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Sample records for ion mobility separations

  1. Method and device for ion mobility separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-07-11

    Methods and devices for ion separations or manipulations in gas phase are disclosed. The device includes a single non-planar surface. Arrays of electrodes are coupled to the surface. A combination of RF and DC voltages are applied to the arrays of electrodes to create confining and driving fields that move ions through the device. The DC voltages are static DC voltages or time-dependent DC potentials or waveforms.

  2. Separation and Classification of Lipids Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has im...

  3. Blind Source Separation For Ion Mobility Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, S.; Pomareda, V.; Pardo, A.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturization is a powerful trend for smart chemical instrumentation in a diversity of applications. It is know that miniaturization in IMS leads to a degradation of the system characteristics. For the present work, we are interested in signal processing solutions to mitigate limitations introduced by limited drift tube length that basically involve a loss of chemical selectivity. While blind source separation techniques (BSS) are popular in other domains, their application for smart chemical instrumentation is limited. However, in some conditions, basically linearity, BSS may fully recover the concentration time evolution and the pure spectra with few underlying hypothesis. This is extremely helpful in conditions where non-expected chemical interferents may appear, or unwanted perturbations may pollute the spectra. SIMPLISMA has been advocated by Harrington et al. in several papers. However, more modern methods of BSS for bilinear decomposition with the restriction of positiveness have appeared in the last decade. In order to explore and compare the performances of those methods a series of experiments were performed.

  4. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  5. Separation and classification of lipids using differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2011-07-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has impeded finer distinctions. Differential IMS (or FAIMS) is generally less correlated to MS and thus could separate those domains better. We report the first observation of chemical class separation by trend lines using FAIMS, here for lipids. For lipids, FAIMS is indeed more independent of MS than conventional IMS, and subclasses (such as phospho-, glycero-, or sphingolipids) form distinct, often non-overlapping domains. Even finer categories with different functional groups or degrees of unsaturation are often separated. As expected, resolution improves in He-rich gases: at 70% He, glycerolipid isomers with different fatty acid positions can be resolved. These results open the door for application of FAIMS to lipids, particularly in shotgun lipidomics and targeted analyses of bioactive lipids.

  6. Enhancing biological analyses with three dimensional field asymmetric ion mobility, low field drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (μFAIMS/IMS-MS) separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E; Norheim, Randolph V; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Baker, Erin S

    2015-10-21

    Multidimensional high throughput separations are ideal for analyzing distinct ion characteristics simultaneously in one analysis. We report on the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (μFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The μFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional FAIMS compensation fields, IMS drift times, and accurate ion masses for the detected features. These separations thereby increased the overall measurement separation power, resulting in greater information content and more complete characterization of the complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by interfering peaks.

  7. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  8. Variable-Velocity Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility Separation Enhancing Peak Capacity for Data-Independent Acquisition Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Sarah E; Polasky, Daniel A; Dixit, Sugyan M; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Neeson, Kieran; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Martin, Brent R

    2017-06-06

    High mass accuracy, data-dependent acquisition is the current standard method in mass spectrometry-based peptide annotation and quantification. In high complexity samples, limited instrument scan speeds often result in under-sampling. In contrast, all-ion data-independent acquisition methods bypass precursor selection, alternating high and low collision energies to analyze product and precursor ions across wide mass ranges. Despite capturing data for all events, peptide annotation is limited by inadequate alignment algorithms or overlapping ions. Ion mobility separation can add an orthogonal analytical dimension, reducing ion interference to improve reproducibility, peak capacity, and peptide identifications to rival modern hybrid quadrupole orbitrap systems. Despite the advantages of ion mobility separation in complex proteomics analyses, there has been no quantitative measure of ion mobility resolution in a complex proteomic sample. Here, we present TWIMExtract, a data extraction tool to export defined slices of liquid chromatography/ion mobility/mass spectrometry (LC-IM-MS) data, providing a route to quantify ion mobility resolution from a commercial traveling-wave ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Using standard traveling-wave ion mobility parameters (600 m/s, 40 V), 90% of the annotated peptides occupied just 23% of the ion mobility drift space, yet inclusion of ion mobility nearly doubled the overall peak capacity. Relative to fixed velocity traveling-wave ion mobility settings, ramping the traveling-wave velocity increased drift space occupancy, amplifying resolution by 16%, peak capacity by nearly 50%, and peptide/protein identifications by 40%. Overall, variable-velocity traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry significantly enhances proteomics analysis in all-ion fragmentation acquisition.

  9. Isomer Information from Ion Mobility Separation of High-Mannose Glycan Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J; Seabright, Gemma E; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B

    2018-03-05

    Extracted arrival time distributions of negative ion CID-derived fragments produced prior to traveling-wave ion mobility separation were evaluated for their ability to provide structural information on N-linked glycans. Fragmentation of high-mannose glycans released from several glycoproteins, including those from viral sources, provided over 50 fragments, many of which gave unique collisional cross-sections and provided additional information used to assign structural isomers. For example, cross-ring fragments arising from cleavage of the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue on Man 8 GlcNAc 2 isomers have unique collision cross-sections enabling isomers to be differentiated in mixtures. Specific fragment collision cross-sections enabled identification of glycans, the antennae of which terminated in the antigenic α-galactose residue, and ions defining the composition of the 6-antenna of several of the glycans were also found to have different cross-sections from isomeric ions produced in the same spectra. Potential mechanisms for the formation of the various ions are discussed and the estimated collisional cross-sections are tabulated. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Enhancing glycan isomer separations with metal ions and positive and negative polarity ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Zhang, Xing; Schocker, Nate; Renslow, Ryan S.; Orton, Daniel J.; Khamsi, Jamal; Ashmus, Roger A.; Almeida, Igor C.; Tang, Keqi; Costello, Catherine E; Smith, Richard D.; Michael, Katja; Baker, Erin M.

    2016-09-07

    Glycomics has become an increasingly important field of research since glycans play critical roles in biology processes ranging from molecular recognition and signaling to cellular communication. Glycans often conjugate with other biomolecules such as proteins and lipids, and alter their properties and functions, so understanding the effect glycans have on cellular systems is essential. However the analysis of glycans is extremely difficult due to their complexity and structural diversity (i.e., the number and identity of monomer units, and configuration of their glycosidic linkages and connectivities). In this work, we coupled ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to characterize glycan standards and biologically important isomers of synthetic αGal-containing O-glycans including glycotopes of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. IMS-MS results showed significant differences for the glycan structural isomers when analyzed in positive and negative polarity and complexed with different metal cations. These results suggest specific metal ions or ion polarities could be used to target and baseline separate glycan isomers of interest with IMS-MS.

  11. Correlating Resolving Power, Resolution, and Collision Cross Section: Unifying Cross-Platform Assessment of Separation Efficiency in Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, James N; May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2017-11-21

    Here we examine the relationship among resolving power (R p ), resolution (R pp ), and collision cross section (CCS) for compounds analyzed in previous ion mobility (IM) experiments representing a wide variety of instrument platforms and IM techniques. Our previous work indicated these three variables effectively describe and predict separation efficiency for drift tube ion mobility spectrometry experiments. In this work, we seek to determine if our previous findings are a general reflection of IM behavior that can be applied to various instrument platforms and mobility techniques. Results suggest IM distributions are well characterized by a Gaussian model and separation efficiency can be predicted on the basis of the empirical difference in the gas-phase CCS and a CCS-based resolving power definition (CCS/ΔCCS). Notably traveling wave (TWIMS) was found to operate at resolutions substantially higher than a single-peak resolving power suggested. When a CCS-based R p definition was utilized, TWIMS was found to operate at a resolving power between 40 and 50, confirming the previous observations by Giles and co-workers. After the separation axis (and corresponding resolving power) is converted to cross section space, it is possible to effectively predict separation behavior for all mobility techniques evaluated (i.e., uniform field, trapped ion mobility, traveling wave, cyclic, and overtone instruments) using the equations described in this work. Finally, we are able to establish for the first time that the current state-of-the-art ion mobility separations benchmark at a CCS-based resolving power of >300 that is sufficient to differentiate analyte ions with CCS differences as small as 0.5%.

  12. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. Though IMS alone is useful, its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations is extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information available from biological and environmental sample analyses. In fact, multiple disease screening and environmental evaluations have illustrated that the IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information that cannot be acquired with each technique individually. This review highlights three-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, liquid chromatography, solid-phase extractions, capillary electrophoresis, field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry, and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities of these multidimensional approaches are described in detail to provide insight into their uses and benefits. PMID:28301728

  13. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.

    2017-06-12

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. IMS alone is useful, but its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations has been extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information in biological and environmental sample analyses. Multiple studies in disease screening and environmental evaluations have even shown these IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information not possible with each technique individually. This review highlights 3-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), liquid chromatography (LC), solid phase extractions (SPE), capillary electrophoresis (CE), field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities for these multidimensional approaches are described to provide insight into the utility and potential of each technique.

  14. Resolving powers of >7900 using linked scans: how well does resolving power describe the separation capability of differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Brandon G; Harris, Rachel A; Isenberg, Samantha L; Glish, Gary L

    2015-10-21

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) separations are described using similar terminology to liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, and drift tube ion mobility spectrometry. The characterization and comparison of all these separations are typically explained in terms of resolving power, resolution, and/or peak capacity. A major difference between these separations is that DIMS separations are in space whereas the others are separations in time. However, whereas separations in time can, in theory, be extended infinitely, separations in space, such as DIMS separations, are constrained by the physical dimensions of the device. One method to increase resolving power of DIMS separations is to use helium in the DIMS carrier gas. However, ions have a greater mobility in helium which causes more ions to be neutralized due to collisions with the DIMS electrodes or electrode housing, i.e. the space constraints. This neutralization of ions can lead to the loss of an entire peak, or peaks, from a DIMS scan. To take advantage of the benefits of helium use while reducing ion losses, linked scans were developed. During a linked scan the amount of helium present in the DIMS carrier gas is decreased as the compensation field is increased. A comparison of linked scans to compensation field scans with constant helium is presented herein. Resolving powers >7900 are obtained with linked scans. However, this result highlights the limitation of using resolving power as a metric to describe DIMS separations.

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of the achievable separation power in resistive-glass atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnik, Mark; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-07-15

    We present a detailed investigation of the performance of our previously reported nanoelectrospray high-resolution resistive-glass atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometer constructed with monolithic resistive-glass desolvation and drift regions. Using experimental spectral data and theoretical pulse width and diffusion variables, we compare theoretical and experimental resolving powers achievable under a variety of field strengths and ion gate pulse widths. The effects of instrumental and operational parameters on the resolution achievable in chromatographic terms are also discussed. Following characterization of the separation power of the instrument, experimental spectral peak width data is fitted by a least-squares procedure to a pre-existing semi-empirical model developed to study contributions to peak width other than initial pulse width and diffusional broadening. The model suggests possible contributions to the final measured peak width from electric field inhomogeneity and minor contributions from instrumental parameters such as anode size, anode-to-anode grid distance and drift gas flow rate. The model also reveals an unexpected ion gate width dependence on the final measured peak width that we attribute to non-ideal performance of the Bradbury-Nielsen ion gate and limitations in the design of our pulsing-electronics. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  17. Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Separations Utilizing Traveling Waves in a 13 m Serpentine Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Zheng, Xueyun; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-20

    We report the development and initial evaluation of a 13-m path length Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) module for achieving high resolution separations using traveling waves (TW) with ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. The TW SLIM module was fabricated using two mirror-image printed circuit boards with appropriately configured RF, DC and TW electrodes and positioned with a 2.75-mm inter-surface gap. Ions were effective confined between the surfaces by RF-generated pseudopotential fields and moved losslessly through a serpentine path including 44 “U” turns using TWs. The ion mobility resolution was characterized at different pressures, gaps between the SLIM surfaces, TW and RF parameters. After initial optimization the SLIM IM-MS module provided about 5-fold higher resolution separations than present commercially available drift tube or traveling wave IM-MS platforms. Peak capacity and peak generation rates achieved were 246 and 370 s-1, respectively, at a TW speed of 148 m/s. The high resolution achieved in the TW SLIM IM-MS enabled e.g., isomeric sugars (Lacto-N-fucopentaose I and Lacto-N-fucopentaose II) to be baseline resolved, and peptides from a albumin tryptic digest much better resolved than with existing commercial IM-MS platforms. The present work also provides a foundation for the development of much higher resolution SLIM devices based upon both considerably longer path lengths and multi-pass designs.

  18. Enhancement of biological mass spectrometry by using separations based on changes in ion mobility (FAIMS and DMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Randy W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of complex biological samples for low-level analytes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) often requires additional selectivity. Differential mobility techniques (FAIMS and DMS) have been shown to enhance LC-MS/MS analyses by separating ions in the gas-phase on a millisecond timescale by use of a mechanism that is complementary to both liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this overview, a simplified description of the operation of these devices is given and an example presented that illustrates the utility of FAIMS (DMS) for solving a challenging analytical assay. Important recent advances in the field, including work with gas modifiers, are presented, along with an outlook for the technology.

  19. Ion mobility sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  20. Linear and Differential Ion Mobility Separations of Middle-Down Proteoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garabedian, Alyssa; Baird, Matthew A; Porter, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of proteomes comprising the same proteins with distinct post-translational modifications (PTMs) is a staggering challenge. Many such proteoforms are isomers (localization variants) that require separation followed by top-down or middle-down mass spectrometric analys...

  1. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  2. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, William J (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250 degrees Centigrade, and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  3. Evaluation of ion mobility for the separation of glycoconjugate isomers due to different types of sialic acid linkage, at the intact glycoprotein, glycopeptide and glycan level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Albert; Giménez, Estela; Konijnenberg, Albert; Sancho, Jaime; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; Sobott, Frank

    2018-02-20

    The study of protein glycosylation can be regarded as an intricate but very important task, making glycomics one of the most challenging and interesting, albeit under-researched, type of "omics" science. Complexity escalates remarkably when considering that carbohydrates can form severely branched structures with many different constituents, which often leads to the formation of multiple isomers. In this regard, ion mobility (IM) spectrometry has recently demonstrated its power for the separation of isomeric compounds. In the present work, the potential of traveling wave IM (TWIMS) for the separation of isomeric glycoconjugates was evaluated, using mouse transferrin (mTf) as model glycoprotein. Particularly, we aim to assess the performance of this platform for the separation of isomeric glycoconjugates due to the type of sialic acid linkage, at the intact glycoprotein, glycopeptide and glycan level. Straightforward separation of isomers was achieved with the analysis of released glycans, as opposed to the glycopeptides which showed a more complex pattern. Finally, the developed methodology was applied to serum samples of mice, to investigate its robustness when analyzing real complex samples. Ion mobility mass spectrometry is a promising analytical technique for the separation of glycoconjugate isomers due to type of sialic acid linkage. The impact of such a small modification in the glycan structure is more evident in smaller analytes, reason why the analysis of free glycans was easier compared to the intact protein or the glycopeptides. The established methodology could be regarded as starting point in the separation of highly decorated glycoconjugates. This is an important topic nowadays, as differences in the abundance of some glycan isomers could be the key for the early diagnosis, control or differentiation of certain diseases, such as inflammation or cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopy of mobility-selected biomolecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Svendsen, Annette; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    We describe here experiments that combine differential ion mobility, which separates conformational isomers of biomolecular ions, with electronic spectroscopy in a cold, radio-frequency ion trap. Although the low temperature attainable in a cold ion trap greatly simplifies the electronic spectra of large molecules, conformational heterogeneity can still be a significant source of congestion, complicating spectroscopic analysis. We demonstrate here that using differential ion mobility to separate gas-phase peptide conformers before injecting them into a cold ion trap allows one to decompose a dense spectrum into contributions from different conformational families. In the inverse sense, cold ion spectroscopy can be used as a conformation-specific detector for ion mobility, allowing one to separate an unresolved peak into contributions from different conformational families. The doubly protonated peptide bradykinin serves as a good test case for the marriage of these two techniques as it exhibits a considerable degree of conformational heterogeneity that results in a highly congested electronic spectrum. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of directly coupling ion mobility with spectroscopy and provide a diagnostic of conformational isomerization of this peptide after being produced in the gas phase by electrospray.

  5. Comprehensive lipidomic analysis of human plasma using multidimensional liquid- and gas-phase separations: Two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry vs. liquid chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglai, Anna; Gargano, Andrea F G; Jordens, Jan; Mengerink, Ynze; Honing, Maarten; van der Wal, Sjoerd; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-12-29

    Recent advancements in separation science have resulted in the commercialization of multidimensional separation systems that provide higher peak capacities and, hence, enable a more-detailed characterization of complex mixtures. In particular, two powerful analytical tools are increasingly used by analytical scientists, namely online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC, having a second-dimension separation in the liquid phase) and liquid chromatography-ion mobility-spectrometry (LC-IMS, second dimension separation in the gas phase). The goal of the current study was a general assessment of the liquid-chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry (LC-TIMS-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC×LC-MS) platforms for untargeted lipid mapping in human plasma. For the first time trapped-ion-mobility spectrometry (TIMS) was employed for the separation of the major lipid classes and ion-mobility-derived collision-cross-section values were determined for a number of lipid standards. The general effects of a number of influencing parameters have been inspected and possible directions for improvements are discussed. We aimed to provide a general indication and practical guidelines for the analyst to choose an efficient multidimensional separation platform according to the particular requirements of the application. Analysis time, orthogonality, peak capacity, and an indicative measure for the resolving power are discussed as main characteristics for multidimensional separation systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  7. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  8. Review on Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Part 1: Current Instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow which provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrume...

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  10. Laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation reveals metabolites in the symbiotic interactions of soybean roots and rhizobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Agtuca, Beverly J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary; Vertes, Akos; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-05-23

    Technologies enabling in situ metabolic profiling of living plant systems are invaluable for understanding physiological processes and could be used for rapid phenotypic screening (e.g., to produce plants with superior biological nitrogen fixing ability). The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria results in a specialized plant organ (i.e., root nodule), where the exchange of nutrients between host and endosymbiont occurs. Laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) is a method that can be performed under ambient conditions requiring minimal sample preparation. Here, we employed LAESI-MS to explore the well-characterized symbiosis between soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and its compatible symbiont, Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The utilization of ion mobility separation (IMS) improved the molecular coverage, selectivity, and identification of the detected biomolecules. Specifically, incorporation of IMS resulted in an increase of 153 detected metabolites in the nodule samples. The data presented demonstrates the advantages of using LAESI-IMS-MS for the rapid analysis of intact root nodules, uninfected root segments, and free-living rhizobia. Untargeted pathway analysis revealed several metabolic processes within the nodule (e.g., zeatin, riboflavin, and purine synthesis). Compounds specific to the uninfected root and bacteria were also detected. Lastly, we performed depth-profiling of intact nodules to reveal the location of metabolites to the cortex and inside the infected region, and lateral profiling of sectioned nodules confirmed these molecular distributions. Our results established the feasibility of LAESI-IMS-MS for the analysis and spatial mapping of plant tissues, with its specific demonstration to improve our understanding of the soybean-rhizobial symbiosis.

  11. Maximizing Ion Transmission in Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Londry, Frank; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Kang, Yang; Covey, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    We provide modeling and experimental data describing the dominant ion-loss mechanisms for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Ion motion is considered from the inlet region of the mobility analyzer to the DMS exit, and losses resulting from diffusion to electrode surfaces, insufficient effective gap, ion fragmentation, and fringing field effects are considered for a commercial DMS system with 1-mm gap height. It is shown that losses due to diffusion and radial oscillations can be minimized with careful consideration of residence time, electrode spacing, gas flow rate, and waveform frequency. Fragmentation effects can be minimized by limitation of the separation field. When these parameters were optimized, fringing field effects at the DMS inlet contributed the most to signal reduction. We also describe a new DMS cell configuration that improves the gas dynamics at the mobility cell inlet. The new cell provides a gas jet that decreases the residence time for ions within the fringing field region, resulting in at least twofold increase in ion signal as determined by experimental data and simulations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  13. Simple area determination of strongly overlapping ion mobility peaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovcová, L.; Hermannová, M.; Pauk, V.; Šimek, M.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Lemr, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 981, AUG 15 (2017), s. 71-79 ISSN 0003-2670 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ion mobility-mass spectrometry * Fitting of mobility peaks * Analysis of isomers Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  14. Residential mobility and migration of the separated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Ham

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation is known to have a disruptive effect on the housing careers of those involved, mainly because a decrease in resources causes (temporary downward moves on the housing ladder. Little is known about the geographies of the residential mobility behaviour of the separated. Applying a hazard analysis to retrospective life-course data for the Netherlands, we investigate three hypotheses: individuals who experienced separation move more often than do steady singles and people in intact couple relationships, they are less likely to move over long distances, and they move more often to cities than people in intact couple relationships. The results show that separation leads to an increase in mobility, to moves over short distance for men with children, and to a prevalence of the city as a destination of moves.

  15. Ion mass separation modeling inside a plasma separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Sidorov, V. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2018-01-01

    The results have been obtained in a continuation of the work for ion trajectories calculation in crossed electric and magnetic fields and also in a close alignment with the plasma separation study development. The main task was to calculate trajectories of ions of the substance imitating spent nuclear fuel in order to find a feasible plasma separator configuration. The three-dimensional modeling has been made with KARAT code in a single-particle approximation. The calculations have been performed under the following conditions. Magnetic field is produced by 2 coils of wire, the characteristic field strength in a uniform area is 1.4 kG. Electric field is produced by several electrodes (axial ones, anode shell and capacitor sheets) with electric potential up to 500 V. The characteristic linear size of the cylindrical separator area is ∼ 100 cm. The characteristic size of injection region is ∼ 1 cm. Spatial position of the injection region is inside the separator. The injection direction is along magnetic lines. Injected particles are single-charged ions with energies from 0 to 20 eV with atomic masses A = 150 and 240. Wide spreading angle range was investigated. As a result of simulation a feasible separator configuration was found. This configuration allows to achieve more than 10 cm spatial division distance for the separated ions and is fully compliant with and supplementary to the vacuum arc-based ion source research.

  16. A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Ewing, Robert G.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-02-01

    Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection.

  17. Ion Mobility Spectrometer Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; McLain, Derek [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Steeb, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-12-20

    The Morpho Saffran Itemizer 4DX Ion Mobility Spectrometer previously used to detect uranium signatures in FY16 was used at the former New Brunswick Facility, a past uranium facility located on site at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was chosen in an attempt to detect safeguards relevant signatures and has a history of processing uranium at various enrichments, chemical forms, and purities; various chemicals such as nitric acid, uranium fluorides, phosphates and metals are present at various levels. Several laboratories were sampled for signatures of nuclear activities around the laboratory. All of the surfaces that were surveyed were below background levels of the radioanalytical instrumentation and determined to be radiologically clean.

  18. Mothers' Mobility after Separation: Do Grandmothers Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Marjolijn; de Valk, Helga; Merz, Eva-Maria

    2017-03-01

    Starting from a life course perspective, this study aims to gain more insight into mobility patterns of recently separated mothers, focusing especially on moves to the location of their own mother: the maternal grandmother. Separated mothers, having linked lives with their own mothers, may benefit from their practical and emotional support. Additionally, the grandparents' home can be a (temporary) place to stay shortly after divorce. Data come from the System of social statistical datasets (Statistics Netherlands). This unique dataset combines longitudinal data from a vast number of administrative registers. It covers the complete Dutch population, making it exceptionally well suited for life course and mobility research. We studied mothers with minor children between 1/1/2008 and 31/12/2010. Our study included 579,500 mothers, of whom about 8,800 (1.5%) experienced a separation in 2008. Separated mothers moved to the grandmother's municipality more often than non-separated mothers, which might be partially motivated by the need for childcare. They also coresided with the grandmother more than non-separated movers, mostly because of a vulnerable socio-economic position. Although often temporary, coresidence appears to have a prolonged impact on the mothers' location choice; mothers frequently stayed in the grandmother's municipality after moving out. Finally, our results indicated that some mothers seemed to use the parental home as a stepping stone to cohabit with a new partner. © 2016 The Authors. Population, Space and Place published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  20. Pure inorganic separator for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meinan; Zhang, Xinjie; Jiang, Kuiyang; Wang, Joe; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-14

    Battery safety is critical for many applications including portable electronics, hybrid and electric vehicles, and grid storage. For lithium ion batteries, the conventional polymer based separator is unstable at 120 °C and above. In this research, we have developed a pure aluminum oxide nanowire based separator; this separator does not contain any polymer additives or binders; additionally, it is a bendable ceramic. The physical and electrochemical properties of the separator are investigated. The separator has a pore size of about 100 nm, and it shows excellent electrochemical properties under both room and high temperatures. At room temperature, the ceramic separator shows a higher rate capability compared to the conventional Celgard 2500 separator and life cycle performance does not show any degradation. At 120 °C, the cell with the ceramic separator showed a much better cycle performance than the conventional Celgard 2500 separator. Therefore, we believe that this research is really an exciting scientific breakthrough for ceramic separators and lithium ion batteries and could be potentially used in the next generation lithium ion batteries requiring high safety and reliability.

  1. Measurement of acetates in air using differential ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Zajiczek, Żaneta; Maziejuk, Mirosław

    2017-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds are one of the most important group of air pollutants. Potential health and environmental problems resulting from their emission prompted the requirement for monitoring these species. It motivates development of new measurement techniques which are fast, cost effective, reliable and field deployable. One of novel approaches is ion mobility spectrometry. It dwells on ion separation in electric field, based on differences in ion mobility. Many variants of this method are developed. In this wok, differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) was considered in respect of acetate measurements in air. It was demonstrated that DMS offers linear response to methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl acetate in concentration range from 0.3 ppm to 7 ppm. Positive ions spectrum has to be utilised for this purpose. We showed that fragments of DMS spectrum which secure linearity are compound-specific. The obtained results are promising from the application point of view.

  2. Optimum Waveforms for Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is a new tool for separation and identification of gas-phase ions, particularly in conjunction with mass-spectrometry. In FAIMS, ions are filtered by the difference between mobilities in gases (K) at high and low electric field intensity (E) using asymmetric waveforms. An infinite number of possible waveform profiles make maximizing the performance within engineering constraints a major issue for FAIMS technology refinement. Earlier optimizations assumed the non-constant component of mobility to scale as E2, producing the same result for all ions. Here we show that the optimum profiles are defined by the full series expansion of K(E) that includes terms beyond the 1st that is proportional to E2. For many ion/gas pairs, the first two terms have different signs, and the optimum profiles at sufficiently high E in FAIMS may differ substantially from those previously reported, improving the resolving power by up to 2.2 times. This situation arises for some ions in all FAIMS systems, but becomes more common in recent miniaturized devices that employ higher E. With realistic K(E) dependences, the maximum waveform amplitude is not necessarily optimum and reducing it by up to ∼20 – 30% is beneficial in some cases. The present findings are particularly relevant to targeted analyses where separation depends on the difference between K(E) functions for specific ions. PMID:18585054

  3. Separation of cesium by ion exchange columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, Alberto; Falcon, Marcelo F.; Devida, Claudio A.; Tadey, D.; Vaccaro, Jorge O.; Maset, Elvira

    2003-01-01

    Crystalline silico titanate (CST) has been tested as a selective inorganic ion exchanger to separate Cs 137 from the residual fission product s solution of the Mo 99 plant. The tests are described in detail and show decontamination factors higher than 6000 and a good elution yield

  4. Chemical standards in ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Harden, Charles Steve; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Crawford, Christina Lynn; Hill, Herbert Henderson

    2010-06-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K(0)) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match with those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-Dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion-molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer gas, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound's mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  6. Rapid ion-exchange separations of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuda, Shigekazu

    1988-01-01

    For the purpose of studying short-lived actinide nuclides, three methods for rapid ion exchange separation of actinide elements with mineral acid-alcohol mixed media were developed: anion exchange with nitric acid-methyl alcohol mixed media to separate the transplutonium and rare earth elements from target material, U or Pu and Al catcher foils; anion exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media to separate Am+Cm, Bk and Cf+Fm from the target, catcher foils and major fission products; and cation exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media and with concentrated hydrochloric acid to separate the transplutonium elements as a group from the rare earths after eliminating the large amounts of U, Al, Cu, Fe etc. The methods enable one to perform rapid and effective separation at elevated temperature (90 deg C) and immediate source preparation for alpha-ray spectrometry. (author) 47 refs.; 10 figs

  7. Experiments with SIRA - the radioactive ion separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    There are two main techniques to obtain radioactive ion beams. One, consisting in the fragmentation of projectile in a thin target followed by a separation carried out with LISE or SISSI type spectrometers or by an alpha spectrometer is used currently at GANIL. The second one, the ISOL (Isotope Separator One-Line) is presently under study on the SIRa benchmark, as part of the SPIRaL (Source de Production d'Ions Radioactifs en Ligne). A high energy light ion beam is stopped by a thick target to produce radioactive nuclei by various reactions in the target. The target, usually of carbon, is heated at around 1800 deg. C in order to accelerate the migration of the atoms produced at the target surface. These atoms are then diffused by a transfer tube up to plasma region where they are ionized and then accelerated. As projectiles the GANIL project makes use of a large variety of heavy ions. A table containing the radioactive ion beam characteristics (charge state and lifetime), the primary beams, the yields and the expected intensities to be obtained with SPIRaL is presented. Also, data concerning the production rates of rare gases obtained during 1993 to 1994 are given

  8. Energy landscapes for mobile ions in ion conducting solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    demonstrated here for a range of metaphosphate and diborate glasses, the complete description of the energy landscape for mobile ions also provides an effective tool for achieving a more detailed understanding of ion transport in glasses. The investigation of time evolutions can be included, if the bond valence analysis is ...

  9. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Part 2: Hyphenated Methods and Effects of Experimental Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separat...

  10. Influence of mobile dislocations on phase separation in binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Leonard, Francois

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a continuum model to describe the phase separation of a binary alloy in the presence of mobile dislocations. The kinetics of the local composition and dislocation density are coupled through their elastic fields. We show both analytically and numerically that mobile dislocations modify the standard spinodal decomposition process, and lead to several regimes of growth. Depending on the dislocation mobility and observation time, the phase separation may be accelerated, decelerated, or unaffected by mobile dislocations. For any finite dislocation mobility, we show that the domain growth rate asymptotically becomes independent of the dislocation mobility, and is faster than the dislocation-free growth rate

  11. Metal ion separations using reactive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A membrane is a barrier between two phases. If one component of a mixture moves through the membrane faster than another mixture component, a separation can be accomplished. Membranes are used commercially for many applications including gas separations, water purification, particle filtration, and macromolecule separations (Abelson). There are two points to note concerning this definition. First, a membrane is defined based on its function, not the material used to make the membrane. Secondly, a membrane separation is a rate process. The separation is accomplished by a driving force, not by equilibrium between phases. Liquids that are immiscible with the feed and product streams can also be used as membrane materials. Different solutes will have different solubilities and diffusion coefficients in a liquid. The product of the diffusivity and the solubility is known as the permeability coefficient, which is proportional to the solute flux. Differences in permeability coefficient will produce a separation between solutes at constant driving force. Because the diffusion coefficients in liquids are typically orders of magnitude higher than in polymers, a larger flux can be obtained. Further enhancements can be accomplished by adding a nonvolatile complexation agent to the liquid membrane. One can then have either coupled or facilitated transport of metal ions through a liquid membrane. The author describes two implementations of this concept, one involving a liquid membrane supported on a microporous membrane, and the other an emulsion liquid membrane, where separation occurs to internal receiving phases. Applications and costing studies for this technology are reviewed, and a brief summary of some of the problems with liquid membranes is presented

  12. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here ma...

  13. Calibration method for ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Valery

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the calibration of the ion mobility spectrometer has been developed. This article describes the working principle, advantages and disadvantages of the calibration method operating in the mode of explosives detection. This method is most suitable for use in portable detectors, due to the small weight, small size parameters and low power consumption.

  14. Ion Mobility and Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Phosphatidylglycerol and Bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate (BMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.; Barkley, Robert M.; Gijón, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The tandem mass spectrometry, ion mobility, and normal phase HPLC of isomeric phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate (BMP) have been investigated in this study with the objective of differentiating these unique classes of lipids. Measurement of ion mobility using the traveling wave method for negative molecular and product ions from isomeric PG and BMP yielded identical results, but different ion mobilities were observed for positive product ions arising from collision-induced dissociation (CID). The fastest moving positive product ions from the ion mobility analysis of BMP(18:1/18:1) were monoglyceride-like, and the slowest moving product ions from this BMP corresponded to [M+H-2H2O]+, which were readily observed for BMP but were only at very low abundance in the CID spectra of PG. The major product ions observed from the sodium adduct of PG(18:1/18:1) were consistent with diglyceride-like ion formation, but for BMP(18:1/18:1) only monoglyceride-like product ions were formed. The usefulness of ion mobility separation was tested with the selection of positive product ions derived from the isomeric PG and BMP molecular species in the lipid extract of RAW 264.7 cells. The ion mobility spectra of monoglyceride-like ions derived from BMP species with various esterified fatty acyl groups displayed some separation in ion mobility based on fatty acyl chain length and presence of a double bond in the acyl chain. The mechanism of ion formation of the diglyceride- and monoglyceride-like ions from PG and BMP respectively was examined using deuterium-labeled species including PG(D3116:0/18:1) and PG and BMP labeled by deuterium exchange. PMID:25883529

  15. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  16. Pendular proteins in gases and new avenues for characterization of macromolecules by ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Noskov, Sergei Y; Purves, Randy W; Smith, Richard D

    2009-04-21

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E x dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles that align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross-sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. The exceptional sensitivity of that difference to ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p that depends on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, p for realistic ions must exceed approximately 300-400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above approximately 30 kDa. As expected for the dipole-aligned regime, FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of approximately 30-130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared with smaller proteins and other ions.

  17. Ion exchange separation of rare earths. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nghi, Nguyen danh; Matous, K.

    1977-01-01

    The optimal conditions of separating selected rare earths by two ion exchange chromatography using Ostion KS cation exchange resin were studied. The effect of acetic acid concentration in the sorption solution was investigated. The elution process was studied in dependence on the concentration of Na 2 H 2 EDTA, on the total concentration of EDTA 4- ion, on elution agent flow, and on temperature. The optimal conditions were determined by evaluating integral elution curves and changes in acid concentration for systems Y-Pr, La-Pr, Er-Pr, Eu-Pr as follows: The sorption solution requires the presence of Na 2 H 2 EDTA of 0.03M in concentration. The basic elution solution was prepared in the following way: 0.183M Na 2 Mg 2 EDTA, 9.6x10 -3 M Na 2 H 2 EDTA, 3.84x10 -3 M CH 3 COOH, 2.30x10 -2 M CH 3 COONH 4 , 2.30x10 -2 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 . Approximate pH 5.7 to 6.0. The optimal elution solution was prepared by diluting the basic solution so that the total concentration of EDTA 4- equalled 0.075M. The optimal flow was determined to be 0.86 ml.cm -2 .min -1 at a temperature of 55 degC. (author)

  18. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Merlin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)

  19. High-Sensitivity Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Lee, Hak-No; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Li, Fumin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-15

    The utility of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for separation of mixtures and structural characterization of ions has been demonstrated extensively, including in the biological and nanoscience contexts. A major attraction of IMS is its speed, several orders of magnitude above that of condensed-phase separations. Nonetheless, IMS combined with mass spectrometry (MS) has remained a niche technique, substantially due to limited sensitivity resulting from ion losses at the IMS-MS junction. We have developed a new electrospray ionization (ESI)-IMS-QToF MS instrument that incorporates electrodynamic ion funnels at both front ESI-IMS and back IMS-QToF interfaces. The front funnel is of the novel ''hourglass'' design that efficiently accumulates ions and pulses them into the IMS drift tubes. Even for drift tubes of two meter length, ion transmission through IMS and on to QToF is essentially lossless across the range of ion masses relevant to most applications. The RF ion focusing at IMS terminus does not degrade IMS resolving power, which exceeds 100 (for singly-charged ions) and is close to the theoretical limit. The overall sensitivity of present ESI-IMS-MS system is shown to be comparable to that of commercial ESI-MS, which should make IMS-MS suitable for analyses of complex mixtures with ultra-high sensitivity and exceptional throughput.

  20. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 1: current instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-07

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences in ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow that provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation and have become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as a function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique.

  1. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  2. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  3. Toward an Intelligent Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Carla J. Miller

    2003-07-01

    The ultimate goal is to design and build a very smart ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) that can operate autonomously. To accomplish this, software capable of interpreting spectra so that it can be used in control loops for data interpretation as well as adjusting instrument parameters is being developed. Fuzzy logic and fuzzy numbers are used in this IMS spectra classification scheme. Fuzzy logic provides a straight forward method for developing a classification/detection system, whenever rules for classifying the spectra can be described linguistically. Instead of using 'max' and 'min' values, the product of the truth values is used to determine class membership. Using the product allows rule-bases that utilize the AND function to allow each condition to discount truth value in determining membership, while rule-bases with an OR function are allowed to accumulate membership. Fuzzy numbers allow encapsulation of the uncertainties due to ion mobility peak widths as well as measured instrumental parameters, such as pressure and temperature. Associating a peak with a value of uncertainty, in addition to making adjustments to the mobility calculation based on variations in measured parameters, enables unexpected shifts to be more reliably detected and accounted for; thereby, reducing the opportunity for 'false negative' results. The measure of uncertainty is anticipated to serve the additional purpose of diagnosing the operational conditions of the IMS instrument.

  4. Toward an Intelligent Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Scott, Jill R.; Miller, Carla J.

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate goal is to design and build a very smart ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) that can operate autonomously. To accomplish this, software capable of interpreting spectra so that it can be used in control loops for data interpretation as well as adjusting instrument parameters is being developed. Fuzzy logic and fuzzy numbers are used in this IMS spectra classification scheme. Fuzzy logic provides a straight forward method for developing a classification/detection system, whenever rules for classifying the spectra can be described linguistically. Instead of using 'max' and 'min' values, the product of the truth values is used to determine class membership. Using the product allows rule-bases that utilize the AND function to allow each condition to discount truth value in determining membership, while rule-bases with an OR function are allowed to accumulate membership. Fuzzy numbers allow encapsulation of the uncertainties due to ion mobility peak widths as well as measured instrumental parameters, such as pressure and temperature. Associating a peak with a value of uncertainty, in addition to making adjustments to the mobility calculation based on variations in measured parameters, enables unexpected shifts to be more reliably detected and accounted for; thereby, reducing the opportunity for 'false negative' results. The measure of uncertainty is anticipated to serve the additional purpose of diagnosing the operational conditions of the IMS instrument.

  5. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  6. Ion separation from dilute electrolyte solutions by nanofiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Corazon M.

    2000-03-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a pressure-driven process which is considered potential for the separation of ionic species selectively from solutions containing mixture of electrolyte solutes. The lower operating pressure requirement of NF than reverse osmosis (RO) makes the earlier potentially economical. In the separation of ions, many authors believed that there are membranes with characteristic fixed surface charge and that the mechanism of separation of ions is by the differences in valences of the ions. In this study, experiments involving dilute single-solute and multiple-solute electrolyte solutions were performed using three different NF membranes. Permeate fluxes and ion rejections of the different species of ions in samples of permeate solutions were measured at varied conditions. The mechanism of separation in NF was determined based on the analysis of the trends and behavior of ion rejection relative to the solution temperature, pressure, type of solute, feed concentration and feed solution pH. The results of the experiments show that there is no evidence of the presence of fixed surface charge on the NF membranes. Ion separation was made possible by the combination of sieve effect and ion-hydration effect. Ions having higher hydration numbers showed higher ion rejection than those having lower hydration numbers. A method to determine the effective membrane pore size of NF membranes using hydrodynamic model was proposed. The proposed method is based on the assumptions that the membrane is neutral and that the separation is based on sieving effect. (Author)

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-12-12

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Signal processing for ION mobility spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.; Hinton, M.; Turner, R.

    1995-01-01

    Signal processing techniques for systems based upon Ion Mobility Spectrometry will be discussed in the light of 10 years of experience in the design of real-time IMS. Among the topics to be covered are compensation techniques for variations in the number density of the gas - the use of an internal standard (a reference peak) or pressure and temperature sensors. Sources of noise and methods for noise reduction will be discussed together with resolution limitations and the ability of deconvolution techniques to improve resolving power. The use of neural networks (either by themselves or as a component part of a processing system) will be reviewed.

  9. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  10. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented

  11. High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, we review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  12. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Hamid, Ahmed M; Webb, Ian K; Attah, Isaac K; Norheim, Randolph V; Prost, Spencer A; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A; Baker, Erin S; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2017-06-20

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also efficient ion population compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a SLIM serpentine ultralong path with extended routing (SUPER) region after which CRIMP compression allows the large ion populations to be "squeezed". The SLIM SUPER IM module has two regions, one operating with conventional traveling waves (i.e., traveling trap; TT region) and the second having an intermittently pausing or "stuttering" TW (i.e., stuttering trap; ST region). When a stationary voltage profile was used in the ST region, ions are blocked at the TT-ST interface and accumulated in the TT region and then can be released by resuming a conventional TW in the ST region. The population can also be compressed using CRIMP by the repetitive merging of ions distributed over multiple TW bins in the TT region into a single TW bin in the ST region. Ion accumulation followed by CRIMP compression provides the basis for the use of larger ion populations for IM separations. We show that over 10 9 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Approximately 5 × 10 9 charges introduced from an electrospray ionization source were trapped for a 40 s accumulation period, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity of an ion funnel trap. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP compression and multiple passes through the serpentine path provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultrahigh sensitivity and SLIM SUPER high-resolution IM separations.

  13. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aplin, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long established. A recent development is the computerized aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the voltage decay inversion, and an established voltage switching technique, were compared and shown to be of similar shape. Air conductivities calculated by integration were: 5.3±2.5 and 2.7±1.1 fSm -1 , respectively, with conductivity determined to be 3 fSm -1 by direct measurement at a constant voltage. Applications of the relaxation potential inversion method include air ion mobility spectrum retrieval from historical data, and computation of ion mobility spectra in planetary atmospheres

  14. Device for separating ruthenium ion from spent fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Sasahira, Akira; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate plutonium ions efficiently and selectively from organic solvent containing tributyl phosphate used in the main step of reprocessing process. Constitution: The device comprises, as the main constituent factor, a liquid-liquid contact device for bringing not water soluble organic solvent into contact with a nitric acid solution of spent fuel substances and a liquid-liquid contact-separation device for bringing an organic solvent solution containing spent fuel substances separated with nitric acid into contact again with nitric acid. Then, a device is disposed between two liquid-liquid contact devices for staying ruthenium ions and organic solvent for a sufficient time. In this way, ruthenium ions in the organic solvent containing butyl phosphate are gradually converted into complex compounds combined with tributyl phosphate thereby enabling to separate ruthenium ions efficiently and remarkably reduce the corrosion of equipments. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Application of pressurized ion exchange to separations of transplutonium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.

    1980-01-01

    High-pressure ion exchange chromatography, used first for nucleic acid separations, was applied to the production of the heavier actinides, particularly the transcurium elements. Its use at the TRU plant is described. Future developments are considered briefly

  16. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-02-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations ((1)H) and anions ((19)F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes.

  17. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuemei; Zheng Jian; Lv Yongjie; Chen Yangqin

    2007-01-01

    A 63 Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  18. Application of PVDF composite for lithium-ion battery separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina, Q.; Majid, N.; Prihandoko, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this study a composite observed in PVDF composite as lithium ion battery separator. Observation of performance cell battery with cyclic voltametry and charge discharge capacity. Surface morphology PVDF separator and commercial separator observed with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cyclic Voltamerty test (CV) and Charge Discharge (CD) showed a capacity value on the coin cell. Coin cell is composed of material LiFePO 4 cathode, anode material of lithium metal and varies as graphite, liquid electrolyte varied use LiBOB and LiPF 6 . While the PVDF as compared to the commercial separator. Coin cell commercial separator has a better high capacity value when compared with Coin cell with the PVDF separator. Life cycle coin cell with the commercial separator material is still longer than coin cell separator with PVDF Copolymer. Development of PVDF as separator remains to be done in order to improve the performance of the battery exceeds the usage of commercial material. (paper)

  19. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Webb, Ian K.; Attah, Isaac K.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-05-25

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also their subsequent efficient compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a long serpentine path TW SLIM region after which CRIMP allows the large ion populations to be ‘squeezed’. The compression process occurs at an interface between two SLIM regions, one operating conventionally and the second having an intermittently pausing or ‘stuttering’ TW, allowing the contents of multiple bins of ions from the first region to be merged into a single bin in the second region. In this initial work stationary voltages in the second region were used to block ions from exiting the first (trapping) region, and the resumption of TWs in the second region allows ions to exit, and the population to also be compressed if CRIMP is applied. In our initial evaluation we show that the number of charges trapped for a 40 s accumulation period was ~5×109, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity using an ion funnel trap. We also show that over 1×109 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device, and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Lower compression ratios allow increased IM peak heights without significant loss of signal, while excessively large compression ratios can lead to ion losses and other artifacts. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP and multiple passes provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-high resolution IM separations using SLIM.

  20. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  1. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, J; Hahm, H S; Seeberger, P H; Pagel, K

    2015-10-08

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  2. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  3. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  4. Electrodialytic separation of alkali-element ions with the aid of ion-exchange membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurskii, V.S.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1988-01-01

    Electrodialytic separation of ions bearing charges of the same sign with the aid of ion-exchange membranes has been examined in the literature in relation to the so-called ideal membranes, which do not exhibit selectivity with respect to one ion type in ion exchange. It has been shown that separation on such membranes is effective only for counterions differing in size of charge. A matter of greater importance from the practical standpoint is the possibility of using electrodialysis for separating ions bearing like charges and having similar properties, including ionic forms of isotopes of the same element. In this paper they report a comparative study of ion separation, with reference to the Cs-Na pair, by electrodialysis through various types of cation-exchange membranes. Changes of the solution concentration in the cathode compartment were monitored by measurement of 22 Na and 137 Cs activities

  5. Investigation of electrostatic ion chromatography for the separation of inorganic ions

    OpenAIRE

    Twohill, Eadaoin

    2002-01-01

    The new technique of ‘electrostatic ion chromatography’ (ion chromatography using a zwittenomc stationary phase) has been applied to the separation of ions using pure water as an eluent, without the addition of any inorganic buffers or organic modifiers. The nature of the separation, le cationic or anionic, is dependent upon the nature of the zwittenomc stationary phase. In the work presented here, the zwittenomc surfactant Zwittergent 3-14 was used to functionalise an octadecylsihca stationa...

  6. Proton affinity measurements using ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud.; Shooshtari, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    Relative proton affinities are usually measured by means of high pressure mass spectrometry. In this work ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine proton affinities. The standard molar enthalpy change ΔH 0 M for the reaction MH + +N[rlhar2]M+NH + was found to be: -(56.3±0.8) kJ·mol -1 , when M was ethyl acetate and N ethanol; -(27.8±0.5) kJ·mol -1 , when M was acetophenone and N ethyl acetate; -(10.6±0.2) kJ·mol -1 , when M was cycloheptanone and N ethyl acetate; -(66.1±1.2) kJ·mol -1 , when M was dimethyl methyl phosphonate and N ethyl acetate; and, -(56.7±0.9) kJ·mol -1 , when M was dimethyl methyl phosphonate and N cycloheptanone. These values are internally consistent and in good agreement with results obtained with high pressure mass spectrometry. On the basis of proton affinities of cycloheptanone and ethyl acetate, an absolute proton affinity of (902±1.2) kJ·mol -1 has been determined for dimethyl methyl phosphonate

  7. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Michelle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  8. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Separation of plutonium oxidation states by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Jun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-01-01

    The ion chromatography for the separation of plutonium species which are suggested to be Pu 3+ , Pu 4+ PuO 2 + and PuO 2 2+ in natural water was studied. Two separation methods were performed; 1) two-column method containing each of SiO - and SiO-SO 3 - cation exchanger, 2) IC with an AG11 column and the eluent of oxalate/nitric acid. Separation conditions for Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , NpO 2 + and UO 2 2+ in place of plutonium species were acquired from preliminary tests. When these conditions were applied to separate the plutonium species, two-column method was separated them successfully. However, the IC method with oxalate eluent was difficult in the separation of plutonium species due to the change of Pu 3+ and PuO 2 2+ to Pu 4+ and PuO 2 + , respectively. (author)

  10. The mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomaa, M.

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews recent experimental and theoretical work on the mobility of negative ions in the superfluid A and B phases of liquid 3 He. In the normal Fermi liquid at temperatures below approximately 50 mK and also in the superfluid close to the superfluid transition temperature, Tsub(c), the mobility of a negative ion may simply be considered as limited by the elastic scattering of 3 He quasiparticles. This explains the constancy of the ion mobility in the normal phase. However, underlying the rapid increase of the measured mobility in the superfluid phases there is a subtle quantum-mechanical scattering effect. Detailed solutions of the 3 He quasiparticle-negative ion scattering process in the pair-correlated state provide a simple physical picture of an energy-dependent forward-peaking phenomenon. This yields quantitative theoretical results for the ion mobility in the quasi-isotropic B phase and for the ion mobility tensor in the anisotropic A phase which agree with the experimental data. (author)

  11. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new variant of a technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the reproducibility was checked. (author)

  12. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  13. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, A.M.F.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A.F.V.; Conde, C.A.N.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Santos, F.P.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities ( K 0 ) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH 3 ) 3 N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E / N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH 3 ) 3 N + (59 u) and (CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 N + (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E / N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm 2 V −1 s −1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (∼0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  14. An alkali ion source based on graphite intercalation compounds for ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Zahra S

    2008-01-01

    A variety of alkali cation emitters were developed as the ion source for ion mobility spectrometry. The cation emitters were constructed based on alkali ion graphite intercalation compounds (GICs). The compounds were prepared by fusing alkali salts with ground graphite. In order to produce alkali ions, the compounds were loaded on a filament and heated to red. Reactant ions of the form alk + ions were observed for the alkali salts NaCl, KCl.LiCl, CsCl and SrCl. In addition to Na + ions, K + ions were observed at the beginning of thermionic emission from Na-GIC. This is due to the low ionization potential of potassium that exists in trace amounts in sodium salts. In addition to the potassium ion, Na + was observed in the case of LiCl salt. The Na + and K + peaks originating from impurities totally disappeared after about 40 min. However, the thermionic emission of the main ion of the corresponding salt lasted for several days. No negative ions were observed upon reversing the drift field. Selected organic compounds (methyl isobutyl ketone, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone and tetrahydrofuran) were also ionized via alkali cation attachment reaction. Distinct ion mobility patterns were observed for different substances using one type of alkali reactant ion. However, the ion mobility pattern for a given substance changed when a different alkali reactant ion was used. Ammonia and amines were not ionized when this source was used

  15. Control of chemical effects in the separation process of a differential mobility mass spectrometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Coy, Stephen L; Krylov, Evgeny V; Nazarov, Erkinjon G

    2010-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) separates ions on the basis of the difference in their migration rates under high versus low electric fields. Several models describing the physical nature of this field mobility dependence have been proposed but emerging as a dominant effect is the clusterization model sometimes referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. DMS resolution and peak capacity is strongly influenced by the addition of modifiers which results in the formation and dissociation of clusters. This process increases selectivity due to the unique chemical interactions that occur between an ion and neutral gas-phase molecules. It is thus imperative to bring the parameters influencing the chemical interactions under control and find ways to exploit them in order to improve the analytical utility of the device. In this paper, we describe three important areas that need consideration in order to stabilize and capitalize on the chemical processes that dominate a DMS separation. The first involves means of controlling the dynamic equilibrium of the clustering reactions with high concentrations of specific reagents. The second area involves a means to deal with the unwanted heterogeneous cluster ion populations emitted from the electrospray ionization process that degrade resolution and sensitivity. The third involves fine control of parameters that affect the fundamental collision processes, temperature and pressure.

  16. Diffusion and mobility of positive ions in sulphur hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, J. de; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Martinez, H.

    1988-01-01

    It is presented some recent results on the measurements of longitudinal difusion and mobility of positive ions in SF 6 . The experimental technique employed could determine the most abundant positive ion under electric discharge conditions. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  17. Traveling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salbo, Rune; Bush, Matthew F; Naver, Helle

    2012-01-01

    The collision cross-section (Ω) of a protein or protein complex ion can be measured using traveling-wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS) via calibration with compounds of known Ω. The T-wave Ω-values depend strongly on instrument parameters and calibrant selection. Optimization...

  18. Application of ion mobility-mass spectrometry to microRNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Kosuke; Hirose, Kenji; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is widely used for studying sequence determination and modification analysis of small RNAs. However, the efficiency of liquid chromatography-based separation of intact small RNA species is insufficient, since the physiochemical properties among small RNAs are very similar. In this study, we focused on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which is a gas-phase separation technique coupled with mass spectrometry; we have evaluated the utility of IM-MS for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. A multiply charged deprotonated ion derived from an 18-24-nt-long miRNA was formed by electrospray ionization, and then the time, called the "drift time", taken by each ion to migrate through a buffer gas was measured. Each multivalent ion was temporally separated on the basis of the charge state and structural formation; 3 types of unique mass-mobility correlation patterns (i.e., chainlike-form, hairpin-form, and dimer-form) were present on the two-dimensional mobility-mass spectrum. Moreover, we found that the ion size (sequence length) and the secondary structures of the small RNAs strongly contributed to the IM-MS-based separation, although solvent conditions such as pH had no effect. Therefore, sequence isomers could also be discerned by the selection of each specific charged ion, i.e., the 6(-) charged ion reflected a majority among chainlike-, hairpin-, and other structures. We concluded that the IM-MS provides additional capability for separation; thus, this analytical method will be a powerful tool for comprehensive small RNA analysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The mobility of negative ions is shown to increase rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature independent mobility between 40 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bar. The increase of μ/sub N/ with increasing pressure is in agreement with the bubble model for the negative ion

  20. Method of multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-06-02

    A method for analyzing analytes from a sample introduced into a Spectrometer by generating a pseudo random sequence of a modulation bins, organizing each modulation bin as a series of submodulation bins, thereby forming an extended pseudo random sequence of submodulation bins, releasing the analytes in a series of analyte packets into a Spectrometer, thereby generating an unknown original ion signal vector, detecting the analytes at a detector, and characterizing the sample using the plurality of analyte signal subvectors. The method is advantageously applied to an Ion Mobility Spectrometer, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer interfaced with a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer.

  1. Programmable ion mobility spectrometer: Time resolution improvement and ion counter comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Wilding, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ion mobility spectrometers operating on the aspirated electrode principle require switching of a bias voltage to select ions of different mobility. The ion spectrum can be obtained by sweeping across a set of bias voltages. If rapid temporal changes in atmospheric ion spectra are to be measured, however, such as for a balloon-carried instrument, the sweep time across the ion spectrum must be kept short. As bias voltage steps can generate saturation in the mobility spectrometer's electrometer amplifier, the electrometer recovery time limits the ion mobility spectrum sweep rate. Here, active compensation of the charge injected at a bias voltage step is used to reduce the saturation time. Further, the optimal setting of the charge compensation circuitry provides a determination of the system capacitance, a necessary calibration parameter for absolute measurements. Using laboratory air, hourly variations in ion concentrations and air conductivity found using the voltage switching system were similar to those obtained with a traditional ion counter operating at a single mobility: ion growth, however, could only be detected using the ion spectrometer

  2. Comprehensive lipidomic analysis of human plasma using multidimensional liquid- and gas-phase separations: Two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry vs. liquid chromatography-trapped-ion-mobility-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baglai, A.; Gargano, A.F.G.; Jordens, J.; Mengerink, Y.; Honing, M.; van der Wal, S.; Schoenmakers, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in separation science have resulted in the commercialization of multidimensional separation systems that provide higher peak capacities and, hence, enable a more-detailed characterization of complex mixtures. In particular, two powerful analytical tools are increasingly used by

  3. A new inversion technique for calculating atmospheric ion mobility spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, K. L.

    2003-04-01

    More detailed tropospheric ion measurements are needed to improve understanding of the electrical microphysics affecting clouds. Additionally, atmospheric ion mobility spectra can be used to identify tropospheric ion growth processes leading to condensation nucleus formation. However these measurements are rare, although modern ion instrumentation is available [1]. Developments in the operating theory of the classical instrument for ion measurement, the aspirated cylindrical capacitor, will be described, which enable ion mobility spectrum information to be extracted from the rate of voltage decay of the aspirated capacitor in air. In this presentation, data from historical balloon-borne ion counter ascents [2] will be reanalysed to extract new ion mobility spectra from simple voltage time series. Such data recovery will increase the amount of atmospheric ion spectra available for analysis. References 1. Aplin K L and Harrison R G, Rev. Sci. Inst 72, 3467 (2001) 2. Venkiteshwaran S P, Measurement of the electrical potential gradient and conductivity by radiosonde at Poona, India, In: Smith L G (ed.), Recent advances in atmospheric electricity, Pergamon Press, Oxford, UK (1958)

  4. Separation of ions in nanofluidic channels with combined pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2013-03-05

    Separation of ionic species with the same electrophoretic mobility but different valence in electrolyte systems can occur within nanometer-scale channels with finite electrical double layers (EDLs). This is because EDL thicknesses are a significant fraction of slit height in such channels and can create transverse analyte concentration profiles that allow for unique separation modalities when combined with axial fluid flow. Previous work has shown such separation to occur using either pressure-driven flow or electro-osmotic flow separately. Here, we develop a Poisson-Boltzmann model to compare the separation of such ions using the combination of both pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow. Applying a pressure gradient in the opposite direction of electro-osmotic flow can allow for zero or infinite retention of analyte species, which we investigate using three different wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we determine conditions in fused silica nanochannels with which to generate optimal separation between two analytes of different charge but the same mobility. We also give simple rules of thumb to achieve the best separation efficacy in nanochannel systems.

  5. Preorganized and Immobilized Ligands for Metal Ion Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, Robert T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The research project, in the period 2003-2015, was focused on the discovery of fundamental new principles in f-element ion coordination chemistry and the application of the new knowledge to the development of advanced detection/separations reagents and methods for these ions. The findings relate to the Nation's efforts to safely and efficiently process nuclear materials. In addition, the project provided training for young scientists needed to maintain the Nation's preeminence in nuclear science.

  6. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5 kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100 °C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing the Peak Capacity of IMS-IMS Separations of Tryptic Peptide Ions in 300 K He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Bohrer, Brian C.; Koeniger, Stormy L.; Clemmer, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS-IMS) coupled with mass spectrometry is examined as a means of separating mixtures of tryptic peptides (from myoglobin and hemoglobin). In this study we utilize two distinct drift regions that are identical in that each contains He buffer gas at 300 K. The two-dimensional advantage is realized by changing the structures of the ions. As ions arrive at the end of the first drift region, those of a specified mobility are selected, exposed to energizing collisions, and then introduced into a second drift region. Upon collisional activation some ions undergo structural transitions, leading to substantial changes in their mobilities; others undergo only slight (or no) mobility changes. Examination of peak positions and shapes for peptides that are separated in the first IMS dimension indicates experimental peak capacities ranging from ~60 to 80; the peak shapes and range of changes in mobility that are observed in the second drift region (after activation) indicates a capacity enhancement ranging from a factor of ~7 to 17. Thus, experimental (and theoretical) evaluation of the peak capacity of IMS-IMS operated in this fashion indicates that capacities of ~480 to 1360 are accessible for peptides. Molecular modeling techniques are used to simulate the range of structural changes that would be expected for tryptic peptide ions and are consistent with the experimental shifts that are observed. PMID:17222015

  8. Characterization of triacetone triperoxide by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.

    2011-04-28

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with subsequent separation and detection by ion mobility spectrometry has been studied. Positive ionization with hydronium reactant ions produced only fragments of the TATP molecule, with m/z 91 ion being the most predominant species. Ionization with ammonium reactant ions produced a molecular adduct at m/z 240. The reduced mobility value of this ion was constant at 1.36 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} across the temperature range from 60 to 140 C. The stability of this ion was temperature dependent and did not exist at temperatures above 140 C, where only fragment ions were observed. The introduction of ammonia vapors with TATP resulted in the formation of m/z 58 ion. As the concentration of ammonia increased, this smaller ion appeared to dominate the spectra and the TATP-ammonium adduct decreased in intensity. The ion at m/z 58 has been noted by several research groups upon using ammonia reagents in chemical ionization, but the identity was unknown. Evidence presented here supports the formation of protonated 2-propanimine. A proposed mechanism involves the addition of ammonia to the TATP-ammonium adduct followed by an elimination reaction. A similar mechanism involving the chemical ionization of acetone with excess ammonia also showed the formation of m/z 58 ion. TATP vapors from a solid sample were detected with a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer operated at room temperature. The TATP-ammonium molecular adduct was observed in the presence of ammonia and TATP vapors with this spectrometer.

  9. Characterization of triacetone triperoxide by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G; Waltman, Melanie J; Atkinson, David A

    2011-06-15

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with subsequent separation and detection by ion mobility spectrometry has been studied. Positive ionization with hydronium reactant ions produced only fragments of the TATP molecule, with m/z 91 ion being the most predominant species. Ionization with ammonium reactant ions produced a molecular adduct at m/z 240. The reduced mobility value of this ion was constant at 1.36 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) across the temperature range from 60 to 140 °C. The stability of this ion was temperature dependent and did not exist at temperatures above 140 °C, where only fragment ions were observed. The introduction of ammonia vapors with TATP resulted in the formation of m/z 58 ion. As the concentration of ammonia increased, this smaller ion appeared to dominate the spectra and the TATP-ammonium adduct decreased in intensity. The ion at m/z 58 has been noted by several research groups upon using ammonia reagents in chemical ionization, but the identity was unknown. Evidence presented here supports the formation of protonated 2-propanimine. A proposed mechanism involves the addition of ammonia to the TATP-ammonium adduct followed by an elimination reaction. A similar mechanism involving the chemical ionization of acetone with excess ammonia also showed the formation of m/z 58 ion. TATP vapors from a solid sample were detected with a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer operated at room temperature. The TATP-ammonium molecular adduct was observed in the presence of ammonia and TATP vapors with this spectrometer.

  10. Reducing False Alarms in Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detectors: Determination of Accurate and Precise Reduced Mobility Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    MOBILITY VALUES ECBC-TR-1470 Brian C. Hauck William F. Siems Herbert H. Hill, Jr. WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Pullman, WA 99164-4630...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) XX-11-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Sep 2012 – Sept 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reducing False...Alarms in Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detectors: Determination of Accurate and Precise Reduced Mobility Values 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  11. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin.

  12. The evolution of heavy ion recoil and fragment separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nole, J.

    1991-01-01

    Research in heavy ion nuclear science is evolving towards more extensive use of reaction recoil and fragment separators. The emphasis has been on the development of devices which promptly separate reaction products according to A or A/q at or very near zero degrees. Probably the most important performance criterion for such devices is the degree to which weak reaction products are separated from the beam and other abundant species. Another important design consideration is the optimization for the beam and reaction product energy or rigidity and the related dominant reaction mechanisms. Separator configuration and size requirements vary rapidly as the research emphasis changes from fission fragments, to slow fusion products (light beam on heavy target), to fast fusion products (heavy on light), to deep ineslastic, and finally to fragmentation products at 50 to 500 MeV per nucleon. Examples of on-going and new research programs with such devices around the world will be discussed along with plans for nearly-completed and recently-designed facilities at several heavy ion labs

  13. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector

  14. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  15. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  17. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Patra, R. N.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of only one peak for all gas ratios of Xe-CO2, low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV·cm-1·bar-1), low pressures 6-8 Torr (8-10.6 mbar), at room temperature.

  18. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ne-N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, A.F.V.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors, such as the ALICE TPC or in the NEXT experiment. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Ne-N 2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two peaks for different gas ratios of Ne-N 2 , low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10–20 Td (2.4–4.8 kV·cm −1 ·bar −1 ), low pressures 6–8 Torr (8–10.6 mbar) and at room temperature.

  19. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, A.F.V.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Santos, M.A.G.; Veenhof, R.; Patra, R.N.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2017-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO 2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of only one peak for all gas ratios of Xe-CO 2 , low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV·cm −1 ·bar −1 ), low pressures 6-8 Torr (8-10.6 mbar), at room temperature.

  20. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work, the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two distinct groups of ions. The nature of the ions depend on the mixture ratio since they are originated by both Xe and CH4. The results here presented were obtained for low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV ṡ cm-1 ṡ bar-1), at low pressure (8 Torr) (10.6 mbar), and at room temperature.

  1. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdigoto, J.M.C.; Cortez, A.F.V.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2017-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work, the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH 4 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two distinct groups of ions. The nature of the ions depend on the mixture ratio since they are originated by both Xe and CH 4 . The results here presented were obtained for low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10–25 Td (2.4–6.1 kV ⋅ cm −1  ⋅ bar −1 ), at low pressure (8 Torr) (10.6 mbar), and at room temperature.

  2. The dressed mobile atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Amour, B; Guillot, L

    2005-01-01

    We consider free atoms and ions in $\\R^3$ interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Because of the translation invariance we consider the reduced hamiltonian associated with the total momentum. After introducing an ultraviolet cutoff we prove that the reduced hamiltonian for atoms has a ground state if the coupling constant and the total momentum are sufficiently small. In the case of ions an extra infrared regularization is needed. We also consider the case of the hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field. Finally we determine the absolutely continuous spectrum of the reduced hamiltonian. \\end{abstract}

  3. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.)

  4. Thin layer chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (TLC-IMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-06

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a fast and sensitive analytical method which operates at the atmospheric pressure. To enhance the capability of IMS for the analysis of mixtures, it is often used with preseparation techniques, such as GC or HPLC. Here, we report for the first time the coupling of the thin-layer chromatography and IMS. A variety of coupling schemes were tried that included direct electrospray from the TLC strip tip, indirect electrospray from a needle connected to the TLC strip, introducing the moving solvent into the injection port, and, the simplest way, offline introduction of scratched or cut pieces of strips into the IMS injection port. In this study a special solvent tank was designed and the TLC strip was mounted horizontally where the solvent would flow down. A very small funnel right below the TLC tip collected the solvent and transferred it to a needle via a capillary tubing. Using the TLC-ESI-IMS technique, acceptable separations were achieved for two component mixtures of morphine-papaverine and acridine-papaverine. A special injection port was designed to host the pieces cut off the TLC. The method was successfully used to identify each spot on the TLC by IMS in a few seconds.

  5. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1976-01-01

    We have found that the mobility of negative ions increases rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature-independent mobility between 30 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bars

  6. Resolution of Ion Mobility Spectra for the Detection of Hazardous Substances in Real Sampling Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoliu, I.; Kalms, A.; Pardo, A.; Pomareda, V.; Marco, S.; Goebel, J.; Kessler, M.; Mueller, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the possibilities offered by a blind source separation method such Multivariate Curve Resolution- Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of Ion Mobility Spectra (IMS). Two security applications are analyzed in this context: the detection of TNT both in synthetic and real samples. Results obtained show the possibilities offered by the direct analysis of the drift time spectra when an appropriate resolution method is used.

  7. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 2: hyphenated methods and effects of experimental parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-07

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, specifically mass spectrometry as an identification approach and a multi-capillary column as a pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data sets are treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters on both conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The present review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and contains the sections that configure both conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. These reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion mobility in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rui; Dodds, Eric D.; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    A force field molecular dynamics method is developed to directly simulate ion drift in buffer gases driven by an electric field. The ion mobility and collision cross sections (CCSs) with relevance to ion mobility spectrometry can be obtained from the simulated drift velocity in high-density buffer gases (pressure ˜50 bars) and high electric fields (˜107 V/m). Compared to trajectory methods, the advantage of the molecular dynamics method is that it can simultaneously sample the internal dynamic motions of the ion and the ion-gas collisions. For ions with less than 100 atoms, the simulated collision cross section values can be converged to within ±1%-2% by running a 100 ns simulation for 5-19 h using one computer core. By using a set of element-based Lennard-Jones parameters that are not tuned for different atomic types in different molecules, the simulated collision cross sections for 15 small molecular ions (number of atoms ranging from 17 to 85, mass ranging from 74.1 to 609.4 g/mol) are consistent with experimental values: the mean unsigned error is 2.6 Å2 for He buffer gas and 4.4 Å2 for N2 buffer gas. The sensitivity of the simulated CCS values to random diffusion, drift velocity, electric field strength, temperature, and buffer gas density is examined.

  9. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ar-CO2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encarnação, P M C C; Cortez, A F V; Pinto, M G A; Trindade, A M F; Escada, J; Santos, F P; Borges, F I G M; Barata, J A S; Conde, C A N; Neves, P N B

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility of ions in argon-carbon dioxide gaseous mixtures (Ar-CO 2 ) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr and for reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range, at room temperature.The time-of-arrival spectra of the several mixture ratios studied revealed that the relative abundance of the ions and their mobilities depend on the mixture ratio. For Ar concentrations below 80% only one peak was observed in the spectra which was attributed to CO 2 + , while for Ar concentrations above 80% a second peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which may be due to impurities, probably H 2 O + . In this work, the time-of-arrival spectra from which reduced mobilities were obtained for Ar concentrations of 20% (K 0 = 1.141±0.004 cm 2 V −1 s −1 ), 50% (K 0 = 1.385±0.009 cm 2 V −1 s −1 ), 85% (K 0 = 1.690±0.022 cm 2 V −1 s −1 ) and 95% (K 0 = 1.954±0.043 cm 2 V −1 s −1 ) are displayed as well as other reduced mobilities values obtained similarly. The ion mobility study was performed at reduced electric field values typically used in gaseous detectors

  10. Apparatus and Method for Separation of Ions According to Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Fetterman; N. Fisch

    2008-01-01

    This is a device that uses rotating plasma and radiofrequency waves in order to separate ions within the plasma according to their mass. The device fundamentally consists of a mirror configuration (a primarily axial field) with a radial electric field, producing rotation. Radiofrequency waves are injected to produce diffusion paths allowing select species to exit through the loss cone. The use of these waves within the trap maintains the radial electric field, and allows species to be removed at low energy and with precise control over the location of exit

  11. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowell, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Slysz, Gordon W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Erin Shammel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monroe, Matthew E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Payne, Samuel H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Gordon A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  12. Electrospun polyimide-composite separator for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayapat, Jaritphun; Chung, Ok Hee; Park, Jun Seo

    2015-01-01

    Non-woven mats of thermally stable polyimide (PI) composites were fabricated as a separator of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) by first electrospinning a mixture of the pre-polymer, poly(amic acid) ammonium salt (PAAS), and inorganic nanoparticles of SiO 2 or Al 2 O 3 and then imidizing the electrospun nanofibers of the PAAS composites at 350 °C. The microstructures of the electrospun PI nanofibers, electrospun PI–SiO 2 -composite nanofibers, electrospun PI–Al 2 O 3 -composite nanofibers, and the commercial separator SV718 were examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Test results of the thermal properties of the PI nanofibers, PI-composite nanofibers, and SV718, obtained with a thermal gravimetric analyzer and a differential scanning calorimeter, indicate the superior thermal stability of PI and PI composites, which showed no melting peak and no decomposition at 600 °C, while SV718 had a melting peak at 137 °C and decomposed at 300 °C. The thermal stability of the separators, evaluated in a hot-oven test, showed no shrinkage of PI and PI composites at 200 °C, while SV718 started to shrink at above 100 °C. Using a drop of liquid electrolyte on the surface of each separator, the electrolyte contact angle on PI and PI composites was around 10° and that on SV718 was 54°, indicating that PI and PI composites had better wettability than SV718. The porosity and liquid-electrolyte uptake of the PI composites were over 90% and 790%, respectively, while the corresponding values for SV718 were 40% and 101%, respectively, implying that the separators consisting of the non-woven mats of PI–SiO 2 -composite nanofibers and PI–Al 2 O 3 -composite nanofibers had lower interfacial resistance than the commercial SV718 separator. The electrochemical performance of the PI-composite separator assembled between the LiCoO 2 cathode and the Li anode of an LIB exhibited more stable cycle performance, higher discharge

  13. Separation of Aliphatic and Aromatic Carboxylic Acids by Conventional and Ultra High Performance Ion Exclusion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Fotouh R; Kirkpatrick, Christine L; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-06-01

    An ion exclusion chromatography (IELC) comparison between a conventional ion exchange column and an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) dynamically surfactant modified C18 column for the separation of an aliphatic carboxylic acid and two aromatic carboxylic acids is presented. Professional software is used to optimize the conventional IELC separation conditions for acetylsalicylic acid and the hydrolysis products: salicylic acid and acetic acid. Four different variables are simultaneously optimized including H 2 SO 4 concentration, pH, flow rate, and sample injection volume. Thirty different runs are suggested by the software. The resolutions and the time of each run are calculated and feed back to the software to predict the optimum conditions. Derringer's desirability functions are used to evaluate the test conditions and those with the highest desirability value are utilized to separate acetylsalicylic acid, salicylic acid, and acetic acid. These conditions include using a 0.35 m M H 2 SO 4 (pH 3.93) eluent at a flow rate of 1 mL min -1 and an injection volume of 72 μL. To decrease the run time and improve the performance, a UHPLC C18 column is used after dynamic modification with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Using pure water as a mobile phase, a shorter analysis time and better resolution are achieved. In addition, the elution order is different from the IELC method which indicates the contribution of the reversed-phase mode to the separation mechanism.

  14. Arrival time distributions of product ions reveal isomeric ratio of deprotonated molecules in ion mobility-mass spectrometry of hyaluronan-derived oligosaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hermanová, M.; Iordache, A.-M.; Slováková, K.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Pelantová, Helena; Lemr, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2015), s. 854-863 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : tyramine-based hyaluronan derivatives * isomer discrimination * ion mobility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2015

  15. Separation of seven arsenic species by ion-pair and ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, Sven Hedegaard

    1992-01-01

    Arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and the tetramethylarsonium ion were subjected to ion-exchange and ion-pair reversed phase HPLC. The ion exchange method was superior in selectivity and time of analysis for the arsenic anions. The ammonium ions...... used for the ion-pair method only resulted in separation of some of the anionic arsenic compounds. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for on-line arsenic-specific detection....

  16. Ra/Ca separation by ion exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores Mendoza, J.

    1990-01-01

    Ra/Ca separation by ion exchange. The objective of this work was to acquire knowledge of the chromatographic behaviour of the alkaline earth cations calcium, barium and radium and the obtention of well-defined alpha spectra of 226 Ra. Three cationic ion exchange resins (Dower 50 W-X8, AG 50W-XB and Merck I) and three complexing agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid and tartaric acid) at various pH values have been investigated. The three types of ions are fixed on the resins at pH 4.8; calcium is eluted at pH between 5 and 6 depending on the resin; barium and radium are eluted at pH values from 8 to 11. Radium is also eluted with a 2 M nitric acid solution, from which it can be electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk potassium fluoride as electrolyte at pH 14. The electrolysis is conducted for 18 hours with a current of mA. Under these conditions high resolution alpha spectra were obtained for 226 Ra, which was practically free from radioactive contaminants (Author)

  17. Study of Aging ion exchange membranes used in separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellakhal, N.; Ghalloussi, R.; Dammak, L.

    2009-01-01

    Presently, the most important application of ion exchange membranes (IEM) is the electrodialysis. This technique consists of a membrane separation using a series of anion exchange membranes alternately and cations, often used for the desalination of brackish water. These membranes are confronted with problems of aging. Indeed, the more they are used more physical and chemical properties will change. A comparative study of the behavior of both EMI and new but the same treatment is carried out by measuring a magnitude transfer characteristic: ion permeability. Ionic permeability is a physical quantity can have an idea about the selectivity of the membrane towards the charged species and the p orosity o f the membrane. It is a transport of ions (cations + anions) through the membrane. Thus, determining the ion permeability is to determine the diffusion flux of a strong electrolyte through a membrane separating two compartments (one containing electrolytes and other water initially ultrapure who will gradually electrolyte through the membrane). The measurement technique used is that by conductimetric detection because of the ease of its implementation and its accuracy. Thus, the variation of the concentration of the electrolyte is continuously monitored by measuring the conductivity of the solution diluted with time. The curves s = f (t) MEA and MEC new and used varying concentration of the electrolyte membranes show that let in less waste of strong electrolyte (NaCl and HCl) than new ones. This can be explained by: - The functional sites are combined with polyvalent ions present even in trace amounts in the solution process and become inactive. The membrane loses its hydrophilic character and turns into a film almost hydrophobic. - The chemical attacks and electrodialysis operations have degraded and eliminated much of the fixed sites leading to the same effects on the hydrophilic membrane. - These two assumptions have been reinforced by the extent of exchange

  18. Interfacing an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, Alexey; Viidanoja, Jyrki; Kaerpaenoja, Esko; Paakkanen, Heikki; Ketola, Raimo A.; Kostiainen, Risto; Sysoev, Alexey; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the combination of an aspiration-type ion mobility spectrometer with a mass spectrometer. The interface between the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer and the mass spectrometer was designed to allow for quick mounting of the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer onto a Sciex API-300 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The developed instrumentation is used for gathering fundamental information on aspiration ion mobility spectrometry. Performance of the instrument is demonstrated using 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine and dimethyl methylphosphonate

  19. Ion exchange separation of nitrate from uranium compounds and its determination by spectrophotometry and ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    A procedure for the separation of nitrate from uranium compounds by retaintion of uranyl ion on a cationic ion exchanger and its determination in the effluent is described. Nitrate is analysed by the spectrometric method with 1-phenol-2,4-dissulphonic acid. This determination covers the 1 to 10 μg NO - 3 /mL range and requires an amount of 10 to 100 μg NO - 3 . The main interference is uranium (VI) due its own intense yellow color. This difficulty is overcome by the complete separation of UO 2 ++ with the cationic resin. Alternatively, the ion chromatography technique is used for the determination of nitrate in the effluent of the cationic resin. The determination was easily made by the comparison of the nitrate peak hights of the analyte and the standard solutions. The ion chromatography method is very sensitive (0,3 μg NO - 3 /mL), reproducible and suitable for routine analysis and permits the determination of fraction of part per million of nitrate in uranium. The results of nitrate determination using both spectrophotometric and ion chromatography techniques are compared. The method is being routinely applied for the quality control of uranium compounds in the fuel cycle, specially uranium oxide, ammonium diuranate, uranium peroxide and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. (Author) [pt

  20. High-Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2004-11-16

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  1. Novel configuration of polyimide matrix-enhanced cross-linked gel separator for high performance lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yin; Yao, Zhikan; John, Angelin Ebanezar; Li, Yang; Li, Weishan; Zhu, Baoku

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • For the first time, a cross-linked gel polymer electrolyte with additional lithium ions, was introduced into a nonwoven separator. • The PI nonwoven is employed to ensure enhanced thermal stability and mechanical strength of the IACS. • With the introduction of PAMPS(Li + ), the migration and mobility rate of anions could be hindered by the -SO 3 − group, giving rise to a high lithium ion transference number. • This IACS is recommended as a promising candidate for the high-power and high-safety lithium ion batteries. - Abstract: A novel composite nonwoven separator exhibiting high heat resistance, high ionic conductivity and high lithium ion transference number is fabricated by a simple dip-coating and heat treatment method. The thermal stable polyimide (PI) nonwoven matrix is chosen as a mechanical support and contributes to improving the thermal shrinkage of the composite nonwoven separator (abbreviated as IACS). The cross-linked poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) PAMPS(Li + ) gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), lithium ion sources of a single ion conductor, is introduced into the PI nonwoven matrix and acts as a functional filler. This PAMPS (Li + ) GPE is proved to be able to provide internal short circuit protection, to alleviate liquid electrolyte leakage effectively, to supply more lithium ions dissociating from PAMPS (Li + ) by liquid electrolyte solvent, to contribute a more stable interfacial resistance, and thus resulting in an excellent cyclability. More notably, the migration and mobility rate of anions could be hindered by the −SO 3 − group in the PAMPS (Li + ) polymer based on electrostatic interaction, giving rise to a very high lithium ion transference number. These fascinating characteristics endow the IACS a great promise for the application in the high power and high safety lithium ion batteries.

  2. Alkaline Anion-Exchange Membranes Containing Mobile Ion Shuttles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaolin; He, Yubin; Guiver, Michael D; Wu, Liang; Ran, Jin; Yang, Zhengjin; Xu, Tongwen

    2016-05-01

    A new class of alkaline anion-exchange membranes containing mobile ion shuttles is developed. It is achieved by threading ionic linear guests into poly(crown ether) hosts via host-guest molecular interaction. The thermal- and pH-triggered shuttling of ionic linear guests remarkably increases the solvation-shell fluctuations in inactive hydrated hydroxide ion complexes (OH(-) (H2 O)4 ) and accelerates the OH(-) transport. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CF4 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Kaja, M. A.; Escada, J.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon with carbon tetrafluoride (Xe-CF4) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm‑1ṡbar‑1), at room temperature. The time-of-arrival spectra revealed one or two peaks depending on the gas relative abundances, which were attributed to CF3+ and to Xe2+ ions. However, for Xe concentrations above 60%, only one peak remains (Xe2+). The reduced mobilities obtained from the peak centroid of the time-of-arrival spectra are presented for Xe concentrations in the 5%-95% range.

  4. Mixed mobile ion effect on ac conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  5. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing

    2013-05-09

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Dynamic multiplexed analysis method using ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA

    2010-05-18

    A method for multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer in which the effectiveness and efficiency of the multiplexed method is optimized by automatically adjusting rates of passage of analyte materials through an IMS drift tube during operation of the system. This automatic adjustment is performed by the IMS instrument itself after determining the appropriate levels of adjustment according to the method of the present invention. In one example, the adjustment of the rates of passage for these materials is determined by quantifying the total number of analyte molecules delivered to the ion trap in a preselected period of time, comparing this number to the charge capacity of the ion trap, selecting a gate opening sequence; and implementing the selected gate opening sequence to obtain a preselected rate of analytes within said IMS drift tube.

  7. Gas-Phase Enrichment of Multiply Charged Peptide Ions by Differential Ion Mobility Extend the Comprehensiveness of SUMO Proteome Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Sibylle; Bonneil, Eric; McManus, Francis P; Thibault, Pierre

    2018-04-05

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the family of ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) and is involved in important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, meiosis and cellular trafficking. The large-scale identification of SUMO peptides in a site-specific manner is challenging not only because of the low abundance and dynamic nature of this modification, but also due to the branched structure of the corresponding peptides that further complicate their identification using conventional search engines. Here, we exploited the unusual structure of SUMO peptides to facilitate their separation by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and increase the coverage of SUMO proteome analysis. Upon trypsin digestion, branched peptides contain a SUMO remnant side chain and predominantly form triply protonated ions that facilitate their gas-phase separation using FAIMS. We evaluated the mobility characteristics of synthetic SUMO peptides and further demonstrated the application of FAIMS to profile the changes in protein SUMOylation of HEK293 cells following heat shock, a condition known to affect this modification. FAIMS typically provided a 10-fold improvement of detection limit of SUMO peptides, and enabled a 36% increase in SUMO proteome coverage compared to the same LC-MS/MS analyses performed without FAIMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Nonlinear wavelet compression of ion mobility spectra from ion mobility spectrometers mounted in an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Libo; Harrington, Peter de B; Harden, Charles S; McHugh, Vincent M; Thomas, Martin A

    2004-02-15

    Linear and nonlinear wavelet compression of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) data are compared and evaluated. IMS provides low detection limits and rapid response for many compounds. Nonlinear wavelet compression of ion mobility spectra reduced the data to 4-5% of its original size, while eliminating artifacts in the reconstructed spectra that occur with linear compression, and the root-mean-square reconstruction error was 0.17-0.20% of the maximum intensity of the uncompressed spectra. Furthermore, nonlinear wavelet compression precisely preserves the peak location (i.e., drift time). Small variations in peak location may occur in the reconstructed spectra that were linearly compressed. A method was developed and evaluated for optimizing the compression. The compression method was evaluated with in-flight data recorded from ion mobility spectrometers mounted in an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Plumes of dimethyl methylphosphonate were disseminated for interrogation by the UAV-mounted IMS system. The daublet 8 wavelet filter exhibited the best performance for these evaluations.

  9. Status report of the Jyvaskyla ion guide isotope separator on-line facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penttila, H; Dendooven, P; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Jauho, PP; Jokinen, A; Lhersonneau, G; Oinonen, M; Parmonen, JM; Perajarvi, K; Aysto, J

    The ion guide isotope separator facility IGISOL of the University of Jyvaskyla has been moved to the new K-130 heavy ion cyclotron laboratory. The totally reconstructed facility is described in detail. The primary beams and targets, helium pumping, separator beam line construction and separator beam

  10. Ion optical system of a 255 deg double-focusing electromagnetic isotope separator at IAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Naifeng; Lu Hongyou; Cai Rentai

    1987-01-01

    The ion optical system of a 255 deg double-focusing electro-magnetic isotope separator at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE), Beijing, is described, including the analysis of ion beam focusing and the calculation of magnetic field shaping

  11. The fabrication and modification of capillary polymer monoliths for the separation of small ions

    OpenAIRE

    Moyna, Aine

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and modification of polymer monoliths, in capillary formats, for the separation of small ions is presented. The separation of small ions using polymer monoliths has limitations and this work aims to investigate increasing the ion exchange capacity using photo-grafting techniques. Chapter 1.0 includes a comprehensive review on the use of capillary ion chromatography including advancements made in capillary instrumentation, stationary phases and detection devices. This chapter a...

  12. Study on rare earths complexes separation by means of different type of ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubicka, H.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of different types of ion exchangers for purification and separation of rare earths complexes has been examined. The experimental work has been carried out on 14 chelating ion exchangers. The investigation results proved the great usefulness chelating ion exchangers especially of amino acid and phosphorus-type. Application of that type ion exchangers in column chromatographic process gave the excellent rare earths separation as well as enabled to obtain their preparates of high purity. 218 refs, 21 figs, 27 tabs

  13. Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to FT-ICR MS: Fundamentals and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Paolo; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-07-19

    In the present paper, we describe the fundamentals and analytical advantages of Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry (OSA-TIMS) when coupled to ultrahigh resolution mass analyzers (e.g., FT-ICR MS). During TIMS analysis, ion packages are spatially resolved based on their mobilities along the TIMS analyzer axis and multiple strategies can be utilized during the trapping and elution of the ion population of interest. In the case of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS, the TIMS operation sequence, trapping conditions, and operations are optimized to increase the signal-to-noise and the number of points across the mobility domain, which leads to more accurate mobility and mass measurements. Experimental results show that accurate ion-neutral collision cross sections (analytical advantages of OSA-TIMS over SA-TIMS were illustrated for the analysis of structural peptide isomers (SDGRG and GRGDS [M + H](+)), conformational isomers (AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2)), and a complex mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from coal tar. Baseline separation of the structural peptide isomers SDGRG and GRGDS, [M + H](+), was observed, and three conformations were identified for the AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2) during OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS. A 2-fold increase in the number of molecular features and a 2-6-fold signal-to-noise increase was observed for OSA-TIMS when compared with SA-TIMS during the PAH analysis. This work provides the proof-of-principle for further application of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS for the unsupervised analysis of complex mixtures based on the characterization of the conformational space and the assignment of chemical formulas in a single analysis.

  14. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  15. The effect of ion irradiation on inert gas bubble mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Al ion irradiation on the mobility of Xe gas bubbles in Al thin films was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine bubble diffusivities in films irradiated and/or annealed at 673K, 723K and 773K. Irradiation increased bubble diffusivity by a factor of 2--9 over that due to thermal annealing alone. The Arrhenius behavior and dose rate dependence of bubble diffusivity are consistent with a radiation enhanced diffusion phenomenon affecting a volume diffusion mechanism of bubble transport. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Chromatographic separation process with pellicular ion exchange resins that can be used for ion or isotope separation and resins used in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, M.; Neige, R.; Niemann, C.; Michel, A.; Bert, M.; Bodrero, S.; Guyot, A.

    1989-01-01

    For separation of uranium, boron or nitrogen isotopes, an isotopic exchange is carried out betwen an isotope fixed on an ion exchange resin and another isotope of the same element in the liquid phase contacting the resin. Pellicular resins are used comprising composite particulates with an inert polymeric core and a surface layer with ion exchange groups [fr

  17. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  18. Measurement of negative ion mobility in O2 at high pressures using a point plate gap as an ion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Y; Kimura, T; Suzuki, S; Itoh, H

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results for negative ion mobility in O 2 at 0.5-2.0 atm. The ion mobility is observed using a high-pressure ion drift tube with a positive corona gap (Geiger counter), which is constructed from a point plate gap and acts as a negative ion detector. The variation of waveforms in the burst pulse is observed by varying the voltage applied to the ion detector to find the optimum voltage that must be applied across the ion detector in O 2 . This is investigated carefully to ensure the precise determination of mobility. The distortion of the electric field near the mesh electrode, which operates as the cathode of the ion detector and as the anode of the ion drift gap, is then examined to determine the optimum applied voltage to suppress its effect on the measurement of mobility. The mobility is subsequently measured at a reduced electric field intensity of 2.83 × 10 -3 to 2.83. The observed mobility of 2.31 ± 0.03 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in O 2 is concluded to be that of O 2 - . This value is also obtained in experiments over a wide range of gas pressures (0.5-2.0 atm) and drift lengths (1.00-9.00 cm). The mobilities of O 3 - and O - are also obtained experimentally. (paper)

  19. Controller Development for a Separate Meter-In Separate Meter-Out Fluid Power Valve for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian

    equal to the controlled flow rate times the pressure drop across the orifice. By a constant flow rate the best energy efficiency is therefore obtained by keeping the pressure drop across the orifice as low as possible. More orifices are commonly included in a single valve. A specific type of valve....... And to develop controllers for a valve prototype whereby the two mentioned fluid streams may be controlled separately. First an introduction to mobile fluid power systems is given. It is explained that the future trend within mobile fluid power systems goes towards integration of sensors and microprocessors...

  20. The positive ions mobility in the gas mixtures for filling the proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagusztyn, W.

    1979-01-01

    A description of a new method of the positive ions mobility measurements in the gas mixtures for filling proportional counters is presented. The positive ions mobility has been determined for the selected gas mixtures with Ar, Kr and Xe as the main components. The influence of the type and the amount of admixture on the positive ions mobility has been discussed on the base of the achieved results. (author)

  1. Size Exclusion Chromatography-Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Coupling: a Step Toward Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Rest, Guillaume; Halgand, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    Noncovalent interactions are essential for the structural organization of biomacromolecules in cells. For this reason, the study of the biophysical, dynamic, and architectural interactions among biomacromolecules is essential. Since mass spectrometry requires compatible solutions while preserving the noncovalent bonding network, we envisioned that size exclusion chromatography coupled with ion mobility and mass spectrometry would be a valuable technique to desalt the initial sample and provide solution and gas-phase structural information in a single stage experiment. Such coupling allowed obtaining information on solution protein complex composition with SEC separation and on authenticity and purity with IMS-MS. Our study demonstrated that such coupling is compatible, useful, as well as suitable for a routine analysis, in pharmaceutical industry, for example. Mobility data were reliable and injected standards allowed calibrating the collision cross-section scale. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. The separation of heavy ion tracks in nuclear emulsions by means of the pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopova, A.B.; Magradze, N.V.; Melkumyan, L.V.; Prokhorenko, Y.P.

    1976-01-01

    The pulsed electric field (PEF) technique is developed for the separation of heavy ion tracks from the intense background caused by high energy electrons, protons and γ-radiation. The tracks of Ne, Cr, Ar-ions accelerated at the Dubna Nuclear Reactions Laboratory have been separated from the background, the voltage of the applied PEF being 10 5 V/cm. (orig.) [de

  3. High efficiency noble gas electron impact ion source for isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, A. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dahl, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ward, M. B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    An electron impact ion source has been designed for generation of noble gas ions in a compact isotope separator. The source utilizes a circular filament that surrounds an ionization chamber, enabling multiple passes of electrons through the ionization chamber. This report presents ion optical design and the results of efficiency and sensitivity measurements performed in an ion source test chamber and in the compact isotope separator. The cylindrical design produced xenon ions at an efficiency of 0.37% with a sensitivity of ~24 µA /Pa at 300 µA of electron current.

  4. Analysis of Bacterial Lipooligosaccharides by MALDI-TOF MS with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nancy J.; John, Constance M.; Jarvis, Gary A.

    2016-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are major microbial virulence factors displayed on the outer membrane of rough-type Gram-negative bacteria. These amphipathic glycolipids are comprised of two domains, a core oligosaccharide linked to a lipid A moiety. Isolated LOS samples are generally heterogeneous mixtures of glycoforms, with structural variability in both domains. Traditionally, the oligosaccharide and lipid A components of LOS have been analyzed separately following mild acid hydrolysis, although important acid-labile moieties can be cleaved. Recently, an improved method was introduced for analysis of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS using a thin layer matrix composed of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) and nitrocellulose. In addition to molecular ions, the spectra show in-source "prompt" fragments arising from regiospecific cleavage between the lipid A and oligosaccharide domains. Here, we demonstrate the use of traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for IMS-MS and IMS-MS/MS analyses of intact LOS from Neisseria spp. ionized by MALDI. Using IMS, the singly charged prompt fragments for the oligosaccharide and lipid A domains of LOS were readily separated into resolved ion plumes, permitting the extraction of specific subspectra, which led to increased confidence in assigning compositions and improved detection of less abundant ions. Moreover, IMS separation of precursor ions prior to collision-induced dissociation (CID) generated time-aligned, clean MS/MS spectra devoid of fragments from interfering species. Incorporating IMS into the profiling of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS exploits the unique domain structure of the molecule and offers a new means of extracting more detailed information from the analysis.

  5. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  6. Measurement of negative ion mobilities in O2 and O3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Norimoto, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Mobility measurements of negative molecular oxygen ions in pure oxygen and in an oxygen-ozone mixture are reported. A cascaded gap consisting of an ion drift gap and an ion detection gap was used in the experiment. The ion detection gap was formed by a positive point and a grounded plane electrode was operated at atmospheric pressure. The zero field mobility of negative molecular oxygen ions was determined to be 2.07+-0.02 cm 2 /V.s. A somewhat higher value of oxygen mobility was found at higher electric field/pressure ratios; this is presumed to be due to negative ozone ions. When changing the electric field/pressure ratio the mobility of negative oxygen ions in oxygen-ozone mixtures becomes smaller than that in pure oxygen; this is probably due to the cumulative effect of other particles produced by silent discharges. (J.U.)

  7. Analysis of a series of chlorogenic acid isomers using differential ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Jamie L; Khamis, Mona M; Mohammed Saeid, Waleed; Purves, Randy W; Katselis, George; Low, Nicholas H; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-08-24

    Chlorogenic acids are among the most abundant phenolics found in the human diet. Of these, the mono-caffeoylquinic acids are the predominant phenolics found in fruits, such as apples and pears, and products derived from them. In this research, a comprehensive study of the electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) dissociation behavior of the three most common mono-caffeoylquinic acids, namely 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA), were determined using both positive and negative ionization. All proposed structures of the observed product ions were confirmed with second-generation MS(3) experiments. Similarities and differences between the dissociation pathways in the positive and negative ion modes are discussed, confirming the proposed structures and the established MS/MS fingerprints. MS/MS dissociation was primarily driven via the cleavage of the ester bond linking the quinic acid moiety to the caffeic acid moiety within tested molecules. Despite being structural isomers with the same m/z values and dissociation behaviors, the MS/MS data in the negative ion mode was able to differentiate the three isomers based on ion intensity for the major product ions, observed at m/z 191, 179 and 173. This differentiation was consistent among various MS instruments. In addition, ESI coupled with high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-FAIMS-MS) was employed for the separation of these compounds for the first time. By combining MS/MS data and differential ion mobility, a method for the separation and identification of mono-caffeoylquinic in apple/pear juice samples was developed with a run time of less than 1 min. It is envisaged that this methodology could be used to identify pure juices based on their chlorogenic acid profile (i.e., metabolomics), and could also be used to detect juice-to-juice adulteration (e.g., apple juice addition to pear juice

  8. Examination of Organic Vapor Adsorption onto Alkali Metal and Halide Atomic Ions by using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiβer, Anne; Hogan, Christopher J

    2017-11-03

    We utilize ion mobility mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) to examine the formation of ion-vapor molecule complexes with seed ions of K + , Rb + , Cs + , Br - , and I - exposed to n-butanol and n-nonane vapor under subsaturated conditions. Ion-vapor molecule complex formation is indicated by a shift in the apparent mobility of each ion. Measurement results are compared to predicted mobility shifts based upon the Kelvin-Thomson equation, which is commonly used in predicting rates of ion-induced nucleation. We find that n-butanol at saturation ratios as low as 0.03 readily binds to all seed ions, leading to mobility shifts in excess of 35 %. Conversely, the binding of n-nonane is not detectable for any ion for saturation ratios in the 0-0.27 range. An inverse correlation between the ionic radius of the initial seed and the extent of n-butanol uptake is observed, such that at elevated n-butanol concentrations, the smallest ion (K + ) has the smallest apparent mobility and the largest (I - ) has the largest apparent mobility. Though the differences in behavior of the two vapor molecules types examined and the observed effect of ionic seed radius are not accounted for by the Kelvin-Thomson equation, its predictions are in good agreement with measured mobility shifts for Rb + , Cs + , and Br - in the presence of n-butanol (typically within 10 % of measurements). © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  10. Ion mobility in the pharmaceutical industry: an established biophysical technique or still niche?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Iain Dg; Lippens, Jennifer L

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decade ion mobility (IM) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a wide spread analytical technique, utilized in research areas ranging from small molecule to proteins analyzed under native-MS and solution conditions. The ion-neutral collision cross section (Ω) derived from an IM experiment can be used to make inferences about the ion's size, shape and charge distribution, when compared to molecular dynamic (MD) or quantum mechanically (QM) derived candidate structures. IM can also be used as an orthogonal separation technique when coupled with liquid chromatographic (LC) separations. IM has been readily adopted by academic research groups and has been demonstrated to be highly enabling, resulting in the inception of completely new research areas, such as gas-phase structural biology. The same cannot be said for IM in pharma, where it is still perceived as a standalone, research-only based analytical tool. Herein, we will describe key innovations of IM instrumentation by current MS vendors and IMs application within academic and pharmaceutical research and how these developments have been, and can be applied to research discovery efforts within the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Separation and recovery of chromium and vanadium metal ions from waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothmann, H.; Bauer, G.; Stuhr, A.; Retelsdorf, H-J.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of Cr- and V- recovery from waste waters, precipitation of chromate and vanadate ions as insoluble compounds, absorption of Cr and V on solid ion exchange resins, absorption of Cr and V on fluid ion exchangers. Extraction with fluid exchangers: simultaneous extraction of Cr and V with Ion Exchanger Hoe F 1857 to determine the distribution isotherms, separate extraction of Cr in a continuously operating mixer-settler plant, separate extraction of vanadate in a constantly operating mixer-settler plant, test with an extraction column, losses in the organic phase during chromium and vanadium extraction, discussion of the test results and economic considerations

  12. Surface-Modified Membrane as A Separator for Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Young Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fabrication of novel modified polyethylene (PE membranes using plasma technology to create high-performance and cost-effective separator membranes for practical applications in lithium-ion polymer batteries. The modified PE membrane via plasma modification process plays a critical role in improving wettability and electrolyte retention, interfacial adhesion between separators and electrodes, and cycle performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries. This paper suggests that the performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries can be greatly enhanced by the plasma modification of commercial separators with proper functional materials for targeted application.

  13. Heavy stable isotope separation by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvet, P.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Larousse, B.; Patris, M.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific feasibility of the ion cyclotron resonance process (ICR), as well as the technical one, has been investigated carefully for light metallic elements, whose masses lies between 40 and 100/1,2/. The present work deals mainly with the same demonstration for heavier elements such as ytterbium, gadolinium and barium. Recent results, as well as future prospects, are considered here. (authors)

  14. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)

  15. Separation of Ra/Ca by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe, J.L.; Jimenez R, M.; Flores M, J.

    1991-04-01

    The radium and the calcium belong to the same group in the periodic classification and as consequence both they present very similar chemical properties, that makes difficult its separation. Both elements are also frequently associate in the nature, the calcium is very abundant, the radium is not it and for that reason it is indispensable its separation to analyze to this last one. The alpha spectroscopy is very appropriate to analyze to the 226 Ra, however to achieve a good resolution of the spectra, the samples should contain small quantities of calcium. The purposes of this work were to know the chromatographic behavior of the alkaline-earthy cations: calcium, barium and radium and to apply these knowledge to the separation of the 226 Ra and its analysis by means of alpha spectroscopy. (Author)

  16. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlösser, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.schloesser@googlemail.com; Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González, E-mail: laseres@pluri.ucm.es [Unidad de Láseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Plurisdisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  17. Method of separating radioactive nuclides from ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Saikoku, Masami; Taneta, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to safely process radioactive nuclides from spent ion exchange resins by using existent processing facilities. Method: Ion exchange resins in aqueous medium are at first placed to the ultrasonic wave irradiation site and put into such a state where clads and resins are easily separatable from each other by weakening the bonding force between them. Since the clads are magnetic material such as Fe 3 O 4 or NiFe 2 O 4 , the clads can be collected in the direction of the magnetic force by exerting the magnetic field simultaneously. The collected clads are transported by means of the aqueous medium to a collecting tank by removing the effect of magnetic field, for example, by interrupting the current supply to the electromagnet. Finally, they were subjected to stabilization and fixation into inorganic hardening agent such as cement hardener. Thus, processions can be made safely by using existent facilities. (Takahashi, M.)

  18. Study of ion separation through solid-supported liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Do; Kim, Kyoung Ho

    1990-01-01

    The membranes used in this study consist of a microporous polymeric support with the solvent contraining alamine 336, Tri-N-Octyl phosphine oxide, Tri-N-butyl phosphate, Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid as a carrier within the pores by the capillary forces. When this liquid membrane is interposed between aqueous feed and product solutions, the carrier serving as a complexing agent, can pick up the uranium ions on the feed side of the membrane and carry them across the membrane by diffusion. In this study, the uranium flux through the solid-supported liquid membrane was analyzed as a function of carrier concentration and acidity of the feed solution for the carrier species. Also, the Gel-liquid extraction of uranium ions from aqueous solution was performed. The adsorbents were prepared by casting the polymer solution composed of polyvinyl chloride, TOPO, and additions. The extraction of uranyl nitrate ions has been investigated as a function of TOPO/PVC ratio, evaporation time, and the stability. The results show that is maybe possible to develop an alternative uranium purification process. (author)

  19. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Use of weak ion association in the separation of inorganic anions by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work weak ion association was used to effect selectivity and detection of inorganic anions with environmental or health significance by capillary electropheresis, CE. Tetrabutylammonium ion was used as a pairing anion to separate mixtures containing closely or co-migrating inorganic anions at pHs 3.8 and pH 7.

  1. First measurement of radioisotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy at an ion-guide separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, JL; Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Griffith, JAR; Grant, IS; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The first successful application of an ion-guide separator (IGISOL) for collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes has achieved an efficiency comparable with the best obtained with catcher-ionizer facilities. The ion beam energy spread was determined to be less than 6 eV, allowing laser

  2. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  3. Travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of 5-aminolaevulinic acid, porphobilinogen and porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Christopher M; Lim, Chang Kee; Moniz, Caje; Jones, Donald J L

    2012-02-29

    Human porphyrias, diseases caused by enzyme defects in haem biosynthesis, are characterised by the excessive production, accumulation and excretion of porphyrins and/or 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG). A method for the simultaneous separation, detection and identification of ALA, PBG and porphyrins would greatly facilitate the screening and diagnosis of porphyrias. Such a method would also be invaluable for the biochemical study of the haem, chlorophyll and corrin pathways. An aqueous mixture containing ALA, PBG and type I isomer porphyrins was diluted with acetonitrile and infused (10 μL/min) into a Waters Synapt G2 high-definition mass spectrometer, equipped with a Z-Spray electrospray ionisation (ESI) source. Mass spectra were acquired in positive ionisation mode and the optimised ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) conditions were as follows: IMS wave height (V), 40; IMS wave velocity (m/s), 648; IMS gas flow (mL/min) 90.40; helium gas flow (mL/min), 182.60. The IMS drift-time increased with increasing ion mass in the order of ALA, PBG, mesoporphyrin, coproporphyrin I, penta-, hexa- and heptacarboxylic acid porphyrin I and uroporphyrin I. The ESI-IMS-MS spectra shows that PBG could form two different positively charged ions by protonation [M+H](+) , m/z 227, or deprotonation [M - H](+) , m/z 225. The protonated PBG (m/z 227) easily eliminated ammonia in source and the fragment ion (m/z 210) was monitored instead. Doubly charged ions of porphyrins having different drift times from the protonated singly charged molecules were observed in high abundance, providing further structural characterisation. We have shown, for the first time, an analytical method capable of simultaneously separating haem biosynthetic intermediates and metabolites, for a potential rapid clinical screening method for the porphyrias. IMS-MS allowed the separation of doubly charged porphyrin ions, which will be advantageous for the analysis of natural and synthetic

  4. Thin film separators with ion transport properties for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan

    2017-09-01

    Recent years, along with the increasing need of energy, energy storage also becomes a challenging problem which we need to deal with. The batterieshave a good developing prospect among energy storage system in storing energy such as wind, solar and geothermal energy. One hurdle between the lab-scale experiment and industry-scale application of the advanced batteries is the urgent need for limiting charging capacity degradation and improving cycling stability, known as the shuttle effect in lithium-sulfur batteries or electroosmotic drag coefficient in fuel-cell batteries. The microporous separator between the cathode and anode could be molecular engineered to possessesion selective permeation properties, which can greatly improves the energy efficiency and extends application range of the battery. The present review offers the fundamental fabrication methods of separator film with different material. The review also contains the chemical or physical structure of different materials which are used in making separator film. A table offers the reader a summary of properties such as ionic conductivity, ionic exchange capacity and current density etc.

  5. High Resolution Separations and Improved Ion Production and Transmission in Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Page, Jason S.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tang, Keqi; Ding, Jie; Shen, Yufeng; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-31

    The goal of metabolomics experiments is the detection and quantitation of as many sample components as reasonably possible in order to identify “features” that can be used to characterize the samples under study. When utilizing electrospray ionization to produce ions for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), it is imperative that metabolome sample constituents be efficiently separated prior to ion production, in order to minimize the phenomenon of ionization suppression. Similarly, optimization of the MS inlet can lead to increased measurement sensitivity. This review will focus on the role of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) separations in conjunction with improved ion production and transmission for LC-MS-based metabolomics.

  6. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  7. Coupling laser desorption with gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry for improved olive oil characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Sascha; Seifert, Luzia; Ahlmann, Norman; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Franzke, Joachim; Vautz, Wolfgang

    2018-07-30

    The investigation of volatile compounds in the headspace of liquid samples can often be used for detailed and non-destructive characterisation of the sample. This has great potential for process control or the characterisation of food samples, such as olive oil. We investigated, for the first time, the plume of substances released from olive oil droplets by laser desorption in a feasibility study and applied ion mobility spectrometry coupled to rapid GC pre-separation to enhance selectivity. Our investigation demonstrated that significantly more substances can be detected and quantified via laser desorption than in the usual headspace, enabling a rapid (5-10 min), sensitive (low ng/g range) and comprehensive analysis of the sample, with the potential for quality control and fraud identification. Therefore, laser desorption provides a useful sampling tool for characterising liquids in many applications, requiring only a few µL of sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An online peak extraction algorithm for ion mobility spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczynski, Dominik; Rahmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility (IM) spectrometry (IMS), coupled with multi-capillary columns (MCCs), has been gaining importance for biotechnological and medical applications because of its ability to detect and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOC) at low concentrations in the air or in exhaled breath at ambient pressure and temperature. Ongoing miniaturization of spectrometers creates the need for reliable data analysis on-the-fly in small embedded low-power devices. We present the first fully automated online peak extraction method for MCC/IMS measurements consisting of several thousand individual spectra. Each individual spectrum is processed as it arrives, removing the need to store the measurement before starting the analysis, as is currently the state of the art. Thus the analysis device can be an inexpensive low-power system such as the Raspberry Pi. The key idea is to extract one-dimensional peak models (with four parameters) from each spectrum and then merge these into peak chains and finally two-dimensional peak models. We describe the different algorithmic steps in detail and evaluate the online method against state-of-the-art peak extraction methods.

  9. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Immobilized aptamer paper spray ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Tahereh; Khayamian, Taghi; Jafari, Mohammad T

    2017-01-05

    A selective thin-film microextraction based on aptamer immobilized on cellulose paper was used as a paper spray ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (PSI-IMS), for the first time. In this method, the paper is not only used as an ionization source but also it is utilized for the selective extraction of analyte, based on immobilized aptamer. This combination integrates both sample preparation and analyte ionization in a Whatman paper. To that end, an appropriate sample introduction system with a novel design was constructed for the paper spray ionization source. Using this system, a continuous solvent flow works as an elution and spray solvent simultaneously. In this method, analyte is adsorbed on a triangular paper with immobilized aptamer and then it is desorbed and ionized by elution solvent and applied high voltage on paper, respectively. The effects of different experimental parameters such as applied voltage, angle of paper tip, distance between paper tip and counter electrode, elution solvent type, and solvent flow rate were optimized. The proposed method was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility by analyzing the standard solutions of codeine and acetamiprid. The analytical results obtained are promising enough to ensure the use of immobilized aptamer paper-spray as both the extraction and ionization techniques in IMS for direct analysis of biomedicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of explosives in hair using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jimmie C; Smith, James L; Kirschenbaum, Louis J; Marimganti, Suvarna; Vadlamannati, Sravanthi

    2008-05-01

    Conventional explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), nitroglycerin (NG), and ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN) sorbed to hair can be directly detected by an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) in E-mode (for explosives). Terrorist explosive, triacetone triperoxide (TATP), difficult to detect by IMS in E-mode, was detected in N-mode (for narcotics). Three modes of sample introduction to IMS vapor desorption unit were used: (i) placement of hair directly into the unit, (ii) swabbing of hair and placement of swabs (i.e., paper GE-IMS sample traps) into the unit, and (iii) acetonitrile extracts of hair positioned on sample traps and placed into the unit. TNT, NG, and EGDN were detected in E-mode by all three sample introduction methods. TATP could only be detected by the acetonitrile extraction method after exposure of the hair to vapor for 16 days because of lower sensitivity. With standard solutions, TATP detection in E-mode required about 10 times as much sample as EGDN (3.9 mug compared with 0.3 mug). IMS in N-mode detected TATP from hair by all three modes of sample introduction.

  12. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species

  14. Mass Spectrometric Collisional Activation and Product Ion Mobility of Human Serum Neutral Lipid Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Barkley, Robert M.; Zemski-Berry, Karin; Deng, Yiming; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for lipid analysis called CTS (collisional activation and traveling wave mass spectrometry) involving tandem mass spectrometry of all precursor ions with ion mobility determinations of all product ions was applied to a sample of human serum. The resulting four dimensional data set (precursor ion, product ion, ion mobility values, and intensity) was found to be useful for characterization of lipids as classes as well as identification of specific species. Utilization of ion mobility measurements of the product ions is a novel approach for lipid analysis. The trends and patterns of product mobility values when visually displayed yield information on lipid classes and specific species independent of mass determination. The collection of a comprehensive set of data that incorporates all precursor-product relationships combined with ion mobility measurements of all products enables data analysis where different molecular properties can be juxtaposed and analyzed to assist with class and species identification. Overall, CTS is powerful, specific, and comprehensive method for lipid analysis. PMID:27213895

  15. Ionization of water clusters by fast Highly Charged Ions: Stability, fragmentation, energetics and charge mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S; Maisonny, R; Capron, M; Bernigaud, V; Cassimi, A; Gervais, B; Grandin, J-P; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Rousseau, P; Tarisien, M; Adoui, L; Lopez-Tarifa, P; AlcamI, M; MartIn, F; Politis, M-F; Penhoat, M A Herve du; Vuilleumier, R; Gaigeot, M-P; Tavernelli, I

    2009-01-01

    We study dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of fast Ni ions. Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized clusters. An unusual stability of the (H 2 O) 4 H ''+ ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so called ''Eigen'' structure in gas phase water clusters. High charge mobility, responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters that dominate the mass spectrum, is evidenced. These results are supported by CPMD and TDDFT simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  16. Resolution and Assignment of Differential Ion Mobility Spectra of Sarcosine and Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthias, Francis; Maatoug, Belkis; Glish, Gary L.; Moussa, Fathi; Maitre, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Due to their central role in biochemical processes, fast separation and identification of amino acids (AA) is of importance in many areas of the biomedical field including the diagnosis and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism and biomarker discovery. Due to the large number of AA together with their isomers and isobars, common methods of AA analysis are tedious and time-consuming because they include a chromatographic separation step requiring pre- or post-column derivatization. Here, we propose a rapid method of separation and identification of sarcosine, a biomarker candidate of prostate cancer, from isomers using differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) interfaced with a tandem mass spectrometer (MS/MS) instrument. Baseline separation of protonated sarcosine from α- and β-alanine isomers can be easily achieved. Identification of DIMS peak is performed using an isomer-specific activation mode where DIMS- and mass-selected ions are irradiated at selected wavenumbers allowing for the specific fragmentation via an infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) process. Two orthogonal methods to MS/MS are thus added, where the MS/MS(IRMPD) is nothing but an isomer-specific multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method. The identification relies on the comparison of DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) chromatograms recorded at different wavenumbers. Based on the comparison of IR spectra of the three isomers, it is shown that specific depletion of the two protonated α- and β-alanine can be achieved, thus allowing for clear identification of the sarcosine peak. It is also demonstrated that DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) spectra in the carboxylic C=O stretching region allow for the resolution of overlapping DIMS peaks. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Solvent extraction, membranes, and ion exchange in hydrometallurgical dilute metals separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Bae, J.H.; Lee, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    The separation methods which are used in the hydro-metallurgical field are reviewed and compared. Some processes in solvent extraction in use for recovery of crucial metals which are important to the US defense and economy are presented. Various commercial extractants are reviewed and categorized. Other methods such as liquid membranes and ions exchange resins used for dilute metal ions separation are summarized. These methods are compared with solvent extraction. Problems to overcome in the future development of these separation methods are also identified and discussed in this paper

  18. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: detecting multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility and mass spectrometry features in complex datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Kevin L; Slysz, Gordon W; Baker, Erin S; LaMarche, Brian L; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    The addition of ion mobility spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments requires new, or updated, software tools to facilitate data processing. We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is available as a command-line tool for download at http://omics.pnl.gov/software/LC-IMS-MS_Feature_Finder.php. The Microsoft.NET Framework 4.0 is required to run the software. All other dependencies are included with the software package. Usage of this software is limited to non-profit research to use (see README). rds@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Rate-dependent performance of ion chambers for particle-ID at the GSI fragment separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, Jan-Paul; Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, Roman; Maurus, Steffen [Physik Department, TU Muenchen (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the GSI Fragment Separator (FRS), multi-sampling ion chambers (MUSIC) employing a Frisch grid are used for charge identification of secondary ion beams. At the FAIR Super-FRS, higher rates are expected, and an event-by-event determination of the charge of secondary ions will be needed at rates of several 100000 events per second. The comparison of results from test measurements for the MUSIC performance with that of a recently constructed tilted-electrode gas ion chamber (TEGIC), which was designed similar to the one discussed, is presented.

  20. Effective Ion Mobility Peak Width as a New Isomeric Descriptor for the Untargeted Analysis of Complex Mixtures Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Paupy, Benoit; Marceau, Sabrina; Riches, Eleanor; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Ion mobility coupled with mass spectrometry was proven to be an efficient way to characterize complex mixtures such as petroleum samples. However, the identification of isomeric species is difficult owing to the molecular complexity of petroleum and no availability of standard molecules. This paper proposes a new simple indicator to estimate the isomeric content of highly complex mixtures. This indicator is based on the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the extracted ion mobility peak measured in millisecond or square angstrom that is corrected for instrumental factors such as ion diffusion. This value can be easily obtained without precisely identifying the number of isomeric species under the ion mobility peaks. Considering the Boduszynski model, the ion mobility profile for a particular elemental composition is expected to be a continuum of various isomeric species. The drift time-dependent fragmentation profile was studied and confirmed this hypothesis, a continuous evolution of the fragmentation profile showing that the larger alkyl chain species were detected at higher drift time values. This new indicator was proven to be a fast and efficient method to compare vacuum gas oils for which no difference was found using other analytical techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-02-18

    aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol particle size distribution measurements on January 17 and February 18, 2005 at Maitri, Antarctica – A case study. Devendraa Siingh Vimlesh Pant A K Kamra. Volume 120 Issue 4 August ...

  2. Separation of rare-earth (RE) ions by flotation with the aid of citric acid and hexadecylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sazonova, V.F.; Pavlenko, S.N.; Karpenko, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop further the flotation method for separating RE ions, namely, to examine the possibility of separating Re ions by converting them into citrate complexes and subsequently binding them with the aid of hexadecylamine in difficultly soluble and easily floatable compounds, sublates. Thus, these investigations showed that it is possible in principle to separate RE ions by conversion into citrate complexes followed by flotation separation of the latter from solutions with the aid of hexadecylamine

  3. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  4. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  5. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of optimized mobile phases for protein separation by high performance thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Julia; Morschheuser, Lena; Riedner, Maria; Rohn, Sascha

    2015-10-09

    In recent years, protein chemistry tends inexorably toward the analysis of more complex proteins, proteoforms, and posttranslational protein modifications. Although mass spectrometry developed quite fast correspondingly, sample preparation and separation of these analytes is still a major issue and quite challenging. For many years, electrophoresis seemed to be the method of choice; nonetheless its variance is limited to parameters such as size and charge. When taking a look at traditional (thin-layer) chromatography, further parameters such as polarity and different mobile and stationary phases can be utilized. Further, possibilities of detection are manifold compared to electrophoresis. Similarly, two-dimensional separation can be also performed with thin-layer chromatography (TLC). As the revival of TLC developed enormously in the last decade, it seems to be also an alternative to use high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) for the separation of proteins. The aim of this study was to establish an HPTLC separation system that allows a separation of protein mixtures over a broad polarity range, or if necessary allowing to modify the separation with only few steps to improve the separation for a specific scope. Several layers and solvent systems have been evaluated to reach a fully utilized and optimized separation system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Separation of Lead with a Novel Ion Separating Agent Prepared by Clothing a Chitin Whisker on a Potassium Tetratitanate Whisker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Separation of Pb2+ from Cu2+-Pb2+ mixed solution by a newly-developed ion separating agent was examined, which was obtained by clothing chitin whiskers (ChW on the surface of potassium tetratitanate whiskers (PTW. The separation capability and mechanism of the ion separating agent (ChW-PTW was determined, based on the difference of the adsorption isotherm pattern and the adsorption kinetics model between ChW and PTW on Cu2+ and Pb2+, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption process of ChW could be described by Freundlish isotherm. The adsorption affinity of Cu2+ (kF = 0.085·g−1 on ChW was greater than Pb2+ (kF = 0.077 g−1. The adsorption pattern of PTW was inclined to the Langmuir isotherm, and Pb2+ (kL = 310.59 L·mmol−1 could be obviously more easily adsorbed on PTW than Cu2+ (kL = 25.85 L·mmol−1. The experimental data both fitted well with the pseudo-second order kinetics. The reaction rate of Pb2+ (k2 = 4.442 for ChW and k2 = 0.846 for PTW was greater than that of Cu2+ on both ChW and PTW, while the diffusion rate of intra-particles of PTW was much higher than ChW. The adsorption model of ChW and PTW could illustrate well the separation mechanism of ChW-PTW and allowed for relevant results.

  8. Shutdown-functionalized nonwoven separator with improved thermal and electrochemical properties for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngkwon; Lee, Won-Yeol; Kim, Ki Jae; Yu, Ji-Sang; Kim, Young-Jun

    2016-02-01

    A shutdown-functionalized nonwoven separator (SFNS) with improved thermal and electrochemical stabilities is prepared by a simple dip coating method for use in lithium-ion battery (LiB) applications. The SFNS shows thermal stability at 200 °C, while providing shutdown functionality at approximately 140 °C, similar to commercial porous polyethylene separators. The surface-coated polymer prevents leakage current problems and in addition, shows air permeability values similar to that of bare nonwoven separators, while maintaining a thickness of about 20 μm, which is a desired attribute of effective separators for LiBs. The SFNS also shows increased electrolyte uptake and higher conductivity, compared to a bare polyethylene separator. Therefore, a cell with the SFNS exhibits higher discharge capacity and better cycle property than that with a porous polyethylene separator. These results suggest that SFNS is an effective separator for high-performance LiBs.

  9. Isotopic separation through ion cyclotron-resonance: results from the ERIC experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compant la Fontaine, A.; Louvet, P.

    1994-01-01

    Stable isotope separation by the means of ion cyclotron-resonance is studied at CEA since 1981. Results from the ERIC experiments are of two types: parameter measurements which help characterizing the plasma and optimizing the process, and isotopic separation results. For example, the selective feature of isotope heating was verified in the cases of zinc and calcium using an electrostatic analyzer. The separation factors of various elements (calcium, zinc, barium, chromium...) are depending on the mass relative difference of the isotopes to be separated, difference which must be large compared to the magnetic field inhomogeneities and the Doppler broadening. 2 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  10. High-resolution peptide mapping separations with MS-friendly mobile phases and charge-surface-modified C18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Matthew A; Koza, Stephan M; McCall, Scott A; Alden, Bonnie A; Iraneta, Pamela C; Fountain, Kenneth J

    2013-07-16

    Ionic analytes, such as peptides, can be challenging to separate by reverse-phase chromatography with optimal efficiency. They tend, for instance, to exhibit poor peak shapes, particularly when eluted with mobile phases preferred for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that a novel charged-surface C18 stationary phase alleviates some of the challenges associated with reverse-phase peptide separations. This column chemistry, known as CSH (charged-surface hybrid) C18, improves upon an already robust organosilica hybrid stationary phase, BEH (ethylene-bridged hybrid) C18. Based on separations of a nine-peptide standard, CSH C18 was found to exhibit improved loadability, greater peak capacities, and unique selectivity compared to BEH C18. Its performance was also seen to be significantly less dependent on TFA-ion pairing, making it ideal for MS applications where high sensitivity is desired. These performance advantages were evaluated through application to peptide mapping, wherein CSH C18 was found to aid the development of a high-resolution, high-sensitivity LC-UV-MS peptide mapping method for the therapeutic antibody, trastuzumab. From these results, the use of a C18 stationary phase with a charged surface, such as CSH C18, holds significant promise for facilitating challenging peptide analyses.

  11. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte. Methods and experimental organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new variant of technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the method reproducibility was checked

  12. The momentum-loss achromat - a new method for the isotopical separation of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.H.; Geissel, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Dufour, J.P.; Hanelt, E.

    1987-03-01

    The application of the slowing-down process of relativistic heavy ions in a layer of matter in ion-optical devices is theoretically investigated. The modifications of the phase space of the ion beam due to the dissipative forces and the straggling phenomena are discussed. Methods are developed to study the properties of the momentum-loss achromat, an isotope separator consisting of an achromatic magnetic system with an energy degrader located in the intermediate dispersive focal plane. This device separates projectile fragments with respect to A and Z up to uranium over a wide energy range with an efficiency in the order of 50% and with separation times of several hundred nanoseconds. (orig.)

  13. Practical Limitations of Aerosol Separation by a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Radney, James G.; Zangmeister, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectrometer and condensation particle counter were used to investigate the limitations in the separation of singly and multiply charged aerosol particles by a tandem differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). The impact of particle polydispersity and morphology was investigated using three materials: nearly-monodisperse polystyrene latex nanospheres (PSL); polydisperse, nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate (AS) and polydisperse lacey fracta...

  14. Preparation and characterization of a Lithium-ion battery separator from cellulose nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfeng Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing the desired properties for stretch monolayer separators used in Lithium-ion batteries has been a challenge. In the present study a cellulose nanofiber/PET nonwoven composite separator is successfully fabricated, using a wet-laid nonwoven (papermaking process, which can attain optimal properties in wettability, mechanical strength, thermal resistance, and electrochemical performance simultaneously. The PET nonwoven material, which is fabricated from ultrafine PET fibers by a wet-laid process, is a mechanical support layer. The porous structure of the composite separator was created by cellulose nanofibers coating the PET in a papermaking process. Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs, which are an eco-friendly sustainable resource, have been drawing considerable attention due to their astounding properties, such as: incredible specific surface area, thermal and chemical stability, high mechanical strength and hydrophilicity. The results show that the CNF separator exhibits higher porosity (70% than a PP (polypropylene separator (40%. The CNF separator can also be wetted by electrolyte in a few seconds while a PP separator cannot be entirely wetted after 1 min. The CNF separator has an electrolyte uptake of 250%, while a PP separator has only 65%. Another notable finding is that the CNF separator has almost no shrinkage when exposed to 180 °C for 1 h, whereas a PP separator shrinks by more than 50%. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC shows that the CNF separator has a higher melting point than a PP separator. These findings all indicate that the CNF 29 separator will be more favorable than stretch film for use in Lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Preparation and characterization of a Lithium-ion battery separator from cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfeng; Wang, Xiwen; Liang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the desired properties for stretch monolayer separators used in Lithium-ion batteries has been a challenge. In the present study a cellulose nanofiber/PET nonwoven composite separator is successfully fabricated, using a wet-laid nonwoven (papermaking) process, which can attain optimal properties in wettability, mechanical strength, thermal resistance, and electrochemical performance simultaneously. The PET nonwoven material, which is fabricated from ultrafine PET fibers by a wet-laid process, is a mechanical support layer. The porous structure of the composite separator was created by cellulose nanofibers coating the PET in a papermaking process. Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs), which are an eco-friendly sustainable resource, have been drawing considerable attention due to their astounding properties, such as: incredible specific surface area, thermal and chemical stability, high mechanical strength and hydrophilicity. The results show that the CNF separator exhibits higher porosity (70%) than a PP (polypropylene) separator (40%). The CNF separator can also be wetted by electrolyte in a few seconds while a PP separator cannot be entirely wetted after 1 min. The CNF separator has an electrolyte uptake of 250%, while a PP separator has only 65%. Another notable finding is that the CNF separator has almost no shrinkage when exposed to 180 °C for 1 h, whereas a PP separator shrinks by more than 50%. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) shows that the CNF separator has a higher melting point than a PP separator. These findings all indicate that the CNF 29 separator will be more favorable than stretch film for use in Lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Separation of Ni and Co by D2EHPA in the Presence of Citrate Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Hamed; Haghshenas Fatmehsari, Davoud; Firoozi, Sadegh

    2017-10-01

    Recycling processes for the recovery of metallic content from the electronic wastes are environmentally friendly and economical. This paper reports a method for the recovery and separation of Ni and Co from the sulfate solution by the use of D2EHPA. In this regard, the influence of citrate ion, as a carboxylate ligand, was examined in the separation conditions of Ni and Co via D2EHPA (a poor selective extractant for Ni and Co separation). It was found that the Δ {pH}_{0.5}^{Ni-Co} (the difference between pH values corresponding to 50 pct extraction of metallic ion) increases to 1.5 at the citrate concentration of 0.05 M; this Δ {pH}_{0.5}^{Ni-Co} value is much higher than that obtained in the absence of citrate ion (0.1). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) indicated that the citrate ion is co-absorbed during the metallic ions absorption by D2EHPA meaning that the metal-organic complexes contain Co/Ni and citrate ion. Also, the stoichiometric coefficients of the Ni and Co extraction reaction were proposed by applying the slope analysis method.

  17. Mass Spectrum Analysis of CO2 and N2 Using Ion Beam Separator System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjipto-Sujitno, BA; Darsono; Agus-Santoso

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to study investigate the massspectrum profile of CO 2 and N 2 emitted from Penning ion source using ionbeam separator. Besides that, it is also identified the compositions of CO 2 and N 2 ion gas and their abundances through their mass spectrum profile,because as we know that these ions are consist of ion of atom or molecule aswell as the their abundances. To get these profiles, the ion beam acceleratedin accelerating tube are passed through magnet separator. After passing themagnet separator, the ion current beam was detected using microampere meter.By scanning the strength of magnetic field, it will be found the currentspectrum profile as a function of magnetic field. From this current spectrum,we can make a mass spectrum profile. From experiment done, it was found thatthe mass spectrum peak of CO 2 and N 2 were C + with m/z = (12.00 ± 0.10)amu, O 2 + = (31.96 ± 0.29) amu, CO 2 + = (43.93 ± 0.31) amu, N + (13.97 ± 0.33) amu, and N 2 + = (28.05 ± 0.18) amu. (author)

  18. Tandem differential mobility spectrometry with ion dissociation in air at ambient pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menlyadiev, M R; Tarassov, A; Kielnecker, A M; Eiceman, G A

    2015-05-07

    Proton-bound dimers were dissociated to protonated monomers in air at ambient pressure and temperature using electric fields of ultrahigh Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ultraFAIMS) with the onset of dissociation for ethyl acetate as 96 Td and for dimethyl methyl phosphonate as 170 Td. Ions then were measured by differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Fragment ions were formed with propyl acetate at electric fields of 90 Td or greater. The dissociation in ultraFAIMS of ions, with compensation fields near zero, to form smaller ions with new compensation fields, provided a method to improve peak capacity in DMS without gas modifiers. These findings also lay the foundation for a triple stage DMS with a centre stage for ion dissociation or fragmentation.

  19. Atmospheric solid analysis probe-ion mobility mass spectrometry of polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrère, Caroline; Maire, Florian; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2012-11-06

    Polyolefin, including polypropylene (PP), constitutes an important class of materials. In particular, the recent interest in recycling plastic wastes necessitates their characterization as well as their degradation mechanism being understood. PP materials characterization by mass spectrometry, including polymer and additives parts, is not direct and generally involves a pyrolysis step to produce ionizable species. In this study, we extended the use of atmospheric solid analysis probe (ASAP) in combination with traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIM-MS) for the characterization of PP materials, including polymer as well as additives. Different commercial PP samples, from polymer standard to plastic item, were studied. The use of ASAP allow analysis to be done without any sample preparation, while TWIM-MS permitted a clear separation of polymer ions and additive signals. Several series of polymer pyrolysis residues, similar to those produced by classic pyrolysis, were obtained. Moreover, additive characterization has been done and supported by accurate mass measurements and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Finally, this strategy put in evidence the role of additives in polymer degradation.

  20. Automated ion-exchange system for the radiochemical separation of the noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-exchange separation is particularly suitable for mechanisation and automated ion exchange has been applied to the activation analysis of biological and environmental samples. In this work a system has been designed for experimental studies, which can be adapted for different modes of operation. The equipment is based on a large-volume sampler for the automatic presentation of 500 ml of liquid to a sampling probe. The sample is delivered to the ion-exchange column by means of a peristaltic pump. The purpose of this work was to automate a procedure for separating the noble metals from irradiated geological samples, for neutron-activation analysis. The process of digesting the rock sample is carried out manually in 30 min and is not suited to unattended operation. The volume of the resulting liquid sample may be 100 ml and so the manual separation step may take as long as 1.25 h per sample. The reason for automating this part of the procedure is to reduce the separation time for a group of five samples and consequently to improve the sensitivity of the analysis for radionuclides with short half-lives. This paper describes the automatic ion-exchange system and the ways in which it can be used. The mode of operation for the separation of the noble metals is given in detail. The reproducibility of the system has been assessed by repeated measurements on a standard reference matte. (author)

  1. Chromatographic separations on pyridinium tungstoarsenate-impregnated ion-exchange papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange papers were prepared by impregnating chromatographic Whatman No.3 paper with pyridinium tungstoarsenate exchanger. The composition of the material loaded on the paper shows that the compound has the formula (C 5 H 5 NH) 3 W 12 AsO 40 . Rsub(f) values of 30 metal ions were determined on these ion-exchange papers by developing with ascending technique in solvents containing mixtures of n-propanol and hydrochloric or nitric acid. Several binary, ternary and some quaternary separations were also achieved on these papers. Studies were also made on plain papers for comparison. (author)

  2. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  3. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  4. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-05-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers’ claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: • The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. • The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs’ departments (9%). • IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. • Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. • Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall

  5. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-01-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: (1) The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. (2) The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs departments (9%). (3) IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. (4) Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. (5) Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall operation

  6. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Plasma isotope separation based on ion cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgolenko, Dmitrii A.; Muromkin, Yurii A.

    2009-04-01

    Experiments that have been conducted in the USA, France, and Russia to investigate isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) as a tool for plasma isotope separation are analyzed. Because this method runs into difficulties at low values of the relative isotope mass difference ΔM/M, for some elements (for gadolinium, as an example) isotope separation still remains a problem. There are ways to solve it, however, as experimental results and theoretical calculations suggest.

  7. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer detection using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Handa

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for lung cancer detection including computed tomography (CT and bronchoscopy are expensive and invasive. Thus, there is still a need for an optimal lung cancer detection technique.The exhaled breath of 50 patients with lung cancer histologically proven by bronchoscopic biopsy samples (32 adenocarcinomas, 10 squamous cell carcinomas, 8 small cell carcinomas, were analyzed using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and compared with 39 healthy volunteers. As a secondary assessment, we compared adenocarcinoma patients with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation.A decision tree algorithm could separate patients with lung cancer including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. One hundred-fifteen separated volatile organic compound (VOC peaks were analyzed. Peak-2 noted as n-Dodecane using the IMS database was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 70.0% and a specificity of 89.7%. Incorporating a decision tree algorithm starting with n-Dodecane, a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% was achieved. Comparing VOC peaks between adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects, n-Dodecane was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 89.7%. Fourteen patients positive for EGFR mutation displayed a significantly higher n-Dodecane than for the 14 patients negative for EGFR (p<0.01, with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 78.6%.In this prospective study, VOC peak patterns using a decision tree algorithm were useful in the detection of lung cancer. Moreover, n-Dodecane analysis from adenocarcinoma patients might be useful to discriminate the EGFR mutation.

  8. An electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometer as detector for high- performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Martin; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Zenichowski, Karl; Diener, Marc; Linscheid, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The application of electrospray ionization (ESI) ion mobility (IM) spectrometry on the detection end of a high-performance liquid chromatograph has been a subject of study for some time. So far, this method has been limited to low flow rates or has required splitting of the liquid flow. This work presents a novel concept of an ESI source facilitating the stable operation of the spectrometer at flow rates between 10 μL mn(-1) and 1500 μL min(-1) without flow splitting, advancing the T-cylinder design developed by Kurnin and co-workers. Flow rates eight times faster than previously reported were achieved because of a more efficient dispersion of the liquid at increased electrospray voltages combined with nebulization by a sheath gas. Imaging revealed the spray operation to be in a rotationally symmetric multijet mode. The novel ESI-IM spectrometer tolerates high water contents (≤90%) and electrolyte concentrations up to 10mM, meeting another condition required of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detectors. Limits of detection of 50 nM for promazine in the positive mode and 1 μM for 1,3-dinitrobenzene in the negative mode were established. Three mixtures of reduced complexity (five surfactants, four neuroleptics, and two isomers) were separated in the millisecond regime in stand-alone operation of the spectrometer. Separations of two more complex mixtures (five neuroleptics and 13 pesticides) demonstrate the application of the spectrometer as an HPLC detector. The examples illustrate the advantages of the spectrometer over the established diode array detector, in terms of additional IM separation of substances not fully separated in the retention time domain as well as identification of substances based on their characteristic Ims.

  9. Polymethylmethacrylate/Polyacrylonitrile Membranes via Centrifugal Spinning as Separator in Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yanilmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofiber membranes have been extensively studied as separators in Li-ion batteries due to their large porosity, unique pore structure, and high electrolyte uptake. However, the electrospinning process has some serious drawbacks, such as low spinning rate and high production cost. The centrifugal spinning technique can be used as a fast, cost-effective and safe technique to fabricate high-performance fiber-based separators. In this work, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA/polyacrylonitrile (PAN membranes with different blend ratios were produced via centrifugal spinning and characterized by using different electrochemical techniques for use as separators in Li-ion batteries. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membrane, centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membranes had larger ionic conductivity, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. Centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membrane separators were assembled into Li/LiFePO4 cells and these cells delivered high capacities and exhibited good cycling performance at room temperature. In addition, cells using centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membrane separators showed superior C-rate performance compared to those using microporous polypropylene (PP membranes. It is, therefore, demonstrated that centrifugally-spun PMMA/PAN membranes are promising separator candidate for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  10. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile/polyurethane composite nanofibrous separator with electrochemical performance for high power lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainab, Ghazala [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Xianfeng, E-mail: wxf@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Yu, Jianyong [Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Zhai, Yunyun; Ahmed Babar, Aijaz; Xiao, Ke [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Ding, Bin, E-mail: binding@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of High Performance Fibers & Products, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nanofibers Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) for high performance require separators with auspicious reliability and safety. Keeping LIBs reliability and safety in view, microporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/polyurethane (PU) nonwoven composite separator have been developed by electrospinning technique. The physical, electrochemical and thermal properties of the PAN/PU separator were characterized. Improved ionic conductivity up to 2.07 S cm{sup −1}, high mechanical strength (10.38 MPa) and good anodic stability up to 5.10 V are key outcomes of resultant membranes. Additionally, high thermal stability displaying only 4% dimensional change after 0.5 h long exposure to 170 °C in an oven, which could be valuable addition towards the safety of LIBs. Comparing to commercialized polypropylene based separators, resulting membranes offered improved internal short-circuit protection function, offering better rate capability and enhanced capacity retention under same observation conditions. These fascinating characteristics endow these renewable composite nonwovens as promising separators for high power LIBs battery. - Highlights: • The PAN/PU based separators were prepared by multi-needle electrospinning technique. • The electrospun separators displays good mechanical properties and thermal stability. • These separators exhibit good wettability with liquid electrolyte, high ion conductivity and internal short-circuit protection. • Nanofibrous composite nonwoven possesses stable cyclic performance which give rise to acceptable battery performances.

  11. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile/polyurethane composite nanofibrous separator with electrochemical performance for high power lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainab, Ghazala; Wang, Xianfeng; Yu, Jianyong; Zhai, Yunyun; Ahmed Babar, Aijaz; Xiao, Ke; Ding, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) for high performance require separators with auspicious reliability and safety. Keeping LIBs reliability and safety in view, microporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/polyurethane (PU) nonwoven composite separator have been developed by electrospinning technique. The physical, electrochemical and thermal properties of the PAN/PU separator were characterized. Improved ionic conductivity up to 2.07 S cm −1 , high mechanical strength (10.38 MPa) and good anodic stability up to 5.10 V are key outcomes of resultant membranes. Additionally, high thermal stability displaying only 4% dimensional change after 0.5 h long exposure to 170 °C in an oven, which could be valuable addition towards the safety of LIBs. Comparing to commercialized polypropylene based separators, resulting membranes offered improved internal short-circuit protection function, offering better rate capability and enhanced capacity retention under same observation conditions. These fascinating characteristics endow these renewable composite nonwovens as promising separators for high power LIBs battery. - Highlights: • The PAN/PU based separators were prepared by multi-needle electrospinning technique. • The electrospun separators displays good mechanical properties and thermal stability. • These separators exhibit good wettability with liquid electrolyte, high ion conductivity and internal short-circuit protection. • Nanofibrous composite nonwoven possesses stable cyclic performance which give rise to acceptable battery performances.

  12. Silver-Ion Solid Phase Extraction Separation of Classical, Aromatic, Oxidized, and Heteroatomic Naphthenic Acids from Oil Sands Process-Affected Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongfu; Chen, Yuan; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-06-21

    The separation of classical, aromatic, oxidized, and heteroatomic (sulfur-containing) naphthenic acid (NA) species from unprocessed and ozone-treated oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) was performed using silver-ion (Ag-ion) solid phase extraction (SPE) without the requirement of pre-methylation for NAs. OSPW samples before SPE and SPE fractions were characterized using ultra performance liquid chromatography ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-IM-TOFMS) to corroborate the separation of distinct NA species. The mass spectrum identification applied a mass tolerance of ±1.5 mDa due to the mass errors of NAs were measured within this range, allowing the identification of O2S-NAs from O2-NAs. Moreover, separated NA species facilitated the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) characterization of NA compounds due to the removal of matrix and a simplified composition. MS/MS results showed that classical, aromatic, oxidized, and sulfur-containing NA compounds were eluted into individual SPE fractions. Overall results indicated that the separation of NA species using Ag-ion SPE is a valuable method for extracting individual NA species that are of great interest for environmental toxicology and wastewater treatment research, to conduct species-specific studies. Furthermore, the separated NA species on the milligram level could be widely used as the standard materials for environmental monitoring of NAs from various contamination sites.

  13. Quantitative detection of benzene in toluene- and xylene-rich atmospheres using high-kinetic-energy ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langejuergen, Jens; Allers, Maria; Oermann, Jens; Kirk, Ansgar; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2014-12-02

    One major drawback of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the dependence of the response to a certain analyte on the concentration of water or the presence of other compounds in the sample gas. Especially for low proton affine analytes, e.g., benzene, which often exists in mixtures with other volatile organic compounds, such as toluene and xylene (BTX), a time-consuming preseparation is necessary. In this work, we investigate BTX mixtures using a compact IMS operated at decreased pressure (20 mbar) and high kinetic ion energies (HiKE-IMS). The reduced electric field in both the reaction tube and the drift tube can be independently increased up to 120 Td. Under these conditions, the water cluster distribution of reactant ions is shifted toward smaller clusters independent of the water content in the sample gas. Thus, benzene can be ionized via proton transfer from H3O(+) reactant ions. Also, a formation of benzene ions via charge transfer from NO(+) is possible. Furthermore, the time for interaction between ions and neutrals of different analytes is limited to such an extent that a simultaneous quantification of benzene, toluene, and xylene is possible from low ppbv up to several ppmv concentrations. The mobility resolution of the presented HiKE-IMS varies from R = 65 at high field (90 Td) to R = 73 at lower field (40 Td) in the drift tube, which is sufficient to separate the analyzed compounds. The detection limit for benzene is 29 ppbv (2 s of averaging) with 3700 ppmv water, 12.4 ppmv toluene, and 9 ppmv xylene present in the sample gas. Furthermore, a less-moisture-dependent benzene measurement with a detection limit of 32 ppbv with ca. 21 000 ppmv (90% relative humidity (RH) at 20 °C) water present in the sample gas is possible evaluating the signal from benzene ions formed via charge transfer.

  14. Mobility and diffusion of atomic helium and neon ions in their parent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skullerud, H.R.; Larsen, P.-H.

    1990-01-01

    The mobility and the diffusion tensor have been calculated for He + ions in He and Ne + ions in Ne, at temperatures of 77-78 and 294 K, and at field-to-density values E/n 0 up to 2000 Td. For He + ions in He, ab initio potentials were used, with a careful extrapolation to large distances. A slight adjustment of the mean potential resulted in agreement between calculated mobilities and the best experimental values to better than 0.5%. For Ne + ions in Ne, a potential model with three adjustable parameters was constructed, and an overall agreement between measured and calculated mobilities to better than 1% was obtained. The model potentials probably give a good estimate of the gerade-ungerade splitting at internuclear distances from 7.5 to 10 au, but are not expected to be accurate at shorter distances. (author)

  15. Positive ion mobilities in normal liquid 3He at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.W.

    1978-11-01

    The mobility has been measured of positive ions in liquid 3 he in the range 2.5 mK 3 sub(m)/sup(V) 5 sub(m)/sup(V). The effects of 500 p.p.m. 4 He in the 3 He were investigated. It was found that, at low temperatures, several stable ion species could be produced for 3 He pressures of 23 bar and above and, between 25 mK and 60 mK, time dependent conversion from one species of ion to another was observed at all pressures. The creation mechanism, mobility and stability of multiple positive ions were studied. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. The measured drift field dependence of mobility is used to test the quasiparticle scattering model assumed for the liquid. (U.K.)

  16. Comprehensive theoretical analysis and experimental exploration of ultrafast microchip-based high-field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingfeng; Wang, Yonghuan; Chen, Chilai; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui

    2015-06-01

    High-field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has become an efficient technique for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions at ambient pressure, which utilizes the mobility differences of ions at high and low fields. Micro FAIMS devices made by micro-electromechanical system technology have small gaps of the channels, high electric field and good installation precision, as thus they have received great attentions. However, the disadvantage of relatively low resolution limits their applications in some areas. In this study, theoretical analysis and experimental exploration were carried out to overcome the disadvantage. Multiple scans, characteristic decline curves of ion transmission and pattern recognitions were proposed to improve the performance of the microchip-based FAIMS. The results showed that although micro FAIMS instruments as a standalone chemical analyzer suffer from low resolution, by using one or more of the methods proposed, they can identify chemicals precisely and provide quantitative analysis with low detection limit in some applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Online Ozonolysis Combined with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Provides a New Platform for Lipid Isomer Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poad, Berwyck L.; Zheng, Xueyun; Mitchell, Todd A.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2017-12-21

    One of the most significant challenges in contemporary lipidomics lies in the separation and identification of lipid isomers that differ only in site(s) of unsaturation or geometric configuration of the carbon-carbon double bonds. While analytical separation techniques including ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and liquid chromatography (LC) can separate isomeric lipids under appropriate conditions, conventional tandem mass spectrometry cannot provide unequivocal identification. To address this challenge, we have implemented ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) in-line with LC, IMS and high resolution mass spectrometry. Modification of an IMS- capable quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was undertaken to allow the introduction of ozone into the high-pressure trapping ion funnel region preceding the IMS cell. This enabled the novel LC-OzID-IMS-MS configuration where ozonolysis of ionized lipids occurred rapidly (10 ms) without prior mass-selection. LC-elution time alignment combined with accurate mass and arrival time extraction of ozonolysis products facilitated correlation of precursor and product ions without mass-selection (and associated reductions in duty cycle). Unsaturated lipids across 11 classes were examined using this workflow in both positive and negative ion modalities and in all cases the positions of carbon-carbon double bonds were unequivocally assigned based on predictable OzID transitions. Under these conditions geometric isomers exhibited different IMS arrival time distributions and distinct OzID product ion ratios providing a means for discrimination of cis/trans double bonds in complex lipids. The combination of OzID with multidimensional separations shows significant promise for facile profiling of unsaturation patterns within complex lipidomes.

  18. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  19. Synthesis of Anomeric Methyl Fructofuranosides and Their Separation on an Ion-Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Erkki; Poijarvi, Paivi; Koskua, Katja; Hovinen, Jari

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of d-fructose with methanol in the presence of acid as a catalyst gives a mixture of methyl-[beta]-d-fructopyranoside, methyl-[alpha]-D-fructofuranoside, and methyl-[beta]-d-fructofuranoside, which were separated on an ion exchange column and characterized polarimetrically.

  20. Column Extraction and Separation of Some Metal Ions by Diethylenetriamine Polysiloxane Immobilized Ligand System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizam M. El-Ashgar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An extraction chromatographic solid porous polysiloxane functionalized by chelating diethylenetriamine ligand of the general formula P-(CH23-NH(CH22NH(CH22NH2, (Where P represents [Si-O]n siloxane network has been evaluated for the separation of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II from aqueous solutions. The chromatographic parameters of the separation method have been optimized. The ligand system retained Co(II, Cu(II and Zn(II effectively when used as a metal ion extractant by controlling the pH value. The ligand system also shows a good separation of a mixture of metal ions Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II when used as chromatographic stationary phase. The optimum separation pH values were 4.5, 4 for Co(II and Ni(II respectively, while a solution of 0.1 M HNO3 was used to elute Cu(II. Metal ions were also preconcentrated at pH 5.5. The chemisorbed metal ions were regenerated from the solid extractant using 0.5 M HCl.

  1. Mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms of Li-ion battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnaus, Sergiy; Wang, Yanli; Turner, John A.

    2017-04-01

    Anisotropic mechanical properties were experimentally determined and compared for three types of commercially available Li-ion battery separators: Celgard 2325, Celgard PP2075 dry-processed polymer separators, and DreamWeaver Gold 40 non-woven separator. Significant amount of anisotropy of properties was determined, with the Young's modulus being different by up to a factor of 5 and ultimate strength being different by a factor of 10 between orthogonal directions within a polymer separator layer. Strain rate sensitivity was investigated by applying strain rates ranging from 1 ṡ10-4 s-1 to 0.1 s-1. Significant strengthening was observed and the strain rate strengthening coefficients were determined for both elastic modulus and yield stress in case of polymer separators. Digital image correlation technique was used to measure and map the strains over the specimen's gage section. Significant strain concentration in bands running perpendicular to the tensile axis was observed in polymer separator samples oriented in transverse direction. Such localized necking allows for extremely high strains close to 300% to develop in the material. The failure mode was remarkably different for all three types of separators which adds additional variable in safe design of Li-ion batteries for prevention of internal short circuits.

  2. Formation of ion clusters in the phase separated structures of neutral-charged polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ha-Kyung; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte blends, consisting of at least one charged species, are promising candidate materials for fuel cell membranes, for their mechanical stability and high selectivity for proton conduction. The phase behavior of the blends is important to understand, as this can significantly affect the performance of the device. The phase behavior is controlled by χN, the Flory-Huggins parameter multiplied by the number of mers, as well as the electrostatic interactions between the charged backbone and the counterions. It has recently been shown that local ionic correlations, incorporated via liquid state (LS) theory, enhance phase separation of the blend, even in the absence of polymer interactions. In this study, we show phase diagrams of neutral-charged polymer blends including ionic correlations via LS theory. In addition to enhanced phase separation at low χN, the blends show liquid-liquid phase separation at high electrostatic interaction strengths. Above the critical strength, the charged polymer phase separates into ion-rich and ion-poor regions, resulting in the formation of ion clusters within the charged polymer phase. This can be shown by the appearance of multiple spinodal and critical points, indicating the coexistence of several charge separated phases. This work was performed under the following financial assistance award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD).

  3. Polymer-supported reagents with enhanced metal ion recognition: Application to separations science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandratos, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    The design and development of polymer-supported reagents with ever-increasing specificities for targeted metal ions remains an important areas of research. The need for efficient separation schemes for both ions and molecules has been outlined in a report by the National Research Council (King) and will gain increased emphasis as environmental restoration is pursued. Polymer-supported reagents are unique in their ability to be applied in an environmentally benign manner to a host of challenges. Such reagents, in the form of beads, can be applied to continuous separation processes ranging from the removal of metal ions in water to the recovery of medicinal drugs produced through biotechnological means. The application of polymer-supported reagents to metal ion separations still requires developing a fundamental understanding of ligand-metal interactions, the role of the polymer in those interactions, and the methods of synthesizing such polymeric reagents in a readily applicable form. Ion exchange resins with sulfonic acid ligands are the prototypical polymer-supported reagents, and their properties have been exhaustively studied (Helfferich). The high acidity of the sulfonic acid group, however, precludes much selectivity, and it displays a very limited range of reaction free energy values with different metal ions (Boyd et al.). The carboxylic acid ligand, present in the acrylate resins, is more selective, though its weak acidity requires relatively high pH solutions for it to be effective. Research has thus been focused on the preparation of polymer-supported reagents with high levels of specificity for targeted metal ions

  4. Electrophoretic mobility as a tool to separate immune adjuvant saponins from Quillaja saponaria Molina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Weng, Alexander; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Stöshel, Anja; Nissi, Linda; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Thakur, Mayank

    2015-06-20

    Quillaja saponins are used as adjuvants in animal vaccines but their application in human vaccination is still under investigation. Isolation and characterization of adjuvant saponins is very tedious. Furthermore, standardization of Quillaja saponins is critical pertaining to its application in humans. In this study, a convenient method based on agarose gel electrophoresis was developed for the separation of Quillaja saponins. Six different commercial Quillaja saponins were segregated by size/charge into numerous fractions. Each of the fractions was characterized by ESI-TOF-MS spectroscopy and thin layer chromatography. Real-time impedance-based monitoring and red blood cell lysis assay were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and hemolytic activities respectively. Two specific regions in the agarose gel (delimited by specific relative electrophoretic mobility values) were identified and characterized by exclusive migration of acylated saponins known to possess immune adjuvant properties (0.18-0.58), and cytotoxic and hemolytic saponins (0.18-0.94). In vivo experiments in mice with the isolated fractions for evaluation of adjuvant activity also correlated with the relative electrophoretic mobility. In addition to the separation of specific Quillaja saponins with adjuvant effects as a pre-purification step to HPLC, agarose gel electrophoresis stands out as a new method for rapid screening, separation and quality control of saponins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of intense metallic ion beams in order of isotopic separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrouy, J.L.

    1955-01-01

    We describe an isotope separator with magnetic sector of 60 deg that permits, with a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The sources of realized ions provide ionic debits of 10 mA. This present work deals who to obtain intense ion beams (10 to 15 mA), different processes of ion currents measurement, as well as the study of the phenomenon of space charge neutralization. The second part of this memory will be on the survey and the adaptation on the source of various type of oven permitting to spray and to ionize metals directly. By order of increasing difficulty of vaporization, we reached the chromium. (M.B.) [fr

  6. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented

  7. Optimization of mobile phase for separation of carbohydrates in honey by high performance liquid chromatography using a mixture design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Cristiane B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixture design was used to optimize the mobile phase composition for separation of carbohydrates in honey by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Nine ternary acetronitrile, water and ethyl acetate mobile phases corresponding to a simplex centroid design with axial points were test to separate those carbohydrates most frequently encountered in honey samples. The results suggest that a special cubic model accurately describes changes in the proportions of these solvents in the mobile phase close to the region of optimal peak separation. The addition of a third solvent, ethyl acetate, to binary mobile phase of water and acetonitrile permitted a significant improvement in carbohydrate separation that can be applied to the quantitative analysis of these compounds in honey.

  8. Separation of Fluoride Ions in an Electrolytic Cell by Using an AnionExchange Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathurrachman; Sunardi

    2000-01-01

    Separation of fluoride ions in an electrolytic cell with an anionexchange membrane which is so-called an electrodialysis process has beenperformed. The experiment have been taken place in room temperature in anelectrolytic cell made by plexiglas consisted on anode and cathode chambersseparated by an anion exchange membrane in dimension of 4 x 4 cm. The carbonand stainless steel are applied as an anode and platinum as s' cathode. Theanolyte is a HNO 3 0.3 M solution, while a solution of NaF 0.3 M, and amixture of NaF 0.3 M containing uranyl nitrate solution for separating offluoride ions and uranium are used as a catholyte. The distance between theelectrode and the membrane is 1.5 cm and this distance is kept constant. Theparameters observed are the current voltage, cathode applied, and uraniumconcentration. For the solution without uranium, the results show that thefluoride ions transferred are around 50 % using carbon as a cathode for 3hours and the voltage of 10 volts, while for SS as a cathode are around 93 %.For the solution containing uranium, the fluoride ions transferred are around78 % for 3.5 hours and the uranium ions remain in the catholyte in which mostof them are as 8 yellow deposit of Na 2 U 2 O 7 on the cathode surface andothers are as a white precipitate of NaUF 5 on the bottom of the cathodechamber. (author)

  9. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-01-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. - Highlights: ► Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS) was developed to study electron attachment reaction. ► The rate constants of electron attachment to CCl 4 and CHCl 3 were determined. ► The present experimental results are in good agreement with the previously reported data.

  10. Stabilization of gas-phase uranyl complexes enables rapid speciation using electrospray ionization and ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Austen L; Clowers, Brian H

    2018-01-01

    Significant challenges exist when characterizing f-element complexes in solution using traditional approaches such as electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques as they do not always capture information for lower abundance species. However, provided a metal-complex with sufficient stability, soft ionization techniques such as electrospray offer a means to quantify and probe the characteristics of such systems using mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the gas-phase species observed in ESI-MS systems do not always reflect the solution phase distributions due to the inherent electrochemical mechanism of the electrospray process, ion transfer from ambient to low pressures conditions, and other factors that are related to droplet evaporation. Even for simple systems (e.g. hydrated cations), it is not always clear whether the distribution observed reflects the solution phase populations or whether it is simply a result of the ionization process. This complexity is further compounded in mixed solvent systems and when multiply charged species are present. Despite these challenges, the benefits of mass spectrometry with respect to speed, sensitivity, and the ability to resolve isotopes continue to drive efforts to develop techniques for the speciation of metal complexes. Using an electrospray ionization atmospheric pressure ion mobility mass spectrometer (ESI-apIMS-MS), we demonstrate an approach to stabilize simple uranyl complexes during the ionization process and mobility separation to aid speciation and isotope profile analysis. Specifically, we outline and demonstrate the capacity of ESI-apIMS-MS methods to measure mobilities of different uranyl species, in simple mixtures, by promoting stable gas phase conformations with the addition of sulfoxides (i.e. dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dibutyl sulfoxide (DBSO), and methyl phenyl sulfoxide (MPSO)). Addition of these sulfoxides, as observed in the mass spectrum and mobility domain, produce stable gas-phase conformations that

  11. Physicochemical basis of the ion-exchange separation of gold cyanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, O. N.; Kononov, Yu. S.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism of the separation of gold cyanide complexes is discussed, along with ion exchanger selection, selectivity, elution, and industrial applications. The ion-exchange mechanism for the sorption of gold cyanide complexes is established, and a criterion is suggested for selecting the anion exchanger for their extraction (specifically, the p K a of the anion exchanger). The selectivity of the sorption of gold cyanide complexes by anion exchangers with rarely distributed ionogenic groups is demonstrated. A procedure for the elution of gold cyanide complexes using alkaline solutions is developed.

  12. Separation of halogens from uranium compounds by means of pyrohydrolysis and their determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Brandao Filho, D.; Abrao, A.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describs the determination of fluorine in nuclear grade uranium compounds by means of phyrohydrolysis. A stream of wet oxygem at a temperature of 900 to 1000 0 C is passed through a quartz tube where the powdered samples is put. The halogens are volatilized as their respective acids that are absorbed in a buffer solution or water. The measurements are made with ion-seletive eletrodes or by ion chromatography. The sensitivity is of 1μg F - /g and 5μg Cl - /g. The separation of fluorine from uranium compounds by diferent methods is discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS) and determined to have high affinities

  14. Multiple Gas-Phase Conformations of a Synthetic Linear Poly(acrylamide) Polymer Observed Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haler, Jean R. N.; Far, Johann; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Claereboudt, Jan; Tomczyk, Nick; Giles, Kevin; Jérôme, Christine; De Pauw, Edwin

    2017-08-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has emerged as a powerful separation and identification tool to characterize synthetic polymer mixtures and topologies (linear, cyclic, star-shaped,…). Electrospray coupled to IM-MS already revealed the coexistence of several charge state-dependent conformations for a single charge state of biomolecules with strong intramolecular interactions, even when limited resolving power IM-MS instruments were used. For synthetic polymers, the sample's polydispersity allows the observation of several chain lengths. A unique collision cross-section (CCS) trend is usually observed when increasing the degree of polymerization (DP) at constant charge state, allowing the deciphering of different polymer topologies. In this paper, we report multiple coexisting CCS trends when increasing the DP at constant charge state for linear poly(acrylamide) PAAm in the gas phase. This is similar to observations on peptides and proteins. Biomolecules show in addition population changes when collisionally heating the ions. In the case of synthetic PAAm, fragmentation occurred before reaching the energy for conformation conversion. These observations, which were made on two different IM-MS instruments (SYNAPT G2 HDMS and high resolution multi-pass cyclic T-Wave prototype from Waters), limit the use of ion mobility for synthetic polymer topology interpretations to polymers where unique CCS values are observed for each DP at constant charge state. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. [Photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS) for the isomeric volatile organic compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Niu, Wen-qi; Wang, Hong-mei; Huang, Chao-qun; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2012-01-01

    The construction and performance study is reported for a newly developed ultraviolet photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS). In the present paper, an UV-IMS technique was firstly developed to detect eleven isomeric volatile organic compounds including the differences in the structure of carbon chain, the style of function group and the position of function group. Their reduced mobility values were determined and increased in this order: linears alcohols homemade UV-IMS was around ppb-ppm.

  16. Electrospun polyimide nanofiber-based nonwoven separators for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yue-E.; Zhu, Guan-Nan; Hou, Haoqing; Xia, Yong-Yao; Liu, Tianxi

    2013-03-01

    Polyimide (PI) nanofiber-based nonwovens have been fabricated via electrospinning for the separators of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and hot oven tests show that the PI nanofiber-based nonwovens are thermally stable at a high temperature of 500 °C while the commercial Celgard membrane exhibits great shrinkage at 150 °C and even goes melting over 167 °C, indicating a superior thermal stability of PI nanofiber-based nonwovens than that of the Celgard membrane. Moreover, the PI nanofiber-based nonwovens exhibit better wettability for the polar electrolyte compared to the Celgard membrane. The PI nanofiber-based nonwoven separators are also evaluated to have higher capacity, lower resistance and higher rate capability compared to the Celgard membrane separator, which proves that they are ideal candidates for separators of high-performance rechargeable LIBs.

  17. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  18. Mobility and lifetime of sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, A J

    2003-01-01

    Positively charged sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions are transported through liquid xenon using electric fields in the range of 4-10 kV cm sup - sup 1 and for drift distances up to 50 mm. From these measurements we deduce upper limits on the attenuation length for Tl ions in liquid xenon, resulting in a lifetime >5.5 s. In addition to these results, the field independent mobility of Tl bearing species in liquid xenon was measured to be 1.33+-0.04x10 sup - sup 4 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1. This result, when coupled with those for other species by previous workers, suggests that positive ion mobility in liquid xenon is proportional to the hard-core radius. Applications to Ba ion collection in a double beta decay experiment are also discussed.

  19. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507268

    2017-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  20. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility in irradiated power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupac, D.; Galloway, K.F.; Khosropour, P.; Anderson, S.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    An effective approach to separating the effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility degradation in irradiated MOSFETs is demonstrated. It is based on analyzing mobility data sets which have different functional relationships between the radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge is possible only if these two trapped charge components are not linearly dependent. A significant contribution of oxide-trapped charge to mobility degradation is demonstrated and quantified

  1. Observation of water separated ion-pairs between cations and phospholipid headgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Sietse T; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we present evidence for ion pair formation of cations with a high surface charge density (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) and phosphate groups of phospholipids. We used femto-second infrared pump-probe and dielectric spectroscopy to probe the dynamics of water molecules in solutions of phosphorylethanolamine and different types of cations. We find that sodium and calcium cooperatively retard the dynamics of water in solutions of phosphorylethanolamine, implying the formation of solvent separated ion pairs. This ion-specific interaction is absent for potassium, cesium and ammonium. We compare our results to dielectric spectroscopy experiments, which probes the rotation of all dipolar molecules and ions in solution. The rotation of the dipolar phosphorylethanolamine ion shows that long-lived ion-pairs are only formed with calcium and not with ammonium, cesium, potassium, and sodium. This finding implies that the association between calcium and the phosphate is strong with lifetimes exceeding 200 ps, while the interaction with sodium is relatively short-lived (∼20-100 ps).

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  3. Functional separator consisted of polyimide nonwoven fabrics and polyethylene coating layer for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Shaohua; He, Xinyi; Yang, Pingting; Wu, Dezhi; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a composite membrane with nonwoven polyimide (PI) membrane as structural support and polyethylene (PE) particles coating layer as a thermal shutdown layer, is fabricated as the separator for lithium-ion battery. Different from PI nonwoven membrane, the PE coating PI nonwoven composite membrane (PE-PI-S) not only shows excellent thermal shutdown function, similar to traditional multilayer PP/PE/PP separator, but also exhibits much higher thermal stability, better wettability to the polar electrolyte and lower internal resistance than the PP/PE/PP separator. The electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity of PE-PI-S increase from 58%, 0.84 mS cm-1 to 400%, 1.34 mS cm-1, respectively. Furthermore, the thermal shutdown function of PE-PI-S can be controlled widely in the temperature range from 120 °C to more than 200 °C while the multilayer PP/PE/PP separator only with a shutdown temperature range from 130 °C to 160 °C. Lithium ion battery with PE-PI-S nonwoven separator also shows excellent stable cycling and good rate performance.

  4. Electrospun montmorillonite modified poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanocomposite separators for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Changjiang; Yang, Shuli; Zhao, Xinfei [College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Du, Pingfan, E-mail: dupf@zstu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology (Ministry of Education), Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xiong, Jie, E-mail: jxiong@zstu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology (Ministry of Education), Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Composite separators of PVDF and MMT for lithium-ion batteries were electrospun. • Thermal dimensional stability and tensile property of composite separators get improved. • Presence of montmorillonite promotes electrical properties of PVDF fibrous separators. • Batteries consisting of PVDF/MMT-5% separator achieve the best performance. - Abstract: Composite separators of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with different contents of montmorillonite (MMT) for Li-ion batteries have been fabricated by electrospinning. The morphology, function group, crystallinity, and mechanical properties of membranes were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile test, respectively. Interlayer spacing of MMT in polymer was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the results of electrochemical measurements suggest that PVDF/MMT-5% composite membrane has maximum ionic conductivity of 4.2 mS cm{sup −1}, minimum interfacial resistance of 97 Ω, and excellent electrochemical stability. The cell comprising PVDF/MMT-5% composite membrane shows higher capacity and more stable cycle performance than the one using commercial Celgard PP membrane.

  5. Column Extraction and Separation of Some Metal Ions by Diethylenetriamine Polysiloxane Immobilized Ligand System

    OpenAIRE

    El-Ashgar, Nizam M.

    2008-01-01

    An extraction chromatographic solid porous polysiloxane functionalized by chelating diethylenetriamine ligand of the general formula P-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2NH(CH2)2NH2, (Where P represents [Si-O]n siloxane network) has been evaluated for the separation of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. The chromatographic parameters of the separation method have been optimized. The ligand system retained Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) effectively when used as a metal ion extractant by controlling the...

  6. Swift heavy ion induced modification in polycarbonate membrane for gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra; Vijay, Y.K.; Das, D.

    2003-01-01

    Polymeric membranes are extensively used for commercial gas separation applications. Makrofol-KG (polycarbonate) is a glassy polymer. 40 μm thick sheet of Makrofol-KG was irradiated with 40 Ar (14.9 MeV/n) of fluence 10 3 ions/cm 2 and 20 μm thick sheet with 5.3 MeV α-particles of fluence 10 7 ions/cm 2 . The permeability of these polycarbonate membranes for H 2 and CO 2 was measured and also after etching in 6 N NaOH at 60 degC for different periods. Permeability is found to be increased with etching time. At a definite time, critical etching time, the permeability rapidly increases in PC. Positron annihilation lifetimes for unirradiated and irradiated membranes were measured with fast fast coincidence system to study the correlation of free volume hole concentration with gas separation properties. (author)

  7. A study of an ion-exchange process for separation of strontium and yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarek, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been carried out to determine optimum conditions for the separation of strontium and yttrium by ion-exchange. The parameters of interest for such separation such as the dimensions of the ion-exchange columns, flow rates through the columns and pH values of the solutions, which affect the overall yield in the process, have been investigated. Application of this method for routine quantitative determinations of Sr-90 in environmental samples, particularly the wet-ashed biological materials has also been studied. The method, although a rapid and convenient one has not been found to yield consistent results probably due to the requirement of stringent analytical controls during the process. (author)

  8. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ion-implantation-induced phase separation and crystallization in lithia-silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.; Peercy, P.S.; Doyle, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    Crystallization of annealed Li 2 O.2SiO 2 glasses implanted with inert ions and fused SiO 2 glass implanted with Li ions was monitored using infrared reflection spectroscopy. Elastic recoil detection analysis was used to study changes in the Li and H concentration induced in these glasses by implantation and annealing. Implantation of Li 2 O.2SiO 2 with inert ions results in Li depletion, accompanied by H indiffusion, in the implanted region. For Li-implanted SiO 2 , crystallization of α-quartz is accompanied by appreciable Li diffusion to the surface and attendant H migration to the Li-depleted region. The crystallization mechanisms are discussed in terms of phase separation in the lithia-silica system

  10. Separation of some metal ions using coupled transport supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid membrane extraction processes has become very popular due to their superiority in many ways over other separation techniques. In coupled transport membranes the metal ions can be transported across the membrane against their concentration gradient under the influence of chemical potential difference. Liquid membranes consisting of a carrier-cum-diluent, supported in microporous polymeric hydrophobic films have been studied for transport of metal ions like U(VI), Cr(VI), Be(II), V(V), Ti(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hf(IV), W(VI), and Co(II). The present paper presents basic data with respect to flux and permeabilities of these metal ions across membranes based on experimental results and theoretical equations, using different carriers and diluents and provides a brief reference to possibility of such membranes for large scale applications. (author)

  11. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  12. A Novel Microwave-Induced Plasma Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianxiong; Zhao, Zhongjun; Liang, Gaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a novel microwave induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The MIPI source, called Surfatron, is composed of a copper cavity and a hollow quartz discharge tube. The ion mobility spectrum of synthetics air has a main peak with reduced mobility of 2.14 cm2V-1s-1 for positive ion mode and 2.29 cm2V-1s-1 for negative ion mode. The relative standard deviations (RSD) are 0.7% and 1.2% for positive and negative ion mode, respectively. The total ion current measured was more than 3.5 nA, which is much higher than that of the conventional 63Ni source. This indicates that a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be acquired from the MIPI source. The SNR was 110 in the analysis of 500 pptv methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), resulting in the limit of detection (SNR = 3) of 14 pptv. The linear range covers close to 2.5 orders of magnitude in the detection of triethylamine with a concentration range from 500 pptv to 80 ppbv. Finally, this new MIPI-IMS was used to detect some volatile organic compounds, which demonstrated that the MIPI-IMS has great potential in monitoring pollutants in air.

  13. Ion chromatographic separation for analysis of radiostrontium in nuclear reprocessing solutions of high ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J.D.; Nordmeyer, F.R.; Drake, P.A.; Elder, M.P.; Miles, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    An ion chromatography (IC)-based method was developed for Sr 2+ concentration and separation showing high recoveries of strontium. This procedure permits complete automation. One of the potential weaknesses of the IC approach to sample preconcentration, i.e. sensitivity to solutions of high acid content, common in nuclear reprocessing solution, has been overcome by a novel application of acid suppression technology. (author) 12 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) by Triton X-100 Cerium (Iv) Phosphate as a Surface Active Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Ismail Aydia, M.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new and simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection has been developed for the determination of both Cr (III) and Cr (VI) ions. Chromium species were determined by HPLC using a stationary phase consisting of a reversed phase column (Nucleosil phenyl column; 250 mm x 4.6 mm,5 μm), and a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol: water(70 : 30 v/v), in which the complexing agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) was dissolved. The UV detection was carried out at wavelength 650 nm. Separation of Cr (III) from Cr (VI) on Triton X-100 cerium(IV) phosphate(TX-100 CeP) as a surface active ion exchanger was investigated. TX-100 CeP has been synthesized, characterized using IR, X-Ray, TGA/DTA and elemental analysis. The ion exchange capacity and chemical stability in different HCl concentration have been studied

  15. Strain distribution and failure mode of polymer separators for Li-ion batteries under biaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnaus, Sergiy; Kumar, Abhishek; Wang, Yanli; Li, Jianlin; Simunovic, Srdjan; Turner, John A.; Gorney, Phillip

    2018-02-01

    Deformation of polymer separators for Li-ion batteries has been studied under biaxial tension by using a dome test setup. This deformation mode provides characterization of separator strength under more complex loading conditions, closer representing deformation of an electric vehicle battery during crash event, compared to uniaxial tension or compression. Two polymer separators, Celgard 2325 and Celgard 2075 were investigated by deformation with spheres of three different diameters. Strains in separators were measured in situ by using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. The results show consistent rupture of separators along the machine direction coinciding with areas of high strain accumulation. The critical first principal strain for failure was independent of the sphere diameter and was determined to be approximately 34% and 43% for Celgard 2325 and Celgard 2075 respectively. These values can be taken as a criterion for internal short circuit in a battery following an out-of-plane impact. A Finite Element (FE) model was built with the anisotropic description of separator behavior, derived from tensile tests in orthogonal directions. The results of simulations predicted the response of separator rather well when compared to experimental results for various sizes of rigid sphere.

  16. First laser ions at an off-line mass separator of the ISAC facility at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Rauth, C; Horn, R; Lassen, J; Bricault, P; Wendt, K; 10.1016/j.nimb.2003.08.029

    2004-01-01

    For efficient and in particular for selective production of radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities the technique of resonance ionization laser ion sources (RILlS) has become the most powerful tool. In facilities like ISOLDE at CERN they nowadays represent the most commonly used type of ion source for rare short-lived isotopes, delivering highest suppression of isobaric contaminations. For a first off-line demonstration preparing the development and installation of such a laser ion source at the new ISAC facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver (Canada), an all solid state laser system developed at the University of Mainz (Germany), was transferred and tested there at an off-line test separator. The laser system consists of three tunable titanium:sapphire lasers with a repetition rate of 12 kHz, pulse length of ~30 ns, up to 2.5 W output power in the infrared to red spectral region and features additional frequency doubling units. With this system first RILIS studies were performed in a number of el...

  17. Application of retention modelling to the simulation of separation of organic anions in suppressed ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Philip; Dicinoski, Greg W; Ng, Boon Khing; Shellie, Robert A; Hanna-Brown, Melissa; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-09-18

    The ion-exchange separation of organic anions of varying molecular mass has been demonstrated using ion chromatography with isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent profiles on commercially available columns with UV detection. A retention model derived previously for inorganic ions and based solely on electrostatic interactions between the analytes and the stationary phase was applied. This model was found to accurately describe the observed elution of all the anions under isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent conditions. Hydrophobic interactions, although likely to be present to varying degrees, did not limit the applicability of the ion-exchange retention model. Various instrumental configurations were investigated to overcome problems associated with the use of organic modifiers in the eluent which caused compatibility issues with the electrolytically derived, and subsequently suppressed, eluent. The preferred configuration allowed the organic modifier stream to bypass the eluent generator, followed by subsequent mixing before entering the injection valve and column. Accurate elution prediction was achieved even when using 5-step eluent profiles with errors in retention time generally being less than 1% relative standard deviation (RSD) and all being less than 5% RSD. Peak widths for linear gradient separations were also modelled and showed good agreement with experimentally determined values.

  18. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pepin, R.; Laszlo, K. J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, B.; Bush, M. F.; Lavanant, H.; Afonso, C.; Tureček, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2016), s. 1647-1660 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : peptide ions * ion mobility * collisional cross sections * density functional theory calculations * ion structures * polar effects Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.786, year: 2016

  19. Distinguishing d - and l -aspartic and isoaspartic acids in amyloid β peptides with ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Deng, Liulin; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was utilized to separate Aβ peptide variants containing isomeric asparic and isoaspartic acid residues with either al- ord-form. The abundance of each variant is of great interest in Alzheimer's disease studies and also to evaluate how often these modifications are occurring in other environmental and biological samples.

  20. Superior lithium adsorption and required magnetic separation behavior of iron-doped lithium ion-sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulei; Zheng, Shili; Wang, Zheming; Cui, Wenwen; Zhang, Hailin; Yang, Liangrong; Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping

    2018-01-01

    The recent research on adsorption-based lithium recovery from lithium-containing solutions has been centred on adsorption capacity and separation of lithium ion-sieves powder from solutions. Herein, an effective iron-doped lithium titanium oxide (Fe-doped Li2TiO3) was synthesized by Fe-doping via solid state reactions followed by acid treatment to form iron-doped lithium ion-sieves (Fe/Ti-x(H)). The resulting solid powder displays both superior adsorption capacity of lithium and high separation efficiency of the adsorbent from the solutions. SEM imaging and BET surface area measurement results showed that at Fe doping levels x0.15, Fe-doping led to grain shrinkage as compared to Li2TiO3 and at the same time the BET surface area increased. The Fe/Ti-0.15(H) exhibited saturated magnetization values of 13.76 emu g-1, allowing effective separation of the material from solid suspensions through the use of a magnet. Consecutive magnetic separation results suggested that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) powders could be applied at large-scale and continuously removed from LiOH solutions with separation efficiency of 96% or better. Lithium adsorption studies indicated that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of Fe/Ti-0.15(H) in LiOH 2 solutions (1.8 g L-1 Li, pH 12) reached 53.3 mg g-1 within 24 h, which was higher than that of pristine Li2TiO3 (50.5 mg g-1) without Fe doping. Competitive adsorption and regeneration results indicated that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) possessed a high selectivity for Li with facile regeneration. Therefore, it could be expected that the iron-doped lithium ion-sieves have practical applicability potential for large scale lithium extraction and recovery from lithium-bearing solutions.

  1. Method and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry with alignment of dipole direction (IMS-ADD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A [Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2007-01-30

    Techniques and instrumentation are described for analyses of substances, including complex samples/mixtures that require separation prior to characterization of individual components. A method is disclosed for separation of ion mixtures and identification of ions, including protein and other macromolecular ions and their different structural isomers. Analyte ions are not free to rotate during the separation, but are substantially oriented with respect to the drift direction. Alignment is achieved by applying, at a particular angle to the drift field, a much stronger alternating electric field that "locks" the ion dipoles with moments exceeding a certain value. That value depends on the buffer gas composition, pressure, and temperature, but may be as low as .about.3 Debye under certain conditions. The presently disclosed method measures the direction-specific cross-sections that provide the structural information complementing that obtained from known methods, and, when coupled to those methods, increases the total peak capacity and specificity of gas-phase separations. Simultaneous 2-D separations by direction-specific cross sections along and orthogonally to the ion dipole direction are also possible.

  2. Transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS): exploring the IMS-IMS-MS possibilities of the instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-de-Miguel, G; Macía, M; Barrios, C; Cuevas, J

    2015-02-03

    A prototype is introduced based on the transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry (TMIMS) technique, which provides a continuous output of mobility-selected ions, greatly easing the synchronization between different analyzing stages. In the new architecture, two stages of filtration are used to drastically reduce the background produced by one stage alone. Two-stages TMIMS was coupled with two different atmospheric pressure interface mass spectrometers (MS). The new system enables IMS-IMS-MS analysis and other modes of operation: IMS prefiltration, IMS-IMS, and full transmission mode. It provides a resolving power R > 60 in IMS mode, and R > 40 in each stage of IMS-IMS mode. 2-Propanol vapors were introduced in one of the stages to enhance the mobility variations, and their effect was studied on a set of tetraalkylammonium ions. We found that concentrations as low as 1% (in partial pressure) produce mobility variations as high as 20%, which suggest that IMS-IMS separation using dried N2 (in one stage) and a dopant (in the other stage), could be a very powerful way to enhance the separation capacity of the IMS-IMS prefiltration approach.

  3. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  4. Analysis of space-charge effects on the ion beam in a magnetic sector-type mass separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, A.

    1988-01-01

    Profiles of ion beams in a magnetic sector-type mass separator are analysed by comparing with calculated ion trajectories from viewpoint of the space-charge effect; the calculation is based on a new method which takes into account the space-charge effect analytically. In the analysis, the space-charge potential in the ion beam, an axial third order aberration at the ion beam source, the space-charge neutralization and a beam of neutral particles accompanied by the ion beam are discussed. Influences of the space-charge of the primary ions are also shown to be important in the analysis of the secondary electrons. (author)

  5. Interaction of High Flash Point Electrolytes and PE-Based Separators for Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Kaufmann, Christoph; Müller, Marcus; Hanemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this study, promising electrolytes for use in Li-ion batteries are studied in terms of interacting and wetting polyethylene (PE) and particle-coated PE separators. The electrolytes are characterized according to their physicochemical properties, where the flow characteristics and the surface tension are of particular interest for electrolyte–separator interactions. The viscosity of the electrolytes is determined to be in a range of η = 4–400 mPa∙s and surface tension is finely graduated in a range of γL = 23.3–38.1 mN∙m−1. It is verified that the technique of drop shape analysis can only be used in a limited matter to prove the interaction, uptake and penetration of electrolytes by separators. Cell testing of Li|NMC half cells reveals that those cell results cannot be inevitably deduced from physicochemical electrolyte properties as well as contact angle analysis. On the other hand, techniques are more suitable which detect liquid penetration into the interior of the separator. It is expected that the results can help fundamental researchers as well as users of novel electrolytes in current-day Li-ion battery technologies for developing and using novel material combinations. PMID:26343636

  6. Interaction of High Flash Point Electrolytes and PE-Based Separators for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hofmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, promising electrolytes for use in Li-ion batteries are studied in terms of interacting and wetting polyethylene (PE and particle-coated PE separators. The electrolytes are characterized according to their physicochemical properties, where the flow characteristics and the surface tension are of particular interest for electrolyte–separator interactions. The viscosity of the electrolytes is determined to be in a range of η = 4–400 mPa∙s and surface tension is finely graduated in a range of γL = 23.3–38.1 mN∙m−1. It is verified that the technique of drop shape analysis can only be used in a limited matter to prove the interaction, uptake and penetration of electrolytes by separators. Cell testing of Li|NMC half cells reveals that those cell results cannot be inevitably deduced from physicochemical electrolyte properties as well as contact angle analysis. On the other hand, techniques are more suitable which detect liquid penetration into the interior of the separator. It is expected that the results can help fundamental researchers as well as users of novel electrolytes in current-day Li-ion battery technologies for developing and using novel material combinations.

  7. Selective separation of radionuclides from nuclear waste solutions with inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.; Harjula, R.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry produces and stores large volumes of radioactive waste solutions. Removal of radionuclides from the solutions is an important and challenging task for two main reasons: reductions in the volumes of solidified waste, which have to be disposed of, and reductions in the radioactive discharges into the environment. Since the radioactive elements in most waste solutions are in trace concentrations and the waste solutions contain large excesses of inactive metal ions, highly selective separation methods are needed for the removal of radionuclides. A number of inorganic ion exchange materials are very selective to key radionuclides and they can play an important role in solving these problems. The spectrum of nuclear waste solutions is rather wide considering their radionuclide contents, concentrations of interfering salts and acidity/alkalinity. Therefore, several inorganic ions exchangers are needed for the removal of most harmful radionuclides from a variety of solutions. This paper discusses the use and requirements of inorganic ion exchange materials in nuclear waste management. Special attention is paid to the novel ion exchange materials developed in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki. (orig.)

  8. Performance enhancement of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry by applying differential-RF-driven operation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yue; Tang, Fei; Zhai, Yadong; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-09-01

    The traditional operation mode of high-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) uses a one-way radio frequency (RF) voltage input as the dispersion voltage. This requires a high voltage input and limits power consumption reduction and miniaturization of instruments. With higher dispersion voltages or larger compensation voltages, there also exist problems such as low signal intensity or the fact that the dispersion voltage is no longer much larger than the compensation voltage. In this paper, a differential-RF-driven operation mode of FAIMS is proposed. The two-way RF is used to generate the dispersion field, and a phase difference is added between the two RFs to generate a single step waveform field. Theoretical analysis, and experimental results from an ethanol sample, showed that the peak positions of the ion spectra changed linearly (R 2 = 0.9992) with the phase difference of the two RFs in the differential-RF-driven mode and that the peak intensity of the ion spectrum could be enhanced by more than eight times for ethanol ions. In this way, it is possible to convert the ion spectrum peaks outside the separation or compensation voltage range into a detectable range, by changing the phase difference. To produce the same separation electric field, the high-voltage direct current input voltage can be maximally reduced to half of that in the traditional operation mode. Without changing the drift region size or drift condition, the differential-RF-driven operation mode can reduce power consumption, increase signal-to-noise ratio, extend the application range of the dispersion voltage and compensation voltage, and improve FAIMS detection performance.

  9. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  10. Chemometrics for ion mobility spectrometry data: recent advances and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanska, E.; Davies, Antony N.; Buydens, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, advances in the field of ion mobility spectrometry have been hindered by the variation in measured signals between instruments developed by different research laboratories or manufacturers. This has triggered the development and application of chemometric techniques able to reveal and

  11. The simulation of pulsed heater for a sampling system for the ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The development of the sampling device with pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier for ion mobility spectrometer is described in this article. Numerical simulation of a pulse heater structure of is presented. The design of the sampling device using a pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier is developed. Experimental results of approval of the sampling device are presented.

  12. Electron-capture process and ion mobility spectra in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasek, F.W.; Spangler, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basic principles of plasma chromatography are introduced and ion mobility relationships presented. The relationships of plasma chromatography to electron-capture detector mechanisms are discussed, including electron energy considerations and electron-capture reactions. A number of experimental studies by plasma chromatography are described. (C.F.)

  13. Polyethylene terephthalate/poly(vinylidene fluoride) composite separator for Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Huang, Shaohua; Xiao, Zhiming; Zhu, Rui; Sun, Daoheng; Lin, Liwei; Xu, Zhiqin; Shi, Chuan; Zhao, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofiber membranes have been proved to enhance the performance of a Li-ion battery (LIB), but their poor mechanical strength hinders their industrial application. This paper combines a meltblown polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven and a electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane together to improve the mechanical property via hot-pressing, wherein a dried 3 wt% PVDF solution coating on PET nonwoven is used as a binder. The experiment results indicate that the hot-pressing PET/PVDF separator exhibits an excellent mechanical property, whose transverse and longitudinal tensile strength could reach 13.70 MPa and 34.85 MPa respectively. Compared with a commercial PP separator, the hot-pressing PET/PVDF membrane separator shows better wettability, higher thermal shrinkage and excellent discharge capacity as well. (paper)

  14. Polyethylene terephthalate/poly (vinylidene fluoride) composite separator for Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Huang, Shaohua; Xiao, Zhiming; Zhu, Rui; Sun, Daoheng; Lin, Liwei; Xu, Zhiqin; Shi, Chuan; Zhao, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofiber membranes have been proved to enhance performances of Li-ion batteries, but their poor mechanical strength hinders their industrial application. This paper combines meltblown polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven and electrospun poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane together to improve the mechanical property via hot-pressing, wherein a dried 3 wt% PVDF solution coating on PET nonwoven is used as a binder. The hot-pressing temperature is optimized to be 145 °C and the composite PET/PVDF separator exhibits an excellent mechanical property, whose transverse and longitudinal tensile strength could reach 13.70 and 34.85 MPa respectively. Compared with a commercial PP separator, the hot-pressed PET/PVDF membrane separator shows better wettability, higher thermal shrinkage and improved electrochemical performance as well. (paper)

  15. An introduction to the technique of combined ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowall, Mark A.; Bateman, Robert H.; Bajic, Steve; Giles, Kevin; Langridge, Jim; McKenna, Therese; Pringle, Steven D.; Wildgoose, Jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) offers several advantages compared with conventional High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as an 'inlet system' for mass spectrometry. UPLC provides improved chromatographic resolution, increased sensitivity and reduced analysis time. This is achieved through the use of sub 2μm particles (stationary phase) combined with high-pressure solvent delivery (up to 15,000 psi). When coupled with orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (oa-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), UPLC presents a means to achieve high sample throughput with reduced spectral overlap, increased sensitivity, and exact mass measurement capabilities with high mass spectral resolution (Ca 20,000 FWHM). Dispersive ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) implemented within a traveling-wave ion guide provides an orthogonal separation strategy for ions in the gas phase that can resolve isobaric ions formed by either Electrospray of MALDI ionization typically in Ca 20 mille seconds. All three techniques have the potential to be combined on-line (e.g. UPLC-IMS-MS/MS) in real time to maximize peak capacity and resolving power for the analysis of complex biological mixtures including; intact proteins, modified peptides and endogenous/exogenous metabolites

  16. Development of Advanced Nuclide Separation and Recovery Methods using Ion-Exchanhge Techniques in Nuclear Backend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hitoshi

    The development of compact separation and recovery methods using selective ion-exchange techniques is very important for the reprocessing and high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs) treatment in the nuclear backend field. The selective nuclide separation techniques are effective for the volume reduction of wastes and the utilization of valuable nuclides, and expected for the construction of advanced nuclear fuel cycle system and the rationalization of waste treatment. In order to accomplish the selective nuclide separation, the design and synthesis of novel adsorbents are essential for the development of compact and precise separation processes. The present paper deals with the preparation of highly functional and selective hybrid microcapsules enclosing nano-adsorbents in the alginate gel polymer matrices by sol-gel methods, their characterization and the clarification of selective adsorption properties by batch and column methods. The selective separation of Cs, Pd and Re in real HLLW was further accomplished by using novel microcapsules, and an advanced nuclide separation system was proposed by the combination of selective processes using microcapsules.

  17. Novel Ceramic-Grafted Separator with Highly Thermal Stability for Safe Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Xiaoming; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Cao, Yuliang

    2017-08-09

    The separator is a critical component of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), which not only allows ionic transport while it prevents electrical contact between electrodes but also plays a key role for thermal safety performance of LIBs. However, commercial separators for LIBs are typically microporous polyolefin membranes that pose challenges for battery safety, due to shrinking and melting at elevated temperature. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to improve the thermal stability and electrolyte affinity of polyethylene (PE) separators. By simply grafting the vinylsilane coupling reagent on the surface of the PE separator by electron beam irradiation method and subsequent hydrolysis reaction into the Al 3+ solution, an ultrathin Al 2 O 3 layer is grafted on the surface of the porous polymer microframework without sacrificing the porous structure and increasing the thickness. The as-synthesized Al 2 O 3 ceramic-grafted separator (Al 2 O 3 -CGS) shows almost no shrinkage at 150 °C and decreases the contact angle of the conventional electrolyte compared with the bare PE separator. Notably, the full cells with the Al 2 O 3 -CGSs exhibit better cycling performance and rate capability and also provide stable open circuit voltage even at 170 °C, indicating its promising application in LIBs with high safety and energy density.

  18. Separation of copper ions from iron ions using PVA-g-(acrylic acid/N-vinyl imidazole) membranes prepared by radiation-induced grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajji, Zaki; Ali, Ali M

    2010-01-15

    Acrylic acid (AAc), N-vinyl imidazole (Azol) and their binary mixtures were graft copolymerized onto poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes using gamma irradiation. The ability of the grafted membranes to separate Cu ions from Fe ions was investigated with respect to the grafting yield and the pH of the feed solution. The data showed that the diffusion of copper ions from the feed compartment to the receiver compartment depends on the grafting yield of the membranes and the pH of the feed solution. To the contrary, iron ions did not diffuse through the membranes of all grafting yields. However, a limited amount of iron ions diffused in strong acidic medium. This study shows that the prepared membranes could be considered for the separation of copper ions from iron ions. The temperature of thermal decomposition of pure PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane, PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane containing copper ions, and PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane containing iron ions were determined using TGA analyzer. It was shown that the presence of Cu and Fe ions increases the decomposition temperature, and the membranes bonded with iron ions are more stable than those containing copper ions.

  19. Enhanced mobility of discrete solitons in anisotropic two-dimensional waveguide arrays with modulated separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, U. Al; Vinayagam, P. S.; Al-Marzoug, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We consider two-dimensional waveguide arrays with anisotropic coupling coefficients. We show using numerical and variational calculations that four stationary soliton types exist: site centered, bond centered, hybrid X , and hybrid Y . For the isotropic case the last two modes become identical and equivalent to the known hybrid soliton. With a variational calculation using a Gaussian trial function and six variational parameters corresponding to the soliton's position, width, and velocity components, the four stationary soliton types are reproduced and their equilibrium widths are accounted for accurately for a wide range of anisotropy ratios. We obtained using the variational calculation the Peierls-Nabarro potential and barrier heights for the four soliton types and different anisotropy ratios. We have also obtained a phase diagram showing regions of soliton stability against collapse and subregions of mobility in terms of the initial kick-in speed and anisotropy ratio. The phase diagram shows that two-dimensional (2D) solitons become highly mobile for anisotropy ratios larger than some critical values that depend on the initial kick-in speed. This fact was then exploited to design tracks within the 2D waveguide array along which the soliton can be accelerated and routed. We have calculated the actual waveguide separations needed to realize the proposed guided trajectories of 2D solitons.

  20. Separation of individual lanthanides through the combined techniques of urea fractionated homogeneous precipitation and ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, K.; Abrao, A.

    1975-01-01

    The separation of individual lanthanides, especially Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm and La, from a rare earth chlorides concentrate by the industrial processing of monazite sand is made. To reach this goal the homogeneous fractional precipitation and ion exchange techniques were combined. Using the rare earths concentrate depleted in Cerium, fractions enriched in Nd, Pr and Sm, and one final filtrate enriched in La were obtained, by the hydrolysis of urea. The separation of individual lanthanides (Ns, Pr, Sm and La) was accomplished using two strong cationic ion exchanger columns, the second with Cu(II) as retaining ion, and EDTA-NH 4 solution buffered with acetic acid as eluant. The annoy problem of precipitation into the column during the RE elution was solved. The difficult EDTA and Cu(II) recovery was the precipitation of Cu 2 S and disruption of CU-EDTA complex by hydrolysis of thiourea. The combination of both techniques allowed the preparation of individual lanthanides as Nd, Pr and La with 99% and Sm with 90% purity

  1. Methods development for separation of inorganic anions, organic acids and bases, and neutral organic compounds by ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-04-01

    A novel anion-exchange resin containing three amine groups was prepared by reaction of a chloromethylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resin with diethylenetriamine. After being protonated by contact with an aqueous acid, this resin can be used for ion chromatographic separation of anions. The charge on the resins can be varied from +1 to +3 by changing the mobile phase pH. The selectivity of the new ion exchangers for various inorganic anions was quite different from that of conventional anion exchangers. The performance of this new anion exchanger was studied by changing the pH and the concentration of the eluent, and several different eluents were used with some common anions as testing analytes. Conductivity detection and UV-visible detection were applied to detect the anions after separation. The new resin can also be used for HPLC separation of neutral organic compounds. Alkylphenols and alkylbenzenes were separated with this new polymeric resin, and excellent separations were obtained under simple conditions. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction and Chapter 6: General conclusions.

  2. Ethylcellulose-coated polyolefin separators for lithium-ion batteries with improved safety performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ming; Tang, Haolin; Wang, Yadong; Pan, Mu

    2014-01-30

    With the widely use in portable electronic devices and electric vehicles, the safety of lithium-ion battery has raised serious concerns, in which the thermal stability of separator plays an essential role in preventing thermal runaway reactions. The novelty of this work is to coat commercialized polyethylene (PE) separator and trilayer polypropylene/polyethylene/polypropylene (PP/PE/PP) separator with ethylcellulose (EC), a thermally stable and renewable biomass. The formation of the EC layer with high porosity is through a simple dipping and extracting process. The effects of the EC layer on thermal shrinkage, electrolyte wettability and cell performance are investigated. After coating, the thermal shrinkage of PE separator at shutdown and meltdown point is reduced from 20% to 9% and 42% to 23% respectively, while the drop of OCV under increasing temperature is also postponed from 130°C to 160°C. The electrolyte wettability of pristine trilayer PP/PE/PP separator is greatly improved, leading to increased capacity retention from 28% to 99% of the cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly dispersive ion exchangers in the analytical chemistry of uranium, particularly regarding separation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, R.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of water-insoluble polyvinyl pyrrolidon with uranium VI was investigated and a determination method for uranium was worked out in which the polyvinyl pyrrolidon was used as specific exchanger. Good separations of uranium from numerous transition metal ions were achieved here. The application of this exchanger for a fast and simple elution and determination method was of particular importance. A possible sorption mechanism was suggested based on the capacity curve of uranium with polyvinyl pyrrolidon and nitrogen and chloride content at maximum load. The sorption occurs by coordination of the carbonyl oxygen of single pyrrolidon rings with the protons of the complex acides and uranium. This assumption is supported by IR investigations. The sorbability of other inorganic acids was also investigated and possible structures were formulated for the sorption mechanism. In addition to this, ion exchangers were prepared based on cellulose by converting cellulose powder with aziridine and tris-1-aziridinyl-phosphine oxide. A polyethylene imine cellulose of high capacity was obtained in the conversion of cellulose powder with aziridine. This exchanger absorbs cobalt III very strongly. The exchanger loaded with cobalt III was used to separate the uranium as cyanato complex. The exchanger obtained in converting chlorated cellulose with tris-1-aziridinyl phosphine oxide also absorbs uranium VI very strongly. Thus a separation method of high specifity and selectivity was developed. (orig.) [de

  4. Feasibility of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Riahi, Farhad

    2014-05-23

    The capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) for direct analysis of the samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was investigated and evaluated, for the first time. To that end, an appropriate new injection port was designed and constructed, resulting in possibility of direct injection of the known sample volume, without tedious sample preparation steps (e.g. derivatization, solvent evaporation, and re-solving in another solvent…). Malathion as a test compound was extracted from different matrices by a rapid and convenient DLLME method. The positive ion mobility spectra of the extracted malathion were obtained after direct injection of carbon tetrachloride or methanol solutions. The analyte responses were compared and the statistical results revealed the feasibility of direct analysis of the extracted samples in carbon tetrachloride, resulting in a convenient methodology. The coupled method of DLLME-CD-IMS was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, recovery, and enrichment factor. Finally, various real samples of apple, river and underground water were analyzed, all verifying the feasibility and success of the proposed method for the easy extraction of the analyte using DLLME separation before the direct analysis by CD-IMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Explosives vapour identification in ion mobility spectrometry using a tunable laser ionization source: a comparison with conventional 63Ni ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Laser multiphoton ionization (MPI) is used to produce ions from explosive vapours at atmospheric pressure in air for analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). In the positive ion mode of detection, NO + ions, generated directly by multiphoton dissociation/ionization of the explosive compounds, show strong variation with laser wavelength. This provides a means of identifying the presence of nitro-containing compounds. Moreover, electrons formed in the MPI of gaseous components in the air carrier stream, primarily O 2 , are transferred via neutral molecular oxygen (O 2 ) to trace explosive vapour, forming negative ions which give rise to characteristic and identifiable ion mobility spectra. Further, negative ion mobility spectra of several explosive vapours are presented using conventional 63 Ni ionization and are compared qualitatively with the laser ionization approach. (author)

  6. Influence of Active Layer on Separation Potentials of Nanofiltration Membranes for Inorganic Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadekar, Shardul S; Vidic, Radisav D

    2017-05-16

    Active layers of two fully aromatic and two semi-aromatic nanofiltration membranes were studied along with surface charge at different electrolyte composition and effective pore size to elucidate their influence on separation mechanisms for inorganic ions by steric, charge, and dielectric exclusion. The membrane potential method used for pore size measurement is underlined as the most appropriate measurement technique for this application owing to its dependence on the diffusional potentials of inorganic ions. Crossflow rejection experiments with dilute feed composition indicate that both fully aromatic membranes achieved similar rejection despite the differences in surface charge, which suggests that rejection by these membranes is exclusively dependent on size exclusion and the contribution of charge exclusion is weak. Rejection experiments with higher ionic strength and different composition of the feed solution confirmed this hypothesis. On the other hand, increase in the ionic strength of feed solution when the charge exclusion effects are negligible due to charge screening strongly influenced ion rejection by semi-aromatic membranes. The experimental results confirmed that charge exclusion contributes significantly to the performance of semi-aromatic membranes in addition to size exclusion. The contribution of dielectric exclusion to overall ion rejection would be more significant for fully aromatic membranes.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of LATP/PAN composite fiber-based lithium-ion battery separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yinzheng; Lin Zhan; Qiu Yiping; Zhang Xiangwu

    2011-01-01

    Lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fiber-based membranes were prepared by electrospinning dispersions of LATP particles in PAN solutions. The electrolyte uptakes of the electrospun LATP/PAN composite fiber-based membranes were measured and the results showed that the electrolyte uptake increased as the LATP content increased. The lithium ion conductivity, the electrochemical oxidation limit and the interface resistance of liquid electrolyte-soaked electrospun LATP/PAN composite fiber-based membranes were also measured and it was found that as the LATP content increased, the electrospun LATP/PAN composite fiber-based membranes had higher lithium ion conductivity, better electrochemical stability, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium electrode. Additionally, lithium//1 M LiPF 6 /EC/EMC//lithium iron phosphate cells using LATP/PAN composite fiber-based membranes as the separator demonstrated high charge/discharge capacity and good cycle performance.

  8. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  9. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org, p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30-300 keV/1 pA-10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  10. Renewable and superior thermal-resistant cellulose-based composite nonwoven as lithium-ion battery separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Zhihong; Kong, Qingshan; Zhang, Chuanjian; Pang, Shuping; Yue, Liping; Wang, Xuejiang; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei

    2013-01-01

    A renewable and superior thermal-resistant cellulose-based composite nonwoven was explored as lithium-ion battery separator via an electrospinning technique followed by a dip-coating process. It was demonstrated that such nanofibrous composite nonwoven possessed good electrolyte wettability, excellent heat tolerance, and high ionic conductivity. The cells using the composite separator displayed better rate capability and enhanced capacity retention, when compared to those of commercialized polypropylene separator under the same conditions. These fascinating characteristics would endow this renewable composite nonwoven a promising separator for high-power lithium-ion battery.

  11. Application of linear pH gradients for the modeling of ion exchange chromatography: Separation of monoclonal antibody monomer from aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluters, Simon; Wittkopp, Felix; Jöhnck, Matthias; Frech, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The mobile phase pH is a key parameter of every ion exchange chromatography process. However, mechanistic insights into the pH influence on the ion exchange chromatography equilibrium are rare. This work describes a mechanistic model capturing salt and pH influence in ion exchange chromatography. The pH dependence of the characteristic protein charge and the equilibrium constant is introduced to the steric mass action model based on a protein net charge model considering the number of amino acids interacting with the stationary phase. This allows the description of the adsorption equilibrium of the chromatographed proteins as a function of pH. The model parameters were determined for a monoclonal antibody monomer, dimer, and a higher aggregated species based on a manageable set of pH gradient experiments. Without further modification of the model parameters the transfer to salt gradient elution at fixed pH is demonstrated. A lumped rate model was used to predict the separation of the monoclonal antibody monomer/aggregate mixture in pH gradient elution and for a pH step elution procedure-also at increased protein loadings up to 48 g/L packed resin. The presented model combines both salt and pH influence and may be useful for the development and deeper understanding of an ion exchange chromatography separation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Classification of Ion Mobility Data Using the Neural Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Kanik, I.

    2005-01-01

    Determination of atmospheric and surface elemental and molecular composition of various solar system bodies is essential to the development of a firm understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system. Furthermore, such data is needed to address the intriguing question of whether or not life exists or once existed elsewhere in the Solar System. As such, these measurements are among the primary scientific goals of NASA s current and future planetary missions. In recent years, significant progress toward both miniaturization and field portability of in situ analytical separation and detection devices have been made with future planetary explorations in mind. However, despite all these advances, accurate in situ identification of atmospheric and surface compounds remains a big challenge. In response to that we are developing various hardware and software tools which would enable us to uniquely identify species of interest in a complex chemical environment.

  13. SEPARATION AND PRECONCENTRATION OF COPPER (II ION BY FATTY HYDROXAMIC ACIDS IMMOBILIZED ONTO AMBERLITE XAD – 4 RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Suhendra

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of copper (II ion preconcentration and separation from other ions by using a column containing fatty hydroxamic acids - loaded Amberlite XAD 4 resin (FHA-Amb is described. Several factors, which affect the separation and preconcentration efficiency such as pH, sample volume, and concentration of eluent and flow rate, have been investigated.  A quantitative recovery of copper (II ion from FHA-Amb resin column was obtained using 10% HNO3 solutions as eluent with a preconcentration factor of 60. A method for separation of Cu(II from Zn(II and Cd(II is proposed.  A rapid sample throughput, a clean separation, a high preconcentration factor and simplicity are the main advantages in these analytical procedures.   Keywords: extraction, preconcentration, fatty hydroxamic acid, copper (ii ion, amberlite XAD-4

  14. Production of chemically reactive radioactive ion beams through on-line separation; Production de faisceaux d'ions radioactifs chimiquement reactifs par separation en ligne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joinet, A

    2003-10-01

    The ISOL (isotope separation on line) allows the production of secondary radioactive ion beams through spallation or fragmentation or fission reactions that take place in a thick target bombarded by a high intensity primary beam. The challenge is to increase the intensity and purity of the radioactive beam. The optimization of the system target/source requires the right choice of material for the target by taking into account the stability of the material, its reactivity and the ionization method used. The target is an essential part of the system because radioactive elements are generated in it and are released more or less quickly. Tests have been made in order to select the best fitted material for the release of S, Se, Te, Ge and Sn. Materials tested as target filling are: ZrO{sub 2}, Nb, Ti, V,TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub x}, ThO{sub 2}, C, ZrC{sub 4} and VC). Other molecules such as: COSe, COS, SeS, COTe, GeS, SiS, SnS have been studied to ease the extraction of recoil nuclei (Se, S, Te, Ge and Sn) produced inside the target.

  15. Lithium isotope separation on an ion exchange resin having azacrown ether as an anchor group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.W.; Jeong, Y.K.; Lee, J.K.; Hong, Ch.P.; Kim, Ch.S.; Jeon, Y.Sh.

    1997-01-01

    As study on the separation of lithium isotopes was carried out with an ion exchange resin having 1,7,13-trioxa-4,10,16-triazacyclooctadecane (N 3 O 3 ) as an anchor group. The lighter isotope, 6 Li concentrated in the resin phase, while the heavier isotope, 7 Li is enriched in the fluid phase. Upon column chromatography [0.6 cm (I. D.) x 20 cm (height) using 1.0M ammonium chloride solution as an eluent, single separation factor, α, 1.068 ( 6 Li/ 7 Li) r esin/( 6 Li/ 7 Li) s olution was obtained by the GLUECKAUF method from the elution curve and isotope ratios. (author)

  16. Separation of chloride and fluoride from uranium compounds and their determination by ion selective electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fluoride and chloride must be rigorously controlled in uranium compounds, especially in ceramic grade UO 2 . Their determination is very difficult without previous uranium separation, particularly when both are at a low concentration. A simple procedure is described for this separation using a strong cationic resin to retain the uranyl ion. Both anions are determined in the effluent solution. Uranium compounds of nuclear fuel cycle, especially ammonium diuranate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, sodium diuranate, uranium trioxide and dioxide and uranium peroxide are dissolved in nitric acid and the solutions are percolated through the resin column. Chloride and fluoride are determined in the effluent by selective electrodes, the detection limits being 0.02 μg F - /ml and 1.0 μg Cl - /ml. The dissolution of the sample, the acidity of the solution, the measurement conditions and the sensitivity of the method are discussed. (Author) [pt

  17. The potential of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V; Calvo, Daniel; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2012-05-15

    The off-flavor of "tainted wine" is attributed mainly to the presence of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in the wine. In the present study the atmospheric pressure gas-phase ion chemistry, pertaining to ion mobility spectrometry, of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was investigated. In positive ion mode the dominant species is a monomer ion with a lower intensity dimer species with reduced mobility values (K(0)) of 1.58 and 1.20 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In negative mode the ion with K(0) =1.64 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) is ascribed to a trichlorophenoxide species while the ions with K(0) =1.48 and 1.13 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) are attributed to chloride attachment adducts of a TCA monomer and dimer, respectively. The limit of detection of the system for 2,4,6-TCA dissolved in dichloromethane deposited on a filter paper was 2.1 μg and 1.7 ppm in the gas phase. In ethanol and in wine the limit of detection is higher implying that pre-concentration and pre-separation are required before IMS can be used to monitor the level of TCA in wine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the lithium ion mobility in cyclic model compounds and their ion conduction properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, Joerg

    2011-07-27

    In view of both, energy density and energy drain, rechargeable lithium ion batteries outperform other present accumulator systems. However, despite great efforts over the last decades, the ideal electrolyte in terms of key characteristics such as capacity, cycle life, and most important reliable safety, has not yet been identified. Steps ahead in lithium ion battery technology require a fundamental understanding of lithium ion transport, salt association, and ion solvation within the electrolyte. Indeed, well defined model compounds allow for systematic studies of molecular ion transport. Thus, in the present work, based on the concept of immobilizing ion solvents, three main series with a cyclotriphosphazene (CTP), hexaphenylbenzene (HBP), and tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMS) scaffold were prepared. Lithium ion solvents, among others ethylene carbonate (EC), which has proven to fulfill together with propylene carbonate safety and market concerns in commercial lithium ion batteries, were attached to the different cores via alkyl spacers of variable length. All model compounds were fully characterized, pure and thermally stable up to at least 235 C, covering the requested broad range of glass transition temperatures from -78.1 C up to +6.2 C. While the CTP models tend to rearrange at elevated temperatures over time, which questions the general stability of alkoxide related (poly)phosphazenes, both, the HPB and CTP based models show no evidence of core stacking. In particular the CTP derivatives represent good solvents for various lithium salts, exhibiting no significant differences in the ionic conductivity {sigma}{sub dc} and thus indicating comparable salt dissociation and rather independent motion of cations and ions. In general, temperature-dependent bulk ionic conductivities investigated via impedance spectroscopy follow a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) type behavior. Modifications of the alkyl spacer length were shown to influence ionic conductivities only in

  19. Direct separation of 67Ga citrate from zinc and copper target materials by an ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Ferieg, Kh.; Saleh, Z.A.

    2004-01-01

    The separation of 6 7G a from zinc and copper target materials using an anion- f:exchanger (Dowex21K) and 0.1 M citrate buffer at pH 6 is described. The gallium-67 was separated in citrate solution and can be directly used for medical applications. Gallium-67 with a half-life of 78.3 h and gamma-rays with energies of 93, 185 and 300 keV is a cyclotron produced radioisotope for which a considerable demand exists. 6 7G a is frequently produced through proton or deuteron bombardment of natural or enriched Zn targets (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973). It is usually separated from Zn by ion exchange chromatography (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; van der Walt and Strelow, 1983) or by liquid extraction Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; Hupf and Beaver, 1970). The isotope is usually supplied in citrate solution which is widely used as 6 7G a Gallium citrate which is a well-established radiopharmaceutical for imaging soft tissue tumors and abscesses. Several routes for large scale production of 6 7G a and the development of medical applications have been reported (Silvester and Thakur, 1970; Dahl and Tilbury, 1972; Steyn and Meyer,1973; Vlatkovic et al., 1975; Neirinckx, 1976; Thakur, 1977). Various attempts were carried out to separate gallium-67 by using different ion exchange methods (Strelow et al., 1971; Das and Ramamoorthy, 1995; Boothe et al.,1991) through the labelling of citrate by using 6 7G a was carried out for medical applications

  20. Separation profiles of Sr from irradiated Yttrium matrix using different eluants by ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Kumar, G.V.S.; Vithya, J.; Kumar, R.; VenkataSubramani, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    89 Sr (a pure β - emitter, T 1/2 = 50.5d) is used in palliative care of bone metastases and was produced using the 89 Y(n,p) 89 Sr reaction in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), Kalpakkam. The irradiated yttria target was dissolved in nitric acid and bulk separation of yttrium carried out by solvent extraction using TBP-HNO 3 followed by ion exchange chromatography of the aqueous phase with nitric acid as an eluting agent to obtain the pure fraction of 89 Sr. This paper discusses about the feasibility of separation of 89 Sr with other eluting agents in ion exchange chromatography vis-a-vis nitric acid. As this nuclide is injected as the chloride, the purified fraction of Sr in nitric acid medium is finally converted into HCI medium which is the preferred medium of source for its final application. In order to simplify the conversion, HCI medium can be used directly in the purifying stage making the process faster and simpler. Hence the separation profile using HCI was obtained. In addition, the elution pattern using another reagent tri sodium tri meta phosphate (SMP) was also determined. Purification of 89 Sr fraction using the eluants HCI and SMP was established. However, the elution with SMP yielded the 89 Sr fraction in a small volume and shorter period i.e. ∼ 9 h in comparison with 15 h and 22 h in the case of HCI and HNO 3 medium respectively and also generated less liquid waste. This study established that SMP can be a more favoured elution agent for the purification of 89 Sr source during the chemical processing of the bulk irradiated yttria target material. However the direct separation of Sr using the Sr selective crown ether i.e.ditert.butyl dicyclohexano 18 Crown 6, is much preferred over this method which is in progress

  1. Synthesis and Ion-Exchange Properties of Graphene Th(IV) Phosphate Composite Cation Exchanger: Its Applications in the Selective Separation of Lead Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangreez, Tauseef Ahmad; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alhogbi, Basma G; Naushad, Mu

    2017-07-24

    In this study, graphene Th(IV) phosphate was prepared by sol-gel precipitation method. The ion-exchange behavior of this cation-exchanger was studied by investigating properties like ion-exchange capacity for various metal ions, the effect of eluent concentration, elution behavior, and thermal effect on ion-exchange capacity (IEC). Several physicochemical properties as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, thermal studies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were also carried out. The material possessed an IEC of 1.56 meq·dry·g -1 of the exchanger and was found to be nano-composite. The selectivity studies showed that the material is selective towards Pb(II) ions. The selectivity of this cation-exchanger was demonstrated in the binary separation of Pb(II) ions from mixture with other metal ions. The recovery was found to be both quantitative and reproducible.

  2. Integrated statistical learning of metabolic ion mobility spectrometry profiles for pulmonary disease identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, A-C; Baumbach, J I; Baumbach, J

    2012-08-16

    Exhaled air carries information on human health status. Ion mobility spectrometers combined with a multi-capillary column (MCC/IMS) is a well-known technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within human breath. This technique is relatively inexpensive, robust and easy to use in every day practice. However, the potential of this methodology depends on successful application of computational approaches for finding relevant VOCs and classification of patients into disease-specific profile groups based on the detected VOCs. We developed an integrated state-of-the-art system using sophisticated statistical learning techniques for VOC-based feature selection and supervised classification into patient groups. We analyzed breath data from 84 volunteers, each of them either suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or both COPD and bronchial carcinoma (COPD + BC), as well as from 35 healthy volunteers, comprising a control group (CG). We standardized and integrated several statistical learning methods to provide a broad overview of their potential for distinguishing the patient groups. We found that there is strong potential for separating MCC/IMS chromatograms of healthy controls and COPD patients (best accuracy COPD vs CG: 94%). However, further examination of the impact of bronchial carcinoma on COPD/no-COPD classification performance is necessary (best accuracy CG vs COPD vs COPD + BC: 79%). We also extracted 20 high-scoring VOCs that allowed differentiating COPD patients from healthy controls. We conclude that these statistical learning methods have a generally high accuracy when applied to well-structured, medical MCC/IMS data.

  3. Peak detection method evaluation for ion mobility spectrometry by using machine learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Kopczynski, Dominik; D'Addario, Marianna; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-04-16

    Ion mobility spectrometry with pre-separation by multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) has become an established inexpensive, non-invasive bioanalytics technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with various metabolomics applications in medical research. To pave the way for this technology towards daily usage in medical practice, different steps still have to be taken. With respect to modern biomarker research, one of the most important tasks is the automatic classification of patient-specific data sets into different groups, healthy or not, for instance. Although sophisticated machine learning methods exist, an inevitable preprocessing step is reliable and robust peak detection without manual intervention. In this work we evaluate four state-of-the-art approaches for automated IMS-based peak detection: local maxima search, watershed transformation with IPHEx, region-merging with VisualNow, and peak model estimation (PME).We manually generated Metabolites 2013, 3 278 a gold standard with the aid of a domain expert (manual) and compare the performance of the four peak calling methods with respect to two distinct criteria. We first utilize established machine learning methods and systematically study their classification performance based on the four peak detectors' results. Second, we investigate the classification variance and robustness regarding perturbation and overfitting. Our main finding is that the power of the classification accuracy is almost equally good for all methods, the manually created gold standard as well as the four automatic peak finding methods. In addition, we note that all tools, manual and automatic, are similarly robust against perturbations. However, the classification performance is more robust against overfitting when using the PME as peak calling preprocessor. In summary, we conclude that all methods, though small differences exist, are largely reliable and enable a wide spectrum of real-world biomedical applications.

  4. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-05

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s.

  5. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS theme meeting on ion chromatography separations - state of art and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion Chromatography (IC) plays a vital role in all disciplines of science and technology. In the field of trace separations and speciation studies, use of IC techniques becomes indispensable. In nuclear technology, IC plays a pivotal role in the reactor water chemistry, in the front end of fuel cycle especially in the characterization of nuclear materials including the reactor fuels, post irradiation examination, actinide speciation studies and in understanding the interaction and migration of actinide species in the geo environment. Ion chromatography is also useful in the studies related to waste management particularly for the separation and determination of fission products. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to all the researchers in the area of ion chromatography to discuss their recent findings and information, to learn from the mutual experiences and interests, and to promote cooperation both nationally and internationally. Ion chromatography techniques including Ion Chromatography Separations and Nuclear Materials, Speciation Studies by Ion chromatography, Hyphenated -IC Techniques, Reactor Water Chemistry and Ion Chromatography, Solid Phase Extraction and Sample Preparations for IC and Separation of Bio-molecules and Environmental aspects etc are discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  6. Comprehensive Ion Mobility Calibration: Poly(ethylene oxide) Polymer Calibrants and General Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haler, Jean R N; Kune, Christopher; Massonnet, Philippe; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Jordens, Jan; Honing, Maarten; Mengerink, Ynze; Far, Johann; De Pauw, Edwin

    2017-11-21

    Ion mobility (IM) is now a well-established and fast analytical technique. The IM hardware is constantly being improved, especially in terms of the resolving power. The Drift Tube (DTIMS), the Traveling Wave (TWIMS), and the Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TIMS) coupled to mass spectrometry are used to determine the Collision Cross-Sections (CCS) of ions. In analytical chemistry, the CCS is approached as a descriptor for ion identification and it is also used in physical chemistry for 3D structure elucidation with computational chemistry support. The CCS is a physical descriptor extracted from the reduced mobility (K 0 ) measurements obtainable only from the DTIMS. TWIMS and TIMS routinely require a calibration procedure to convert measured physical quantities (drift time for TWIMS and elution voltage for TIMS) into CCS values. This calibration is a critical step to allow interinstrument comparisons. The previous calibrating substances lead to large prediction bands and introduced rather large uncertainties during the CCS determination. In this paper, we introduce a new IM calibrant (CCS and K 0 ) using singly charged sodium adducts of poly(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether (CH 3 O-PEO-H) for positive ionization in both helium and nitrogen as drift gas. These singly charged calibrating ions make it possible to determine the CCS/K 0 of ions having higher charge states. The fitted calibration plots exhibit larger coverage with less data scattering and significantly improved prediction bands and uncertainties. The reasons for the improved CCS/K 0 accuracy, advantages, and limitations of the calibration procedures are also discussed. A generalized IM calibration strategy is suggested.

  7. Separation of uranium from iron in environmental samples using ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulhani, V.A.; Dafauti, S.; Hegde, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium is ubiquitously present in the environment and forms an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. The uranium content in the various matrices of the environment has to be determined for many purposes right from prospecting to waste management and environmental protection. Uranium estimation by the common techniques likes alpha spectrometry, laser fluorometry, anodic stripping voltammetry all involve interferences due to dissolved solids and iron. Iron also being a major component element, is present in most of the environmental matrices. It follows the same chemistry as uranium and accompanies it in all the fractions. In many pre-concentration steps ferric hydroxide is used for collecting uranium and other actinides. Separation of iron from uranium becomes essential for interference free quantitative estimation as it interferes by reducing the efficiency of electro-deposition of U, 59 Fe formed gives compton contribution to 239 Np peak in neutron activation analysis etc., hence a method was standardized for Fe separation from U. U is reported to be isolated from iron by precipitating iron with ammonium carbonate or bicarbonate where U remains in solution as (NH 4 ) 4 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 , but some uranium gets occluded on the iron precipitate, leading to variable efficiency and a recovery of about 70-75%. Comparative study of reported methods did not give the expected separation and solvent extraction procedures involved use of hazardous chemicals, hence ion exchange method was found to more suitable for separations especially those involving low concentrations of the analyte

  8. Separation of 1,3-Propanediol from Aqueous Solutions by Ion Exchange Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukowicz Beata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-propanediol is a promising monomer with many applications and can be produced by bioconversion of renewable resources. The separation of this product from fermentation broth is a difficult task. In this work, the application of cation exchange resin for the separation of 1,3-propanediol from model aqueous solution was examined. The best effect of separation of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol using sorption method was obtained for H+ resin form, although the observed partition coefficient of 1,3-propanediol was low. On the basis of the results of the sorption of 1,3-propanediol, the ionic forms of the resin were selected and used in the next experiments (H+, Ca2+, Ag+, Na+, Pb2+, Zn2+. The best results in ion exchange chromatography were obtained for cation exchange resin in H+ and Ca2+ form. The use of smaller particle size of resin and a longer length of the column allows to obtain better separation of mixtures.

  9. Ion chromatography of transition metals: specific alteration of retention by complexation reactions in the mobile and on the stationary phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, S.

    1992-05-01

    Ion chromatography of mono- and bivalent cations was performed on a conventional cation exchanger. The pH influence of an ethylene-diamine/citrate eluent was significant for the retention of alkaline earth and transition metals, but negligible for alkali ions. This was dealt with from a mechanistic point of view. Mobile phase optimization allowed fast isocratic analysis of mono- and bivalent cations and the separation of the radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90. A newly synthesized stationary phase containing iminodiacetate (IDA) function was investigated for cation chromatography using ethylenediamine/citrate eluents, polyhydroxy acid and dipicolinic acid. The column's high selectivity for transition metal ions in comparison to alkali and alkaline earth metals may be governed by the choice of complexing ability and pH of the eluent. Applications verified by atomic absorption spectroscopy include alkaline earth metals in beverages and the determination of Co, Cd and Zn in solutions containing more than 10 14 -fold excess of Na and Mg, such as sea water

  10. Microporous ceramic coated separators with superior wettability for enhancing the electrochemical performance of sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharto, Yustian; Lee, Yongho; Yu, Ji-Sang; Choi, Wonchang; Kim, Ki Jae

    2018-02-01

    Finding an alternative to glass fiber (GF) separators is a crucial factor for the fast commercialization of sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), because GF separators are too thick for use in SIBs, thereby decreasing the volumetric and gravimetric energy density. Here we propose a microporous composite separator prepared by introducing a polymeric coating layer of polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP co-polymer) with ZrO2 nanoparticles to a polyethylene (PE) separator. The coated separator efficiently enhances the cell performance of SIBs. The ZrO2 nanoparticles, finely dispersed on the polymeric coating layer, induce the formation of many micropores on the polymeric coating layer, suggesting that micropore formation on the coating layer renders the composite separator more open in structure. An ethylene carbonate/propylene carbonate liquid electrolyte for SIBs is not absorbed by PE separators even after 1 h of electrolyte droplet testing, while the proposed separator with many micropores is completely wetted by the electrolyte. Sodium ion migration across the composite separator is therefore effectively enhanced by the formation of ion transfer pathways, which improve ionic conductivity. As a result, the microporous composite separator affords stable cycle performances and excellent specific capacity retention (95.8%) after 50 cycles, comparable to those offered by a SIB with a GF separator.

  11. Design and implementation of embedded ion mobility spectrometry instrument based on SOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genwei; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yanwei; Yang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    On the hardware platform with single CYCLONE IV FPGA Chip based on SOPC technology, the control functions of IP cores of a Ion Mobility Spectrometry instrument was tested, including 32 bit Nios II soft-core processor, high-voltage module, ion gate switch, gas flow, temperature and pressure sensors, signal acquisition and communication protocol. Embedded operating system μCLinux was successfully transplanted to the hardware platform, used to schedule all the tasks, such as system initialization, parameter setting, signal processing, recognition algorithm and results display. The system was validated using the IMS diagram of Acetone reagent, and the instrument was proved to have a strong signal resolution.

  12. Silk Fibroin Separators: A Step Toward Lithium-Ion Batteries with Enhanced Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rui F P; Brito-Pereira, Ricardo; Gonçalves, Renato; Silva, Marco P; Costa, Carlos M; Silva, Maria Manuela; de Zea Bermudez, Verónica; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2018-02-14

    Battery separators based on silk fibroin (SF) have been prepared aiming at improving the environmental issues of lithium-ion batteries. SF materials with three different morphologies were produced: membrane films (SF-F), sponges prepared by lyophilization (SF-L), and electrospun membranes (SF-E). The latter materials presented a suitable porous three-dimensional microstructure and were soaked with a 1 M LiPF 6 electrolyte. The ionic conductivities for SF-L and SF-E were 1.00 and 0.32 mS cm -1 at 20 °C, respectively. A correlation between the fraction of β-sheet conformations and the ionic conductivity was observed. The electrochemical performance of the SF-based materials was evaluated by incorporating them in cathodic half-cells with C-LiFePO 4 . The discharge capacities of SF-L and SF-E were 126 and 108 mA h g -1 , respectively, at the C/2-rate and 99 and 54 mA h g -1 , respectively, at the 2C-rate. Furthermore, the capacity retention and capacity fade of the SF-L membrane after 50 cycles at the 2C-rate were 72 and 5%, respectively. These electrochemical results show that a high percentage of β-sheet conformations were of prime importance to guarantee excellent cycling performance. This work demonstrates that SF-based membranes are appropriate separators for the production of environmentally friendlier lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Electrochemical Properties of EVOH-SO3Li/PET Lithium Ion Battery Separator via Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GONG Gui-fen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available EVOH-SO3 Li/PET Li-ion battery composite membranes were prepared by means of alternated electrostatic spinning, then the morphology of the membranes was observed by scanning electron microscope, and the electrochemical properties of the membranes were tested by using an electrochemistry work station. The results show that the average diameter of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET fibre is 387nm, both two kinds of fibres exhibit uniform net-like structure. Compared with pure EVOH-SO3 Li fibre, adhesion phenomenon of modified EVOH-SO3 Li/PET fibre is not obvious anymore, and the surface of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET fibre becomes more smooth with enlarged pores between adjacent fibres; the electrochemical window of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET separator is 5.3V, bulk resistance of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET is decreased to 212.31Ω, and the ion conductivity of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET separator is 2.347×10-3 S/cm, the properties of EVOH-SO3 Li/PET membranes are improved compared with EVOH-SO3 Li.

  14. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira-Nunes, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  15. Comprehensive Gas-Phase Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Ion Population Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-05-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using D2O reagent and collision cross-section (CCS) measurements are utilized to monitor the ion conformers of the model peptide acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK. The measurements are carried out on a home-built ion mobility instrument coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer containing electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. ETD is utilized to obtain per-residue deuterium uptake data for select ion conformers, and a new algorithm is presented for interpreting the HDX data. Using molecular dynamics (MD) production data and a hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS)-number of effective collisions (NEC) model, hypothetical HDX behavior is attributed to various in-silico candidate (CCS match) structures. The HAS-NEC model is applied to all candidate structures, and non-negative linear regression is employed to determine structure contributions resulting in the best match to deuterium uptake. The accuracy of the HAS-NEC model is tested with the comparison of predicted and experimental isotopic envelopes for several of the observed c-ions. It is proposed that gas-phase HDX can be utilized effectively as a second criterion (after CCS matching) for filtering suitable MD candidate structures. In this study, the second step of structure elucidation, 13 nominal structures were selected (from a pool of 300 candidate structures) and each with a population contribution proposed for these ions.

  16. High-energy ion-beam-induced phase separation in SiOx films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldbik, W.M.; Tomozeiu, N.; Hattum, E.D. van; Lof, R.W.; Vredenberg, A.M.; Habraken, F.H.P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The modification of the nanostructure of silicon suboxide (SiO x ) films as a result of high-energy heavy-ion irradiation has been studied for the entire range 0.1≤x x films have been obtained by radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposition. For 50 MeV 63 Cu 8+ ions and an angle of incidence of 20 deg. with the plane of the surface, and for x≥0.5, it takes a fluence of about 10 14 /cm 2 to reach a Si-O-Si infrared absorption spectrum, which is supposed to be characteristic for a Si-SiO 2 composite film structure. For smaller x values, it takes a much larger fluence. The interpretation of the IR spectra is corroborated for the surface region by results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results present evidence for a mechanism, in which the phase separation takes place in the thermal spike, initiated by the energy deposited in many overlapping independent ion tracks. Such a process is possible since the suboxides fulfill the conditions for spinodal decomposition

  17. Application Of Electronic Nose And Ion Mobility Spectrometer To Quality Control Of Spice Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, U.; Tiebe, C.; Huebert, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the application of electronic nose (e-nose) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to quality control and to find out product adulteration of spice mixtures. Therefore the gaseous head space phase of four different spice mixtures (spices for sausages and saveloy) was differed from original composition and product adulteration. In this set of experiments metal-oxide type e-nose (KAMINA-type) has been used, and characteristic patterns of data corresponding to various complex odors of the four different spice mixtures were generated. Simultaneously an ion mobility spectrometer was coupled also to an emission chamber for the detection of gaseous components of spice mixtures. The two main methods that have been used show a clear discrimination between the original spice mixtures and product adulteration could be distinguished from original spice mixtures.

  18. Radionuclide separations in the nuclear fuel cycle development and application of micro and meso porous inorganic ion-exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.S.; Luca, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: From the mining of uranium-containing ores to the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, separations technologies play a crucial role in determining the efficiency and viability of the nuclear fuel cycle. With respect to proposed Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles (ANFC), the integral role of separations is no different with solvent extraction and pyroelectrometalurgical processing dominating efforts to develop a sustainable and publicly acceptable roadmap for nuclear power in the next 100 years. An often forgotten or overlooked separation technology is ion-exchange, more specifically, inorganic ion-exchangers. This is despite the fact that these materials offer the potential advantages of process simplicity; exceptional selectivity against high background concentrations of competing ions; and the possibility of a simple immobilization route for the separated radionculides. ANSTO's principal interest in inorganic ion-exchange materials in recent years has been the development of an inorganic ion-exchanger for the pretreatment of acidic legacy 9 Mo production waste to simultaneously remove radiogenic cesium and strontium. Radiogenic cesium and strontium comprise the majority of activity in such waste and may offer increased ease in the downstream processing to immobilise this waste in a Synroc wasteform. With the reliance on separations technologies in all current ANFC concepts, and the recent admission of ANSTO to the European Commissions EUROPART project, the development of new inorganic ion-exchangers has also expanded within our group. This presentation will provide a background of the fundamentals of inorganic and composite inorganic-organic ion-exchange materials followed by specific discussion of some selected inorganic and composite ion-exchange materials being developed and studied at ANSTO. The detailed structural and ion-exchange chemistry of these materials will be discussed and note made of how such materials could benefit any of the

  19. EM∩IM: software for relating ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiacomi, Matteo T; Benesch, Justin L P

    2016-01-07

    We present EM∩IM, software that allows the calculation of collision cross-sections from electron density maps obtained for example by means of transmission electron microscopy. This allows the assessment of structures other than those described by atomic coordinates with ion mobility mass spectrometry data, and provides a new means for contouring and validating electron density maps. EM∩IM thereby facilitates the use of data obtained in the gas phase within structural biology studies employing diverse experimental methodologies.

  20. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and f...

  1. Identification and interconversion of diastereomeric oligo-Troger bases probed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Révész, Agnes; Schröder, Detlef; Rokob, Tibor András; Havlík, M.; Dolenský, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 19 (2012), s. 6987-6995 ISSN 1463-9076 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1445; European Research Council(XE) AdG HORIZOMS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cross section * epimerization * ion mobility * mass spectrometry * Troeger bases Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  2. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Rudnicka, Joanna; Mochalski, Pawe; Agapiou, Agapios; Statheropoulos, Milt; Amann, Anton; Buszewski, Bogusaw

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the detection of human urine as an indication of human presence during urban search and rescue operations in collapsed buildings. To this end, IMS with a radioactive ionization source and a multicapillary column was used to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from human urine. A study involving a group of 30 healthy volunteers resulted in the selection of seven volatile species, na...

  3. Mixed mobile ion effect on a.c. conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  4. Development of long-lived radionuclide partitioning technology - Preparation of ion exchanges for selective separation of radioactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Joong; Jeong, Hae In; Shim, Min Sook [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong [Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Ion exchanger contained nitrogen-oxygen donor macrocyclic units was synthesized, and immobilization process was carried out by adsorption of the exchanger to silica gel. The binding constants were measured with acid concentration. From the binding constants, selectivity for Pt(II) ion and acid concentration of eluents were determined. The most optimum conditions for the separation were also determined from investigating the effects of amount of immobile phase and column length. And liarit aza-crown ethers were synthesized and selectively separated Cs/Sr ion from mixed metal solution. 37= refs., 24 tabs., 40 figs. (author)

  5. Practical Limitations of Aerosol Separation by a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectrometer and condensation particle counter were used to investigate the limitations in the separation of singly and multiply charged aerosol particles by a tandem differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). The impact of particle polydispersity and morphology was investigated using three materials: nearly-monodisperse polystyrene latex nanospheres (PSL); polydisperse, nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate (AS) and polydisperse lacey fractal soot agglomerates. PSL and AS particles were easily resolved as a function of charge. For fresh soot, the presence of multiply charged particles severely affects the isolation of the singly charged particles. In cases where the DMA-APM was unable to fully resolve the singly charged particles of interest, the peak mass deviated by up to 13 % leading to errors in the mass specific extinction cross section of over 100 %. For measurements of non-spherical particles, non-symmetrical distributions of concentration as a function of mass were a sign of the presence of multiply charged particles. Under these conditions, the effects of multiply charged particles can be reduced by using a second charge neutralizer after the DMA and prior to the APM. Dilution of the aerosol stream serves to decrease the total number concentration of particles and does not remove the contributions of multiply charged particles.

  6. Investigation of the potential of silica-bonded macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Colton, N.G.; Bruening, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the testing of some novel separations materials known as SuperLig trademark materials for their ability to separate efficiently and selectively certain metal ions from a synthetic, nonradioactive nuclear waste solution. The materials, developed and patented by IBC Advanced Technologies, are highly selective macrocyclic ligands that have been covalently bonded to silica gel. The SuperLig trademark materials that were tested are: (1) SuperLig trademark 601 for barium (Ba 2+ ) and strontium (Sr 2+ ) separation, (2) SuperLig trademark 602 for cesium (Cs + ) and rubidium (Rb + ) separation, (3) SuperLig trademark 27 for palladium (Pd 2+ ) separation, and (4) SuperLig trademark II for silver (Ag + ) and ruthenium (Ru 3+ ) separation. Our observations show that the technology for separating metal ions using silica-bonded macrocycles is essentially sound and workable to varying degrees of success that mainly depend on the affinity of the macrocycle for the metal ion of interest. It is expected that ligands will be discovered or synthesized that are amenable to separating metal ions of interest using this technology. Certainly more development, testing, and evaluation is warranted. 3 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-C2H6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon (Xe) with ethane (C2H6) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm-1ṡ bar-1), at room temperature. The time of arrival spectra revealed two peaks throughout the entire range studied which were attributed to ion species with 3-carbons (C3H5+, C3H6+ C3H8+ and C3H9+) and with 4-carbons (C4H7+, C4H9+ and C4H10+). Besides these, and for Xe concentrations above 70%, a bump starts to appear at the right side of the main peak for reduced electric fields higher than 20 Td, which was attributed to the resonant charge transfer of C2H6+ to C2H6 that affects the mobility of its ion products (C3H8+ and C3H9+). The time of arrival spectra for Xe concentrations of 20%, 50%, 70% and 90% are presented, together with the reduced mobilities as a function of the Xe concentration calculated from the peaks observed for the low reduced electric fields and pressures studied.

  8. Online hydrogen/deuterium exchange performed in the ion mobility cell of a hybrid mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Kornél; Redeuil, Karine; Rezzi, Serge

    2009-11-15

    The present paper describes the performance of online, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange implemented in the ion mobility cell of a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deuterium oxide and deuterated methanol were utilized to create deuterated vapor that is introduced into the ion mobility region of the mass spectrometer. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange occurs spontaneously in the milliseconds time frame without the need of switching the instrument into ion mobility mode. The exchange was studied in case of low molecular weight molecules and proteins. The observed number of exchanged hydrogens was equal to the number of theoretically exchangeable hydrogens for all low molecular weight compounds. This method needs only minimal instrumental modifications, is simple, cheap, environment friendly, compatible with ultraperformance liquid chromatography, and can be implemented on commercially available instruments. It does not compromise choice of liquid chromatographic solvents and accurate mass or parallel-fragmentation (MS(E)) methods. The performance of this method was compared to that of conventional alternatives where the deuterated solvent is introduced into the cone gas of the instrument. Although the degree of exchange was similar between the two methods, the "cone gas method" requires 10 times higher deuterated solvent volumes (50 muL/min) and offers reduced sensitivity in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mode. The presented method is suggested as a standard future element of mass spectrometers to aid online structural characterization of unknowns and to study conformational changes of proteins with hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

  9. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-C2H6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdigoto, J.M.C.; Cortez, A.F.V.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon (Xe) with ethane (C 2 H 6 ) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8–10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range (2.4–6.1 kV⋅cm −1 ⋅ bar −1 ), at room temperature. The time of arrival spectra revealed two peaks throughout the entire range studied which were attributed to ion species with 3-carbons (C 3 H 5 + , C 3 H 6 + C 3 H 8 + and C 3 H 9 + ) and with 4-carbons (C 4 H 7 + , C 4 H 9 + and C 4 H 10 + ). Besides these, and for Xe concentrations above 70%, a bump starts to appear at the right side of the main peak for reduced electric fields higher than 20 Td, which was attributed to the resonant charge transfer of C 2 H 6 + to C 2 H 6 that affects the mobility of its ion products (C 3 H 8 + and C 3 H 9 + ). The time of arrival spectra for Xe concentrations of 20%, 50%, 70% and 90% are presented, together with the reduced mobilities as a function of the Xe concentration calculated from the peaks observed for the low reduced electric fields and pressures studied.

  10. Hysteresis and Photoinstability Caused by Mobile Ions in Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Hoon; Mai, Xuan Dung; Jeong, Sohee; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2017-11-02

    Organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaics (PVs) have recently attracted considerable attention as their PV performance has rapidly improved. Abnormal current-voltage (I-V) characteristics or I-V hysteresis, however, were occasionally observed in such systems that hampered the development of the PV technology. Here we study the hysteresis of organic-inorganic hybrid colloidal quantum dot (CQD) PVs by analyzing I-V characteristics upon systematic modulation of organic components of CQDs. We demonstrate that an external bias stress to CQD films transiently prompts redistribution of mobile ions, particularly protons of surface ligands, thus leading to the formation of a transient space-charge region in the CQD films. The variable space-charge region causes I-V hysteresis and photoinstability of CQD PVs, which is closely correlated with the transient behavior of mobile ions. Our findings here could provide significant implications to the understanding of the influence of mobile ions on I-V hysteresis in other organic-inorganic hybrid PVs such as perovskites.

  11. The effect of magnetite nanoparticles synthesis conditions on their ability to separate heavy metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobik Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite nanoparticles have become a promising material for scientific research. Among numerous technologies of their synthesis, co-precipitation seems to be the most convenient, less time-consuming and cheap method which produces fine and pure iron oxide particles applicable to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to investigate how the co-precipitation synthesis parameters, such as temperature and base volume, influence the magnetite nanoparticles ability to separate heavy metal ions. The synthesis were conducted at nine combinations of different ammonia volumes - 8 cm3, 10 cm3, 15 cm3 and temperatures - 30°C, 60°C, 90°C for each ammonia volume. Iron oxides synthesized at each combination were examined as an adsorbent of seven heavy metals: Cr(VI, Pb(II, Cr(III, Cu(II, Zn(II, Ni(II and Cd(II. The representative sample of magnetite was characterized using XRD, SEM and BET methods. It was observed that more effective sorbent for majority of ions was produced at 30°C using 10 cm3 of ammonia. The characterization of the sample produced at these reaction conditions indicate that pure magnetite with an average crystallite size of 23.2 nm was obtained (XRD, the nanosized crystallites in the sample were agglomerated (SEM and the specific surface area of the aggregates was estimated to be 55.64 m2·g-1 (BET. The general conclusion of the work is the evidence that magnetite nanoparticles have the ability to adsorb heavy metal ions from the aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of the process depends on many factors such as kind of heavy metal ion or the synthesis parameters of the sorbent.

  12. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  13. Ignition method of corona discharge with modulation of the field in ion source of ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the ignition of the corona discharge has been developed, which improves the stability of the ion mobility spectrometer and the resolution of the instrument. The system of forming a corona discharge without additional electrodes, which are used in a number of known structures for the pre-ionization, has been developed. This simplifies the design of the proposed source and an electronic control circuit. IMS technology is widely used in different civil and military fields for vapor-phase detection of explosive, narcotics, chemical warfare agents, biology molecules and so on. There are set of methods whose are used for the ionization of molecules under analysis. They are the following: radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, electric field ionization, corona spray ionization, electro spray ionization, roentgen ionization, and surface ionization. All these methods has their own advantages and disadvantages. A comparing of ion mobility spectra of non-polar hydrocarbons for photoionization, corona discharge ionization and 63 Ni ionization, had carried in. In our work we have investigated four types of IMS spectrometers whose use different sources for molecules under analysis ionization. They use radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, and roentgen ionization. The traditional explosives had investigated in experiments. In electricity, a corona discharge is an electrical discharge brought on by the ionization of a fluid surrounding a conductor, which occurs when the potential gradient (the strength of the electric field) exceeds a certain value, but conditions are insufficient to cause complete electrical breakdown or arcing.

  14. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  15. Nanoparticle-coated separators for lithium-ion batteries with advanced electrochemical performance

    KAUST Repository

    Fang, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple, scalable approach to improve the interfacial characteristics and, thereby, the performance of commonly used polyolefin based battery separators. The nanoparticle-coated separators are synthesized by first plasma treating the membrane in oxygen to create surface anchoring groups followed by immersion into a dispersion of positively charged SiO 2 nanoparticles. The process leads to nanoparticles electrostatically adsorbed not only onto the exterior of the surface but also inside the pores of the membrane. The thickness and depth of the coatings can be fine-tuned by controlling the ζ-potential of the nanoparticles. The membranes show improved wetting to common battery electrolytes such as propylene carbonate. Cells based on the nanoparticle-coated membranes are operable even in a simple mixture of EC/PC. In contrast, an identical cell based on the pristine, untreated membrane fails to be charged even after addition of a surfactant to improve electrolyte wetting. When evaluated in a Li-ion cell using an EC/PC/DEC/VC electrolyte mixture, the nanoparticle-coated separator retains 92% of its charge capacity after 100 cycles compared to 80 and 77% for the plasma only treated and pristine membrane, respectively. © the Owner Societies 2011.

  16. Note: Buffer gas temperature inhomogeneities and design of drift-tube ion mobility spectrometers: Warnings for real-world applications by non-specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, R.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates gas phase ions moving under an electric field according to their size-to-charge ratio. IMS is the method of choice to detect illegal drugs and explosives in customs and airports making accurate determination of reduced ion mobilities (K0) important for national security. An ion mobility spectrometer with electrospray ionization coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to study uncertainties in buffer gas temperatures during mobility experiments. Differences up to 16°C were found in the buffer gas temperatures in different regions of the drift tube and up to 42°C between the buffer gas and the drift tube temperatures. The drift tube temperature is used as an approximation to the buffer gas temperature for the calculation of K0 because the buffer gas temperature is hard to measure. This is leading to uncertainties in the determination of K0 values. Inaccurate determination of K0 values yields false positives that delay the cargo and passengers in customs and airports. Therefore, recommendations are issued for building mobility tubes to assure a homogeneous temperature of the buffer gas. Because the temperature and other instrumental parameters are difficult to measure in IMS, chemical standards should always be used when calculating K0. The difference of 42°C between the drift tube and buffer gas temperatures found in these experiments produces a 10.5% error in the calculation of K0. This large inaccuracy in K0 shows the importance of a correct temperature measurement in IMS.

  17. [Influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic separation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoping; Yao, Shanshan; Jin, Micong

    2011-10-01

    The influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation were investigated. The organic modification effects of acids, i. e. , trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and buffer salts, i. e. , TFA-ammonium acetate (AmAc) were studied emphatically. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percentages of ion-suppressors in the mobile phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, separately. The separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA (0.01%, v/v)-AmAc (2. 5 mmol/L) aqueous solution as the mobile phases. An RP-HPLC method was established for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives in red wine. In the range of 10. 0 - 100. 0 mg/L, nine food additives showed good linearity with the correlation coefficients ( r2 ) larger than 0. 999 1. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0. 33 - 2. 36 mg/L and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 1. 11 - 7. 80 mg/L. The spiked recoveries were between 87. 61% and 108. 4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2. 2% -9. 4%. These results are of referential significance for the rapid establishment and accu- rate optimization of RP-HPLC separation for the simultaneous determination of food additives in other foods.

  18. Adsorption of fluids in slitlike pores containing a small amount of mobile ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Bucior, K; Sokołowski, S; Staszewski, T

    2005-11-01

    We apply density functional theory to investigate changes in the phase behavior of a fluid caused by the presence of mobile ions inside the pore. The approach has been based on the fundamental measure density functional theory and on the theory of nonuniform electrolytes developed recently by O. Pizio, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokołowski [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2005) 11,957]. We have evaluated capillary condensation phase diagrams for pores of different widths and for different concentrations of confined ions. The calculations have demonstrated that the presence of ions leads to lowering the critical temperature and to an increase of the value of the chemical potential at the capillary condensation point.

  19. Polypropylene/hydrophobic-silica-aerogel-composite separator induced enhanced safety and low polarization for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guanhua; Li, Zihe; Mi, Liwei; Zheng, Jinyun; Feng, Xiangming; Chen, Weihua

    2018-02-01

    Separator as an important part of lithium-ion batteries, allowing the ion to transfer and preventing the direct contact of anode with cathode, determines the safety of the batteries. In this work, a kind of polypropylene/hydrophobic silica-aerogel-composite (SAC) separator is fabricated through combining hydrophobic silica aerogel and polypropylene (PP) separator. The rationally designed SAC effectively increases the thermal stability of the separator with slightly growing weight (the area retention rate is 30% higher than that of the PP separator after being heated for 30 min at 160 °C). In addition, the hydrophobic silica aerogel layer in SAC significantly improves the wettability of PP separator to electrolyte owning to the introduced hydrophobic functional groups of -Si(CH3)3 and porous structure, and the contact angles of SAC separator to several common organic electrolytes (EC/DMC, DMC/DOL, Diglyme) are close to 0°. Electrochemical tests show that the prepared SAC separator can decrease the polarization of Li-ion batteries and leads to improved power performance and cycle stability. And the SAC separator is firm with neglectable abscission after folding 200 times. This work provides a new way to improve the safety and simultaneously reduce the polarization of the batteries, implying promising application potential in power batteries.

  20. Methods for separating boron from borated paraffin wax and its determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Boron compounds are found to be useful in shielding against high-energy neutrons. In radiotherapy treatments, in order to protect occupational workers and patients from the undesirable neutron and gamma doses, paraffin wax containing B 4 C/boric acid is used. Low-level borate wastes generated from the nuclear power plants have been immobilized with paraffin wax using a concentrate waste drying system (CWDS). Borated paraffin waxes are prepared by mixing calculated amounts of either boric acid or boron carbide with the molten wax. This necessitates the determination of boron at different locations in order to check the homogeneous distribution of B over the borated wax. The determination of boron in nuclear materials is inevitable due to its high neutron absorption cross section. For the determination of boron in borated waxes, not many methods have been reported. A method based on the pyrohydrolysis extraction of boron and its quantification with ion chromatography was proposed for paraffin waxes borated with H 3 BO 3 and B 4 C. The B 4 C optimum pyrohydrolysis conditions were identified. Wax samples were mixed with U 3 O 8 , which prevents the sample from flare up, and also accelerates the extraction of boron. Pyrohydrolysis was carried out with moist O 2 at 950℃ for 60 and 90 min for wax with H 3 BO 3 and wax with B 4 C, respectively. Two simple methods of separation based on alkali extraction and melting wax in alkali were also developed exclusively for wax with H 3 BO 3 . In all the separations, the recovery of B was above 98%. During IC separation, B was separated as boron-mannitol anion complex. Linear calibration was obtained between 0.1 and 50 ppm of B, and LOD was calculated as 5 ppb (S/N=3). The reproducibility was better than 5% (RSD)

  1. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu; Jia Jian; Gao Xiaoguang; He Xiuli; Li Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. ► Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. ► Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. ► Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. ► The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L −1 (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  2. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shu; Jia Jian; Gao Xiaoguang; He Xiuli [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li Jianping, E-mail: jpli@mail.ie.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L{sup -1} (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  3. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of plasma proteins when incorporating traveling wave ion mobility into a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry workflow for biomarker discovery: use of product ion quantitation as an alternative data analysis tool for label free quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charlotte E; Ng, Leong L; Hakimi, Amirmansoor; Willingale, Richard; Jones, Donald J L

    2014-02-18

    Discovery of protein biomarkers in clinical samples necessitates significant prefractionation prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Integrating traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) enables in-line gas phase separation which when coupled with nanoflow liquid chromatography and data independent acquisition tandem mass spectrometry, confers significant advantages to the discovery of protein biomarkers by improving separation and inherent sensitivity. Incorporation of TWIMS leads to a packet of concentrated ions which ultimately provides a significant improvement in sensitivity. As a consequence of ion packeting, when present at high concentrations, accurate quantitation of proteins can be affected due to detector saturation effects. Human plasma was analyzed in triplicate using liquid-chromatography data independent acquisition mass spectrometry (LC-DIA-MS) and using liquid-chromatography ion-mobility data independent acquisition mass spectrometry (LC-IM-DIA-MS). The inclusion of TWIMS was assessed for the effect on sample throughput, data integrity, confidence of protein and peptide identification, and dynamic range. The number of identified proteins is significantly increased by an average of 84% while both the precursor and product mass accuracies are maintained between the modalities. Sample dynamic range is also maintained while quantitation is achieved for all but the most abundant proteins by incorporating a novel data interpretation method that allows accurate quantitation to occur. This additional separation is all achieved within a workflow with no discernible deleterious effect on throughput. Consequently, TWIMS greatly enhances proteome coverage and can be reliably used for quantification when using an alternative product ion quantification strategy. Using TWIMS in biomarker discovery in human plasma is thus recommended.

  4. Event-shape-engineering study of charge separation in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fufang; Bryon, Jacob; Wen, Liwen; Wang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Recent measurements of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions have indicated charge-separation signals perpendicular to the reaction plane, and have been related to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). However, the correlation signal is contaminated with the background caused by the collective motion (flow) of the collision system, and an effective approach is needed to remove the flow background from the correlation. We present a method study with simplified Monte Carlo simulations and a multi-phase transport model, and develop a scheme to reveal the true CME signal via event-shape engineering with the flow vector of the particles of interest. Supported by a grant (DE-FG02-88ER40424) from U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics

  5. Ion chromatographic separation and spectrophotometric determination of U(IV) and U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, H.; Coetzee, P.P. (Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rand Afrikaans Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1992-01-01

    An ion chromatographic method is described for the simultaneous determination of U(IV) and U(VI) species in mixtures of uranium oxides and fluorides. The separation of the uranium species was performed on a Dionex HPIC-AS5 column using a 0.1 M MgSO[sub 4]-0.05 M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] eluent mixture. The uranium species were determined spectrophotometrically at 650 nm as uranium Arsenazo-III complexes after post-column derivitization. Oxygen was removed from all solutions by nitrogen flux to ensure the stability of the U(IV) species during the analytical procedure. Analysis time required per sample was 6 minutes. Detection limits for both species were around 200 [mu]g dm[sup -3]. The method was applied to the analysis of uranium compound mixtures from the uranium fluorination process for the production of UF[sub 6]. (orig.).

  6. Alternative radiochemical heavy ion activation methods for the production and separation of thallium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta.; Ramaswami, A.

    2002-01-01

    Heavy ion activation of natural gold foil with a 7 Li beam results in the formation of carrier-free 199-201 Pb radionuclides along with their corresponding decay products, 199-201 Tl, in the matrix. At 49 MeV projectile energy, the production of 199 Tl through its precursor 199 Pb is maximal, while that of other thallium radionuclides is minimal. Another way for the direct production of carrier-free thallium radionuclides is to irradiate natural platinum foil with a 7 Li beam; on this case, production of 199 Tl is maximal at 43 MeV projectile energy. The carrier-free thallium radionuclides have been separated from the bulk target matrix gold and platinum by liquid-liquid extraction using trioctylamine as a liquid anion exchanger

  7. Standard practice for The separation of americium from plutonium by ion exchange

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the use of an ion exchange technique to separate plutonium from solutions containing low concentrations of americium prior to measurement of the 241Am by gamma counting. 1.2 This practice covers the removal of plutonium, but not all the other radioactive isotopes that may interfere in the determination of 241Am. 1.3 This practice can be used when 241Am is to be determined in samples in which the plutonium is in the form of metal, oxide, or other solid provided that the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved (See Test Methods C758, C759, and C1168). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Study on Mobility, Distribution and Rapid Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detection of Seven Pesticide Residues in Cucumber, Apple, and Cherry Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Yuan, Chunhao; Chen, Ronghua; Yang, Juan; Li, Yifan; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2017-01-11

    This research explores the mobility and distribution rules of simazine, acetamiprid, hexazinone, paclobutrazol, amitraz, clofentezine, and boscalid in the pulp and peel of apple, cucumber, and cherry tomato. A laboratory test was carried out by treating the matrices with standard solution for different periods of time. The percentage sorption of pesticides ranged from 0.02 to 89.3% for the three matrices. The pesticides' distribution was also determined, and all pesticides showed ratio values (Q) between pulp and peel concentrations in the three matrices of <0.8, which proved that the highest pesticides' content was found in the peel. In addition, a rapid and simple process combining a surface swab capture method and pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (PGD-IMS) detection was established for the detection of pesticides on matrix surfaces. In the swab method, the whole matrix surface was swabbed manually by swab sticks, and swab sticks were agitated in acetonitrile to release the pesticides. The releasing factors of pesticides in the three matrices were calculated. The linearity, LOD, LOQ, and matrix effect were investigated to assess the applicability of the swab-IMS process in practical analysis. The swab-IMS method is rapid, sensitive, and quantitative and can be achieved in the field.

  9. Separation of amaranthine-type betacyanins by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerz, Gerold; Gebers, Nadine; Szot, Dominika; Szaleniec, Maciej; Winterhalter, Peter; Wybraniec, Slawomir

    2014-05-30

    Betacyanins, red-violet plant pigments, were fractionated by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography (IP-HSCCC) from leaves extract of Iresine lindenii Van Houtte, an ornamental plant of the family Amaranthaceae. An HSCCC solvent system consisting of TBME-1-BuOH-ACN-H2O (1:3:1:5, v/v/v/v) was applied using ion-pair forming heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA). Significantly different elution profiles of betacyanin diastereomeric pairs (derivatives based on betanidin and isobetanidin) observed in the HSCCC in comparison to HPLC systems indicate a complementarity of both techniques' fractionation capabilities. The numerous diastereomeric pairs can be selectively separated from each other using the HSCCC system simplifying the pigment purification process. Apart from the three well known highly abundant pigments (amaranthine, betanin and iresinin I) together with their isoforms, three new acylated (feruloylated and sinapoylated) betacyanins as well as known pigment hylocerenin (previously isolated from cacti fruits) were characterized in the plant for the first time and they are new for the whole Amaranthaceae family. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Recycling metals from lithium ion battery by mechanical separation and vacuum metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiefeng; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhengming

    2017-09-15

    The large-batch application of lithium ion batteries leads to the mass production of spent batteries. So the enhancement of disposal ability of spent lithium ion batteries is becoming very urgent. This study proposes an integrated process to handle bulk spent lithium manganese (LiMn 2 O 4 ) batteries to in situ recycle high value-added products without any additives. By mechanical separation, the mixed electrode materials mainly including binder, graphite and LiMn 2 O 4 are firstly obtained from spent batteries. Then, the reaction characteristics for the oxygen-free roasting of mixed electrode materials are analyzed. And the results show that mixed electrode materials can be in situ converted into manganese oxide (MnO) and lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) at 1073K for 45min. In this process, the binder is evaporated and decomposed into gaseous products which can be collected to avoid disposal cost. Finally, 91.30% of Li resource as Li 2 CO 3 is leached from roasted powders by water and then high value-added Li 2 CO 3 crystals are further gained by evaporating the filter liquid. The filter residues are burned in air to remove the graphite and the final residues as manganous-manganic oxide (Mn 3 O 4 ) is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved detection of drugs of abuse using high-performance ion mobility spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI-HPIMS) for urine matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midey, Anthony J; Patel, Aesha; Moraff, Carol; Krueger, Clinton A; Wu, Ching

    2013-11-15

    High-performance ion mobility spectrometry (HPIMS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to separate drugs of abuse compounds as a function of drift time (ion mobility), which is based on their size, structural shape, and mass-to-charge. HPIMS has also been used to directly detect and identify a variety of the most commonly encountered illegal drugs, as well as a mixture of opiates in a urine matrix without extra sample pretreatment. HPIMS has shown resolving power greater than 65 comparable to that of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with only 1 mL of solvent and sample required using air as the IMS separation medium. The HPIMS method can achieve two-order of magnitude linear response, precise drift times, and high peak area precision with percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) less than 3% for sample quantitation. The reduced mobilities measured agree very well with other IMS measurements, allowing a simple "dilute-and-shoot" method to be used to detect a mixture of codeine and morphine in urine matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO2 and CO2-N2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Cortez, A.F.V.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K 0 , of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO 2 ) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO 2 -N 2 ) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO 2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO 2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO 2 , while below 25% of CO 2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm 2 V −1 s −1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO 2 , and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO 2 ). For the CO 2 -N 2 , the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO 2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO 2 , namely CO 2 + (CO 2 ), with a second peak appearing for CO 2 concentrations below 10%. This second peak, with higher mobility, was attributed to CO 2 + ions. The mobility values of the main peak range between 2.11 ± 0.04 and 1.10 ± 0.03 cm 2 V −1 s −1 in the 1%–99% interval of CO 2 , while the second peak's from 2.26 ± 0.02 and 1.95 ± 0.04 cm 2 V −1 s −1 (1%–10% of CO 2 ). The inverse of the mobility displays an aproximately linear dependence on the CO 2 concentration in the mixture.

  13. Plasma processes in the preparation of lithium-ion battery electrodes and separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Avendaño, J.; Veilleux, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are the energy storage devices that dominate the portable electronic market. They are now also considered and used for electric vehicles and are foreseen to enable the smart grid. Preparing batteries with high energy and power densities, elevated cycleability and improved safety could be achieved by controlling the microstructure of the electrode materials and the interaction they have with the electrolyte over the working potential window. Selecting appropriate precursors, reducing the preparation steps and selecting more efficient synthesis methods could also significantly reduce the costs of LIB components. Implementing plasma technologies can represent a high capital investment, but the versatility of the technologies allows the preparation of powdered nanoparticles with different morphologies, as well as with carbon and metal oxide coatings. Plasma technologies can also enable the preparation of binder-free thin films and coatings for LIB electrodes, and the treatment of polymeric membranes to be used as separators. This review paper aims at highlighting the different thermal and non-thermal plasma technologies recently used to synthesize coated and non-coated active materials for LIB cathodes and anodes, and to modify the surface of separators.

  14. Separation and purification of uranium by ion exchange on stannic phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Nadkarni, M.N.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1977-01-01

    Exchange of uranium, plutonium and some fission product elements was investigated on stannic phosphate (SnP) exchanger from nitric acid solutions. Batch equilibration studies exhibited stronger absorption of plutonium (IV) and some of the fission products on the exchanger than uranium. This indicated the possibility of separation and purification of uranium from plutonium and fission products. Breakthrough studies were carried out to determine the effects of flow-rates and uranium, plutonium and free nitric acid concentrations in the feed to establish the optimum conditions for this separation. Several reagents were also tested to find suitable eluting agents to desorb plutonium from the exchanger. The results indicate that traces of plutonium and fission products present as impurities in the uranium product of the purex process stream can be removed by ion exchange method using SnP. 1 M nitric acid solution containing low concentrations of reducing agents such as ferrous sulfamate or ascorbic acid was found to be an effective eluting agent for plutonium. (author)

  15. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water by using ion-exclusion chromatographic separation and post-column derivatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Masuda, Wakako; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water was examined by using ion-exclusion chromatography and post-column derivatization. Phosphate and silicate ions were separated by the ion-exclusion column packed with a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H + -form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) by using ultra pure water as an eluent. After the post-column derivatization with molybdate and ascorbic acid, so-called molybdenum-blue, both ions were determined simultaneously by spectrophotometry. The effects of sulfuric acid, sodium molybdate and ascorbic acid concentrations and reaction coil length, which have relation to form the reduced complexes of molybdate and ions, on the detector response for phosphate and silicate ions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions (color-forming reactant, 50 mM sulfuric acid-10 mM sodium molybdate; reducing agent, 50 mM ascorbic acid; reaction coil length, 6 m), the calibration curves of phosphate and silicate ions were linear in the range of 50-2000 μg L -1 as P and 250-10,000 μg L -1 as Si. This method was successfully applied to water quality monitoring of Kurose-river watershed and it suggested that the effluent from a biological sewage treatment plant was significant source of phosphate ion in Kurose-river water

  16. Mobilities of silicon cluster ions: The reactivity of silicon sausages and spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Martin F.; Bower, J. Eric

    1992-06-01

    The mobilities of size selected silicon cluster ions, Si+n (n=10-60), have been measured using injected ion drift tube techniques. Two families of isomers have been resolved by their different mobilities. From comparison of the measured mobilities with the predictions of a simple model, it appears that clusters larger than Si+10 follow a prolate growth sequence to give sausage-shaped geometries. A more spherical isomer appears for clusters with n>23, and this isomer completely dominates for unannealed clusters with n>35. Annealing converts the sausage-shaped isomer into the more spherical form for n>30. Activation energies for this ``sausage-to-sphere'' structural transition have been estimated for several cluster sizes and are ˜1.2-1.5 eV. We have examined the chemical reactivity of the sausages and spheres towards both C2H4 and O2. With C2H4 large differences in reactivity of the isomers were found, with the spherical isomer often being more reactive than the sausage form by more than an order of magnitude. With O2 the variations in reactivity were smaller. Despite the substantial differences in reactivity observed for the two isomers in the cluster size regime where both forms coexist, examination of a broader range of cluster sizes shows that there is not a systematic change in reactivity associated with the geometry change.

  17. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library.

  18. Separators with Biomineralized Zirconia Coatings for Enhanced Thermo- and Electro-Performance of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jun-Ke; Wu, Guang-Peng; Yang, Hao-Cheng; Arges, Christopher G; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2017-07-05

    Porous separators are key components for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and they have drawn considerable attention because of their vital role in governing battery cost and performance (e.g., power density, safety, and longevity). Here, zirconia-coated separators were fabricated via a facile biomineralization process with the aim to improve the performance of commercialized polypropylene separators. The as-prepared organic-inorganic composite separators show excellent thermal stability, even at the melting temperature (160 °C) of polypropylene. This is due to the well-distributed zirconia coatings on the separator surfaces. Furthermore, the interfacial impedance of the composite separators is only 343.8 Ω, which is four times lower than the pristine polypropylene ones. The results demonstrate an attractive method to prepare organic-inorganic composite separators with outstanding properties, which makes them promising candidates for high-performance LIBs.

  19. Dynamic separation of Szilard-Chalmers reaction products applied to the trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.B.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of dynamic elution of recoiled 51 Cr +3 , formed by the Szilard-Chalmers reaction during the irradiation of trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin is presented. The influence of some factors on the separation yield of chromium-51, such as: composition, concentration and flow rate of eluent, mesh size of the resin and irradiation time are studied. The results are compardd with those obtained by the static method, in which the recoiled atom is separated from the target after irradiation. Because of the high separation yield of chromium-51, the method of dynamic separation is proposed for routine production of this elemnt, with high specific activities. (author) [pt

  20. Online Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry (HDX-IM-MS): a Systematic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryar, Adam; Groves, Kate; Quaglia, Milena

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an important tool for measuring and monitoring protein structure. A bottom-up approach to HDX-MS provides peptide level deuterium uptake values and a more refined localization of deuterium incorporation compared with global HDX-MS measurements. The degree of localization provided by HDX-MS is proportional to the number of peptides that can be identified and monitored across an exchange experiment. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to improve MS-based peptide analysis of biological samples through increased separation capacity. The integration of IMS within HDX-MS workflows has been commercialized but presently its adoption has not been widespread. The potential benefits of IMS, therefore, have not yet been fully explored. We herein describe a comprehensive evaluation of traveling wave ion mobility integrated within an online-HDX-MS system and present the first reported example of UDMSE acquisition for HDX analysis. Instrument settings required for optimal peptide identifications are described and the effects of detector saturation due to peak compression are discussed. A model system is utilized to confirm the comparability of HDX-IM-MS and HDX-MS uptake values prior to an evaluation of the benefits of IMS at increasing sample complexity. Interestingly, MS and IM-MS acquisitions were found to identify distinct populations of peptides that were unique to the respective methods, a property that can be utilized to increase the spatial resolution of HDX-MS experiments by >60%. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  2. "Evaluation of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of mitragynine in kratom products".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenffinger, Nathan; Ritchie, Melissa; Ruth, Ashley; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie

    2017-02-05

    An ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method was developed for the rapid detection of mitragynine, the most abundant alkaloid in Mitragyna speciosa also known as kratom. The peak corresponding to the mitragynine protonated ion exhibited a reduced ion mobility of 0.95±0.00014cm 2 /(Vs), and the mitragynine limit of detection using IMS was 0.5ng. The IMS method was applied to the analysis of 15 commercial samples suspected of containing kratom. IMS results were compared to those obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the same samples. Mitragynine was conclusively detected in 14 of 15 samples using LC-MS/MS and 13 of 15 samples using IMS. The discrepancy between methods reflected the fact that one sample contained mitragynine at a concentration below the IMS detection limit. This study demonstrates the utility of IMS for the rapid screening of products containing kratom as well as the scientific reliability of the IMS screening method, which was demonstrated by comparing the IMS results to the confirmatory results obtained using LC-MS/MS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Retention modeling under organic modifier gradient conditions in ion-pair reversed-phase chromatography. Application to the separation of a set of underivatized amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa-Louisi, A; Agrafiotou, P; Papachristos, K

    2010-07-01

    The combined effect of the ion-pairing reagent concentration, C(ipr), and organic modifier content, phi, on the retention under phi-gradient conditions at different constant C(ipr) was treated in this study by using two approaches. In the first approach, the prediction of the retention time of a sample solute is based on a direct fitting procedure of a proper retention model to 3-D phi-gradient retention data obtained under the same phi-linear variation but with different slope and time duration of the initial isocratic part and in the presence of various constant C(ipr) values in the eluent. The second approach is based on a retention model describing the combined effect of C(ipr) and phi on the retention of solutes in isocratic mode and consequently analyzes isocratic data obtained in mobile phases containing different C(ipr) values. The effectiveness of the above approaches was tested in the retention prediction of a mixture of 16 underivatized amino acids using mobile phases containing acetonitrile as organic modifier and sodium dodecyl sulfate as ion-pairing reagent. From these approaches, only the first one gives satisfactory predictions and can be successfully used in optimization of ion-pair chromatographic separations under gradient conditions. The failure of the second approach to predict the retention of solutes in the gradient elution mode in the presence of different C(ipr) values was attributed to slow changes in the distribution equilibrium of ion-pairing reagents caused by phi-variation.

  5. Relaxation effects in ionic mobility and cluster formation: negative ions in SF{sub 6} at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A M; De Urquijo, J; Hinojosa, G [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, PO Box 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Hernandez-Avila, J L [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Pablo 180, 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Basurto, E, E-mail: juarez@fis.unam.m [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Pablo 180, 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-06-15

    The relaxation effects of the ionic mobility and the formation of negative-ion clusters in SF{sub 6} are studied in this work. For this purpose, we have measured the mobility of negative ions in SF{sub 6} over the pressure range 100-800 Torr at a fixed value of density-normalized electric field, E/N, of 20 Td (1 Townsend = 10{sup -17} V cm{sup 2}). The data obtained show a clear dependence of the negative-ion drift velocity on drift distance. It is observed that the drift velocity (mobility) reaches a steady-state value only for drift distances above 2 cm, over the studied pressure range. In addition to this, we have observed that the ionic mobility depends strongly on the gas pressure. An explanation of this dependence of the ionic mobility on gas pressure is given in terms of a negative-ion clustering formation process. It was found that the assumption of a linear dependence of the cluster ion mass on pressure provides a satisfactory explanation for the observed mobilities.

  6. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membranes with varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities as lithium-ion battery separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xiaojing; Kolla, Praveen; Yang, Ruidong; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Yong; Smirnova, Alevtina L.; Fong, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nine types of electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membranes were prepared. • These membranes had varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities. • The membranes were explored as innovative Li-ion battery (LIB) separators. • The hot-pressed membrane with thin fibers had superior performance as LIB separator. - Abstract: In this study, nine types of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membranes with varied fiber diameters and different membrane porosities are prepared by electrospinning followed by hot-pressing. Subsequently, these membranes are explored as Li-ion battery (LIB) separators. The impacts of fiber diameter and membrane porosity on electrolyte uptake, Li + ion transport through the membrane, electrochemical oxidation potential, and membrane performance as LIB separator (during charge/discharge cycling and rate capability tests of a cathodic half-cell) have been investigated. When compared to commercial Celgard PP separator, hot-pressed electrospun PAN nanofibrous membranes exhibit larger electrolyte uptake, higher thermal stability, wider electrochemical potential window, higher Li + ion permeability, and better electrochemical performance in LiMn 2 O 4 /separator/Li half-cell. The results also indicate that the PAN-based membrane/separator with small fiber diameters of 200–300 nm and hot-pressed under high pressure of 20 MPa surpasses all other membranes/separators and demonstrates the best performance, leading to the highest discharge capacity (89.5 mA h g −1 at C/2 rate) and cycle life (with capacity retention ratio being 97.7%) of the half-cell. In summary, this study has revealed that the hot-pressed electrospun PAN nanofibrous membranes (particularly those consisting of thin nanofibers) are promising as high-performance LIB separators.

  7. Ion mobility based on column leaching of South African gold tailings dam with chemometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowska, Ewa M; Govender, Koovila; Viljoen, Morris

    2004-07-01

    New column leaching experiments were designed and used as an alternative rapid screening approach to element mobility assessment. In these experiments, field-moist material was treated with an extracting solution to assess the effects of acidification on element mobility in mine tailings. The main advantage of this version of column leaching experiments with partitioned segments is that they give quick information on current element mobility in conditions closely simulating field conditions to compare with common unrepresentative air-dried, sieved samples used for column leaching experiments. Layers from the tailings dump material were sampled and packed into columns. The design of columns allows extracting leachates from each layer. The extracting solutions used were natural (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 4.2) rainwater. Metals and anions were determined in the leachates. The concentrations of metals (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Al, Cr, Ni, Co, Zn, and Cu) in sample leachates were determined using ICP OES. The most important anions (NO3-, Cl-, and SO4(2)-) were determined using the closed system izotacophoresis ITP analyser. The chemical analytical data from tailings leaching and physico-chemical data from field measurements (including pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature) were used for chemometric evaluation of element mobility. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was used to evaluate ions mobility from different layers of tailings dump arising from varied pH and redox conditions. It was found that the results from the partitioned column leaching illustrate much better complex processes of metals mobility from tailings dump than the total column. The chemometric data analysis (PFA) proofed the differences in the various layers leachability that are arising from physico-chemical processes due to chemical composition of tailings dump deposit. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Performance evaluation of a non-woven lithium ion battery separator prepared through a paper-making process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosong

    2014-06-01

    Porous separator functions to electrically insulate the negative and positive electrodes yet communicate lithium ions between the two electrodes when infiltrated with a liquid electrolyte. The separator must fulfill numerous requirements (e.g. permeability, wettability, and thermal stability) in order to optimize the abuse tolerance and electrochemical performance of a battery. Non-woven mat separators have advantages such as high porosity and heat resistance. However, their applications in lithium ion batteries are very limited as their inadequate pore structures could cause accelerated battery performance degradation and even internal short. This work features the development of thermally stable non-woven composite separators using a low cost paper-making process. The composite separators offer significantly improved thermal dimensional stability and exhibit superior wettability by the liquid electrolyte compared to a conventional polypropylene separator. The open porous structures of the non-woven composite separators also resulted in high effective ionic conductivities. The electrochemical performance of the composite separators was tested in coin cells. Stable cycle performances and improved rate capabilities have been observed for the coin cells with these composite separators.

  9. Monitoring the Effect of Metal Ions on the Mobility of Artemia salina Nauplii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Kokkali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to measure the effect of toxic aqueous solutions of metals on the mobility of Artemia salina nauplii by using digital image processing. The instrument consists of a camera with a macro lens, a dark chamber, a light source and a laptop computer. Four nauplii were inserted into a macro cuvette, which contained copper, cadmium, iron and zinc ions at various concentrations. The nauplii were then filmed inside the dark chamber for two minutes and the video sequence was processed by a motion tracking algorithm that estimated their mobility. The results obtained by this system were compared to the mortality assay of the Artemia salina nauplii. Despite the small number of tested organisms, this system demonstrates great sensitivity in quantifying the mobility of the nauplii, which leads to significantly lower EC50 values than those of the mortality assay. Furthermore, concentrations of parts per trillion of toxic compounds could be detected for some of the metals. The main novelty of this instrument relies in the sub-pixel accuracy of the tracking algorithm that enables robust measurement of the deterioration of the mobility of Artemia salina even at very low concentrations of toxic metals.

  10. High performance liquid chromatography/ion-trap mass spectrometry for separation and simultaneous determination of ethynylestradiol, gestodene, levonorgestrel, cyproterone acetate and desogestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejícek, David; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2007-04-11

    A fast and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic/ion-trap mass spectrometric method (LC/MS) has been developed for simultaneous determination of ethynylestradiol (EE2), gestodene (GES), levonorgestrel (LNG), cyproterone acetate (CPA) and desogestrel (DES). Among three types of sorbents tested (C8, C18 and phenyl) from two suppliers, the best separation was achieved on reverse phase Zorbax SB-Phenyl column using aqueous methanol as a mobile phase. A linear gradient profile from 70 up to 100% (v/v) in 7th min, kept constant at 100% up to 10th min and followed by a negative gradient to 70% of methanol up to 12th min was used for elution. Applicability of electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and influence of the mobile phase composition, its flow rate, capillary/vaporizer temperature of API source and in-source fragmentor voltage ionization are discussed. The on-column limits of quantification (10S/N) were 300 pg of EE2, 14 pg of GES and LNG, 4 pg of CPA and 960 pg of DES per injection (1 microL) using APCI with data collection in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The analytical performance of the method was evaluated using the determination of EE2, GES, LNG, CPA and DES in contraceptives and river water samples.

  11. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  12. Determinants of Job Separation and Occupational Mobility in Australia. Working Paper No. 66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    In the year to February 2002, one in every five of the 9.8 million people who worked in Australia experienced at least one job separation. This paper looks at the determinants of job separation within a stayer/mover framework using individual-level data for Australia. Conditional on job separation the paper also investigates the determinants of…

  13. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Sheibani; Najmeh Haghpazir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs). Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for ...

  14. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  15. Application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in forensic chemistry and toxicology with focus on biological matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Werner; Keller, Thomas; Regenscheit, Priska

    1995-01-01

    The IMS (Ion Mobility Spectroscopy) instrument 'Ionscan' takes advantage of the fact that trace quantities of illicit drugs are adsorbed on dust particles on clothes, in cars and on other items of evidence. The dust particles are collected on a membrane filter by a special attachment on a vacuum cleaner. The sample is then directly inserted into the spectrometer and can be analyzed immediately. We show casework applications of a forensic chemistry and toxicology laboratory. One new application of IMS in forensic chemistry is the detection of psilocybin in dried mushrooms without any further sample preparation.

  16. Quantitation of 11 alkylamines in atmospheric samples: separating structural isomers by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Bryan K.; Quilty, Aleya T.; Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Ziegler, Susan E.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.

    2017-03-01

    Amines are important drivers in particle formation and growth, which have implications for Earth's climate. In this work, we developed an ion chromatographic (IC) method using sample cation-exchange preconcentration for separating and quantifying the nine most abundant atmospheric alkylamines (monomethylamine (MMAH+), dimethylamine (DMAH+), trimethylamine (TMAH+), monoethylamine (MEAH+), diethylamine (DEAH+), triethylamine (TEAH+), monopropylamine (MPAH+), isomonopropylamine (iMPAH+), and monobutylamine (MBAH+)) and two alkyl diamines (1, 4-diaminobutane (DABH+) and 1, 5-diaminopentane (DAPH+)). Further, the developed method separates the suite of amines from five common atmospheric inorganic cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+). All 16 cations are greater than 95 % baseline resolved and elute in a runtime of 35 min. This paper describes the first successful separation of DEAH+ and TMAH+ by IC and achieves separation between three sets of structural isomers, providing specificity not possible by mass spectrometry. The method detection limits for the alkylamines are in the picogram per injection range and the method precision (±1σ) analyzed over 3 months was within 16 % for all the cations. The performance of the IC method for atmospheric application was tested with biomass-burning (BB) particle extracts collected from two forest fire plumes in Canada. In extracts of a size-resolved BB sample from an aged plume, we detected and quantified MMAH+, DMAH+, TMAH+, MEAH+, DEAH+, and TEAH+ in the presence of Na+, NH4+, and K+ at molar ratios of amine to inorganic cation ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 1000. Quantities of DEAH+ and DMAH+ of 0.2-200 and 3-1200 ng m-3, respectively, were present in the extracts and an unprecedented amine-to-ammonium molar ratio greater than 1 was observed in particles with diameters spanning 56-180 nm. Extracts of respirable fine-mode particles (PM2. 5) from a summer forest fire in British Columbia in 2015 were found to contain iMPAH+, TMAH+, DEAH

  17. Separation of rare earths by ion exchange method: ion retainer Zn (II) and Cu (II) and Dowex-50 X-4 and Amberlite IR-120 resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavanin, L.A.; Tfouni, E.; Serra, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of rare earths from Brazilian monazite by ion exchange method is presented. The performance of Dowex-50 X-4 (50 to 100 mesh) and Amberlite IR-120 (20-30 mesh) and Cu (II) and Zn (II) is compared. (A.R.H.) [pt

  18. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M.

    1993-01-01

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than ∼ 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO 2 /Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  19. Electron mobility and saturation of ion yield in 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poffenberger, P.R.; Astbury, A.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Keeler, R.K.; Li, Y.; Robertson, L.P.; Rosvick, M.; Schenk, P.; Oram, C.; Sobie, R.

    1993-01-01

    The electron drift mobility μ and zero field free ion yield G fi 0 have been measured for liquid 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane using a waveform analysis. The saturation of the ion yield for highly ionizing radiation has also been investigated and parameterized using the Birks' equation. The results obtained are μ=26.3±0.8 cm 2 /V s, G fi 0 =0.743±0.029 electrons/100 eV, and a Birks' factor ranging from kB=0.222±0.014 cm/MeV at 604 V/cm to kB=0.141±0.021 cm/MeV at 3625 V/cm. (orig.)

  20. Systems Maturity Assessment of the Lithium Ion Battery for Extravehicular Mobility Unit Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Samuel P.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery (LLB/LIB) is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Silver/Zinc (Ag/Zn) Increased Capacity Battery (ICB), which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). The LLB (a battery based on commercial lithium ion cell technology) is designed to have the same electrical and mechanical interfaces as the current ICB. The EMU LIB Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the LLB either in a charger-strapped configuration or in an EMU-mounted configuration. This paper will retroactively apply the principles of Systems Maturity Assessment to the LLB project through use of the Integration Readiness Level and Earned Readiness Management. The viability of this methodology will be considered for application to new and existing technology development projects.

  1. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  2. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-19

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two (88)Sr(+) ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d(-3.0(4)) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  3. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble ( apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  4. Distance Geometry Protocol to Generate Conformations of Natural Products to Structurally Interpret Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Collision Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the separation of ionized molecules based on their charge-to-surface area (IM) and mass-to-charge ratio (MS), respectively. The IM drift time data that is obtained is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision cross section (CCS) of the ionized molecule with the neutral drift gas, which is directly related to the ion conformation and hence molecular size and shape. Studying the conformational landscape of these ionized molecules computationally provides interpretation to delineate the potential structures that these CCS values could represent, or conversely, structural motifs not consistent with the IM data. A challenge in the IM-MS community is the ability to rapidly compute conformations to interpret natural product data, a class of molecules exhibiting a broad range of biological activity. The diversity of biological activity is, in part, related to the unique structural characteristics often observed for natural products. Contemporary approaches to structurally interpret IM-MS data for peptides and proteins typically utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to sample conformational space. However, MD calculations are computationally expensive, they require a force field that accurately describes the molecule of interest, and there is no simple metric that indicates when sufficient conformational sampling has been achieved. Distance geometry is a computationally inexpensive approach that creates conformations based on sampling different pairwise distances between the atoms within the molecule and therefore does not require a force field. Progressively larger distance bounds can be used in distance geometry calculations, providing in principle a strategy to assess when all plausible conformations have been sampled. Our results suggest that distance geometry is a computationally efficient and potentially superior strategy for conformational analysis of natural products to interpret gas-phase CCS data. PMID:25360896

  5. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  6. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis; Transport d'ions sous l'effet d'un champ electrique en milieu poreux: Application a la separation de terres rares par electrophorese a focalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira-Nunes, A.I

    1999-01-15

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  8. Iminodiacetic acid functionalised organopolymer monoliths: application to the separation of metal cations by capillary high-performance chelation ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyna, Áine; Connolly, Damian; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-03-01

    Lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate monoliths were polymerised within fused silica capillaries and subsequently photo-grafted with varying amounts of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The grafted monoliths were then further modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA), resulting in a range of chelating ion-exchange monoliths of increasing capacity. The IDA functional groups were attached via ring opening of the epoxy group on the poly(GMA) structure. Increasing the amount of attached poly(GMA), via photo-grafting with increasing concentrations of GMA, from 15 to 35%, resulted in a proportional and controlled increase in the complexation capacity of the chelating monoliths. Scanning capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (sC(4)D) was used to characterise and verify homogenous distribution of the chelating ligand along the length of the capillaries non-invasively. Chelation ion chromatographic separations of selected transition and heavy metals were carried out, with retention factor data proportional to the concentration of grafted poly(GMA). Average peak efficiencies of close to 5,000 N/m were achieved, with the isocratic separation of Na, Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) possible on a 250-mm-long monolith. Multiple monolithic columns produced to the same recipes gave RSD data for retention factors of ions). The monolithic chelating ion-exchanger was applied to the separation of alkaline earth and transition metal ions spiked in natural and potable waters.

  9. Drying and moisture resorption behaviour of various electrode materials and separators for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Michael; Pandey, Nisrit; Bund, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The drying behaviour and water uptake of a variety of commonly used electrode materials (graphite, LiFePO4, LiMn2O4, LiCoO2, Li(NiCoMn)O2) and separators (polyolefin, glass fibre) for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are investigated. The drying experiments are carried out using a coulometric Karl Fischer titrator in combination with a vaporiser. This setup leads to a highly sensitive and precise method to quantify water amounts in the microgram range in solid materials. Thereby the mass specific drying behaviour at RT and 120 °C is determined as well as the water resorption of the investigated materials in conditioned air atmosphere (T: 25 °C, RH: 40%). By extracting characteristic water detection rate curves for the investigated materials, a method is developed to predict the water detection beyond the runtime of the experiment. The results help optimising drying procedures of LIB components and thus can save time and costs. It is also shown, that water contaminations in graphite/LiFePO4 coin cells with a LiPF6 based electrolyte lead to a faster capacity fade during cycling and a significant change of the cell impedance.

  10. Classification of ion mobility spectra by functional groups using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.; Nazarov, E.; Wang, Y. F.; Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neural networks were trained using whole ion mobility spectra from a standardized database of 3137 spectra for 204 chemicals at various concentrations. Performance of the network was measured by the success of classification into ten chemical classes. Eleven stages for evaluation of spectra and of spectral pre-processing were employed and minimums established for response thresholds and spectral purity. After optimization of the database, network, and pre-processing routines, the fraction of successful classifications by functional group was 0.91 throughout a range of concentrations. Network classification relied on a combination of features, including drift times, number of peaks, relative intensities, and other factors apparently including peak shape. The network was opportunistic, exploiting different features within different chemical classes. Application of neural networks in a two-tier design where chemicals were first identified by class and then individually eliminated all but one false positive out of 161 test spectra. These findings establish that ion mobility spectra, even with low resolution instrumentation, contain sufficient detail to permit the development of automated identification systems.

  11. Bioleaching of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeh, N. Bahaloo; Mousavi, S. M.; Shojaosadati, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a bio-hydrometallurgical route based on fungal activity of Aspergillus niger was evaluated for the detoxification and recovery of Cu, Li, Mn, Al, Co and Ni metals from spent lithium-ion phone mobile batteries under various conditions (one-step, two-step and spent medium bioleaching). The maximum recovery efficiency of 100% for Cu, 95% for Li, 70% for Mn, 65% for Al, 45% for Co, and 38% for Ni was obtained at a pulp density of 1% in spent medium bioleaching. The HPLC results indicated that citric acid in comparison with other detected organic acids (gluconic, oxalic and malic acid) had an important role in the effectiveness of bioleaching using A. niger. The results of FTIR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis of battery powder before and after bioleaching process confirmed that the fungal activities were quite effective. In addition, bioleaching achieved higher removal efficiency for heavy metals than the chemical leaching. This research demonstrated the great potential of bio-hydrometallurgical route to recover heavy metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries.

  12. Development of an Organic/Inorganic nano-composite Separator for Lithium Ion Batteries Using an Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Kim, Min

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the organic/inorganic nano-composite separator including an inorganic filler over 90% was prepared for preventing internal short in Li-ion battery, which was enhanced mechanical property and electrochemical stability by irradiation treatment. The polymer binder is essential in preparing inorganic separator. However, since most of polymer binders dissolve or absorb in liquid electrolyte, the mechanical property could be not maintained. To solve this problem, the polymer binders of prepared nanocomposite separator was irradiated by e-beam

  13. Application of silver ion in the separation of macrolide antibiotic components by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yaoming; Wang, Jiaoyan; Chen, Xiuming; Le, Zhanxian; Chen, Yuxiang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-05-29

    Three macrolide antibiotic components - ascomycin, tacrolimus and dihydrotacrolimus - were separated and purified by silver ion high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). The solvent system consisted of n-hexane-tert-butyl methyl ether-methanol-water (1:3:6:5, v/v) and silver nitrate (0.10mol/l). The silver ion acted as a pi-complexing agent with tacrolimus because of its extra side double bond compared with ascomycin and dihydrotacrolimus. This complexation modified the partition coefficient values and the separation factors of the three components. As a result, ascomycin, tacrolimus and dihydrotacrolimus were purified from 150mg extracted crude sample with purities of 97.6%, 98.7% and 96.5%, respectively, and yields over 80% (including their tautomers). These results cannot be achieved with the same solvent system but without the addition of silver ion.

  14. SEPARATION OF Ca AND Fe METAL ION IN SOURCE WATER BY ADSORPTION COLUMN TECHNIC WITH LOCAL ZEOLITE AND ACTIVE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims are to separate of Ca and Fe metal ion in source water, with local zeolite and active carbon by adsorption column technic. Efficiency of separation are control by adsorption time and size of zeolite. Method that used was column adsorption with a flow system in which sample is applied to the filtration tube containing zeolite and active carbon. Initial and final concentrations of the samples were analyzed using Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer instrument. The results obtained shows that ability adsorption of zeolite to Ca and Fe metal ion are a good. Zeolite 1 (10 mesh can reduce iron concentration until 93.98 % and zeolite 2 (5mesh until 98.88% for 1 – 4 week range time. Whereas reducing of calcium concentration is not good, until 2 week period time adsorption of calcium ion is about 50%.   Keywords: adsorption, zeolite, source water

  15. Comparison of the performance of three ion mobility spectrometers for measurement of biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V.; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The response to different amounts of TMA (in μg) that were placed in a headspace vial as a function of time for the VG-Test (top) and the GDA (bottom). Note that the ratio [TMA/(TMA + TEP)] (top) and [TMA/(TMA + RIP)] (bottom) and the clearance time increase with the amount of TMA deposited in the vial. Highlights: ► First comparison of performance of IMS devices. ► Gas-phase ion chemistry affected by operational parameters. ► Limits of detection quite similar despite differences in devices. ► LODs determined in controlled continuous flow and in headspace vapor. ► Exponential dilution of headspace studies. - Abstract: The performance of three different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) devices: GDA2 with a radioactive ion source (Airsense, Germany), UV-IMS with a photo-ionization source (G.A.S. Germany) and VG-Test with a corona discharge source (3QBD, Israel) was studied. The gas-phase ion chemistry in the IMS devices affected the species formed and their measured reduced mobility values. The sensitivity and limit of detection for trimethylamine (TMA), putrescine and cadaverine were compared by continuous monitoring of a stream of air with a given concentration of the analyte and by measurement of headspace vapors of TMA in a sealed vial. Preprocessing of the mobility spectra and the effectiveness of multivariate curve resolution techniques (MCR-LASSO) improved the accuracy of the measurements by correcting baseline effects and adjusting for variations in drift time as well as enhancing the signal to noise ratio and deconvolution of the complex data matrix to their pure components. The limit of detection for measurement of the biogenic amines by the three IMS devices was between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm (for TMA with the VG-Test and GDA, respectively) and between 0.2 and 0.7 ppm for putrescine and cadaverine with all three devices. Considering the uncertainty in the LOD determination there is almost no statistically significant

  16. Comparison of the performance of three ion mobility spectrometers for measurement of biogenic amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpas, Zeev, E-mail: karpas4@netvision.net.il [3QBD, Arad (Israel); Chemistry Department, Nuclear Research Center, Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Guaman, Ana V., E-mail: aguaman@ibecbarcelona.eu [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Artificial Olfaction Lab, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, Baldiri i Rexach, 4-8, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pardo, Antonio, E-mail: apardo@el.ub.edu [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Santiago, E-mail: smarco@ibecbarcelona.eu [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Artificial Olfaction Lab, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, Baldiri i Rexach, 4-8, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-01-03

    Graphical abstract: The response to different amounts of TMA (in {mu}g) that were placed in a headspace vial as a function of time for the VG-Test (top) and the GDA (bottom). Note that the ratio [TMA/(TMA + TEP)] (top) and [TMA/(TMA + RIP)] (bottom) and the clearance time increase with the amount of TMA deposited in the vial. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First comparison of performance of IMS devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas-phase ion chemistry affected by operational parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Limits of detection quite similar despite differences in devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LODs determined in controlled continuous flow and in headspace vapor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exponential dilution of headspace studies. - Abstract: The performance of three different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) devices: GDA2 with a radioactive ion source (Airsense, Germany), UV-IMS with a photo-ionization source (G.A.S. Germany) and VG-Test with a corona discharge source (3QBD, Israel) was studied. The gas-phase ion chemistry in the IMS devices affected the species formed and their measured reduced mobility values. The sensitivity and limit of detection for trimethylamine (TMA), putrescine and cadaverine were compared by continuous monitoring of a stream of air with a given concentration of the analyte and by measurement of headspace vapors of TMA in a sealed vial. Preprocessing of the mobility spectra and the effectiveness of multivariate curve resolution techniques (MCR-LASSO) improved the accuracy of the measurements by correcting baseline effects and adjusting for variations in drift time as well as enhancing the signal to noise ratio and deconvolution of the complex data matrix to their pure components. The limit of detection for measurement of the biogenic amines by the three IMS devices was between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm (for TMA with the VG-Test and GDA, respectively) and between 0.2 and 0.7 ppm for putrescine and cadaverine

  17. Relationship of Ambient Atmosphere and Biological Aerosol Responses from a Fielded Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Bioanalytical Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    .... A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry stand-alone bioaerosol system was interfaced to an aerosol concentrator to collect ambient background aerosols and produce bioanalytical...

  18. The effect of copper ions, aluminium ions and their mixtures on separation of pectin from the sugar beet juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In sugar industry there is a problem of the presence of undesirable macromolecules compounds such as pectin in sugar beet juice. The affinity of calcium ions commonly used in the sugar industry for the removal of pectin from the sugar beet juice is relatively small. Coagulation and precipitation of pectin can be performed by process of discharging that is chemically induced. Compounds with di- and trivalent cations such as pure CuSO4, Al2(SO43 or their mixtures can be applied for clarification of pectin colloidal systems. According to data from the order of pectin selectivity to divalent metal ions, Cu2+ ions are the first order of ion binding. Also, aluminum sulfate is commonly used in the waste water treatment. Two model solutions of pectin whose concentration corresponds to the concentration of these macromolecules in sugar beet juice (0.1% w/w are investigated. Using a method of measuring zeta potential, it was proven for both investigated pectin that fewer quantities of Cu2+ ions compared to the values of Al3+ ions are needed to reach zero zeta potential. In all the investigated coagulants and their mixtures, zeta potential has changed the sign. In experiments with mixtures has been shown that pure salts showed better coagulation properties. The reduced strength of binding of cations in the case of most of the applied mixture of Cu2+ and Al3+ ions, can be explained by the mutual competition of these ions for the adsorption site (COO- groups on the surface of macromolecules. Mixture with approximately equal shares of ions Cu2+ and Al3+ had the most unfavorable coagulation ability (ion antagonism. Mechanism of discharge as well as the model of double electric layer surrounding pectin macromolecules in the presence of mixtures of Cu2+ and Al3+ ions are suggested. However, due to possible undesirable effects of CuSO4 on food processing, Al2(SO43 is proposed instead of traditional coagulant CaO, not only because of lower consumptions of

  19. Lithium-Ion Mobility in Quaternary Boro-Germano-Phosphate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Sklepić, Kristina; Mošner, Petr; Koudelka, Ladislav; Kalenda, Petr

    2016-04-28

    Effect of the structural changes, electrical conductivity, and dielectric properties on the addition of a third glass-former, GeO2, to the borophosphate glasses, 40Li2O-10B2O3-(50 - x)P2O5-xGeO2, x = 0-25 mol %, has been studied. Introduction of GeO2 causes the structural modifications in the glass network, which results in a continuous increase in electrical conductivity. Glasses with low GeO2 content, up to 10 mol %, show a rapid increase in dc conductivity as a result of the interlinkage of slightly depolymerized phosphate chains and negatively charged [GeO4](-) units, which enhances the migration of Li(+) ions. The Li(+) ions compensate these delocalized charges connecting both phosphate and germanium units, which results in reduction of both bond effectiveness and binding energy of Li(+) ions and therefore enables their hop to the next charge-compensating site. For higher GeO2 content, the dc conductivity increases slightly, tending to approach a maximum in Li(+) ion mobility caused by the incorporation of GeO2 units into phosphate network combined with conversion of GeO4 to GeO6 units. The strong cross-linkage of germanium and phosphate units creates heteroatomic P-O-Ge bonds responsible for more effectively trapped Li(+) ions. A close correspondence between dielectric and conductivity parameters at high frequencies indicates that the increase in conductivity indeed is controlled by the modification of structure as a function of GeO2 addition.

  20. Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Uvarov, N. F.; Slobodyuk, A. B.; Ulihin, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. V.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) (I) have been investigated by the methods of 1H, 19F, 31P NMR (including 1H, 19F, 31P MAS NMR), DSC, X-ray diffraction, and impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the fundamental changes in 1H, 19F, 31P NMR spectra (above 390 K) were associated with the formation of a crystalline disorder phase I with high ionic mobility in the proton and fluoride sublattices, as a result of a phase transition in the 400-420 K range. In the same temperature range, the transition of PO2(OH)2- anions from the "rigid lattice" to fast reorientations takes place. Above 430 K, there occurs a transition from the crystalline disordered phase to the amorphous one. The types of ion mobility in CsSbF3(H2PO4) and its amorphous phase have been established and temperature ranges of their realization have been determined (150-450 K). According to the NMR data, the diffusion in the proton sublattice of the disordered crystalline and amorphous phases is preserved even at room temperature. The ionic conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) reaches the values of 2.6 × 10-4 S/cm in the temperature range 410-425 K and decreases down to 2.0 × 10-5 S/cm upon transition to the amorphous phase (435-445 K).

  1. Nanofiber/ZrO2-based mixed matrix separator for high safety/high-rate lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2017-10-01

    A novel asymmetric separator based on a thin bacterial cellulose nanofiber (BCF)/nano-ZrO2 composite layer and a non-woven support was prepared by paper-making method. Owing to the relatively polar constituents and well-developed, gradient porous structure, the separator exhibited the advantages of higher thermal resistance, electrolyte wettability, and ionic conductivity in comparison to polyethylene separator. Based on these advantages, the Li/LiFePO4 cells assembled from this composite separator showed excellent performance characteristics, including outstanding C-rate capability, high capacity and cycling performance. Production of the composite separator is simple, environmentally benign and economically viable. Therefore, it's a good candidate for creating improved lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Core-shell structured ceramic nonwoven separators by atomic layer deposition for safe lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiu; Li, Chao; Shi, Chuan; Yang, Chaochao; Deng, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Longqing; Dai, Jianhui; Wu, Dezhi; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Jinbao

    2018-05-01

    Safety is one of the most factors for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, a novel kind of ceramic separator with high safety insurance is proposed. We fabricated the core-shell nanofiber separators for LIBs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of 30 nm Al2O3 on the electrospinning nonwoven fiber of polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP). The separators show a pretty high heat resistance up to 200 °C without any shrinkage, an excellent fire-resistant property and a wide electrochemical window. Besides, with higher uptake and ionic conductivity, cells assembled with the novel separator shows better electrochemical performance. The ALD produced separators exhibit great potential in elaborate products like 3C communications and in energy field with harsh requirements for safety such as electric vehicles. The application of ALD on polymer fiber membranes brings a new strategy and opportunity for improving the safety of the advanced LIBs.

  3. Separation and characterisation of five polar herbicides using countercurrent chromatography with detection by negative ion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, H; Jones, J J; Games, D E

    2001-01-01

    Five polar herbicides were separated and characterised using high-speed analytical countercurrent chromatography (HSACCC) in conjunction with online electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The countercurrent chromatography used a standard isocratic biphasic solvent system of hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water in reverse phase to effect the separation of these five environmentally important compounds. The chromatograph was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer via a standard electrospray liquid chromatography interface that was able to give mass spectra in negative ion mode of each compound. Limits of detection are reported for this series of compounds along with representative negative ion ESI-MS data and calibrations for the separation. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Miniature GC-Minicell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for In Situ Measurements in Astrobiology Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Holland, Paul M.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    Astrobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of volatile chemical species and minerals present in the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and asteroids. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The use of land rovers and balloon aero-rovers place additional emphasis on miniaturization of the analytical instrumentation. In addition, smaller instruments, using tiny amounts of consumables, allow the use of more instrumentation and/or ionger mission life for stationary landers/laboratories. The miniCometary Ice and Dust Experiment (miniCIDEX), which combined Gas Chromatography (GC) with helium Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS), was capable of providing the wide range of analytical information required for Astrobiology missions. The IMS used here was based on the PCP model 111 IMS. A similar system, the Titan Ice and Dust Experiment (TIDE), was proposed as part of the Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM). Newer GC systems employing Micro Electro- Mechanical System (MEMS) based technology have greatly reduced both the size and resource requirements for space GCs. These smaller GCs, as well as the continuing miniaturization of Astrobiology analytical instruments in general, has highlighted the need for smaller, dry helium IMS systems. We describe here the development of a miniature, MEMS GC-IMS system (MEMS GC developed by Thorleaf Research Inc.), employing the MiniCell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS), from Ion Applications Inc., developed through NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development (ASTID) Program and NASA s Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program.

  5. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  6. Enhanced extraction yields and mobile phase separations by solvent mixtures for the analysis of metabolites in Annona muricata L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Eloana Benassi; da Silva, Renata Reis; Afonso, Sabrina; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2009-12-01

    The effects of five extraction solvents and their mixtures on the yield of metabolites in crude and fractionated extracts of Annona muricata L. leaves were investigated by direct comparison. Extraction media were prepared using simplex centroid mixtures of ethanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, acetone, and chloroform. The effects of the mobile phase solvent strength and the analysis wavelength on the chromatographic separation were also investigated. Solvent mixtures rather than pure solvents were found to be the most efficient extractors for the different fractions. The results indicated that the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (26:27:47 v/v/v) was most suitable for the basic fraction analysis at 254 nm, whereas the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (35:35:30 v/v/v) was the most adequate for the organic fraction analysis at 254 nm. The results indicated that the chromatographic profiles and number of peaks were affected by the mobile phase strength and analysis wavelength.

  7. Composite mixed ion-electron conducting (MIEC) membranes for hydrogen generation and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibing

    Decomposition of steam under a chemical driving force at moderate temperatures (˜900°C) offers a convenient and economical way to generate hydrogen. A significant amount of hydrogen can be generated and separated by splitting steam and removing oxygen using a mixed ion-electron conducting (MIEC) membrane. In this work, Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9-deltaGd 0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al0.05O3+/-delta MIEC membranes have been explored in which, Gd0.2Ce 0.8O1.9-delta (GDC) functions as a predominantly oxygen ionic conductor, and Gd0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al 0.05O3+/-delta (GSTA) functions as a predominantly n-type electronic conductor under the process conditions. During the hydrogen generation process, oxygen transports from the feed side to the permeate side through coupled diffusion of oxygen ions and electrons under an oxygen partial pressure gradient across membranes. This process results in a H2-rich product on the feed side and depleted fuel gases on the permeate side. In this work, membrane architectures comprising self-supported thick membranes and thin membranes supported on porous supports of the same composition have been studied. The effect of membrane thickness on hydrogen generation has been studied by measuring the area-specific hydrogen generation rates at different experimental conditions. Experimental results have shown that the hydrogen generation process for the thick membranes was controlled by the oxygen bulk diffusion through membranes, while the hydrogen generation process for the dense thin membranes was controlled by both the surface exchange reactions and oxygen bulk diffusion process. The area-specific hydrogen generation rates of the supported dense thin membranes were significantly enhanced by applying a porous catalytic layer onto the surface of the membrane. Experimental results showed that the area-specific hydrogen generation rates were higher when the surface catalytic layer was exposed to the feed side rather than the permeate side. A mathematical model for

  8. Benchmark Comparison for a Multi-Processing Ion Mobility Calculator in the Free Molecular Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Vaibhav; Nahin, Minal; Hogan, Christopher J.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    A benchmark comparison between two ion mobility and collision cross-section (CCS) calculators, MOBCAL and IMoS, is presented here as a standard to test the efficiency and performance of both programs. Utilizing 47 organic ions, results are in excellent agreement between IMoS and MOBCAL in He and N2, when both programs use identical input parameters. Due to a more efficiently written algorithm and to its parallelization, IMoS is able to calculate the same CCS (within 1%) with a speed around two orders of magnitude faster than its MOBCAL counterpart when seven cores are used. Due to the high computational cost of MOBCAL in N2, reaching tens of thousands of seconds even for small ions, the comparison between IMoS and MOBCAL is stopped at 70 atoms. Large biomolecules (>10000 atoms) remain computationally expensive when IMoS is used in N2 (even when employing 16 cores). Approximations such as diffuse trajectory methods (DHSS, TDHSS) with and without partial charges and projected area approximation corrections can be used to reduce the total computational time by several folds without hurting the accuracy of the solution. These latter methods can in principle be used with coarse-grained model structures and should yield acceptable CCS results.

  9. Optimization of long range potential interaction parameters in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyang; Derrick, Joseph; Nahin, Minal; Chen, Xi; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    The problem of optimizing Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential parameters to perform collision cross section (CCS) calculations in ion mobility spectrometry has been undertaken. The experimental CCS of 16 small organic molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and fluoride in N2 was compared to numerical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT). CCS calculations were performed using the momentum transfer algorithm IMoS and a 4-6-12 potential without incorporating the ion-quadrupole potential. A ceteris paribus optimization method was used to optimize the intercept σ and potential well-depth ɛ for the given atoms. This method yields important information that otherwise would remain concealed. Results show that the optimized L-J parameters are not necessarily unique with intercept and well-depth following an exponential relation at an existing line of minimums. Similarly, the method shows that some molecules containing atoms of interest may be ill-conditioned candidates to perform optimizations of the L-J parameters. The final calculated CCSs for the chosen parameters differ 1% on average from their experimental counterparts. This result conveys the notion that DFT calculations can indeed be used as potential candidates for CCS calculations and that effects, such as the ion-quadrupole potential or diffuse scattering, can be embedded into the L-J parameters without loss of accuracy but with a large increase in computational efficiency.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of adsorption and separation phenomena of metal ions in organic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Suzuki, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2007-11-01

    Analytical technique using organic resins has already been well-developed, and its applications are employed in various fields; nevertheless, the chemical phenomena occurring inside the resin remain unclear for the most part. In the present study, we apply EXAFS spectroscopy to elucidate the adsorption and separation phenomena of metal ions by organic resin. That is, the chemical species of trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) adsorbed in a tertiary pyridine resin from hydrochloric acid and nitric acid solutions have been determined by EXAFS. The results in HCl solutions suggest that Ln(III) ions are partly dehydrated in the resin phase, enabling the pyridine groups of the resin and chloride ions to coordinate to the Ln(III) ions in their primary coordination sphere. On the other hand, Ln(III) ions are tightly coordinated by several nitrate ions in HNO3 solutions and they keep forming the nitrate complex even in the resin phase. The lighter Ln of Nd tends to form an anionic nitrate complex, [Nd(NO3)4.nH2O]-, in the resin phase, while the middle Ln of Sm exists as a cationic nitrate complex, [Sm(NO3)2.nH2O]+, for the most part. On the basis of these EXAFS results, the adsorption and separation mechanisms of the pyridine resin in HCl solutions are interpreted as the direct coordination of pyridine groups to metal ions, while the mechanisms in HNO3 solutions are mainly dominated by the anion-exchange reaction between the protonated pyridine groups and the anionic nitrate complexes of Ln(III). The obtained results demonstrate that the hydration of metal ions weakens, and instead, other complexations are enhanced in the resin phase.

  11. Flexible, High-Wettability and Fire-Resistant Separators Based on Hydroxyapatite Nanowires for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Wu, Dabei; Wu, Jin; Dong, Li-Ying; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Hu, Xianluo

    2017-11-01

    Separators play a pivotal role in the electrochemical performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The commercial microporous polyolefin-based separators often suffer from inferior electrolyte wettability, low thermal stability, and severe safety concerns. Herein, a novel kind of highly flexible and porous separator based on hydroxyapatite nanowires (HAP NWs) with excellent thermal stability, fire resistance, and superior electrolyte wettability is reported. A hierarchical cross-linked network structure forms between HAP NWs and cellulose fibers (CFs) via hybridization, which endows the separator with high flexibility and robust mechanical strength. The high thermal stability of HAP NW networks enables the separator to preserve its structural integrity at temperatures as high as 700 °C, and the fire-resistant property of HAP NWs ensures high safety of the battery. In particular, benefiting from its unique composition and highly porous structure, the as-prepared HAP/CF separator exhibits near zero contact angle with the liquid electrolyte and high electrolyte uptake of 253%, indicating superior electrolyte wettability compared with the commercial polyolefin separator. The as-prepared HAP/CF separator has unique advantages of superior electrolyte wettability, mechanical robustness, high thermal stability, and fire resistance, thus, is promising as a new kind of separator for advanced LIBs with enhanced performance and high safety. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J; Jones, Christina M; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A; Stecenko, Arlene A; Fernández, Facundo M

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J.; Jones, Christina M.; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy.

  14. Investigating the Relationship Between Soil Water Mobility and Stable Isotope Composition with Implications for the Ecohydrologic Separation Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, J.; McNamara, J. P.; Benner, S. G.; Kohn, M. J.; Evans, S.

    2017-12-01

    The ecohydrologic separation (ES) hypothesis states that streams and plants return different soil water compartments to the atmosphere and that these compartments bear distinct isotopic compositions that can be used to infer soil water mobility. Recent studies have found isotopic evidence for ES in a variety of ecosystems, though interpretations of these data vary. ES investigations frequently suffer from low sampling frequencies as well as incomplete or missing soil moisture and matric potential data to support assumptions of soil water mobility. We sampled bulk soil water every 2-3 weeks in the upper 1 m of a hillslope profile from May 2016 to July 2017 in a semi-arid watershed outside Boise, ID. Twig samples of three plant species were also collected concurrently. Plant and soil water samples extracted via cryogenic vacuum distillation were analyzed for δ2H and δ18O composition. Soil moisture and soil matric potential sensors were installed at five and four depths in the profile, respectively. Shallow bulk soil water was progressively enriched in both isotopes over the growing season and plotted along a soil evaporation line in a plot of δ2H versus δ18O. Plant water during the growing season plotted below both the Local Meteoric Water Line and soil evaporation line. Plant water isotopic composition could not be traced to any source sampled in this study. Additionally, soil moisture and matric potential data revealed that soils were well-drained and that mobile soil water was unavailable throughout most of the growing season at the depths sampled. Soil water isotopic composition alone failed to predict mobility as observed in soil moisture and matric potential data. These results underscore the need for standard hydrologic definitions for the mobile and immobile compartments of soil water in future studies of the ES hypothesis and ecohydrologic processes in general.

  15. Self-management of self-organising mobile computing applications : a separation of concerns approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Marquez, Jose Luis; di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna; Stevenson, Graeme Turnbull; Ye, Juan; Dobson, Simon Andrew; Zamonelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Although the research area of self-organising systems is well established, their construction is often ad hoc. Consequently, such software is difficult reuse across applications that require similar functionality of have similar goals. The development of self-organising applications and, a fortiori, self-organising mobile applications is therefore limited to developers who are experts in specific self-organising mechanisms. As a first step towards addressing this, this paper discusses the not...

  16. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  17. Determining the Effect of Catechins on SOD1 Conformation and Aggregation by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Combined with Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Pi, Zifeng; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui

    2018-02-01

    The aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays an important role in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). For the disruption of ALS progression, discovering new drugs or compounds that can prevent SOD1 aggregation is important. In this study, ESI-MS was used to investigate the interaction of catechins and SOD1. The noncovalent complex of catechins that interact with SOD1 was found and retained in the gas phase under native ESI-MS condition. The conformation changes of SOD1 after binding with catechins were also explored via traveling wave ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) can stabilize SOD1 conformation against unfolding in three catechins. To further evaluate the efficacy of EGCG, we monitored the fluorescence changes of dimer E2,E2,-SOD1(apo-SOD1, E:empty) with and without ligands under denaturation conditions, and found that EGCG can inhibit apo-SOD1 aggregation. In addition, the circular dichroism spectra of the samples showed that EGCG can decrease the β-sheet content of SOD1, which can produce aggregates. These results indicated that orthogonal separation dimension in the gas-phase IM coupled with ESI-MS (ESI-IM-MS) can potentially provide insight into the interaction between SOD1 and small molecules. The advantage is that it dramatically decreases the analysis time. Meantime, optical spectroscopy techniques can be used to confirm ESI-IM-MS results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  19. Test of Blanc's law for negative ion mobility in mixtures of SF6 with N2, O2 and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa, G; Urquijo, J de

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of negative ion species drifting in mixtures of SF 6 with N 2 , O 2 and air. The pulsed Townsend experiment was used for this purpose. The conditions of the experiment, high pressures and low values of the reduced electric field, E/N, ensured that the majority species drifting in the gap was SF 6 - , to which the present mobilities are ascribed. The extrapolated, zero field mobilities for several mixture compositions were used to test them successfully with Blanc's law. Moreover, the measured zero field SF 6 - mobilities in air could also be explained in terms of the measured mobilities for this ionic species in N 2 and O 2

  20. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Steve; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  1. Hardware/Software Codesign in a Compact Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Subsurface Contaminant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribb MollyM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A field-programmable-gate-array-(FPGA- based data acquisition and control system was designed in a hardware/software codesign environment using an embedded Xilinx Microblaze soft-core processor for use with a subsurface ion mobility spectrometer (IMS system, designed for detection of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs. An FPGA is used to accelerate the digital signal processing algorithms and provide accurate timing and control. An embedded soft-core processor is used to ease development by implementing nontime critical portions of the design in software. The design was successfully implemented using a low-cost, off-the-shelf Xilinx Spartan-III FPGA and supporting digital and analog electronics.

  2. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds using ion mobility spectra and cascade correlation neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Peter DEB.; Zheng, Peng

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique for trace organic analysis in the gas phase. Quantitative measurements are difficult, because IMS has a limited linear range. Factors that may affect the instrument response are pressure, temperature, and humidity. Nonlinear calibration methods, such as neural networks, may be ideally suited for IMS. Neural networks have the capability of modeling complex systems. Many neural networks suffer from long training times and overfitting. Cascade correlation neural networks train at very fast rates. They also build their own topology, that is a number of layers and number of units in each layer. By controlling the decay parameter in training neural networks, reproducible and general models may be obtained.

  3. Direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M T; Khayamian, T

    2008-09-15

    In this study, direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen residues in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was investigated. Pyridine was used as an alternate reagent gas to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of the method. The results indicate that the limit of detection (LOD) was about 9.2x10(-3)mugmL(-1) and the linear dynamic range was obtained from 0.03 to 2.00mugmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was about 11%. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in river and tap water samples and the results were compared with the Nessler method. The comparison of the results validates the potential of the proposed method as an alternative technique for the analysis of the ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples.

  4. Recent Applications of Ion Mobility Spectrometry in Diagnosis of Vaginal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeev Karpas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaginal infections (vaginosis globally affect more than 15% of the female population of reproductive age. However, diagnosis of vaginosis and differentiating between the three common types: bacterial vaginosis (BV, vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, and trichomoniasis are challenging. Elevated levels of the biogenic amines, trimethylamine (TMA, putrescine, and cadaverine have been found in vaginal discharge fluid of women with vaginosis. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is particularly suitable for measurement of amines even in complex biological matrices due to their high proton affinity and has been shown to be suitable for the diagnosis of vaginal infections. Recent developments that have increased the accuracy of the technique for diagnosis of BV and simplified sample introduction are described here.

  5. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  6. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  7. Studies on rapid ion-exchange separation of the transplutonium elements with mineral acid-methanol mixed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuda, Shigekazu

    1989-03-01

    In order to study properties of short-lived transplutonium nuclides synthesized by heavy-ion bombardment, three methods for rapid separation of tri-valent transplutonium elements by ion-exchange chromatography with mineral acid-methanol mixed media at elevated temperature were investigated. The first separation method was anion-exchange chromatography with nitric acid-methanol mixed media. The second method was anion-exchange choromatography with dilute hydrochloric acid-methanol mixed media. The third method was improved cation-exchange chromatography with single-column operation using the mixed media of hydrochloric acid and methanol. The separation methods developed were found applicable to studies on synthesis of the trans-plutonium nuclides, 250 Fm (T 1/2 :30 min), 244,245,246 Cf (T 1/2 :20 min, 46 min and 35.7 h, respectively) from the 16 O + 238 U and 12 C + 242 Pu reactions, and on the decay property of 245 Cf. Attempts to search for new actinide nuclides, such as 240 U and neutron deficient nuclides of Am, Cm and Bk, were made by a quick purification. The separation system was also applied to the rapid and effective separation of Nd, Am and Cm from spent nuclear fuel samples, for burn-up determination. (J.P.N.) 242 refs

  8. use of weak ion association in the separation of inorganic anions by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    ANIONS BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH SPECIFIC APPLICATION. TO SIMULTANEOUS-TRACE .... ions. CE compliments ion chromatography but is preferred in inorganic anions determination, because of its simplicity in method development, less wastage of reagents and high efficiency coupled with lower ...

  9. Evaluation and application of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry for complex sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denawaka, Chamila J; Fowlis, Ian A; Dean, John R

    2014-04-18

    An evaluation of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS) has been undertaken to assess its applicability for the determination of 32 volatile compounds (VCs). The key experimental variables of sample incubation time and temperature have been evaluated alongside the MCC-GC variables of column polarity, syringe temperature, injection temperature, injection volume, column temperature and carrier gas flow rate coupled with the IMS variables of temperature and drift gas flow rate. This evaluation resulted in six sets of experimental variables being required to separate the 32 VCs. The optimum experimental variables for SHS-MCC-GC-IMS, the retention time and drift time operating parameters were determined; to normalise the operating parameters, the relative drift time and normalised reduced ion mobility for each VC were determined. In addition, a full theoretical explanation is provided on the formation of the monomer, dimer and trimer of a VC. The optimum operating condition for each VC calibration data was obtained alongside limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values. Typical detection limits ranged from 0.1ng bis(methylthio)methane, ethylbutanoate and (E)-2-nonenal to 472ng isovaleric acid with correlation coefficient (R(2)) data ranging from 0.9793 (for the dimer of octanal) through to 0.9990 (for isobutyric acid). Finally, the developed protocols were applied to the analysis of malodour in sock samples. Initial work involved spiking an inert matrix and sock samples with appropriate concentrations of eight VCs. The average recovery from the inert matrix was 101±18% (n=8), while recoveries from the sock samples were lower, that is, 54±30% (n=8) for sock type 1 and 78±24% (n=6) for sock type 2. Finally, SHS-MCC-GC-IMS was applied to sock malodour in a field trial based on 11 volunteers (mixed gender) over a 3-week period. By applying the SHS-MCC-GC-IMS database, four VCs were

  10. Separation of deuteriated isotopomers of dopamine by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, C.F.; Markey, S.P.; Mefford, I.N.; Duncan, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The ion-pair reversed-phase separation of dopamine and deuterium-substituted dopamine isotopomers is described. Chromatographic parameters and deuterium isotope effects governing the resolution are examined and compared to the factors regulating the resolution are examined and compared to the factors regulating the resolution of the chemically distinct entities dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. The potential utility of the [ 2 H 7 ]dopamine, isotopomer as an internal standard for the high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dopamine is demonstrated by using aluminum oxide extraction prior to chromatographic separation

  11. Separation of uranium and other metals from commercial phosphoric acid by ion-exchange and voltammetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.B.C.; Carvalho, F.M.S. de; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    The separation of metals from crude commercial phosphoric acid is achieved by simple dilution and percolation through a strong cationic ion exchanger. Uranium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron and aluminum are quantitatively fixed by the exchanger and can be detected or analysed after their complete elution with 6 M HCI. Titanium and zirconium are only partially retained. Specially for its separation and determination uranium is retained selectively by the resin from the phosphoric acid-EDTA solution, the column is washed with water and then eluted with hydrochloric acid. Uranium is analyzed by voltametry with the hanging drop mercury electrode. (Author) [pt

  12. Iqpc 2015 Track: Tree Separation and Classification in Mobile Mapping LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorte, B.; Oude Elberink, S.; Sirmacek, B.; Wang, J.

    2015-08-01

    The European FP7 project IQmulus yearly organizes several processing contests, where submissions are requested for novel algorithms for point cloud and other big geodata processing. This paper describes the set-up and execution of a contest having the purpose to evaluate state-of-the-art algorithms for Mobile Mapping System point clouds, in order to detect and identify (individual) trees. By the nature of MMS these are trees in the vicinity of the road network (rather than in forests). Therefore, part of the challenge is distinguishing between trees and other objects, such as buildings, street furniture, cars etc. Three submitted segmentation and classification algorithms are thus evaluated.

  13. Effects of mobile vacancies on the dynamics of ordering and phase separation in nonconserved multicomponent systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilhøj, Henriette; Jeppesen, Claus; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1995-01-01

    the condition of conserved vacancy density and nonconserved Potts order. The dynamics of ordering and phase separation is found to follow algebraic growth laws with exponent values that depend on the phase to which the quench is performed. Strong transient effects are observed in the dilute Potts-ordered phase...

  14. Separation of strontium-90 and yttrium-90 in the presence of thorium-234 by dynamic ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borai, E.H.; El-Sofany, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    A relatively rapid ( 90 Sr and 90 Y in the presence of 234 Th. The method joins ion-chromatography and on-line scintillation detection. Experiments were performed to characterize separation of the three radionuclides in an Ion Pac CS5 ion-exchange column under the influence of the following eluents: oxalic acid, diglycolic acid (DGA), α-hydroxy isobuteric acid (HIBA), and a mixture of hydrochloric acid and ammonium sulfate. Ammonium sulfate was the most effective of the eluents tested, yielding a resolution of 2.04 for strontium/yttrium and 1.03 for strontium/thorium. Within the limits of experimental uncertainty, the recoveries were quantitative for 90 Sr and 90 Y in the presence of 17 to 262 Bq x ml of 234 Th. (author)

  15. Simultaneous Proteomic Discovery and Targeted Monitoring using Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Nie, Song; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-25

    Current proteomics approaches are comprised of both broad discovery measurements as well as more quantitative targeted measurements. These two different measurement types are used to initially identify potentially important proteins (e.g., candidate biomarkers) and then enable improved quantification for a limited number of selected proteins. However, both approaches suffer from limitations, particularly the lower sensitivity, accuracy, and quantitation precision for discovery approaches compared to targeted approaches, and the limited proteome coverage provided by targeted approaches. Herein, we describe a new proteomics approach that allows both discovery and targeted monitoring (DTM) in a single analysis using liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS). In DTM, heavy labeled peptides for target ions are spiked into tryptic digests and both the labeled and unlabeled peptides are broadly detected using LC-IMS-MS instrumentation, allowing the benefits of discovery and targeted approaches. To understand the possible improvement of the DTM approach, it was compared to LC-MS broad measurements using an accurate mass and time tag database and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) targeted measurements. The DTM results yielded greater peptide/protein coverage and a significant improvement in the detection of lower abundance species compared to LC-MS discovery measurements. DTM was also observed to have similar detection limits as SRM for the targeted measurements indicating its potential for combining the discovery and targeted approaches.

  16. Disorder and diffusion path of mobile ions in ionic conductors. Neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2006-01-01

    We review our recent works on the positional disorder and diffusion path of mobile ions in fast ionic conductors Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 and La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 . These were studied through the nuclear density distribution obtained by a combined technique including the Rietveld refinement, the maximum-entropy method (MEM) and MEM-based pattern fitting of neutron powder diffraction data. The oxide ions in the fluorite-structured Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 have a complicated disorder spreading over a wide area, shift to the directions from the ideal fluorite position and diffuse along the directions. At 77 K, the Li cations in the La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 perovskite are located at the 2c site (Wycoff notation of the Cmmm space group) on the (002) La deficient layer, while at room temperature, they spread over a wide area and migrate following the 2c-4f-2c or 2c-2d-2c tie line on the (002) layer. (author)

  17. Separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) by Triton X-100 cerium(IV) phosphate as a surface active ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Ismail Aydia, M.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Triton X-100 cerium(IV) phosphate (TX-100CeP) was synthesized and characterized by using IR, X-ray, TGA/DT and the elemental analysis. The chemical stability of TX-100CeP versus the different concentrations of HCl acid was studied before and after its exposure to the radiation dose (30 K Gray). The effect of HCl concentration on separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) by using TX-100CeP as surface active ion exchanger was also studied. A novel method was achieved for the quantifying of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions by using the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at wavelength 650 nm, a stationary phase consists of reversed phase column (Nucleosil phenyl column; 250 x 4.6 mm, 5 μm), and a mobile phase consists of 0.001 M di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) in methanol:water (70:30 v/v). The retention times were 7.0 and 8.5 min, for the Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively. The exchange capacity of Cr(III) was quantified (2.1 meq/g) onto the TX-100CeP. (author)

  18. Mesotubular-Structured Hybrid Membrane Nanocontainer for Periodical Monitoring, Separation, and Recovery of Cobalt Ions from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Sakai, Masaru; Selim, Mahmoud M; Alhamid, Abdulaziz A

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to toxins can cause deleterious effects even at very low concentrations. We have developed an optical sensor, filter, and extractor (i.e., containerlike) in a nanoscale membrane (NSM) for the ultratrace sensing, separation, and recovery of Co(2+) ions from water. The design of the NSM is successfully controlled by dense decoration of a hydrophobic oil-hydrophilic receptor onto mesoscale tubular-structured silica nanochannels made of a hybrid anodic alumina membrane. The particular structure of the nanocontainer is ideal to control the multiple functions of the membrane, such as the optical detection/recognition, rejection/permeation, and recovery of Co(2+) species in a single step. A typical sensor, filter, and extractor assessment experiment was performed by using a benchtop contact time technique and a flow-through cell detector to allow for precise control of the optical detection and exclusive rejection of target ions and the permeation of nontarget metal ions in water. This nanocontainer membrane has great potential to meet the increasing needs of purification and separation of Co(2+) ions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Mobilization of major inorganic ions during experimental diagenesis of characterized peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A.M.; Cohen, A.D.; Orem, W.H.; Blackson, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to study changes in concentrations of major inorganic ions during simulated burial of peats to about 1.5 km. Cladium, Rhizophora, and Cyrilla peats were first analyzed to determine cation distributions among fractions of the initial materials and minerals in residues from wet oxidation. Subsamples of the peats (80 g) were then subjected to increasing temperatures and pressures in steps of 5??C and 300 psi at 2-day intervals and produced solutions collected. After six steps, starting from 30??C and 300 psi, a final temperature of 60??C and a final pressure of 2100 psi were achieved. The system was then allowed to stand for an additional 2 weeks at 60??C and 2100 psi. Treatments resulted in highly altered organic solids resembling lignite and expelled solutions of systematically varying compositions. Solutions from each step were analyzed for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, total dissolved Si (Si(T)), Cl-, SO42-, and organic acids and anions (OAAs). Some data on total dissolved Al (Al(T)) were also collected. Mobilization of major ions from peats during these experiments is controlled by at least three processes: (1) loss of dissolved ions in original porewater expelled during compaction, (2) loss of adsorbed cations as adsorption sites are lost during modification of organic solids, and (3) increased dissolution of inorganic phases at later steps due to increased temperatures (Si(T)) and increased complexing by OAAs (Al(T)). In general, results provide insight into early post-burial inorganic changes occurring during maturation of terrestrial organic matter. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Compositions and structures of niobium oxide cluster ions, NbmOn±, (m = 2-12), revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jenna W J; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Ohshimo, Keijiro; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2017-09-20

    Herein, the compositions and geometrical structures of niobium oxide cluster ions were studied and compared with those of the lighter Group 5 counterpart vanadium oxide cluster ions by ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). As a result of collision-induced dissociation in IM-MS, the compositions were found to be dependent on an odd and even number of niobium atoms, whereby the ions with (NbO 2 )(Nb 2 O 5 ) (m-1)/2 + and (NbO 3 )(Nb 2 O 5 ) (m-1)/2 - were identified as stable compositions for an odd number of Nb atoms, whereas (Nb 2 O 5 ) m/2 ± and (Nb 2 O 6 )(Nb 2 O 5 ) (m-2)/2 - were identified as stable compositions for an even number of Nb atom clusters. Furthermore, structural transitions were observed between m = 8 and 9 for cluster cations and m = 7 and 8 for cluster anions for experimental collision cross-sections (CCSs), which were determined from the arrival times in the ion-mobility measurements. Quantum chemical calculations were conducted on several structural candidates of these compositions for m = 2-12. For cluster cations with the sizes between m = 2 and 8 and cluster anions with m = 2-7, the structures were found to be similar to those of vanadium oxide cluster ions upon comparing the experimental CCSs with the theoretical CCSs of optimized structures. As compared to the vanadium oxide cluster ions, niobium oxide cluster cations with m ≥ 9 and anions with m ≥ 8 consisted of structures where some niobium atoms had more than five oxygen-atom coordination; thus, compact structures could be achieved in the case of niobium oxide cluster ions.

  1. Practical application of in silico fragmentation based residue screening with ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathry; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-07-15

    A screening concept for residues in complex matrices based on liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IMS-HRMS is presented. The comprehensive four-dimensional data (chromatographic retention time, drift time, mass-to-charge and ion abundance) obtained in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode was used for data mining. An in silico fragmenter utilizing a molecular structure database was used for suspect screening, instead of targeted screening with reference substances. The utilized data-independent acquisition mode relies on the MS E concept; where two constantly alternating HRMS scans (low and high fragmentation energy) are acquired. Peak deconvolution and drift time alignment of ions from the low (precursor ion) and high (product ion) energy scan result in relatively clean product ion spectra. A bond dissociation in silico fragmenter (MassFragment) supplied with mol files of compounds of interest was used to explain the observed product ions of each extracted candidate component (chromatographic peak). Two complex matrices (fish and bovine liver extract) were fortified with 98 veterinary drugs. Out of 98 screened compounds 94 could be detected with the in silico based screening approach. The high correlation among drift time and m/z value of equally charged ions was utilized for an orthogonal filtration (ranking). Such an orthogonal ion mobility based filter removes multiply charged ions (e.g. peptides and proteins from the matrix) as well as noise and artefacts. Most significantly, this filtration dramatically reduces false positive findings but hardly increases false negative findings. The proposed screening approach may offer new possibilities for applications where reference compounds are hardly or not at all commercially available. Such areas may be the analysis of metabolites of drugs, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, marine toxins, derivatives of sildenafil or novel designer drugs (new psychoactive substances

  2. Development of plasma-treated polypropylene nonwoven-based composites for high-performance lithium-ion battery separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaofei; He, Jinlin; Wu, Dazhao; Zhang, Mingzu; Meng, Juwen; Ni, Peihong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A composite separator based on plasma-treated fluorinated polypropylene (PP) nonwoven, poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) and SiO 2 nanoparticles exhibiting enhanced thermal stability, ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Fluorinated segments are introduced on the surface of PP nonwoven through plasma treatment. •The obtained composite separators exhibit better physical and electrochemical properties. •The capacity of half-cell with composite separator keeps above 150 mA h g −1 after 100 charge–discharge cycles. -- Abstract: Separators have drawn substantial attention because of their important role in achieving the safety and good electrochemical performance of lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we report a new type of composite membrane prepared by a combination of fluorinated polypropylene (PP) nonwoven fabric, poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) and SiO 2 nanoparticles. 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5-Octafluoropentyl methacrylate (OFPMA) is first grafted on the surface of PP nonwoven by plasma treatment to improve the nonwoven’s adhesion with PVdF-HFP. Two kinds of composite separators have been prepared by using the different PP nonwovens together with PVdF-HFP and SiO 2 nanoparticles. They were separately designated as PHS for commercially raw PP nonwoven system and PHS-n for OFPMA-modified PP nonwoven systems (n means plasma treatment time). The morphology, electrolyte uptake, ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties of the composite separators have been analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, impedance measurement, charge-discharge cycle and C-rate tests, respectively. The results indicate that PHS-10 composite separator using the modified PP nonwoven treated by plasma for 10 min exhibits much better properties than PHS separator, including an improved mechanical property, thermal stability, electrolyte uptake

  3. Kinetics of Cu (II) separation by ion flotation techniques, in cells with flexible spargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M.; Tavera, F. J.; Escudero, R.; Patino, F.; Salinas, E.; Rivera, I.

    2010-01-01

    This research studies and experimentally determines the kinetic parameters and effect of modifying the hydrodynamics and chemical conditions of the air-liquid dispersions during the Cu (II) extraction by ion flotation techniques in cells with porous spargers. Results show that the elimination of Cu (II) from solution can be carried out by ion flotation in one stage, obtaining efficiencies of 68% and 56% for the flat and cylindrical sparger respectively with a xanthate concentration of 0,02 g/l. In multistage systems five cells, recoveries over 92 % were achieved for both sparger geometries. The behavior of the flotation apparent kinetic constant is linear to the parameters that characterize dispersion (Jg, eg y Db), until a point is achieved where the process instability makes the system inoperable. The results show that removing base metal ions by ion flotation is strongly affected by the following factors: collector concentration [C], Jg, eg, Db, Jl and Sb. (Author) 20 refs

  4. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-07

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  5. Automated ion-exchange system for the rapid separation of plutonium from impurities in safeguards analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, B.P.; Weiss, J.R.; Pietri, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Many plutonium samples cannot be analyzed directly after dissolution because of their high impurity content. The demand to increase sample analysis output, to decrease sample turnaround time, and to reduce operating costs, has prompted the development of an automated system, AUTOSEP, based on the manual ion-exchange method. The AUTOSEP system is designed as a batch-type operation in which ten sample aliquots are simultaneously passed through mini ion-exchange columns. 9 refs

  6. Non-destructive separation of metal ions from wastewater containing excess aminopolycarboxylate chelant in solution with an ion-selective immobilized macrocyclic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Rahman, Ismail M M; Kinoshita, Sanae; Maki, Teruya; Furusho, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Although the excellent metal-binding capacities of aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) facilitate their extensive use, pre- and post-toxicity of APCs and their high persistence in aquatic environments evoke concerns. Several treatment techniques with a principal focus on the degradation of APCs at the pre-release step have been proposed. Here, we report a technique for the separation of metal ions from waste solution containing excess APCs using a solid phase extraction system with an ion-selective immobilized macrocyclic material, commonly known as a molecular recognition technology (MRT) gel. Synthetic metal solutions with 100-fold chelant content housed in H2O matrices were used as samples. The MRT gel showed a higher recovery rate compared with other SPE materials at 20 degrees C using a flow rate of 0.2 mL min(-1). The effects of solution pH, metal-chelant stability constants and ionic radii were assessed for 32 metals. Compared to the conventional treatment options for such waste solutions, our proposed technique has the advantage of non-destructive separation of both metal ions and chelants. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Select Anions from the Hofmeister Series on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions Measured with Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Flick, Tawnya G.; Daly, Michael P.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-11-01

    The gas-phase conformations of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin ions, formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing 5 mM ammonium perchlorate, ammonium iodide, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium thiocyanate, or guanidinium chloride, are examined using traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). For ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and α-lactalbumin, adduction of multiple acid molecules results in no significant conformational changes to the highest and lowest charge states formed from aqueous solutions, whereas the intermediate charge states become more compact. The transition to more compact conformers for the intermediate charge states occurs with fewer bound H2SO4 molecules than HClO4 or HI molecules, suggesting ion-ion or salt-bridge interactions are stabilizing more compact forms of the gaseous protein. However, the drift time distributions for protein ions of the same net charge with the highest levels of adduction of each acid are comparable, indicating that these protein ions all adopt similarly compact conformations or families of conformers. No significant change in conformation is observed upon the adduction of multiple acid molecules to charge states of lysozyme. These results show that the attachment of HClO4, HI, or H2SO4 to multiply protonated proteins can induce compact conformations in the resulting gas-phase protein ions. In contrast, differing Hofmeister effects are observed for the corresponding anions in solution at higher concentrations.

  8. Separation and solidification of radioactive cesium from nuclear waste solutions with potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate (II) ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.; Harjula, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a separation and solidification process for 137 Cs, present in nuclear waste solutions. In this process cesium is selectively separated from the solutions by columns packed with granular potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate. The process has been tested both in laboratory and pilot-plant experiments and the full scale industrial plant at the Loviisa NPP will be in operation in 1991. In this plant potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate columns are used for the separation 134,137 Cs from an evaporator concentrate solution. Results on the column performance are given in this report. In addition, preparation, structure and ion exchange properties, as well as, resistance to radiation and elevated temperatures, of potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate are described. A short description of the final disposal concept for the columns loaded with cesium is also given. (author). 16 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs

  9. SiO2/polyacrylonitrile membranes via centrifugal spinning as a separator for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem; Lu, Yao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal spinning is a fast, cost-effective and safe alternative to the electrospinning technique, which is commonly used for making fiber-based separator membranes. In this work, SiO2/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes were produced by using centrifugal spinning and they were characterized by using different electrochemical techniques for use as separators in Li-ion batteries. SiO2/PAN membranes exhibited good wettability and high ionic conductivity due to their highly porous fibrous structure. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN membrane separators were assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells and these cells delivered high capacities and exhibited good cycling performance at room temperature. In addition, cells using SiO2/PAN membranes showed superior C-rate performance compared to those using microporous PP membrane.

  10. Evaluating the trade-off between mechanical and electrochemical performance of separators for lithium-ion batteries: Methodology and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaimer, Martin; Breitfuß, Christoph; Sinz, Wolfgang; Heindl, Simon F.; Ellersdorfer, Christian; Steffan, Hermann; Wilkening, Martin; Hennige, Volker; Tatschl, Reinhard; Geier, Alexander; Schramm, Christian; Freunberger, Stefan A.

    2016-02-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are in widespread use in electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles. Besides features like energy density, cost, lifetime, and recyclability the safety of a battery system is of prime importance. The separator material impacts all these properties and requires therefore an informed selection. The interplay between the mechanical and electrochemical properties as key selection criteria is investigated. Mechanical properties were investigated using tensile and puncture penetration tests at abuse relevant conditions. To investigate the electrochemical performance in terms of effective conductivity a method based on impedance spectroscopy was introduced. This methodology is applied to evaluate ten commercial separators which allows for a trade-off analysis of mechanical versus electrochemical performance. Based on the results, and in combination with other factors, this offers an effective approach to select suitable separators for automotive applications.

  11. Functional reduced graphene oxide-based membranes with selective ion transport channels for zwitterionic ions separation based on the pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Ji, Hongyun; Yang, Feng; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yujue; Dai, Jianyuan; Ren, Haisheng; Tan, Guangqun; Xiao, Dan

    2018-01-18

    In this work, we report a method for the fabrication of a functional free-standing graphene membrane (FFGM) with high mechanical strength, enlarged interlayer spacing and ion channels for zwitterionic ions separation. To obtain the FFGM, the anionic dye Eosin Y (EY) was introduced into a graphene oxide (GO) and hydroquinone (HQ) mixture to prepare functional graphene-based membranes on Cu foil using simply a drop-casting method. In comparison with a GO membrane, the molar flux and the mechanical strength of the FFGM were dramatically increased. The FFGM was then equipped on custom-built glass reservoirs for zwitterionic amino acids (AAs) separation based on the inner pH gradient, which was formed by controlling H + and OH - (in the feed and receiver solution) migration in rGO/GO sheets via an external electric field. With the help of the inner pH gradient and external electric field, AAs could change their charge behaviors. The ionized AAs transport through the FFGM and finally separation was realized.

  12. Ion-Exchange Membrane Chromatography as an Alternative Method of Separation of Potato y Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treder Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Procedures of separation of virus particles from a plant material are multistage. Furthermore often they are difficult in terms of methodology and require use of expensive, highly specialist equipment and yield of separation is often low. The antigen obtained is often degraded and contains admixtures of other proteins. Therefore, generation of high quality and specificity antibodies based on such antigen is very difficult and quality of the antibodies has impact on reliability, sensitivity and unambiguity of results of immunodiagnostic tests (e.g. ELISA that are currently conventionally used to detect vegetable viruses. In this study three conventionally-performed methods of separation of potato virus Y (PVY were compared and a method of separation based on membrane chromatography, as an alternative separation technique, has been presented. It has been demonstrated that in proper process conditions good quality virus preparation can be obtained.

  13. A compact electron beam ion source with integrated Wien filter providing mass and charge state separated beams of highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M. [DREEBIT GmbH, Zur Wetterwarte 50, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Peng, H. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zschornack, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Sykora, S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    A Wien filter was designed for and tested with a room temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS). Xenon charge state spectra up to the charge state Xe{sup 46+} were resolved as well as the isotopes of krypton using apertures of different sizes. The complete setup consisting of an EBIS and a Wien filter has a length of less than 1 m substituting a complete classical beamline setup. The Wien filter is equipped with removable permanent magnets. Hence total beam current measurements are possible via simple removal of the permanent magnets. In dependence on the needs of resolution a weak (0.2 T) or a strong (0.5 T) magnets setup can be used. In this paper the principle of operation and the design of the Wien filter meeting the requirements of an EBIS are briefly discussed. The first ion beam extraction and separation experiments with a Dresden EBIS are presented.

  14. A compact electron beam ion source with integrated Wien filter providing mass and charge state separated beams of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Peng, H.; Zschornack, G.; Sykora, S.

    2009-06-01

    A Wien filter was designed for and tested with a room temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS). Xenon charge state spectra up to the charge state Xe46+ were resolved as well as the isotopes of krypton using apertures of different sizes. The complete setup consisting of an EBIS and a Wien filter has a length of less than 1 m substituting a complete classical beamline setup. The Wien filter is equipped with removable permanent magnets. Hence total beam current measurements are possible via simple removal of the permanent magnets. In dependence on the needs of resolution a weak (0.2 T) or a strong (0.5 T) magnets setup can be used. In this paper the principle of operation and the design of the Wien filter meeting the requirements of an EBIS are briefly discussed. The first ion beam extraction and separation experiments with a Dresden EBIS are presented.

  15. In-depth study of in-trap high-resolution mass separation by transversal ion ejection from a multi-reflection time-of-flight device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Paul; Knauer, Stefan; Marx, Gerrit; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2018-01-01

    The recently introduced method of ion separation by transversal ejection of unwanted species in electrostatic ion-beam traps and multi-reflection time-of-flight devices has been further studied in detail. As this separation is performed during the ion storage itself, there is no need for additional external devices such as ion gates or traps for either pre- or postselection of the ions of interest. The ejection of unwanted contaminant ions is performed by appropriate pulses of the potentials of deflector electrodes. These segmented ring electrodes are located off-center in the trap, i.e., between one of the two ion mirrors and the central drift tube, which also serves as a potential lift for capturing incoming ions and axially ejecting ions of interest after their selection. The various parameters affecting the selection effectivity and resolving power are illustrated with tin-cluster measurements, where isotopologue ion species provide mass differences down to a single atomic mass unit at ion masses of several hundred. Symmetric deflection voltages of only 10 V were found sufficient for the transversal ejection of ion species with as few as three deflection pulses. The duty cycle, i.e., the pulse duration with respect to the period of ion revolution, has been varied, resulting in resolving powers of up to several tens of thousands for this selection technique.

  16. Ion separation in a Paul trap in the presence of damping force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ziaeian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical behavior of particles in a Paul trap has been investigated by solving the set of differential equations considering the effect of damping force. Positions of the trapped ions as a function of time, ion trajectories and the phase space curves in the first stability region have been obtained in the presence of the damping force. The region of stability for r and z components as well as the first stability region with and without the damping force have been computed using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Furthermore, for a Paul trap with specified dimensions and a typical RF frequency, the first stability region for 3H+ and 1H+ ions has been determined in the Vdc – Vac plane. It is worthwhile to note that computation of the stability region in the presence of damping force through the use of this method has been reported for the first time.

  17. Nanomaterial size distribution analysis via liquid nebulization coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (LN-IMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seongho; Oberreit, Derek R; Van Schooneveld, Gary; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-02-21

    We apply liquid nebulization (LN) in series with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS, using a differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter) to measure the size distribution functions (the number concentration per unit log diameter) of gold nanospheres in the 5-30 nm range, 70 nm × 11.7 nm gold nanorods, and albumin proteins originally in aqueous suspensions. In prior studies, IMS measurements have only been carried out for colloidal nanoparticles in this size range using electrosprays for aerosolization, as traditional nebulizers produce supermicrometer droplets which leave residue particles from non-volatile species. Residue particles mask the size distribution of the particles of interest. Uniquely, the LN employed in this study uses both online dilution (with dilution factors of up to 10(4)) with ultra-high purity water and a ball-impactor to remove droplets larger than 500 nm in diameter. This combination enables hydrosol-to-aerosol conversion preserving the size and morphology of particles, and also enables higher non-volatile residue tolerance than electrospray based aerosolization. Through LN-IMS measurements we show that the size distribution functions of narrowly distributed but similarly sized particles can be distinguished from one another, which is not possible with Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis in the sub-30 nm size range. Through comparison to electron microscopy measurements, we find that the size distribution functions inferred via LN-IMS measurements correspond to the particle sizes coated by surfactants, i.e. as they persist in colloidal suspensions. Finally, we show that the gas phase particle concentrations inferred from IMS size distribution functions are functions of only of the liquid phase particle concentration, and are independent of particle size, shape, and chemical composition. Therefore LN-IMS enables characterization of the size, yield, and polydispersity of sub-30 nm particles.

  18. A modular computational framework for automated peak extraction from ion mobility spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addario, Marianna; Kopczynski, Dominik; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven

    2014-01-22

    An ion mobility (IM) spectrometer coupled with a multi-capillary column (MCC) measures volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air or in exhaled breath. This technique is utilized in several biotechnological and medical applications. Each peak in an MCC/IM measurement represents a certain compound, which may be known or unknown. For clustering and classification of measurements, the raw data matrix must be reduced to a set of peaks. Each peak is described by its coordinates (retention time in the MCC and reduced inverse ion mobility) and shape (signal intensity, further shape parameters). This fundamental step is referred to as peak extraction. It is the basis for identifying discriminating peaks, and hence putative biomarkers, between two classes of measurements, such as a healthy control group and a group of patients with a confirmed disease. Current state-of-the-art peak extraction methods require human interaction, such as hand-picking approximate peak locations, assisted by a visualization of the data matrix. In a high-throughput context, however, it is preferable to have robust methods for fully automated peak extraction. We introduce PEAX, a modular framework for automated peak extraction. The framework consists of several steps in a pipeline architecture. Each step performs a specific sub-task and can be instantiated by different methods implemented as modules. We provide open-source software for the framework and several modules for each step. Additionally, an interface that allows easy extension by a new module is provided. Combining the modules in all reasonable ways leads to a large number of peak extraction methods. We evaluate all combinations using intrinsic error measures and by comparing the resulting peak sets with an expert-picked one. Our software PEAX is able to automatically extract peaks from MCC/IM measurements within a few seconds. The automatically obtained results keep up with the results provided by current state-of-the-art peak

  19. Radioactive ion beams at the Bevalac: Greatly enhanced fragment separation for high energy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.

    1990-09-01

    Radioactive beams are routinely produced at the Bevalac by the fragmentation process. High energy beams (energies ∼ 800 MeV/u) produce fragments with nearly the original beam momentum, forming a radioactive ion beam. A new beamline is being constructed which will provide resolution for ions approaching the mass 100 region, compared to the present mass 20 capability, by strongly increasing the dispersion and also increasing the beam size for easier tuning and more effective collimation. In addition, the angular acceptance has been more than doubled. Details of the design will be presented. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of ∼2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of ∼25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs

  1. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...... for all students and scholars with an interest in the ‘mobilities turn’ and its contributions to a deeper understanding of the contemporary and mobile world. The entries chosen all are amongst the most creative, thought provoking, and thoughtful of this diverse field of analysis and thought. The selection...

  2. Ion mobility spectrometry for microbial volatile organic compounds: a new identification tool for human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Melanie; Vautz, Wolfgang; Kuhns, Martin; Hofmann, Lena; Ulbricht, Siobhán; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Quintel, Michael; Perl, Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    Presently, 2 to 4 days elapse between sampling at infection suspicion and result of microbial diagnostics. This delay for the identification of pathogens causes quite often a late and/or inappropriate initiation of therapy for patients suffering from infections. Bad outcome and high hospitalization costs are the consequences of these currently existing limited pathogen identification possibilities. For this reason, we aimed to apply the innovative method multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS) for a fast identification of human pathogenic bacteria by determination of their characteristic volatile metabolomes. We determined volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns in headspace of 15 human pathogenic bacteria, which were grown for 24 h on Columbia blood agar plates. Besides MCC-IMS determination, we also used thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements to confirm and evaluate obtained MCC-IMS data and if possible to assign volatile compounds to unknown MCC-IMS signals. Up to 21 specific signals have been determined by MCC-IMS for Proteus mirabilis possessing the most VOCs of all investigated strains. Of particular importance is the result that all investigated strains showed different VOC patterns by MCC-IMS using positive and negative ion mode for every single strain. Thus, the discrimination of investigated bacteria is possible by detection of their volatile organic compounds in the chosen experimental setup with the fast and cost-effective method MCC-IMS. In a hospital routine, this method could enable the identification of pathogens already after 24 h with the consequence that a specific therapy could be initiated significantly earlier.

  3. Electrospray Ionization Mechanisms for Large Polyethylene Glycol Chains Studied Through Tandem Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Carlos; de la Mora, Juan Fernandez; Clemmer, David E.

    2014-08-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) is used to investigate the abundance pattern, n z (m) of Poly-(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) electrosprayed from water/methanol as a function of mass and charge state. We examine n z (m) patterns from a diversity of solution cations, primarily dimethylammonium and triethylammonium. The ability of PEG chains to initially attach to various cations in the spraying chamber, and to retain them (or not) on entering the MS, provide valuable clues on the ionization mechanism. Single chains form in highly charged and extended shapes in most buffers. But the high initial charge they hold under atmospheric pressure is lost on transit to the vacuum system for large cations. In contrast, aggregates of two or more chains carry in all buffers at most the Rayleigh charge of a water drop of the same volume. This shows either that they form via Dole's charge residue mechanism, or that highly charged and extended aggregates are ripped apart by Coulombic repulsion. IMS-IMS experiments in He confirm these findings, and provide new mechanistic insights on the stability of aggregates. When collisionally activated, initially globular dimers are stable. However, slightly nonglobular dimers projecting out a linear appendix are segregated into two monomeric chains. The breakup of a charged dimer is therefore a multi-step process, similar to the Fenn-Consta polymer extrusion mechanism. The highest activation barrier is associated to the first step, where a short chain segment carrying a single charge escapes (ion-evaporates) from a charged drop, leading then to gradual field extrusion of the whole chain out of the drop.

  4. Neutron-activation determination of phosphorus using extraction separation of phosphate-ion with dialkylti dinitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, Yu.V.; Kolotov, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The selectivity of phosphorus (5) separation has been studied using dialkyltin dinitrates-promising reagents for extraction of oxygen-containing anions. Procedures have been developed for separating phosphorus in the presence of macro amounts of some interfering-elements (Al, Fe, Mo and Zr). The procedure was used for neutron activation determination of phosphorus in aluminium. The limit of detection was 5x10 -10 g [ru

  5. Analysis of triacetone triperoxide complexes with alkali metal ions by electrospray and extractive electrospray ionisation combined with ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alex R; Edgar, Mark; Chatzigeorgiou, Maria; Reynolds, James C; Kelly, Paul F; Creaser, Colin S

    2015-01-01

    The complexation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with a range of alkali metals has been studied by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry yield [M+Cat](+) ions for all of the alkali metals. The formation of [2TATP+Li+LiX](+) (X = Br, Cl) sandwich complexes was also observed. Collision cross- sections for the lithium-containing complexes of TATP were measured by travelling wave ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry, and compared well with computationally determined structures. Extractive electrospray ionisation (EESI) using a lithium doped electrospray is demonstrated for the detection of TATP vapours desorbed from a metal surface. The limit of detection for EESI was shown to be 20 ng using the [TATP+Li](+) ion.

  6. An efficient method for extracting plasma ions in laser isotope separation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidova, N.S.; Mishin, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using a Hall-current accelerator to extract ions from a partially ionized plasma produced by selective laser isotope photoionization of atomic vapor is examined. A mechanism for ion acceleration is investigated using one-dimensional time-dependent equations of two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. The current cutoff due to the ion space charge is prevented by electron emission. It is shown that, at an accelerating voltage of 25-50 V and emission current density of several mA/cm 2 , the ion component is accelerated throughout the entire plasma volume up to a velocity of ∼10 5 cm/s in a few microseconds. The influence of resonant charge exchange and secondary ionization by electrons on both the acceleration dynamics and selectivity degradation is taken into account. It is shown that the Hall-current extractor allows one to avoid selectivity degradation even when the plasma size exceeds the charge-exchange mean free path by one order of magnitude

  7. High-performance liquid chromatographic separations of stereoisomers of chiral basic agrochemicals with polysaccharide-based chiral columns and polar organic mobile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarashvili, Iza; Shvangiradze, Iamze; Chankvetadze, Lali; Sidamonidze, Shota; Takaishvili, Nino; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2015-12-01

    The separation of the stereoisomers of 23 chiral basic agrochemicals was studied on six different polysaccharide-based chiral columns in high-performance liquid chromatography with various polar organic mobile phases. Along with the successful separation of analyte stereoisomers, emphasis was placed on the effect of the chiral selector and mobile phase composition on the elution order of stereoisomers. The interesting phenomenon of reversal of enantiomer/stereoisomer elution order function of the polysaccharide backbone (cellulose or amylose), type of derivative (carbamate or benzoate), nature, and position of the substituent(s) in the phenylcarbamate moiety (methyl or chloro) and the nature of the mobile phase was observed. For several of the analytes containing two chiral centers all four stereoisomers were resolved with at least one chiral selector/mobile phase combination. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2018-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate ( in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract.

  9. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sheibani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for the determination of tramadol in human plasma, saliva, serum, and urine samples. The limits of detection and the limits of quantitation were between 0.1 and 0.3 and 0.3 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations were between 7.5 and 8.8%. The recovery results (90–103.9% indicate that the proposed method can be applied for tramadol analysis in different biological samples.

  10. Multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry of volatile metabolites emitted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E; Blank, Lars M

    2014-09-05

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control.

  11. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Halbfeld

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS. The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control.

  12. Coming to Grips with Ambiguity: Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Protein Quaternary Structure Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Joseph D.; Frank, Aaron T.; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2017-10-01

    Multiprotein complexes are central to our understanding of cellular biology, as they play critical roles in nearly every biological process. Despite many impressive advances associated with structural characterization techniques, large and highly-dynamic protein complexes are too often refractory to analysis by conventional, high-resolution approaches. To fill this gap, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) methods have emerged as a promising approach for characterizing the structures of challenging assemblies due in large part to the ability of these methods to characterize the composition, connectivity, and topology of large, labile complexes. In this Critical Insight, we present a series of bioinformatics studies aimed at assessing the information content of IM-MS datasets for building models of multiprotein structure. Our computational data highlights the limits of current coarse-graining approaches, and compelled us to develop an improved workflow for multiprotein topology modeling, which we benchmark against a subset of the multiprotein complexes within the PDB. This improved workflow has allowed us to ascertain both the minimal experimental restraint sets required for generation of high-confidence multiprotein topologies, and quantify the ambiguity in models where insufficient IM-MS information is available. We conclude by projecting the future of IM-MS in the context of protein quaternary structure assignment, where we predict that a more complete knowledge of the ultimate information content and ambiguity within such models will undoubtedly lead to applications for a broader array of challenging biomolecular assemblies. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Ion Mobility-Enhanced Data-Independent Acquisitions Enable a Deep Proteomic Landscape of Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Cassoli, Juliana; Brandão-Teles, Caroline; G Santana, Aline; H M F Souza, Gustavo; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Oligodendrocytes are a type of neuroglia that provide trophic support and insulation to axons in the central nervous system. The genesis and maturation of oligodendrocytes are essential processes for myelination and the course of CNS development. Using ion mobility-enhanced, data-independent acquisitions and 2D-nanoUPLC fractionation operating at nanoscale flow rates, we established a comprehensive data set of proteins expressed by the human oligodendroglia cell line MO3.13. The final dataset incorporating all fractions comprised 223 531 identified peptides assigned to 10 390 protein hits, an improvement of 4.5 times on identified proteins described previously by our group using the same cell line. Identified proteins play pivotal roles in many biological processes such as cell growth and development and energy metabolism, providing a rich resource for future studies on oligodendrocyte development, myelination, axonal support, and the regulation of such process. Our results can help further studies that use MO3.13 cells as a tool of investigation, not only in relation to oligodendrocyte maturation, but also to diseases that have oligodendrocytes as key players. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004696. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Indoor and outdoor determination of pesticides in air by ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallart-Mateu, D; Armenta, S; de la Guardia, M

    2016-12-01

    The use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been evaluated as analytical methodology to detect and evaluate the occupational exposure to pesticides. The developed IMS methodology was used, in positive and negative modes, to determine the presence of pesticides in air and to evaluate possible inhalation exposures of workers and users based on active sampling on Teflon membranes and direct thermal desorption IMS. The negative IMS mode was used to determine bensulfuron, clorpyrifos, diniconazole, diuron, flutolanil and imidacloprid, while the positive mode was employed to evaluate formetanate, metalaxyl, metamitrone, metribuzin, paclobutrazol and pirimicarb. The IMS measurements provided limits of detection from 8pg to 600pg. Indoor air samples, from phytosanitary plants, and outdoor samples, obtained from pesticide treatments in a local farm, were analysed providing pesticide air concentrations in the range of 0.04 to>0.25mgm -3 . Occupational exposure of workers and pesticide users were evaluated and compared with values recommended by the authorities, providing useful information to improve the prevention programs in the phytosanitary field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring Conformational Landscape of Ovine Prion Protein Monomer Using Ion Mobility Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Rest, Guillaume; Rezaei, Human; Halgand, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Prion protein is involved in deadly neurodegenerative diseases. Its pathogenicity is linked to its structural conversion (α-helix to β-strand transition). However, recent studies suggest that prion protein can follow a plurality of conversion pathways, which hints towards different conformers that might coexist in solution. To gain insights on the plasticity of the ovine prion protein (PrP) monomer, wild type (A136, R154, Q171), mutants and deletions of ARQ were studied by traveling wave ion mobility experiments coupled to mass spectrometry. In order to perform the analysis of a large body of data sets, we designed and evaluated the performance of a processing pipeline based on Driftscope peak detection and a homemade script for automated peak assignment, annotation, and quantification on specific multiply charged protein data. Using this approach, we showed that in the gas phase, PrPs are represented by at least three conformer families differing in both charge state distribution and collisional cross-section, in agreement with the work of Hilton et al. (2010). We also showed that this plasticity is borne both by the N- and C-terminal domains. Effect of protein concentration, pH and temperature were also assessed, showing that (1) pH does not affect conformer distributions, (2) protein concentration modifies the conformational landscape of one mutant (I208M) only, and (3) heating leads to other unfolded species and to a modification of the conformer intensity ratios.

  16. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J.; Wu, C.; Robertson, W. D.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 107 V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 1010 V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  18. Analysis of triazines and associated metabolites with electrospray ionization field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Sandulescu, Madaline; Mathiasson, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Triazines comprise an important pollutant class owing to continued use in certain countries, and owing to strong environmental persistence that leads to problems even in countries like Sweden where the use of triazines has been prohibited for some years. We investigated mass-selective detection...... for analysis of triazines. More specifically, we studied the background reduction and sensitivity enhancement that result from the use of a new interface technique, field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), in conjunction with electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. This technique allows...... analysis with mass-selective detection coupled to membrane-based sample cleanup and enrichment for additional enhancement in sensitivity....

  19. Strontium (Sr) separation from seawater using titanate adsorbents: Effects of seawater matrix ions on Sr sorption behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungho; Hong, Hye-jin; Ryu, Taegong; Park, In-Su

    2017-04-01

    Strontium (Sr) which has many industrial applications such as ferrite magnet, ceramic, and fire works exists in seawater with the concentration of approximately 7 mg/L. In previous report estimating economic potential on recovery of various elements from seawater in terms of their commercial values and concentrations in seawater, Sr locates upper than approximate break-even line, which implies Sr recovery from seawater can be potentially profitable. Recently, Sr separation from seawater has received great attention in the environmental aspect after Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident which released much amount of radioactive Sr and Cs. Accordingly, the efficient separation of radioactive elements released to seawater has become critical as an important technological need as well as their removal from radioactive wastes. So far, it has been introduced to separate Sr from aqueous media by various methods including solvent extraction, adsorption by solid materials, and ion exchange. Among them, the adsorption technique using solid adsorbents is of great interest for selectively separating Sr from seawater with respect to low concentration level of Sr. In this study, we synthesized titanate nanotube (TiNT) by simple hydrothermal reaction, characterized its physicochemical properties, and systematically evaluated Sr sorption behavior under various reaction conditions corresponding to seawater environment. The synthesized TiNT exhibited the fibril-type nanotube structure with high specific surface area of 260 m2/g. The adsorption of Sr on TiNT rapidly occurred following pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and was in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model, indicating maximum adsorption capacity of 97 mg/g. Based on Sr uptake and Na release with stoichiometric balance, sorption mechanism of Sr on TiNT was found to be ion-exchange between Na in TiNT lattice and Sr in solution phase, which was also confirmed by XRD and Raman analysis. Among competitive ions, Ca

  20. Towards an electro-magnetic field separation of deposited material implemented in an ion beam sputter process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malobabic, Sina; Jupé, Marco; Ristau, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Ion Beam Sputter (IBS) processes are very well optimized on an empirical basis. To achieve further progresses, a modification of the IBS process by guiding the coating material using an axial magnetic field and an additional electrical