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Sample records for ion mobility separations

  1. Method and device for ion mobility separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-07-11

    Methods and devices for ion separations or manipulations in gas phase are disclosed. The device includes a single non-planar surface. Arrays of electrodes are coupled to the surface. A combination of RF and DC voltages are applied to the arrays of electrodes to create confining and driving fields that move ions through the device. The DC voltages are static DC voltages or time-dependent DC potentials or waveforms.

  2. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  3. Blind Source Separation For Ion Mobility Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, S.; Pomareda, V.; Pardo, A.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturization is a powerful trend for smart chemical instrumentation in a diversity of applications. It is know that miniaturization in IMS leads to a degradation of the system characteristics. For the present work, we are interested in signal processing solutions to mitigate limitations introduced by limited drift tube length that basically involve a loss of chemical selectivity. While blind source separation techniques (BSS) are popular in other domains, their application for smart chemical instrumentation is limited. However, in some conditions, basically linearity, BSS may fully recover the concentration time evolution and the pure spectra with few underlying hypothesis. This is extremely helpful in conditions where non-expected chemical interferents may appear, or unwanted perturbations may pollute the spectra. SIMPLISMA has been advocated by Harrington et al. in several papers. However, more modern methods of BSS for bilinear decomposition with the restriction of positiveness have appeared in the last decade. In order to explore and compare the performances of those methods a series of experiments were performed.

  4. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-11-02

    In this work, we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas phase ion population manipulation, and demonstrate its application for the collapse of the ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventionally traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or ‘stuttered’. This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved S/N ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multi-pass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening due to increasing peak widths.

  5. Using different drift gases to change separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury; Hill

    2000-02-01

    The use of different drift gases to alter separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry has been demonstrated. The mobility of a series of low molecular weight compounds and three small peptides was determined in four different drift gases. The drift gases chosen were helium, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. These drift gases provide a range of polarizabilities and molecular weights. In all instances, the compounds showed the greatest mobility in helium and the lowest mobility in carbon dioxide; however the percentage change of mobility for each compound was different, effectively changing the alpha value. The alpha value changes were primarily due to differences in drift gas polarizability but were also influenced by the mass of the drift gas. In addition, gas-phase ion radii were calculated in each of the different drift gases. These radii were then plotted against drift gas polarizability producing linear plots with r2 values greater than 0.99. The intercept of these plots provides the gas-phase radius of an ion in a nonpolarizing environment, whereas the slope is indicative of the magnitude of the ion's mobility change related to polarizability. It therefore, should be possible to separate any two compounds that have different slopes with the appropriate drift gas.

  6. Ion Mobility Separations of Isomers based upon Long Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Aly, Noor A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Hamid, Ahmed M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zhang, Xing [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Garimella, Sandilya V. B. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Webb, Ian K. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Prost, Spencer A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Sandoval, Jeremy A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Norheim, Randolph V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Anderson, Gordon A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Tolmachev, Aleksey V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based multi-omic measurements, including proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics, are increasingly transforming our ability to characterize and understand biological systems, but, presently have limitations due to the chemical diversity and range of abundances of biomolecules in complex samples. Advances addressing these challenges increasingly are based upon the ability to quickly separate, react and otherwise manipulate sample components for analysis by MS. Here we report on a new approach using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) to enable long serpentine path ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations followed by MS analyses. This approach provides previously unachieved mobility biomolecule isomer separations for biomolecular species, in conjunction with more effective ion utilization, and producing a basis for the improved characterization of very small samples.

  7. Isomer Information from Ion Mobility Separation of High-Mannose Glycan Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J; Seabright, Gemma E; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B

    2018-05-01

    Extracted arrival time distributions of negative ion CID-derived fragments produced prior to traveling-wave ion mobility separation were evaluated for their ability to provide structural information on N-linked glycans. Fragmentation of high-mannose glycans released from several glycoproteins, including those from viral sources, provided over 50 fragments, many of which gave unique collisional cross-sections and provided additional information used to assign structural isomers. For example, cross-ring fragments arising from cleavage of the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue on Man 8 GlcNAc 2 isomers have unique collision cross-sections enabling isomers to be differentiated in mixtures. Specific fragment collision cross-sections enabled identification of glycans, the antennae of which terminated in the antigenic α-galactose residue, and ions defining the composition of the 6-antenna of several of the glycans were also found to have different cross-sections from isomeric ions produced in the same spectra. Potential mechanisms for the formation of the various ions are discussed and the estimated collisional cross-sections are tabulated. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2003-06-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations.

  9. Separation of different ion structures in atmospheric pressure photoionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (APPI-IMS-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakia, Jaakko; Adamov, Alexey; Jussila, Matti; Pedersen, Christian S; Sysoev, Alexey A; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2010-09-01

    This study demonstrates how positive ion atmospheric pressure photoionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (APPI-IMS-MS) can be used to produce different ionic forms of an analyte and how these can be separated. When hexane:toluene (9:1) is used as a solvent, 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine (2,6-DtBPyr) and 2,6-di-tert-4-methylpyridine (2,6-DtB-4-MPyr) efficiently produce radical cations [M](+*) and protonated [M + H](+) molecules, whereas, when the sample solvent is hexane, protonated molecules are mainly formed. Interestingly, radical cations drift slower in the drift tube than the protonated molecules. It was observed that an oxygen adduct ion, [M + O(2)](+*), which was clearly seen in the mass spectra for hexane:toluene (9:1) solutions, shares the same mobility with radical cations, [M](+*). Therefore, the observed mobility order is most likely explained by oxygen adduct formation, i.e., the radical cation forming a heavier adduct. For pyridine and 2-tert-butylpyridine, only protonated molecules could be efficiently formed in the conditions used. For 1- and 2-naphthol it was observed that in hexane the protonated molecule typically had a higher intensity than the radical cation, whereas in hexane:toluene (9:1) the radical cation [M](+*) typically had a higher intensity than the protonated molecule [M + H](+). Interestingly, the latter drifts slower than the radical cation [M](+*), which is the opposite of the drift pattern seen for 2,6-DtBPyr and 2,6-DtB-4-MPyr. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Separation and characterization of metallosupramolecular libraries by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Chan, Yi-Tsu; Casiano-Maldonado, Madalis; Yu, Jing; Carri, Gustavo A; Newkome, George R; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2011-09-01

    The self-assembly of Zn(II) ions and bis(terpyridine) (tpy) ligands carrying 120° or 180° angles between their metal binding sites was utilized to prepare metallosupramolecular libraries with the connectivity. These combinatorial libraries were separated and characterized by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)). The 180°-angle building blocks generate exclusively linear complexes, which were used as standards to determine the architectures of the assemblies resulting from the 120°-angle ligands. The latter ligand geometry promotes the formation of macrocyclic hexamers, but other n-mers with smaller (n = 5) or larger ring sizes (n = 7-9) were identified as minor products, indicating that the angles in the bis(terpyridine) ligand and within the coordinative tpy-Zn(II)-tpy bonds are not as rigid, as previously believed. Macrocyclic and linear isomers were detected in penta- and heptameric assemblies; in the larger octa- and nonameric assemblies, ring-opened conformers with compact and folded geometries were observed in addition to linear extended and cyclic architectures. IM MS(2) experiments provided strong evidence that the macrocycles present in the libraries were already formed in solution, during the self-assembly process, not by dissociation of larger complexes in the gas phase. The IM MS/MS(2) methods provide a means to analyze, based on size and shape (architecture), supramolecular libraries that are not amenable to liquid chromatography, LC-MS, NMR, and/or X-ray techniques.

  11. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. Though IMS alone is useful, its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations is extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information available from biological and environmental sample analyses. In fact, multiple disease screening and environmental evaluations have illustrated that the IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information that cannot be acquired with each technique individually. This review highlights three-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, liquid chromatography, solid-phase extractions, capillary electrophoresis, field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry, and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities of these multidimensional approaches are described in detail to provide insight into their uses and benefits. PMID:28301728

  12. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.

    2017-06-12

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. IMS alone is useful, but its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations has been extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information in biological and environmental sample analyses. Multiple studies in disease screening and environmental evaluations have even shown these IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information not possible with each technique individually. This review highlights 3-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), liquid chromatography (LC), solid phase extractions (SPE), capillary electrophoresis (CE), field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities for these multidimensional approaches are described to provide insight into the utility and potential of each technique.

  13. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  14. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  15. Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Separations Utilizing Traveling Waves in a 13 m Serpentine Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Zheng, Xueyun; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-20

    We report the development and initial evaluation of a 13-m path length Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) module for achieving high resolution separations using traveling waves (TW) with ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. The TW SLIM module was fabricated using two mirror-image printed circuit boards with appropriately configured RF, DC and TW electrodes and positioned with a 2.75-mm inter-surface gap. Ions were effective confined between the surfaces by RF-generated pseudopotential fields and moved losslessly through a serpentine path including 44 “U” turns using TWs. The ion mobility resolution was characterized at different pressures, gaps between the SLIM surfaces, TW and RF parameters. After initial optimization the SLIM IM-MS module provided about 5-fold higher resolution separations than present commercially available drift tube or traveling wave IM-MS platforms. Peak capacity and peak generation rates achieved were 246 and 370 s-1, respectively, at a TW speed of 148 m/s. The high resolution achieved in the TW SLIM IM-MS enabled e.g., isomeric sugars (Lacto-N-fucopentaose I and Lacto-N-fucopentaose II) to be baseline resolved, and peptides from a albumin tryptic digest much better resolved than with existing commercial IM-MS platforms. The present work also provides a foundation for the development of much higher resolution SLIM devices based upon both considerably longer path lengths and multi-pass designs.

  16. Enhancement of biological mass spectrometry by using separations based on changes in ion mobility (FAIMS and DMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Randy W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of complex biological samples for low-level analytes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) often requires additional selectivity. Differential mobility techniques (FAIMS and DMS) have been shown to enhance LC-MS/MS analyses by separating ions in the gas-phase on a millisecond timescale by use of a mechanism that is complementary to both liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this overview, a simplified description of the operation of these devices is given and an example presented that illustrates the utility of FAIMS (DMS) for solving a challenging analytical assay. Important recent advances in the field, including work with gas modifiers, are presented, along with an outlook for the technology.

  17. Ion mobility sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  18. Linear and Differential Ion Mobility Separations of Middle-Down Proteoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garabedian, Alyssa; Baird, Matthew A; Porter, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    . Separations using traveling-wave (TWIMS) and/or involving various time scales and electrospray ionization source conditions are similar (with lower resolution for TWIMS), showing the transferability of results across linear IMS instruments. The linear IMS and FAIMS dimensions are substantially orthogonal...

  19. A four dimensional separation method based on continuous heart-cutting gas chromatography with ion mobility and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipok, Christian; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2018-02-09

    A two-dimensional GC (2D-GC) method was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometer, which enables the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-GC, ion mobilility spectrometry and mass spectrometry). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting GC-system (GC+GC), using a long modulation time of 20s, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first dimension peaks to the second dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Calendula officinales shows the separation power of this four dimensional separation method. The introduction of ion mobility spectrometry provides an additional separation dimension and allows to determine collision cross sections (CCS) of the analytes as a further physicochemical constant supporting the identification. A CCS database with more than 800 standard substances including drug-like compounds and pesticides was used for CCS data base search in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  1. Comprehensive lipidomic analysis of human plasma using multidimensional liquid- and gas-phase separations: Two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry vs. liquid chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglai, Anna; Gargano, Andrea F G; Jordens, Jan; Mengerink, Ynze; Honing, Maarten; van der Wal, Sjoerd; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-12-29

    Recent advancements in separation science have resulted in the commercialization of multidimensional separation systems that provide higher peak capacities and, hence, enable a more-detailed characterization of complex mixtures. In particular, two powerful analytical tools are increasingly used by analytical scientists, namely online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC, having a second-dimension separation in the liquid phase) and liquid chromatography-ion mobility-spectrometry (LC-IMS, second dimension separation in the gas phase). The goal of the current study was a general assessment of the liquid-chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry (LC-TIMS-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC×LC-MS) platforms for untargeted lipid mapping in human plasma. For the first time trapped-ion-mobility spectrometry (TIMS) was employed for the separation of the major lipid classes and ion-mobility-derived collision-cross-section values were determined for a number of lipid standards. The general effects of a number of influencing parameters have been inspected and possible directions for improvements are discussed. We aimed to provide a general indication and practical guidelines for the analyst to choose an efficient multidimensional separation platform according to the particular requirements of the application. Analysis time, orthogonality, peak capacity, and an indicative measure for the resolving power are discussed as main characteristics for multidimensional separation systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ions mobilities in corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtaev, Sh. A.; Bochkareva, G. V.; Sydykova, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Ion mobility in unipolar corona at small inter-electron distances (up to 0.01 m) when as coroning element serves micro-wire is consider. Experimental data of ion mobility in corona discharge external zone in atmospheric air are obtained and its comparative analysis with known data is worked out. (author)

  3. Material review of Li ion battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christoph J.; Geiger, Sigrid; Falusi, Sandra; Roth, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Separators for Li Ion batteries have a strong impact on cell production, cell performance, life, as well as reliability and safety. The separator market volume is about 500 million m2 mainly based on consumer applications. It is expected to grow strongly over the next decade for mobile and stationary applications using large cells. At present, the market is essentially served by polyolefine membranes. Such membranes have some technological limitations, such as wettability, porosity, penetration resistance, shrinkage and meltdown. The development of a cell failure due to internal short circuit is potentially closely related to separator material properties. Consequently, advanced separators became an intense area of worldwide research and development activity in academia and industry. New separator technologies are being developed especially to address safety and reliability related property improvements.

  4. Material review of Li ion battery separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christoph J., E-mail: Christoph.Weber@freudenberg-nw.com; Geiger, Sigrid, E-mail: Christoph.Weber@freudenberg-nw.com [Freudenberg Vliesstoffe SE and Co KG, 69465 Weinheim (Germany); Falusi, Sandra; Roth, Michael [Freudenberg Forschungsdienste SE and Co KG, 69465 Weinheim (Germany)

    2014-06-16

    Separators for Li Ion batteries have a strong impact on cell production, cell performance, life, as well as reliability and safety. The separator market volume is about 500 million m{sup 2} mainly based on consumer applications. It is expected to grow strongly over the next decade for mobile and stationary applications using large cells. At present, the market is essentially served by polyolefine membranes. Such membranes have some technological limitations, such as wettability, porosity, penetration resistance, shrinkage and meltdown. The development of a cell failure due to internal short circuit is potentially closely related to separator material properties. Consequently, advanced separators became an intense area of worldwide research and development activity in academia and industry. New separator technologies are being developed especially to address safety and reliability related property improvements.

  5. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  6. Isotope separation by ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  7. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  8. Laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation reveals metabolites in the symbiotic interactions of soybean roots and rhizobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Agtuca, Beverly J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary; Vertes, Akos; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-05-23

    Technologies enabling in situ metabolic profiling of living plant systems are invaluable for understanding physiological processes and could be used for rapid phenotypic screening (e.g., to produce plants with superior biological nitrogen fixing ability). The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria results in a specialized plant organ (i.e., root nodule), where the exchange of nutrients between host and endosymbiont occurs. Laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) is a method that can be performed under ambient conditions requiring minimal sample preparation. Here, we employed LAESI-MS to explore the well-characterized symbiosis between soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and its compatible symbiont, Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The utilization of ion mobility separation (IMS) improved the molecular coverage, selectivity, and identification of the detected biomolecules. Specifically, incorporation of IMS resulted in an increase of 153 detected metabolites in the nodule samples. The data presented demonstrates the advantages of using LAESI-IMS-MS for the rapid analysis of intact root nodules, uninfected root segments, and free-living rhizobia. Untargeted pathway analysis revealed several metabolic processes within the nodule (e.g., zeatin, riboflavin, and purine synthesis). Compounds specific to the uninfected root and bacteria were also detected. Lastly, we performed depth-profiling of intact nodules to reveal the location of metabolites to the cortex and inside the infected region, and lateral profiling of sectioned nodules confirmed these molecular distributions. Our results established the feasibility of LAESI-IMS-MS for the analysis and spatial mapping of plant tissues, with its specific demonstration to improve our understanding of the soybean-rhizobial symbiosis.

  9. Maximizing Ion Transmission in Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Londry, Frank; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Kang, Yang; Covey, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    We provide modeling and experimental data describing the dominant ion-loss mechanisms for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Ion motion is considered from the inlet region of the mobility analyzer to the DMS exit, and losses resulting from diffusion to electrode surfaces, insufficient effective gap, ion fragmentation, and fringing field effects are considered for a commercial DMS system with 1-mm gap height. It is shown that losses due to diffusion and radial oscillations can be minimized with careful consideration of residence time, electrode spacing, gas flow rate, and waveform frequency. Fragmentation effects can be minimized by limitation of the separation field. When these parameters were optimized, fringing field effects at the DMS inlet contributed the most to signal reduction. We also describe a new DMS cell configuration that improves the gas dynamics at the mobility cell inlet. The new cell provides a gas jet that decreases the residence time for ions within the fringing field region, resulting in at least twofold increase in ion signal as determined by experimental data and simulations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Mothers' Mobility after Separation : Do Grandmothers Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Marjolijn; de Valk, Helga; Merz, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Starting from a life course perspective, this study aims to gain more insight into mobility patterns of recently separated mothers, focusing especially on moves to the location of their own mother: the maternal grandmother. Separated mothers, having linked lives with their own mothers, may benefit

  11. Mothers' Mobility after Separation: Do Grandmothers Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, M.; de Valk, H.A.G.; Merz, E.-M.

    2017-01-01

    Starting from a life course perspective, this study aims to gain more insight into mobility patterns of recently separated mothers, focusing especially on moves to the location of their own mother: the maternal grandmother. Separated mothers, having linked lives with their own mothers, may benefit

  12. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  13. Residential mobility and migration of the separated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Ham

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation is known to have a disruptive effect on the housing careers of those involved, mainly because a decrease in resources causes (temporary downward moves on the housing ladder. Little is known about the geographies of the residential mobility behaviour of the separated. Applying a hazard analysis to retrospective life-course data for the Netherlands, we investigate three hypotheses: individuals who experienced separation move more often than do steady singles and people in intact couple relationships, they are less likely to move over long distances, and they move more often to cities than people in intact couple relationships. The results show that separation leads to an increase in mobility, to moves over short distance for men with children, and to a prevalence of the city as a destination of moves.

  14. Simple area determination of strongly overlapping ion mobility peaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovcová, L.; Hermannová, M.; Pauk, V.; Šimek, M.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Lemr, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 981, AUG 15 (2017), s. 71-79 ISSN 0003-2670 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ion mobility-mass spectrometry * Fitting of mobility peaks * Analysis of isomers Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  15. A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Ewing, Robert G.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-02-01

    Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometer Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; McLain, Derek [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Steeb, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-12-20

    The Morpho Saffran Itemizer 4DX Ion Mobility Spectrometer previously used to detect uranium signatures in FY16 was used at the former New Brunswick Facility, a past uranium facility located on site at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was chosen in an attempt to detect safeguards relevant signatures and has a history of processing uranium at various enrichments, chemical forms, and purities; various chemicals such as nitric acid, uranium fluorides, phosphates and metals are present at various levels. Several laboratories were sampled for signatures of nuclear activities around the laboratory. All of the surfaces that were surveyed were below background levels of the radioanalytical instrumentation and determined to be radiologically clean.

  17. Collection shield for ion separation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, K.L.; Pugh, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ion separation electrodes in isotope separation apparatus are provided with removable collection shields to collect neutral particles which would normally pass through the ionization region. A preferred collection shield comprises a u-shaped section for clipping onto the leading edge of an electrode and a pair of flanges projecting substantially perpendicular to the clipping section for collecting neutral particles

  18. Principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Arnold, G.; Baumbach, J.I.; Doering, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    An outline is given of the principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy to the selective measurement of single substances in a substance matrix, including advantages and disadvantages of ion mobility detectors for solving analytical problems in the fields of environment, microelectronics, medicine, and military engineering. (orig.) [de

  19. Measurement of acetates in air using differential ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Zajiczek, Żaneta; Maziejuk, Mirosław

    2017-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds are one of the most important group of air pollutants. Potential health and environmental problems resulting from their emission prompted the requirement for monitoring these species. It motivates development of new measurement techniques which are fast, cost effective, reliable and field deployable. One of novel approaches is ion mobility spectrometry. It dwells on ion separation in electric field, based on differences in ion mobility. Many variants of this method are developed. In this wok, differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) was considered in respect of acetate measurements in air. It was demonstrated that DMS offers linear response to methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl acetate in concentration range from 0.3 ppm to 7 ppm. Positive ions spectrum has to be utilised for this purpose. We showed that fragments of DMS spectrum which secure linearity are compound-specific. The obtained results are promising from the application point of view.

  20. Ion mobility: its role in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the basic physical theory underlying plasma chromatography. Essentially, plasma chromatography simply measures ion mobility. The new feature of plasma chromatography, as compared to aqueous electrophoresis, is the existence of a highly-developed and accurate body of theory that connects gaseous ion mobility and diffusion to the ion molecule interactions in the drift tube. Attention is restricted to phenomena occurring in the drift tube portion of the apparatus

  1. Separation of uranyl ion using polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayshree Ramkumar; Chandramouleeswaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    Polyaniline (Pani) was synthesized by the chemical oxidation of aniline. The use of persulphate instead of dichromate was desired in order to avoid the incorporation of chromium in the polymer matrix. The presence of chromium in the matrix, when dichromate was used as an oxidant, was confirmed by various techniques. The batch mode experiments showed that Pani could be used for separation of different metal ions. These ions were converted into their anionic complexes using suitable complexing agents. It was found that EDTA was used as a suitable reagent for the separation of Cu 2+ from Zn 2+ whereas the uranyl ion uptake could be increased to about 95 % when carbonate was used instead of EDTA as complexing agent. A possible application of the above exchange system to preconcentration of uranyl ion from seawater has also been examined. (author)

  2. Separation of cesium by ion exchange columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, Alberto; Falcon, Marcelo F.; Devida, Claudio A.; Tadey, D.; Vaccaro, Jorge O.; Maset, Elvira

    2003-01-01

    Crystalline silico titanate (CST) has been tested as a selective inorganic ion exchanger to separate Cs 137 from the residual fission product s solution of the Mo 99 plant. The tests are described in detail and show decontamination factors higher than 6000 and a good elution yield

  3. Rapid ion-exchange separations of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuda, Shigekazu

    1988-01-01

    For the purpose of studying short-lived actinide nuclides, three methods for rapid ion exchange separation of actinide elements with mineral acid-alcohol mixed media were developed: anion exchange with nitric acid-methyl alcohol mixed media to separate the transplutonium and rare earth elements from target material, U or Pu and Al catcher foils; anion exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media to separate Am+Cm, Bk and Cf+Fm from the target, catcher foils and major fission products; and cation exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media and with concentrated hydrochloric acid to separate the transplutonium elements as a group from the rare earths after eliminating the large amounts of U, Al, Cu, Fe etc. The methods enable one to perform rapid and effective separation at elevated temperature (90 deg C) and immediate source preparation for alpha-ray spectrometry. (author) 47 refs.; 10 figs

  4. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  5. Experiments with SIRA - the radioactive ion separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    There are two main techniques to obtain radioactive ion beams. One, consisting in the fragmentation of projectile in a thin target followed by a separation carried out with LISE or SISSI type spectrometers or by an alpha spectrometer is used currently at GANIL. The second one, the ISOL (Isotope Separator One-Line) is presently under study on the SIRa benchmark, as part of the SPIRaL (Source de Production d'Ions Radioactifs en Ligne). A high energy light ion beam is stopped by a thick target to produce radioactive nuclei by various reactions in the target. The target, usually of carbon, is heated at around 1800 deg. C in order to accelerate the migration of the atoms produced at the target surface. These atoms are then diffused by a transfer tube up to plasma region where they are ionized and then accelerated. As projectiles the GANIL project makes use of a large variety of heavy ions. A table containing the radioactive ion beam characteristics (charge state and lifetime), the primary beams, the yields and the expected intensities to be obtained with SPIRaL is presented. Also, data concerning the production rates of rare gases obtained during 1993 to 1994 are given

  6. Influence of mobile dislocations on phase separation in binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Leonard, Francois

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a continuum model to describe the phase separation of a binary alloy in the presence of mobile dislocations. The kinetics of the local composition and dislocation density are coupled through their elastic fields. We show both analytically and numerically that mobile dislocations modify the standard spinodal decomposition process, and lead to several regimes of growth. Depending on the dislocation mobility and observation time, the phase separation may be accelerated, decelerated, or unaffected by mobile dislocations. For any finite dislocation mobility, we show that the domain growth rate asymptotically becomes independent of the dislocation mobility, and is faster than the dislocation-free growth rate

  7. Differential Fragmentation of Mobility-Selected Glycans via Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2017-06-01

    The alternative dissociation pathways initiated by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) compared with collision-induced dissociation (CID) may provide useful diagnostic fragments for biomolecule identification, including glycans. However, underivatized glycans do not commonly demonstrate strong UV absorbance, resulting in low fragmentation yields for UVPD spectra. In contrast to UVPD experiments that leverage covalent modification of glycans, we detail the capacity of metal adduction to yield comparatively rich UVPD fragmentation patterns and enhance separation factors for an isomeric glycan set in a drift tube ion mobility system. Ion mobility and UVPD-MS spectra for two N-acetyl glycan isomers were examined, each adducted with sodium or cobalt cations, with the latter providing fragment yield gains of an order of magnitude versus sodium adducts. Furthermore, our glycan analysis incorporated front-end ion mobility separation such that the structural glycan isomers could still be identified even as a mixture and not simply composite spectra of isomeric standards. Cobalt adduction proved influential in the glycan separation by yielding an isomer resolution of 0.78 when analyzed simultaneously versus no discernable separation obtained with the sodium adducts. It is the combined enhancement of both isomeric drift time separation and isomer distinction with improved UVPD fragment ion yields that further bolster multivalent metal adduction for advancing glycan IM-MS experiments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Metal ion separations using reactive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A membrane is a barrier between two phases. If one component of a mixture moves through the membrane faster than another mixture component, a separation can be accomplished. Membranes are used commercially for many applications including gas separations, water purification, particle filtration, and macromolecule separations (Abelson). There are two points to note concerning this definition. First, a membrane is defined based on its function, not the material used to make the membrane. Secondly, a membrane separation is a rate process. The separation is accomplished by a driving force, not by equilibrium between phases. Liquids that are immiscible with the feed and product streams can also be used as membrane materials. Different solutes will have different solubilities and diffusion coefficients in a liquid. The product of the diffusivity and the solubility is known as the permeability coefficient, which is proportional to the solute flux. Differences in permeability coefficient will produce a separation between solutes at constant driving force. Because the diffusion coefficients in liquids are typically orders of magnitude higher than in polymers, a larger flux can be obtained. Further enhancements can be accomplished by adding a nonvolatile complexation agent to the liquid membrane. One can then have either coupled or facilitated transport of metal ions through a liquid membrane. The author describes two implementations of this concept, one involving a liquid membrane supported on a microporous membrane, and the other an emulsion liquid membrane, where separation occurs to internal receiving phases. Applications and costing studies for this technology are reviewed, and a brief summary of some of the problems with liquid membranes is presented

  9. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  10. Calibration method for ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Valery

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the calibration of the ion mobility spectrometer has been developed. This article describes the working principle, advantages and disadvantages of the calibration method operating in the mode of explosives detection. This method is most suitable for use in portable detectors, due to the small weight, small size parameters and low power consumption.

  11. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  12. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  13. Ion exchange separation of rare earths. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nghi, Nguyen danh; Matous, K.

    1977-01-01

    The optimal conditions of separating selected rare earths by two ion exchange chromatography using Ostion KS cation exchange resin were studied. The effect of acetic acid concentration in the sorption solution was investigated. The elution process was studied in dependence on the concentration of Na 2 H 2 EDTA, on the total concentration of EDTA 4- ion, on elution agent flow, and on temperature. The optimal conditions were determined by evaluating integral elution curves and changes in acid concentration for systems Y-Pr, La-Pr, Er-Pr, Eu-Pr as follows: The sorption solution requires the presence of Na 2 H 2 EDTA of 0.03M in concentration. The basic elution solution was prepared in the following way: 0.183M Na 2 Mg 2 EDTA, 9.6x10 -3 M Na 2 H 2 EDTA, 3.84x10 -3 M CH 3 COOH, 2.30x10 -2 M CH 3 COONH 4 , 2.30x10 -2 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 . Approximate pH 5.7 to 6.0. The optimal elution solution was prepared by diluting the basic solution so that the total concentration of EDTA 4- equalled 0.075M. The optimal flow was determined to be 0.86 ml.cm -2 .min -1 at a temperature of 55 degC. (author)

  14. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Merlin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)

  15. Viscosity, ion mobility, and the lambda transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodstein, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A model is presented of the lambda transition in superfluid helium in which fluctuations near the transition are approximated by distinct regions of normal fluid and superfluid. The macroscopic viscosity of such a medium is computed. The ion mobility is also computed, taking into account a region of normal fluid around the ion induced by electrostriction. The results are, for the viscosity, eta/sub lambda/ - eta approx. t/sup 0.67/ and for the mobility μ - μ/sub lambda/ approx. t/sup 0.92/, both in excellent agreement with recent experiments. The model suggests that the lambda transition itself is the point at which superfluid regions become macroscopically connected

  16. The Quantitative Ion Exchange Separation of Uranium from Impurities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Narayanan, Usha

    1995-01-01

    .... This procedure involve adsorption of uranium onto Bio-Rad AG 1X8 or MP-1 ion exchange resins in 8 M HCl, separation of uncomplexed or weakly complexed matrix ions with an 8 M HCl wash, and subsequent...

  17. Behaviour of tetraalkylammonium ions in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Kapron, James T

    2010-05-30

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an ion-filtering technique recently adapted for use with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to remove interferences during analysis of complex matrices. This is the first systematic study of a series of singly charged tetraalkylammonium ions by FAIMS-MS. The compensation voltage (CV) is the DC offset of the waveform which permits the ion to emerge from FAIMS and it was determined for each member of the series under various conditions. The electrospray ionization conditions explored included spray voltage, vaporizer temperature, and sheath and auxiliary gas pressure. The FAIMS conditions explored included carrier gas flow rate, electrode temperature and composition of the carrier gas. Optimum desolvation was achieved using sufficient carrier gas (flow rate > or = 2 L/min) to ensure stable response. Low-mass ions (m/z 100-200) are more susceptible to changes in electrode temperature and gas composition than high mass ions (m/z 200-700). As a result of this study, ions are reliably analyzed using standard FAIMS conditions (dispersion voltage -5000 V, carrier gas flow rate 3 L/min, 50% helium/50%nitrogen, inner electrode temperature 70 degrees C and outer electrode temperature 90 degrees C). Variation of FAIMS conditions may be of great use for the separation of very low mass tetraalkylammonium (TAA) ions from other TAA ions. The FAIMS conditions do not appear to have a major effect on higher mass ions. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The ion mobility spectrometer for high explosive vapor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.J.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Phemto-Chem /SUP R/ Model 100 Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) operates in air and measures a number of explosive vapors at levels as low as partsper-trillion in seconds. The theory and operation of this instrument is discussed. The IMS inhales the vapor sample in a current of air and generates characteristic ions which are separated by time-of -ion drift in the atmospheric pressure gas. Quantitative results, using a dilution tunnel and standard signal generator with TNT, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, cyclohexanone, methylamine, octafluoronaphthalene and hexafluorobenzene, are given. Rapid sample treatment with sample concentrations, microprocessor signal readout and chemical identification, offer a realistic opportunity of rapid explosive vapor detection at levels down to 10 -14 parts by volume in air

  19. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  20. Toward an Intelligent Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Scott, Jill R.; Miller, Carla J.

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate goal is to design and build a very smart ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) that can operate autonomously. To accomplish this, software capable of interpreting spectra so that it can be used in control loops for data interpretation as well as adjusting instrument parameters is being developed. Fuzzy logic and fuzzy numbers are used in this IMS spectra classification scheme. Fuzzy logic provides a straight forward method for developing a classification/detection system, whenever rules for classifying the spectra can be described linguistically. Instead of using 'max' and 'min' values, the product of the truth values is used to determine class membership. Using the product allows rule-bases that utilize the AND function to allow each condition to discount truth value in determining membership, while rule-bases with an OR function are allowed to accumulate membership. Fuzzy numbers allow encapsulation of the uncertainties due to ion mobility peak widths as well as measured instrumental parameters, such as pressure and temperature. Associating a peak with a value of uncertainty, in addition to making adjustments to the mobility calculation based on variations in measured parameters, enables unexpected shifts to be more reliably detected and accounted for; thereby, reducing the opportunity for 'false negative' results. The measure of uncertainty is anticipated to serve the additional purpose of diagnosing the operational conditions of the IMS instrument.

  1. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  2. Ion separation from dilute electrolyte solutions by nanofiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Corazon M.

    2000-03-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a pressure-driven process which is considered potential for the separation of ionic species selectively from solutions containing mixture of electrolyte solutes. The lower operating pressure requirement of NF than reverse osmosis (RO) makes the earlier potentially economical. In the separation of ions, many authors believed that there are membranes with characteristic fixed surface charge and that the mechanism of separation of ions is by the differences in valences of the ions. In this study, experiments involving dilute single-solute and multiple-solute electrolyte solutions were performed using three different NF membranes. Permeate fluxes and ion rejections of the different species of ions in samples of permeate solutions were measured at varied conditions. The mechanism of separation in NF was determined based on the analysis of the trends and behavior of ion rejection relative to the solution temperature, pressure, type of solute, feed concentration and feed solution pH. The results of the experiments show that there is no evidence of the presence of fixed surface charge on the NF membranes. Ion separation was made possible by the combination of sieve effect and ion-hydration effect. Ions having higher hydration numbers showed higher ion rejection than those having lower hydration numbers. A method to determine the effective membrane pore size of NF membranes using hydrodynamic model was proposed. The proposed method is based on the assumptions that the membrane is neutral and that the separation is based on sieving effect. (Author)

  3. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  4. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented

  5. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-10-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve the detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, the authors review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics.

  6. High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, we review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry after supercritical fluid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, a Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometer (FT-IMS) was constructed and evaluated as a detector for supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The FT-IMS provides both quantitative and qualitative data of a wide range of compounds, selective and nonselective modes of chromatographic detection, and it is compatible with a wide range of SFC mobile phases. Drift spectra are presented for a number of samples, including polymers, lipids, herbicides, antibiotics, and pharmaceuticals. The unique properties of supercritical fluids made it possible to introduce these compounds into the spectrometer. While the drift spectra presented are generally simple, showing only a quasi-molecular ion, a few are surprising complex. Examples of selective and non-selective detection demonstrate the usefulness of the detector. Examples are presented for fish oil concentrate, bacon grease extract, soil extract, and polymer mixtures. In the case of Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, the FT-IMS was able to selectively detect individual oligomers in the polymer mixture. In the case of a polydimethylsilicone mixture the detector isolated a contaminant in the mixture

  8. Isotope separation in plasma by ion-cyclotron resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinov, A.E.; Kornilova, I.Yu.; Selemir, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    Contemporary state of investigation on isotope separation in plasma using selective ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating is considered. The main attention is paid to necessary conditions of heating selectivity, plasma creation methods in isotope ICR-separation facilities, selection of antenna systems for heating, and principles of more-heated component selection. Experimental results obtained at different isotope mixtures separation are presented [ru

  9. Ion transport restriction in mechanically strained separator membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannarella, John; Arnold, Craig B.

    2013-03-01

    We use AC impedance methods to investigate the effect of mechanical deformation on ion transport in commercial separator membranes and lithium-ion cells as a whole. A Bruggeman type power law relationship is found to provide an accurate correlation between porosity and tortuosity of deformed separators, which allows the impedance of a separator membrane to be predicted as a function of deformation. By using mechanical compression to vary the porosity of the separator membranes during impedance measurements it is possible to determine both the α and γ parameters from the modified Bruggeman relation for individual separator membranes. From impedance testing of compressed pouch cells it is found that separator deformation accounts for the majority of the transport restrictions arising from compressive stress in a lithium-ion cell. Finally, a charge state dependent increase in the impedance associated with charge transfer is observed with increasing cell compression.

  10. Device for separating ruthenium ion from spent fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Sasahira, Akira; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate plutonium ions efficiently and selectively from organic solvent containing tributyl phosphate used in the main step of reprocessing process. Constitution: The device comprises, as the main constituent factor, a liquid-liquid contact device for bringing not water soluble organic solvent into contact with a nitric acid solution of spent fuel substances and a liquid-liquid contact-separation device for bringing an organic solvent solution containing spent fuel substances separated with nitric acid into contact again with nitric acid. Then, a device is disposed between two liquid-liquid contact devices for staying ruthenium ions and organic solvent for a sufficient time. In this way, ruthenium ions in the organic solvent containing butyl phosphate are gradually converted into complex compounds combined with tributyl phosphate thereby enabling to separate ruthenium ions efficiently and remarkably reduce the corrosion of equipments. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Application of pressurized ion exchange to separations of transplutonium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.

    1980-01-01

    High-pressure ion exchange chromatography, used first for nucleic acid separations, was applied to the production of the heavier actinides, particularly the transcurium elements. Its use at the TRU plant is described. Future developments are considered briefly

  12. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aplin, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long established. A recent development is the computerized aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the voltage decay inversion, and an established voltage switching technique, were compared and shown to be of similar shape. Air conductivities calculated by integration were: 5.3±2.5 and 2.7±1.1 fSm -1 , respectively, with conductivity determined to be 3 fSm -1 by direct measurement at a constant voltage. Applications of the relaxation potential inversion method include air ion mobility spectrum retrieval from historical data, and computation of ion mobility spectra in planetary atmospheres

  13. A Simple Apparatus for Fast Ion Exchange Separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.

    1964-09-01

    An apparatus suitable for very fast ion exchange group separations in radiochemistry has been elaborated. The apparatus which consists of a system of glass tubes with pistons driven by the same force, allows the exact adjustment of influent solutions to a long series of ion-exchange columns. The practical application of the apparatus to the simultaneous separation of six groups of trace elements in the neutron activation analysis of biological material is described

  14. A Simple Apparatus for Fast Ion Exchange Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1964-09-15

    An apparatus suitable for very fast ion exchange group separations in radiochemistry has been elaborated. The apparatus which consists of a system of glass tubes with pistons driven by the same force, allows the exact adjustment of influent solutions to a long series of ion-exchange columns. The practical application of the apparatus to the simultaneous separation of six groups of trace elements in the neutron activation analysis of biological material is described.

  15. Novel wave/ion beam interaction approach to isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Lowder, R.S.; Schwager, L.A.; Barr, W.L.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-02-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental studies have been made related to the possibility of employing an externally imposed electrostatic potential wave to separate isotopes. This wave/ion interaction is a sensitive function of the wave/ion difference velocity and for the appropriate wave amplitude and wave speed, a lighter faster isotope will be reflected by the wave to a higher energy while leaving heavier, slower isotopes virtually undisturbed in energy -- allowing subsequent ion separation by simple energy discrimination. In these experiments, a set of some 200 individual, electrodes, which surrounded a microamp beam of neon ions, was used to generate the wave. Measurements of the wave amplitudes needed for ion reflection and measurements of the final energies of those reflected ions are consistent with values expected from simple kinetic arguments and with the more detailed results of numeric simulations

  16. Trajectory separation of channeled ions in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temkin, Misha; Chakarov, Ivan; Webb, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Spatial distributions of ions implanted into crystals can be of a very complex shape with 'lobes' due to ions penetrating through open channels in several directions. This paper suggests an analytical model which represents such a distribution as a linear combination of 'random' distribution and one or more 'channeled' distributions. This study is focused on the algorithm of the separation of ion trajectories into several distributions. The first distribution includes those ions which have undergone predominantly random collisions. The other distributions include those ions which have undergone mainly 'weak' collisions and traveled mostly along the main channeling directions. Our binary collision approximation (BCA) simulator is used for generating and analyzing ion trajectories. The spatial moments can be extracted from each separated distribution. It is shown that 2D analytical distributions obtained as a linear combination of distributions derived from these moments and aligned along corresponding channeling direction are in a very good agreement with direct BCA calculations

  17. Ion mobility spectrometer for online monitoring of trace compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.; Xie, Z.; Schmidt, H.; Sielemann, S.; Baumbach, J.I.

    2002-01-01

    The principle, character and developments of the instrumentation of ion mobility spectrometry are reviewed. The application of ion mobility spectrometers in monitoring chemical warfare agents, explosives, drugs, environmental hazardous compounds and industrial process control are discussed. Process applications with respect to miniaturization of the instrument are presented

  18. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuemei, Zhu; Jian, Zheng [The Third Research Inst. of Ministry of Public Security, Shanghai (China); Yongjie, Lv; Yangqin, Chen [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Optical and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, East China Normal Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2007-10-15

    A {sup 63}Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  19. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuemei; Zheng Jian; Lv Yongjie; Chen Yangqin

    2007-01-01

    A 63 Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  20. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  1. Solution chemistry and separation of metal ions in leached solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, J.

    1991-01-01

    The method to presume a dissolved state of metal ions in an aqueous solution and the technology to separate and concentrate metal ions in a leached solution are described in this paper. It is very important for the separation of metal ions to know the dissolved state of metal ions. If we know the composition of an aqueous solution and the stability constants of metal-ligand complexes, we can calculate and estimate the concentration of each species in the solution. Then, we can decide the policy to separate and concentrate metal ions. There are several methods for separation and purification; hydroxide precipitation method, sulfide precipitation method, solvent extraction method and ion exchange resin method. Solvent extraction has been used in purification processes of copper refinery, uranium refinery, platinum metal refinery and rare earth metal refinery. Fundamental process of solvent extraction, a kind of commercial extractants, a way of determining a suitable extractant and an equipment are discussed. Finally, it will be emphasized how the separation of rare earths is improved in solvent extraction. (author) 21 figs., 8 tabs., 8 refs

  2. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge - engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation

  3. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  4. Yttrium and rare earths separation by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Ayres, M.J.G.; Ribeiro, S.; Silva, G.L.J.P.; Silva, M.L.C.P.; Martins, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of yttrium and rare earths separation from Brazilian xenotime are presented. The research consist in five stage: 1) Preparation of yttrium, erbium and lutetium standard solutions, from solubilization of pure oxides 2) yttrium and rare earths separation by ion exchange chromatrography 3) Separation and recovery of EDTA 4) Precipitation and calcination and 4) Analytical control of process. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  6. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Webb, Ian K.; Attah, Isaac K.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-05-25

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also their subsequent efficient compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a long serpentine path TW SLIM region after which CRIMP allows the large ion populations to be ‘squeezed’. The compression process occurs at an interface between two SLIM regions, one operating conventionally and the second having an intermittently pausing or ‘stuttering’ TW, allowing the contents of multiple bins of ions from the first region to be merged into a single bin in the second region. In this initial work stationary voltages in the second region were used to block ions from exiting the first (trapping) region, and the resumption of TWs in the second region allows ions to exit, and the population to also be compressed if CRIMP is applied. In our initial evaluation we show that the number of charges trapped for a 40 s accumulation period was ~5×109, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity using an ion funnel trap. We also show that over 1×109 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device, and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Lower compression ratios allow increased IM peak heights without significant loss of signal, while excessively large compression ratios can lead to ion losses and other artifacts. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP and multiple passes provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-high resolution IM separations using SLIM.

  7. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  8. Electrodialytic separation of alkali-element ions with the aid of ion-exchange membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurskii, V.S.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1988-01-01

    Electrodialytic separation of ions bearing charges of the same sign with the aid of ion-exchange membranes has been examined in the literature in relation to the so-called ideal membranes, which do not exhibit selectivity with respect to one ion type in ion exchange. It has been shown that separation on such membranes is effective only for counterions differing in size of charge. A matter of greater importance from the practical standpoint is the possibility of using electrodialysis for separating ions bearing like charges and having similar properties, including ionic forms of isotopes of the same element. In this paper they report a comparative study of ion separation, with reference to the Cs-Na pair, by electrodialysis through various types of cation-exchange membranes. Changes of the solution concentration in the cathode compartment were monitored by measurement of 22 Na and 137 Cs activities

  9. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Manuel J.; Weeks, Stephan; Kyle, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  10. Comparing the effect of pressure and temperature on ion mobilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Rouholahnejad, Fereshteh

    2005-01-01

    The effect of pressure on ion mobilities has been investigated and compared with that of temperature. In this connection, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) cell, which employs a corona discharge as the ionization source, has been designed and constructed to allow varying pressure inside the drift region. IMS spectra were recorded at various pressures ranging from 15 Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The results show that IMS peaks shift perfectly linear with pressure which is in excellent agreement with the ion mobility theory. However, experimental ion mobilities versus temperature show deviation from the theoretical trend. The deviation is attributed to formation of clusters. The different behaviour of pressure and temperature was explained on the basis of the different impact of pressure and temperature on hydration and clustering of ions. Pressure affects the clustering reactions linearly but temperature affects it exponentially

  11. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Michelle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  12. Mobilities of positive ions in gas ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumegi, Asao

    1990-01-01

    Observed ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar are compared with a complete polarization model to examine the performance of the model, and its applicability is discussed. In spite of its simplicity, the polarization model (small sphere limit) is found to agree satisfactorily with observed mobilities in the case of alkali ions in Ar. However, the model fails to account for the mobility of Ar + in Ar due to a resonant charge transfer interaction between the ion and the parent gas. On the other hand, the values of k, a parameter which depends on the kinetic and the potential energy of the relevant ion, derived from observed ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar and in the parent gas are found to be close to each other. Except for few cases, it appears that the complete polarization model gives a reasonable approximation for the positive ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar, though the importance of the ion mass identification is significant in considering the applicability of the model to the positive ion mobility of those organic molecules in Ar used in a gas ionization chamber. (N.K.)

  13. Investigation of electrostatic ion chromatography for the separation of inorganic ions

    OpenAIRE

    Twohill, Eadaoin

    2002-01-01

    The new technique of ‘electrostatic ion chromatography’ (ion chromatography using a zwittenomc stationary phase) has been applied to the separation of ions using pure water as an eluent, without the addition of any inorganic buffers or organic modifiers. The nature of the separation, le cationic or anionic, is dependent upon the nature of the zwittenomc stationary phase. In the work presented here, the zwittenomc surfactant Zwittergent 3-14 was used to functionalise an octadecylsihca stationa...

  14. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P.; Barkley, Robert M.; Jones, David N. M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2018-04-01

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H]- ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H]- and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H2O-CO2]- and [M-H-H2O]- displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H2O]- ion from LTB4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H2O]- product ions from LTB4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Separation of lithium isotopes on ion exchangers; Separation des isotopes du lithium sur echangeurs d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menes, F; Saito, E; Roth, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    A survey of the literature shows that little information has been published on the separation of lithium isotopes with ion exchange resins. We have undertaken a series of elutions using the ion-exchange resins 'Dowex 50 x 12' and IRC 50, and various eluting solutions. Formulae derived from the treatment of Mayer and Tompkins permit the calculation of the separation factor per theoretical plate. For the solutions tried out in our experiments the separation factors lie in the interval 1.001 to 1.002. These values are quite low in comparison to the factor 1.022 found by Taylor and Urey for ion exchange with zeolites. (author) [French] Nous avons trouve relativement peu de donnees dans la litterature scientifique sur la separation des isotopes de lithium par les resines echangeuses d'ions. Nous avons effectue un certain nombre d'essais sur Dowex 50 X 12 et IRC 50 utilisant divers eluants. Des formules derivees de celles de Mayer et Tompkins permettent le calcul du coefficient de separation par plateau theorique. Pour les eluants etudies, ces facteurs de separation se trouvent entre 1,001 et 1,002. Ces valeurs sont faibles en comparaison du facteur 1,022 trouve par Taylor et Urey pour les zeolithes. (auteur)

  17. Towards a magnetic field separation in Ion Beam Sputtering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malobabic, Sina, E-mail: s.malobabic@lzh.de [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany); Jupé, Marco [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany); Kadhkoda, Puja [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Ristau, Detlev [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Defects embedded in coatings due to particle contamination are considered as a primary factor limiting the quality of optical coatings in Ion Beam Sputtering. An approach combining the conventional Ion Beam Sputtering process with a magnetic separator in order to remove these particles from film growth is presented. The separator provides a bent axial magnetic field that guides the material flux towards the substrate positioned at the exit of the separator. Since there is no line of sight between target and substrate, the separator prevents that the particles generated in the target area can reach the substrate. In this context, optical components were manufactured that reveal a particle density three times lower than optical components which were deposited using a conventional Ion Beam Sputtering process. - Highlights: • We use bent magnetic fields to guide and separate the sputtered deposition material. • No line of sight between substrate and target prevents thin films from particles. • The transport efficiency of binary and ternary oxides is investigated. • The defect statistics of manufactured dielectric ternary multilayers are evaluated. • The phase separation leads to a drastically reduction of particle contamination.

  18. Separation of strontium ions from other alkaline earth metal ions using masking reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Cs + and Sr 2+ have been well known as serious elements in high level radioactive waste. Separation of Cs + has already been successful when using an ion-exchange method from solution in the presence of other alkali metal ions. The separation of Sr 2+ is, however, not so easy by any known separation method such as solvent-extraction and ion-exchange methods. This is because Sr 2+ is in the middle of the selectivity series, which is Mg 2+ > Ca 2+ > Sr 2+ > Ba 2+ for the solvent-extraction method and Ba 2+ > Sr 2+ > Ca 2+ > Mg 2+ for the ion- exchange method. In the present study, separation of strontium from other alkaline earth metal ions was studied by a combined use of three types of separation methods at 298 K: the solvent-extraction method was applied for the first separation, in which thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA, extractant) and trioctylphosphine oxide ( TOPO, adduct forming ligand) were used for the organic phase of the system. The separation factors for each combination of four alkaline earth metal ions were determined by the values of the distribution ratio. The Mg 2+ was well separated from Sr 2+ by the TTA-TOPO system. However, the separation of the combinations of Ca 2+ -Sr 2+ and Sr 2+ -Ba 2+ was not complete by the above solvent-extraction system. The second separation method, an ion-exchange method was applied using dihydrogen tetratitanate hydrate fibers (H 2 Ti 4 O 9 nH 2 O) as an ion exchanger to separate Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ . The separation factors for each combination of four alkaline earth metal ions were calculated by the values of the distribution coefficients. Ba 2+ was well separated from Sr 2+ by the ion-exchange method. To separate Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ , however, a modified solvent-extraction method was finally used in which H 2 Ti 4 O 9 nH 2 O was used as a masking reagent of Sr 2+ . After the dihydrogen tetratitanate hydrate fibers were contacted with the aqueous solution containing Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ , the organic solution containing TTA and TOPO

  19. Ion creation, ion focusing, ion/molecule reactions, ion separation, and ion detection in the open air in a small plastic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Zane; Wei, Pu; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-07

    A method is presented in which ions are generated and manipulated in the ambient environment using polymeric electrodes produced with a consumer-grade 3D printer. The ability to focus, separate, react, and detect ions in the ambient environment is demonstrated and the data agree well with simulated ion behaviour.

  20. The mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomaa, M.

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews recent experimental and theoretical work on the mobility of negative ions in the superfluid A and B phases of liquid 3 He. In the normal Fermi liquid at temperatures below approximately 50 mK and also in the superfluid close to the superfluid transition temperature, Tsub(c), the mobility of a negative ion may simply be considered as limited by the elastic scattering of 3 He quasiparticles. This explains the constancy of the ion mobility in the normal phase. However, underlying the rapid increase of the measured mobility in the superfluid phases there is a subtle quantum-mechanical scattering effect. Detailed solutions of the 3 He quasiparticle-negative ion scattering process in the pair-correlated state provide a simple physical picture of an energy-dependent forward-peaking phenomenon. This yields quantitative theoretical results for the ion mobility in the quasi-isotropic B phase and for the ion mobility tensor in the anisotropic A phase which agree with the experimental data. (author)

  1. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new variant of a technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the reproducibility was checked. (author)

  2. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  3. Application of ion exchange to isotope separation. 2. Isotope separation of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Aida, Masao; Nomura, Masao; Aoyama, Taku

    1985-10-01

    Research work on the uranium isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography done by the ahthors was reviewed and summarized in the present paper. Specifically described are the determination of separation coefficients of uranium isotopes in various chemical systems involving uranium ions and complexes. The chemical systems are classifield into three main categories; (1) uranyl, U (VI), complex formation system, (2) uranous, U (IV), complex formation system and (3) U (IV) - U (VI) redox system. The redox system showed the largest separation coefficient of approx. 7 x 10/sup -4/, while the uranyl and uranous complex systems showed the separation coefficients of -- 2 x 10/sup -4/ and approx. 6 x 10/sup -5/, respectively.

  4. Ion mobilities in Xe/Ne and other rare-gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitelli, D; Pitchford, L C [Centre de Physique des Plasmas et Applications de Toulouse (CPAT), UMR 5002 CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Phelps, A V [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Urquijo, J de [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Post Office Box 48-3, 62251, 80309-0440 Cuernavaca, Moreno (Mexico); Basurto, E [Departmento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2003-10-01

    The ion mobility or drift velocity data important for modeling glow discharges in rare gas mixtures are not generally available, nor are the ion-neutral scattering cross sections needed to calculate these data. In this paper we propose a set of cross sections for Xe{sup +} and Ne{sup +} collisions with Xe and Ne atoms. Ion mobilities at 300 K calculated using this cross section set in a Monte Carlo simulation are reported for reduced field strengths, E/N, up to 1500x10{sup -21} V m{sup 2}, in pure gases and in Xe/Ne mixtures containing 5% and 20% Xe/Ne, which are mixtures of interest for plasma display panels (PDPs). The calculated Xe{sup +} mobilities depend strongly on the mixture composition, but the Ne{sup +} mobility varies only slightly with increasing Xe in the mixture over the range studied here. The mobilities in pure gases compare well with available experimental values, and mobilities in gas mixtures at low E/N compare well with our recent measurements which will be published separately. Results from these calculations of ion mobilities are used to evaluate the predictions of Blanc's law and of the mixture rule proposed by Mason and Hahn [Phys. Rev. A 5, 438 (1972)] for determining the ion mobilities in mixtures from a knowledge of the mobilities in each of the pure gases. The mixture rule of Mason and Hahn is accurate to better than 10% at high field strengths over a wide range of conditions of interest for modeling PDPs. We conclude that a good estimate of ion mobilities at high E/N in Xe/Ne and other binary rare gas mixtures can be obtained using this mixture rule combined with known values of mobilities in parent gases and with the Langevin form for mobility of rare gas ions ion in other gases. This conclusion is supported by results in Ar/Ne mixtures which are also presented here.

  5. Energy landscapes for mobile ions in ion conducting solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular dynamics (MD) simulations yields quantitative predictions of the ion transport characteristics. As ... Solid electrolytes; bond valence analysis; ion transport in glasses. 1. .... clusters are considered to contribute only to a.c. conduc-.

  6. An alkali ion source based on graphite intercalation compounds for ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Zahra S

    2008-01-01

    A variety of alkali cation emitters were developed as the ion source for ion mobility spectrometry. The cation emitters were constructed based on alkali ion graphite intercalation compounds (GICs). The compounds were prepared by fusing alkali salts with ground graphite. In order to produce alkali ions, the compounds were loaded on a filament and heated to red. Reactant ions of the form alk + ions were observed for the alkali salts NaCl, KCl.LiCl, CsCl and SrCl. In addition to Na + ions, K + ions were observed at the beginning of thermionic emission from Na-GIC. This is due to the low ionization potential of potassium that exists in trace amounts in sodium salts. In addition to the potassium ion, Na + was observed in the case of LiCl salt. The Na + and K + peaks originating from impurities totally disappeared after about 40 min. However, the thermionic emission of the main ion of the corresponding salt lasted for several days. No negative ions were observed upon reversing the drift field. Selected organic compounds (methyl isobutyl ketone, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone and tetrahydrofuran) were also ionized via alkali cation attachment reaction. Distinct ion mobility patterns were observed for different substances using one type of alkali reactant ion. However, the ion mobility pattern for a given substance changed when a different alkali reactant ion was used. Ammonia and amines were not ionized when this source was used

  7. Application of ion mobility-mass spectrometry to microRNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Kosuke; Hirose, Kenji; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is widely used for studying sequence determination and modification analysis of small RNAs. However, the efficiency of liquid chromatography-based separation of intact small RNA species is insufficient, since the physiochemical properties among small RNAs are very similar. In this study, we focused on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which is a gas-phase separation technique coupled with mass spectrometry; we have evaluated the utility of IM-MS for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. A multiply charged deprotonated ion derived from an 18-24-nt-long miRNA was formed by electrospray ionization, and then the time, called the "drift time", taken by each ion to migrate through a buffer gas was measured. Each multivalent ion was temporally separated on the basis of the charge state and structural formation; 3 types of unique mass-mobility correlation patterns (i.e., chainlike-form, hairpin-form, and dimer-form) were present on the two-dimensional mobility-mass spectrum. Moreover, we found that the ion size (sequence length) and the secondary structures of the small RNAs strongly contributed to the IM-MS-based separation, although solvent conditions such as pH had no effect. Therefore, sequence isomers could also be discerned by the selection of each specific charged ion, i.e., the 6(-) charged ion reflected a majority among chainlike-, hairpin-, and other structures. We concluded that the IM-MS provides additional capability for separation; thus, this analytical method will be a powerful tool for comprehensive small RNA analysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Diffusion and mobility of positive ions in sulphur hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, J. de; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Martinez, H.

    1988-01-01

    It is presented some recent results on the measurements of longitudinal difusion and mobility of positive ions in SF 6 . The experimental technique employed could determine the most abundant positive ion under electric discharge conditions. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  9. Traveling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salbo, Rune; Bush, Matthew F; Naver, Helle

    2012-01-01

    The collision cross-section (Ω) of a protein or protein complex ion can be measured using traveling-wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS) via calibration with compounds of known Ω. The T-wave Ω-values depend strongly on instrument parameters and calibrant selection. Optimization ...

  10. Comprehensive lipidomic analysis of human plasma using multidimensional liquid- and gas-phase separations: Two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry vs. liquid chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baglai, A.; Gargano, A.F.G.; Jordens, J.; Mengerink, Y.; Honing, M.; van der Wal, S.; Schoenmakers, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in separation science have resulted in the commercialization of multidimensional separation systems that provide higher peak capacities and, hence, enable a more-detailed characterization of complex mixtures. In particular, two powerful analytical tools are increasingly used by

  11. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The mobility of negative ions is shown to increase rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature independent mobility between 40 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bar. The increase of μ/sub N/ with increasing pressure is in agreement with the bubble model for the negative ion

  12. Separation of ions in nanofluidic channels with combined pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2013-03-05

    Separation of ionic species with the same electrophoretic mobility but different valence in electrolyte systems can occur within nanometer-scale channels with finite electrical double layers (EDLs). This is because EDL thicknesses are a significant fraction of slit height in such channels and can create transverse analyte concentration profiles that allow for unique separation modalities when combined with axial fluid flow. Previous work has shown such separation to occur using either pressure-driven flow or electro-osmotic flow separately. Here, we develop a Poisson-Boltzmann model to compare the separation of such ions using the combination of both pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow. Applying a pressure gradient in the opposite direction of electro-osmotic flow can allow for zero or infinite retention of analyte species, which we investigate using three different wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we determine conditions in fused silica nanochannels with which to generate optimal separation between two analytes of different charge but the same mobility. We also give simple rules of thumb to achieve the best separation efficacy in nanochannel systems.

  13. Mesoporous Cladophora cellulose separators for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruijun; Cheung, Ocean; Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Huo, Jinxing; Lindh, Jonas; Edström, Kristina; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2016-07-01

    Much effort is currently made to develop inexpensive and renewable materials which can replace the polyolefin microporous separators conventionally used in contemporary lithium-ion batteries. In the present work, it is demonstrated that mesoporous Cladophora cellulose (CC) separators constitute very promising alternatives based on their high crystallinity, good thermal stability and straightforward manufacturing. The CC separators, which are fabricated using an undemanding paper-making like process involving vacuum filtration, have a typical thickness of about 35 μm, an average pore size of about 20 nm, a Young's modulus of 5.9 GPa and also exhibit an ionic conductivity of 0.4 mS cm-1 after soaking with 1 M LiPF6 EC: DEC (1/1, v/v) electrolyte. The CC separators are demonstrated to be thermally stable at 150 °C and electrochemically inert in the potential range between 0 and 5 V vs. Li+/Li. A LiFePO4/Li cell containing a CC separator showed good cycling stability with 99.5% discharge capacity retention after 50 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. These results indicate that the renewable CC separators are well-suited for use in high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Jet-Underlying Event Separation Method for Heavy Ion Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Hanks, J. A.; Sickles, A. M.; Cole, B. A.; Franz, A.; McCumber, M. P.; Morrison, D. P.; Nagle, J. L.; Pinkenburg, C. H.; Sahlmueller, B.; Steinberg, P.; von Steinkirch, M.; Stone, M.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a me...

  15. Programmable ion mobility spectrometer: Time resolution improvement and ion counter comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Wilding, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ion mobility spectrometers operating on the aspirated electrode principle require switching of a bias voltage to select ions of different mobility. The ion spectrum can be obtained by sweeping across a set of bias voltages. If rapid temporal changes in atmospheric ion spectra are to be measured, however, such as for a balloon-carried instrument, the sweep time across the ion spectrum must be kept short. As bias voltage steps can generate saturation in the mobility spectrometer's electrometer amplifier, the electrometer recovery time limits the ion mobility spectrum sweep rate. Here, active compensation of the charge injected at a bias voltage step is used to reduce the saturation time. Further, the optimal setting of the charge compensation circuitry provides a determination of the system capacitance, a necessary calibration parameter for absolute measurements. Using laboratory air, hourly variations in ion concentrations and air conductivity found using the voltage switching system were similar to those obtained with a traditional ion counter operating at a single mobility: ion growth, however, could only be detected using the ion spectrometer

  16. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.dugourd@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Chirot, Fabien [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  17. Multi stage electrodialysis for separation of two metal ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K.; Sakurai, H.; Nii, S.; Sugiura, K. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-04-20

    In this article, separation of two metal ions by electrodialysis with a cation exchange membrane has been investigated. In other words, separation of potassium ion and sodium ion has been investigated by using batch dialysis with and without an electric field and continuous electrodialysis with a four-stage dialyzer. As a result, the difference in the permselectivity between the dialysis with and without an electric field has not been appreciable for the system of potassium and sodium ions with the cation exchange membrane. Concerning the continuous electrodialysis, the concentration ratio between potassium and sodium ions in the outlet solution from the recovery side of the dialyzer has increased with the reflux flow rate and the number of stages. In case when the reflux flow rate has been zero, the concentration ratio with the four-stage dialyzer has become 1.5 which is almost the same as with that with a two-stage dialyzer consisting of a simple membrane. When the reflux flow ratio has been 0.7, the concentration ratio has reached 3.6. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Ionic liquids used in extraction and separation of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinghai; Xu Chao; Liu Xinqi; Chu Taiwei

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids as green solvents now have become a research hotspot in the field of separation of metal ions by solvent extraction. Experimental results of extraction of various metal ions with ionic liquids as solvents, including that of alkali metals, alkaline earths, transition metals rare earths and actinides are introduced. The extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products that are involved in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is also reviewed. The possible extraction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the prospect of replacement of volatile and/or toxic organic solvents with environmentally benign ionic liquids for solvent extraction and the potency of applications of ionic liquids in solvent extraction are also commented. (authors)

  19. Preorganized and Immobilized Ligands for Metal Ion Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, Robert T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The research project, in the period 2003-2015, was focused on the discovery of fundamental new principles in f-element ion coordination chemistry and the application of the new knowledge to the development of advanced detection/separations reagents and methods for these ions. The findings relate to the Nation's efforts to safely and efficiently process nuclear materials. In addition, the project provided training for young scientists needed to maintain the Nation's preeminence in nuclear science.

  20. Redox‐Active Separators for Lithium‐Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruijun; Ruan, Changqing; Edström, Kristina; Strømme, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A bilayered cellulose‐based separator design is presented that can enhance the electrochemical performance of lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs) via the inclusion of a porous redox‐active layer. The proposed flexible redox‐active separator consists of a mesoporous, insulating nanocellulose fiber layer that provides the necessary insulation between the electrodes and a porous, conductive, and redox‐active polypyrrole‐nanocellulose layer. The latter layer provides mechanical support to the nanocellulose layer and adds extra capacity to the LIBs. The redox‐active separator is mechanically flexible, and no internal short circuits are observed during the operation of the LIBs, even when the redox‐active layer is in direct contact with both electrodes in a symmetric lithium–lithium cell. By replacing a conventional polyethylene separator with a redox‐active separator, the capacity of the proof‐of‐concept LIB battery containing a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li metal anode can be increased from 0.16 to 0.276 mA h due to the capacity contribution from the redox‐active separator. As the presented redox‐active separator concept can be used to increase the capacities of electrochemical energy storage systems, this approach may pave the way for new types of functional separators. PMID:29593967

  1. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5 kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100 °C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of drift gas selectivity in high resolution ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Laura M; Hill, Herbert H; Beegle, Luther W; Kanik, Isik

    2002-04-01

    Recent studies in electrospray ionization (ESI)/ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) have focussed on employing different drift gases to alter separation efficiency for some molecules. This study investigates four structurally similar classes of molecules (cocaine and metabolites, amphetamines, benzodiazepines, and small peptides) to determine the effect of structure on relative mobility changes in four drift gases (helium, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide). Collision cross sections were plotted against drift gas polarizability and a linear relationship was found for the nineteen compounds evaluated in the study. Based on the reduced mobility database, all nineteen compounds could be separated in one of the four drift gases, however, the drift gas that provided optimal separation was specific for the two compounds.

  3. Direct classification of olive oils by using two types of ion mobility spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido-Delgado, Rocio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Mercader-Trejo, Flora [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Metrologia de Materiales, Centro Nacional de Metrologia, km. 4.5 Carretera a Los Cues, El Marques, Queretaro (Mexico); Sielemann, Stefanie; Bruyn, Wolfgang de [G.A.S. Gesellschaft fuer analytische Sensorsysteme mbH, BioMedizinZentrumDortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 15, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Arce, Lourdes [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-06-24

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > We explore the use of Ion Mobility Spectrometers for classification of olive oils. > Three types of olive oils were analyzed with both devices coupled to headspace system. > The ion mobility data were processed using chemometric to obtain global information. > The classification rate was better using tritium source and separation step prior IMS. - Abstract: In this work, we explored the use of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) device with an ultraviolet (UV) source, and of a Gas Chromatographic (GC) column coupled to an IM Spectrometer with a tritium source, for the discrimination of three grades of olive oil, namely: extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), olive oil (OO) and pomace olive oil (POO). The three types of oil were analyzed with both equipment combinations as coupled to a headspace system and the obtained ion mobility data were consecutively processed with various chemometric tools. The classification rate for an independent validation set was 86.1% (confidence interval at 95% [83.4%, 88.5%]) with an UV-IMS and 100% (confidence interval at 95% [87%, 100%]) using a GC-IMS system. The classification rate was improved by using a more suitable ionization source and a pre-separation step prior to the IM analysis.

  4. Direct classification of olive oils by using two types of ion mobility spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido-Delgado, Rocio; Mercader-Trejo, Flora; Sielemann, Stefanie; Bruyn, Wolfgang de; Arce, Lourdes; Valcarcel, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → We explore the use of Ion Mobility Spectrometers for classification of olive oils. → Three types of olive oils were analyzed with both devices coupled to headspace system. → The ion mobility data were processed using chemometric to obtain global information. → The classification rate was better using tritium source and separation step prior IMS. - Abstract: In this work, we explored the use of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) device with an ultraviolet (UV) source, and of a Gas Chromatographic (GC) column coupled to an IM Spectrometer with a tritium source, for the discrimination of three grades of olive oil, namely: extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), olive oil (OO) and pomace olive oil (POO). The three types of oil were analyzed with both equipment combinations as coupled to a headspace system and the obtained ion mobility data were consecutively processed with various chemometric tools. The classification rate for an independent validation set was 86.1% (confidence interval at 95% [83.4%, 88.5%]) with an UV-IMS and 100% (confidence interval at 95% [87%, 100%]) using a GC-IMS system. The classification rate was improved by using a more suitable ionization source and a pre-separation step prior to the IM analysis.

  5. Minor Actinide Separations Using Ion Exchangers Or Ionic Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-01-01

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  6. Magneto-paper electrophoresis in the separation of inorganic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, H.G.; Datta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of the separation of lanthanide ions by paper electrophoresis and magneto-paper electrophoresis is reported. The separation of La(III)-Gd(III), La(III)-Dy(III), Lu(III)-Gd(III), Lu(III)-Ho(III) etc. was achieved by magneto paper electrophoresis using 0.1M KCl as carrier electrolyte. Separation of different oxidation states of the same element like Cu(I)-Cu(II), Ce(III)-Ce(IV), Mn(CN) 6 3 - -Mn(CN) 6 4 - , Co(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2 - -Co(C 2 O 4 ) 3 3 - , V(CN) 6 3 - -VO(CN) 5 3 - , W(CN) 8 4 - -W(CN) 8 3 - and Ru(CN) 6 3 - Ru(CN) 6 4 - was also achieved by magneto paper electrophoretic technique using different carrier electrolytes. (Author)

  7. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  8. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation; La separation isotopique par chromatographie ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, M G; Barre, Y; Neige, R

    1994-12-31

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.). 5 refs.

  9. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.)

  10. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  11. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  12. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ne-N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, A.F.V.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors, such as the ALICE TPC or in the NEXT experiment. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Ne-N 2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two peaks for different gas ratios of Ne-N 2 , low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10–20 Td (2.4–4.8 kV·cm −1 ·bar −1 ), low pressures 6–8 Torr (8–10.6 mbar) and at room temperature.

  13. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Patra, R. N.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of only one peak for all gas ratios of Xe-CO2, low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV·cm-1·bar-1), low pressures 6-8 Torr (8-10.6 mbar), at room temperature.

  14. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work, the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two distinct groups of ions. The nature of the ions depend on the mixture ratio since they are originated by both Xe and CH4. The results here presented were obtained for low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV ṡ cm-1 ṡ bar-1), at low pressure (8 Torr) (10.6 mbar), and at room temperature.

  15. Complex fluids with mobile charge-regulating macro-ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, Tomer; Andelman, David; Podgornik, Rudi

    2017-10-01

    We generalize the concept of charge regulation of ionic solutions, and apply it to complex fluids with mobile macro-ions having internal non-electrostatic degrees of freedom. The suggested framework provides a convenient tool for investigating systems where mobile macro-ions can self-regulate their charge (e.g., proteins). We show that even within a simplified charge-regulation model, the charge dissociation equilibrium results in different and notable properties. Consequences of the charge regulation include a positional dependence of the effective charge of the macro-ions, a non-monotonic dependence of the effective Debye screening length on the concentration of the monovalent salt, a modification of the electric double-layer structure, and buffering by the macro-ions of the background electrolyte.

  16. Corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry at reduced pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Rouholahnejad, Fereshteh

    2004-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) normally operate at ambient pressure. In this work an IMS cell has been designed and constructed to allow the pressure to be reduced inside the IMS cell. In this cell, corona discharge was employed as the ionization source. Reducing pressure affected both the discharge and the performance of the IMS. The discharge current was observed to increase with reducing pressure while the ignition potential decreased. The ion current received at the collector plate was also increased about 50 times when the pressure was reduced from ambient pressure to 15 Torr. The higher ion current can lead to an extended dynamic range. IMS spectra were recorded at various pressures and the results show that the drift times shift perfectly linear with pressure. This suggests that unlike temperature, pressure correction for ion mobility spectra is as simple as multiplying the drift times by a factor of 760/P

  17. The dressed mobile atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Amour, B; Guillot, L

    2005-01-01

    We consider free atoms and ions in $\\R^3$ interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Because of the translation invariance we consider the reduced hamiltonian associated with the total momentum. After introducing an ultraviolet cutoff we prove that the reduced hamiltonian for atoms has a ground state if the coupling constant and the total momentum are sufficiently small. In the case of ions an extra infrared regularization is needed. We also consider the case of the hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field. Finally we determine the absolutely continuous spectrum of the reduced hamiltonian. \\end{abstract}

  18. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1976-01-01

    We have found that the mobility of negative ions increases rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature-independent mobility between 30 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bars

  19. Chromatographic studies of the lanthanide element separation for the americium/curium large scale separation using ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, Claude.

    1981-06-01

    The Am/Cm large scale separations, operated by chromatography with the use of ion exchange resins, are described by numerous publications. The bibliographic studies allow to retain the followed points: use of sulfonate cationic resins, development by elution with the α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, column loadings between 1 and 30% of the capacity, possibility to use no radioactive lanthanides prior to actinides for trial purposes. The optimisation of such a process is the major part of this thesis. This point is realised by introducing a new definition for the resolution, for non symmetrical elution peaks, and a measure of this dissymmetry by introducing a shape factor F. For the separation itself and for the pressure drop in the column, the influence of the following parameters are studied: composition of the elution solution (concentration and pH), column temperature (20 to 90 0 C), resin size (9 to 27 μm), rate flow of mobile phase (70 ml.cm -2 .mn -1 ), column length and diameter. Symmetrical elution peaks may be obtained, even with a 27% loading. Elution conditions may be modified during the separation process in order to have the best recovery for the two components (1,3 [fr

  20. Separation of metal ions using an o-hydroxypropiophenoxime resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.N.

    1977-12-01

    A chelating ion-exchange resin incorporating an o-hydroxypropiophenoxime functional group onto an XAD-4 polymer matrix has been synthesized. This resin has been used for the separation and quantitative determination of both copper and molybdenum by high-speed liquid chromatography. Iron, uranium, citrate, and fluoride were found to interfere in the determination of copper. Of the ions tested, none were found to interfere with the determination of molybdenum. Several NBS Standard samples were successfully analyzed for copper and molybdenum. The new method is both accurate and fast. Most samples can be analyzed in less than ten minutes. Bis(2-hydroxyethyl) dithiocarbamate was shown to be superior to PAR as a color-forming reagent for the continuous spectrophotometric detection of copper. Thiolactic acid was shown to be adaptable to the continuous spectrophotometric detection of molybdenum. Both dyes gave linear responses when peak height was plotted against micrograms of metal

  1. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1 : 49.5 : 49.5, formic acid : methanol : water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase

  2. Apparatus and Method for Separation of Ions According to Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Fetterman; N. Fisch

    2008-01-01

    This is a device that uses rotating plasma and radiofrequency waves in order to separate ions within the plasma according to their mass. The device fundamentally consists of a mirror configuration (a primarily axial field) with a radial electric field, producing rotation. Radiofrequency waves are injected to produce diffusion paths allowing select species to exit through the loss cone. The use of these waves within the trap maintains the radial electric field, and allows species to be removed at low energy and with precise control over the location of exit

  3. A flexible statistical model for alignment of label-free proteomics data--incorporating ion mobility and product ion information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Ashlee M; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Geromanos, Scott J; Henao, Ricardo; Kraus, Virginia B; Moseley, M Arthur; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-12-16

    The goal of many proteomics experiments is to determine the abundance of proteins in biological samples, and the variation thereof in various physiological conditions. High-throughput quantitative proteomics, specifically label-free LC-MS/MS, allows rapid measurement of thousands of proteins, enabling large-scale studies of various biological systems. Prior to analyzing these information-rich datasets, raw data must undergo several computational processing steps. We present a method to address one of the essential steps in proteomics data processing--the matching of peptide measurements across samples. We describe a novel method for label-free proteomics data alignment with the ability to incorporate previously unused aspects of the data, particularly ion mobility drift times and product ion information. We compare the results of our alignment method to PEPPeR and OpenMS, and compare alignment accuracy achieved by different versions of our method utilizing various data characteristics. Our method results in increased match recall rates and similar or improved mismatch rates compared to PEPPeR and OpenMS feature-based alignment. We also show that the inclusion of drift time and product ion information results in higher recall rates and more confident matches, without increases in error rates. Based on the results presented here, we argue that the incorporation of ion mobility drift time and product ion information are worthy pursuits. Alignment methods should be flexible enough to utilize all available data, particularly with recent advancements in experimental separation methods.

  4. Method of separation of uranium from contaminating ions in an aqueous feed liquid containing uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.; Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    A coupled cationic/anionic method for the separation of uranium from contaminated aqueous solutions which contain uranyl ions is proposed. The fluid is extracted using an organic solvent containing a reagent which, together with the uranyl ions, forms a soluble aggregate in that solvent. As an example, 0.1 - 1 Mol/l Di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphorous acid in kerosene is mentioned. The organic solvent is then treated with a sealing liquid (volume ratio 20 - 35). For separation, an aqueous carbonate solution or a sulfuric acid solution can be used; the most favorable pH-values and concentrations for both cases are mentioned. The U +4 -ion at the sulfuric acid separation is subsequently oxidized to the uranyl ion with air. In each case, an extraction with an amine follows; after that, the amine is separated using an ammonium-carbonate solution and the uranium aggregate is precipitated, for example as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, and then further processed to uranium oxide. The solvents and fluids used are led back in closed circuit; a flow diagram is given. (UWI) [de

  5. Partitioning-separation of metal ions using heterocyclic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, M.J.; Drew, M.G.B.; Iveson, P.B.; Russell, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Some guidelines are proposed for the effective design of heterocyclic ligands for partitioning because there is no doubt that the correct design of a molecular extractant is required for the effective separation of metal ions such as actinides(III) from lanthanides(III). Heterocyclic ligands with aromatic ring systems have a rich chemistry, which is only now becoming sufficiently well understood in relation to the partitioning process. The synthesis, characterisation and structures of some chosen molecules will be introduced in order to illustrate some important features. For example, the molecule N-carboxy-butyl-2-amino-4,6-di (2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (BADPTZ), which is an effective solvent extraction reagent for actinides and lanthanides, has been synthesised, characterised and its interaction with lanthanide ions studied. The interesting and important features of this molecule will be compared with those of other heterocyclic molecules such as 2,6-bis(5-butyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl) pyridine (DBTZP), which is a candidate molecule for the commercial separation of actinides and lanthanide elements. (author)

  6. Arrival time distributions of product ions reveal isomeric ratio of deprotonated molecules in ion mobility-mass spectrometry of hyaluronan-derived oligosaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hermanová, M.; Iordache, A.-M.; Slováková, K.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Pelantová, Helena; Lemr, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2015), s. 854-863 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : tyramine-based hyaluronan derivatives * isomer discrimination * ion mobility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2015

  7. Ra/Ca separation by ion exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores Mendoza, J.

    1990-01-01

    Ra/Ca separation by ion exchange. The objective of this work was to acquire knowledge of the chromatographic behaviour of the alkaline earth cations calcium, barium and radium and the obtention of well-defined alpha spectra of 226 Ra. Three cationic ion exchange resins (Dower 50 W-X8, AG 50W-XB and Merck I) and three complexing agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid and tartaric acid) at various pH values have been investigated. The three types of ions are fixed on the resins at pH 4.8; calcium is eluted at pH between 5 and 6 depending on the resin; barium and radium are eluted at pH values from 8 to 11. Radium is also eluted with a 2 M nitric acid solution, from which it can be electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk potassium fluoride as electrolyte at pH 14. The electrolysis is conducted for 18 hours with a current of mA. Under these conditions high resolution alpha spectra were obtained for 226 Ra, which was practically free from radioactive contaminants (Author)

  8. Study of Aging ion exchange membranes used in separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellakhal, N.; Ghalloussi, R.; Dammak, L.

    2009-01-01

    Presently, the most important application of ion exchange membranes (IEM) is the electrodialysis. This technique consists of a membrane separation using a series of anion exchange membranes alternately and cations, often used for the desalination of brackish water. These membranes are confronted with problems of aging. Indeed, the more they are used more physical and chemical properties will change. A comparative study of the behavior of both EMI and new but the same treatment is carried out by measuring a magnitude transfer characteristic: ion permeability. Ionic permeability is a physical quantity can have an idea about the selectivity of the membrane towards the charged species and the p orosity o f the membrane. It is a transport of ions (cations + anions) through the membrane. Thus, determining the ion permeability is to determine the diffusion flux of a strong electrolyte through a membrane separating two compartments (one containing electrolytes and other water initially ultrapure who will gradually electrolyte through the membrane). The measurement technique used is that by conductimetric detection because of the ease of its implementation and its accuracy. Thus, the variation of the concentration of the electrolyte is continuously monitored by measuring the conductivity of the solution diluted with time. The curves s = f (t) MEA and MEC new and used varying concentration of the electrolyte membranes show that let in less waste of strong electrolyte (NaCl and HCl) than new ones. This can be explained by: - The functional sites are combined with polyvalent ions present even in trace amounts in the solution process and become inactive. The membrane loses its hydrophilic character and turns into a film almost hydrophobic. - The chemical attacks and electrodialysis operations have degraded and eliminated much of the fixed sites leading to the same effects on the hydrophilic membrane. - These two assumptions have been reinforced by the extent of exchange

  9. The selective separation of Cs and Sr ion on the inorganic ion-exchanger zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hun Hwee; Min, Byeog Heon [Hoseo University, Taegu (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    This study shows the selective separation of Cs and Sr ion on the inorganic ion-exchanger zeolites such as clinoptilolite, Y-type CBV760, CBV780 and A-type 3A. The selective separation of Cs and Sr on these zeolites was examined using batch and continuous column experiments. For the selective separation of Cs and Sr from a synthetic wastewater, adsorption rate of Cs increased in the order, clinoptilolite> 3A>> CBV760> CBV780, adsorption rate of Sr increased in the other, 3A>> clinoptilolite> CBV760> CBV780. For the clinoptilolite, the adsorption rate of Cs reached about 96 {approx} 98% within 3h. The adsorption rate of Sr on 3A reached about 99% within 3h. (author). 40 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Interfacing an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, Alexey; Viidanoja, Jyrki; Kaerpaenoja, Esko; Paakkanen, Heikki; Ketola, Raimo A.; Kostiainen, Risto; Sysoev, Alexey; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the combination of an aspiration-type ion mobility spectrometer with a mass spectrometer. The interface between the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer and the mass spectrometer was designed to allow for quick mounting of the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer onto a Sciex API-300 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The developed instrumentation is used for gathering fundamental information on aspiration ion mobility spectrometry. Performance of the instrument is demonstrated using 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine and dimethyl methylphosphonate

  11. Separation of seven arsenic species by ion-pair and ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, Sven Hedegaard

    1992-01-01

    Arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and the tetramethylarsonium ion were subjected to ion-exchange and ion-pair reversed phase HPLC. The ion exchange method was superior in selectivity and time of analysis for the arsenic anions. The ammonium ions...... used for the ion-pair method only resulted in separation of some of the anionic arsenic compounds. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for on-line arsenic-specific detection....

  12. Separation of zirconium from hafnium by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, Elaine C.B.; Palhares, Hugo G.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q., E-mail: elainecfelipe@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: hugopalhares@gmail.com, E-mail: ana.ladeira@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are two of the most important metals for the nuclear industry. Hafnium occurs in all zirconium ores usually in the range 2 - 3%. However, for the most nuclear industry applications, it is necessary to use a zirconium of extremely pure level. The current work consists in the separation of zirconium and hafnium by the ion exchange method in order to obtain a zirconium concentrate of high purity. The zirconium and hafnium liquors were produced from the leaching of the Zr(OH){sub 4} and Hf(OH){sub 4} with nitric acid for 24 hours. From these two liquors it was prepared one solution containing 7.5 x 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1} of Zr and 5.8 x 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} of Hf with acidity of 1 M. Ion exchange experiments were carried out in batch with the resins Dowex 50WX4, Dowex 50WX8 100, Dowex 50WX8 50, Amberlite IR-120 and Marathon C at constant temperature 28 deg C. Other variables such as, acidity and agitation were kept constant. The data were adjusted to Langmuir equation in order to calculate the maximum loading capacity (q{sub max}) of the resins, the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) for Zr and Hf and the separation factor (α{sub Hf}{sup Zr} ). The results of maximum loading capacity (q{sub max}) for Zr and Hf, in mmol g{sup -}1, showed that the most suitable resins for columns experiments are: Dowex 50WX4 50 (q{sub max} Z{sub r} = 2.21, Hf = 0.18), Dowex 50WX8 50 (q{sub max} Zr = 1.89, Hf = 0.13) and Amberlite (q{sub max} Zr = 1.64, Hf = 0.12). However, separations factors, α{sub Hf}{sup Zr}, showed that the resins are not selective. (author)

  13. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baym, G.; Pethick, C.J.; Salomaa, M.

    1979-01-01

    We calculate the mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3 He-B. We first derive the general formula for the mobility, and show that to a good approximation the scattering of quasiparticles from an ion may be treated as elastic, both in the superfluid for temperatures not too far below the transition temperature and also in the normal state. The scattering cross section in the superfluid is then calculated in terms of normal state properties; as we show, it is vital to include the effects of superfluid correlations on intermediate states in the scattering process. We find that for quasiparticles near the gap edge, the quasiparticle: ion scattering amplitude has a resonant behavior, and that as a result of interference among many partial waves, the differential scattering cross section is strongly peaked in the forward direction and reduced at larger angles, in much the same way as in diffraction. The transport cross section for such a quasiparticle is strongly reduced compared to that for a normal state quasiparticle, and the mobility is consequently strongly enhanced. Detailed calculations of the mobility which contain essentially no free parameters, agree well with the experimental data

  14. Separator-Integrated, Reversely Connectable Symmetric Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhang; Zeng, Jiren; Cui, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-02-24

    A separator-integrated, reversely connectable, symmetric lithium-ion battery is developed based on carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 nanoparticles and polyvinylidene fluoride-treated separators. The Li3V2(PO4)3 nanoparticles are synthesized via a facile solution route followed by calcination in Ar/H2 atmosphere. Sucrose solution is used as the carbon source for uniform carbon coating on the Li3V2(PO4)3 nanoparticles. Both the carbon and the polyvinylidene fluoride treatments substantially improve the cycling life of the symmetric battery by preventing the dissolution and shuttle of the electroactive Li3V2(PO4)3. The obtained symmetric full cell exhibits a reversible capacity of ≈ 87 mA h g(-1), good cycling stability, and capacity retention of ≈ 70% after 70 cycles. In addition, this type of symmetric full cell can be operated in both forward and reverse connection modes, without any influence on the cycling of the battery. Furthermore, a new separator integration approach is demonstrated, which enables the direct deposition of electroactive materials for the battery assembly and does not affect the electrochemical performance. A 10-tandem-cell battery assembled without differentiating the electrode polarity exhibits a low thickness of ≈ 4.8 mm and a high output voltage of 20.8 V. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development of Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Selective Ion Separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Orth, Rick J.; Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    The electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) process, being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, provides an alternative separation method to selectively remove ions from process and waste streams. In the ESIX process, in which an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto a high surface area electrode, uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the electrochemical potential of the film. This paper addresses engineering issues necessary to fully develop ESIX for specific industrial alkali cation separation challenges. The cycling and chemical stability and alkali cation selectivity of nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) electroactive films were investigated. The selectivity of NiHCF was determined using cyclic voltammetry and a quartz crystal microbalance to quantify ion uptake in the film. Separation factors indicated a high selectivity for cesium and a moderate selectivity for potassium in high sodium content solutions. A NiHCF film with improved redox cycling and chemical stability in a simulated pulp mill process stream, a targeted application for ESIX, was also prepared and tested

  16. Ion exchange separation of nitrate from uranium compounds and its determination by spectrophotometry and ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    A procedure for the separation of nitrate from uranium compounds by retaintion of uranyl ion on a cationic ion exchanger and its determination in the effluent is described. Nitrate is analysed by the spectrometric method with 1-phenol-2,4-dissulphonic acid. This determination covers the 1 to 10 μg NO - 3 /mL range and requires an amount of 10 to 100 μg NO - 3 . The main interference is uranium (VI) due its own intense yellow color. This difficulty is overcome by the complete separation of UO 2 ++ with the cationic resin. Alternatively, the ion chromatography technique is used for the determination of nitrate in the effluent of the cationic resin. The determination was easily made by the comparison of the nitrate peak hights of the analyte and the standard solutions. The ion chromatography method is very sensitive (0,3 μg NO - 3 /mL), reproducible and suitable for routine analysis and permits the determination of fraction of part per million of nitrate in uranium. The results of nitrate determination using both spectrophotometric and ion chromatography techniques are compared. The method is being routinely applied for the quality control of uranium compounds in the fuel cycle, specially uranium oxide, ammonium diuranate, uranium peroxide and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. (Author) [pt

  17. Novel configuration of polyimide matrix-enhanced cross-linked gel separator for high performance lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yin; Yao, Zhikan; John, Angelin Ebanezar; Li, Yang; Li, Weishan; Zhu, Baoku

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • For the first time, a cross-linked gel polymer electrolyte with additional lithium ions, was introduced into a nonwoven separator. • The PI nonwoven is employed to ensure enhanced thermal stability and mechanical strength of the IACS. • With the introduction of PAMPS(Li"+), the migration and mobility rate of anions could be hindered by the -SO_3"− group, giving rise to a high lithium ion transference number. • This IACS is recommended as a promising candidate for the high-power and high-safety lithium ion batteries. - Abstract: A novel composite nonwoven separator exhibiting high heat resistance, high ionic conductivity and high lithium ion transference number is fabricated by a simple dip-coating and heat treatment method. The thermal stable polyimide (PI) nonwoven matrix is chosen as a mechanical support and contributes to improving the thermal shrinkage of the composite nonwoven separator (abbreviated as IACS). The cross-linked poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) PAMPS(Li"+) gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), lithium ion sources of a single ion conductor, is introduced into the PI nonwoven matrix and acts as a functional filler. This PAMPS (Li"+) GPE is proved to be able to provide internal short circuit protection, to alleviate liquid electrolyte leakage effectively, to supply more lithium ions dissociating from PAMPS (Li"+) by liquid electrolyte solvent, to contribute a more stable interfacial resistance, and thus resulting in an excellent cyclability. More notably, the migration and mobility rate of anions could be hindered by the −SO_3"− group in the PAMPS (Li"+) polymer based on electrostatic interaction, giving rise to a very high lithium ion transference number. These fascinating characteristics endow the IACS a great promise for the application in the high power and high safety lithium ion batteries.

  18. Raman scattering studies of mobile ions in superionic conductor hollandites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.; Suemoto, T.; Ishigame, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the superionic conductors K/sub 1.6/Mg/sub 0.8/Ti/sub 7.2/O 16 , Cs/sub 1.2/Mg/sub 0.6/Ti/sub 7.4/O 16 , and (KTl)/sub 1.6/Mg/sub 0.8/Ti/sub 7.2/O 16 are measured in the frequency range from 5 to 1000 cm -1 . In the range from 100 to 1000 cm -1 Raman spectra hardly show alkali ion dependence. On the contrary, in the frequency range from 5 to 100 cm -1 , an additional Raman band is observed. This Raman band shows alkali ion dependence. By using the Frenkel-Kontorova model for the hollandite crystal with the given configuration of the mobile ions, it is found that the dependence of vibrational frequency of mobile ions with kinds of alkali ion is well explained and that the concept of 'super unit cell' that is introduced by Beyeler is very useful to explain the Raman bands which are observed below 100 cm -1 in hollandite crystals. (author)

  19. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina; Bocos-Bintintan, V

    2009-01-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  20. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bocos-Bintintan, V, E-mail: cornel.cuna@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, 3 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  1. Micro faraday-element array detector for ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Christopher A [Albuquerque, NM; Rodacy, Phillip J [Albuquerque, NM; Denton, M Bonner [Tucson, AZ; Sperline, Roger [Tucson, AZ

    2004-10-26

    An ion mobility spectrometer includes a drift tube having a collecting surface covering a collecting area at one end of the tube. The surface comprises a plurality of closely spaced conductive elements on a non-conductive substrate, each conductive element being electrically insulated from each other element. A plurality of capacitive transimpedance amplifiers (CTIA) adjacent the collecting surface are electrically connected to the plurality of elements, so charge from an ion striking an element is transferred to the capacitor of the connected CTIA. A controller counts the charge on the capacitors over a period of time.

  2. On mobility of ions in thin films in liquid substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of energy dissipation by emission of ripplons is solved for an ion moving in the media with two interfaces (films on solid and liquid substrates), taking into account the Van der Waals interaction. It is shown that in contrast to the earlier considered case of solid substrate where the action of the Van der Waals forces causes only renormalization of the free fall acceleration, in the vase of liquid substrate the influence of these forces is much more complicated. In addition to renormalization of the amplitude of the emitted surface wave and change of the velocity threshold after which the wave mechanism is effective, in sufficiently thin film, where modes are ''intersected'' the analytical expressions for mobility are also significantly modified. In real experimental environments consideration of all the factors mentioned leads as a rule to higher ion mobility

  3. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CF4 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Kaja, M. A.; Escada, J.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon with carbon tetrafluoride (Xe-CF4) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm‑1ṡbar‑1), at room temperature. The time-of-arrival spectra revealed one or two peaks depending on the gas relative abundances, which were attributed to CF3+ and to Xe2+ ions. However, for Xe concentrations above 60%, only one peak remains (Xe2+). The reduced mobilities obtained from the peak centroid of the time-of-arrival spectra are presented for Xe concentrations in the 5%-95% range.

  4. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed

  5. Hypothesis of linear relaxation and ion mobility in neutral gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudy, Michel

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to propose a theory of ion mobility in neutral gases, based on the hypothesis of linear relaxation, in order to obtain simple formula and a good agreement with experiment. The author first presents some generalities on ion mobility such as history and values of interest, and some notions about the way experimental results are obtained, and then theories proposed from 1903 to 1976. He reports two tests. The first one, based on the Boltzmann equation, is based on a method of moments, and requires the use of a computer, but does not give results in good agreement with the experiment. Thus, for the second test, the author used a kinetic equation similar to one used for the study of neutral gas viscosity. This kinetic equation is used for the study of ion mobility in neutral gases, and the author shows that, with a Sutherland potential, a simple formula can be obtained, the results of which can be obtained with a pocket calculator. Moreover, these results are in agreement with experimental values over a portion of the experimental range. In order to reach an agreement over the whole experimental range, a possibility has been to use, in some cases, a more realistic interaction potential. However, a computer was then necessary [fr

  6. The hypertrehalosemic neuropeptides of cicadas are structural isomers-evidence by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Marco, Heather; Gäde, Gerd

    2017-11-01

    It has been known for more than 20 years that the neurosecretory glands of the cicadas, the corpora cardiaca, synthesize two isobaric peptides with hypertrehalosemic activity. Both decapeptides have exactly the same amino acid sequence (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Ser-Trp-Gly-Asn-NH 2 ) and mass but differ in their retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. A synthetic peptide with the same sequence elutes together with the second more hydrophobic peptide peak of the natural cicada extract. It is not clear what modification is causing the described observations. Therefore, in the current study, ion mobility separation in conjunction with high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate this phenomenon as it was sensitive to changes in conformation. It detected different drift times in buffer gas for both the intact peptides and some of their fragment ions. Based on the ion mobility and fragment ion intensity of the corresponding ions, it is concluded that the region Pro 6 -Ser 7 -Trp 8 contains a structural feature differing from the L-amino acids present in the known peptide. Whether the conformer is the result of racemization or other biochemical processes needs to be further investigated.

  7. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Peng; Ji, Zhiwei; Deng, Shuping; Li, Chi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing

    2013-05-09

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Gas-Phase Enrichment of Multiply Charged Peptide Ions by Differential Ion Mobility Extend the Comprehensiveness of SUMO Proteome Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Sibylle; Bonneil, Eric; McManus, Francis P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the family of ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) and is involved in important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, meiosis and cellular trafficking. The large-scale identification of SUMO peptides in a site-specific manner is challenging not only because of the low abundance and dynamic nature of this modification, but also due to the branched structure of the corresponding peptides that further complicate their identification using conventional search engines. Here, we exploited the unusual structure of SUMO peptides to facilitate their separation by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and increase the coverage of SUMO proteome analysis. Upon trypsin digestion, branched peptides contain a SUMO remnant side chain and predominantly form triply protonated ions that facilitate their gas-phase separation using FAIMS. We evaluated the mobility characteristics of synthetic SUMO peptides and further demonstrated the application of FAIMS to profile the changes in protein SUMOylation of HEK293 cells following heat shock, a condition known to affect this modification. FAIMS typically provided a 10-fold improvement of detection limit of SUMO peptides, and enabled a 36% increase in SUMO proteome coverage compared to the same LC-MS/MS analyses performed without FAIMS. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. A compact high resolution ion mobility spectrometer for fast trace gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Allers, Maria; Cochems, Philipp; Langejuergen, Jens; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2013-09-21

    Drift tube ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) are widely used for fast trace gas detection in air, but portable compact systems are typically very limited in their resolving power. Decreasing the initial ion packet width improves the resolution, but is generally associated with a reduced signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the lower number of ions injected into the drift region. In this paper, we present a refined theory of IMS operation which employs a combined approach for the analysis of the ion drift and the subsequent amplification to predict both the resolution and the SNR of the measured ion current peak. This theoretical analysis shows that the SNR is not a function of the initial ion packet width, meaning that compact drift tube IMS with both very high resolution and extremely low limits of detection can be designed. Based on these implications, an optimized combination of a compact drift tube with a length of just 10 cm and a transimpedance amplifier has been constructed with a resolution of 183 measured for the positive reactant ion peak (RIP(+)), which is sufficient to e.g. separate the RIP(+) from the protonated acetone monomer, even though their drift times only differ by a factor of 1.007. Furthermore, the limits of detection (LODs) for acetone are 180 pptv within 1 s of averaging time and 580 pptv within only 100 ms.

  11. Experiments with a magnetic separator for heavy recoil ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosler, E.

    1981-01-01

    Using a triple-focusing (position and momentum), crescent-shaped separator for heavy recoil-ions different experiments were performed. The improvement consists in the enhancement of the transmission from 8% to 25% for 500 keV recoil ions from the reaction 238 U(α, 3n)sup(239m)Pu. For sup(237m)Pu the electromagnetic decay of the 1.1 μs shape isomer into the 82 ns shape isomer was searched for. The upper limit for gamma decay is 1.25 +- 1.25% for Esub(γ) = 200 keV and for electron decay 0.29 +- 0.29% in comparison to isomeric fission. The upper limit for interband transitions is 2.5% (2 delta), from which the upper limit of the partial half-life for the electromagnetic decay of the 1.1 μs isomer is calculated to 44 μs. Due to the performed interpretation the spin difference between both isomers extends at least to ΔI = 3. For sup(238m)U the back-decay into the 1. minimum by the EO-transition and the converted 2 + → 0 + transition in the first decay and the decay by alpha articles was looked for both in single measurements as in a coincidence measurement to L-X-ray quanta. The upper limits are GAMMAsub(EO) = 2.0, GAMMAsub(α)/GAMMAsub(F) = 0.4 and GAMMA(back-decay)/GAMMAsub(F) approx. equal to 100. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Study on rare earths complexes separation by means of different type of ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubicka, H.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of different types of ion exchangers for purification and separation of rare earths complexes has been examined. The experimental work has been carried out on 14 chelating ion exchangers. The investigation results proved the great usefulness chelating ion exchangers especially of amino acid and phosphorus-type. Application of that type ion exchangers in column chromatographic process gave the excellent rare earths separation as well as enabled to obtain their preparates of high purity. 218 refs, 21 figs, 27 tabs

  13. Facile fabrication of multilayer separators for lithium-ion battery via multilayer coextrusion and thermal induced phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Pu, Hongting

    2018-04-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/polyethylene (PE) multilayer separators with cellular-like submicron pore structure for lithium-ion battery are efficiently fabricated by the combination of multilayer coextrusion (MC) and thermal induced phase separation (TIPS). The as-prepared separators, referred to as MC-TIPS PP/PE, not only show efficacious thermal shutdown function and wider shutdown temperature window, but also exhibit higher thermal stability than the commercial separator with trilayer construction of PP and PE (Celgard® 2325). The dimensional shrinkage of MC-TIPS PP/PE can be negligible until 160 °C. In addition, compared to the commercial separator, MC-TIPS PP/PE exhibits higher porosity and electrolyte uptake, leading to higher ionic conductivity and better battery performances. The above-mentioned fascinating characteristics with the convenient preparation process make MC-TIPS PP/PE a promising candidate for the application as high performance lithium-ion battery separators.

  14. Ion-optical design of the high-resolution mass separator for the Japanese Hadron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaoshi, Hitoshi; Fujioka, Manabu; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Wollnik, Hermann; Meuser, Stefan; Nomura, Toru; Kubono, Shigeru.

    1991-12-01

    An ion-optical design of the JHP-ISOL is presented. This separator consists of a beam guidance system, a main magnetic separator stage and an electrostatic energy focusing stage. This separator is to be coupled with a heavy-ion linac for post-acceleration of mass separated ions up to 6.5 MeV/u. The design goal of the separator is to realize a mass resolving power of R M = 20,000 (basal) at a transmission approaching 100 % with the initial phase space of ± 0.2 mm x ± 20 mrad. (author)

  15. Chromatographic separation process with pellicular ion exchange resins that can be used for ion or isotope separation and resins used in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, M.; Neige, R.; Niemann, C.; Michel, A.; Bert, M.; Bodrero, S.; Guyot, A.

    1989-01-01

    For separation of uranium, boron or nitrogen isotopes, an isotopic exchange is carried out betwen an isotope fixed on an ion exchange resin and another isotope of the same element in the liquid phase contacting the resin. Pellicular resins are used comprising composite particulates with an inert polymeric core and a surface layer with ion exchange groups [fr

  16. The effect of ion irradiation on inert gas bubble mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Al ion irradiation on the mobility of Xe gas bubbles in Al thin films was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine bubble diffusivities in films irradiated and/or annealed at 673K, 723K and 773K. Irradiation increased bubble diffusivity by a factor of 2--9 over that due to thermal annealing alone. The Arrhenius behavior and dose rate dependence of bubble diffusivity are consistent with a radiation enhanced diffusion phenomenon affecting a volume diffusion mechanism of bubble transport. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. [Separation of p-aminobenzenearsonic acid and its oxide by ion-pair reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Ma, X; Meng, L; Ma, D

    1999-05-01

    To study the separation of p-aminobenzenearsonic acid (PABAA) and its oxide, p-aminophenylarsine oxide (PAPAO), both the absorption spectra were scanned at the wavelengths from 200 nm to 380 nm. PABAA had absorption maximum at 254 nm and PAPAO 258 nm. The effects of salt concentration, column temperature, methanol and ion-pair agent concentrations on the capacity factor were investigated. Compounds of high polarity showed almost no retention on reversed-phase column; as the volume fraction of the methanol decreased from 90% to 10%, the retention time of PABAA gradually increased with broad peak, and partially eluted when methanol volume fraction being below 20%. With temperature rising, the retention time of PABAA was decreased. But PABAA capacity factor can be increased by selecting an appropriate salt concentration for the mobile phase. The cetyltrimethyl and tetrabutyl ammonium ions were separately added as ion-pair agents to the mobile phase containing methanol in phosphate buffer of 10 mmol/L, the changes of retention time were observed. The mechanism of retention based on reversed phase ion-pair model is proposed. Besides, the retention behaviour is also influenced by size exclusion in stationary phase as well as polar interactions with residual silanol group on the silica surface.

  18. Measurement of negative ion mobility in O2 at high pressures using a point plate gap as an ion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Y; Kimura, T; Suzuki, S; Itoh, H

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results for negative ion mobility in O 2 at 0.5-2.0 atm. The ion mobility is observed using a high-pressure ion drift tube with a positive corona gap (Geiger counter), which is constructed from a point plate gap and acts as a negative ion detector. The variation of waveforms in the burst pulse is observed by varying the voltage applied to the ion detector to find the optimum voltage that must be applied across the ion detector in O 2 . This is investigated carefully to ensure the precise determination of mobility. The distortion of the electric field near the mesh electrode, which operates as the cathode of the ion detector and as the anode of the ion drift gap, is then examined to determine the optimum applied voltage to suppress its effect on the measurement of mobility. The mobility is subsequently measured at a reduced electric field intensity of 2.83 × 10 -3 to 2.83. The observed mobility of 2.31 ± 0.03 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in O 2 is concluded to be that of O 2 - . This value is also obtained in experiments over a wide range of gas pressures (0.5-2.0 atm) and drift lengths (1.00-9.00 cm). The mobilities of O 3 - and O - are also obtained experimentally. (paper)

  19. The separation of heavy ion tracks in nuclear emulsions by means of the pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopova, A.B.; Magradze, N.V.; Melkumyan, L.V.; Prokhorenko, Y.P.

    1976-01-01

    The pulsed electric field (PEF) technique is developed for the separation of heavy ion tracks from the intense background caused by high energy electrons, protons and γ-radiation. The tracks of Ne, Cr, Ar-ions accelerated at the Dubna Nuclear Reactions Laboratory have been separated from the background, the voltage of the applied PEF being 10 5 V/cm. (orig.) [de

  20. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-05-21

    May 21, 2011 ... On these days mobility spectra showed two modes, ... together with the formation of multiple charged ions are proposed to result in the light and heavy large ion modes. Growth of ..... day and minimum during the night hours.

  1. Rapid radiochemical ion-exchange separation of iodine from tellurium: a novel radioiodine-132 generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao, A

    1975-01-01

    Tellurium ions form a soluble cationic complex with thiourea in acid medium. The cationic tellurium-thiourea species is strongly absorbed on a cationic ion exchanger. The retention of tellurium on the resin enables many interesting separation schemes for tellurium from various ions. With special interest, the separation of iodine from tellurium was studied. An efficient and convenient iodine-132 generator is described, in which the radio-iodine is eluted with water or 9 g/1 NaCl, when desired.

  2. A rapid radiochemical ion-exchange separation of iodine from tellurium: a novel radioiodine-132 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.

    1975-01-01

    Tellurium ions form a soluble cationic complex with thiourea in acid medium. The cationic tellurium-thiourea species is strongly absorbed on a cationic ion exchanger. The retention of tellurium on the resin enables many interesting separation schemes for tellurium from various ions. With special interest, the separation of iodine from tellurium was studied. An efficient and convenient iodine-132 generator is described, in which the radio-iodine is eluted with water or 9 g/1 NaCL, when desired

  3. Mobilities of ions trapped on vortex lines in dilute 3He--4He solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Dahm, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A model calculation of the mobility of a positive ion in the presence of 3 He atoms condensed on a vortex core is presented. Reasonable qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and reasons for differences are discussed. A reason for the larger mobility of the negative ion in comparison to the smaller positive ion is suggested. The contribution of vortex waves to the scattering of ions is addressed

  4. The role of ion optics modeling in the design and development of ion mobility spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew T.

    2005-05-01

    Detection of trace gases by ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) has become common in recent years. In fact, IMS devices are the most commonly deployed military devices for the detection of classical chemical warfare agents (CWA). IMS devices are protecting the homeland by aiding first responders in the identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and providing explosive and narcotic screening systems. Spurred by the asymmetric threat posed by new threat agents and the ever expanding list of toxic chemicals, research in the development, improvement, and optimization of IMS systems has increased. Much of the research is focused on increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of IMS systems. Ion optics is a large area of study in the field of mass spectrometry, but has been mostly overlooked in the design and development of IMS systems. Ion optics provides insight into particle trajectories, duty cycle, and efficiency of these systems. This paper will outline the role that ion optics can have in the development of IMS systems and introduce the trade space for traditional IMS as well as differential mobility spectroscopy.

  5. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  6. Measurement of negative ion mobilities in O2 and O3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Norimoto, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Mobility measurements of negative molecular oxygen ions in pure oxygen and in an oxygen-ozone mixture are reported. A cascaded gap consisting of an ion drift gap and an ion detection gap was used in the experiment. The ion detection gap was formed by a positive point and a grounded plane electrode was operated at atmospheric pressure. The zero field mobility of negative molecular oxygen ions was determined to be 2.07+-0.02 cm 2 /V.s. A somewhat higher value of oxygen mobility was found at higher electric field/pressure ratios; this is presumed to be due to negative ozone ions. When changing the electric field/pressure ratio the mobility of negative oxygen ions in oxygen-ozone mixtures becomes smaller than that in pure oxygen; this is probably due to the cumulative effect of other particles produced by silent discharges. (J.U.)

  7. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  8. A Simple Analytical Model for Predicting the Detectable Ion Current in Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Corona Discharge Ionization Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar Thomas; Kobelt, Tim; Spehlbrink, Hauke; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Corona discharge ionization sources are often used in ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) when a non-radioactive ion source with high ion currents is required. Typically, the corona discharge is followed by a reaction region where analyte ions are formed from the reactant ions. In this work, we present a simple yet sufficiently accurate model for predicting the ion current available at the end of this reaction region when operating at reduced pressure as in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) or most IMS-MS instruments. It yields excellent qualitative agreement with measurement results and is even able to calculate the ion current within an error of 15%. Additional interesting findings of this model are the ion current at the end of the reaction region being independent from the ion current generated by the corona discharge and the ion current in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) growing quadratically when scaling down the length of the reaction region. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Examination of Organic Vapor Adsorption onto Alkali Metal and Halide Atomic Ions by using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiβer, Anne; Hogan, Christopher J

    2017-11-03

    We utilize ion mobility mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) to examine the formation of ion-vapor molecule complexes with seed ions of K + , Rb + , Cs + , Br - , and I - exposed to n-butanol and n-nonane vapor under subsaturated conditions. Ion-vapor molecule complex formation is indicated by a shift in the apparent mobility of each ion. Measurement results are compared to predicted mobility shifts based upon the Kelvin-Thomson equation, which is commonly used in predicting rates of ion-induced nucleation. We find that n-butanol at saturation ratios as low as 0.03 readily binds to all seed ions, leading to mobility shifts in excess of 35 %. Conversely, the binding of n-nonane is not detectable for any ion for saturation ratios in the 0-0.27 range. An inverse correlation between the ionic radius of the initial seed and the extent of n-butanol uptake is observed, such that at elevated n-butanol concentrations, the smallest ion (K + ) has the smallest apparent mobility and the largest (I - ) has the largest apparent mobility. Though the differences in behavior of the two vapor molecules types examined and the observed effect of ionic seed radius are not accounted for by the Kelvin-Thomson equation, its predictions are in good agreement with measured mobility shifts for Rb + , Cs + , and Br - in the presence of n-butanol (typically within 10 % of measurements). © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. The mobility of Li+ and K+ ions in helium and argon at 294 and 80 K and derived interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, R.A.; Elford, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of mobility data is a valuable technique for deriving ion-atom interaction potentials or testing at initio potentials particularly at relatively large internuclear separations. In order to obtain the most complete information on the long range part of the potential it is necessary to have mobility data at sufficiently low gas temperatures and small values of E/N that the mobility is determined only by the dipole polarization force. Although this condition can be reasonably well met at room temperature for gases of high polarizability, this is not the case for ions in helium and in particular for the most well studied case, that of Li + in helium. The prime purpose of the present measurements was to obtain low temperature data for Li + in helium in order to determine more accurately the attractive long range tail of the potential. The measurements were also extended to argon to demonstrate the effect of the polarizability on the derivation of potentials. The mobility measurements were made using a drift tube-mass spectrometer system employing the Bradbury-Nielsen time of flight technique. Measurements were performed at 294 K and 80 K. The 'three temperature' theory of Lin, Viehland and Mason was used to fit interaction potentials to the present data. Detailed comparisons are made here only for the case of Li + ions in helium. The new data for 80 K provide additional information on the potential at internuclear separations which cover the range to 5 A. (Authors)

  11. Thin-film type Li-ion battery, using a polyethylene separator grafted with glycidyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, J.M.; Min, B.G.; Kim, D.-W.; Ryu, K.S.; Kim, K.M.; Lee, Y.G.; Chang, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    For the improvement of organic electrolyte holding ability, the hydrophobic surface of a porous polyethylene (PE)-membrane separator was modified by grafting a hydrophilic monomer, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), PE-g-GMA, by using electron beam technology, and applied to a thin film type Li-ion battery to elucidate the effect of a surface modification of a PE membrane separator on the cyclic life of Li-ion batteries. The Li-ion battery using the PE-g-GMA membrane separator showed a better cycle life than that of the unmodified PE membrane separator, indicating that the surface hydrophilicity of the PE membrane separator improved the electrolyte holding capability between the electrodes in the Li-ion cell and prevented the electrolyte leakage

  12. Waste separation and pretreatment using crystalline silicotitanate ion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, M.E.; Miller, J.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anthony, R.G. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) has been developed jointly by Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University to selectively remove Cs and other radionuclides from a wide spectrum of radioactive defense wastes. The CST exhibits high selectivity and affinity for Cs and Sr under a wide range of conditions. Tests show it can remove part-per-million concentrations of Cs{sup +} from highly alkaline, high-sodium simulated radioactive waste solutions modeled after those at Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River. The materials exhibit ion exchange properties based on ionic size selectivity. Specifically, crystalline lattice spacing is controlled to be highly selective for Cs ions even in waste streams containing very high (5 to 10 M) concentrations of sodium. The CST technology is being demonstrated with actual waste at several DOE facilities. The use of inorganic ion exchangers. The inorganics are more resistant to chemical, thermal, and radiation degradation. Their high selectivities result in more efficient operations offering the possibility of a simple single-pass operation. In contrast, regenerable organic ion exchangers require additional processing equipment to handle the regeneration liquids and the eluant with the dissolved Cs.

  13. Separation of transition-metal and 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid complexes using ion-pair liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basova, E.M.; Demurov, L.M.; Shpigun, O.A.; Van Iyuchun'

    1994-01-01

    The retention of chelates of Fe(3), Cu(2), Co(2), Ni(2), Zn(2), Cd(2), Hg(2), and Pb)(2) with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid depending on the concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, acetonitrile, and pH of the mobile phase was investigated using the ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on separon C 18 . Under the optimum conditions, the separation of mixtures of Fe(3), Co(2) and Ni(2) is performed within 8 to 12 min

  14. Separation and recovery of chromium and vanadium metal ions from waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothmann, H.; Bauer, G.; Stuhr, A.; Retelsdorf, H-J.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of Cr- and V- recovery from waste waters, precipitation of chromate and vanadate ions as insoluble compounds, absorption of Cr and V on solid ion exchange resins, absorption of Cr and V on fluid ion exchangers. Extraction with fluid exchangers: simultaneous extraction of Cr and V with Ion Exchanger Hoe F 1857 to determine the distribution isotherms, separate extraction of Cr in a continuously operating mixer-settler plant, separate extraction of vanadate in a constantly operating mixer-settler plant, test with an extraction column, losses in the organic phase during chromium and vanadium extraction, discussion of the test results and economic considerations

  15. Surface-Modified Membrane as A Separator for Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Young Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fabrication of novel modified polyethylene (PE membranes using plasma technology to create high-performance and cost-effective separator membranes for practical applications in lithium-ion polymer batteries. The modified PE membrane via plasma modification process plays a critical role in improving wettability and electrolyte retention, interfacial adhesion between separators and electrodes, and cycle performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries. This paper suggests that the performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries can be greatly enhanced by the plasma modification of commercial separators with proper functional materials for targeted application.

  16. Heavy stable isotope separation by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvet, P.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Larousse, B.; Patris, M.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific feasibility of the ion cyclotron resonance process (ICR), as well as the technical one, has been investigated carefully for light metallic elements, whose masses lies between 40 and 100/1,2/. The present work deals mainly with the same demonstration for heavier elements such as ytterbium, gadolinium and barium. Recent results, as well as future prospects, are considered here. (authors)

  17. Effects of mobile vacancies on the dynamics of ordering and phase separation in nonconserved multicomponent systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilhøj, Henriette; Jeppesen, Claus; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of mobile vacancies on the dynamics of ordering processes and phase separation in multicomponent systems are studied via Monte Carlo simulations of a two-dimensional seven-state ferromagnetic Potts model with varying degrees of site dilution. The model displays phase equilibria...

  18. Unexpected mobility of OH+ and OD+ molecular ions in cooled helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, R; Yamazoe, J; Tanuma, H; Ohtsuki, K

    2012-01-01

    Mobilities of OH + and OD + ions in cooled helium gas have been measured at gas temperature of 4.3 K. Measured mobilities of both ions as a function of an effective temperature T eff show a minimum around 80 K, and they are approaching to the polarization limits at very low T eff . These findings will be related to the extremely strong anisotropy of the interaction potential between the molecular ion and helium atom.

  19. Separation of Ra/Ca by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe, J.L.; Jimenez R, M.; Flores M, J.

    1991-04-01

    The radium and the calcium belong to the same group in the periodic classification and as consequence both they present very similar chemical properties, that makes difficult its separation. Both elements are also frequently associate in the nature, the calcium is very abundant, the radium is not it and for that reason it is indispensable its separation to analyze to this last one. The alpha spectroscopy is very appropriate to analyze to the 226 Ra, however to achieve a good resolution of the spectra, the samples should contain small quantities of calcium. The purposes of this work were to know the chromatographic behavior of the alkaline-earthy cations: calcium, barium and radium and to apply these knowledge to the separation of the 226 Ra and its analysis by means of alpha spectroscopy. (Author)

  20. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)

  1. Method of separating radioactive nuclides from ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Saikoku, Masami; Taneta, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to safely process radioactive nuclides from spent ion exchange resins by using existent processing facilities. Method: Ion exchange resins in aqueous medium are at first placed to the ultrasonic wave irradiation site and put into such a state where clads and resins are easily separatable from each other by weakening the bonding force between them. Since the clads are magnetic material such as Fe 3 O 4 or NiFe 2 O 4 , the clads can be collected in the direction of the magnetic force by exerting the magnetic field simultaneously. The collected clads are transported by means of the aqueous medium to a collecting tank by removing the effect of magnetic field, for example, by interrupting the current supply to the electromagnet. Finally, they were subjected to stabilization and fixation into inorganic hardening agent such as cement hardener. Thus, processions can be made safely by using existent facilities. (Takahashi, M.)

  2. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlösser, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.schloesser@googlemail.com; Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González, E-mail: laseres@pluri.ucm.es [Unidad de Láseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Plurisdisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  3. Study of ion separation through solid-supported liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Do; Kim, Kyoung Ho

    1990-01-01

    The membranes used in this study consist of a microporous polymeric support with the solvent contraining alamine 336, Tri-N-Octyl phosphine oxide, Tri-N-butyl phosphate, Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid as a carrier within the pores by the capillary forces. When this liquid membrane is interposed between aqueous feed and product solutions, the carrier serving as a complexing agent, can pick up the uranium ions on the feed side of the membrane and carry them across the membrane by diffusion. In this study, the uranium flux through the solid-supported liquid membrane was analyzed as a function of carrier concentration and acidity of the feed solution for the carrier species. Also, the Gel-liquid extraction of uranium ions from aqueous solution was performed. The adsorbents were prepared by casting the polymer solution composed of polyvinyl chloride, TOPO, and additions. The extraction of uranyl nitrate ions has been investigated as a function of TOPO/PVC ratio, evaporation time, and the stability. The results show that is maybe possible to develop an alternative uranium purification process. (author)

  4. A rapid method for the separation and estimation of uranium in geological materials using ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Satya; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Ion Chromatography is an elegant analytical technique which was primarily developed for the analysis of anionic species and over the years it has been used successfully to analyse various elements in different matrices. In this work the potential of Ion Chromatography has been used for the rapid separation and estimation of uranium in hydrogeochemical and other geological materials

  5. Modeling of ion transport through a porous separator in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zhao, T. S.; An, L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Wei, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop a two-dimensional, transient model to investigate the mechanisms of ion-transport through a porous separator in VRFBs and their effects on battery performance. Commercial-available separators with pore sizes of around 45 nm are particularly investigated and effects of key separator design parameters and operation modes are explored. We reveal that: i) the transport mechanism of vanadium-ion crossover through available separators is predominated by convection; ii) reducing the pore size below 15 nm effectively minimizes the convection-driven vanadium-ion crossover, while further reduction in migration- and diffusion-driven vanadium-ion crossover can be achieved only when the pore size is reduced to the level close to the sizes of vanadium ions; and iii) operation modes that can affect the pressure at the separator/electrode interface, such as the electrolyte flow rate, exert a significant influence on the vanadium-ion crossover rate through the available separators, indicating that it is critically important to equalize the pressure on each half-cell of a power pack in practical applications.

  6. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  7. Thin film separators with ion transport properties for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan

    2017-09-01

    Recent years, along with the increasing need of energy, energy storage also becomes a challenging problem which we need to deal with. The batterieshave a good developing prospect among energy storage system in storing energy such as wind, solar and geothermal energy. One hurdle between the lab-scale experiment and industry-scale application of the advanced batteries is the urgent need for limiting charging capacity degradation and improving cycling stability, known as the shuttle effect in lithium-sulfur batteries or electroosmotic drag coefficient in fuel-cell batteries. The microporous separator between the cathode and anode could be molecular engineered to possessesion selective permeation properties, which can greatly improves the energy efficiency and extends application range of the battery. The present review offers the fundamental fabrication methods of separator film with different material. The review also contains the chemical or physical structure of different materials which are used in making separator film. A table offers the reader a summary of properties such as ionic conductivity, ionic exchange capacity and current density etc.

  8. Aerosol Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ionization (Aero-VaPI) Coupled to Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Sandra L.; Ng, Nga L.; Zambrzycki, Stephen C.; Li, Anyin; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2018-02-01

    In this communication, we report on the real-time analysis of organic aerosol particles by Vacuum-assisted Plasma Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (Aero-VaPI-MS) using a home-built VaPI ion source coupled to a Synapt G2-S HDMS ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) system. Standards of organic molecules of interest in prebiotic chemistry were used to generate aerosols. Monocaprin and decanoic acid aerosol particles were successfully detected in both the positive and negative ion modes, respectively. A complex aerosol mixture of different sizes of polymers of L-malic acid was also examined through ion mobility (IM) separations, resulting in the detection of polymers of up to eight monomeric units. This noncommercial plasma ion source is proposed as a low cost alternative to other plasma ionization platforms used for aerosol analysis, and a higher-performance alternative to more traditional aerosol mass spectrometers. VaPI provides robust online ionization of organics in aerosols without extensive ion activation, with the coupling to IM-MS providing higher peak capacity and excellent mass accuracy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. High Resolution Separations and Improved Ion Production and Transmission in Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Page, Jason S.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tang, Keqi; Ding, Jie; Shen, Yufeng; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-31

    The goal of metabolomics experiments is the detection and quantitation of as many sample components as reasonably possible in order to identify “features” that can be used to characterize the samples under study. When utilizing electrospray ionization to produce ions for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), it is imperative that metabolome sample constituents be efficiently separated prior to ion production, in order to minimize the phenomenon of ionization suppression. Similarly, optimization of the MS inlet can lead to increased measurement sensitivity. This review will focus on the role of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) separations in conjunction with improved ion production and transmission for LC-MS-based metabolomics.

  10. Separation of electron ion ring components (computational simulation and experimental results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V.S.; Dolbilov, G.V.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Mironov, V.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Shevtsov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the available polarization value of electron-ion rings in the regime of acceleration and separation of its components at the final stage of acceleration are studied. The results of computational simulation by use of the macroparticle method and experiments on the ring acceleration and separation are given. The comparison of calculation results with experiment is presented

  11. Selective separation of uranium and thorium from lanthanides on sulphonic ion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubicki, Z; Hubicka, H; Jusiak, S [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland)

    1977-01-01

    Separation of uranium and thorium from rare earth elements was studied on sulphonic ion exchangers of various types. Ammonium acetate, ammonium salicylate, aliphatic amine acetates, metaphosphoric acid and others were used as eluants. The most effective separation was attained by using metaphosphoric acid as eluant.

  12. Alumina/Phenolphthalein Polyetherketone Ceramic Composite Polypropylene Separator Film for Lithium Ion Power Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Zhiyu; Yin, Xiunan; Li, Yunchao; Huo, Hong; Zhou, Jianjun; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PEK-C (T g : ∼230 °C) was used as binder to prepare ceramic coated composite PP separator. • The composite PP separator was stable and showed low thermal shrinkage in the electrolyte solvent. • The composite PP separator was helpful for high current density discharge. • The composite PP separator improved the safety performance of the coin cells. - Abstract: One way to obtain the lithium ion power battery with better safety performance was to increase the thermal shrinkage resistance of the separator at higher temperature. Phenolphthalein polyetherketone (PEK-C) is a polymer that can withstand high temperature to about 230 °C. Here, we developed a new Al 2 O 3 coated composite polypropylene (PP) separator with PEK-C as binder. The coating layer was formed on the surface of the PP separator and both ceramic particles and binder did not infiltrated into the separator along the thickness direction. The composite separator with 4 μm coating layer provided balanced permeability and thermal shrinkage properties. The composite separator was stable at the electrochemical window for lithium ion battery. The coin cells with composite separator showed better charge/discharge performance than that of the cells with the PP separator. It seemed that the composite separator was helpful for high current density discharge. Also, the battery safety performance test had verified that the Al 2 O 3 coated composite separator with PEK-C as binder had truly improved the safety performance of the coin cells. So, the newly developed Al 2 O 3 coated composite PP separator was a promising safety product for lithium ion power batteries with high energy density

  13. Coupling laser desorption with gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry for improved olive oil characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Sascha; Seifert, Luzia; Ahlmann, Norman; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Franzke, Joachim; Vautz, Wolfgang

    2018-07-30

    The investigation of volatile compounds in the headspace of liquid samples can often be used for detailed and non-destructive characterisation of the sample. This has great potential for process control or the characterisation of food samples, such as olive oil. We investigated, for the first time, the plume of substances released from olive oil droplets by laser desorption in a feasibility study and applied ion mobility spectrometry coupled to rapid GC pre-separation to enhance selectivity. Our investigation demonstrated that significantly more substances can be detected and quantified via laser desorption than in the usual headspace, enabling a rapid (5-10 min), sensitive (low ng/g range) and comprehensive analysis of the sample, with the potential for quality control and fraud identification. Therefore, laser desorption provides a useful sampling tool for characterising liquids in many applications, requiring only a few µL of sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species

  15. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroch, C.J. [Wastren, Inc., Westminster, CO (United States); Grant, P.J. [Wastren, Inc., Hummelstown, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  16. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Resolution and Assignment of Differential Ion Mobility Spectra of Sarcosine and Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthias, Francis; Maatoug, Belkis; Glish, Gary L.; Moussa, Fathi; Maitre, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Due to their central role in biochemical processes, fast separation and identification of amino acids (AA) is of importance in many areas of the biomedical field including the diagnosis and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism and biomarker discovery. Due to the large number of AA together with their isomers and isobars, common methods of AA analysis are tedious and time-consuming because they include a chromatographic separation step requiring pre- or post-column derivatization. Here, we propose a rapid method of separation and identification of sarcosine, a biomarker candidate of prostate cancer, from isomers using differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) interfaced with a tandem mass spectrometer (MS/MS) instrument. Baseline separation of protonated sarcosine from α- and β-alanine isomers can be easily achieved. Identification of DIMS peak is performed using an isomer-specific activation mode where DIMS- and mass-selected ions are irradiated at selected wavenumbers allowing for the specific fragmentation via an infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) process. Two orthogonal methods to MS/MS are thus added, where the MS/MS(IRMPD) is nothing but an isomer-specific multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method. The identification relies on the comparison of DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) chromatograms recorded at different wavenumbers. Based on the comparison of IR spectra of the three isomers, it is shown that specific depletion of the two protonated α- and β-alanine can be achieved, thus allowing for clear identification of the sarcosine peak. It is also demonstrated that DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) spectra in the carboxylic C=O stretching region allow for the resolution of overlapping DIMS peaks. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Ionization of water clusters by fast Highly Charged Ions: Stability, fragmentation, energetics and charge mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S; Maisonny, R; Capron, M; Bernigaud, V; Cassimi, A; Gervais, B; Grandin, J-P; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Rousseau, P; Tarisien, M; Adoui, L; Lopez-Tarifa, P; AlcamI, M; MartIn, F; Politis, M-F; Penhoat, M A Herve du; Vuilleumier, R; Gaigeot, M-P; Tavernelli, I

    2009-01-01

    We study dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of fast Ni ions. Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized clusters. An unusual stability of the (H 2 O) 4 H ''+ ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so called ''Eigen'' structure in gas phase water clusters. High charge mobility, responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters that dominate the mass spectrum, is evidenced. These results are supported by CPMD and TDDFT simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  20. The outline of the processes for lithium isotope separation by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Saito, Keiichiro; Naruse, Yuji; Shiba, Koreyuki; Kosuge, Masao; Itoi, Toshiaki; Kitsukawa, Tomohiko.

    1981-10-01

    A plant of lithium isotope separation by displacement chromatography is preliminary designed. The construction expenses of a 100 kg 7 Li/year plant and the unit cost of separation are estimated on the basis of the data taken from the literature, and the feasibility is studied. Experimental equipment of continuous displacement chromatography is set up and is tested with the stable automatic operation. These results indicate that the ion exchange method is promising for industrial lithium isotope separation. (author)

  1. Multi-column step-gradient chromatography system for automated ion exchange separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    A multi-column step-gradient chromatography system has been designed to perform automated sequential separations of radionuclides by ion exchange chromatography. The system consists of a digital programmer with automatic stream selection valve, two peristaltic pumps, ten columns, and a fraction collector. The automation allows complicated separations of radionuclides to be made with minimal analyst attention and allows for increased productivity and reduced cost of analyses. Results are reported for test separations on mixtures of radionuclides by the system

  2. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples.

  3. Separation of In (III)and Cd(II) Using Zirconium Vanadate As Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, A.; Abou El Nour, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, zirconium vanadate as inorganic ion exchanger was chemically synthesized using homogeneous precipitation technique. The obtained zirconium vanadate was mixed with Indium ions to determine its capacity in aqueous solution using batch experiment. Ion exchange capacity of various metal ions was investigated. Effects of ph, initial concentration, weight of the sorbent and contact time on the adsorption of metals were studied. Chromatographic column methods were applied for separation of indium and cadmium. A fixed bed column of zirconium vanadate was successfully used for separation of indium and cadmium. The recovery percentage of both metal ions was about 98.4% using 2 M HCl and citrate buffer ph 3.5, respectively.

  4. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: detecting multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility and mass spectrometry features in complex datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Kevin L; Slysz, Gordon W; Baker, Erin S; LaMarche, Brian L; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    The addition of ion mobility spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments requires new, or updated, software tools to facilitate data processing. We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is available as a command-line tool for download at http://omics.pnl.gov/software/LC-IMS-MS_Feature_Finder.php. The Microsoft.NET Framework 4.0 is required to run the software. All other dependencies are included with the software package. Usage of this software is limited to non-profit research to use (see README). rds@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Production of intense metallic ion beams in order of isotopic separations; Production de faisceaux intenses d'ions metalliques en vue de la separation des isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrouy, J L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    We describe an isotope separator with magnetic sector of 60 deg that permits, with a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The sources of realized ions provide ionic debits of 10 mA. This present work deals who to obtain intense ion beams (10 to 15 mA), different processes of ion currents measurement, as well as the study of the phenomenon of space charge neutralization. The second part of this memory will be on the survey and the adaptation on the source of various type of oven permitting to spray and to ionize metals directly. By order of increasing difficulty of vaporization, we reached the chromium. (M.B.) [French] 0n decrit un separateur d'isotope a secteur magnetique de 60 deg qui permet, grace a un procede de neutralisation de la charge d'espace, d'utiliser efficacement des faisceaux d'ions intenses. Les sources d'ions realisees fournissent des debits ioniques de 10 mA. Ce present travail porte sur l'obtention de faisceaux d'ions faisceaux d'ions intenses (10 a 15 mA), des differents procedes de mesures des courants d'ions, ainsi que l'etude du phenomene de neutralisation de charge d'espace. La deuxieme partie de ce memoire portera sur l'etude et l'adaptation sur la source de divers type de four permettant de vaporiser et d'ioniser directement les metaux. Par ordre de difficulte croissantes de vaporisations, nous avons atteint le chrome. (M.B.)

  6. Rate-dependent performance of ion chambers for particle-ID at the GSI fragment separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, Jan-Paul; Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, Roman; Maurus, Steffen [Physik Department, TU Muenchen (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the GSI Fragment Separator (FRS), multi-sampling ion chambers (MUSIC) employing a Frisch grid are used for charge identification of secondary ion beams. At the FAIR Super-FRS, higher rates are expected, and an event-by-event determination of the charge of secondary ions will be needed at rates of several 100000 events per second. The comparison of results from test measurements for the MUSIC performance with that of a recently constructed tilted-electrode gas ion chamber (TEGIC), which was designed similar to the one discussed, is presented.

  7. Transition from the constant ion mobility regime to the ion-atom charge-exchange regime for bounded collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poggie, Jonathan; Sternberg, Natalia

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and analytical study of a planar, collisional, direct-current, plasma-wall problem is presented. The fluid model for the problem is first validated by comparing numerical solutions with experimental data for low-pressure (∼0.1 Pa) electrode sheaths with wall potentials on the order of -100 V. For electric potential, ion number density, and ion velocity, good agreement was found between theory and experiment from within the sheath out to the bulk plasma. The frictional drag resulting from ion-neutral collisions is described by a model incorporating both linear and quadratic velocity terms. In order to study the transition from the constant ion mobility regime (linear friction) to the ion-atom charge-exchange collision regime (quadratic friction), the theoretical model was examined numerically for a range of ion temperatures and ion-neutral collision rates. It was found that the solution profiles in the quasineutral plasma depend on the ion temperature. For low ion temperatures they are governed mainly by the ion-atom charge-exchange regime, whereas for high temperatures they are governed by the constant ion mobility regime. Quasineutral plasma models corresponding to these two limiting cases were solved analytically. In particular, an analytical plasma solution is given for the ion-atom charge exchange regime that includes the effects of ion inertia. In contrast to the quasineutral plasma, the sheath is always governed for low to moderate collision rates by the ion-atom charge-exchange regime, independent of the ion temperature. Varying the collision rate, it was shown that when the wall potential is sufficiently high, the sheath cannot be considered collisionless, even if the collision rate is quite small

  8. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G; Laverlochere, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  9. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G.; Laverlochere, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  10. On the role of local charge carrier mobility in the charge separation mechanism of organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Saya; Saeki, Akinori; Saito, Masahiko; Osaka, Itaru; Seki, Shu

    2015-07-21

    Although the charge separation (CS) and transport processes that compete with geminate and non-geminate recombination are commonly regarded as the governing factors of organic photovoltaic (OPV) efficiency, the details of the CS mechanism remain largely unexplored. Here we provide a systematic investigation on the role of local charge carrier mobility in bulk heterojunction films of ten different low-bandgap polymers and polythiophene analogues blended with methanofullerene (PCBM). By correlating with the OPV performances, we demonstrated that the local mobility of the blend measured by time-resolved microwave conductivity is more important for the OPV output than those of the pure polymers. Furthermore, the results revealed two separate trends for crystalline and semi-crystalline polymers. This work offers guidance in the design of high-performance organic solar cells.

  11. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-02-18

    aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol particle size distribution measurements on January 17 and February 18, 2005 at Maitri, Antarctica – A case study. Devendraa Siingh Vimlesh Pant A K Kamra. Volume 120 Issue 4 August ...

  12. Separation of rare-earth (RE) ions by flotation with the aid of citric acid and hexadecylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sazonova, V.F.; Pavlenko, S.N.; Karpenko, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop further the flotation method for separating RE ions, namely, to examine the possibility of separating Re ions by converting them into citrate complexes and subsequently binding them with the aid of hexadecylamine in difficultly soluble and easily floatable compounds, sublates. Thus, these investigations showed that it is possible in principle to separate RE ions by conversion into citrate complexes followed by flotation separation of the latter from solutions with the aid of hexadecylamine

  13. Optimization of the Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Separation of Metal Ions Using Mixture Design and Response Surface Methods

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, Cevdet; YÜCEL, Yasin

    2014-01-01

    Mixture experimental design was used to enhance the separation selectivity of metal ions in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis. The separation of cations (Ag, Fe, Cr, Mn, Cd, Co, Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu) was achieved using imidazole as UV co-ion for indirect detection. Acetic acid was chosen as an electrolyte because its cathodic electroosmotic flow permits faster separation. The composition of organic solvents is important to achieve the best separation of all metal ions. Simplex latt...

  14. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mekky, W. [AMEC NSS, Power and Process America, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)

  15. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y.; Mekky, W.

    2015-01-01

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  17. Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile ions in copper selenides studied by EXAFS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asylgushina, G.N.; Bikkulova, N.N.; Titova, S.G.; Kochubey, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile Cu ions has been studied in Cu 2- x Se in superionic and in normal state using EXAFS-spectroscopy. It has been found that the transition from normal to superionic state and change of mobile Cu ion concentration practically do not have an influence on local state of Cu atoms, but change of both these parameters is accompanied by a change of Se-sublattice state

  18. Preparation of thermal resistant-enhanced separators for lithium ion battery by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Joon Yong; Shin, Junhwa; Nho, Youngchang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Micro-porous membrane made of polyethylene (PE) or polypropylene (PP) is most widely used as physical separators between the cathode and anode in lithium secondary batteries. However, the polymer membranes so soften or melt when the temperature reaches 130 .deg. C or higher because of thermal shrinkage of the polyolefin separators, and thaw low thermal stability may cause internal short circuiting or lead to thermal runaway. In this study, to realize a highly safe battery, we prepared three type separators as crosslinked PE separator, polymer-coated PE separator, and ceramic-coated PE separators, for lithium secondary battery by electron beam irradiation. We prepared crosslinked PE separators with the improved thermal stability by irradiating a commercial PE separator with an electron beam. A polymer-coated PE separator was prepared by a dip-coating of PVDF-HFP/PEGDMA on both sides of a PE separator followed by an electron beam irradiation. Ceramic-coated PE separator was prepared by coating ceramic particles on a PE separator followed by an electron beam irradiation. The prepared separators were characterized with FT-IR, SEM, electrolyte uptake, ion conductivity, thermal shrinkage and battery performance test.

  19. Effects of separator breakdown on abuse response of 18650 Li-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E.P.; Doughty, D.H.; Pile, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0613 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    The thermal abuse tolerance of Li-ion cells depends not only on the stability of the active materials in the anode and cathode but also on the stability of the separator which prevents direct interaction between these electrodes. Separator response has been measured as a function of temperature and high voltage both for isolated materials and in full 18650 cells. Separators with different compositions and properties were measured to determine the effect of separator melt integrity on cell response under abusive conditions. These studies were performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program. (author)

  20. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte. Methods and experimental organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new variant of technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the method reproducibility was checked

  1. Separation of the lanthanides on high-efficiency bonded phases and conventional ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elchuk, S.; Cassidy, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separations (< 20 min) of the lanthanides are illustrated for both 5- and 10-μm bonded-phase strong-acid ion exchangers. The performance of these bonded phase packings is compared with that obtained with a 13-μm styrene-divinylbenzene resin. The eluted metal ions are detected with a variable-wavelength detector after a post-column complexation reaction. The requirements and characteristics of post-column reaction for sensitive metal ion detection after separation on high-performance columns are discussed and the linearity, reproducibility, and sensitivity of the system used in the work are illustrated. The potential of on-column preconcentration for the ultratrace (pg/mL) determination of metal ions is also discussed and illustrated. 7 figures, 2 tables

  2. Basic studies of a gas-jet-coupled ion source for on-line isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Novick, V.J.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A hollow-cathode ion source was used in a gas-jet-coupled configuration to produce ion beams of fission products transported to it from a 252 Cf fission source. Solid aerosols of NaCl and Ag were used effectively as activity carriers in the gas-jet system. Flat-plate skimmers provided an effective coupling of the ion source to the gas jet. Ge(Li) spectrometric measurements of the activity deposited on an ion-beam collector relative to that deposited on a pre-skimmer collector were used to obtain separation efficiencies ranging from 0.1% to > 1% for Sr, Y, Tc, Te, Cs, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm. The use of CCl 4 as a support gas resulted in a significant enhancement of the alkaline-earth and rare-earth separation efficiencies

  3. The momentum-loss achromat - a new method for the isotopical separation of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.H.; Geissel, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Dufour, J.P.; Hanelt, E.

    1987-03-01

    The application of the slowing-down process of relativistic heavy ions in a layer of matter in ion-optical devices is theoretically investigated. The modifications of the phase space of the ion beam due to the dissipative forces and the straggling phenomena are discussed. Methods are developed to study the properties of the momentum-loss achromat, an isotope separator consisting of an achromatic magnetic system with an energy degrader located in the intermediate dispersive focal plane. This device separates projectile fragments with respect to A and Z up to uranium over a wide energy range with an efficiency in the order of 50% and with separation times of several hundred nanoseconds. (orig.)

  4. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromatographic separation of metal ions by means of paper treated with trioctyl - phosphate, Annex 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvjeticanin, N M; Cvoric, J D; Obrenovic-Paligoric, I D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    This chromatographic behaviour of uranium, thorium and some other metal ions and long-lived fission products was investigated on paper treated with trioctyl-phosphate. Hydrochloric, nitric, sulphuric and perchloric acids in concentrations of 0.1-10 N were used as the elution agents. The R{sub f} values of the ions investigated, which show the possibility of the inter separation of some cations, are given as a function of the concentration of acids (author)

  6. Elaboration and test of the method of separation of alkaline metals ions with tin phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, G.I.; Chernyak, A.S.; Kostromina, O.N.; Kachur, N.Ya.; Shpeyzer, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to elaboration and test of the method of separation of alkaline metals ions with tin phosphate. Thus, the isotherms of sorption of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions with amorphous tin phosphate depending on their concentration, ph of solution, sorbent quantity are obtained. The parameters of extraction of potassium microquantities from sodium salts are defined. Ultra pure sodium chloride, sodium iodide, sodium sulphate, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium phosphate are synthesized.

  7. Mass Spectrum Analysis of CO2 and N2 Using Ion Beam Separator System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjipto-Sujitno, BA; Darsono; Agus-Santoso

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to study investigate the massspectrum profile of CO 2 and N 2 emitted from Penning ion source using ionbeam separator. Besides that, it is also identified the compositions of CO 2 and N 2 ion gas and their abundances through their mass spectrum profile,because as we know that these ions are consist of ion of atom or molecule aswell as the their abundances. To get these profiles, the ion beam acceleratedin accelerating tube are passed through magnet separator. After passing themagnet separator, the ion current beam was detected using microampere meter.By scanning the strength of magnetic field, it will be found the currentspectrum profile as a function of magnetic field. From this current spectrum,we can make a mass spectrum profile. From experiment done, it was found thatthe mass spectrum peak of CO 2 and N 2 were C + with m/z = (12.00 ± 0.10)amu, O 2 + = (31.96 ± 0.29) amu, CO 2 + = (43.93 ± 0.31) amu, N + (13.97 ± 0.33) amu, and N 2 + = (28.05 ± 0.18) amu. (author)

  8. Computer programmes for high current ion trajectories in a magnetic sector-type mass separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Akira

    1988-01-01

    According to theoretical calculations previously proposed by the author, a new programme 'MALT' for electronic computers has been developed for numerical calculations of ion trajectories of a high current ion beam traversing a magnetic sector-type mass separator. In the programme, both effects of the fringing field and the space charge are taken into account in an analytical way, so that numerical calculations can be done straightforwardly. Furthermore, it becomes also possible to analyze and cotrol the trajectories of the high current ion beam. The programme MALT contains several subroutine programmes which are separated individually for the convenience of various calculations with respect to the high current ion beam. To demonstrate the calculations by the use of these subroutine programmes, a main programme for the calculation of the trajectories in the whole region of the separator is shown, which also makes it possible to draw the traces of the trajectories. The trajectories calculated by the proposed programme have been compared with the images of the ion beams recorded on novel dry plates developed by the author: the comparison enables us to evaluate the effective space charge and the effective space charge potential, and to analyze the behaviour of the beam of neutral particles accompanying the ion beam. (author)

  9. Automated ion-exchange system for the radiochemical separation of the noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-exchange separation is particularly suitable for mechanisation and automated ion exchange has been applied to the activation analysis of biological and environmental samples. In this work a system has been designed for experimental studies, which can be adapted for different modes of operation. The equipment is based on a large-volume sampler for the automatic presentation of 500 ml of liquid to a sampling probe. The sample is delivered to the ion-exchange column by means of a peristaltic pump. The purpose of this work was to automate a procedure for separating the noble metals from irradiated geological samples, for neutron-activation analysis. The process of digesting the rock sample is carried out manually in 30 min and is not suited to unattended operation. The volume of the resulting liquid sample may be 100 ml and so the manual separation step may take as long as 1.25 h per sample. The reason for automating this part of the procedure is to reduce the separation time for a group of five samples and consequently to improve the sensitivity of the analysis for radionuclides with short half-lives. This paper describes the automatic ion-exchange system and the ways in which it can be used. The mode of operation for the separation of the noble metals is given in detail. The reproducibility of the system has been assessed by repeated measurements on a standard reference matte. (author)

  10. Battery Separator Characterization and Evaluation Procedures for NASA's Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Richard S.; Bennet, William R.; Wong, Eunice K.; Lewton, MaryBeth R.; Harris, Megan K.

    2010-01-01

    To address the future performance and safety requirements for the electrical energy storage technologies that will enhance and enable future NASA manned aerospace missions, advanced rechargeable, lithium-ion battery technology development is being pursued within the scope of the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program s (ETDP's) Energy Storage Project. A critical cell-level component of a lithium-ion battery which significantly impacts both overall electrochemical performance and safety is the porous separator that is sandwiched between the two active cell electrodes. To support the selection of the optimal cell separator material(s) for the advanced battery technology and chemistries under development, laboratory characterization and screening procedures were established to assess and compare separator material-level attributes and associated separator performance characteristics.

  11. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 3. Relating Solution-Phase to Gas-Phase Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study peptide ion conformer establishment during the electrospray process. An explicit water model is used for nanodroplets containing a model peptide and hydronium ions. Simulations are conducted at 300 K for two different peptide ion charge configurations and for droplets containing varying numbers of hydronium ions. For all conditions, modeling has been performed until production of the gas-phase ions and the resultant conformers have been compared to proposed gas-phase structures. The latter species were obtained from previous studies in which in silico candidate structures were filtered according to ion mobility and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) reactivity matches. Results from the present study present three key findings namely (1) the evidence from ion production modeling supports previous structure refinement studies based on mobility and HDX reactivity matching, (2) the modeling of the electrospray process is significantly improved by utilizing initial droplets existing below but close to the calculated Rayleigh limit, and (3) peptide ions in the nanodroplets sample significantly different conformers than those in the bulk solution due to altered physicochemical properties of the solvent. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Separation and Extraction of Some Heavy and Toxic Metal Ions from Their Wastes by Ionic Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed Hegazy, A.; Kamal, H.; Mahmoud, Gh. A.; Khalifa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation and characterisation of a series of ion-exchange membranes for the purpose of separation and extraction of some heavy and toxic metal ions from their wastes have been studied. Such ion exchange membranes prepared by γ-radiation grafting of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinyl acetate (VAc) in a binary monomers mixture onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) using direct technique of grafting. The reaction conditions at which grafting process proceeds successfully have been determined. Many modification treatments have been attempted for the prepared membranes to improve their ion-exchange properties. The possibility of their practical use in waste water treatment from some heavy and toxic metal ions such as Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ ,Cu 2+ ,Fe 3+ ,Sr 2+ and Li + have been investigated. These grafted membranes showed great promise for its use in the field of extraction and removal of some heavy and toxic metals from their wastes

  13. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  14. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  15. Sulfide precipitation method of separating uranium from Group II and Group III metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium is separated from analytical Group II and Group III metal ions in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is extracted with a non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent containing a reagent which will react with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the liquor is acidic, the solvent is washed with water. Then to the solvent is added an aqueous solution containing about 0.5 to 1.0 mole per liter of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions and sufficient sulfide ions to precipitate the metal ions as sulfides. The solvent and the aqueous solution are separated and the sulfides filtered from the aqueous solution. The ammonium-uranyl-tricarbonate in the aqueous solution can then be precipitated by increasing the concentration of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions to about 1.5 to 2.5 moles per liter. The precipitate is filtered and calcined to obtain U 3 O 8 or UO 2 . 21 claims, 1 figure

  16. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-01-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: (1) The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. (2) The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs departments (9%). (3) IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. (4) Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. (5) Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall operation

  17. Investigation of ion mobilities in different buffer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peska, N.

    1981-01-01

    An existing drift apparatus has been adapted to mobility measurements. Mobilities of C + /He, CH + /He, CH 2 + /He and CH 3 + /Ar, hitherto unknown or known with low accuracy only, have been determined over the E/N range of about 20 - 200 Td. (G.Q.)

  18. Relaxation effects in ionic mobility and cluster formation: negative ions in SF6 at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, A M; De Urquijo, J; Hinojosa, G; Hernandez-Avila, J L; Basurto, E

    2010-01-01

    The relaxation effects of the ionic mobility and the formation of negative-ion clusters in SF 6 are studied in this work. For this purpose, we have measured the mobility of negative ions in SF 6 over the pressure range 100-800 Torr at a fixed value of density-normalized electric field, E/N, of 20 Td (1 Townsend = 10 -17 V cm 2 ). The data obtained show a clear dependence of the negative-ion drift velocity on drift distance. It is observed that the drift velocity (mobility) reaches a steady-state value only for drift distances above 2 cm, over the studied pressure range. In addition to this, we have observed that the ionic mobility depends strongly on the gas pressure. An explanation of this dependence of the ionic mobility on gas pressure is given in terms of a negative-ion clustering formation process. It was found that the assumption of a linear dependence of the cluster ion mass on pressure provides a satisfactory explanation for the observed mobilities.

  19. Polymethylmethacrylate/Polyacrylonitrile Membranes via Centrifugal Spinning as Separator in Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yanilmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofiber membranes have been extensively studied as separators in Li-ion batteries due to their large porosity, unique pore structure, and high electrolyte uptake. However, the electrospinning process has some serious drawbacks, such as low spinning rate and high production cost. The centrifugal spinning technique can be used as a fast, cost-effective and safe technique to fabricate high-performance fiber-based separators. In this work, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA/polyacrylonitrile (PAN membranes with different blend ratios were produced via centrifugal spinning and characterized by using different electrochemical techniques for use as separators in Li-ion batteries. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membrane, centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membranes had larger ionic conductivity, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. Centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membrane separators were assembled into Li/LiFePO4 cells and these cells delivered high capacities and exhibited good cycling performance at room temperature. In addition, cells using centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membrane separators showed superior C-rate performance compared to those using microporous polypropylene (PP membranes. It is, therefore, demonstrated that centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membranes are promising separator candidate for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  20. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile/polyurethane composite nanofibrous separator with electrochemical performance for high power lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainab, Ghazala [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Xianfeng, E-mail: wxf@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Yu, Jianyong [Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Zhai, Yunyun; Ahmed Babar, Aijaz; Xiao, Ke [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Ding, Bin, E-mail: binding@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) for high performance require separators with auspicious reliability and safety. Keeping LIBs reliability and safety in view, microporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/polyurethane (PU) nonwoven composite separator have been developed by electrospinning technique. The physical, electrochemical and thermal properties of the PAN/PU separator were characterized. Improved ionic conductivity up to 2.07 S cm{sup −1}, high mechanical strength (10.38 MPa) and good anodic stability up to 5.10 V are key outcomes of resultant membranes. Additionally, high thermal stability displaying only 4% dimensional change after 0.5 h long exposure to 170 °C in an oven, which could be valuable addition towards the safety of LIBs. Comparing to commercialized polypropylene based separators, resulting membranes offered improved internal short-circuit protection function, offering better rate capability and enhanced capacity retention under same observation conditions. These fascinating characteristics endow these renewable composite nonwovens as promising separators for high power LIBs battery. - Highlights: • The PAN/PU based separators were prepared by multi-needle electrospinning technique. • The electrospun separators displays good mechanical properties and thermal stability. • These separators exhibit good wettability with liquid electrolyte, high ion conductivity and internal short-circuit protection. • Nanofibrous composite nonwoven possesses stable cyclic performance which give rise to acceptable battery performances.

  1. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer detection using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Handa

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for lung cancer detection including computed tomography (CT and bronchoscopy are expensive and invasive. Thus, there is still a need for an optimal lung cancer detection technique.The exhaled breath of 50 patients with lung cancer histologically proven by bronchoscopic biopsy samples (32 adenocarcinomas, 10 squamous cell carcinomas, 8 small cell carcinomas, were analyzed using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and compared with 39 healthy volunteers. As a secondary assessment, we compared adenocarcinoma patients with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation.A decision tree algorithm could separate patients with lung cancer including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. One hundred-fifteen separated volatile organic compound (VOC peaks were analyzed. Peak-2 noted as n-Dodecane using the IMS database was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 70.0% and a specificity of 89.7%. Incorporating a decision tree algorithm starting with n-Dodecane, a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% was achieved. Comparing VOC peaks between adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects, n-Dodecane was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 89.7%. Fourteen patients positive for EGFR mutation displayed a significantly higher n-Dodecane than for the 14 patients negative for EGFR (p<0.01, with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 78.6%.In this prospective study, VOC peak patterns using a decision tree algorithm were useful in the detection of lung cancer. Moreover, n-Dodecane analysis from adenocarcinoma patients might be useful to discriminate the EGFR mutation.

  2. Supercritical fluid chromatographic resolution of water soluble isomeric carboxyl/amine terminated peptides facilitated via mobile phase water and ion pair formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M A; Riley, F; Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    2012-04-13

    Both analytical scale and preparative scale packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) have found widespread applicability for chiral separations of multiple polar pharmaceutical candidates. However, SFC is rapidly becoming an achiral technique. More specifically, ion pair SFC is finding greater utility for separation of ionic analytes such as amine salts and organic sulfonates. The key to this success is, in part, the incorporation of additives such as trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate into the mobile phase in association with a wide variety of both bonded silica stationary phases and high purity bare silica. Ion pairing SFC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection and mass spectrometric detection is presented here for the separation of water soluble, uncapped, isomeric peptide pairs that differ in amino acid arrangement. The separation is best achieved on either diol-bonded silica or bare silica with 1-5% (w/w) water as a significant ingredient in the mobile phase. Nitrogenous stationary phases such as 2-ethylpyridine, which had been very successful for the separation of capped peptides failed to yield the desired separation regardless of the mobile phase composition. A HILIC type retention mechanism is postulated for the separation of both isomeric uncapped peptide pairs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mobility and diffusion of atomic helium and neon ions in their parent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skullerud, H.R.; Larsen, P.-H.

    1990-01-01

    The mobility and the diffusion tensor have been calculated for He + ions in He and Ne + ions in Ne, at temperatures of 77-78 and 294 K, and at field-to-density values E/n 0 up to 2000 Td. For He + ions in He, ab initio potentials were used, with a careful extrapolation to large distances. A slight adjustment of the mean potential resulted in agreement between calculated mobilities and the best experimental values to better than 0.5%. For Ne + ions in Ne, a potential model with three adjustable parameters was constructed, and an overall agreement between measured and calculated mobilities to better than 1% was obtained. The model potentials probably give a good estimate of the gerade-ungerade splitting at internuclear distances from 7.5 to 10 au, but are not expected to be accurate at shorter distances. (author)

  4. Positive ion mobilities in normal liquid 3He at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.W.

    1978-11-01

    The mobility has been measured of positive ions in liquid 3 he in the range 2.5 mK 3 sub(m)/sup(V) 5 sub(m)/sup(V). The effects of 500 p.p.m. 4 He in the 3 He were investigated. It was found that, at low temperatures, several stable ion species could be produced for 3 He pressures of 23 bar and above and, between 25 mK and 60 mK, time dependent conversion from one species of ion to another was observed at all pressures. The creation mechanism, mobility and stability of multiple positive ions were studied. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. The measured drift field dependence of mobility is used to test the quasiparticle scattering model assumed for the liquid. (U.K.)

  5. Identity confirmation of drugs and explosives in ion mobility spectrometry using a secondary drift gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Abu B; Hill, Herbert H

    2007-10-15

    This work demonstrated the potential of using a secondary drift gas of differing polarizability from the primary drift gas for confirmation of a positive response for drugs or explosives by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The gas phase mobilities of response ions for selected drugs and explosives were measured in four drift gases. The drift gases chosen for this study were air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide providing a range of polarizability and molecular weights. Four other drift gases (helium, neon, argon and sulfur hexafluoride) were also investigated but design limitations of the commercial instrument prevented their use for this application. When ion mobility was plotted against drift gas polarizability, the resulting slopes were often unique for individual ions, indicating that selectivity factors between any two analytes varied with the choice of drift gas. In some cases, drugs like THC and heroin, which are unresolved in air or nitrogen, were well resolved in carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide.

  6. Mobility and molecular ions of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, methyl salicylate and acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, D. M.

    1983-06-01

    The mobilities of positive and negative reactant ions are reported for (H2O)nH(+); (H2O)2O2 and (H2O)2CO3(-) ion clusters. The formation of positive DMMP monomer and dimer is reported, and equilbria molecular reactions are reported. Acetone is reported as forming a dimer at 81 ppb with a reduced mobility (K sub o) of 1.82, Methyl salicylate is shown to form a protonated and hydrated positive monomer. Mixtures of DMMP and methyl salicylate with acetone showed a substantial change in DMMP ion clustering and little or no change in the methyl salicylate mobility spectra. Negative ions were not observed for DMMP, methyl salicylate, acetone and the mixtures under the conditions reported.

  7. Separation of silver ions and starch modified silver nanoparticles using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and inductively coupled mass spectrometric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Traci A.; Saadawi, Ryan; Zhang, Peng; Caruso, Joseph A.; Landero-Figueroa, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The production of commercially available products marketed to contain silver nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Species-specific toxicity is a phenomenon associated with many elements, including silver, making it imperative to develop a method to identify and quantify the various forms of silver (namely, silver ions vs. silver nanoparticles) possibly present in these products. In this study a method was developed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV–VIS) and inductively coupled mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection to separate starch stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions (Ag + ) by cation exchange chromatography with 0.5 M nitric acid mobile phase. The silver nanoparticles and ions were baseline resolved with an ICP-MS response linear over four orders of magnitude, 0.04 mg kg −1 detection limit, and 90% chromatographic recovery for silver solutions containing ions and starch stabilized silver nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm

  8. Separation of silver ions and starch modified silver nanoparticles using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and inductively coupled mass spectrometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, Traci A.; Saadawi, Ryan; Zhang, Peng; Caruso, Joseph A., E-mail: joseph.caruso@uc.edu; Landero-Figueroa, Julio

    2014-10-01

    The production of commercially available products marketed to contain silver nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Species-specific toxicity is a phenomenon associated with many elements, including silver, making it imperative to develop a method to identify and quantify the various forms of silver (namely, silver ions vs. silver nanoparticles) possibly present in these products. In this study a method was developed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV–VIS) and inductively coupled mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection to separate starch stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions (Ag{sup +}) by cation exchange chromatography with 0.5 M nitric acid mobile phase. The silver nanoparticles and ions were baseline resolved with an ICP-MS response linear over four orders of magnitude, 0.04 mg kg{sup −1} detection limit, and 90% chromatographic recovery for silver solutions containing ions and starch stabilized silver nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm.

  9. Theory of longitudinal plasma waves with allowance for ion mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichigin, G.N.

    2003-01-01

    One studies propagation of stationary longitudinal plasma wave of high amplitude in collisionless cold plasma with regard to motion of electrons and ions in a wave. One derived dependences of amplitudes of electric field, potential, frequency and length of wave on the speed of wave propagation and on the parameter equal to the ration of ion mass to electron mass. Account of motion of ions in the wave with maximum possible amplitude resulted in nonmonotone dependence of frequency on wave speed [ru

  10. Online Ozonolysis Combined with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Provides a New Platform for Lipid Isomer Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poad, Berwyck L.; Zheng, Xueyun; Mitchell, Todd A.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2017-12-21

    One of the most significant challenges in contemporary lipidomics lies in the separation and identification of lipid isomers that differ only in site(s) of unsaturation or geometric configuration of the carbon-carbon double bonds. While analytical separation techniques including ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and liquid chromatography (LC) can separate isomeric lipids under appropriate conditions, conventional tandem mass spectrometry cannot provide unequivocal identification. To address this challenge, we have implemented ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) in-line with LC, IMS and high resolution mass spectrometry. Modification of an IMS- capable quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was undertaken to allow the introduction of ozone into the high-pressure trapping ion funnel region preceding the IMS cell. This enabled the novel LC-OzID-IMS-MS configuration where ozonolysis of ionized lipids occurred rapidly (10 ms) without prior mass-selection. LC-elution time alignment combined with accurate mass and arrival time extraction of ozonolysis products facilitated correlation of precursor and product ions without mass-selection (and associated reductions in duty cycle). Unsaturated lipids across 11 classes were examined using this workflow in both positive and negative ion modalities and in all cases the positions of carbon-carbon double bonds were unequivocally assigned based on predictable OzID transitions. Under these conditions geometric isomers exhibited different IMS arrival time distributions and distinct OzID product ion ratios providing a means for discrimination of cis/trans double bonds in complex lipids. The combination of OzID with multidimensional separations shows significant promise for facile profiling of unsaturation patterns within complex lipidomes.

  11. Separation of thorium from cerium by the ion-exchange sorption method. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozanski, A.

    1981-01-01

    The method is described of separation of trace-quantities of thorium from chloride and ceric sulfate solutions. Thorium is sorbed selectively on the ion exchanger chelating Vofatite MC-50. Thorium-free ceric solutions were achieved and after ionite eluation concentrates of oxides were considerably enriched. (author)

  12. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  13. Investigation of gas discharge ion sources for on-line mass separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, R.

    1976-03-01

    The development of efficient gas discharge ion sources with axial beam extraction for on-line mass separation is described. The aim of the investigation was to increase the ion source temperature, the lifetime and the ionisation yield in comparison to present low-pressure are discharge ion sources and to reduce the ion current density from usually 1 to 100 mA/cm 3 . In all ion sources the pressure range below the minimal ignition pressure of the arc discharge was investigated. As a result an ion source was developed which works at small changes in geometry and in electric device of a Nielsen source with high ionization yield (up to 50% for xenon) stabil and without ignition difficulties up to 10 -5 Torr. At a typical pressure of 3 x 10 -5 Torr ion current and ion current density are about 1 μA and 0.1 mA/cm 3 respectively besides high yield and a great emission aperture (diameter 1.2 mm). (orig.) [de

  14. Separation and recovery of dioxins using a heavy ion irradiation film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S; Iida, S; Ohbayashi, Y [Meiji Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2004-02-01

    It is demonstrated that halogenated dioxin and its derivatives can be separated from polluted aqueous solutions using pervaporation technique with a nanopore membrane fabricated by heavy-ion beam irradiation. The concentration of dioxin in the sample solution was set below 1 ppm. Polyethyleneterphthalate membrane was used. The membrane was first irradiated with high energy Xe-ions of 450 MeV with a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 3} to 3 x 10{sup 9} ions/cm{sup 2} using TIARA facility of JAERI Takasaki, etched with 6 mol/l NaOH solution resulting in formation of pores with diameter ranging from several to 40 nm, followed by grafting with monomers having affinity to dioxin. Dibenzo-p-dioxin was used to obtain permeability data. Separation factor obtained were within the range from 10 to 50. (S. Ohno)

  15. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Philippos, E-mail: philippos.papadakis@jyu.fi; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  17. A novel intrinsically porous separator for self-standing lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo; Villano, Paola; Carewska, Maria

    2002-01-01

    γ-LiAlO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and MgO were used as fillers in a PVdF-HFP polymer matrix to form self-standing, intrinsically porous separators for lithium-ion batteries. These separators can be hot-laminated onto the electrodes without losing their ability to adsorb liquid electrolyte. The electrochemical stability of the separators was tested by constructing half-cells with the configuration: Li/fibre-glass/filler-based separator/electrode. MgO-based separators were found to work well with both positive and negative electrodes. An ionic conductivity of about 4x10 -4 S cm -1 was calculated for the MgO-based separator containing 40% 1 M solution of LiPF 6 in an EC/DMC 1:1 solvent. Self-standing, lithium-ion cells were constructed using the MgO-based separator and the resulting battery performance evaluated in terms of cyclability, power and energy density

  18. Polymer-supported reagents with enhanced metal ion recognition: Application to separations science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandratos, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    The design and development of polymer-supported reagents with ever-increasing specificities for targeted metal ions remains an important areas of research. The need for efficient separation schemes for both ions and molecules has been outlined in a report by the National Research Council (King) and will gain increased emphasis as environmental restoration is pursued. Polymer-supported reagents are unique in their ability to be applied in an environmentally benign manner to a host of challenges. Such reagents, in the form of beads, can be applied to continuous separation processes ranging from the removal of metal ions in water to the recovery of medicinal drugs produced through biotechnological means. The application of polymer-supported reagents to metal ion separations still requires developing a fundamental understanding of ligand-metal interactions, the role of the polymer in those interactions, and the methods of synthesizing such polymeric reagents in a readily applicable form. Ion exchange resins with sulfonic acid ligands are the prototypical polymer-supported reagents, and their properties have been exhaustively studied (Helfferich). The high acidity of the sulfonic acid group, however, precludes much selectivity, and it displays a very limited range of reaction free energy values with different metal ions (Boyd et al.). The carboxylic acid ligand, present in the acrylate resins, is more selective, though its weak acidity requires relatively high pH solutions for it to be effective. Research has thus been focused on the preparation of polymer-supported reagents with high levels of specificity for targeted metal ions

  19. Using a portable ion mobility spectrometer to screen dietary supplements for sibutramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jamie D; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie M; Kauffman, John F; Westenberger, Benjamin J; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2011-02-20

    In response to recent incidents of undeclared sibutramine, an appetite suppressant found in dietary supplements, we developed a method to detect sibutramine using hand-held ion mobility spectrometers with an analysis time of 15 s. Ion mobility spectrometry is a high-throughput and sensitive technique that has been used for illicit drug, explosive, volatile organic compound and chemical warfare detection. We evaluated a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer as a tool for the analysis of supplement extracts containing sibutramine. The overall instrumental limit of detection of five portable ion mobility spectrometers was 2 ng of sibutramine HCl. When sample extractions containing 30 ng/μl or greater of sibutramine were analyzed, saturation of the ionization chamber of the spectrometer occurred and the instrument required more than three cleaning cycles to remove the drug. Hence, supplement samples suspected of containing sibutramine should be prepared at concentrations of 2-20 ng/μl. To obtain this target concentration range for products containing unknown amounts of sibutramine, we provided a simple sample preparation procedure, allowing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or other agencies to screen products using the portable ion mobility spectrometer. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Separation of polar betalain pigments from cacti fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Stalica, Paweł; Jerz, Gerold; Klose, Bettina; Gebers, Nadine; Winterhalter, Peter; Spórna, Aneta; Szaleniec, Maciej; Mizrahi, Yosef

    2009-10-09

    Polar betacyanin pigments together with betaxanthins from ripe cactus fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus (Cactaceae) were fractionated by means of preparative ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography (IP-HSCCC) also using the elution-extrusion (EE) approach for a complete pigment recovery. HSCCC separations were operated in the classical 'head-to-tail' mode with an aqueous mobile phase. Different CCC solvent systems were evaluated in respect of influence and effectiveness of fractionation capabilities to separate the occurring pigment profile of H. polyrhizus. For that reason, the additions of two different volatile ion-pair forming perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCA) were investigated. For a direct comparison, five samples of Hylocereus pigment extract were run on preparative scale (900 mg) in 1-butanol-acetonitrile-aqueous TFA 0.7% (5:1:6, v/v/v) and the modified systems tert.-butyl methyl ether-1-butanol-acetonitrile-aqueous PFCA (2:2:1:5, v/v/v/v) using 0.7% and 1.0% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) in the aqueous phase, respectively. The chemical affinity to the organic stationary CCC solvent phases and in consequence the retention of these highly polar betalain pigments was significantly increased by the use of the more lipophilic fluorinated ion-pair reagent HFBA instead of TFA. The HFBA additions separated more effectively the typical cacti pigments phyllocactin and hylocerenin from betanin as well as their iso-forms. Unfortunately, similar K(D) ratios and selectivity factors alpha around 1.0-1.1 in all tested solvent systems proved that the corresponding diastereomers, 15S-type pigments cannot be resolved from the 15R-epimers (iso-forms). Surprisingly, additions of the stronger ion-pair reagent (HFBA) resulted in a partial separation of hylocerenin from phyllocactin which were not resolved in the other solvent systems. The pigments were detected by means of HPLC-DAD and HPLC-electrospray ionization-MS using also

  1. Production of intense metallic ion beams in order of isotopic separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrouy, J.L.

    1955-01-01

    We describe an isotope separator with magnetic sector of 60 deg that permits, with a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The sources of realized ions provide ionic debits of 10 mA. This present work deals who to obtain intense ion beams (10 to 15 mA), different processes of ion currents measurement, as well as the study of the phenomenon of space charge neutralization. The second part of this memory will be on the survey and the adaptation on the source of various type of oven permitting to spray and to ionize metals directly. By order of increasing difficulty of vaporization, we reached the chromium. (M.B.) [fr

  2. Electrochemical membrane reactor: In situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Jeeshan; Tripathi, Bijay P.; Saxena, Arunima; Shahi, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane reactor with three compartments (anolyte, catholyte and central compartment) based on in-house-prepared cation- and anion-exchange membrane was developed to achieve in situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions. The physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the ion-exchange membrane under standard operating conditions reveal its suitability for the proposed reactor. Experiments using synthetic solutions of chromate and dichromate of different concentrations were carried out to study the feasibility of the process. Electrochemical reactions occurring at the cathode and anode under operating conditions are proposed. It was observed that metal ion migrated through the cation-exchange membrane from central compartment to catholyte and OH - formation at the cathode leads to the formation of metal hydroxide. Simultaneously, chromate ion migrated through the anion-exchange membrane from central compartment to the anolyte and formed chromic acid by combining H + produced their by oxidative water splitting. Thus a continuous decay in the concentration of chromate and metal ion was observed in the central compartment, which was recovered separately in the anolyte and catholyte, respectively, from their mixed solution. This process was completely optimized in terms of operating conditions such as initial concentration of chromate and metal ions in the central compartment, the applied cell voltage, chromate and metal ion flux, recovery percentage, energy consumption, and current efficiency. It was concluded that chromic acid and metal ions can be recovered efficiently from their mixed solution leaving behind the uncharged organics and can be reused as their corresponding acid and base apart from the purifying water for further applications

  3. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented

  4. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  5. Combined corona discharge and UV photoionization source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2012-08-15

    An ion mobility spectrometer is described which is equipped with two non-radioactive ion sources, namely an atmospheric pressure photoionization and a corona discharge ionization source. The two sources cannot only run individually but are additionally capable of operating simultaneously. For photoionization, a UV lamp was mounted parallel to the axis of the ion mobility cell. The corona discharge electrode was mounted perpendicular to the UV radiation. The total ion current from the photoionization source was verified as a function of lamp current, sample flow rate, and drift field. Simultaneous operation of the two ionization sources was investigated by recording ion mobility spectra of selected samples. The design allows one to observe peaks from either the corona discharge or photoionization individually or simultaneously. This makes it possible to accurately compare peaks in the ion mobility spectra from each individual source. Finally, the instrument's capability for discriminating two peaks appearing in approximately identical drift times using each individual ionization source is demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene by means of an ion mobility spectrometer device using photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, J. W.; Bensch, H.; Berger, D.; Nolting, M.; Baumbach, J. I.

    1995-01-01

    The continuous monitoring of changes on the quality of ambient air is a field of advantage of ion mobility spectrometry. Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene are substances of special interest because of their toxicity. We present an optimized drift tube for ion mobility spectrometers, which uses photo-ionization tubes to produce the ions to be analyzed. The actual version of this drift tube has a length of 45 mm, an electric field strength established within the drift tube of about 180 V/cm and a shutter-opening-time of 400 mus. With the hydrogen tube used for ionisation a mean flux of 10(exp 12) photons/sq cm s was established for the experiments described. We discuss the results of investigations on Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene in normal used gasoline SUPER. The detection limits obtained with the ion mobility spectrometer developed in co-operation are in the range of 10 ppbv in this case. Normally, charge transfer from Benzene ions to Toluene takes place. Nevertheless the simultaneous determination in mixtures is possible by a data evaluation procedure developed for this case. The interferences found between Xylene and others are rather weak. The ion mobility spectra of different concentrations of gasoline SUPER are attached as an example for the resolution and the detection limit of the instrument developed. Resolution and sensitivity of the system are well demonstrated. A hand-held portable device produced just now is to be tested for special environmental analytical problems in some industrial and scientific laboratories in Germany.

  7. Model Titan atmospheric hydrocarbon analysis by Ion Mobility Spectrometry in dry helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojiro, D.R.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.; Cohen, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is one analytical technique being investigated for the in situ analysis of the atmosphere of Titan. Any hydrocarbon ions that may form react immediately, in microseconds, with the high concentration of water vapor normally present in conventional IMS. By reducing the water concentration to the parts-per-billion range, the lifetime of the hydrocarbon ions may be increased to the milliseconds required for measurement. At low water level concentrations, other species may become the reactant ion. This study focuses on IMS analysis of expected Titan atmospheric hydrocarbons under very dry, low water concentration conditions

  8. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility in irradiated power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupac, D.; Galloway, K.F.; Khosropour, P.; Anderson, S.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    An effective approach to separating the effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility degradation in irradiated MOSFETs is demonstrated. It is based on analyzing mobility data sets which have different functional relationships between the radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge is possible only if these two trapped charge components are not linearly dependent. A significant contribution of oxide-trapped charge to mobility degradation is demonstrated and quantified

  9. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Shchepunov, V. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Gulbekyan, G. G.; Khabarov, M. V.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Efremov, A. A.; Pashenko, S. V.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Yeremin, A. V.; Yavor, M. I.; Kalimov, A. G.

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A≈20 to A≈500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90° electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  10. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Oganessian, Yu T; Dmitriev, S N; Itkis, M G; Gulbekyan, G G; Khabarov, M V; Bekhterev, V V; Bogomolov, S L; Efremov, A A; Pashenko, S V; Stepantsov, S V; Yeremin, A V; Yavor, M I; Kalimov, A G

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 sup - sup 3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A approx 20 to A approx 500, its mass acceptance is as large as +-2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considere...

  11. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3 . The set up can work in the wide mass range from A∼20 to A∼500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given

  12. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A. E-mail: shchepun@sunhe.jinr.rushchepun@cv.jinr.ru; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10{sup -3}. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A{approx}20 to A{approx}500, its mass acceptance is as large as {+-}2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  13. Plasma-modified polyethylene membrane as a separator for lithium-ion polymer battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Young; Lee, Yongbeom; Lim, Dae Young

    2009-01-01

    The surface of polyethylene (PE) membranes as a separator for lithium-ion polymer battery was modified with acrylonitrile (AN) using the plasma technology. The plasma-induced acrylonitrile coated PE (PiAN-PE) membrane was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle measurement. The electrochemical performance of the lithium-ion polymer cell fabricated with the PE and the PiAN-PE membranes were also analyzed. The surface characterization demonstrates that the enhanced adhesion of the PiAN-PE membrane resulted from the increased polar component of surface energy for the PiAN-PE membrane. The presence of the PiAN induced onto the surface of the membrane via the plasma modification plays a critical role in improving the wettability and electrolyte retention, the interfacial adhesion between the electrodes and the separator, the cycle performance of the resulting lithium-ion polymer cell assembly. The PiAN-PE membrane modified by the plasma treatment holds a great potential to be used as a high-performance and cost-effective separator for lithium-ion polymer battery.

  14. Ion exchange separation of minor elements from iron for the analysis of S/G sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Kyun; Choi, Kwang Soon; Kim, Jong Goo

    2005-01-01

    The chemical data of minor elements in steam generator sludge could give information about the contamination sources such as a system corrosion, an intrusion of chemicals, etc. The major component of sludge is iron. Iron of a high concentration in a measuring solution worsens the determination limit of the minor elements in a spectroscopic atom analysis. Moreover, iron has so many absorption or emission bands in a wide wavelength range that it has a spectroscopic interference on the atomic spectroscopy of various minor elements such as B, Pb, etc. Thus, the quantitative separation of minor elements from the iron matrix is essential for their determination. Gas sublimation, co-precipitation, solvent extraction and ion exchange are used for this separation. Ion exchange chromatography is applied to the separation of specific minor elements. Ion exchange method has an advantage from the point of experimental space, waste production, and number of elements when applyed to radioactive samples. This presentation describes the results of a separation of some minor elements(Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Gd, Mg, Mn, Mo, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Si, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Yb, Zn and Zr) from synthetic iron samples by anionic and cationic exchange methods for the purpose of analyzing them in the S/G sludge from a power plant

  15. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-01-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. - Highlights: ► Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS) was developed to study electron attachment reaction. ► The rate constants of electron attachment to CCl 4 and CHCl 3 were determined. ► The present experimental results are in good agreement with the previously reported data.

  16. Ion-neutral potential models in atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry IM(tof)MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; English, William A; Hill, Herbert H

    2006-02-09

    The ion mobilities and their respective masses of several classes of amines (primary, secondary, and tertiary) were measured by electrospray ionization atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry IM(tof)MS. The experimental data obtained were comparatively analyzed by the one-temperature kinetic theory of Chapman-Enskog. Several theoretical models were used to estimate the collision cross-sections; they include the rigid-sphere, polarization-limit, 12-6-4, and 12-4 potential models. These models were investigated to represent the interaction potentials contained within the collision integral that occurs between the polyatomic ions and the neutral drift gas molecules. The effectiveness of these collision cross-section models on predicting the mobility of these amine ions was explored. Moreover, the effects of drift gas selectivity on the reduced-mass term and in the collision cross-section term was examined. Use of a series of drift gases, namely, helium, neon, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, made it possible to distinguish between mass effects and polarizability effects. It was found that the modified 12-4 potential that compensates for the center of charge not being at the same location as the centers of mass showed improved agreement over the other collision cross-section models with respect to experimental data.

  17. Separation of halogens from uranium compounds by means of pyrohydrolysis and their determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Brandao Filho, D.; Abrao, A.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describs the determination of fluorine in nuclear grade uranium compounds by means of phyrohydrolysis. A stream of wet oxygem at a temperature of 900 to 1000 0 C is passed through a quartz tube where the powdered samples is put. The halogens are volatilized as their respective acids that are absorbed in a buffer solution or water. The measurements are made with ion-seletive eletrodes or by ion chromatography. The sensitivity is of 1μg F - /g and 5μg Cl - /g. The separation of fluorine from uranium compounds by diferent methods is discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Contribution to the study of rare earth separation by ion exchange, using ammonium lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratot, I.

    1958-01-01

    Using the technique of chromatography on a column of Dowex 50 resin, heated to 87 deg. C, we have studied the separation of rare earths (from holmium to praseodymium) which may be produced with the cyclotron by heavy ions, α or protons. From an ammonium lactate solution M at pH 5, separations are carried out by varying the dilution as a function of the quantity of the target rare earth and of its position during elution. When weighable quantities of the rare earth (more than 5 mg) appear towards the end of the elution, the separation is little affected this case approaches that of a tracer mixture of rare earths; if on the other hand weighable quantities of the rare earth are washed through at the beginning of the chromatogram, the dilution must be adjusted in order to obtain a good separation. (author) [fr

  19. Determining Double Bond Position in Lipids Using Online Ozonolysis Coupled to Liquid Chromatography and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rachel A; May, Jody C; Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu; McLean, John A

    2018-02-06

    The increasing focus on lipid metabolism has revealed a need for analytical techniques capable of structurally characterizing lipids with a high degree of specificity. Lipids can exist as any one of a large number of double bond positional isomers, which are indistinguishable by single-stage mass spectrometry alone. Ozonolysis reactions coupled to mass spectrometry have previously been demonstrated as a means for localizing double bonds in unsaturated lipids. Here we describe an online, solution-phase reactor using ozone produced via a low-pressure mercury lamp, which generates aldehyde products diagnostic of cleavage at a particular double bond position. This flow-cell device is utilized in conjunction with structurally selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The lamp-mediated reaction was found to be effective for multiple lipid species in both positive and negative ionization modes, and the conversion efficiency from precursor to product ions was tunable across a wide range (20-95%) by varying the flow rate through the ozonolysis device. Ion mobility separation of the ozonolysis products generated additional structural information and revealed the presence of saturated species in a complex mixture. The method presented here is simple, robust, and readily coupled to existing instrument platforms with minimal modifications necessary. For these reasons, application to standard lipidomic workflows is possible and aids in more comprehensive structural characterization of a myriad of lipid species.

  20. [Photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS) for the isomeric volatile organic compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Niu, Wen-qi; Wang, Hong-mei; Huang, Chao-qun; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2012-01-01

    The construction and performance study is reported for a newly developed ultraviolet photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS). In the present paper, an UV-IMS technique was firstly developed to detect eleven isomeric volatile organic compounds including the differences in the structure of carbon chain, the style of function group and the position of function group. Their reduced mobility values were determined and increased in this order: linears alcohols homemade UV-IMS was around ppb-ppm.

  1. Surface-ionization ion source designed for in-beam operation with the BEMS-2 isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, D.D.; Voboril, J.; Demyanov, A.V.; Karnaukhov, V.A.; Petrov, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    A surface-ionization ion source designed to operate in combination with the BEMS-2 isotope separator in a heavy ion beam is described. The ion source is adjusted for the separation of rare-earth elements. The separation efficiency for 150 Dy is determined to be equal to about 20% at the ionizer temperature of 2600 deg K. The hold-up times for praseodymium, promethium and dysprosium in the ion source range from 5 to 10 sec at the ionizer temperature of 2500-2700 deg K

  2. Studies on mobility in electric and magnetic fields of tritium ions occluded in titanium and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, R [Wyzsza Szkola Pedagogiczna, Opole (Poland); Rozenfeld, B [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    Migration of tritium ions in zirconium and titanium in electric field has been investigated. The effect of simultaneous action of crossed electric and magnetic fields on ions migration has also been studied. The averaged values taken from the large number of measurements allow us to suggest the relation between the rate of electromobility and electric field intensity oriented in the direction of migration. In case of migration caused by simultaneously applied both field, the mobility varied monotonously with the increase of magnetic induction; a linear dependence, however, was observed between the mobility of tritium and the current density in a sample.

  3. Distinguishing d- and l-aspartic and isoaspartic acids in amyloid β peptides with ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Deng, Liulin; Baker, Erin S; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D

    2017-07-11

    While α-linked amino acids in the l-form are exclusively utilized in mammalian protein building, β-linked and d-form amino acids also have important biological roles. Unfortunately, the structural elucidation and separation of these different amino acid types in peptides has been analytically challenging to date due to the numerous isomers present, limiting our knowledge about their existence and biological roles. Here, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry platform coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to separate amyloid β (Aβ) peptides containing l-aspartic acid, d-aspartic acid, l-isoaspartic acid, and d-isoaspartic acid residues which span α- and β-linked amino acids in both d- and l-forms. The results illustrate how IMS-MS could be used to better understand age-related diseases or protein folding disorders resulting from amino acid modifications.

  4. Observation of water separated ion-pairs between cations and phospholipid headgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Sietse T; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we present evidence for ion pair formation of cations with a high surface charge density (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) and phosphate groups of phospholipids. We used femto-second infrared pump-probe and dielectric spectroscopy to probe the dynamics of water molecules in solutions of phosphorylethanolamine and different types of cations. We find that sodium and calcium cooperatively retard the dynamics of water in solutions of phosphorylethanolamine, implying the formation of solvent separated ion pairs. This ion-specific interaction is absent for potassium, cesium and ammonium. We compare our results to dielectric spectroscopy experiments, which probes the rotation of all dipolar molecules and ions in solution. The rotation of the dipolar phosphorylethanolamine ion shows that long-lived ion-pairs are only formed with calcium and not with ammonium, cesium, potassium, and sodium. This finding implies that the association between calcium and the phosphate is strong with lifetimes exceeding 200 ps, while the interaction with sodium is relatively short-lived (∼20-100 ps).

  5. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507268

    2017-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  6. Mobility and lifetime of sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, A J

    2003-01-01

    Positively charged sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions are transported through liquid xenon using electric fields in the range of 4-10 kV cm sup - sup 1 and for drift distances up to 50 mm. From these measurements we deduce upper limits on the attenuation length for Tl ions in liquid xenon, resulting in a lifetime >5.5 s. In addition to these results, the field independent mobility of Tl bearing species in liquid xenon was measured to be 1.33+-0.04x10 sup - sup 4 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1. This result, when coupled with those for other species by previous workers, suggests that positive ion mobility in liquid xenon is proportional to the hard-core radius. Applications to Ba ion collection in a double beta decay experiment are also discussed.

  7. Rapid and Convenient Separation of Chitooligosaccharides by Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxiao; Lu, Wei-Peng; Wang, Jianing; Gao, Yunhua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2017-12-01

    Pervious methods for separation of highly purified chitooligosaccharides was time-consuming and labor-intensive, which limited the large-scale production. This study developed a convenient ion-exchange chromatography using the ÄKTA™ avant 150 chromatographic system. Five fractions were automatically collected under detecting the absorption at 210 nm. The fractions were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. It proved that they primarily comprised chitobiose, chitotriose, chitotetraose, chitopentaose, and chitohexaose, respectively, with chromatographic purities over 90%. The separation process was rapid, convenient and could be monitored on-line, which would be benefit for the mass production of chitooligosaccharides.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  9. Swift heavy ion induced modification in polycarbonate membrane for gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra; Vijay, Y.K.; Das, D.

    2003-01-01

    Polymeric membranes are extensively used for commercial gas separation applications. Makrofol-KG (polycarbonate) is a glassy polymer. 40 μm thick sheet of Makrofol-KG was irradiated with 40 Ar (14.9 MeV/n) of fluence 10 3 ions/cm 2 and 20 μm thick sheet with 5.3 MeV α-particles of fluence 10 7 ions/cm 2 . The permeability of these polycarbonate membranes for H 2 and CO 2 was measured and also after etching in 6 N NaOH at 60 degC for different periods. Permeability is found to be increased with etching time. At a definite time, critical etching time, the permeability rapidly increases in PC. Positron annihilation lifetimes for unirradiated and irradiated membranes were measured with fast fast coincidence system to study the correlation of free volume hole concentration with gas separation properties. (author)

  10. A study of an ion-exchange process for separation of strontium and yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarek, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been carried out to determine optimum conditions for the separation of strontium and yttrium by ion-exchange. The parameters of interest for such separation such as the dimensions of the ion-exchange columns, flow rates through the columns and pH values of the solutions, which affect the overall yield in the process, have been investigated. Application of this method for routine quantitative determinations of Sr-90 in environmental samples, particularly the wet-ashed biological materials has also been studied. The method, although a rapid and convenient one has not been found to yield consistent results probably due to the requirement of stringent analytical controls during the process. (author)

  11. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Off-line coupling of multidimensional immunoaffinity chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry: A promising partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel; Abad-Fuentes, Antonio; Abad-Somovilla, Antonio; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A

    2015-12-24

    The extreme specificity of immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC) columns coupled to the high sensitivity of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements makes this combination really useful for rapid, selective, and sensitive determination of a high variety of analytes in different samples. The capabilities of the IAC-IMS coupling have been highlighted under three different scenarios: (i) multiclass residue analysis using a single IAC column, (ii) multiclass residue analysis using stacked IAC columns, and (iii) isomer analysis. In the first case, the determination of three strobilurin fungicides - azoxystrobin, picoxystrobin, and pyraclostrobin - in water and strawberry juice was considered, obtaining limits of quantification (LOQs) from 11 to 63μgL(-1). Recoveries from 96 to 106% for water, and from 67 to 104% for strawberry juice were obtained. In the second case, anilinopyrimidine compounds, including two analytes with similar drift time, were selectively retained in different IAC columns and analyzed after independent elution in commercial wine samples by IMS. LOQ values of 16, 14 and 12μgL(-1) were obtained for pyrimethanil, mepanipyrim, and cyprodinil, respectively. The obtained recoveries for wine samples spiked with 25 and 100μgL(-1) were from 82 to 123%. Additionally, the stacked IAC columns concept was applied to the separation of Z and E isomers of azoxystrobin that were selectively retained in specific IAC columns and quantified by IMS. Recoveries between 91 and 94% were obtained for both isomers in water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) by Triton X-100 Cerium (Iv) Phosphate as a Surface Active Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Ismail Aydia, M.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new and simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection has been developed for the determination of both Cr (III) and Cr (VI) ions. Chromium species were determined by HPLC using a stationary phase consisting of a reversed phase column (Nucleosil phenyl column; 250 mm x 4.6 mm,5 μm), and a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol: water(70 : 30 v/v), in which the complexing agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) was dissolved. The UV detection was carried out at wavelength 650 nm. Separation of Cr (III) from Cr (VI) on Triton X-100 cerium(IV) phosphate(TX-100 CeP) as a surface active ion exchanger was investigated. TX-100 CeP has been synthesized, characterized using IR, X-Ray, TGA/DTA and elemental analysis. The ion exchange capacity and chemical stability in different HCl concentration have been studied

  14. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  15. Effect of hydrocarbon radical length of fatty acid collectors on flotation separation process of thorium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Perlova, O.V.; Sazonova, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that the degree of flotation separation of thorium ions collected by their means increases firstly (potassium laurate), then decreases (potassium tridecanate) and after that increases again (potassium palminate) when increasing the length of the hydrocarbon radical of potassium soaps of saturated fatty acids. The first increase of the collector efficiency is due to the decrease of solubility of thorium-containing sublates, and drop and further increase is due to the change in colloidchemical properties of sublates

  16. Ion chromatographic separation for analysis of radiostrontium in nuclear reprocessing solutions of high ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J.D.; Nordmeyer, F.R.; Drake, P.A.; Elder, M.P.; Miles, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    An ion chromatography (IC)-based method was developed for Sr 2+ concentration and separation showing high recoveries of strontium. This procedure permits complete automation. One of the potential weaknesses of the IC approach to sample preconcentration, i.e. sensitivity to solutions of high acid content, common in nuclear reprocessing solution, has been overcome by a novel application of acid suppression technology. (author) 12 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Strain distribution and failure mode of polymer separators for Li-ion batteries under biaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnaus, Sergiy; Kumar, Abhishek; Wang, Yanli; Li, Jianlin; Simunovic, Srdjan; Turner, John A.; Gorney, Phillip

    2018-02-01

    Deformation of polymer separators for Li-ion batteries has been studied under biaxial tension by using a dome test setup. This deformation mode provides characterization of separator strength under more complex loading conditions, closer representing deformation of an electric vehicle battery during crash event, compared to uniaxial tension or compression. Two polymer separators, Celgard 2325 and Celgard 2075 were investigated by deformation with spheres of three different diameters. Strains in separators were measured in situ by using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. The results show consistent rupture of separators along the machine direction coinciding with areas of high strain accumulation. The critical first principal strain for failure was independent of the sphere diameter and was determined to be approximately 34% and 43% for Celgard 2325 and Celgard 2075 respectively. These values can be taken as a criterion for internal short circuit in a battery following an out-of-plane impact. A Finite Element (FE) model was built with the anisotropic description of separator behavior, derived from tensile tests in orthogonal directions. The results of simulations predicted the response of separator rather well when compared to experimental results for various sizes of rigid sphere.

  18. Separation of some metal ions using coupled transport supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid membrane extraction processes has become very popular due to their superiority in many ways over other separation techniques. In coupled transport membranes the metal ions can be transported across the membrane against their concentration gradient under the influence of chemical potential difference. Liquid membranes consisting of a carrier-cum-diluent, supported in microporous polymeric hydrophobic films have been studied for transport of metal ions like U(VI), Cr(VI), Be(II), V(V), Ti(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hf(IV), W(VI), and Co(II). The present paper presents basic data with respect to flux and permeabilities of these metal ions across membranes based on experimental results and theoretical equations, using different carriers and diluents and provides a brief reference to possibility of such membranes for large scale applications. (author)

  19. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  20. Metal ion separations with proton-ionizable Lariat Ethers and their polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The preparation of novel and specific organic complexing agents may lead to the development of new separation systems for aqueous metal ions. Thus the introduction of highly lipophilic oximes led to the current utilization of these compounds as commercial extractants for the hydrometallurgy of nonferrous metals. Crown ethers (macrocyclic polyethers) have been employed in the laboratory-scale solvent extraction of alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, and other metal cations into organic phases. Attachment of side arms to crown ethers gives lariat ethers. The presence of one or more potential coordination sites in the side arm of the lariat ether may produce substantial changes in the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. It has been demonstrated that concomitant transfer of an aqueous phase anion into the organic medium is not required for metal ion extraction. This factor is of immense importance to potential practical applications of these proton-ionizable crown ethers in which the common, hard, aqueous phase anions would be involved. Another advantage of proton-ionizable lariat ethers is the ease with which extracted metal ions may be stripped from the organic phase by shaking with aqueous mineral acid. Thus both metal ion extraction and stripping are facilitated by pendent proton-ionizable groups. Most of the hazardous metal ion species in the Hanford Site tank wastes are members of the alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, lanthanide, and actinide families. These hard metal ion species prefer association with hard donor atoms, such as oxygens. Therefore, crown and lariat ethers are well-suited for complexation with such metal ion species

  1. Characterization of applied fields for ion mobility in traveling wave based structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Prabhakaran Nair Syamala Amma, Aneesh; Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-03-21

    Ion mobility (IM) is rapidly gaining attention for the analysis of biomolecules due to the ability to distinguish the shapes of ions. However, conventional constant electric field drift tube IM has limited resolving power, constrained by practical limitations on the path length and maximum applied voltage. The implementation of traveling waves (TW) in IM removes the latter limitation, allowing higher resolution to be achieved using extended path lengths. These can be readily obtainable in structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM), which are fabricated from electric fields that are generated by appropriate potentials applied to arrays of electrodes patterned on two parallel surfaces. In this work we have investigated the relationship between the various SLIM variables, such as electrode dimensions, inter-surface gap, and the TW applied voltages, that directly impact the fields experienced by ions. Ion simulation and theoretical calculations have been utilized to understand the dependence of SLIM geometry and effective electric field. The variables explored impact both ion confinement and the observed IM resolution in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) modules.

  2. A Novel Microwave-Induced Plasma Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianxiong; Zhao, Zhongjun; Liang, Gaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a novel microwave induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The MIPI source, called Surfatron, is composed of a copper cavity and a hollow quartz discharge tube. The ion mobility spectrum of synthetics air has a main peak with reduced mobility of 2.14 cm2V-1s-1 for positive ion mode and 2.29 cm2V-1s-1 for negative ion mode. The relative standard deviations (RSD) are 0.7% and 1.2% for positive and negative ion mode, respectively. The total ion current measured was more than 3.5 nA, which is much higher than that of the conventional 63Ni source. This indicates that a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be acquired from the MIPI source. The SNR was 110 in the analysis of 500 pptv methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), resulting in the limit of detection (SNR = 3) of 14 pptv. The linear range covers close to 2.5 orders of magnitude in the detection of triethylamine with a concentration range from 500 pptv to 80 ppbv. Finally, this new MIPI-IMS was used to detect some volatile organic compounds, which demonstrated that the MIPI-IMS has great potential in monitoring pollutants in air.

  3. Application of retention modelling to the simulation of separation of organic anions in suppressed ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Philip; Dicinoski, Greg W; Ng, Boon Khing; Shellie, Robert A; Hanna-Brown, Melissa; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-09-18

    The ion-exchange separation of organic anions of varying molecular mass has been demonstrated using ion chromatography with isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent profiles on commercially available columns with UV detection. A retention model derived previously for inorganic ions and based solely on electrostatic interactions between the analytes and the stationary phase was applied. This model was found to accurately describe the observed elution of all the anions under isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent conditions. Hydrophobic interactions, although likely to be present to varying degrees, did not limit the applicability of the ion-exchange retention model. Various instrumental configurations were investigated to overcome problems associated with the use of organic modifiers in the eluent which caused compatibility issues with the electrolytically derived, and subsequently suppressed, eluent. The preferred configuration allowed the organic modifier stream to bypass the eluent generator, followed by subsequent mixing before entering the injection valve and column. Accurate elution prediction was achieved even when using 5-step eluent profiles with errors in retention time generally being less than 1% relative standard deviation (RSD) and all being less than 5% RSD. Peak widths for linear gradient separations were also modelled and showed good agreement with experimentally determined values.

  4. A chemically selective laser ion source for the on-line isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheerer, F.

    1993-03-01

    In this thesis a laser ion source is presented. In a hot chamber the atoms of the elements to be studied are resonantly by light of pulsed dye lasers, which are pumped by pulsed copper-vapor lasers with extremely high pulse repetition rate (ν rep ∼ 10 kHz), stepwise excited and ionized. By the storage of the atoms in a hot chamber and the high pulse repetition rate of the copper-vapor lasers beyond the required high efficiency (ε ∼ 10%) can be reached. First preparing measurements were performed at the off-line separator at CERN with the rare earth elements ytterbium and thulium. Starting from the results of these measurements further tests of the laser ion source were performed at the on-line separator with in a thick tantalum target produced neutron-deficient ytterbium isotopes. Under application of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer in Mainz an efficient excitation scheme on the resonance ionization of tin was found. This excitation scheme is condition for an experiment at the GSI for the production of the extremely neutron-deficient, short-lived nucleus 102 Sn. In the summer 1993 is as first application of the newly developed laser ion source at the PSB-ISOLDE at CERN an astrophysically relevant experiment for the nuclear spectroscopy of the neutron-rich silver isotopes 124-129 Ag is planned. This experiment can because of the lacking selectivity of conventional ion sources only be performed by means of the here presented laser ion source. The laser ion source shall at the PSB-ISOLDE 1993 also be applied for the selective ionization of manganese. (orig./HSI) [de

  5. Distinguishing d - and l -aspartic and isoaspartic acids in amyloid β peptides with ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Deng, Liulin; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was utilized to separate Aβ peptide variants containing isomeric asparic and isoaspartic acid residues with either al- ord-form. The abundance of each variant is of great interest in Alzheimer's disease studies and also to evaluate how often these modifications are occurring in other environmental and biological samples.

  6. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies with Duolite-162, a type-II resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The selection of resin plays an important role in the process of separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography. The determination of (i) ion exchange capacity of Duolite-162 resin for hydroxyl - chloride exchange, (ii) hydroxyl - borate exchange, (iii) isotopic exchange separation factor by batch method and (iv) effect of concentration of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor to test the suitability of the above resin for this process are discussed in this report. (author)

  7. Superior lithium adsorption and required magnetic separation behavior of iron-doped lithium ion-sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulei; Zheng, Shili; Wang, Zheming; Cui, Wenwen; Zhang, Hailin; Yang, Liangrong; Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping

    2018-01-01

    The recent research on adsorption-based lithium recovery from lithium-containing solutions has been centred on adsorption capacity and separation of lithium ion-sieves powder from solutions. Herein, an effective iron-doped lithium titanium oxide (Fe-doped Li2TiO3) was synthesized by Fe-doping via solid state reactions followed by acid treatment to form iron-doped lithium ion-sieves (Fe/Ti-x(H)). The resulting solid powder displays both superior adsorption capacity of lithium and high separation efficiency of the adsorbent from the solutions. SEM imaging and BET surface area measurement results showed that at Fe doping levels x0.15, Fe-doping led to grain shrinkage as compared to Li2TiO3 and at the same time the BET surface area increased. The Fe/Ti-0.15(H) exhibited saturated magnetization values of 13.76 emu g-1, allowing effective separation of the material from solid suspensions through the use of a magnet. Consecutive magnetic separation results suggested that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) powders could be applied at large-scale and continuously removed from LiOH solutions with separation efficiency of 96% or better. Lithium adsorption studies indicated that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of Fe/Ti-0.15(H) in LiOH 2 solutions (1.8 g L-1 Li, pH 12) reached 53.3 mg g-1 within 24 h, which was higher than that of pristine Li2TiO3 (50.5 mg g-1) without Fe doping. Competitive adsorption and regeneration results indicated that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) possessed a high selectivity for Li with facile regeneration. Therefore, it could be expected that the iron-doped lithium ion-sieves have practical applicability potential for large scale lithium extraction and recovery from lithium-bearing solutions.

  8. Ion mobilities in diatomic gases: measurement versus prediction with non-specular scattering models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-05-16

    Ion/electrical mobility measurements of nanoparticles and polyatomic ions are typically linked to particle/ion physical properties through either application of the Stokes-Millikan relationship or comparison to mobilities predicted from polyatomic models, which assume that gas molecules scatter specularly and elastically from rigid structural models. However, there is a discrepancy between these approaches; when specular, elastic scattering models (i.e., elastic-hard-sphere scattering, EHSS) are applied to polyatomic models of nanometer-scale ions with finite-sized impinging gas molecules, predictions are in substantial disagreement with the Stokes-Millikan equation. To rectify this discrepancy, we developed and tested a new approach for mobility calculations using polyatomic models in which non-specular (diffuse) and inelastic gas-molecule scattering is considered. Two distinct semiempirical models of gas-molecule scattering from particle surfaces were considered. In the first, which has been traditionally invoked in the study of aerosol nanoparticles, 91% of collisions are diffuse and thermally accommodating, and 9% are specular and elastic. In the second, all collisions are considered to be diffuse and accommodating, but the average speed of the gas molecules reemitted from a particle surface is 8% lower than the mean thermal speed at the particle temperature. Both scattering models attempt to mimic exchange between translational, vibrational, and rotational modes of energy during collision, as would be expected during collision between a nonmonoatomic gas molecule and a nonfrozen particle surface. The mobility calculation procedure was applied considering both hard-sphere potentials between gas molecules and the atoms within a particle and the long-range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential. Predictions were compared to previous measurements in air near room temperature of multiply charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ions, which range in morphology from

  9. Evaluation of false positive responses by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of trace explosives in complex samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L., E-mail: clcrawf@sandia.gov; Hill, H.H.

    2013-09-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First study to use (−)SESI-IM-TOFMS to analyze complex mixtures of personal care products. •The study demonstrated, by identifying mobility and mass interferents with explosive signatures, which, if used separately, neither IMS nor MS alone would prevent every false positive for explosives when detected in the presence of a complex sample matrix. •Ingredients in common household cleaning products were shown to either enhance or suppress the ionization of explosives in a SESI-IM-TOFMS analysis. •Mobility separation provided real-time separation of ion species that indicated overlapping isotope peak patterns -- Abstract: Secondary electrospray ionization-ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (SESI-IM-TOFMS) was used to evaluate common household products and food ingredients for any mass or mobility responses that produced false positives for explosives. These products contained ingredients which shared the same mass and mobility drift time ranges as the analyte ions for common explosives. The results of this study showed that the vast array of compounds in these products can cause either mass or mobility false positive responses. This work also found that two ingredients caused either enhanced or reduced ionization of the target analytes. Another result showed that an IMS can provide real-time separation of ion species that impede accurate mass identifications due to overlapping isotope peak patterns. The final result of this study showed that, when mass and mobility values were used to identify an ion, no false responses were found for the target explosives. The wider implication of these results is that the possibility exists for even greater occurrences of false responses from complex mixtures found in common products. Neither IMS nor MS alone can provide 100% assurance from false responses. IMS, due to its low cost, ease of operation, rugged reliability, high sensitivity and tunable selectivity, will remain

  10. Comparison of liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography mobile phases for enantioselective separations on polysaccharide stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Syame; Lozac'h, Marie-Anne; Adam, Isabelle; Francotte, Eric; West, Caroline

    2016-10-07

    Analysis and production of enantiomerically pure compounds is a major topic of interest when active pharmaceutical ingredients are concerned. Enantioselective chromatography has become a favourite both at the analytical and preparative scales. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) are dominating the scene and are often seen as complementary techniques. Nowadays, for economic and ecologic reasons, SFC may be preferred over normal-phase HPLC (NPLC) as it allows significant reductions in solvent consumption. However, the transfer of NPLC methods to SFC is not always straightforward. In this study, we compare the retention of achiral molecules and separation of enantiomers under supercritical fluid (carbon dioxide with ethanol or isopropanol) and liquid normal-phase (heptane with ethanol or isopropanol) elution modes with polysaccharide stationary phases in order to explore the differences between the retention and enantioseparation properties between the two modes. Chemometric methods (namely quantitative structure-retention relationships and discriminant analysis) are employed to compare the results obtained on a large set of analytes (171 achiral probes and 97 racemates) and gain some understanding on the retention and separation mechanisms. The results indicate that, contrary to popular belief, carbon dioxide - solvent SFC mobile phases are often weaker eluents than liquid mobile phases. It appears that SFC and NPLC elution modes provide different retention mechanisms. While some enantioseparations are unaffected, facilitating the transfer between the two elution modes, other enantioseparations may be drastically different due to different types and strength of interactions contributing to enantioselectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pepin, R.; Laszlo, K. J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, B.; Bush, M. F.; Lavanant, H.; Afonso, C.; Tureček, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2016), s. 1647-1660 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : peptide ions * ion mobility * collisional cross sections * density functional theory calculations * ion structures * polar effects Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.786, year: 2016

  12. Interaction of High Flash Point Electrolytes and PE-Based Separators for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Kaufmann, Christoph; Müller, Marcus; Hanemann, Thomas

    2015-08-27

    In this study, promising electrolytes for use in Li-ion batteries are studied in terms of interacting and wetting polyethylene (PE) and particle-coated PE separators. The electrolytes are characterized according to their physicochemical properties, where the flow characteristics and the surface tension are of particular interest for electrolyte-separator interactions. The viscosity of the electrolytes is determined to be in a range of η = 4-400 mPa∙s and surface tension is finely graduated in a range of γL = 23.3-38.1 mN∙m(-1). It is verified that the technique of drop shape analysis can only be used in a limited matter to prove the interaction, uptake and penetration of electrolytes by separators. Cell testing of Li|NMC half cells reveals that those cell results cannot be inevitably deduced from physicochemical electrolyte properties as well as contact angle analysis. On the other hand, techniques are more suitable which detect liquid penetration into the interior of the separator. It is expected that the results can help fundamental researchers as well as users of novel electrolytes in current-day Li-ion battery technologies for developing and using novel material combinations.

  13. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  14. Selective separation of radionuclides from nuclear waste solutions with inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.; Harjula, R.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry produces and stores large volumes of radioactive waste solutions. Removal of radionuclides from the solutions is an important and challenging task for two main reasons: reductions in the volumes of solidified waste, which have to be disposed of, and reductions in the radioactive discharges into the environment. Since the radioactive elements in most waste solutions are in trace concentrations and the waste solutions contain large excesses of inactive metal ions, highly selective separation methods are needed for the removal of radionuclides. A number of inorganic ion exchange materials are very selective to key radionuclides and they can play an important role in solving these problems. The spectrum of nuclear waste solutions is rather wide considering their radionuclide contents, concentrations of interfering salts and acidity/alkalinity. Therefore, several inorganic ions exchangers are needed for the removal of most harmful radionuclides from a variety of solutions. This paper discusses the use and requirements of inorganic ion exchange materials in nuclear waste management. Special attention is paid to the novel ion exchange materials developed in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki. (orig.)

  15. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko (Government Industrial Research Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  16. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, K.; Hirotsu, T.; Fujii, A.; Katoh, S.; Sugasaka, K. (Government Industrial Research. Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  17. Performance enhancement of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry by applying differential-RF-driven operation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yue; Tang, Fei; Zhai, Yadong; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-09-01

    The traditional operation mode of high-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) uses a one-way radio frequency (RF) voltage input as the dispersion voltage. This requires a high voltage input and limits power consumption reduction and miniaturization of instruments. With higher dispersion voltages or larger compensation voltages, there also exist problems such as low signal intensity or the fact that the dispersion voltage is no longer much larger than the compensation voltage. In this paper, a differential-RF-driven operation mode of FAIMS is proposed. The two-way RF is used to generate the dispersion field, and a phase difference is added between the two RFs to generate a single step waveform field. Theoretical analysis, and experimental results from an ethanol sample, showed that the peak positions of the ion spectra changed linearly (R 2 = 0.9992) with the phase difference of the two RFs in the differential-RF-driven mode and that the peak intensity of the ion spectrum could be enhanced by more than eight times for ethanol ions. In this way, it is possible to convert the ion spectrum peaks outside the separation or compensation voltage range into a detectable range, by changing the phase difference. To produce the same separation electric field, the high-voltage direct current input voltage can be maximally reduced to half of that in the traditional operation mode. Without changing the drift region size or drift condition, the differential-RF-driven operation mode can reduce power consumption, increase signal-to-noise ratio, extend the application range of the dispersion voltage and compensation voltage, and improve FAIMS detection performance.

  18. Electron beam induced strong organic/inorganic grafting for thermally stable lithium-ion battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunah; Kim, Jin Il; Moon, Jungjin; Jeong, Jongyeob; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2018-06-01

    A tailored interface between organic and inorganic materials is of great importance to maximize the synergistic effects from hybridization. Polyethylene separators over-coated with inorganic thin films are the state-of-the art technology for preparing various secondary batteries with high safety. Unfortunately, the organic/inorganic hybrid separators have the drawback of a non-ideal interface, thus causing poor thermal/dimensional stability. Here, we report a straightforward method to resolve the drawback of the non-ideal interface between vapor deposited SiO2 and polyethylene separators, to produce a highly stable lithium-ion battery separator through strong chemical linking generated by direct electron beam irradiation. The simple treatment with an electron beam with an optimized dose generates thermally stable polymer separators, which may enhance battery safety under high-temperature conditions. Additionally, the newly formed Si-O-C or Si-CH3 chemical bonding enhances electrolyte-separator compatibility and thus may provide a better environment for ionic transport between the cathode and anode, thereby leading to better charge/discharge behaviors.

  19. Electron-capture process and ion mobility spectra in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasek, F.W.; Spangler, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basic principles of plasma chromatography are introduced and ion mobility relationships presented. The relationships of plasma chromatography to electron-capture detector mechanisms are discussed, including electron energy considerations and electron-capture reactions. A number of experimental studies by plasma chromatography are described. (C.F.)

  20. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  1. Application of an ion mobility spectrometer based on virtual instrument technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shihong; Wei Yongbo; Jiang Dazhen

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of virtual instrument technology on an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). By designing the data acquisition and processing system of IMS on LabVIEW platform, the ability of signal processing and real time measurement in practice has been improved. (authors)

  2. The simulation of pulsed heater for a sampling system for the ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The development of the sampling device with pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier for ion mobility spectrometer is described in this article. Numerical simulation of a pulse heater structure of is presented. The design of the sampling device using a pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier is developed. Experimental results of approval of the sampling device are presented.

  3. Chemometrics for ion mobility spectrometry data: recent advances and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanska, E.; Davies, Antony N.; Buydens, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, advances in the field of ion mobility spectrometry have been hindered by the variation in measured signals between instruments developed by different research laboratories or manufacturers. This has triggered the development and application of chemometric techniques able to reveal and

  4. An introduction to the technique of combined ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowall, Mark A.; Bateman, Robert H.; Bajic, Steve; Giles, Kevin; Langridge, Jim; McKenna, Therese; Pringle, Steven D.; Wildgoose, Jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) offers several advantages compared with conventional High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as an 'inlet system' for mass spectrometry. UPLC provides improved chromatographic resolution, increased sensitivity and reduced analysis time. This is achieved through the use of sub 2μm particles (stationary phase) combined with high-pressure solvent delivery (up to 15,000 psi). When coupled with orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (oa-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), UPLC presents a means to achieve high sample throughput with reduced spectral overlap, increased sensitivity, and exact mass measurement capabilities with high mass spectral resolution (Ca 20,000 FWHM). Dispersive ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) implemented within a traveling-wave ion guide provides an orthogonal separation strategy for ions in the gas phase that can resolve isobaric ions formed by either Electrospray of MALDI ionization typically in Ca 20 mille seconds. All three techniques have the potential to be combined on-line (e.g. UPLC-IMS-MS/MS) in real time to maximize peak capacity and resolving power for the analysis of complex biological mixtures including; intact proteins, modified peptides and endogenous/exogenous metabolites

  5. Stem cell mobilization with G-CSF analogs: a rational approach to separate GVHD and GVL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Edward S; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2006-05-01

    The separation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) remains the "holy grail" of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and improvements are urgently needed to allow more effective therapy of malignant disease. The use of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood as a clinical stem cell source is associated with enhanced GVL effects without amplification of significant acute GVHD. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that G-CSF modulates donor T cell function before transplantation, promoting T(H)2 differentiation and regulatory T cell function. In addition, the expansion of immature antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) favors the maintenance of this pattern of T cell differentiation after transplantation. Although these patterns of T cell differentiation attenuate acute GVHD, they do not have an impact on the cytolytic pathways of the CD8(+) T cells that are critical for effective GVL. Recently, it has been demonstrated that modification of G-CSF, either by pegylation of the native cytokine or conjugation to Flt-3L, results in the expansion and activation of donor iNKT cells, which significantly augment CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and GVL effects after transplantation. Given that these cytokines also enhance the expansion of regulatory T cells and APCs, they further separate GVHD and GVL, offering potential clinical advantages for the transplant recipient.

  6. Drift tube measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of ions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelf, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The zero-field mobilities of Br - and NH 4+ in O 2 were determined as a function of gas temperature in a high pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of the ion-gas combinations Br - in Ne and Kr, Li + in Xe, and Tl/ + in Kr and Xe were determined as a function of E/N, where E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density in a low pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The measured longitudinal diffusion coefficients were used for a test and comparison of the generalized Einstein relations of Viehland-Mason and Waldman-Mason theories. The measured mobilities of Br - in Kr and Tl/ + in Kr were used in an iterative-inversion scheme from which the ion-neutral interaction potentials were determined

  7. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  8. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number k z is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the k z spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B 0 , and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44 Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  10. Separation of individual lanthanides through the combined techniques of urea fractionated homogeneous precipitation and ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, K; Abrao, A

    1975-06-01

    The separation of individual lanthanides, especially Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm and La, from a rare earth chlorides concentrate by the industrial processing of monazite sand is made. To reach this goal the homogeneous fractional precipitation and ion exchange techniques were combined. Using the rare earths concentrate depleted in Cerium, fractions enriched in Nd, Pr and Sm, and one final filtrate enriched in La were obtained, by the hydrolysis of urea. The separation of individual lanthanides (Nd, Pr, Sm and La) was accomplished using two strong cationic ion exchanger columns, the second with Cu(II) as retaining ion, and EDTA-NH/sub 4/ solution buffered with acetic acid as eluant. The annoying problem of precipitation into the column during the RE elution was solved. The difficult EDTA and Cu(II) recovery was the precipitation of Cu/sub 2/S and disruption of Cu-EDTA complex by hydrolysis of thiourea. The combination of both techniques allowed the preparation of individual lanthanides as Nd, Pr and La with 99% and Sm with 90% purity.

  11. Ion-assisted phase separation in compound films: An alternate route to ordered nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, observations of highly ordered, hexagonal arrays of self-organized nanostructures on binary or impurity-laced targets under normal-incidence ion irradiation have excited interest in this phenomenon as a potential route to high-throughput, low-cost manufacture of nanoscale devices or nanostructured coatings. The currently prominent explanation for these structures is a morphological instability driven by ion erosion discovered by Bradley and Shipman; however, recent parameter estimates via molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this erosive instability may not be active for the representative GaSb system in which hexagonal structures were first observed. Motivated by recent experimental and numerical evidence suggesting the likely importance of phase separation during thin-film processing, we here generalize the Bradley-Shipman theory to include the effect of ion-assisted phase separation. The resulting system admits a chemically driven finite-wavelength instability that can explain the order of observed patterns even when the erosive Bradley-Shipman instability is inactive. In a relevant simplifying limit, it also provides an intuitive instability criterion similar to results in thin-film deposition, as well as predictions on pattern wavelengths that agree qualitatively with experimental observations. Finally, we identify a characteristic experimental signature that distinguishes the chemical and morphological instabilities and highlights the need for specific additional experimental data on the GaSb system

  12. Separation of individual lanthanides through the combined techniques of urea fractionated homogeneous precipitation and ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, K.; Abrao, A.

    1975-01-01

    The separation of individual lanthanides, especially Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm and La, from a rare earth chlorides concentrate by the industrial processing of monazite sand is made. To reach this goal the homogeneous fractional precipitation and ion exchange techniques were combined. Using the rare earths concentrate depleted in Cerium, fractions enriched in Nd, Pr and Sm, and one final filtrate enriched in La were obtained, by the hydrolysis of urea. The separation of individual lanthanides (Ns, Pr, Sm and La) was accomplished using two strong cationic ion exchanger columns, the second with Cu(II) as retaining ion, and EDTA-NH 4 solution buffered with acetic acid as eluant. The annoy problem of precipitation into the column during the RE elution was solved. The difficult EDTA and Cu(II) recovery was the precipitation of Cu 2 S and disruption of CU-EDTA complex by hydrolysis of thiourea. The combination of both techniques allowed the preparation of individual lanthanides as Nd, Pr and La with 99% and Sm with 90% purity

  13. Boundary layer separation method for recycling of sodium ions from industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petho, Dóra; Horváth, Géza; Liszi, János; Tóth, Imre; Paor, Dávid

    2010-12-01

    The most effective technological solution for waste treatment is recycling. We have developed a new method for the treatment of industrial wastewaters and have called it the boundary layer separation method (BLSM). We have used the phenomenon that, on the surface of an electrically charged electrode, ions can be enriched in the boundary layer, as compared with the inside of the phase. The essence of the method is that, with an appropriately chosen velocity, the boundary layer can be removed from the wastewater, and the boundary layer, which is rich in ions, can be recycled. The BLSM can be executed as a cyclic procedure. The capacitance of the boundary layer was examined. The best mass transport can be achieved with the use of 1000 and 1200 mV polarization potentials in the examined system, with its value being 1200 mg/m2 per cycle. The necessary operation times were determined by the examination of the velocity of the electrochemical processes. When using 1000 mV polarization potential, the necessary adsorption time is at least 25 seconds, and the desorption time at least 300 seconds. The advantage of the procedure is that it does not use dangerous chemicals, only inert electrodes. The drawback is that it is not selective to ions, the achievable separation in one step is low, and the hydrogen that emerges during the electrolysis might be dangerous.

  14. Methods development for separation of inorganic anions, organic acids and bases, and neutral organic compounds by ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-04-01

    A novel anion-exchange resin containing three amine groups was prepared by reaction of a chloromethylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resin with diethylenetriamine. After being protonated by contact with an aqueous acid, this resin can be used for ion chromatographic separation of anions. The charge on the resins can be varied from +1 to +3 by changing the mobile phase pH. The selectivity of the new ion exchangers for various inorganic anions was quite different from that of conventional anion exchangers. The performance of this new anion exchanger was studied by changing the pH and the concentration of the eluent, and several different eluents were used with some common anions as testing analytes. Conductivity detection and UV-visible detection were applied to detect the anions after separation. The new resin can also be used for HPLC separation of neutral organic compounds. Alkylphenols and alkylbenzenes were separated with this new polymeric resin, and excellent separations were obtained under simple conditions. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction and Chapter 6: General conclusions.

  15. Electrically driven ion separations and nanofiltration through membranes coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films deposited using the layer-by-layer (LBL) method are attractive for their simple deposition, tailorable nature, scalability, and charge or size-based selectivity for solutes. This dissertation explores ion separations in electrodialysis (ED) and solute removal through nanofiltration with PEMs deposited on polymer membranes. ED membranes typically exhibit modest selectivities between monovalent and divalent ions. In contrast, this work shows that K+/Mg 2+ ED selectivities reach values >1000 when using Nafion 115 cation-exchange membranes coated with multilayer poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/protonated poly(allylamine) (PAH) films. For comparison, the corresponding K+ /Mg2+ selectivity of bare Nafion 115 is salt concentrations, the K+ transference number approaches unity and the K+/Mg2+ selectivity is >20,000, presumably because the applied current is below the limiting value for K+ and H+ transport is negligible at this high K+ concentration. The high selectivities of these membranes may enable electrodialysis applications such as purification of salts that contain divalent or trivalent ions. The high ED selectivities of (PAH/PSS)5PAH-coated Nafion membranes translate to separations with Li+/Co2+ and K +/La3+. Even with adsorption of only 3 polyelectrolyte layers, Nafion membranes exhibit a Li+/Co2+ selectivity >23. However, the resistance to monovalent-ion passage does not decrease significantly with fewer polyelectrolyte layers. At overlimiting currents, hydroxides from water splitting form insoluble metal hydroxides to foul the membrane. With 0.1 M source-phase salt concentrations, transference numbers for monovalent cations approach unity and selectivities are >5000 because the diffusion-limited K+ or Li+ currents exceed the applied current. However, ED selectivities gradually decline with time. Thus, future research should aim to increase membrane stability and limiting currents to fully exploit the remarkable selectivity

  16. Highly dispersive ion exchangers in the analytical chemistry of uranium, particularly regarding separation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, R.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of water-insoluble polyvinyl pyrrolidon with uranium VI was investigated and a determination method for uranium was worked out in which the polyvinyl pyrrolidon was used as specific exchanger. Good separations of uranium from numerous transition metal ions were achieved here. The application of this exchanger for a fast and simple elution and determination method was of particular importance. A possible sorption mechanism was suggested based on the capacity curve of uranium with polyvinyl pyrrolidon and nitrogen and chloride content at maximum load. The sorption occurs by coordination of the carbonyl oxygen of single pyrrolidon rings with the protons of the complex acides and uranium. This assumption is supported by IR investigations. The sorbability of other inorganic acids was also investigated and possible structures were formulated for the sorption mechanism. In addition to this, ion exchangers were prepared based on cellulose by converting cellulose powder with aziridine and tris-1-aziridinyl-phosphine oxide. A polyethylene imine cellulose of high capacity was obtained in the conversion of cellulose powder with aziridine. This exchanger absorbs cobalt III very strongly. The exchanger loaded with cobalt III was used to separate the uranium as cyanato complex. The exchanger obtained in converting chlorated cellulose with tris-1-aziridinyl phosphine oxide also absorbs uranium VI very strongly. Thus a separation method of high specifity and selectivity was developed. (orig.) [de

  17. Ion source development for the on-line isotope separator at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, R.; Burkard, K.; Hueller, W.; Klepper, O.

    1991-08-01

    The progress in the understanding of ion sources for isotope separation on-line and the feasibility of bunched beams of relatively refractory elements is reported. The ultra-high temperature FEBIAD-H ion source, facilitating the mounting of catchers and window compared to the earlier F-version, enables bunched beams of the elements with adsorption enthalpies up to almost 6 eV, e.g. of Be, Al, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr, Pd, Ba, Yb, and Au. This way also chemical selectivity for these elements may be achieved, at least to some extent, for isotopes with halflives > or approx.1 minute, including especially the difficult separation of alkaline-earth isotopes from isobaric alkalines. These studies reveal, however, also a principal difficulty in the on-line separation of refractory elements, namely their tendency, increasing with ΔH a , to re-diffuse after release from the catcher into the bulk of the hot source enclosure. (orig.)

  18. Recoil separators for radiative capture using radioactive ion beams. Recent advances and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Chris [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Greife, Uwe; Hager, Ulrike [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiative capture reactions involving the fusion of hydrogen or helium are ubiquitous in the stellar history of the universe, and are some of the most important reactions in the processes that govern nucleosynthesis and energy generation in both static and explosive scenarios. However, radiative capture reactions pose some of the most difficult experimental challenges due to extremely small cross sections. With the advent of recoil separators and techniques in inverse kinematics, it is now possible to measure radiative capture reactions on very short-lived radioactive nuclei, and in the presence of high experimental backgrounds. In this paper we review the experimental needs for making measurements of astrophysical importance on radiative capture reactions. We also review some of the important historical advances in the field of recoil separators as well as describe current techniques and performance milestones, including descriptions of some of the separators most recently working at radioactive ion beam facilities, such as DRAGON at TRIUMF and the DRS at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. We will also summarize some of the scientific highlight measurements at the RIB facilities. (orig.)

  19. Gas separation techniques with liquid Ar for production of 11C ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Satoru; Honma, Toshihiro; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Yukio; Sugiura, Akinori; Suzuki, Naokata; Noda, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Heavy-ion cancer therapy with 12 C-beam has been carried out at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences) since 1994. One of the feasibility study in HIMAC is to use a positron emitter beam such as 11 C-beam for the cancer therapy. A nuclear reaction, 14 N (p,α) 11 C will be applied in the present study; it can be expected to obtain a considerably large number of 11 C-particles by utilizing the commonly used short-lives RI production techniques for PET (Positron Emission Tomography). The amount of 11 C gas is limited in this technique. The 11 CO 2 gas was produced from N 2 gas that is irradiated high-energy proton beam. Therefore, CO 2 gas separation from N 2 gas is very important. The gas-separation techniques with cryogenic system utilizing a liquid Ar were tested by dummy gas (N 2 + 12 CO 2 ). Details of the gas-separation techniques and measurement of CO 2 partial pressure are discussed. (author)

  20. Feasibility of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Riahi, Farhad

    2014-05-23

    The capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) for direct analysis of the samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was investigated and evaluated, for the first time. To that end, an appropriate new injection port was designed and constructed, resulting in possibility of direct injection of the known sample volume, without tedious sample preparation steps (e.g. derivatization, solvent evaporation, and re-solving in another solvent…). Malathion as a test compound was extracted from different matrices by a rapid and convenient DLLME method. The positive ion mobility spectra of the extracted malathion were obtained after direct injection of carbon tetrachloride or methanol solutions. The analyte responses were compared and the statistical results revealed the feasibility of direct analysis of the extracted samples in carbon tetrachloride, resulting in a convenient methodology. The coupled method of DLLME-CD-IMS was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, recovery, and enrichment factor. Finally, various real samples of apple, river and underground water were analyzed, all verifying the feasibility and success of the proposed method for the easy extraction of the analyte using DLLME separation before the direct analysis by CD-IMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Explosives vapour identification in ion mobility spectrometry using a tunable laser ionization source: a comparison with conventional 63Ni ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Laser multiphoton ionization (MPI) is used to produce ions from explosive vapours at atmospheric pressure in air for analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). In the positive ion mode of detection, NO + ions, generated directly by multiphoton dissociation/ionization of the explosive compounds, show strong variation with laser wavelength. This provides a means of identifying the presence of nitro-containing compounds. Moreover, electrons formed in the MPI of gaseous components in the air carrier stream, primarily O 2 , are transferred via neutral molecular oxygen (O 2 ) to trace explosive vapour, forming negative ions which give rise to characteristic and identifiable ion mobility spectra. Further, negative ion mobility spectra of several explosive vapours are presented using conventional 63 Ni ionization and are compared qualitatively with the laser ionization approach. (author)

  2. Influence of Active Layer on Separation Potentials of Nanofiltration Membranes for Inorganic Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadekar, Shardul S; Vidic, Radisav D

    2017-05-16

    Active layers of two fully aromatic and two semi-aromatic nanofiltration membranes were studied along with surface charge at different electrolyte composition and effective pore size to elucidate their influence on separation mechanisms for inorganic ions by steric, charge, and dielectric exclusion. The membrane potential method used for pore size measurement is underlined as the most appropriate measurement technique for this application owing to its dependence on the diffusional potentials of inorganic ions. Crossflow rejection experiments with dilute feed composition indicate that both fully aromatic membranes achieved similar rejection despite the differences in surface charge, which suggests that rejection by these membranes is exclusively dependent on size exclusion and the contribution of charge exclusion is weak. Rejection experiments with higher ionic strength and different composition of the feed solution confirmed this hypothesis. On the other hand, increase in the ionic strength of feed solution when the charge exclusion effects are negligible due to charge screening strongly influenced ion rejection by semi-aromatic membranes. The experimental results confirmed that charge exclusion contributes significantly to the performance of semi-aromatic membranes in addition to size exclusion. The contribution of dielectric exclusion to overall ion rejection would be more significant for fully aromatic membranes.

  3. Application of β-cyclodextrin polymers in separation of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, C.A.; Kozlowska, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the competitive transport of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions through the plasticized immobilized membranes was studied. β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) polymers have been used as macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions by ion exchange methods, i.e. transport across polymer inclusion membranes and ion flotation process. β-CD polymers were prepared by cross-linking β-CD with alkenyl (nonenyl) succinic anhydride derivatives, phtalic and 3-nitrophtalic anhydride in anhydrous N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) resulting in formation of Polymer A, B or C, respectively. In he case of cooper(II) flotation results obtained with the use of nonylphenol polyoxyethyl glycol ether as an non-anionic surfactant and β-CD polymers as complexation agent, show that the removal of metal decreases with higher molecular mass of β-CD polymers linked by phtalic or 3-nitrophtalic anhydrides. For both derivatives with pH increase the copper(II) removed increase. The highest flotation removal, i.e. 93% is observed for β-CD polymers synthesized at 100 o C with molar ratio CD : NaH : 3-nitrophtalic anhydride equal to 1 : 7 : 7

  4. Detection of chlorinated and brominated byproducts of drinking water disinfection using electrospray ionization-high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, B; Barnett, D A; Froese, K; Purves, R W; Hrudey, S; Guevremont, R

    1999-10-15

    The lower limit of detection for low molecular weight polar and ionic analytes using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is often severely compromised by an intense background that obscures ions of trace components in solution. Recently, a new technique, referred to as high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), has been shown to separate gas-phase ions at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. A FAIMS instrument is an ion filter that may be tuned, by control of electrical voltages, to continuously transmit selected ions from a complex mixture. This capability offers significant advantages when FAIMS is coupled with ESI, a source that generates a wide variety of ions, including solvent clusters and salt adducts. In this report, the tandem arrangement of ESI-FAIMS-MS is used for the analysis of haloacetic acids, a class of disinfection byproducts regulated by the US EPA. FAIMS is shown to effectively discriminate against background ions resulting from the electrospray of tap water solutions containing the haloacetic acids. Consequently, mass spectra are simplified, the selectivity of the method is improved, and the limits of detection are lowered compared with conventional ESI-MS. The detection limits of ESI-FAIMS-MS for six haloacetic acids ranged between 0.5 and 4 ng/mL in 9:1 methanol/tap water (5 and 40 ng/mL in the original tap water samples) with no preconcentration, derivatization, or chromatographic separation prior to analysis.

  5. Deprotonation effect of tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile buffer gas dopant in ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-06-15

    When dopants are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, spectra are simplified due to charge competition. We used electrospray ionization to inject tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile (F, 2-furonitrile or 2-furancarbonitrile) as a buffer gas dopant into an ion mobility spectrometer coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Density functional theory was used for theoretical calculations of dopant-ion interaction energies and proton affinities, using the hybrid functional X3LYP/6-311++(d,p) with the Gaussian 09 program that accounts for the basis set superposition error; analytes structures and theoretical calculations with Gaussian were used to explain the behavior of the analytes upon interaction with F. When F was used as a dopant at concentrations below 1.5 mmol m(-3) in the buffer gas, ions were not observed for α-amino acids due to charge competition with the dopant; this deprotonation capability arises from the production of a dimer with a high formation energy that stabilized the positive charge and created steric hindrance that deterred the equilibrium with analyte ions. F could not completely strip other compounds of their charge because they either showed steric hindrance at the charge site that deterred the approach of the dopant (2,4-lutidine, and DTBP), formed intramolecular bonds that stabilized the positive charge (atenolol), had high proton affinity (2,4-lutidine, DTBP, valinol and atenolol), or were inherently ionic (tetraalkylammonium ions). This selective deprotonation suggests the use of F to simplify spectra of complex mixtures in ion mobility and mass spectrometry in metabolomics, proteomics and other studies that generate complex spectra with thousands of peaks. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Lithium-sodium separation by ion-exchange. Particular study of a pulsed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvert, H.

    1966-02-01

    A study is made of the operational conditions and constraints in the case of a moving-bed ion-exchange column subjected to pulses. The example chosen to illustrate its application concerns the lithium-sodium separation in a hydroxide medium (LiOH, NaOH). In the first part, the physico-chemical characteristics of the exchange and the kinetic characteristics of the exchange-reaction are considered. In the second part, the operation of the pulsed column is studied. Using the results obtained in the first part, the conditions required for study state operation are determined. When this is obtained, it is possible to calculate the height equivalent of the theoretical plate (HETP) of the installation. A study is also made of 'sliding', a phenomenon peculiar to pulsed columns. The results obtained show that it is possible, using laboratory tests, to determine the characteristics and the operational condition of a moving-bed ion-exchange column. (author) [fr

  7. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y.; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-01-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article

  8. Influence of the coupling between an atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometer and the low pressure ion inlet of a mass spectrometer on the mobility measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzer Frank

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS are versatile gas analyzers. Due to their small size and robustness, combined with a very high sensitivity, they are often used in gas sensing applications such as environmental monitoring. In order to improve the selectivity, they are typically combined with a mass spectrometer (MS. Since IMS works at atmospheric pressure, and MS works at vacuum, a special interface reducing the pressure over normally two stages has to be used. In this paper the influence of this coupling of different pressure areas on the IMS signal will be analyzed with help of finite elements method simulations.

  9. Controller Development for a Separate Meter-In Separate Meter-Out Fluid Power Valve for Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In most mobile vehicles which are used within construction, agriculture, material handling, forestry, garbage handling etc. a fluid power system is used for power transport and power distribution. The transported/distributed power is usually generated by a diesel engine or from an electrical battery. The largest advantages of the fluid power system are its high energy density and its robustness. Currently there is no cost effective and robust alternative to using a fluid power system for the ...

  10. Renewable and superior thermal-resistant cellulose-based composite nonwoven as lithium-ion battery separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Zhihong; Kong, Qingshan; Zhang, Chuanjian; Pang, Shuping; Yue, Liping; Wang, Xuejiang; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei

    2013-01-01

    A renewable and superior thermal-resistant cellulose-based composite nonwoven was explored as lithium-ion battery separator via an electrospinning technique followed by a dip-coating process. It was demonstrated that such nanofibrous composite nonwoven possessed good electrolyte wettability, excellent heat tolerance, and high ionic conductivity. The cells using the composite separator displayed better rate capability and enhanced capacity retention, when compared to those of commercialized polypropylene separator under the same conditions. These fascinating characteristics would endow this renewable composite nonwoven a promising separator for high-power lithium-ion battery.

  11. Application of linear pH gradients for the modeling of ion exchange chromatography: Separation of monoclonal antibody monomer from aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluters, Simon; Wittkopp, Felix; Jöhnck, Matthias; Frech, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The mobile phase pH is a key parameter of every ion exchange chromatography process. However, mechanistic insights into the pH influence on the ion exchange chromatography equilibrium are rare. This work describes a mechanistic model capturing salt and pH influence in ion exchange chromatography. The pH dependence of the characteristic protein charge and the equilibrium constant is introduced to the steric mass action model based on a protein net charge model considering the number of amino acids interacting with the stationary phase. This allows the description of the adsorption equilibrium of the chromatographed proteins as a function of pH. The model parameters were determined for a monoclonal antibody monomer, dimer, and a higher aggregated species based on a manageable set of pH gradient experiments. Without further modification of the model parameters the transfer to salt gradient elution at fixed pH is demonstrated. A lumped rate model was used to predict the separation of the monoclonal antibody monomer/aggregate mixture in pH gradient elution and for a pH step elution procedure-also at increased protein loadings up to 48 g/L packed resin. The presented model combines both salt and pH influence and may be useful for the development and deeper understanding of an ion exchange chromatography separation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Production of chemically reactive radioactive ion beams through on-line separation; Production de faisceaux d'ions radioactifs chimiquement reactifs par separation en ligne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joinet, A

    2003-10-01

    The ISOL (isotope separation on line) allows the production of secondary radioactive ion beams through spallation or fragmentation or fission reactions that take place in a thick target bombarded by a high intensity primary beam. The challenge is to increase the intensity and purity of the radioactive beam. The optimization of the system target/source requires the right choice of material for the target by taking into account the stability of the material, its reactivity and the ionization method used. The target is an essential part of the system because radioactive elements are generated in it and are released more or less quickly. Tests have been made in order to select the best fitted material for the release of S, Se, Te, Ge and Sn. Materials tested as target filling are: ZrO{sub 2}, Nb, Ti, V,TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub x}, ThO{sub 2}, C, ZrC{sub 4} and VC). Other molecules such as: COSe, COS, SeS, COTe, GeS, SiS, SnS have been studied to ease the extraction of recoil nuclei (Se, S, Te, Ge and Sn) produced inside the target.

  13. Production of chemically reactive radioactive ion beams through on-line separation; Production de faisceaux d'ions radioactifs chimiquement reactifs par separation en ligne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joinet, A

    2003-10-01

    The ISOL (isotope separation on line) allows the production of secondary radioactive ion beams through spallation or fragmentation or fission reactions that take place in a thick target bombarded by a high intensity primary beam. The challenge is to increase the intensity and purity of the radioactive beam. The optimization of the system target/source requires the right choice of material for the target by taking into account the stability of the material, its reactivity and the ionization method used. The target is an essential part of the system because radioactive elements are generated in it and are released more or less quickly. Tests have been made in order to select the best fitted material for the release of S, Se, Te, Ge and Sn. Materials tested as target filling are: ZrO{sub 2}, Nb, Ti, V,TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub x}, ThO{sub 2}, C, ZrC{sub 4} and VC). Other molecules such as: COSe, COS, SeS, COTe, GeS, SiS, SnS have been studied to ease the extraction of recoil nuclei (Se, S, Te, Ge and Sn) produced inside the target.

  14. Separation of chloride and fluoride from uranium compounds and their determination by ion selective electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fluoride and chloride must be rigorously controlled in uranium compounds, especially in ceramic grade UO 2 . Their determination is very difficult without previous uranium separation, particularly when both are at a low concentration. A simple procedure is described for this separation using a strong cationic resin to retain the uranyl ion. Both anions are determined in the effluent solution. Uranium compounds of nuclear fuel cycle, especially ammonium diuranate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, sodium diuranate, uranium trioxide and dioxide and uranium peroxide are dissolved in nitric acid and the solutions are percolated through the resin column. Chloride and fluoride are determined in the effluent by selective electrodes, the detection limits being 0.02 μg F - /ml and 1.0 μg Cl - /ml. The dissolution of the sample, the acidity of the solution, the measurement conditions and the sensitivity of the method are discussed. (Author) [pt

  15. A novel method for selective separation of {sup 111}In from impurities by ion exchange chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, R.; Khanachi, A.R.; Ghannad Maragheh, M.; Bagheri, G. [Jaber Ibn-e Hayan Research Laboratories, A.E.O.I., Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    {sup 111}In is one of the most important cyclotron-produced radionuclides that is prepared from nuclear reactions like Cd (p,xn){sup 111}In and Cd (d,xn) {sup 111}In. It is used in various branches of medicine such as lymphoscintigraphy and cisternography. Several methods have been reported in the literature for the separation of carrier-free {sup 111}In from irradiated cadmium matrix. But there has not been a sufficiently fast method for this purpose until recently. In this work, a new method has been developed for the separation of {sup 111}In from a cadmium target by using Dowex 50W-X8 as an ion exchanger. (orig.)

  16. Lithium isotope separation on an ion exchange resin having azacrown ether as an anchor group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.W.; Jeong, Y.K.; Lee, J.K.; Hong, Ch.P.; Kim, Ch.S.; Jeon, Y.Sh.

    1997-01-01

    As study on the separation of lithium isotopes was carried out with an ion exchange resin having 1,7,13-trioxa-4,10,16-triazacyclooctadecane (N 3 O 3 ) as an anchor group. The lighter isotope, 6 Li concentrated in the resin phase, while the heavier isotope, 7 Li is enriched in the fluid phase. Upon column chromatography [0.6 cm (I. D.) x 20 cm (height) using 1.0M ammonium chloride solution as an eluent, single separation factor, α, 1.068 ( 6 Li/ 7 Li) r esin/( 6 Li/ 7 Li) s olution was obtained by the GLUECKAUF method from the elution curve and isotope ratios. (author)

  17. The potential of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V; Calvo, Daniel; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2012-05-15

    The off-flavor of "tainted wine" is attributed mainly to the presence of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in the wine. In the present study the atmospheric pressure gas-phase ion chemistry, pertaining to ion mobility spectrometry, of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was investigated. In positive ion mode the dominant species is a monomer ion with a lower intensity dimer species with reduced mobility values (K(0)) of 1.58 and 1.20 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In negative mode the ion with K(0) =1.64 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) is ascribed to a trichlorophenoxide species while the ions with K(0) =1.48 and 1.13 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) are attributed to chloride attachment adducts of a TCA monomer and dimer, respectively. The limit of detection of the system for 2,4,6-TCA dissolved in dichloromethane deposited on a filter paper was 2.1 μg and 1.7 ppm in the gas phase. In ethanol and in wine the limit of detection is higher implying that pre-concentration and pre-separation are required before IMS can be used to monitor the level of TCA in wine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of the high temperature ion-source for the Grenoble electromagnetic isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouriant, M.

    1968-01-01

    The production of high purity stable or radioactive isotopes (≥ 99.99 per cent) using electromagnetic separation require for equipment having a high resolving power. Besides, and in order to collect rare or short half-life isotopes, the efficiency of the ion-source must be high (η > 5 to 10 per cent). With this in view, the source built operates at high temperatures (2500-3000 C) and makes use of ionisation by electronic bombardment or of thermo-ionisation. A summary is given in the first part of this work on the essential characteristics of the isotope separator ion Sources; a diagram of the principle of the source built is then given together with its characteristics. In the second part are given the values of the resolving power and of the efficiency of the Grenoble isotope separator fitted with such a source. The resolving power measured at 10 per cent of the peak height is of the order of 200. At the first magnetic stage the efficiency is between 1 and 26 per cent for a range of elements evaporating between 200 and 3000 C. Thus equipped, the separator has for example given, at the first stage, 10 mg of 180 Hf at (99.69 ± 0.1) per cent corresponding to an enrichment coefficient of 580; recently 2 mg of 150 Nd at (99.996 ± 0.002) per cent corresponding to an enrichment coefficient of 4.2 x 10 5 has been obtained at the second stage. (author) [fr

  19. Separation profiles of Sr from irradiated Yttrium matrix using different eluants by ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Kumar, G.V.S.; Vithya, J.; Kumar, R.; VenkataSubramani, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    89 Sr (a pure β - emitter, T 1/2 = 50.5d) is used in palliative care of bone metastases and was produced using the 89 Y(n,p) 89 Sr reaction in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), Kalpakkam. The irradiated yttria target was dissolved in nitric acid and bulk separation of yttrium carried out by solvent extraction using TBP-HNO 3 followed by ion exchange chromatography of the aqueous phase with nitric acid as an eluting agent to obtain the pure fraction of 89 Sr. This paper discusses about the feasibility of separation of 89 Sr with other eluting agents in ion exchange chromatography vis-a-vis nitric acid. As this nuclide is injected as the chloride, the purified fraction of Sr in nitric acid medium is finally converted into HCI medium which is the preferred medium of source for its final application. In order to simplify the conversion, HCI medium can be used directly in the purifying stage making the process faster and simpler. Hence the separation profile using HCI was obtained. In addition, the elution pattern using another reagent tri sodium tri meta phosphate (SMP) was also determined. Purification of 89 Sr fraction using the eluants HCI and SMP was established. However, the elution with SMP yielded the 89 Sr fraction in a small volume and shorter period i.e. ∼ 9 h in comparison with 15 h and 22 h in the case of HCI and HNO 3 medium respectively and also generated less liquid waste. This study established that SMP can be a more favoured elution agent for the purification of 89 Sr source during the chemical processing of the bulk irradiated yttria target material. However the direct separation of Sr using the Sr selective crown ether i.e.ditert.butyl dicyclohexano 18 Crown 6, is much preferred over this method which is in progress

  20. Direct separation of 67Ga citrate from zinc and copper target materials by an ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Ferieg, Kh.; Saleh, Z.A.

    2004-01-01

    The separation of 6 7G a from zinc and copper target materials using an anion- f:exchanger (Dowex21K) and 0.1 M citrate buffer at pH 6 is described. The gallium-67 was separated in citrate solution and can be directly used for medical applications. Gallium-67 with a half-life of 78.3 h and gamma-rays with energies of 93, 185 and 300 keV is a cyclotron produced radioisotope for which a considerable demand exists. 6 7G a is frequently produced through proton or deuteron bombardment of natural or enriched Zn targets (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973). It is usually separated from Zn by ion exchange chromatography (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; van der Walt and Strelow, 1983) or by liquid extraction Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; Hupf and Beaver, 1970). The isotope is usually supplied in citrate solution which is widely used as 6 7G a Gallium citrate which is a well-established radiopharmaceutical for imaging soft tissue tumors and abscesses. Several routes for large scale production of 6 7G a and the development of medical applications have been reported (Silvester and Thakur, 1970; Dahl and Tilbury, 1972; Steyn and Meyer,1973; Vlatkovic et al., 1975; Neirinckx, 1976; Thakur, 1977). Various attempts were carried out to separate gallium-67 by using different ion exchange methods (Strelow et al., 1971; Das and Ramamoorthy, 1995; Boothe et al.,1991) through the labelling of citrate by using 6 7G a was carried out for medical applications

  1. Measurement of mobility profile in ion-implanted silicon layers using electroreflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiev, G.B.; Kapaev, V.V.; Mokerov, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is shown of the application of the low field linearized electroreflection spectroscopy for the measurement of profiles of carriers mobilities μ(x) simultaneously with the concentration profiles N(x) in thin ion-implanted silicon layers. The μ(χ) value is determined from the calibration curve of the dependence of the phenomenological broadening parameter γ on the mobility for uniformly doped samples. The results are presented for the measurements of the profiles μ(x) for boron- and arsenic-implanted silicon

  2. Peak detection method evaluation for ion mobility spectrometry by using machine learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Kopczynski, Dominik; D'Addario, Marianna; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-04-16

    Ion mobility spectrometry with pre-separation by multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) has become an established inexpensive, non-invasive bioanalytics technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with various metabolomics applications in medical research. To pave the way for this technology towards daily usage in medical practice, different steps still have to be taken. With respect to modern biomarker research, one of the most important tasks is the automatic classification of patient-specific data sets into different groups, healthy or not, for instance. Although sophisticated machine learning methods exist, an inevitable preprocessing step is reliable and robust peak detection without manual intervention. In this work we evaluate four state-of-the-art approaches for automated IMS-based peak detection: local maxima search, watershed transformation with IPHEx, region-merging with VisualNow, and peak model estimation (PME).We manually generated Metabolites 2013, 3 278 a gold standard with the aid of a domain expert (manual) and compare the performance of the four peak calling methods with respect to two distinct criteria. We first utilize established machine learning methods and systematically study their classification performance based on the four peak detectors' results. Second, we investigate the classification variance and robustness regarding perturbation and overfitting. Our main finding is that the power of the classification accuracy is almost equally good for all methods, the manually created gold standard as well as the four automatic peak finding methods. In addition, we note that all tools, manual and automatic, are similarly robust against perturbations. However, the classification performance is more robust against overfitting when using the PME as peak calling preprocessor. In summary, we conclude that all methods, though small differences exist, are largely reliable and enable a wide spectrum of real-world biomedical applications.

  3. Short communication: separation and quantification of caseins and casein macropeptide using ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, B; Rahimi Yazdi, S; Ion Titapiccolo, G; Corredig, M

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work was to improve an existing method to separate and quantify the 4 major caseins from milk samples (i.e., containing whey proteins) using ion-exchange chromatography. The separation process was carried out using a mini-preparative cation exchange column (1 or 5mL of column volume), using urea acetate as elution buffer at pH 3.5 with a NaCl gradient. All 4 major caseins were separated, and the purity of each peak was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Purified casein fractions were also added to raw milk to confirm their elution volumes. The quantification was carried out using purified caseins in buffer as well as added directly to fresh skim milk. This method can also be employed to determine the decrease in kappa-casein and the release of the casein-macropeptide during enzymatic hydrolysis using rennet. In this case, the main advantage of using this method is the lack of organic solvents compared with the conventional method for separation of macropeptide (using reversed phase HPLC).

  4. Separation of 1,3-Propanediol from Aqueous Solutions by Ion Exchange Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukowicz Beata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-propanediol is a promising monomer with many applications and can be produced by bioconversion of renewable resources. The separation of this product from fermentation broth is a difficult task. In this work, the application of cation exchange resin for the separation of 1,3-propanediol from model aqueous solution was examined. The best effect of separation of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol using sorption method was obtained for H+ resin form, although the observed partition coefficient of 1,3-propanediol was low. On the basis of the results of the sorption of 1,3-propanediol, the ionic forms of the resin were selected and used in the next experiments (H+, Ca2+, Ag+, Na+, Pb2+, Zn2+. The best results in ion exchange chromatography were obtained for cation exchange resin in H+ and Ca2+ form. The use of smaller particle size of resin and a longer length of the column allows to obtain better separation of mixtures.

  5. Quadrature detection for the separation of the signals of positive and negative ions in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweikhard, Lutz; Drader, Jared J.; Shi, Stone D.-H.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    Positive and negative ions may be confined simultaneously in a nested open cylindrical Malmberg-Penning trap. However, ion charge sign cannot be distinguished by conventional dipolar (linearly-polarized) detection with a single pair of opposed electrodes. Here, the signals from each of two orthogonal pairs of opposed detection electrodes are acquired simultaneously and stored as real and imaginary parts of mathematically complex data. Complex Fourier transformation yields separate spectra for positive and negative ions. For a fullerene sample, experimental quadrature detection yields C 60 + and C 60 - signals separated by ∼1440 u rather than by the mass of two electrons, ∼0.001 u in conventional dipolar detection

  6. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS theme meeting on ion chromatography separations - state of art and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion Chromatography (IC) plays a vital role in all disciplines of science and technology. In the field of trace separations and speciation studies, use of IC techniques becomes indispensable. In nuclear technology, IC plays a pivotal role in the reactor water chemistry, in the front end of fuel cycle especially in the characterization of nuclear materials including the reactor fuels, post irradiation examination, actinide speciation studies and in understanding the interaction and migration of actinide species in the geo environment. Ion chromatography is also useful in the studies related to waste management particularly for the separation and determination of fission products. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to all the researchers in the area of ion chromatography to discuss their recent findings and information, to learn from the mutual experiences and interests, and to promote cooperation both nationally and internationally. Ion chromatography techniques including Ion Chromatography Separations and Nuclear Materials, Speciation Studies by Ion chromatography, Hyphenated -IC Techniques, Reactor Water Chemistry and Ion Chromatography, Solid Phase Extraction and Sample Preparations for IC and Separation of Bio-molecules and Environmental aspects etc are discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Microporous ceramic coated separators with superior wettability for enhancing the electrochemical performance of sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharto, Yustian; Lee, Yongho; Yu, Ji-Sang; Choi, Wonchang; Kim, Ki Jae

    2018-02-01

    Finding an alternative to glass fiber (GF) separators is a crucial factor for the fast commercialization of sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), because GF separators are too thick for use in SIBs, thereby decreasing the volumetric and gravimetric energy density. Here we propose a microporous composite separator prepared by introducing a polymeric coating layer of polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP co-polymer) with ZrO2 nanoparticles to a polyethylene (PE) separator. The coated separator efficiently enhances the cell performance of SIBs. The ZrO2 nanoparticles, finely dispersed on the polymeric coating layer, induce the formation of many micropores on the polymeric coating layer, suggesting that micropore formation on the coating layer renders the composite separator more open in structure. An ethylene carbonate/propylene carbonate liquid electrolyte for SIBs is not absorbed by PE separators even after 1 h of electrolyte droplet testing, while the proposed separator with many micropores is completely wetted by the electrolyte. Sodium ion migration across the composite separator is therefore effectively enhanced by the formation of ion transfer pathways, which improve ionic conductivity. As a result, the microporous composite separator affords stable cycle performances and excellent specific capacity retention (95.8%) after 50 cycles, comparable to those offered by a SIB with a GF separator.

  8. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  9. Investigation of the lithium ion mobility in cyclic model compounds and their ion conduction properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, Joerg

    2011-07-27

    In view of both, energy density and energy drain, rechargeable lithium ion batteries outperform other present accumulator systems. However, despite great efforts over the last decades, the ideal electrolyte in terms of key characteristics such as capacity, cycle life, and most important reliable safety, has not yet been identified. Steps ahead in lithium ion battery technology require a fundamental understanding of lithium ion transport, salt association, and ion solvation within the electrolyte. Indeed, well defined model compounds allow for systematic studies of molecular ion transport. Thus, in the present work, based on the concept of immobilizing ion solvents, three main series with a cyclotriphosphazene (CTP), hexaphenylbenzene (HBP), and tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMS) scaffold were prepared. Lithium ion solvents, among others ethylene carbonate (EC), which has proven to fulfill together with propylene carbonate safety and market concerns in commercial lithium ion batteries, were attached to the different cores via alkyl spacers of variable length. All model compounds were fully characterized, pure and thermally stable up to at least 235 C, covering the requested broad range of glass transition temperatures from -78.1 C up to +6.2 C. While the CTP models tend to rearrange at elevated temperatures over time, which questions the general stability of alkoxide related (poly)phosphazenes, both, the HPB and CTP based models show no evidence of core stacking. In particular the CTP derivatives represent good solvents for various lithium salts, exhibiting no significant differences in the ionic conductivity {sigma}{sub dc} and thus indicating comparable salt dissociation and rather independent motion of cations and ions. In general, temperature-dependent bulk ionic conductivities investigated via impedance spectroscopy follow a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) type behavior. Modifications of the alkyl spacer length were shown to influence ionic conductivities only in

  10. Ion chromatography of transition metals: specific alteration of retention by complexation reactions in the mobile and on the stationary phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, S.

    1992-05-01

    Ion chromatography of mono- and bivalent cations was performed on a conventional cation exchanger. The pH influence of an ethylene-diamine/citrate eluent was significant for the retention of alkaline earth and transition metals, but negligible for alkali ions. This was dealt with from a mechanistic point of view. Mobile phase optimization allowed fast isocratic analysis of mono- and bivalent cations and the separation of the radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90. A newly synthesized stationary phase containing iminodiacetate (IDA) function was investigated for cation chromatography using ethylenediamine/citrate eluents, polyhydroxy acid and dipicolinic acid. The column's high selectivity for transition metal ions in comparison to alkali and alkaline earth metals may be governed by the choice of complexing ability and pH of the eluent. Applications verified by atomic absorption spectroscopy include alkaline earth metals in beverages and the determination of Co, Cd and Zn in solutions containing more than 10 14 -fold excess of Na and Mg, such as sea water

  11. Fragmentation of molecular ions in differential mobility spectrometry as a method for identification of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziejuk, M; Puton, J; Szyposzyńska, M; Witkiewicz, Z

    2015-11-01

    The subject of the work is the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA). Studies were performed for mustard gas, i.e., bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (HD), sarin, i.e., O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB) and methyl salicylate (MS) used as test compounds. Measurements were conducted with two ceramic DMS analyzers of different constructions allowing the generation of an electric field with an intensity of more than 120 Td. Detector signals were measured for positive and negative modes of operation in a temperature range from 0 to 80 °C. Fragmentations of ions containing analyte molecules were observed for all tested compounds. The effective temperatures of fragmentation estimated on the basis of dispersion plots were equal from about 148 °C for GB to 178 °C for MS. It was found that values of separation voltage (SV) and compensation voltage (CV) at which the fragmentation of sample ions is observed may be the parameters improving the certainty of detection for different analytes. The DMS analyzers enabling the observation of ion fragmentation can be successfully used for effective CWA detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Design and implementation of embedded ion mobility spectrometry instrument based on SOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genwei; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yanwei; Yang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    On the hardware platform with single CYCLONE IV FPGA Chip based on SOPC technology, the control functions of IP cores of a Ion Mobility Spectrometry instrument was tested, including 32 bit Nios II soft-core processor, high-voltage module, ion gate switch, gas flow, temperature and pressure sensors, signal acquisition and communication protocol. Embedded operating system μCLinux was successfully transplanted to the hardware platform, used to schedule all the tasks, such as system initialization, parameter setting, signal processing, recognition algorithm and results display. The system was validated using the IMS diagram of Acetone reagent, and the instrument was proved to have a strong signal resolution.

  13. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 μm) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes 90 Zr and 180 Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer

  14. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira-Nunes, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  15. High-energy ion-beam-induced phase separation in SiOx films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldbik, W.M.; Tomozeiu, N.; Hattum, E.D. van; Lof, R.W.; Vredenberg, A.M.; Habraken, F.H.P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The modification of the nanostructure of silicon suboxide (SiO x ) films as a result of high-energy heavy-ion irradiation has been studied for the entire range 0.1≤x x films have been obtained by radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposition. For 50 MeV 63 Cu 8+ ions and an angle of incidence of 20 deg. with the plane of the surface, and for x≥0.5, it takes a fluence of about 10 14 /cm 2 to reach a Si-O-Si infrared absorption spectrum, which is supposed to be characteristic for a Si-SiO 2 composite film structure. For smaller x values, it takes a much larger fluence. The interpretation of the IR spectra is corroborated for the surface region by results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results present evidence for a mechanism, in which the phase separation takes place in the thermal spike, initiated by the energy deposited in many overlapping independent ion tracks. Such a process is possible since the suboxides fulfill the conditions for spinodal decomposition

  16. Application of resin in pulp technique for ion exchange separation of uranium from alkaline leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.; Chakravorty, J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of uranium from different ores uses ion exchange (IX) technique for the separation of dissolved uranium values. Conventionally, the IX process is carried out on leach solution obtained after the filtration or counter-current decantation of the leach slurries. Amongst the two types of leach pulps generated in uranium ore processing, viz acidic and alkaline, the latter one consists of predominantly fine-size pulps of higher viscosity, thus making the solid-liquid separation an arduous task. Sustained research for improvising the efficiency of various unit operations in the uranium process flowsheet have resulted in advent of new generation resins which are mechanically re-silent, posses higher exchange capacity thereby enabling separation of dissolved uranium ions from the leach pulps directly. Some of the prominent low-grade uranium ore deposits in India are hosted in acid consuming gangue matrix. These ore deposits necessitate fine grinding as well as application of alkaline leaching for the dissolution of uranium values. The leach pulps analyse 500 – 600 mg/l of U3O8 and contain total dissolved solutes (TDS) to the extent of about 50 g/l. Analysis of the characteristics of the leach pulp indicated suitability of resin-in-pulp technique for the separation of uranyl carbonate anions from the leachate. This paper describes the results of the RIP test work on alkaline leach slurry using various commercially available strong base anionic exchange resins. Parametric variation studies were conducted to establish the adsorption isotherm and sorption kinetics followed by elution of loaded uranium. Based on these results semi-continuous experiments on “carousel” mode were carried out. The results indicate superiority of gel type polystyrene based resins grafted with quaternary ammonium ion in comparison to the macro-porous resins. Semi-continuous counter-current extraction and elution tests indicated that about 98% of

  17. Application Of Electronic Nose And Ion Mobility Spectrometer To Quality Control Of Spice Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, U.; Tiebe, C.; Huebert, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the application of electronic nose (e-nose) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to quality control and to find out product adulteration of spice mixtures. Therefore the gaseous head space phase of four different spice mixtures (spices for sausages and saveloy) was differed from original composition and product adulteration. In this set of experiments metal-oxide type e-nose (KAMINA-type) has been used, and characteristic patterns of data corresponding to various complex odors of the four different spice mixtures were generated. Simultaneously an ion mobility spectrometer was coupled also to an emission chamber for the detection of gaseous components of spice mixtures. The two main methods that have been used show a clear discrimination between the original spice mixtures and product adulteration could be distinguished from original spice mixtures.

  18. Radionuclide separations in the nuclear fuel cycle development and application of micro and meso porous inorganic ion-exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.S.; Luca, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: From the mining of uranium-containing ores to the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, separations technologies play a crucial role in determining the efficiency and viability of the nuclear fuel cycle. With respect to proposed Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles (ANFC), the integral role of separations is no different with solvent extraction and pyroelectrometalurgical processing dominating efforts to develop a sustainable and publicly acceptable roadmap for nuclear power in the next 100 years. An often forgotten or overlooked separation technology is ion-exchange, more specifically, inorganic ion-exchangers. This is despite the fact that these materials offer the potential advantages of process simplicity; exceptional selectivity against high background concentrations of competing ions; and the possibility of a simple immobilization route for the separated radionculides. ANSTO's principal interest in inorganic ion-exchange materials in recent years has been the development of an inorganic ion-exchanger for the pretreatment of acidic legacy 9 Mo production waste to simultaneously remove radiogenic cesium and strontium. Radiogenic cesium and strontium comprise the majority of activity in such waste and may offer increased ease in the downstream processing to immobilise this waste in a Synroc wasteform. With the reliance on separations technologies in all current ANFC concepts, and the recent admission of ANSTO to the European Commissions EUROPART project, the development of new inorganic ion-exchangers has also expanded within our group. This presentation will provide a background of the fundamentals of inorganic and composite inorganic-organic ion-exchange materials followed by specific discussion of some selected inorganic and composite ion-exchange materials being developed and studied at ANSTO. The detailed structural and ion-exchange chemistry of these materials will be discussed and note made of how such materials could benefit any of the

  19. Development of long-lived radionuclide partitioning technology - Preparation of ion exchanges for selective separation of radioactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Joong; Jeong, Hae In; Shim, Min Sook [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong [Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Ion exchanger contained nitrogen-oxygen donor macrocyclic units was synthesized, and immobilization process was carried out by adsorption of the exchanger to silica gel. The binding constants were measured with acid concentration. From the binding constants, selectivity for Pt(II) ion and acid concentration of eluents were determined. The most optimum conditions for the separation were also determined from investigating the effects of amount of immobile phase and column length. And liarit aza-crown ethers were synthesized and selectively separated Cs/Sr ion from mixed metal solution. 37= refs., 24 tabs., 40 figs. (author)

  20. Mixed mobile ion effect on a.c. conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  1. Investigation of the potential of silica-bonded macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Colton, N.G.; Bruening, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the testing of some novel separations materials known as SuperLig trademark materials for their ability to separate efficiently and selectively certain metal ions from a synthetic, nonradioactive nuclear waste solution. The materials, developed and patented by IBC Advanced Technologies, are highly selective macrocyclic ligands that have been covalently bonded to silica gel. The SuperLig trademark materials that were tested are: (1) SuperLig trademark 601 for barium (Ba 2+ ) and strontium (Sr 2+ ) separation, (2) SuperLig trademark 602 for cesium (Cs + ) and rubidium (Rb + ) separation, (3) SuperLig trademark 27 for palladium (Pd 2+ ) separation, and (4) SuperLig trademark II for silver (Ag + ) and ruthenium (Ru 3+ ) separation. Our observations show that the technology for separating metal ions using silica-bonded macrocycles is essentially sound and workable to varying degrees of success that mainly depend on the affinity of the macrocycle for the metal ion of interest. It is expected that ligands will be discovered or synthesized that are amenable to separating metal ions of interest using this technology. Certainly more development, testing, and evaluation is warranted. 3 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  3. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  4. The effect of magnetite nanoparticles synthesis conditions on their ability to separate heavy metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobik Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite nanoparticles have become a promising material for scientific research. Among numerous technologies of their synthesis, co-precipitation seems to be the most convenient, less time-consuming and cheap method which produces fine and pure iron oxide particles applicable to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to investigate how the co-precipitation synthesis parameters, such as temperature and base volume, influence the magnetite nanoparticles ability to separate heavy metal ions. The synthesis were conducted at nine combinations of different ammonia volumes - 8 cm3, 10 cm3, 15 cm3 and temperatures - 30°C, 60°C, 90°C for each ammonia volume. Iron oxides synthesized at each combination were examined as an adsorbent of seven heavy metals: Cr(VI, Pb(II, Cr(III, Cu(II, Zn(II, Ni(II and Cd(II. The representative sample of magnetite was characterized using XRD, SEM and BET methods. It was observed that more effective sorbent for majority of ions was produced at 30°C using 10 cm3 of ammonia. The characterization of the sample produced at these reaction conditions indicate that pure magnetite with an average crystallite size of 23.2 nm was obtained (XRD, the nanosized crystallites in the sample were agglomerated (SEM and the specific surface area of the aggregates was estimated to be 55.64 m2·g-1 (BET. The general conclusion of the work is the evidence that magnetite nanoparticles have the ability to adsorb heavy metal ions from the aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of the process depends on many factors such as kind of heavy metal ion or the synthesis parameters of the sorbent.

  5. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-C2H6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon (Xe) with ethane (C2H6) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm-1ṡ bar-1), at room temperature. The time of arrival spectra revealed two peaks throughout the entire range studied which were attributed to ion species with 3-carbons (C3H5+, C3H6+ C3H8+ and C3H9+) and with 4-carbons (C4H7+, C4H9+ and C4H10+). Besides these, and for Xe concentrations above 70%, a bump starts to appear at the right side of the main peak for reduced electric fields higher than 20 Td, which was attributed to the resonant charge transfer of C2H6+ to C2H6 that affects the mobility of its ion products (C3H8+ and C3H9+). The time of arrival spectra for Xe concentrations of 20%, 50%, 70% and 90% are presented, together with the reduced mobilities as a function of the Xe concentration calculated from the peaks observed for the low reduced electric fields and pressures studied.

  6. Performance evaluation of oxygen adsorbents using negative corona discharge–ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadkish, Kamal; Jafari, Mohammad T., E-mail: jafari@cc.iut.ac.ir; Ghaziaskar, Hassan S.

    2017-02-08

    Trace amounts of oxygen was determined using negative corona discharge as an ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry. A point-in-cylinder geometry with novel design was used to establish the corona discharge without interferences of negative ions such as NO{sub X}{sup −}. The desirable background spectrum shows only electrons peak, providing the instrument capable of trace analysis of oxygen in gaseous samples. The limit of detection and linear dynamic range with high coefficient of determination (r{sup 2} = 0.9997), were obtained for oxygen as 8.5 and 28–14204 ppm, respectively. The relative standard deviations of the method for intraday and interday were obtained 4 and 11%, respectively. The satisfactory results revealed the ability of the negative corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for investigating the performance of synthesized oxygen adsorbents in nitrogen streams. Two oxygen scavengers of MnO and Cu powder were prepared and the optimum temperature of the reactor containing MnO and Cu powder were obtained as 180 and 230 °C, respectively. Due to higher lifetime of copper powder, it was selected as the oxygen scavenger and some parameters such as: the type of adsorbent support, the size of adsorbent particles, and the amount of copper were studied for preparation of more efficient oxygen adsorbent. - Highlights: • Analysis of oxygen using negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry was investigated for the first time. • Novel designed point-in-cylinder geometry was used to establish the corona discharge without interferences of negative ions. • The method was utilized to evaluate the performance of some synthesized oxygen scavengers.

  7. Nanoparticle-coated separators for lithium-ion batteries with advanced electrochemical performance

    KAUST Repository

    Fang, Jason; Kelarakis, Antonios; Lin, Yueh-Wei; Kang, Chi-Yun; Yang, Ming-Huan; Cheng, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Yue; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Tsai, Li-Duan

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple, scalable approach to improve the interfacial characteristics and, thereby, the performance of commonly used polyolefin based battery separators. The nanoparticle-coated separators are synthesized by first plasma treating the membrane in oxygen to create surface anchoring groups followed by immersion into a dispersion of positively charged SiO 2 nanoparticles. The process leads to nanoparticles electrostatically adsorbed not only onto the exterior of the surface but also inside the pores of the membrane. The thickness and depth of the coatings can be fine-tuned by controlling the ζ-potential of the nanoparticles. The membranes show improved wetting to common battery electrolytes such as propylene carbonate. Cells based on the nanoparticle-coated membranes are operable even in a simple mixture of EC/PC. In contrast, an identical cell based on the pristine, untreated membrane fails to be charged even after addition of a surfactant to improve electrolyte wetting. When evaluated in a Li-ion cell using an EC/PC/DEC/VC electrolyte mixture, the nanoparticle-coated separator retains 92% of its charge capacity after 100 cycles compared to 80 and 77% for the plasma only treated and pristine membrane, respectively. © the Owner Societies 2011.

  8. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  9. Lithium Thiophosphate Compounds as Stable High Rate Li-Ion Separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Battery separators based upon lithium thiophosphate (LiPS4) have previously been demonstrated at UC Boulder, but the thickness of the separators was too high to be of practical use in a lithium ion battery. The separators are solid phase, which makes them intrinsically less prone to thermal runaway and thereby improves safety. Results of attempting to develop sputtered thin film layers of this material by starting with targets of pure Li, Li2S, and P2S5 are reported. Sputtering rates and film quality and composition are discussed, along with efforts to use Raman spectroscopy to determine quantitative film composition. The latter is a rate limiting step in the investigation of these films, as they are typically thin and require long times to get to sufficient thickness to be analyzed using traditional methods, whereas Raman is particularly well suited to this analysis, if it can be made quantitative. The final results of the film deposition methods are reported, and a path towards new films is discussed. Finally, it should be noted that this program originally began with one graduate student working on the program, but this student ultimately chose to not continue with a PhD. A second student took over in the middle of the effort, and a new program has been proposed with a significantly altered chemistry to take the program in a new direction.

  10. Ignition method of corona discharge with modulation of the field in ion source of ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the ignition of the corona discharge has been developed, which improves the stability of the ion mobility spectrometer and the resolution of the instrument. The system of forming a corona discharge without additional electrodes, which are used in a number of known structures for the pre-ionization, has been developed. This simplifies the design of the proposed source and an electronic control circuit. IMS technology is widely used in different civil and military fields for vapor-phase detection of explosive, narcotics, chemical warfare agents, biology molecules and so on. There are set of methods whose are used for the ionization of molecules under analysis. They are the following: radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, electric field ionization, corona spray ionization, electro spray ionization, roentgen ionization, and surface ionization. All these methods has their own advantages and disadvantages. A comparing of ion mobility spectra of non-polar hydrocarbons for photoionization, corona discharge ionization and 63 Ni ionization, had carried in. In our work we have investigated four types of IMS spectrometers whose use different sources for molecules under analysis ionization. They use radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, and roentgen ionization. The traditional explosives had investigated in experiments. In electricity, a corona discharge is an electrical discharge brought on by the ionization of a fluid surrounding a conductor, which occurs when the potential gradient (the strength of the electric field) exceeds a certain value, but conditions are insufficient to cause complete electrical breakdown or arcing.

  11. [Influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic separation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoping; Yao, Shanshan; Jin, Micong

    2011-10-01

    The influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation were investigated. The organic modification effects of acids, i. e. , trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and buffer salts, i. e. , TFA-ammonium acetate (AmAc) were studied emphatically. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percentages of ion-suppressors in the mobile phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, separately. The separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA (0.01%, v/v)-AmAc (2. 5 mmol/L) aqueous solution as the mobile phases. An RP-HPLC method was established for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives in red wine. In the range of 10. 0 - 100. 0 mg/L, nine food additives showed good linearity with the correlation coefficients ( r2 ) larger than 0. 999 1. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0. 33 - 2. 36 mg/L and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 1. 11 - 7. 80 mg/L. The spiked recoveries were between 87. 61% and 108. 4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2. 2% -9. 4%. These results are of referential significance for the rapid establishment and accu- rate optimization of RP-HPLC separation for the simultaneous determination of food additives in other foods.

  12. Note: Buffer gas temperature inhomogeneities and design of drift-tube ion mobility spectrometers: Warnings for real-world applications by non-specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, R.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates gas phase ions moving under an electric field according to their size-to-charge ratio. IMS is the method of choice to detect illegal drugs and explosives in customs and airports making accurate determination of reduced ion mobilities (K0) important for national security. An ion mobility spectrometer with electrospray ionization coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to study uncertainties in buffer gas temperatures during mobility experiments. Differences up to 16°C were found in the buffer gas temperatures in different regions of the drift tube and up to 42°C between the buffer gas and the drift tube temperatures. The drift tube temperature is used as an approximation to the buffer gas temperature for the calculation of K0 because the buffer gas temperature is hard to measure. This is leading to uncertainties in the determination of K0 values. Inaccurate determination of K0 values yields false positives that delay the cargo and passengers in customs and airports. Therefore, recommendations are issued for building mobility tubes to assure a homogeneous temperature of the buffer gas. Because the temperature and other instrumental parameters are difficult to measure in IMS, chemical standards should always be used when calculating K0. The difference of 42°C between the drift tube and buffer gas temperatures found in these experiments produces a 10.5% error in the calculation of K0. This large inaccuracy in K0 shows the importance of a correct temperature measurement in IMS.

  13. Development of a short pulsed corona discharge ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yuan; Aliaga-Rossel, R.; Choi, Peter; Gilles, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The development of a pulsed corona discharge ionization source and its use in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is presented. In a point-plane electrode geometry, an electrical pulse up to 12 kV, 150 ns rise time and 500 ns pulse width was used to generate a corona discharge in air. A single positive high voltage pulse was able to generate about 1.6x10 10 ions at energy consumption of 22 μJ. Since the temporal distribution of ions is in a pulsed form, the possibility of removal the ion gate has been investigated. By purposely arranging the interface between discharge field and drift field, nearly 10 7 positive ions were drawn into the drift region with absence of the ion gate after every single discharge. The positive spectrum of acetone dimer (working at room temperature) was obtained with a resolving power of 20 by using this configuration. The advantages of this new scheme are the low power consumption compared with the dc method as well as the simplicity of the IMS cell structure

  14. Adsorption of fluids in slitlike pores containing a small amount of mobile ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Bucior, K; Sokołowski, S; Staszewski, T

    2005-11-01

    We apply density functional theory to investigate changes in the phase behavior of a fluid caused by the presence of mobile ions inside the pore. The approach has been based on the fundamental measure density functional theory and on the theory of nonuniform electrolytes developed recently by O. Pizio, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokołowski [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2005) 11,957]. We have evaluated capillary condensation phase diagrams for pores of different widths and for different concentrations of confined ions. The calculations have demonstrated that the presence of ions leads to lowering the critical temperature and to an increase of the value of the chemical potential at the capillary condensation point.

  15. Methods for separating boron from borated paraffin wax and its determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Boron compounds are found to be useful in shielding against high-energy neutrons. In radiotherapy treatments, in order to protect occupational workers and patients from the undesirable neutron and gamma doses, paraffin wax containing B 4 C/boric acid is used. Low-level borate wastes generated from the nuclear power plants have been immobilized with paraffin wax using a concentrate waste drying system (CWDS). Borated paraffin waxes are prepared by mixing calculated amounts of either boric acid or boron carbide with the molten wax. This necessitates the determination of boron at different locations in order to check the homogeneous distribution of B over the borated wax. The determination of boron in nuclear materials is inevitable due to its high neutron absorption cross section. For the determination of boron in borated waxes, not many methods have been reported. A method based on the pyrohydrolysis extraction of boron and its quantification with ion chromatography was proposed for paraffin waxes borated with H 3 BO 3 and B 4 C. The B 4 C optimum pyrohydrolysis conditions were identified. Wax samples were mixed with U 3 O 8 , which prevents the sample from flare up, and also accelerates the extraction of boron. Pyrohydrolysis was carried out with moist O 2 at 950℃ for 60 and 90 min for wax with H 3 BO 3 and wax with B 4 C, respectively. Two simple methods of separation based on alkali extraction and melting wax in alkali were also developed exclusively for wax with H 3 BO 3 . In all the separations, the recovery of B was above 98%. During IC separation, B was separated as boron-mannitol anion complex. Linear calibration was obtained between 0.1 and 50 ppm of B, and LOD was calculated as 5 ppb (S/N=3). The reproducibility was better than 5% (RSD)

  16. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Li; Jian, Jia; Xiaoguang, Gao; Xiuli, He [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li Jianping, E-mail: jpli@mail.ie.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L{sup -1} (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  17. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu; Jia Jian; Gao Xiaoguang; He Xiuli; Li Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. ► Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. ► Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. ► Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. ► The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L −1 (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  18. Bench scale studies on separation of rare earths by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroonrung-Areeya, A.

    1976-01-01

    The method of ion exchange was applied to the separation of mixtures of rare earth oxides into the pure components. The method consists of eluting a band of mixed rare earths adsorbed on a cation-exchange resin through a second cation-exchange bed in the copper II state. The eluent consists of an ammonia buffered solution of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. The mixed rare earth oxide used as testing material was obtained from the digestion of Thai monazite. The amounts varied from 1, 5 to 50 grams. The purity of the rare earth fractions were analyzed either by neutron activation of X-ray fluorescence. The Cu.EDTA was recovered by the addition of lime. It was found that gram quantities of pure rare earths could be obtained by this method

  19. Event-shape-engineering study of charge separation in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fufang; Bryon, Jacob; Wen, Liwen; Wang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Recent measurements of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions have indicated charge-separation signals perpendicular to the reaction plane, and have been related to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). However, the correlation signal is contaminated with the background caused by the collective motion (flow) of the collision system, and an effective approach is needed to remove the flow background from the correlation. We present a method study with simplified Monte Carlo simulations and a multi-phase transport model, and develop a scheme to reveal the true CME signal via event-shape engineering with the flow vector of the particles of interest. Supported by a grant (DE-FG02-88ER40424) from U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics

  20. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of plasma proteins when incorporating traveling wave ion mobility into a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry workflow for biomarker discovery: use of product ion quantitation as an alternative data analysis tool for label free quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charlotte E; Ng, Leong L; Hakimi, Amirmansoor; Willingale, Richard; Jones, Donald J L

    2014-02-18

    Discovery of protein biomarkers in clinical samples necessitates significant prefractionation prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Integrating traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) enables in-line gas phase separation which when coupled with nanoflow liquid chromatography and data independent acquisition tandem mass spectrometry, confers significant advantages to the discovery of protein biomarkers by improving separation and inherent sensitivity. Incorporation of TWIMS leads to a packet of concentrated ions which ultimately provides a significant improvement in sensitivity. As a consequence of ion packeting, when present at high concentrations, accurate quantitation of proteins can be affected due to detector saturation effects. Human plasma was analyzed in triplicate using liquid-chromatography data independent acquisition mass spectrometry (LC-DIA-MS) and using liquid-chromatography ion-mobility data independent acquisition mass spectrometry (LC-IM-DIA-MS). The inclusion of TWIMS was assessed for the effect on sample throughput, data integrity, confidence of protein and peptide identification, and dynamic range. The number of identified proteins is significantly increased by an average of 84% while both the precursor and product mass accuracies are maintained between the modalities. Sample dynamic range is also maintained while quantitation is achieved for all but the most abundant proteins by incorporating a novel data interpretation method that allows accurate quantitation to occur. This additional separation is all achieved within a workflow with no discernible deleterious effect on throughput. Consequently, TWIMS greatly enhances proteome coverage and can be reliably used for quantification when using an alternative product ion quantification strategy. Using TWIMS in biomarker discovery in human plasma is thus recommended.

  1. Separation and characterization of unknown impurities and isomers in flomoxef sodium by LC-IT-TOF MS and study of their negative-ion fragmentation regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Wang, Fan; Li, Jiani; Shan, Weiguang; Zhu, Bingqi; Wang, Jian

    2017-06-05

    Thirteen unknown impurities in flomoxef sodium were separated and characterized by liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-IT-TOF MS)with positive and negative modes of electrospray ionization method for further improvement of official monographs in pharmacopoeias. The fragmentation patterns of impurities in flomoxef in the negative ion mode were studied in detail, and new negative-ion fragmentation regularities were discovered. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Kromasil C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm). The mobile phase consisted of (A) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (84:16, v/v) and (B) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (47:53, v/v). In order to determine the m/z values of the molecular ions and formulas of all detected impurities, full scan LC-MS in both positive and negative ion modes was firstly executed to obtain the m/z value of the molecules. Then LC-MS 2 and LC-MS 3 were carried out on target compounds to obtain as much structural information as possible. Complete fragmentation patterns of impurities were studied and used to obtain information about the structures of these impurities. Structures of thirteen unknown degradation products in flomoxef sodium were deduced based on the high resolution MS n data with both positive and negative modes. The forming mechanisms of degradation products in flomoxef sodium were also studied. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A new ion-exchange adsorbent with paramagnetic properties for the separation of genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guodong; Jiang, Luan; Wen, Puhong; Cui, Yali; Li, Hong; Hu, Daodao

    2011-11-21

    A new ion-exchange adsorbent (IEA) derived from Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)-GPTMS-DEAE with paramagnetic properties was prepared. Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were firstly prepared in water-in-oil microemulsion. The magnetic Fe(3)O(4) particles were modified in situ by hydrolysis and condensation reactions with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to form the core-shell Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2). The modified particles were further treated by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) to form Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)-GPTMS nanoparticles. Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)-GPTMS-DEAE nanoparticles (IEA) were finally obtained through the condensation reaction between the Cl of diethylaminoethyl chloride-HCl (DEAE) and the epoxy groups of GPTMS in the Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)-GPTMS. The obtained IEA has features of paramagnetic and ion exchange properties because of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles and protonated organic amine in the sample. The intermediates and final product obtained in the synthesis process were characterized. The separation result of genomic DNA from blood indicated that Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)-GPTMS-DEAE nanoparticles have outstanding advantages in operation, selectivity, and capacity.

  3. Separation of amaranthine-type betacyanins by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerz, Gerold; Gebers, Nadine; Szot, Dominika; Szaleniec, Maciej; Winterhalter, Peter; Wybraniec, Slawomir

    2014-05-30

    Betacyanins, red-violet plant pigments, were fractionated by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography (IP-HSCCC) from leaves extract of Iresine lindenii Van Houtte, an ornamental plant of the family Amaranthaceae. An HSCCC solvent system consisting of TBME-1-BuOH-ACN-H2O (1:3:1:5, v/v/v/v) was applied using ion-pair forming heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA). Significantly different elution profiles of betacyanin diastereomeric pairs (derivatives based on betanidin and isobetanidin) observed in the HSCCC in comparison to HPLC systems indicate a complementarity of both techniques' fractionation capabilities. The numerous diastereomeric pairs can be selectively separated from each other using the HSCCC system simplifying the pigment purification process. Apart from the three well known highly abundant pigments (amaranthine, betanin and iresinin I) together with their isoforms, three new acylated (feruloylated and sinapoylated) betacyanins as well as known pigment hylocerenin (previously isolated from cacti fruits) were characterized in the plant for the first time and they are new for the whole Amaranthaceae family. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recycling metals from lithium ion battery by mechanical separation and vacuum metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiefeng; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhengming

    2017-09-15

    The large-batch application of lithium ion batteries leads to the mass production of spent batteries. So the enhancement of disposal ability of spent lithium ion batteries is becoming very urgent. This study proposes an integrated process to handle bulk spent lithium manganese (LiMn 2 O 4 ) batteries to in situ recycle high value-added products without any additives. By mechanical separation, the mixed electrode materials mainly including binder, graphite and LiMn 2 O 4 are firstly obtained from spent batteries. Then, the reaction characteristics for the oxygen-free roasting of mixed electrode materials are analyzed. And the results show that mixed electrode materials can be in situ converted into manganese oxide (MnO) and lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) at 1073K for 45min. In this process, the binder is evaporated and decomposed into gaseous products which can be collected to avoid disposal cost. Finally, 91.30% of Li resource as Li 2 CO 3 is leached from roasted powders by water and then high value-added Li 2 CO 3 crystals are further gained by evaporating the filter liquid. The filter residues are burned in air to remove the graphite and the final residues as manganous-manganic oxide (Mn 3 O 4 ) is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Separation of metals in the form of ion associates by the method of thin-layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalova, E.N.; Timerbaev, A.R.; Bol'shova, T.A.; Mel'nik, S.V.; Kordejro, E.

    1990-01-01

    Behaviour of pyridylazo resorcinates of certain metals (Ga, In, Fe, Co) in the form of ionic pairs with tri-n-octylamine (TOA) under conditions of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) has been studied. For all eluents investigated Ga and In complexes possess the highest mobility. Selectivity of ionic associate separation decreases with an increase in mobile phase polarity. Mixtures with 10-15 % content of isopropanol in eluating solution are the optimal ones. Separation of Ga and In from Fe 3+ and Co takes place with separation criterion 3.1 and 4.1 respectively. An attempt to separate ionic associates of In and Ga failed owing to similar stability of their pyridylazoresorcinates. Solution of the problem of In and Ga determination in the presence of iron can contribute to concrete application of the method

  6. Improved detection of drugs of abuse using high-performance ion mobility spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI-HPIMS) for urine matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midey, Anthony J; Patel, Aesha; Moraff, Carol; Krueger, Clinton A; Wu, Ching

    2013-11-15

    High-performance ion mobility spectrometry (HPIMS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to separate drugs of abuse compounds as a function of drift time (ion mobility), which is based on their size, structural shape, and mass-to-charge. HPIMS has also been used to directly detect and identify a variety of the most commonly encountered illegal drugs, as well as a mixture of opiates in a urine matrix without extra sample pretreatment. HPIMS has shown resolving power greater than 65 comparable to that of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with only 1 mL of solvent and sample required using air as the IMS separation medium. The HPIMS method can achieve two-order of magnitude linear response, precise drift times, and high peak area precision with percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) less than 3% for sample quantitation. The reduced mobilities measured agree very well with other IMS measurements, allowing a simple "dilute-and-shoot" method to be used to detect a mixture of codeine and morphine in urine matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrodynamics with chiral anomaly and charge separation in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yi, E-mail: yyin@bnl.gov [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Liao, Jinfeng, E-mail: liaoji@indiana.edu [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-05-10

    Matter with chiral fermions is microscopically described by theory with quantum anomaly and macroscopically described (at low energy) by anomalous hydrodynamics. For such systems in the presence of external magnetic field and chirality imbalance, a charge current is generated along the magnetic field direction — a phenomenon known as the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). The quark–gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions provides an (approximate) example, for which the CME predicts a charge separation perpendicular to the collisional reaction plane. Charge correlation measurements designed for the search of such signal have been done at RHIC and the LHC for which the interpretations, however, remain unclear due to contamination by background effects that are collective flow driven, theoretically poorly constrained, and experimentally hard to separate. Using anomalous (and viscous) hydrodynamic simulations, we make a first attempt at quantifying contributions to observed charge correlations from both CME and background effects in one and same framework. The implications for the search of CME are discussed.

  8. Separation and purification of uranium by ion exchange on stannic phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Nadkarni, M.N.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1977-01-01

    Exchange of uranium, plutonium and some fission product elements was investigated on stannic phosphate (SnP) exchanger from nitric acid solutions. Batch equilibration studies exhibited stronger absorption of plutonium (IV) and some of the fission products on the exchanger than uranium. This indicated the possibility of separation and purification of uranium from plutonium and fission products. Breakthrough studies were carried out to determine the effects of flow-rates and uranium, plutonium and free nitric acid concentrations in the feed to establish the optimum conditions for this separation. Several reagents were also tested to find suitable eluting agents to desorb plutonium from the exchanger. The results indicate that traces of plutonium and fission products present as impurities in the uranium product of the purex process stream can be removed by ion exchange method using SnP. 1 M nitric acid solution containing low concentrations of reducing agents such as ferrous sulfamate or ascorbic acid was found to be an effective eluting agent for plutonium. (author)

  9. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library.

  10. Dynamic separation of Szilard-Chalmers reaction products applied to the trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.B.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of dynamic elution of recoiled 51 Cr +3 , formed by the Szilard-Chalmers reaction during the irradiation of trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin is presented. The influence of some factors on the separation yield of chromium-51, such as: composition, concentration and flow rate of eluent, mesh size of the resin and irradiation time are studied. The results are compardd with those obtained by the static method, in which the recoiled atom is separated from the target after irradiation. Because of the high separation yield of chromium-51, the method of dynamic separation is proposed for routine production of this elemnt, with high specific activities. (author) [pt

  11. Preconceptual design for separation of plutonium and gallium by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    The disposition of plutonium from decommissioned nuclear weapons, by incorporation into commercial UO 2 -based nuclear reactor fuel, is a viable means to reduce the potential for theft of excess plutonium. This fuel, which would be a combination of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide, is referred to as a mixed oxide (MOX). Following power generation in commercial reactors with this fuel, the remaining plutonium would become mixed with highly radioactive fission products in a spent fuel assembly. The radioactivity, complex chemical composition, and large size of this spent fuel assembly, would make theft difficult with elaborate chemical processing required for plutonium recovery. In fabricating the MOX fuel, it is important to maintain current commercial fuel purity specifications. While impurities from the weapons plutonium may or may not have a detrimental affect on the fuel fabrication or fuel/cladding performance, certifying the effect as insignificant could be more costly than purification. Two primary concerns have been raised with regard to the gallium impurity: (1) gallium vaporization during fuel sintering may adversely affect the MOX fuel fabrication process, and (2) gallium vaporization during reactor operation may adversely affect the fuel cladding performance. Consequently, processes for the separation of plutonium from gallium are currently being developed and/or designed. In particular, two separation processes are being considered: (1) a developmental, potentially lower cost and lower waste, thermal vaporization process following PuO 2 powder preparation, and (2) an off-the-shelf, potentially higher cost and higher waste, aqueous-based ion exchange (IX) process. While it is planned to use the thermal vaporization process should its development prove successful, IX has been recommended as a backup process. This report presents a preconceptual design with material balances for separation of plutonium from gallium by IX

  12. Improved separation of conjugated fatty acid methyl esters by silver ion-high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehat, N; Rickert, R; Mossoba, M M; Kramer, J K; Yurawecz, M P; Roach, J A; Adlof, R O; Morehouse, K M; Fritsche, J; Eulitz, K D; Steinhart, H; Ku, Y

    1999-04-01

    Operating from one to six silver ion-high-performance liquid chromatography (Ag+-HPLC) columns in series progressively improved the resolution of the methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomeric mixtures from natural and commercial products. In natural products, the 8 trans, 10 cis-octadecadienoic (18:2) acid was resolved from the more abundant 7 trans, 9 cis-18:2, and the 10 trans, 12 cis-18:2 was separated from the major 9 cis, 11 trans-18:2 peak. In addition, both 11 trans, 13 cis-18:2 and 11 cis, 13 trans-18:2 isomers were found in natural products and were separated; the presence of the latter, 11 cis, 13 trans-18:2, was established in commercial CLA preparations. Three Ag+-HPLC columns in series appeared to be the best compromise to obtain satisfactory resolution of most CLA isomers found in natural products. A single Ag+-HPLC column in series with one of several normal-phase columns did not improve the resolution of CLA isomers as compared to that of the former alone. The 20:2 conjugated fatty acid isomers 11 cis, 13 trans-20:2 and 12 trans, 14 cis-20:2, which were synthesized by alkali isomerization from 11 cis, 14 cis-20:2, eluted in the same region of the Ag+-HPLC chromatogram just before the corresponding geometric CLA isomers. Therefore, CLA isomers will require isolation based on chain length prior to Ag+-HPLC separation. The positions of conjugated double bonds in 20:2 and 18:2 isomers were established by gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry as their 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives. The double-bond geometry was determined by gas chromatography-direct deposition-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and by the Ag+-HPLC relative elution order.

  13. The determination of radioactive strontium in environmental samples by preferential ion exchange separation from calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Hiroto; Nonaka, Nobuhiro; Honda, Tetsutaro; Kimura, Toshimasa; Higuchi, Hideo

    1979-01-01

    The determination of radioactive strontium in environmental samples involves a difficulty in the separation and purification of strontium from large amounts of calcium. The principal technique employed in this study is based on a cation exchange separation after preferential chelation of calcium over strontium by EDTA. The alkaline earth fraction separated from samples is dissolved in 1.2 M HCl and an equivalent amount of EDTA is added. The solution is passed through a Dowex 50W-X8 ion exchange column at a flow rate of 20 ml/min after the pH has been adjusted to 5.1. A fraction of calcium retained on the resin is eluted out with 1.8 l of 2 w/v% EDTA solution at pH 5.1. Then the strontium is eluted with 450 ml of 2 M HCl. The strontium carbonate is precipitated, and the chemical yield is determined. After standing for 14 days to reach the radioactive equilibrium of 90 Sr - 90 Y, the activity of 89 Sr + 90 Sr + 90 Y is measured. Then the activity of 90 Sr + 90 Y is measured by milking the 90 Y. The proposed procedure has been applied to sea water, soil and various ash samples of vegetables, seaweeds and daily foods. The results obtained are in good agreement with those by a classical fuming nitric acid precipitation method. The detection limits are 0.1 pCi/l for 10 l of sea water, 10 pCi/kg for 100 g of soil and 1 pCi/kg-fresh for 20 g ash samples, respectively. (author)

  14. Separation method for ions of elements of the III., IV., VI. and VIII. groups of periodical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhol, M.

    1973-01-01

    The method is presented of separating the ions of the elements of the periodic system groups III, IV, and VIII by ion exchangers. The ions are complex-bonded to a new type of ion exchanger consisting of the polycondensates of phenol with aldehydes or ketones and containing an atom of phosphorus, arsenic or antimony with an atom of sulphur or oxygen in a complex bond. The polymers of compounds containing a double bond, e.g., of butadiene, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene, polypropylene, and the compounds of styrene with fural may also be used for this purpose. The method is demonstrated on a case of uranium and heavy metal concentration and the separation thereof from waste waters. (L.K.)

  15. Measurement of liquid mixing characteristics in large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation by stepwise response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Saito, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Itoi, Toshiaki.

    1981-07-01

    Liquid mixing in a large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation was measured by the step-wise response method, using NaCl solution as tracer. A 50 cm diameter column was packed with an ion exchange resin of 200 μm in mean diameter. Experiments were carried out for several types of distributor and collector, which were attached to each end of the column. The smallest mixing was observed for the perforated plate type of the collector, coupled with a minimum stagnant volume above the ion exchange resin bed. The 50 cm diameter column exhibited the better characteristics of liquid mixing than the 2 cm diameter column for which the good performance of lithium isotope separation had already been confirmed. These results indicate that a large increment of throughput is attainable by the scale-up of column diameter with the same performance of isotope separation as for the 2 cm diameter column. (author)

  16. Diffusion pathway of mobile ions and crystal structure of ionic and mixed conductors. A brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2009-01-01

    A brief review on the field of Solid State Ionics, including the diffusion pathway of mobile ions, crystal structure and materials, is presented. In the fluorite-structured ionic conductors such as ceria solid solution Ce 0.93 Y 0.07 O 1.96 , bismuth oxide solid solution δ-Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 and copper iodide CuI, a similar curved diffusion pathway along the directions is observed. In the ionic and mixed conductors with the cubic ABO 3 perovskite-type structure such as lanthanum gallate and lanthanum cobaltite solid solutions, the mobile ions diffuse along a curved line keeping the interatomic distance between the B cation and O 2- anion to some degree. The structure and diffusion path of double-perovskite-type La 0.64 Ti 0.92 Nb 0.08 O 2.99 , K 2 NiF 4 -type (Pr 0.9 La 0.1 ) 2 (Ni 0.74 Cu 0.21 Ga 0.05 )O 4+δ , and apatite-type La 9.69 (Si 5.70 Mg 0.30 )O 26.24 are described. The diffusion paths of Li + ions in La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 and Li 0.6 FePO 4 are two- and one-dimensional, respectively. (author)

  17. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  18. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Retention modeling under organic modifier gradient conditions in ion-pair reversed-phase chromatography. Application to the separation of a set of underivatized amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa-Louisi, A; Agrafiotou, P; Papachristos, K

    2010-07-01

    The combined effect of the ion-pairing reagent concentration, C(ipr), and organic modifier content, phi, on the retention under phi-gradient conditions at different constant C(ipr) was treated in this study by using two approaches. In the first approach, the prediction of the retention time of a sample solute is based on a direct fitting procedure of a proper retention model to 3-D phi-gradient retention data obtained under the same phi-linear variation but with different slope and time duration of the initial isocratic part and in the presence of various constant C(ipr) values in the eluent. The second approach is based on a retention model describing the combined effect of C(ipr) and phi on the retention of solutes in isocratic mode and consequently analyzes isocratic data obtained in mobile phases containing different C(ipr) values. The effectiveness of the above approaches was tested in the retention prediction of a mixture of 16 underivatized amino acids using mobile phases containing acetonitrile as organic modifier and sodium dodecyl sulfate as ion-pairing reagent. From these approaches, only the first one gives satisfactory predictions and can be successfully used in optimization of ion-pair chromatographic separations under gradient conditions. The failure of the second approach to predict the retention of solutes in the gradient elution mode in the presence of different C(ipr) values was attributed to slow changes in the distribution equilibrium of ion-pairing reagents caused by phi-variation.

  20. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membranes with varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities as lithium-ion battery separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xiaojing; Kolla, Praveen; Yang, Ruidong; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Yong; Smirnova, Alevtina L.; Fong, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nine types of electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membranes were prepared. • These membranes had varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities. • The membranes were explored as innovative Li-ion battery (LIB) separators. • The hot-pressed membrane with thin fibers had superior performance as LIB separator. - Abstract: In this study, nine types of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membranes with varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities are prepared by electrospinning followed by hot-pressing. Subsequently, these membranes are explored as Li-ion battery (LIB) separators. The impacts of fiber diameter and membrane porosity on electrolyte uptake, Li"+ ion transport through the membrane, electrochemical oxidation potential, and membrane performance as LIB separator (during charge/discharge cycling and rate capability tests of a cathodic half-cell) have been investigated. When compared to commercial Celgard PP separator, hot-pressed electrospun PAN nanofibrous membranes exhibit larger electrolyte uptake, higher thermal stability, wider electrochemical potential window, higher Li"+ ion permeability, and better electrochemical performance in LiMn_2O_4/separator/Li half-cell. The results also indicate that the PAN-based membrane/separator with small fiber diameters of 200–300 nm and hot-pressed under high pressure of 20 MPa surpasses all other membranes/separators and demonstrates the best performance, leading to the highest discharge capacity (89.5 mA h g"−"1 at C/2 rate) and cycle life (with capacity retention ratio being 97.7%) of the half-cell. In summary, this study has revealed that the hot-pressed electrospun PAN nanofibrous membranes (particularly those consisting of thin nanofibers) are promising as high-performance LIB separators.

  1. Ion mobility based on column leaching of South African gold tailings dam with chemometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowska, Ewa M; Govender, Koovila; Viljoen, Morris

    2004-07-01

    New column leaching experiments were designed and used as an alternative rapid screening approach to element mobility assessment. In these experiments, field-moist material was treated with an extracting solution to assess the effects of acidification on element mobility in mine tailings. The main advantage of this version of column leaching experiments with partitioned segments is that they give quick information on current element mobility in conditions closely simulating field conditions to compare with common unrepresentative air-dried, sieved samples used for column leaching experiments. Layers from the tailings dump material were sampled and packed into columns. The design of columns allows extracting leachates from each layer. The extracting solutions used were natural (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 4.2) rainwater. Metals and anions were determined in the leachates. The concentrations of metals (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Al, Cr, Ni, Co, Zn, and Cu) in sample leachates were determined using ICP OES. The most important anions (NO3-, Cl-, and SO4(2)-) were determined using the closed system izotacophoresis ITP analyser. The chemical analytical data from tailings leaching and physico-chemical data from field measurements (including pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature) were used for chemometric evaluation of element mobility. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was used to evaluate ions mobility from different layers of tailings dump arising from varied pH and redox conditions. It was found that the results from the partitioned column leaching illustrate much better complex processes of metals mobility from tailings dump than the total column. The chemometric data analysis (PFA) proofed the differences in the various layers leachability that are arising from physico-chemical processes due to chemical composition of tailings dump deposit. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Prediction of collision cross section and retention time for broad scope screening in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography-ion mobility-high resolution accurate mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Christian Brinch; Mardal, Marie; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe

    2018-01-01

    artificial neural networks (ANNs). Prediction was based on molecular descriptors, 827 RTs, and 357 CCS values from pharmaceuticals, drugs of abuse, and their metabolites. ANN models for the prediction of RT or CCS separately were examined, and the potential to predict both from a single model......Exact mass, retention time (RT), and collision cross section (CCS) are used as identification parameters in liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC-IM-HRMS). Targeted screening analyses are now more flexible and can be expanded for suspect...

  3. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Robertson, I.M., E-mail: ian.robertson@tcd.ie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  4. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J.; Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P.; Robertson, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry focusing on speciation analysis of metals/metalloids bound to carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessôa, Gustavo de Souza; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) was applied to speciation analysis of metalloproteins. The influence of pH on complexation conditions between some metals and bovine carbonic anhydrase was evaluated from pH 6 to 9, as well as the time involved in their complexation (0-24 h). Employing TWIMS-MS, two conformational states of bovine carbonic anhydrase were observed with charge states of +12 and +11; these configurations being evaluated in terms of the folded state of the apo form and this protein (at charge state +11) being linked to barium, lead, copper, and zinc in their divalent forms. Metalloprotein speciation analysis was carried out for copper (Cu(+) and Cu(2+)), lead (Pb(2+) and Pb(4+)), and selenium (Se(4+) and Se(6+)) species complexed with bovine carbonic anhydrase. Mobilities of all complexed species were compared, also considering the apo form of this protein.

  6. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  7. Quantitation of 11 alkylamines in atmospheric samples: separating structural isomers by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Bryan K.; Quilty, Aleya T.; Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Ziegler, Susan E.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.

    2017-03-01

    Amines are important drivers in particle formation and growth, which have implications for Earth's climate. In this work, we developed an ion chromatographic (IC) method using sample cation-exchange preconcentration for separating and quantifying the nine most abundant atmospheric alkylamines (monomethylamine (MMAH+), dimethylamine (DMAH+), trimethylamine (TMAH+), monoethylamine (MEAH+), diethylamine (DEAH+), triethylamine (TEAH+), monopropylamine (MPAH+), isomonopropylamine (iMPAH+), and monobutylamine (MBAH+)) and two alkyl diamines (1, 4-diaminobutane (DABH+) and 1, 5-diaminopentane (DAPH+)). Further, the developed method separates the suite of amines from five common atmospheric inorganic cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+). All 16 cations are greater than 95 % baseline resolved and elute in a runtime of 35 min. This paper describes the first successful separation of DEAH+ and TMAH+ by IC and achieves separation between three sets of structural isomers, providing specificity not possible by mass spectrometry. The method detection limits for the alkylamines are in the picogram per injection range and the method precision (±1σ) analyzed over 3 months was within 16 % for all the cations. The performance of the IC method for atmospheric application was tested with biomass-burning (BB) particle extracts collected from two forest fire plumes in Canada. In extracts of a size-resolved BB sample from an aged plume, we detected and quantified MMAH+, DMAH+, TMAH+, MEAH+, DEAH+, and TEAH+ in the presence of Na+, NH4+, and K+ at molar ratios of amine to inorganic cation ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 1000. Quantities of DEAH+ and DMAH+ of 0.2-200 and 3-1200 ng m-3, respectively, were present in the extracts and an unprecedented amine-to-ammonium molar ratio greater than 1 was observed in particles with diameters spanning 56-180 nm. Extracts of respirable fine-mode particles (PM2. 5) from a summer forest fire in British Columbia in 2015 were found to contain iMPAH+, TMAH+, DEAH

  8. Application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in forensic chemistry and toxicology with focus on biological matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Werner; Keller, Thomas; Regenscheit, Priska

    1995-01-01

    The IMS (Ion Mobility Spectroscopy) instrument 'Ionscan' takes advantage of the fact that trace quantities of illicit drugs are adsorbed on dust particles on clothes, in cars and on other items of evidence. The dust particles are collected on a membrane filter by a special attachment on a vacuum cleaner. The sample is then directly inserted into the spectrometer and can be analyzed immediately. We show casework applications of a forensic chemistry and toxicology laboratory. One new application of IMS in forensic chemistry is the detection of psilocybin in dried mushrooms without any further sample preparation.

  9. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Sheibani; Najmeh Haghpazir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs). Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for ...

  10. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  11. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I FC by the mobile plate tuner. The I FC is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I FC and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I FC when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  12. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-19

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two (88)Sr(+) ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d(-3.0(4)) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  13. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M; Williams, J S; Svensson, B G; Conway, M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  14. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  15. Systems Maturity Assessment of the Lithium Ion Battery for Extravehicular Mobility Unit Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Samuel P.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery (LLB/LIB) is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Silver/Zinc (Ag/Zn) Increased Capacity Battery (ICB), which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). The LLB (a battery based on commercial lithium ion cell technology) is designed to have the same electrical and mechanical interfaces as the current ICB. The EMU LIB Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the LLB either in a charger-strapped configuration or in an EMU-mounted configuration. This paper will retroactively apply the principles of Systems Maturity Assessment to the LLB project through use of the Integration Readiness Level and Earned Readiness Management. The viability of this methodology will be considered for application to new and existing technology development projects.

  16. Electron mobility and saturation of ion yield in 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poffenberger, P.R.; Astbury, A.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Keeler, R.K.; Li, Y.; Robertson, L.P.; Rosvick, M.; Schenk, P.; Oram, C.; Sobie, R.

    1993-01-01

    The electron drift mobility μ and zero field free ion yield G fi 0 have been measured for liquid 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane using a waveform analysis. The saturation of the ion yield for highly ionizing radiation has also been investigated and parameterized using the Birks' equation. The results obtained are μ=26.3±0.8 cm 2 /V s, G fi 0 =0.743±0.029 electrons/100 eV, and a Birks' factor ranging from kB=0.222±0.014 cm/MeV at 604 V/cm to kB=0.141±0.021 cm/MeV at 3625 V/cm. (orig.)

  17. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis; Transport d'ions sous l'effet d'un champ electrique en milieu poreux: Application a la separation de terres rares par electrophorese a focalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira-Nunes, A.I

    1999-01-15

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  18. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis; Transport d'ions sous l'effet d'un champ electrique en milieu poreux: Application a la separation de terres rares par electrophorese a focalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira-Nunes, A I

    1999-01-15

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  19. Drying and moisture resorption behaviour of various electrode materials and separators for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Michael; Pandey, Nisrit; Bund, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The drying behaviour and water uptake of a variety of commonly used electrode materials (graphite, LiFePO4, LiMn2O4, LiCoO2, Li(NiCoMn)O2) and separators (polyolefin, glass fibre) for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are investigated. The drying experiments are carried out using a coulometric Karl Fischer titrator in combination with a vaporiser. This setup leads to a highly sensitive and precise method to quantify water amounts in the microgram range in solid materials. Thereby the mass specific drying behaviour at RT and 120 °C is determined as well as the water resorption of the investigated materials in conditioned air atmosphere (T: 25 °C, RH: 40%). By extracting characteristic water detection rate curves for the investigated materials, a method is developed to predict the water detection beyond the runtime of the experiment. The results help optimising drying procedures of LIB components and thus can save time and costs. It is also shown, that water contaminations in graphite/LiFePO4 coin cells with a LiPF6 based electrolyte lead to a faster capacity fade during cycling and a significant change of the cell impedance.

  20. Development of composite ion exchanger for separation of cesium from high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Varshney, L.

    2010-01-01

    137 Cs (t 1/2 = 30 years) is one of the major radioisotope present in high level liquid waste (HLLW) generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Separation of 137 Cs from HLLW results in reduction of personal radiation exposure during the conditioning, transportation, storage and disposal. In addition, 137 Cs has enormous application as a radiation source in food preservation, sterilization of medical products, brachytherapy, blood irradiation, hygienization of sewage sludge etc. Ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP), an inorganic ion exchanger, has high selectivity and high exchange capacity for Cs. It exits as microcrystalline powder which is not amenable for column operation. ALIX is a composite material in which AMP is physically blended with inert polymeric substrate to improve its column property, exchange kinetics and increase its mechanical strength. The observed excellent properties of the composite are attributed to its engineered structure which is formed during its production. SEM analysis of ALIX shows that AMP crystals embedded in the cavities are not covered by the polymer which greatly enhances its availability for cesium exchange. The highly porous structure of the composite having 49% void volume facilitates faster kinetics of exchange of Cs from the aqueous phase and increased rate of reaction with alkali required during its dissolution

  1. Production of chemically reactive radioactive ion beams through on-line separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joinet, A.

    2003-10-01

    The ISOL (isotope separation on line) allows the production of secondary radioactive ion beams through spallation or fragmentation or fission reactions that take place in a thick target bombarded by a high intensity primary beam. The challenge is to increase the intensity and purity of the radioactive beam. The optimization of the system target/source requires the right choice of material for the target by taking into account the stability of the material, its reactivity and the ionization method used. The target is an essential part of the system because radioactive elements are generated in it and are released more or less quickly. Tests have been made in order to select the best fitted material for the release of S, Se, Te, Ge and Sn. Materials tested as target filling are: ZrO 2 , Nb, Ti, V,TiO 2 , CeO x , ThO 2 , C, ZrC 4 and VC). Other molecules such as: COSe, COS, SeS, COTe, GeS, SiS, SnS have been studied to ease the extraction of recoil nuclei (Se, S, Te, Ge and Sn) produced inside the target

  2. T/sub 4/ radioimmunoassay with ion-exchange resin separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, J D; Modha, K [Hoechst Pharmaceuticals Research Ltd., Milton Keynes (UK)

    1977-05-28

    An explanation is provided for the reports of falsely low values of serum-thyroxine (T/sub 4/) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA), particularly in sera containing raised concentrations of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) (Burr, W.A., Evans, S.E., Hogan, T.C., 1977, Lancet, April 2, 757). A re-examination of the assay technique used in commercial RIA kits ('RIA-gnost T/sub 3/' and 'RIA-gnost T/sub 4/', Behring Diagnostics) showed that blocking of binding proteins by 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulphonic acid (ANS) was incomplete in sera with raised TBG levels. Spectroscopic determination of the blocker concentration during the time the solution was in contact with the ion exchange resin showed that 98% of the ANS was removed from solution by 10 min contact with the resin, yet 60 min was required to absorb the free T/sub 4/. There was therefore ample time for unblocked TBG to recombine with free T/sub 4/ which was then misclassified as antibody-bound T/sub 4/. The assay technique used in the kits was therefore modified. The less polar TBG blocking agent, ethylmercurithiosalicylate (merthiolate), replaced ANS and it was demonstrated that accurate T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ measurements in high TBG sera could be made by resin-separation RIA without resorting to prior denaturation or alcohol extraction.

  3. Iminodiacetic acid functionalised organopolymer monoliths: application to the separation of metal cations by capillary high-performance chelation ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyna, Áine; Connolly, Damian; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-03-01

    Lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate monoliths were polymerised within fused silica capillaries and subsequently photo-grafted with varying amounts of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The grafted monoliths were then further modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA), resulting in a range of chelating ion-exchange monoliths of increasing capacity. The IDA functional groups were attached via ring opening of the epoxy group on the poly(GMA) structure. Increasing the amount of attached poly(GMA), via photo-grafting with increasing concentrations of GMA, from 15 to 35%, resulted in a proportional and controlled increase in the complexation capacity of the chelating monoliths. Scanning capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (sC(4)D) was used to characterise and verify homogenous distribution of the chelating ligand along the length of the capillaries non-invasively. Chelation ion chromatographic separations of selected transition and heavy metals were carried out, with retention factor data proportional to the concentration of grafted poly(GMA). Average peak efficiencies of close to 5,000 N/m were achieved, with the isocratic separation of Na, Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) possible on a 250-mm-long monolith. Multiple monolithic columns produced to the same recipes gave RSD data for retention factors of ions). The monolithic chelating ion-exchanger was applied to the separation of alkaline earth and transition metal ions spiked in natural and potable waters.

  4. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  5. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  6. High-performance ion chromatography method for separation and quantification of inositol phosphates in diets and digesta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Karoline; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2010-01-01

    A gradient high-performance ion chromatographic method for separation and quantification of inositol phosphates (InsP2-InsP6) in feedstuffs, diets, gastric and ileal digesta from pigs was developed and validated. The InsP2-InsP6 were separated on a Dionex CarboPacTM PA1 column using a gradient...... with 1.5 mol L-1 methanesulfonic acid and water. The exchange of the commonly used HCl with methanesulfonic acid has two advantages: (i) the obtained baseline during the separation is almost horizontal and (ii) it is not necessary to use an inert HPIC equipment as the methanesulfonic acid...

  7. Green Chromatographic Separation of Coumarin and Vanillins Using Subcritical Water as the Mobile Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayan, Berkant; Akay, Sema; Yang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Pure water was used as the eluent for separation of coumarin, vanillin and ethyl vanillin at temperatures ranging from 100 to 200°C using a homemade subcritical water chromatography (SBWC) system. Chromatographic separations were performed on five commercial columns including XTerra MS C18, XBridge C18, Zorbax RRHD Eclipse Plus, Zorbax SB-Phenyl and Zorbax SB-C18 columns. The retention time of all three solutes decreased with increasing water temperature. The shortest retention time among all acceptable separations, less than 4 min, was achieved on the Zorbax SB-C18 column at 200°C. While separations on the XTerra MS C18 column resulted in fronting peaks and a degradation peak from ethyl vanillin on the Zorbax RRHD Eclipse Plus column was observed, all three other columns yielded reasonable separations under SBWC conditions. In addition to separation of the standard test mixture, separation of coumarin contained in a skincare cream sample was also carried out using SBWC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Classification of ion mobility spectra by functional groups using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.; Nazarov, E.; Wang, Y. F.; Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neural networks were trained using whole ion mobility spectra from a standardized database of 3137 spectra for 204 chemicals at various concentrations. Performance of the network was measured by the success of classification into ten chemical classes. Eleven stages for evaluation of spectra and of spectral pre-processing were employed and minimums established for response thresholds and spectral purity. After optimization of the database, network, and pre-processing routines, the fraction of successful classifications by functional group was 0.91 throughout a range of concentrations. Network classification relied on a combination of features, including drift times, number of peaks, relative intensities, and other factors apparently including peak shape. The network was opportunistic, exploiting different features within different chemical classes. Application of neural networks in a two-tier design where chemicals were first identified by class and then individually eliminated all but one false positive out of 161 test spectra. These findings establish that ion mobility spectra, even with low resolution instrumentation, contain sufficient detail to permit the development of automated identification systems.

  9. Bioleaching of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeh, N. Bahaloo; Mousavi, S. M.; Shojaosadati, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a bio-hydrometallurgical route based on fungal activity of Aspergillus niger was evaluated for the detoxification and recovery of Cu, Li, Mn, Al, Co and Ni metals from spent lithium-ion phone mobile batteries under various conditions (one-step, two-step and spent medium bioleaching). The maximum recovery efficiency of 100% for Cu, 95% for Li, 70% for Mn, 65% for Al, 45% for Co, and 38% for Ni was obtained at a pulp density of 1% in spent medium bioleaching. The HPLC results indicated that citric acid in comparison with other detected organic acids (gluconic, oxalic and malic acid) had an important role in the effectiveness of bioleaching using A. niger. The results of FTIR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis of battery powder before and after bioleaching process confirmed that the fungal activities were quite effective. In addition, bioleaching achieved higher removal efficiency for heavy metals than the chemical leaching. This research demonstrated the great potential of bio-hydrometallurgical route to recover heavy metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries.

  10. Application of silver ion in the separation of macrolide antibiotic components by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yaoming; Wang, Jiaoyan; Chen, Xiuming; Le, Zhanxian; Chen, Yuxiang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-05-29

    Three macrolide antibiotic components - ascomycin, tacrolimus and dihydrotacrolimus - were separated and purified by silver ion high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). The solvent system consisted of n-hexane-tert-butyl methyl ether-methanol-water (1:3:6:5, v/v) and silver nitrate (0.10mol/l). The silver ion acted as a pi-complexing agent with tacrolimus because of its extra side double bond compared with ascomycin and dihydrotacrolimus. This complexation modified the partition coefficient values and the separation factors of the three components. As a result, ascomycin, tacrolimus and dihydrotacrolimus were purified from 150mg extracted crude sample with purities of 97.6%, 98.7% and 96.5%, respectively, and yields over 80% (including their tautomers). These results cannot be achieved with the same solvent system but without the addition of silver ion.

  11. Relationship of Ambient Atmosphere and Biological Aerosol Responses from a Fielded Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Bioanalytical Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    .... A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry stand-alone bioaerosol system was interfaced to an aerosol concentrator to collect ambient background aerosols and produce bioanalytical...

  12. Comparison of the performance of three ion mobility spectrometers for measurement of biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V.; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The response to different amounts of TMA (in μg) that were placed in a headspace vial as a function of time for the VG-Test (top) and the GDA (bottom). Note that the ratio [TMA/(TMA + TEP)] (top) and [TMA/(TMA + RIP)] (bottom) and the clearance time increase with the amount of TMA deposited in the vial. Highlights: ► First comparison of performance of IMS devices. ► Gas-phase ion chemistry affected by operational parameters. ► Limits of detection quite similar despite differences in devices. ► LODs determined in controlled continuous flow and in headspace vapor. ► Exponential dilution of headspace studies. - Abstract: The performance of three different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) devices: GDA2 with a radioactive ion source (Airsense, Germany), UV-IMS with a photo-ionization source (G.A.S. Germany) and VG-Test with a corona discharge source (3QBD, Israel) was studied. The gas-phase ion chemistry in the IMS devices affected the species formed and their measured reduced mobility values. The sensitivity and limit of detection for trimethylamine (TMA), putrescine and cadaverine were compared by continuous monitoring of a stream of air with a given concentration of the analyte and by measurement of headspace vapors of TMA in a sealed vial. Preprocessing of the mobility spectra and the effectiveness of multivariate curve resolution techniques (MCR-LASSO) improved the accuracy of the measurements by correcting baseline effects and adjusting for variations in drift time as well as enhancing the signal to noise ratio and deconvolution of the complex data matrix to their pure components. The limit of detection for measurement of the biogenic amines by the three IMS devices was between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm (for TMA with the VG-Test and GDA, respectively) and between 0.2 and 0.7 ppm for putrescine and cadaverine with all three devices. Considering the uncertainty in the LOD determination there is almost no statistically significant

  13. Depleted ion exchange resins encapsulation with mobile unit: equipment and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Faisantieu, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1981, STMI has been operating mobile units in EDF's PWR nuclear power plants, for spent resins encapsulation with polymer thermosetting matrices. Three mobile units are now in operation: COMET 1 and COMET 2, supplied by STMI, using polymerized styrene with proper additives as encapsulating material, and PRECED 1, on PEC-Engineering design, based on a DOW Chemical solidification process. On march 1986, more than 30 operations have been performed on EDF's PWR plants. More than 5000 liners containing encapsulated depleted ion exchange resins have been produced, while processing about 500 m 3 (i.e. 17.000 ft 3 ) of resins. During this period, those mobile units have shown their reliability and their efficiency. The produced processed waste, which have been accepted by ANDRA at the La Manche Storage Site (SSM) must meet the Fundamental Safety Rules (RFS) edicted by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Facilities Safety (SCSIN) of the French Department of Industry. The operations are carried out with excellent safety and radioprotection safety conditions, and following a very detailed Q.A. program [fr

  14. Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Uvarov, N. F.; Slobodyuk, A. B.; Ulihin, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. V.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) (I) have been investigated by the methods of 1H, 19F, 31P NMR (including 1H, 19F, 31P MAS NMR), DSC, X-ray diffraction, and impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the fundamental changes in 1H, 19F, 31P NMR spectra (above 390 K) were associated with the formation of a crystalline disorder phase I with high ionic mobility in the proton and fluoride sublattices, as a result of a phase transition in the 400-420 K range. In the same temperature range, the transition of PO2(OH)2- anions from the "rigid lattice" to fast reorientations takes place. Above 430 K, there occurs a transition from the crystalline disordered phase to the amorphous one. The types of ion mobility in CsSbF3(H2PO4) and its amorphous phase have been established and temperature ranges of their realization have been determined (150-450 K). According to the NMR data, the diffusion in the proton sublattice of the disordered crystalline and amorphous phases is preserved even at room temperature. The ionic conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) reaches the values of 2.6 × 10-4 S/cm in the temperature range 410-425 K and decreases down to 2.0 × 10-5 S/cm upon transition to the amorphous phase (435-445 K).

  15. Lithium-Ion Mobility in Quaternary Boro-Germano-Phosphate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Sklepić, Kristina; Mošner, Petr; Koudelka, Ladislav; Kalenda, Petr

    2016-04-28

    Effect of the structural changes, electrical conductivity, and dielectric properties on the addition of a third glass-former, GeO2, to the borophosphate glasses, 40Li2O-10B2O3-(50 - x)P2O5-xGeO2, x = 0-25 mol %, has been studied. Introduction of GeO2 causes the structural modifications in the glass network, which results in a continuous increase in electrical conductivity. Glasses with low GeO2 content, up to 10 mol %, show a rapid increase in dc conductivity as a result of the interlinkage of slightly depolymerized phosphate chains and negatively charged [GeO4](-) units, which enhances the migration of Li(+) ions. The Li(+) ions compensate these delocalized charges connecting both phosphate and germanium units, which results in reduction of both bond effectiveness and binding energy of Li(+) ions and therefore enables their hop to the next charge-compensating site. For higher GeO2 content, the dc conductivity increases slightly, tending to approach a maximum in Li(+) ion mobility caused by the incorporation of GeO2 units into phosphate network combined with conversion of GeO4 to GeO6 units. The strong cross-linkage of germanium and phosphate units creates heteroatomic P-O-Ge bonds responsible for more effectively trapped Li(+) ions. A close correspondence between dielectric and conductivity parameters at high frequencies indicates that the increase in conductivity indeed is controlled by the modification of structure as a function of GeO2 addition.

  16. Core-shell structured ceramic nonwoven separators by atomic layer deposition for safe lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiu; Li, Chao; Shi, Chuan; Yang, Chaochao; Deng, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Longqing; Dai, Jianhui; Wu, Dezhi; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Jinbao

    2018-05-01

    Safety is one of the most factors for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, a novel kind of ceramic separator with high safety insurance is proposed. We fabricated the core-shell nanofiber separators for LIBs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of 30 nm Al2O3 on the electrospinning nonwoven fiber of polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP). The separators show a pretty high heat resistance up to 200 °C without any shrinkage, an excellent fire-resistant property and a wide electrochemical window. Besides, with higher uptake and ionic conductivity, cells assembled with the novel separator shows better electrochemical performance. The ALD produced separators exhibit great potential in elaborate products like 3C communications and in energy field with harsh requirements for safety such as electric vehicles. The application of ALD on polymer fiber membranes brings a new strategy and opportunity for improving the safety of the advanced LIBs.

  17. The effect of copper ions, aluminium ions and their mixtures on separation of pectin from the sugar beet juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In sugar industry there is a problem of the presence of undesirable macromolecules compounds such as pectin in sugar beet juice. The affinity of calcium ions commonly used in the sugar industry for the removal of pectin from the sugar beet juice is relatively small. Coagulation and precipitation of pectin can be performed by process of discharging that is chemically induced. Compounds with di- and trivalent cations such as pure CuSO4, Al2(SO43 or their mixtures can be applied for clarification of pectin colloidal systems. According to data from the order of pectin selectivity to divalent metal ions, Cu2+ ions are the first order of ion binding. Also, aluminum sulfate is commonly used in the waste water treatment. Two model solutions of pectin whose concentration corresponds to the concentration of these macromolecules in sugar beet juice (0.1% w/w are investigated. Using a method of measuring zeta potential, it was proven for both investigated pectin that fewer quantities of Cu2+ ions compared to the values of Al3+ ions are needed to reach zero zeta potential. In all the investigated coagulants and their mixtures, zeta potential has changed the sign. In experiments with mixtures has been shown that pure salts showed better coagulation properties. The reduced strength of binding of cations in the case of most of the applied mixture of Cu2+ and Al3+ ions, can be explained by the mutual competition of these ions for the adsorption site (COO- groups on the surface of macromolecules. Mixture with approximately equal shares of ions Cu2+ and Al3+ had the most unfavorable coagulation ability (ion antagonism. Mechanism of discharge as well as the model of double electric layer surrounding pectin macromolecules in the presence of mixtures of Cu2+ and Al3+ ions are suggested. However, due to possible undesirable effects of CuSO4 on food processing, Al2(SO43 is proposed instead of traditional coagulant CaO, not only because of lower consumptions of

  18. Ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry studies of ion processes in air at atmospheric pressure and their application to thermal desorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Matejčík, Štefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the negative reactant ion formation in a negative corona discharge (CD) using the corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (CD-IMS-oaTOF) technique. The reactant ions were formed in the CD operating in the reverse gas flow mode at an elevated temperature of 363.5 K in synthetic and ambient air. Under these conditions mainly O 2 − and their clusters were formed. We have also studied the influence of CCl 4 admixture to air (dopant gas) on the composition of the reactant ions, which resulted in the formation of Cl − and its clusters with a reduced ion mobility of 3.05 cm 2  V −1  s −1 as a major reactant ion peak. Additional IMS peaks with reduced ion mobilities of 2.49, 2.25 and 2.03 cm 2  V −1  s −1 were detected, and Cl −  · (NO 2 ) and Cl −  · (NO) n (n = 2, 3) anions were identified. The negative reactant ions were used to detect 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) using the thermal desorption (TD) technique using a CD-IMS instrument. Using TD sampling and a negative CD ion source doped by CCl 4 we have achieved a limit of detection of 350 pg for direct surface analysis of TNT. (paper)

  19. Miniature GC-Minicell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for In Situ Measurements in Astrobiology Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Holland, Paul M.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    Astrobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of volatile chemical species and minerals present in the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and asteroids. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The use of land rovers and balloon aero-rovers place additional emphasis on miniaturization of the analytical instrumentation. In addition, smaller instruments, using tiny amounts of consumables, allow the use of more instrumentation and/or ionger mission life for stationary landers/laboratories. The miniCometary Ice and Dust Experiment (miniCIDEX), which combined Gas Chromatography (GC) with helium Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS), was capable of providing the wide range of analytical information required for Astrobiology missions. The IMS used here was based on the PCP model 111 IMS. A similar system, the Titan Ice and Dust Experiment (TIDE), was proposed as part of the Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM). Newer GC systems employing Micro Electro- Mechanical System (MEMS) based technology have greatly reduced both the size and resource requirements for space GCs. These smaller GCs, as well as the continuing miniaturization of Astrobiology analytical instruments in general, has highlighted the need for smaller, dry helium IMS systems. We describe here the development of a miniature, MEMS GC-IMS system (MEMS GC developed by Thorleaf Research Inc.), employing the MiniCell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS), from Ion Applications Inc., developed through NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development (ASTID) Program and NASA s Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program.

  20. Ion-source dependence of the distributions of internuclear separations in 2-MeV HeH+ beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, E.P.; Gemmell, D.S.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments involving the use of MeV molecular-ion beams have yielded new information on atomic collisions in solids. A central part of the analyses of such experiments is a knowledge of the distribution of internuclear separations contained in the incident beam. In an attempt to determine how these distributions depend on ion-source gas conditions, we have studied foil-induced dissociations of H 2+ , H 3+ , HeH + , and OH 2+ ions. Although changes of ion-source gas compositions and pressure were found to have no measurable influence on the vibrational state populations of the beams reaching our target, for HeH + we found that beams produced in our rf source were vibrationally hotter than beams produced in a duoplasmatron. This was also seen in studies of neutral fragments and transmitted molecules

  1. Preparation and characterization of zirconium phosphate ion exchanger samples with respect to the separation of highly active actinoid elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treplan, J.

    1972-01-01

    Inorganic ion exchangers are of growing interest in connection with separation processes of α-radiators of high specific activity, or with high gamma doses, because they have a considerably higher radiation resistance at their disposal compared to the commonly used organic ion exchangers. In opposition to their use, however, are the worse properties regarding capacity, chemical resistivity, exchange rate and reproducibility of the ion exchange bed. In the present work, an attempt has been made to influence the properties of a typical representative of this group, zirconium phosphate (ZP), by systematic changing of the preparation parameters in such a manner that a sufficient capacity is obtained regarding tri-valent ions. In addition, information is to be gathered in order to clarify the connection between exchanger property and structure of the ZP. (orig./LH) [de

  2. Self-management of self-organising mobile computing applications : a separation of concerns approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Marquez, Jose Luis; di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna; Stevenson, Graeme Turnbull; Ye, Juan; Dobson, Simon Andrew; Zamonelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Although the research area of self-organising systems is well established, their construction is often ad hoc. Consequently, such software is difficult reuse across applications that require similar functionality of have similar goals. The development of self-organising applications and, a fortiori, self-organising mobile applications is therefore limited to developers who are experts in specific self-organising mechanisms. As a first step towards addressing this, this paper discusses the not...

  3. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  4. The predictive power of SIMION/SDS simulation software for modeling ion mobility spectrometry instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hanh; McJunkin, Timothy R.; Miller, Carla J.; Scott, Jill R.; Almirall, José R.

    2008-09-01

    The combined use of SIMION 7.0 and the statistical diffusion simulation (SDS) user program in conjunction with SolidWorks® with COSMSOSFloWorks® fluid dynamics software to model a complete, commercial ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was demonstrated for the first time and compared to experimental results for tests using compounds of immediate interest in the security industry (e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,7-dinitrofluorene, and cocaine). The effort of this research was to evaluate the predictive power of SIMION/SDS for application to IMS instruments. The simulation was evaluated against experimental results in three studies: (1) a drift:carrier gas flow rates study assesses the ability of SIMION/SDS to correctly predict the ion drift times; (2) a drift gas composition study evaluates the accuracy in predicting the resolution; (3) a gate width study compares the simulated peak shape and peak intensity with the experimental values. SIMION/SDS successfully predicted the correct drift time, intensity, and resolution trends for the operating parameters studied. Despite the need for estimations and assumptions in the construction of the simulated instrument, SIMION/SDS was able to predict the resolution between two ion species in air within 3% accuracy. The preliminary success of IMS simulations using SIMION/SDS software holds great promise for the design of future instruments with enhanced performance.

  5. Contribution to the study of rare earth separation by ion exchange, using ammonium lactate; Contribution a l'etude de la separation des terres rares par echange d'ions a l'aide de lactate d'ammonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratot, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Using the technique of chromatography on a column of Dowex 50 resin, heated to 87 deg. C, we have studied the separation of rare earths (from holmium to praseodymium) which may be produced with the cyclotron by heavy ions, {alpha} or protons. From an ammonium lactate solution M at pH 5, separations are carried out by varying the dilution as a function of the quantity of the target rare earth and of its position during elution. When weighable quantities of the rare earth (more than 5 mg) appear towards the end of the elution, the separation is little affected this case approaches that of a tracer mixture of rare earths; if on the other hand weighable quantities of the rare earth are washed through at the beginning of the chromatogram, the dilution must be adjusted in order to obtain a good separation. (author) [French] Par chromatographie sur colonne de resine Dowex 50, chauffee a 87 deg. C, nous avons examine la separation des terres rares (de l'holmium au praseodyme) susceptibles d'etre produites au cyclotron par ions lourds, {alpha} ou protons. A partir d'une solution de lactate d'ammonium M a pH 5, nous effectuons les separations en agissant sur la dilution en fonction de la quantite de terre rare cible et de sa position au cours de l'elution. Lorsque la terre rare en quantite ponderale (superieure a 5 mg) passe en fin d'elution, la separation est peu affectee; nous sommes ramenes au cas d'un melange de terres rares traceur; par contre, si la terre rare en quantite ponderale s'elue en tete du chromatogramme, nous devons agir sur la dilution pour obtenir une bonne separation. (auteur)

  6. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J.; Jones, Christina M.; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy.

  7. Placing the poor while keeping the rich in their place: Separating strategies for optimally managing residential mobility and assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Feichtinger

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A central objective of modern US housing policy is deconcentrating poverty through "housing mobility programs" that move poor families into middle class neighborhoods. Pursuing these policies too aggressively risks inducing middle class flight, but being too cautious squanders the opportunity to help more poor families. This paper presents a stylized dynamicoptimization model that captures this tension. With base-caseparameter values, cost considerations limit mobility programs before flight becomes excessive. However, for modest departures reflecting stronger flight tendencies and/or weaker destination neighborhoods, other outcomes emerge. In particular, we find state-dependence and multiple equilibria, including both de-populated and oversized outcomes. For certain sets of parameters there exists a Skiba point that separates initial conditions for which the optimal strategy leads to substantial flight and depopulation from those for which the optimal strategy retains or even expands the middle class population. These results suggest the value of estimating middle-class neighborhoods' "carrying capacity" for absorbing mobility program placements and further modeling of dynamic response.

  8. Iqpc 2015 Track: Tree Separation and Classification in Mobile Mapping LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorte, B.; Oude Elberink, S.; Sirmacek, B.; Wang, J.

    2015-08-01

    The European FP7 project IQmulus yearly organizes several processing contests, where submissions are requested for novel algorithms for point cloud and other big geodata processing. This paper describes the set-up and execution of a contest having the purpose to evaluate state-of-the-art algorithms for Mobile Mapping System point clouds, in order to detect and identify (individual) trees. By the nature of MMS these are trees in the vicinity of the road network (rather than in forests). Therefore, part of the challenge is distinguishing between trees and other objects, such as buildings, street furniture, cars etc. Three submitted segmentation and classification algorithms are thus evaluated.

  9. Separation of betacyanins from purple flowers of Gomphrena globosa L. by ion-pair high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spórna-Kucab, Aneta; Jagodzińska, Joanna; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2017-03-17

    Betacyanins, known as antioxidants and chemopreventive natural compounds with colourful properties, were extracted from purple flowers of Gomphrena globosa L. belonging to the Amaranthaceae family and separated for the first time by ion-pair high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). The pigments were detected by LC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS technique. Separation of betacyanins (300mg) by HSCCC was accomplished in four solvent systems: tert-butyl methyl ether - butanol - acetonitrile - water (0.7% and 1.0% HFBA - heptafluorobutyric acid - system I and III) and tert-butyl methyl ether - butanol - methanol - water (0.7% and 1.0% HFBA - system II and IV) (2:2:1:5, v/v/v/v) in the head-to-tail mode. The mobile phase (aqueous phase) was run at 2.0ml/min and the column rotation speed was 860rpm. The applied systems enabled to study the influence of HFBA concentration as well as systems polarity on betacyanins separation. Comparison of the systems containing 0.7% HFBA (systems I-II) demonstrates that the replacement of acetonitrile by methanol increases the resolution (R s ) between all betacyanins and does not influence the retention of the stationary phase (S f =76%). Higher concentration of the acid in systems III-IV slightly decreases S f to 71% in the systems with 1.0% HFBA. Comparison of the resolution values for betacyanins in the systems with 0.7% and 1.0% HFBA demonstrates that higher concentration of the acid improves the separation effectiveness for all betacyanins as a result of increasing of the chemical affinity of the pigments to the organic stationary phase in HSCCC. The systems III-IV with 1% HFBA are the most effective for the separation of all the studied betacyanins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring the effects of Coulomb repulsion via signal decay in an atmospheric pressure laser ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlenborg, Marvin; Schuster, Ann-Kathrin; Grotemeyer, Juergen; Gunzer, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Using lasers in ion mobility spectrometry offers a lot of advantages compared to standard ionization sources. Especially, the ion yield can be drastically increased. It can, however, reach levels where the Coulomb repulsion leads to unwanted side effects. Here, we investigate how the Coulomb repulsion can be detected apart from the typical signal broadening by measuring effects created already in the reaction region and comparing them with corresponding finite element method simulations.

  11. Determining the Effect of Catechins on SOD1 Conformation and Aggregation by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Combined with Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Pi, Zifeng; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui

    2018-02-01

    The aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays an important role in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). For the disruption of ALS progression, discovering new drugs or compounds that can prevent SOD1 aggregation is important. In this study, ESI-MS was used to investigate the interaction of catechins and SOD1. The noncovalent complex of catechins that interact with SOD1 was found and retained in the gas phase under native ESI-MS condition. The conformation changes of SOD1 after binding with catechins were also explored via traveling wave ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) can stabilize SOD1 conformation against unfolding in three catechins. To further evaluate the efficacy of EGCG, we monitored the fluorescence changes of dimer E2,E2,-SOD1(apo-SOD1, E:empty) with and without ligands under denaturation conditions, and found that EGCG can inhibit apo-SOD1 aggregation. In addition, the circular dichroism spectra of the samples showed that EGCG can decrease the β-sheet content of SOD1, which can produce aggregates. These results indicated that orthogonal separation dimension in the gas-phase IM coupled with ESI-MS (ESI-IM-MS) can potentially provide insight into the interaction between SOD1 and small molecules. The advantage is that it dramatically decreases the analysis time. Meantime, optical spectroscopy techniques can be used to confirm ESI-IM-MS results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Nonlinear waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas including charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugemana, A.; Moolla, S.; Lazarus, I. J.

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear low-frequency electrostatic waves in a magnetized, three-component plasma consisting of hot electrons, hot positrons and warm ions have been investigated. The electrons and positrons are assumed to have Boltzmann density distributions while the motion of the ions are governed by fluid equations. The system is closed with the Poisson equation. This set of equations is numerically solved for the electric field. The effects of the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and propagation angle are investigated. It is shown that depending on the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and propagation angle, the numerical solutions exhibit waveforms that are sinusoidal, sawtooth and spiky. The introduction of the Poisson equation increased the Mach number required to generate the waveforms but the driving electric field E 0 was reduced. The results are compared with satellite observations.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a surface-grafted Cd(II) ion-imprinted polymer for selective separation of Cd(II) ion from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Feng, Changgen, E-mail: cgfeng@cast.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Gan, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, Haiyan [Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Cd(II) ion-imprinted polymer (Cd(II)-IIP) is prepared. • Cd(II)-IIP shows high stability, good selectivity and reusability. • Cd(II)-IIP can be used as a sorbent for selective removal of Cd(II) ion. - Abstract: A novel Cd(II) ion-imprinted polymer (Cd(II)-IIP) was prepared with surface imprinting technology by using cadmium chloride as a template and allyl thiourea (ATU) as a functional monomer for on-line solid-phase extraction of trace Cd(II) ion and selective separation Cd(II) ion in water samples. The Cd(II)-IIP exhibited good chemical performance and thermal stability. Kinetics studies showed that the equilibrium adsorption was achieved within 8.0 min and the adsorption process can be described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Compared to the Cd(II) non-imprinted polymer (Cd(II)-NIP), the Cd(II)-IIP had a higher adsorption capacity and selectivity for Cd(II) ion. The maximum adsorption capacities of the Cd(II)-IIP and Cd(II)-NIP for Cd(II) were 38.30 and 13.21 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. The relative selectivity coefficients of the adsorbent for Cd(II) in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} were 2.86, 6.42, 11.50, 9.46 and 3.73, respectively. In addition, the Cd(II) ion adsorbed was easy to remove from sorbent and the Cd(II)-IIP exhibited good stability and reusability. The adsorption capacity had no obvious decrease after being used six times. The accuracy of this method was verified by the standard reference material, it was then applied for cadmium ion determination in different types of water samples.

  15. Test of Blanc's law for negative ion mobility in mixtures of SF6 with N2, O2 and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa, G; Urquijo, J de

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of negative ion species drifting in mixtures of SF 6 with N 2 , O 2 and air. The pulsed Townsend experiment was used for this purpose. The conditions of the experiment, high pressures and low values of the reduced electric field, E/N, ensured that the majority species drifting in the gap was SF 6 - , to which the present mobilities are ascribed. The extrapolated, zero field mobilities for several mixture compositions were used to test them successfully with Blanc's law. Moreover, the measured zero field SF 6 - mobilities in air could also be explained in terms of the measured mobilities for this ionic species in N 2 and O 2

  16. On-line separation of Pu(III) and Am(III) using extraction and ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernstroem, J.; Lehto, J.; Betti, M.

    2007-01-01

    An on-line method developed for separating plutonium and americium was developed. The method is based on the use of HPLC pump with three analytical chromatographic columns. Plutonium is reduced throughout the procedure to trivalent oxidation state, and is recovered in the various separation steps together with americium. Light lanthanides and trivalent actinides are separated with TEVA resin in thiocyanate/formic acid media. Trivalent plutonium and americium are pre-concentrated in a TCC-II cation-exchange column, after which the separation is performed in CS5A ion chromatography column by using two different eluents. Pu(III) is eluted with a dipicolinic acid eluent, and Am(III) with oxalic acid eluent. Radiochemical and chemical purity of the eluted plutonium and americium fractions were ensured with alpha-spectrometry. (author)

  17. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Steve; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  18. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  19. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds using ion mobility spectra and cascade correlation neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Peter DEB.; Zheng, Peng

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique for trace organic analysis in the gas phase. Quantitative measurements are difficult, because IMS has a limited linear range. Factors that may affect the instrument response are pressure, temperature, and humidity. Nonlinear calibration methods, such as neural networks, may be ideally suited for IMS. Neural networks have the capability of modeling complex systems. Many neural networks suffer from long training times and overfitting. Cascade correlation neural networks train at very fast rates. They also build their own topology, that is a number of layers and number of units in each layer. By controlling the decay parameter in training neural networks, reproducible and general models may be obtained.

  20. Hardware/Software Codesign in a Compact Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Subsurface Contaminant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribb MollyM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A field-programmable-gate-array-(FPGA- based data acquisition and control system was designed in a hardware/software codesign environment using an embedded Xilinx Microblaze soft-core processor for use with a subsurface ion mobility spectrometer (IMS system, designed for detection of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs. An FPGA is used to accelerate the digital signal processing algorithms and provide accurate timing and control. An embedded soft-core processor is used to ease development by implementing nontime critical portions of the design in software. The design was successfully implemented using a low-cost, off-the-shelf Xilinx Spartan-III FPGA and supporting digital and analog electronics.