiotherapy was started at June 1994 after pre-clinical experiments using 290 MeV/u carbon beam. In this paper, an irradiation system for the heavy-ion radiotherapy installed at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) and the physical characteristics of the therapeutic beam were discussed. (author)

  11. National arrangements for radiotherapy

    2007-01-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee

  12. Radiotherapy of malignant lymphomas

    Kujawska, J [Instytut Onkologii, Krakow (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses current views on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with malignant lymphomas. Principles of radiotherapy employed in the Institute of Oncology in Cracow in case of patients with malignant lymphomas are also presented.

  13. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  14. MRI Primer

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  15. Head MRI

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  16. Pediatric MRI

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  17. SU-F-T-124: Radiation Biological Equivalent Presentations OfLEM-1 and MKM Approaches in the Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    Hsi, W; Jiang, G; Sheng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the correlations of the radiation biological equivalent doses (BED) along depth and lateral distance between LEM-1 and MKM approaches. Methods: In NIRS-MKM (Microdosimetric Kinetic Model) approach, the prescribed BED, referred as C-Eq, doses aims to present the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for different energies of carbon-ions on a fixed 10% survival value of HCG cell with respect to convention X-ray. Instead of a fixed 10% survival, the BED doses of LEM-1 (Local Effect Model) approach, referred as X-Eq, aims to present the RBE over the whole survival curve of chordoma-like cell with alpha/beta ratio of 2.0. The relationship of physical doses as a function of C-Eq and X-Eq doses were investigated along depth and lateral distance for various sizes of cubic targets in water irradiated by carbon-ions. Results: At the center of each cubic target, the trends between physical and C-Eq or X-Eq doses can be described by a linear and 2nd order polynomial functions, respectively. Using fit functions can then calculate a scaling factor between C-Eq and X-Eq doses to have similar physical doses. With equalized C-Eq and X-Eq doses at the depth of target center, over- and under-estimated X-Eq to C-Eq are seen for depths before and after the target center, respectively. Near the distal edge along depth, sharp rising of RBE value is observed for X-Eq, but sharp dropping of RBE value is observed for C-Eq. For lateral locations near and just outside 50% dose level, sharp raising of RBE value is also seen for X-Eq, while only minor increasing with fast dropping for C-Eq. Conclusion: An analytical function to model the differences between the CEq and X-Eq doses along depth and lateral distance need to further investigated to explain varied clinic outcome of specific cancers using two different approaches to calculated BED doses.

  18. Long-term follow-up after modern radical prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Sander, Lotte

    that clinical target volumes are up to 30% smaller on MRI delineation compared to computer tomography delineation. The overall aim of the thesis was to explore the use of MRI target planning and a Nicle-Titanium prostate stent as fiducial marker for both MR-CT co-registration and image guided radiotherapy....... radiotherapy is a well established treatment modality for prostate cancer. Accuracy and precision are key words with regard to optimal survival and minimal toxicity in modern radiotherapy and are fundamentals in modern radiotherapy. Modern imaging has improved the ability to define radiotherapy target volumes......A significant increase in the prostate cancer incidence has made prostate cancer a major health problem in recent years. Because of the often but unfortunately not always indolent nature of the disease, over-diagnosis and over-treatment are relevant clinical and ethic dilemmas. External beam...

  19. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Case report

    Yoshida, Yuya; Toma, Yasuo; Arai, Masayuki; Higashi, Ryo; Kashihara, Kengo; Kaizaki, Yasuharu

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A 15-year-old boy with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the age of 7, underwent chemotherapy and 14 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain. He was admitted to our department due to the development of aphasia, right hemiparesis and generalized convulsive seizure. MRI showed an irregularly enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. A gross total removal of the tumor was performed and histological examination showed it to be PNET. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 20 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain and 42 Gy of local radiotherapy. Follow-up MRI showed no evidence of recurrent tumor 4 months after the radiotherapy. This tumor was thought to be a secondary brain tumor arising in this survivor of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and it is a rare complication of successful leukemia treatment. (author)

  20. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: charged particles produced by 4He and 12C ion beams in a PMMA target at large angle

    Rucinski, A.; Battistoni, G.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Patera, V.

    2018-03-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams are used in the clinical practice for external radiotherapy treatments achieving, for selected indications, promising and superior clinical results with respect to x-ray based radiotherapy. Other ions, like \

  1. Development of irradiation techniques and assessment of tumor response carbon ion radiotherapy in ultra-short fraction and time for a small lung cancer

    Baba, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    For planning safety carbon therapy for lung cancer, the minimum (threshold) dose to generate lung reaction on CT image was investigated at each fraction regimen. From 1995 January to 2003 December, 44 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with carbon ion beams of various fractions (1-12 fractions a port) and total doses (28-90 GyE). The 78 irradiated fields for the early reaction (within 6 months) and 67 for the late (1 year after) were divided into the two groups: the positive (+) and the negative (-) after the reactions on CT image were graded according to Libshits's criteria. The α/βvalue of biological effective dose (BED) responsive curve was determined by assuming the biserial correlation coefficient between positive rate of lung reaction and BED dose. From the BED responsive curve, in turn, the dose responsive curve for lung reaction rate at each fraction regimen was obtained. Based on the curve, D10 (to generate the lung reaction at 10% of the patients) in single fraction regimen was determined to be 10.6 GyE for the late reaction and 9.96 GyE for the early reaction, respectively. These doses seem to be very useful to estimate lung injuries in singe-dose irradiation. (author)

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis

    Noel, G.; Daisne, J.F.; Thillays, F.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is now well implanted in the radiotherapy treatment tools of brain metastasis. The dose can be delivered in one or multiple sessions. Results seem equivalent. CT scan and MRI imaging are required to delineate and calculate dosimetry. Doses are variable according to the size of the metastases, localization, pathology or equipment. Stabilization or reduction of tumour size is the rules after stereotactic treatment. Impact in terms of overall survival is more difficult to apprehend because of the general context of the disease. Many questions remain unresolved, such as the usefulness of whole brain irradiation, adaptation of the treatment schedule to tumour pathophysiology, role of stereotactic treatment after surgery of metastases, etc. (authors)

  3. Early bilateral radiation-induced optic neuropathy with follow-up MRI

    McClellan, R.L.; El Gammal, T.; Kline, L.B.

    1995-01-01

    Most documented cases of radiation-induced optic neuropathy are unilateral and occur more than 1 year after radiotherapy to the sellar region. We describe a patient with bilateral radiation optic neuropathy 3 months following the completion of radiotherapy. MRI 13 months after the onset of visual failure showed bilateral optic atrophy with residual gadolinium enhancement. (orig.)

  4. Early bilateral radiation-induced optic neuropathy with follow-up MRI

    McClellan, R.L. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology; El Gammal, T. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kline, L.B. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-02-01

    Most documented cases of radiation-induced optic neuropathy are unilateral and occur more than 1 year after radiotherapy to the sellar region. We describe a patient with bilateral radiation optic neuropathy 3 months following the completion of radiotherapy. MRI 13 months after the onset of visual failure showed bilateral optic atrophy with residual gadolinium enhancement. (orig.)

  5. Heavy-ion radiography

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  7. The metabolic radiotherapy. La radiotherapie metabolique

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 86 - Poitiers (France))

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy.

  8. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care: Facing the Global Challenge

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Cancer treatment is complex and calls for a diverse set of services. Radiotherapy is recognized as an essential tool in the cure and palliation of cancer. Currently, access to radiation treatment is limited in many countries and non-existent in some. This lack of radiotherapy resources exacerbates the burden of disease and underscores the continuing health care disparity among States. Closing this gap represents an essential measure in addressing this global health equity problem. This publication presents a comprehensive overview of the major topics and issues to be taken into consideration when planning a strategy to address this problem, in particular in low and middle income countries. With contributions from leaders in the field, it provides an introduction to the achievements and issues of radiation therapy as a cancer treatment modality around the world. Dedicated chapters focus on proton therapy, carbon ion radiotherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, radiotherapy for children, HIV/AIDS related malignancies, and costing and quality management issues.

  9. Portable MRI

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  10. Portable MRI

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  11. Fetal MRI

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  12. Interventional MRI

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  13. Fetal MRI

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  14. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. MRI in Glioma Immunotherapy: Evidence, Pitfalls, and Perspectives

    Domenico Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudophenomena, that is, imaging alterations due to therapy rather than tumor evolution, have an important impact on the management of glioma patients and the results of clinical trials. RANO (response assessment in neurooncology criteria, including conventional MRI (cMRI, addressed the issues of pseudoprogression after radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy and pseudoresponse during antiangiogenic therapy of glioblastomas (GBM and other gliomas. The development of cancer immunotherapy forced the identification of further relevant response criteria, summarized by the iRANO working group in 2015. In spite of this, the unequivocal definition of glioma progression by cMRI remains difficult particularly in the setting of immunotherapy approaches provided by checkpoint inhibitors and dendritic cells. Advanced MRI (aMRI may in principle address this unmet clinical need. Here, we discuss the potential contribution of different aMRI techniques and their indications and pitfalls in relation to biological and imaging features of glioma and immune system interactions.

  16. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.)

  17. PLANNING NATIONAL RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES

    Eduardo eRosenblatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Countries, states and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centres are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment.This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centres, equipment, staff, education pr

  18. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Bjerre, Troels

    be employed for contour propagation in adaptive radiotherapy. - MRI-radiotherapy devices have the potential to offer near real-time intrafraction imaging without any additional ionising radiation. It is detailed how the use of multiple, orthogonal slices can form the basis for reliable 3D soft tissue tracking.......-based treatment replanning and real-time intrafraction guidance techniques. The selected contributions detail a number of findings and techniques, in particular: - For ten head & neck cancer patients, changes in tumour density were well described by linear functions with patient-specific slope and intercept...

  19. To understand radiotherapy

    2009-01-01

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  20. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    CT (CBCT) can be used for MRI-only image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and for verifying the correctness of the corresponding pCT. Material and methods. Six patients receiving palliative cranial RT were included in the study. Each patient had three-dimensional (3D) T1W MRI, a CBCT and a CT for reference...

  1. SU-F-303-17: Real Time Dose Calculation of MRI Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy Treatments On Free Breathing Patients, Using a Motion Model and Fast Monte Carlo Dose Calculation

    Thomas, D; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate real-time dose calculation of free-breathing MRI guided Co−60 treatments, using a motion model and Monte-Carlo dose calculation to accurately account for the interplay between irregular breathing motion and an IMRT delivery. Methods: ViewRay Co-60 dose distributions were optimized on ITVs contoured from free-breathing CT images of lung cancer patients. Each treatment plan was separated into 0.25s segments, accounting for the MLC positions and beam angles at each time point. A voxel-specific motion model derived from multiple fast-helical free-breathing CTs and deformable registration was calculated for each patient. 3D images for every 0.25s of a simulated treatment were generated in real time, here using a bellows signal as a surrogate to accurately account for breathing irregularities. Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed every 0.25s of the treatment, with the number of histories in each calculation scaled to give an overall 1% statistical uncertainty. Each dose calculation was deformed back to the reference image using the motion model and accumulated. The static and real-time dose calculations were compared. Results: Image generation was performed in real time at 4 frames per second (GPU). Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed at approximately 1frame per second (CPU), giving a total calculation time of approximately 30 minutes per treatment. Results show both cold- and hot-spots in and around the ITV, and increased dose to contralateral lung as the tumor moves in and out of the beam during treatment. Conclusion: An accurate motion model combined with a fast Monte-Carlo dose calculation allows almost real-time dose calculation of a free-breathing treatment. When combined with sagittal 2D-cine-mode MRI during treatment to update the motion model in real time, this will allow the true delivered dose of a treatment to be calculated, providing a useful tool for adaptive planning and assessing the effectiveness of gated treatments

  2. Therapy tumor with the heavy ions beam

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Li Wenjian

    2002-01-01

    As physical characteristic of heavy ions Bragg peak, therapy tumor with heavy ions is becoming advanced technology. So, many countries have developed the technology and used to treat tumor, the societal and economic effects are beneficial to people. The authors show the development, present situation and information of research in world of advanced radiotherapy with heavy ions

  3. MRI angiography

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  4. MRI zoo

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  5. SU-C-210-07: Assessment of Intra-/Inter-Fractional Internal Tumor and Organ Movement in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Using On-Board Cine MRI

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Fischer-Valuck, B; Kashani, R; Green, O; Rodriguez, V; Mutic, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH (United States); Ruan, S [University of Rouen, QuantIF - EA 4108 LITIS, Rouen (France); Low, D [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Head and neck (H&N) internal organ motion has previously been determined with low frequency and temporary nature based on population-based pre- and post-treatment studies. Using immobilization masks and adding a 4–6 mm planning-tumor-volume margin, geometric uncertainties of patients are routinely considered clinically inconsequential in H&N radiotherapy. Using the first commercially-available MR-IGRT system, we conducted the first quantitative study on inter-patient, intra- and inter-fractional H&N internal motion patterns to evaluate the necessity of individualized asymmetric internal margins. Methods: Ninety cine sagittal MR image sequences were acquired during the entire treatment course (6–7 weeks) of three H&N cancer patients using the ViewRay™ MR-IGRT system. The images were 5 mm thick and acquired at 4 frames/per second. One of the patients had a tracheostomy tube. The cross-sectional H&N airway (nasopharynx, oropharynx, and laryngopharynx portions) movement was analyzed comprehensively using in-house developed motion detection software. Results: Large inter-patient variations of swallowing frequency (0–1 times/per fraction), swallowing duration (1–3 seconds), and pharyngeal cross-sectional area (238–2516 mm2) were observed. Extensive pharyngeal motion occurred during swallowing, while nonzero and periodic change of airway geometry was observed in resting. For patient 1 with tracheostomy tube replacement, 30.3%, 30.0%, 48.7% and 0.3% of total frames showed ≥ 4 mm displacements in the anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries, respectively; similarly, (5.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 0.3%) and (23.3%, 0.0%, 35.7%, 1.7%) occurred for patients 2 and 3. Area overlapping coefficients with respect to the first frame were 76.3+/−6.4%, 90.3+/−0.6%, and 92.3+/−1.2% for the three patients, respectively. Conclusion: Both the resting and swallowing motions varied in frequency and amplitude among the patients and across fractions of a

  6. SU-C-210-07: Assessment of Intra-/Inter-Fractional Internal Tumor and Organ Movement in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Using On-Board Cine MRI

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Fischer-Valuck, B; Kashani, R; Green, O; Rodriguez, V; Mutic, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Li, H; Victoria, J; Dempsey, J; Ruan, S; Low, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck (H&N) internal organ motion has previously been determined with low frequency and temporary nature based on population-based pre- and post-treatment studies. Using immobilization masks and adding a 4–6 mm planning-tumor-volume margin, geometric uncertainties of patients are routinely considered clinically inconsequential in H&N radiotherapy. Using the first commercially-available MR-IGRT system, we conducted the first quantitative study on inter-patient, intra- and inter-fractional H&N internal motion patterns to evaluate the necessity of individualized asymmetric internal margins. Methods: Ninety cine sagittal MR image sequences were acquired during the entire treatment course (6–7 weeks) of three H&N cancer patients using the ViewRay™ MR-IGRT system. The images were 5 mm thick and acquired at 4 frames/per second. One of the patients had a tracheostomy tube. The cross-sectional H&N airway (nasopharynx, oropharynx, and laryngopharynx portions) movement was analyzed comprehensively using in-house developed motion detection software. Results: Large inter-patient variations of swallowing frequency (0–1 times/per fraction), swallowing duration (1–3 seconds), and pharyngeal cross-sectional area (238–2516 mm2) were observed. Extensive pharyngeal motion occurred during swallowing, while nonzero and periodic change of airway geometry was observed in resting. For patient 1 with tracheostomy tube replacement, 30.3%, 30.0%, 48.7% and 0.3% of total frames showed ≥ 4 mm displacements in the anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries, respectively; similarly, (5.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 0.3%) and (23.3%, 0.0%, 35.7%, 1.7%) occurred for patients 2 and 3. Area overlapping coefficients with respect to the first frame were 76.3+/−6.4%, 90.3+/−0.6%, and 92.3+/−1.2% for the three patients, respectively. Conclusion: Both the resting and swallowing motions varied in frequency and amplitude among the patients and across fractions of a

  7. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    Hu, Y. [Mayo Clinic Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  8. The functional imaging in target volume delineation of radiotherapy planning for gliomas

    Huang Jingxiong; Wu Hua

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of important treatments for glioma. Functional imaging, such as PET, SPECT and MRI, may provide more valuable information not only in display of the evasion extent of glioma but also in demonstration of some biological characteristics of the tumor, such as perfusion, metabolism, hypoxia or proliferation. Thus it may play a role in making an individualized and more exact radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  9. Historical review of radiotherapy

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  10. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  11. MRI findings of extramedullary haemopoiesis

    Chourmouzi, D.; Pistevou-Gompaki, K.; Plataniotis, G.; Skaragas, G.; Papadopoulos, L.; Drevelegas, A.

    2001-01-01

    Extramedullary haemopoiesis (EH) is a compensatory process associated with chronic haemolytic anaemia. It is rare, however, for such an abnormality to cause spinal cord compression. We present two patients with known beta-thalassaemia intermedia who developed spinal cord compression due to masses of extramedullary haematopoietic tissue in the epidural space of the thoracic spine. The EH masses were diagnosed by MRI as an isointense epidural lesion on both T1- and T2-weighted images, compressing severely the spinal cord. After administration of a paramagnetic agent, an intermediate enhancement of the masses was evident. All the vertebral bodies had low to intermediate signal intensity as a result of displacement of fatty marrow by haematopoietic marrow. Expansion of thoracic ribs with bilateral paravertebral masses were characteristic. A small dose of radiotherapy was given and marked improvement in neurological symptoms was evident. An MRI examination established shrinkage of the mass and decompression of spinal cord. The role of MRI in diagnosis of EH masses is essential and radiation therapy is a very effective treatment for this rare complication. (orig.)

  12. Carbon Ion Therapy

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  13. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  14. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Geinitz, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  16. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Takezawa, Yuuichi; Suguro, Tohru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko; Motegi, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy injuries in children

    Kalifa, G.; Bennet, J.; Couanet, D.; Masselot, J.

    1985-01-01

    Side effects of radiotherapy in pediatrics are reviewed including bone injuries and radio-induced bone tumors; nervous system injuries with emphasis on hypothalamus, pituitary gland, brain and spinal cord; lung, digestive system and urinary tract injuries [fr

  18. The metabolic radiotherapy

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy

  19. Migration of divalent ions in nylon 6 films

    Reuvers, N.J.W.; Huinink, H.P.; Fischer, H.R.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The migration of ions through a nylon-6 film is studied by MRI. For this study the paramagnetic ions Mn2+ and Cu2+ are used as they act as a contrast agent and are detectable by MRI. The ingress of water and ions in nylon occurs at different rates. First, water is absorbed in the nylon. Second, the

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  6. Play the MRI Game

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  7. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    Tobias, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    After describing the recent advances in radiotherapy, this brief article presents in tabular form the changing indications for radiotherapy for tumours of the skin, head and neck, adult CNS, lung, thyroid, thymus, breast, female genital tract, soft tissue sarcoma, genitourinary tract, bone sarcoma, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, leukemia and paediatric malignancy. For each tumour type, information is provided for the radiosensitivity, the radiocurability, complications and five-year survival. Combined modality treatment is also briefly discussed. (UK)

  8. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  9. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    Horiuchi, Junichi; Masaki, Norie; Onoyama, Yasuto

    1987-01-01

    This chapter presents in greater detail radiotherapy used in each clinical setting. The descriptions are given under the following sections: the tongue and oral cavity; the maxilla, larynx, and pharynx; brain tumors; the eyes and orbit; pediatric tumors; lung cancer; the esophagus; breast cancer; the abdominal digestive system; the urogenital system; the uterine cervix; the ovaries and vulva; bone and soft tissues; the skin; hematopoietic tumors; lymph node metastases; and radiotherapy as palliative treatment. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Patients and radiotherapy

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Radiotherapy and oral cancer

    Sealy, R [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-08-01

    A general review article for the non-radiotherapist. The historical, physical and biological background is briefly reviewed. Mention is made of the effects of fraction size, hyperbaric oxygen, neutron beams and radiation sensitizers. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is discussed, as well as the selection of patients for radiotherapy and the treatment of neck nodes. The author suggests a therapeutic approach to the various disease sites and finally reviews some of the literature on radiation caries and jaw necrosis.

  12. Animal MRI Core

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  13. Outcome of early detection and radiotherapy for occult spinal cord compression

    Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Barbachano, Yolanda; Dearnaley, David P.; Parker, Christopher C.; Khoo, Vincent; Huddart, Robert A.; Eeles, Rosalind; Horwich, Alan; Aslam Sohaib, S.

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis in 150 patients with metastatic prostate cancer was conducted to determine whether early detection with MRI spine and treatment of clinically occult spinal cord compromise (SCC) facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Our results suggest that prophylactic radiotherapy for patients with back pain or radiological SCC without neurologic deficit may facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Thus MRI surveillance for SCC may be important for prostate cancer patients with bone metastases

  14. Evaluating uncertainties in the cross-calibration of parallel ion chambers used in electron beam radiotherapy; Avaliacao das incertezas no processo de calibracao cruzada de camaras de placas paralelas utilizadas em feixes de eletrons para radioterapia

    Anderson, Ernani; Travassos, Paulo; Ferreira, Max da Silva; Carvalho, Samira Marques de; Silva, Michele Maria da; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira, E-mail: ernanianderson@hotmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salmon Junior, Helio Augusto [Grupo COI - Clinicas Oncologicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to estimative the combined standard uncertainty for a detector parallel plate used for dosimetry of electron beams in linear accelerators for radiotherapy, which has been calibrated by the cross-calibration method. Keeping the combined standard uncertainty next of the uncertainty informed in the calibration certificate of the reference chamber, become possible establish the calibration factor of the detector. The combined standard uncertainty obtained in this study was 2.5 %. (author)

  15. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy

    1989-05-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting devoted solely to review the atomic and molecular data needed for radiotherapy was held in Vienna from 13 to 16 June 1988. The following items as related to the atoms and molecules of human tissues were reviewed: Cross sections differential in energy loss for electrons and other charged particles. Secondary electron spectra, or differential ionization cross sections. Total cross sections for ionization and excitation. Subexcitation electrons. Cross sections for charged-particle collisions in condensed matter. Stopping power for low-energy electrons and ions. Initial yields of atomic and molecular ions and their excited states and electron degradation spectra. Rapid conversion of these initial ions and their excited states through thermal collisions with other atoms and molecules. Track-structure quantities. Other relevant data. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    1984-01-01

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  17. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  18. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  19. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  20. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  1. Arterial disease after radiotherapy

    Bigot, J.M.; Mathieu, D.; Reizine, D.

    1983-01-01

    Disease of the large arterial vessels is a relatively unknown complication of radiotherapy. However, it should be considered in the same manner as the other complications of irradiation when a tumour recurrence is suspected. The experimental studies of Kirkpatrick and Konings, demonstrating the synergy between irradiation and hypercholesterolemia in the precocity and gravity of vascular complications are recalled. The different localisations reported in the litterature are discussed: coronary, pulmonary, thoracic aorta, supra aortic, renal, digestive and ilio-femoral arteries. Finally, the difficulty of diagnosis of post-radiotherapy without clinical, radiological or anatomopathological confirmation, is underlined [fr

  2. Second cancers following radiotherapy

    Tubiana, M.

    1983-01-01

    Published reports have shown that there is an increased incidence of second malignancies, particularly sarcomas, following high dose radiotherapy in cancer treatment. However, this increased risk is very small and is relatively negligeable when one considers the beneficial effects of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. This incidence of radiation induced cancer appears to be higher in certain groups of patients, such as children and patients with Hodgkin's disease. In view of scarcity of published data, controlled surveys remain necessary for the quantitative assessment of the cancer risk in various subgroups of irradited patients [fr

  3. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  4. [Current status and potential perspectives in classical radiotherapy technology].

    Dabić-Stanković, Kata M; Stanković, Jovan B; Radosević-Jelić, Ljiljana M

    2004-01-01

    After purchase of radiotherapy equipment in 2003, classic radiation therapy in Serbia will reach the highest world level. In order to define the highest standards in radiation technology, we analyzed the current status and potential perspectives of radiation therapy. An analysis of present situation in the USA, assumed as the most developed in the world, was done. Available data, collected in the last 3 years (equipment assortment, therapy modalities, workload and manpower) for 284 radiotherapy centers, out of potential 2050, were analyzed. Results were presented as crude percentage and matched to point current status. The analysis showed that CLINAC accelerators are the most popular (82.7%), as well as, ADAC (43.7%) and Focus (CMS) (27.4%) systems for therapy planning. Movement towards virtual simulation is evident (59.3%), although classic "simulation" is not fully eliminated from the radiotherapy chain. The most popular brachytherapy afterloader is Microselectron HDR (71%). About 64.4% centers use IMPAC communication/verification/record system that seems more open than Varis. All centers practice modern radiotherapy modalities and techniques (CPRT, IMRT, SRS/SRT, TBI, IORT, IVBHRT, HDR BHRT, etc.). CT and MRI availability is out of question, but PET is available in 3% of centers, however this percentage is rapidly growing. Up to 350 new patients per year are treated by one accelerator (about 35 pts. a day). Centers are relatively small and utilize 2-3 accelerators on average. Average FTE staffing norm is 4 radiation oncologists, 2-3 medical radiotherapy physicists, about 3 certified medical dosimetrists and about 6 radiotherapy technologists. In the past 5 years relative stagnation in classic radiotherapy has been observed. In spite of substantial investments in technology and consequent improvements, as well as wide introduction of computers in radiotherapy, radiotherapy results have not changed significantly. Vendor developement strategies do not point that

  5. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Van Herk, M.; Gilhuijs, K.; Kwa, S.; Lebesque, J.; Muller, S.; De Munck, J.; Touw, A.; Kooy, H.

    1995-01-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors have been demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion have been analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large

  6. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Van Herk, M; Gilhuijs, K; Kwa, S; Lebesque, J; Muller, S; De Munck, J; Touw, A [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, H [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors were demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion were analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large scale.

  7. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered

  8. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    Paulson, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  9. Solitary bone plasmacytoma: outcome and prognostic factors following radiotherapy

    Liebross, Robert H.; Ha, Chul S.; Cox, James D.; Weber, Donna; Delasalle, Kay; Alexanian, Raymond

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the natural history of solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SBP) after radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1965-1996, we identified 57 previously untreated patients with a SBP. A serum myeloma protein was present in 33 patients (58%) and Bence Jones proteinuria was present in an additional eight patients (14%). The median radiotherapy dose was 50 Gy (range, 30-70 Gy). Overall survival, cause-specific survival, and freedom from progression to multiple myeloma were calculated actuarially. Results: Local control was achieved in 55 of 57 patients (96%). For those 29 patients (51%) who subsequently developed multiple myeloma, the median time to progression was 1.8 years. There was a direct correlation between persistence of abnormal protein following radiotherapy and the likelihood of developing multiple myeloma. Among 11 patients with disappearance of myeloma protein, only two developed multiple myeloma after 4 and 12 years, in contrast to progression in 57% of patients with a persistent protein peak and 63% of those with nonsecretory disease (p = 0.02). Among 23 patients with thoracolumbar spine disease, 7 of 8 patients staged with plain radiographs alone developed multiple myeloma in comparison with 1 of 7 patients who also had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (p = 0.08). For all patients, the median survival from radiotherapy was 11.0 years. The median cause-specific survival of patients with disappearance of myeloma protein was significantly longer than that of the remaining patients (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Results supported the importance of precise staging that includes MRI of the spine for optimum patient selection and the application of definitive radiotherapy. Those patients with myeloma protein that disappears following radiotherapy represent a category with a high likelihood of cure

  10. Potential impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried; Graf, Reinhold; Denecke, Timm; Geworski, Lilli; Wurm, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with 68 Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV CT/MRI was 22(±19)cm 3 ; GTV PET was 23(±20)cm 3 . Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9(±10)cm 3 and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7(±11)cm 3 ). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15(±14)cm 3 . The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV CT/MRI and GTV PET accounted to 16(±15)cm 3 (93%, p 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration. 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET also allows detection of additional lesions in patients with multiple meningiomas. (orig.)

  11. New procedures. Comprehensive staging of lung cancer by MRI

    Hintze, C.; Dinkel, J.; Biederer, J.; Heussel, C.P.; Puderbach, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer staging according to the TNM system is based on morphological assessment of the primary cancer, lymph nodes and metastases. All aspects of this important oncological classification are measurable with MRI. Pulmonary nodules can be detected at the clinically relevant size of 4-5 mm in diameter. The extent of mediastinal, hilar and supraclavicular lymph node affection can be assessed at the same time. The predominant metastatic spread to the adrenal glands and spine can be detected in coronal orientation during dedicated MRI of the lungs. Search focused whole body MRI completes the staging. Various additional MR imaging techniques provide further functional and clinically relevant information during a single examination. In the oncological context the most important techniques are imaging of perfusion and tumor motion. Functional MRI of the lungs complements the pure staging and improves surgical approaches and radiotherapy planning. (orig.) [de

  12. APPLICATION OF MRI IN THE DIAGNOSTICS OF M. MASSETER

    Mariana Dimova-Gabrovska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method which can provide detailed images of organs and structures of the human body. The purpose of this review is to explore and introduce the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in imaging m. masseter in conditions of norm and pathology. The material of the review is information of 20 literary sources selected from 530, found by keywordsfromJanuary to April 2017. The information about MRI imaging of the normal anatomy of m. masseter and the most common findings in muscle - muscle hypertrophy, inflammatory changes, vascular malformations, intramuscular hemangioma, cysticercosis and changes after radiotherapy was analyzed. In conclusion, the diagnostic capabilities of MRI of masseter muscle – both in the conditions of norm and pathology were confirmed. The method is considered to be reliable, objective, non-invasive and accurate.

  13. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  14. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  15. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    Cionini, Luca; Gardani, Gianstefano; Gabriele, Pietro; Magri, Secondo; Morosini, Pier Luigi; Rosi, Antonella; Viti, Vincenza

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  17. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    Schofield, P.F.; Holden, D.; Carr, N.D. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1983-06-01

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery.

  18. Radiotherapy of breast fibrosis

    Heibel, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study radiotherapy of breast fibrosis in hormone-treated men with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma was examined. 10 patients had received hormones even before irradiation, 113 obtained hormone administration only after irradiation. The objective size of the glandular body and the overall size of the breast were measured with a special method developed by the author. 46 patients indicated complaints. With hypertrophic mamma and hypertrophic mamilla in 67 examined patients, 127 different symptoms resulted in total. Four patients of the group who had obtained hormones before irradiation, suffered from subjective symptoms. It resulted that radiotherapy of breast fibrosis carried out during hormone treatment is no gynecomastia prophylaxis, that already existent mamma hypertrophies are irreversible, but that existent sensations were notably reduced within 6 months after irradiation therapy. These results indicate the necessity of a radiotherapy of the mamma fibrosis before the hormone treatment is begun. Particularly in cases of higher operative risks, also the possibility of preferring radiotherapy to mastectomy should be fully utilized, in view of adequate or even better therapeutic results. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Gamma apparatuses for radiotherapy

    Sul'kin, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Scientific and technical achievements in development and application of gamma therapeutic apparatuses for external and intracavity irradiations are generalized. Radiation-physical parameters of apparatuses providing usability of progressive methods in radiotherapy of onclogical patients are given. Optimization of main apparatus elements, ensurance of its operation reliability, reduction of errors of irradiation plan reproduction are considered. Attention is paid to radiation safety

  20. Four R's of radiotherapy

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiotherapy given as multiple doses can be effective in sterilizing cancers, but the processes whereby the neoplasm is eradicated and the normal tissues are preserved are not fully understood. The differential between normal tissue and tumor response is enhanced by dose fractionation, single doses resulting in severe normal tissue injury when the dose is sufficient to control a proportion of treated tumors. Data are reviewed from radiobiological studies on laboratory animals and cultured cells that have thrown some light on four of the phenomena that influence the outcome of fractionated-dose radiotherapy, one or more of which may account for the relative sparing of normal tissues. These are repair of sublethal injury in normal and neoplastic cells, reoxygenation of the tumor, redistribution through the division cycle, and regeneration of surviving normal and malignant cells between dose fractions. These have been called the four R's of fractionated radiotherapy. Other factors are involved in the outcome of multifraction radiotherapy, including maintenance of the architectural integrity of the normal tissues, the volume of tissue irradi []ted, the tumor bed, and the immunocompetence of the host. (90 references) (CH)

  1. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    2003-03-01

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  2. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  4. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: preliminary results with the CyberKnife.

    Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier; Prevost, Bernard; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dubus, Francois; Sarrazin, Thierry

    2009-04-01

    In the field of radiation oncology, equipment for fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose radiosurgery has become increasingly accurate, together with the introduction of robotized treatments. A robot is a device that can be programmed to carry out accurate, repeated and adjusted tasks in a given environment. Treatment of extracranial lesions involves taking into account organ mobility (tumor and healthy tissue) whilst retaining the ability to stereotactically locate the target. New imaging techniques (single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET)) provide further relevant information to slice images (computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI) for target definition. Hypo-fractionated treatments can only be used for curative treatment if the target is accurately defined and tracked during treatment. The CyberKnife is a non-invasive system of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. For intracranial lesions treated by single-dose radiosurgery, it has been used to treat meningioma, acoustic neuromas, pituitary adenoma, metastases, arteriovenous malformations and refractory pain (trigeminal neuralgia). More than 10,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Currently, the most significant developments are in the field of extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (lung, liver, reirradiation, prostate, etc.). Clinical results obtained in the CyberKnife Nord-Ouest program after 1 year of experience are presented. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  6. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Before, During, and After Radiotherapy for High-Risk Rectal Cancer

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Markussen, Alice; Jensen, Benny V

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with rectum cancer T4 or T3 involving the mesorectal fascia was included in a prospective phase 2 trial. Liver or lung metastases were...... accepted if the surgeons found them resectable. The patients received 6 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before chemoradiotherapy (CRT), continued capecitabine and oxaliplatin during radiotherapy, and received 4 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin after CRT. The patients received radiotherapy...... as intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was planned 8 weeks after CRT. The patients were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before start of treatment, after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, and again just before the operation. The European Organization for Research and Treatment...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  8. Clinical investigation on RBE estimation for heavy particle radiotherapy

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the clinical updated data of the prostate cancer patients treated with carbon-ions was performed for the purpose of investigating the clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of carbon ion beams. Most of the patients received the carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) with the dose of 66.0 GyE/20 fractions. Probabilities of the late urethral morbidity and biochemical tumor control with this dose fractionation were calculated using the actual updated clinical data. The linear energy transfer (LET) values and physical carbon ion doses of urethra were obtained from treatment planning data. RBE values were calculated from the ratio of average carbon physical doses and photon doses which cause the same grade of urethra reaction with the same probabilities. Obtained RBE values were compared with the values that are being used in actual carbon ion radiotherapy in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). In addition, relative RBE of carbon ion beams for biochemical tumor control was calculated using the data from the literature. As a result, the RBE values being used for the treatment were thought to be proper enough for both the urethra reaction and tumor control. (author)

  9. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    Castro, J.R.; California Univ., San Francisco, CA

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years

  10. Clinical evaluation of 3D/3D MRI-CBCT automatching on brain tumors for online patient setup verification - A step towards MRI-based treatment planning

    Buhl, S.K.; Duun-Christensen, Anne Katrine; Kristensen, B.H.

    2010-01-01

    undergoing postoperative radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors received a weekly CBCT. In total 18 scans was matched with both CT and MRI as reference. The CBCT scans were acquired using a Clinac iX 2300 linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems) with an On-Board Imager (OBI). Results. For the phantom...

  11. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  13. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  14. How to use PET/CT in the evaluation of response to radiotherapy.

    Decazes, Pierre; Thureau, Sébastien; Dubray, Bernard; Vera, Pierre

    2017-11-28

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for many cancers. Tumor response after radiotherapy determines the subsequent steps of the patient's management (surveillance, adjuvant or salvage treatment and palliative care). Tumor response assessed during radiotherapy offers a promising opportunity to adapt the treatment plan to reduced / increased target volume, to specifically target sub-volumes with relevant biological characteristics (metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation ...) and to further spare the organs at risk. In addition to its role in the diagnosis and the initial staging, Positron Emission Tomography combined with a Computed Tomography (PET/CT) provides functional information and is therefore attractive to evaluate tumor response. To review the published data addressing PET/CT as an evaluation tool in irradiated tumors. Reports on PET/CT acquired at various times (during radiotherapy, after initial (chemo-)radiotherapy, after definitive radiotherapy and during posttreatment follow-up) in solid tumors (lung, head-and-neck, cervix, esophagus, prostate and rectum) were collected and reviewed. Various tracers and technical are also discussed. 18F-FDG PET/CT has a well-established role in clinical routine after definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancers. 18F-choline PET/CT is indicated in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. 18F-FDG PET/CT is optional in many others circumstances and the clinical benefits of assessing tumor response with PET/CT remain a field of very active research. The combination of PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) may prove to be valuable in irradiated rectal and cervix cancers. Tumor response can be evaluated by PET/CT with clinical consequences in multiple situations, notably in head and neck and prostate cancers, after radiotherapy. Further clinical evaluation for most cancers is still needed, possibly in association to MRI.

  15. TH-F-202-00: MRI for Radiation Therapy

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  16. TH-F-202-01: MRI Basics

    Miller, W.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  17. TH-F-202-00: MRI for Radiation Therapy

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  18. TH-F-202-01: MRI Basics

    Miller, W. [University of Virginia School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  19. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  20. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  1. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. A case of lumbar pain after intraoperative radiotherapy

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Murakami, Koji; Nawano, Shigeru; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ryu, Munemasa; Kawano, Nariaki

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings after intraoperative radiotherapy. A 53-year-old woman with cancer of the papilla of Vater was treated with pancreatoduodenectomy and 20 Gy of intraoperative radiotherapy by electron beam to the tumor bed. Three months later the patient complained of lumbar pain. A change of signal intensity on MRI was detected in the anterior half of the vertebral body within the irradiated field. The signal was of high intensity but was not enhanced by Gd-DTPA on T1-weighted images, was isointense on T2-weighted images and of low intensity with the fat-suppression method. The radiation dose to the lumbar spine and the surrounding soft tissue was calculated to be 16 Gy. Histologic changes in bone after irradiation may include depletion of bone marrow cells and fat degeneration. The MRI findings were compatible with these changes. The radiation dose that can be tolerated by soft tissue is lower than that tolerated by bone. Therefore, late radiation injury of the soft tissue might have been the cause of the patient's lumbar pain. (author)

  3. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy of lymphogranulomatosis

    Roettinger, E.M.; Sack, H.

    1976-01-01

    Increased knowledge about the course of lymphogranulomatosis and technological progress in radiotherapy during the past 20 years have brought permanent recovery for a major part of patients from this disease which had been infaust before. The supplementation of the local radiotherapy by the systematic effects of chemotherapy enables us at the same time to control the infiltrations and disseminations which cannot be manifested clinically especially in malignant forms and later stages. The good healing results obtained presuppose careful clinical examination of the patient and attentive care during the therapy with regard to the potential complications of radio- and chemotherapy. As potential complications which may occur according to the method used we may name damage to the kidneys, radiopneumonia or pulmonal fibrosis, myocarditis or pericarditis, oeosophagitis, enteritis, and hepatitis. Relatively seldom we see the permanent depression of the bone marrow, induction of leucaemia, and myxoedema. All these complications can occure more frequently in the case of additional chemotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  6. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    Padgett, K; Stoyanova, R; Johnson, P; Dogan, N; Pollack, A [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Piper, J; Javorek, A [MIM Software, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    for multi-modality comparisons which are inherently more challenging. Deformable registrations generated in this work significantly outperformed rigid alignments. Research reported in this abstract was supported by the NIH National Cancer Institute R21CA153826 “MRI-Guided Radiotherapy and Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer” and Bankhead-Coley Cancer Research Program 10BT-03 “MRI-Guided Radiotherapy and Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer”.

  7. Anaplastic astrocytoma 14 years after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Tamura, Masaru; Misumi, Syuuzou; Kurosaki, Syuuhei; Shibasaki, Takashi; Ohye, Chihiro

    1992-01-01

    A case of anaplastic astrocytoma following radiotherapy for growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma is presented with a review of the literature. A 43 year old female was admitted with signs of acromegaly and hypertension. An eosinophilic pituitary adenoma was subtotally removed by transsphenoidal approach, followed by 60 Gy irradiation using a 2x2 cm lateral field. Fourteen years later at the age of 57, she suffered from headache, recent-memory disturbance and uncinate fits. CT scan and MRI disclosed ring-like enhanced mass lesion in the left temporal lobe, corresponding to the previous irradiated field. 18 F-FDG PET showed hypermetabolism at the lesion. Left frontotemporal craniotomy was performed, and a reddish gray gelatinous tumor containing necrotic center and cyst was partially removed. Histologically, the tumor consisted of hypercellular astrocytic cells with perivascular pseudorosette. Coagulation necrosis at the center of the tumor, and hyalinosis and fibrosis of the blood vessels in and around the tumor, which might have been caused by the antecedent radiotherapy, were recognized. Postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were given, however, she expired 13 months after the operation. Seven cases, including ours, of malignant glioma following radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma were reported in the literature. A total dose of irradiation varies from 45 to 95 Gy with a mean of 50 Gy. The period of latency before tumor occurrence ranges from 5 to 22 years with a mean of 10 years. The differentiation of radiation-induced gliomas from radionecrosis of the brain is also discussed. (author)

  8. Anaplastic astrocytoma 14 years after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Tamura, Masaru; Misumi, Syuuzou; Kurosaki, Syuuhei; Shibasaki, Takashi; Ohye, Chihiro (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    A case of anaplastic astrocytoma following radiotherapy for growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma is presented with a review of the literature. A 43 year old female was admitted with signs of acromegaly and hypertension. An eosinophilic pituitary adenoma was subtotally removed by transsphenoidal approach, followed by 60 Gy irradiation using a 2x2 cm lateral field. Fourteen years later at the age of 57, she suffered from headache, recent-memory disturbance and uncinate fits. CT scan and MRI disclosed ring-like enhanced mass lesion in the left temporal lobe, corresponding to the previous irradiated field. {sup 18}F-FDG PET showed hypermetabolism at the lesion. Left frontotemporal craniotomy was performed, and a reddish gray gelatinous tumor containing necrotic center and cyst was partially removed. Histologically, the tumor consisted of hypercellular astrocytic cells with perivascular pseudorosette. Coagulation necrosis at the center of the tumor, and hyalinosis and fibrosis of the blood vessels in and around the tumor, which might have been caused by the antecedent radiotherapy, were recognized. Postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were given, however, she expired 13 months after the operation. Seven cases, including ours, of malignant glioma following radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma were reported in the literature. A total dose of irradiation varies from 45 to 95 Gy with a mean of 50 Gy. The period of latency before tumor occurrence ranges from 5 to 22 years with a mean of 10 years. The differentiation of radiation-induced gliomas from radionecrosis of the brain is also discussed. (author).

  9. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Igdem, Sefik; Alco, Guel; Ercan, Tuelay; Barlan, Metin; Ganiyusufoglu, Kuersat; Unalan, Buelent; Turkan, Sedat; Okkan, Sait

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence, predisposing factors, and clinical characteristics of insufficiency fractures (IF) in patients with prostate cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy as part of their definitive treatment. Methods and Materials: The charts of 134 prostate cancer patients, who were treated with pelvic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. IF was diagnosed by bone scan and/or CT and/or MRI. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was estimated by actuarial methods. Results: Eight patients were identified with symptomatic IF after a median follow-up period of 68 months (range, 12-116 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was 6.8%. All patients presented with lower back pain. Insufficiency fracture developed at a median time of 20 months after the end of radiotherapy and was managed conservatively without any need for hospitalization. Three patients were thought to have metastatic disease because of increased uptake in their bone scans. However, subsequent CT and MR imaging revealed characteristic changes of IF, avoiding any further intervention. No predisposing factors for development of IF could be identified. Conclusions: Pelvic IF is a rare complication of pelvic radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Knowledge of pelvic IF is essential to rule out metastatic disease and prevent unnecessary treatment, especially in a patient cohort with high-risk features for distant spread.

  10. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    Dubray, B.; Giraud, P.; Beaudre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  11. Imagination in radiotherapy

    Pourrez, A.; Truc, G.; Santona, M.; Crehange, G.; Peignaux, K.; Martin, E.; Maingon, P.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a questionnaire given to the patients of a radiotherapy department and to the personnel of a centre of struggle against cancer, the study aimed at revealing imagination and representations about such an advanced medical technology, radio-physics and radioactivity. The patients and personnel were asked to answer the questionnaire with free words, images, or by expressing their own intimate or cultural visions of this environment. Implications on patients' anguish are foreseen. Short communication

  12. The pioneer of radiotherapy

    Camilleri, J.P.; Coursaget, J.

    2005-09-01

    This work narrates the history of the birth of a new field, the radiology and its application to radiotherapy for these multiform pathologies that are the cancers. Two leading figures will favour this field: Marie Curie, physicist and twice awarded by nobel price, and Claudius Regaud, histologist and become a specialist of the action of ionizing radiations on tissues. They will create the Curie Institute, in relation with the Radium Institute and the support of the Pasteur Institute in 1920. (N.C.)

  13. Quality control in radiotherapy

    Batalla, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the modalities and periodicities of internal quality control on radiotherapy installations. They indicate the different concerned systems and the aspects and items to be controlled (patient and personnel security, apparatus mechanical characteristics, beam quality, image quality, isodose and irradiation duration calculation, data transfer). They present the measurement instruments and tools used for the mechanical controls, dose measurement, beam homogeneity and symmetry, anatomic data acquisition systems, and dose distribution and control imagery calculation

  14. Radiotherapy of endocrine orbitopathy

    Weischedel, U.; Wieland, C.

    1985-01-01

    After a review of the history and a discussion of recent theories about pathogenesis of endocrine ophthalmopathy the authros give a report on their radiotherapeutical treatment results with cobalt-60-γ-rays in 50 patients. Amelioration was achieved in 50% of the cases, in the other 50% no progression was seen. Radiotherapy is of antiphlogistic and functional effectivity and should be integrated in the treatment regime in early stages. (orig.) [de

  15. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  16. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  18. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  19. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    Luke Nicholls

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT. Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report: A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion: The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN.

  20. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  1. Concurrent whole brain radiotherapy and bortezomib for brain metastasis

    Lao, Christopher D; Hamstra, Daniel; Lawrence, Theodore; Hayman, James; Redman, Bruce G; Friedman, Judah; Tsien, Christina I; Normolle, Daniel P; Chapman, Christopher; Cao, Yue; Lee, Oliver; Schipper, Matt; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Survival of patients with brain metastasis particularly from historically more radio-resistant malignancies remains dismal. A phase I study of concurrent bortezomib and whole brain radiotherapy was conducted to determine the tolerance and safety of this approach in patients with previously untreated brain metastasis. A phase I dose escalation study evaluated the safety of bortezomib (0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 mg/m 2 ) given on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of whole brain radiotherapy. Patients with confirmed brain metastasis were recruited for participation. The primary endpoint was the dose-limiting toxicity, defined as any ≥ grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity or grade ≥ 4 hematologic toxicity from the start of treatment to one month post irradiation. Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method (TITE-CRM) was used to determine dose escalation. A companion study of brain diffusion tensor imaging MRI was conducted on a subset of patients to assess changes in the brain that might predict delayed cognitive effects. Twenty-four patients were recruited and completed the planned therapy. Patients with melanoma accounted for 83% of all participants. The bortezomib dose was escalated as planned to the highest dose of 1.7 mg/m 2 /dose. No grade 4/5 toxicities related to treatment were observed. Two patients had grade 3 dose-limiting toxicities (hyponatremia and encephalopathy). A partial or minor response was observed in 38% of patients. Bortezomib showed greater demyelination in hippocampus-associated white matter structures on MRI one month after radiotherapy compared to patients not treated with bortezomib (increase in radial diffusivity +16.8% versus 4.8%; p = 0.0023). Concurrent bortezomib and whole brain irradiation for brain metastasis is well tolerated at one month follow-up, but MRI changes that have been shown to predict delayed cognitive function can be detected within one month of treatment

  2. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    Sun, Jidi; Menk, Fred; Lambert, Jonathan; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W; Greer, Peter B; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David; Pichler, Peter; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah

    2015-01-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation.A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities.Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs.The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT. (paper)

  3. Potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Reinhold [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiology, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Geworski, Lilli [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department for Radiation Safety and Medical Physics, Hannover (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Department for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV{sub CT/MRI} was 22({+-}19)cm{sup 3}; GTV{sub PET} was 23({+-}20)cm{sup 3}. Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9({+-}10)cm{sup 3} and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7({+-}11)cm{sup 3}). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15({+-}14)cm{sup 3}. The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV{sub CT/MRI} and GTV{sub PET} accounted to 16({+-}15)cm{sup 3} (93%, p < 0.001). In a subgroup of seven patients with multiple meningiomas, PET showed a total of 19 lesions; nine of them were not recognizable by CT or MRI. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration

  4. MRI in evaluation of perianal fistulae

    Sofic, Amela; Beslic, Serif; Sehovic, Nedzad; Caluk, Jasmin; Sofic, Damir

    2010-01-01

    Fistula is considered to be any abnormal passage which connects two epithelial surfaces. Parks’ fistulae classification demonstrates the biggest practical significance and divides fistulae into: intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric and extrasphincteric. Etiology of perianal fistulae is most commonly linked with the inflammation of anal glands in Crohn’s disease, tuberculosis, pelvic infections, pelvic malignant tumours, and with the radiotherapy. Diagnostic method options are: RTG fistulography, CT fistulography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pelvic organs. We have included 24 patients with perirectal fistulae in the prospective study. X-rays fistulography, CT fistulography, and then MRI of the pelvic cavity have been performed on all patients. Accuracy of each procedure in regards to the patients and the etiologic cause have been statistically determined. 29.16% of transphincteric fistulae have been found, followed by 25% of intersphincteric, 25% of recto-vaginal, 12.5% of extrasphincteric, and 8.33% of suprasphincteric. Abscess collections have been found in 16.6% patients. The most frequent etiologic cause of perianal fistulae was Crohn’s disease in 37.5%, where the accuracy of classification of MRI was 100%, CT was 11% and X-rays 0%. Ulcerous colitis was the second cause, with 20.9% where the accuracy of MRI was 100%, while CT was 80% and X-rays was 0%. All other etiologic causes of fistulae were found in 41.6% patients. MRI is a reliable diagnostic modality in the classification of perirectal fistulae and can be an excellent diagnostic guide for successful surgical interventions with the aim to reduce the number of recurrences. Its advantage is that fistulae and abscess are visible without the need to apply any contrast medium

  5. Physical properties of charged particle beams for use in radiotherapy

    Knapp, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physical properties of the possible charged particle beams used for cancer radiotherapy are reviewed. Each property is discussed for all interesting particles (π, p, α, Ne ion) and the differences are emphasized. This is followed by a short discussion of the several beam delivery systems used in particle therapy today, emphasizing the differences in the problems for the several different radiations, particularly the differences between the accelerated particle beams and those of a secondary nature. Dose calculation techniques are described

  6. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  7. Cerebral function estimation using electro-encephalography for the patients with brain tumor managed by radiotherapy

    Mariya, Yasushi; Saito, Fumio; Kimura, Tamaki

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral function of 12 patients accompanied with brain tumor, managed by radiotherapy, were serially estimated using electroencephalography (EEG), and the results were compared with tumor responses, analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical courses. After radiotherapy, EEG findings were improved in 7 patients, unchanged in 3, and worsened in 1. Clinical courses were generally correlated with serial changes in EEG findings and tumor responses. However, in 3 patients, clinical courses were explained better with EEG findings than tumor responses. It is suggested that the combination of EEG and image analysis is clinically useful for comprehensive estimation of radiotherapeutic effects. (author)

  8. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  9. Radiotherapy and pulmonary fibrosis

    Sone, S; Miyata, Y; Tachiiri, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Clinical findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were outlined, and the relationship between occurence of these disorders and radiotherapy, clinical findings and X-ray picture were studied. Standard radiation dose as cell lethal response of carcinoma of the lung were 4,500 to 5,500 rad in 4 to 5.5 weeks in undifferentiated carcinoma, 6,000 to 7,000 rad in 6 to 7 weeks in squamous cell carcinoma, 7,000 to 9,000 rad in 7 to 9 weeks in adenocarcinoma, 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4 to 5 weeks in the large sized cancer of the esophagus, 6,500 to 7,000 rad in 5 to 7 weeks in the small sized cancer of the esophagus, and irradiation of these amount of dose caused hazards in pulmonary function. Pathological and clinical findings of pulmonary hazards within 6 month period after irradiation, factors causing them and changes in X-ray pictures before and after irradiation were observed and discussed in clinical cases: the case of breast cancer in which 3,000 R/6 times/18 days of 5.5 MeV Liniac electron was irradiated to the chest wall, and the case of pulmonary cancer in which 5,000 rad/25 times/34 days of 6 MeV Liniac X-ray was irradiated in opposite 2 ports radiation beam treatment. The former revealed alveolar lesion and interlobular pleuritis at 4 month later, and remarkable lesion of pulmonary fibrosis was followed at 9 month after radiotherapy. The later developed radiation pneumonitis 1 month after radiotherapy, of which lesion extended to the upper part by 3 months later, and cancer recurred 6.5 month later.

  10. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Saika, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  11. Simulation of ferric ions transfer in dosemeter Fricke-Xylenol-Gel in means no homogeneous

    Milani, Caio J.; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva; Cavinato, Christianne C.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Campos, Leticia L.

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetry in three dimensions using Fricke-Xilenol-Gel dosimeters (FXG) allows the confirmation and a better understanding of a treatment by Radiotherapy. The technique involves the assessment of the irradiated volumes by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or optical-CT. On both cases, the time elapsed between the irradiation and the measurement is an important factor in the quality of results. The quality of the images can be compromised by the mobility of the ferric ions (Fe 3+ ), formed during the the interaction of the radiation with the matter, increasing the uncertainty in the determination of the isodoses in the volume. In this work, the phenomenon of the diffusion of the ferric ions formed by an irradiated region is simulated in a bidimensional domain. The dynamic of the Fe 3+ in Fricke-Gel is modeled by a parabolic partial differential equation and solved by the ADI-Peaceman-Rachford algorithm. Stability and consistency of the method guarantee the convergence of the numerical solution for a pre-defined error magnitude, based on choices for the discretization values of time and space. Homogeneous and non-homogeneous cases are presented considering an irradiated region and a physical barrier that prevents the movement of the ions, on the non-homogeneous case. Graphical visualizations of the phenomenon are presented for better understanding of the process. (author)

  12. Dosimetry using radiosensitive gels in radiotherapy: significance and methods

    Gibon, D.; Bourel, P.; Castelain, B.; Marchandise, X.; Rousseau, J.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to concentrate the dose in a well-defined volume by avoiding the neighbouring healthy structures. This technique requires powerful treatment planning software and a rigorous control of estimated dosimetry. The usual dosimetric tools are not adapted to visualize and validate complex 3D treatment. Dosimetry by radiosensitive gel permits visualization and measurement of the three-dimensional dose distribution. The objective of this work is to report on current work in this field and, based on our results and our experience, to draw prospects for an optimal use of this technique. Further developments will relate to the realization of new radiosensitive gels satisfying, as well as possible, cost requirements, easy realization and use, magnetic resonance imagery (MRI) sensitivity, tissue equivalence, and stability. Other developments focus on scanning methods, especially in MRI to measure T1 and T2. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  14. Large field radiotherapy

    Vanasek, J.; Chvojka, Z.; Zouhar, M.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations may prove that irradiation procedures, commonly used in radiotherapy and represented by large-capacity irradiation techniques, do not exceed certain limits of integral doses with favourable radiobiological action on the organism. On the other hand integral doses in supralethal whole-body irradiation, used in the therapy of acute leukemia, represent radiobiological values which without extreme and exceptional further interventions and teamwork are not compatible with life, and the radiotherapeutist cannot use such high doses without the backing of a large team. (author)

  15. Microplanar beams for radiotherapy

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit the investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which replaces the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. In this study using the Monte Carlo method, the lateral and depth dose of a single planar microbeam of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom is investigated. Poster 195. (author)

  16. Prospective evaluation of early treatment outcome in patients with meningiomas treated with particle therapy based on target volume definition with MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Habermehl, Daniel; Rieken, Stefan; Dittmar, Jan-Oliver; Kessel, Kerstin; Debus, Juergen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate early treatment results and toxicity in patients with meningiomas treated with particle therapy. Material and methods: Seventy patients with meningiomas were treated with protons (n = 38) or carbon ion radiotherapy (n = 26). Median age was 49 years. Median age at treatment was 55 years, 24 were male (34%), and 46 were female (66%). Histology was benign meningioma in 26 patients (37%), atypical in 23 patients (33%) and anaplastic in four patients (6%). In 17 patients (24%) with skull base meningiomas diagnosis was based on the typical appearance of a meningioma. For benign meningiomas, total doses of 52.2-57.6 GyE were applied with protons. For high-grade lesions, the boost volume was 18 GyE carbon ions, with a median dose of 50 GyE applied as highly conformal radiation therapy. Nineteen patients were treated as re-irradiation. Treatment planning with MRI and 68-Ga-DOTATOC-PET was evaluated. Results: Very low rates of side effects developed, including headaches, nausea and dizziness. No severe treatment-related toxicity was observed. Local control for benign meningiomas was 100%. Five of 27 patients (19%) developed tumor recurrence during follow-up. Of these, four patients had been treated as re-irradiation for recurrent high-risk meningiomas. Actuarial local control after re-irradiation of high-risk meningiomas was therefore 67% at six and 12 months. In patients treated with primary radiotherapy, only one of 13 patients (8%) developed tumor recurrence 17 months after radiation therapy (photon and carbon ion boost). Conclusion: Continuous prospective follow-up and development of novel study concepts are required to fully exploit the long-term clinical data after particle therapy for meningiomas. To date, it may be concluded that when proton therapy is available, meningioma patients can be offered a treatment at least comparable to high-end photon therapy.

  17. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children; Role de la radiotherapie dans le traitement des rhabdomyosarcomes de la tete et du cou chez l'enfant

    Nouni, K.; Kebdani, T.; Hassouni, K.; Benjaafer, N.; Elgueddari, B. [Institut national d' oncologie, Rabat (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of clinic results obtained for the radiotherapy of head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children. The study is based on a sample of 22 children. The authors report epidemiologic, clinic, and above all therapeutic and evolutional aspects: age, symptoms, radiological examination (scanography, MRI), tumour location, histological characterization, chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic treatment, local relapses, pulmonary and hepatic metastases, survival. Short communication

  18. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  19. Inverse treatment planning based on MRI for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Citrin, Deborah; Ning, Holly; Guion, Peter; Li Guang; Susil, Robert C.; Miller, Robert W.; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Xie Huchen; Capala, Jacek; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Menard, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize a technique for inverse treatment planning based solely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Phantom studies were performed to verify the spatial integrity of treatment planning based on MRI. Data were evaluated from 10 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who had undergone two high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy boosts under MRI guidance before and after pelvic radiotherapy. Treatment planning MRI scans were systematically evaluated to derive a class solution for inverse planning constraints that would reproducibly result in acceptable target and normal tissue dosimetry. Results: We verified the spatial integrity of MRI for treatment planning. MRI anatomic evaluation revealed no significant displacement of the prostate in the left lateral decubitus position, a mean distance of 14.47 mm from the prostatic apex to the penile bulb, and clear demarcation of the neurovascular bundles on postcontrast imaging. Derivation of a class solution for inverse planning constraints resulted in a mean target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose of 95.69%, while maintaining a rectal volume receiving 75% of the prescribed dose of <5% (mean 1.36%) and urethral volume receiving 125% of the prescribed dose of <2% (mean 0.54%). Conclusion: Systematic evaluation of image spatial integrity, delineation uncertainty, and inverse planning constraints in our procedure reduced uncertainty in planning and treatment

  20. Intra-operative 3-T MRI for paediatric brain tumours: challenges and perspectives

    Abernethy, L.J.; Avula, S.; Hughes, G.M.; Wright, E.J.; Mallucci, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    MRI is the ideal modality for imaging intracranial tumours. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) makes it possible to obtain scans during a neurosurgical operation that can aid complete macroscopic tumour resection - a major prognostic factor in the majority of brain tumours in children. Intra-operative MRI can also help limit damage to normal brain tissue. It therefore has the potential to improve the survival of children with brain tumours and to minimise morbidity, including neurological deficits. The use of ioMRI is also likely to reduce the need for second look surgery, and may reduce the need for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High-field MRI systems provide better anatomical information and also enable effective utilisation of advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, high-field ioMRI facilities require substantial capital investment, and careful planning is required for optimal benefit. Safe ioMRI requires meticulous attention to detail and rigorous application of magnetic field safety precautions. Interpretation of ioMRI can be challenging and requires experience and understanding of artefacts that are common in the intra-operative setting. (orig.)

  1. Visibility of an iron-containing fiducial marker in magnetic resonance imaging for high-precision external beam prostate radiotherapy.

    Tanaka, Osamu; Komeda, Hisao; Hirose, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Takuya; Ono, Kousei; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2017-11-29

    Visualization of fiducial gold markers is critical for registration on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for imaging-guided radiotherapy. Although larger markers provide better visualization on MRI, they tend to generate artifacts on CT. MRI is strongly influenced by the presence of metals, such as iron, in the body. Here we compared efficacies of a 0.5% iron-containing gold marker (GM) and a traditional non-iron-containing marker. Twenty-seven patients underwent CT/MRI fusion-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Markers were placed by urologists under local anesthesia. Gold Anchor (GA; diameter: 0.28 mm; length: 10 mm), an iron-containing marker, was placed on the right side of the prostate using a 22-G needle and VISICOIL (VIS; diameter: 0.35 mm; length: 10 mm), a non-iron-containing marker, was placed on the left side using a 19-G needle. T2*-weighted images MRI sequences were obtained. Two radiation oncologists and a radiation technologist evaluated and assigned scores for visual quality on a five-point scale (1, poor; 5, best visibility). Artifact generation on CT was slightly greater with GA than with VIS. The mean marker visualization scores on MRI of all three observers were significantly superior for GA than for VIS (3.5 vs 3.2, 3.9 vs 3.2, and 4.0 vs 2.9). The actual size of the spherical GA was about 2 mm in diameter, but the signal void on MRI was approximately 5 mm. Although both markers were well visualized and can be recommended clinically, the results suggest that GA has some subtle advantages for quantitative visualization that could prove useful in certain situations of stereotactic body radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Physics aspects of recent and future concepts in radiotherapy

    Georg, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The development of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), in which the high dose volume matches as closely as possible the target volume and avoids therefore normal tissue irradiation as far as possible, has been a major theme in radiotherapy for improving the therapeutic window. Conformal radiotherapy is not a new concept but only the technological improvements of the last decade allow its clinical implementation. More recent and advanced forms of 3D-CRT are intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). IMRT uses an additional degree of freedom to achieve a new class of conformation: the variation of the primary beam intensity. SRT is based on a three dimensional stereotactic coordinate system which is correlated with the patient and the treatment facility through modern imaging technology. IMRT and SRT are related by common features, e.g. high dose gradients and small fields which require a high geometric precision. A high dosimetric and geometric precision can only be based on a detailed knowledge of the patient specific anatomy. Therefore, IMRT and SRT need to underlie multi-modality imaging studies. Both IMRT and SRT utilize photon beams and multiple field arrangements which increase the volumes of healthy tissue receiving low doses. Photons have a low selectivity along the beam direction implying that the sharp dose gradients are to be compromised. The increased low dose volume as well as the low selectivity of photon beams can be over-come by using proton or ions. Brachytherapy, a form of radiotherapy where encapsuled radioactive sources are placed directly in or in the vicinity of the tumor, is by definition conformal. Endovascular brachytherapy has become a promising new field in radiotherapy for the prevention of (re)stenosis after angioplasty. Although many clinical trials have been performed during the last years specific aspects related to endovascular brachytherapy have not been addressed clearly, such as the

  3. Modeling the Risk of Secondary Malignancies after Radiotherapy

    Uwe Schneider

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, more than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy at some stage in the management of their disease. However, a radiation-induced secondary malignancy can be the price of success if the primary cancer is cured or at least controlled. Therefore, there is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. Of particular interest are second cancer risk estimates for new radiation treatment modalities such as intensity modulated radiotherapy, intensity modulated arc-therapy, proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The long term risks from such modern radiotherapy treatment techniques have not yet been determined and are unlikely to become apparent for many years, due to the long latency time for solid tumor induction. Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors who were exposed to γ-rays and neutrons. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. With increasing cure rates, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this review, emphasis was placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Simple radiation protection models should be used only with extreme care for risk estimates in radiotherapy, since they are developed exclusively for low dose. When applied to scatter radiation, such models can predict only a fraction of observed second malignancies. Better semi-empirical models include the effect of dose fractionation and represent the dose-response relationships more accurately. The involved uncertainties are still huge for most of the organs and tissues. A major reason for

  4. Status of ion sources at HIMAC

    Kitagawa, A.