WorldWideScience

Sample records for io plasma torus

  1. Juno Perijove 1 radio occultation of the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, P. H.; Withers, P.; Buccino, D.; Yang, Y. M.; Hinton, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    Io's volcanic activity, the dominant source of plasma at Jupiter, releases material into Io's atmosphere which is lost to Jupiter's magnetosphere near Io. This material is then ionized and trapped by the magnetic field to form a torus of plasma around Jupiter, called the Io plasma torus. This plasma can be detected by radio occultations in which the plasma's total electron content affects properties of a spacecraft's radio signal as it propagates through the plasma on the way to the receiver. The total electron content of the Io plasma torus is derived from the duel frequency (Ka and X-band) gravity measurements from the Juno spacecraft during Perijove 1. These measurements, along with the 2-D Phipps and Withers (2017) torus model and a 3-D model of the torus based on recent reanalysis of Voyager PLS data by Bagenal et al. (2017), have been used to determine plasma properties of the torus at the time of Juno Perijove 1. The uncertainty in the data is around 2.25 TECU or 6.1% at the peak for an integration time of 10 seconds.

  2. A 4D model of the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, P. C.; Bagenal, F.; Bodisch, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    This visualization tells the story of the Io plasma torus. Jupiter's moon Io volcanically outgasses roughly 1000kg/s of neutral atoms that, through various physical mechanisms, end up as plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere. This plasma then becomes distributed along magnetic field lines according to diffusive equilibrium and assumes an overall toroidal structure with a few distinct sections. These sections include the cold inner torus (disk), a portion between the disk and the orbit of Io (duct or sometimes called the ribbon), and the remaining warmer outer torus (donut). The disk exists from approximately 4-5.6 RJ, the duct exists from 5.6-6 RJ, and the donut portion extends from 6-10 RJ, where RJ is the radius of Jupiter (1 RJ = 71,492 km). We seek to reproduce these three features in our 4D model, adding time (duration) as the last dimension. Current modeling efforts involve using a simple tilted dipole magnetic field model. This simple model effectively reproduces the bulk of the toroid - the warmer outer donut. We experiment with other magnetic field models such as VIP4 in order to best match observations and improve the accuracy of our model. We further apply techniques of physical chemistry and ground based observations to develop understanding of the cold inner torus and to aid our modeling efforts. Our model includes various parameters that can be adjusted in order to gain further insight into the plasma torus. Such parameters include ion and electron temperatures, densities, and distributions, as well as the magnetic field model. While our first application involves data from the Voyager 1 through the Io plasma torus in 1979, we intend to compare our empirical 4D model of the Io plasma torus to space and ground-based observations over the past decades.

  3. On the energy crisis in the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A.; Bagenal, Fran; Cheng, Andrew F.; Strobel, Darrell

    1988-01-01

    Recent calculations of the energy balance of the Io plasma torus show that the observed UV and EUV radiation cannot be maintained solely via energy input by the ion pickup mechanism. Current theoretical models of the torus must be modified to include non-local energy input. It is argued that the required energy may be supplied by inward diffusion of energetic heavy ions with energies less than about 20 keV.

  4. Ion Temperature Control of the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamere, P. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Steffl, A. J.; Robbins, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on observational and theoretical studies of ion temperature in the Io plasma torus. Ion temperature is a critical factor for two reasons. First, ions are a major supplier of energy to the torus electrons which power the intense EUV emissions. Second, ion temperature determines the vertical extent of plasma along field lines. Higher temperatures spread plasma out, lowers the density and slows reaction rates. The combined effects can play a controlling role in torus energetics and chemistry. An unexpected tool for the study of ion temperature is the longitudinal structure in the plasma torus which often manifests itself as periodic brightness variations. Opposite sides of the torus (especially magnetic longitudes 20 and 200 degrees) have been observed on numerous occasions to have dramatically different brightness, density, composition, ionization state, electron temperature and ion temperature. These asymmetries must ultimately be driven by different energy flows on the opposite sides, presenting an opportunity to observe key torus processes operating under different conditions. The most comprehensive dataset for the study of longitudinal variations was obtained by the Cassini UVIS instrument during its Jupiter flyby. Steffl (Ph.D. thesis, 2005) identified longitudinal variations in all the quantities listed above wit the exception of ion temperature. We extend his work by undertaking the first search for such variation in the UVIS dataset. We also report on a 'square centimeter' model of the torus which extend the traditional 'cubic centimeter' models by including the controlling effects of ion temperature more completely.

  5. Effect of plasma density around Io on local electron heating in the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kagitani, M.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Misawa, H.; Kasaba, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Sakanoi, T.; Koga, R.; Ryo, A.; Suzuki, F.; Hikida, R.

    2017-12-01

    HISAKI observation of Io plasma torus (IPT) with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength range is a useful probe to access plasma environment in inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. Emissions from sulfur and oxygen ions in EUV range are caused by electron impact excitation and their intensity is well correlated with the abundance of hot electron in IPT. Previous observation showed that the brightness was enhanced downstream of the satellite Io, indicating that efficient electron heating takes place at Io and/or just downstream of Io. Detailed analysis of the emission intensity shows that the brightness depends on the magnetic longitude at Io and primary and secondary peaks appear in the longitude ranges of 100-130 and 250-340 degrees, respectively. The peak position and amplitude are slightly different between dawn and dusk sides. Here, we introduce inhomogeneous IPT density model in order to investigate relation between the emission intensity and local plasma density around Io in detail. An empirical IPT model is used for spatial distribution of ion and electron densities in the meridional plane. To include longitude and local time asymmetry in IPT, we consider (1)dawnward shift of IPT due to global convection electric field, (2) offset of Jupiter's dipole magnetic field, and (3) tilt of IPT with respect to Io's orbital plane. The modeled electron density at the position of Io as a function of magnetic longitude at Io shows similar profile with the ion emission intensity derived from the observation. This result suggests that energy extracted around Io and/or efficiency of electron heating is closely related to the plasma density around Io and longitude and local time dependences is explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of plasma density in IPT. A part of the energy extracted around Io could be transferred to the Jovian ionosphere along the magnetic field line and cause bright aurora spots and strong radio emissions.

  6. Juno Radio Science Observations and Gravity Science Calibrations of Plasma Electron Content in Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. M.; Buccino, D.; Folkner, W. M.; Oudrhiri, K.; Phipps, P. H.; Parisi, M.; Kahan, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Interplanetary and Earth ionosphere plasma electrons can have significant impacts on radio frequency signal propagation such as telecommunication between spacecraft and the Deep Space Network (DSN). On 27 August 2016, the first closest approach of The Juno spacecraft (Perijove 1) provided an opportunity to observe plasma electrons inside of the Io plasma torus using radio science measurements from Juno. Here, we report on the derivations of plasma electron content in the Io plasma torus by using two-way coherent radio science measurements made from Juno's Gravity Science Instrument and the Deep Space Network. During Perijove 1, Juno spacecraft passed through the inner region (perijove altitude of 1.06 Jovian Radii) between Jupiter and the Io plasma torus. Significant plasma electron variations of up to 30 TEC units were observed while the radio link between Juno and the DSN traveled through the Io plasma torus. In this research, we compare observations made by open-loop and closed-loop processes using different frequency radio signals, corresponding Io plasma torus model simulations, and other Earth ionosphere observations. The results of three-dimensional Io plasma model simulations are consistent with observations with some discrepancies. Results are shown to improve our understanding of the Io plasma torus effect on Juno gravity science measurements and its calibrations to reduce the corresponding (non-gravity field induced) radio frequency shift.

  7. Characterizing the Io Plasma Torus with Juno radio science experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, D.; Zannoni, M.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft is currently orbiting Jupiter in a highly eccentric, 52.5-day orbit, with a perijove altitude of about 4000 km. Juno mission's goals include the determination of the planet's gravity field, a crucial step to model the deep interior and atmospheric dynamics. The radio science instrumentation collects Doppler data during selected perijove passes for about eight hours across closest approach. Due to the orbital geometry, the radio beam crosses the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) during each perijove pass, suffering a phase shift. The Juno radio system is composed of a standard Deep Space Transponder, which allow to establish a coherent two-way X/X link (7.2-8.4 GHz), along with a Ka-band Translator System (KaTS), devised for the radio science investigations. The KaTS transposes an incoming Ka-band signal (34 GHz) back to the Earth at Ka-band (32 GHz). The dual frequency radio link (X/X and Ka/Ka) is used during passes dedicated to gravity, since it allows a 75% calibration of plasma noise in range rate measurements at Ka band. The dispersive contribution can be isolated (nearly the total contribution) and analyzed.We report on the signatures from the Io Plasma Torus measured during Juno's gravity perijoves PJ03 (11 Dec. 2016) and PJ06 (19 May 2017). In addition, during PJ01 (27 Aug. 2016), a precise measurement of plasma contribution in the downlink leg was possible by transmitting two downlink signals at X and Ka band coherent with a common uplink X band signal. Our analysis provides measurements of the integrated path delay of the radio signal, allowing a direct measurement of the Total Electron Content (TEC) along the line-of-sight.

  8. Energy branching in the Io plasma torus - The failure of neutral cloud theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemansky, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Model calculations are used to explore the energy source characteristics of the energy branching of the hot Io plasma torus. It is assumed that the energy is derived from the kinetic energy acquired by ions created in the rotating planetary magnetic field, and that Coulomb collisions with the electron gas control the flow of energy to the ionizing and radiative processes. The results show that neutral cloud theory is qualitatively inadequate. It is shown that neutral cloud theory can only support a dominantly singly ionized system (at the measured electron densities in the plasma torus) and that it fails to predict observed plasma properties relative to variations in number density.

  9. X-ray probes of Jupiter's auroral zones, Galilean moons, and the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Gaskin, J. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-09-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we examine the necessary characteristics of such an instrument and the challenges it would face in the extreme radiation environment in which it would have to survive and operate. Such an instrument would have the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  10. Radial transport from the Io plasma torus: driven from the inside out or outside in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, J. P.; Marconi, M.; Oliversen, R. J.; Woodward, R. C., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    The Io plasma torus (IPT) is much more massive than it should be assuming radial transport was driven by centrifugally driven interchange instability. Two competing hypotheses have been proposed that provide the necessary impounding effect to radial transport of plasma: velocity shear impound and ring current impound. The velocity shear impound hypothesis suggests that the region of subcorotational plasma seen at the outer edge of the IPT impounds the progress of outward-moving flux tubes and processes near the IPT, such as Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, would govern mass loss from the IPT ("inside out"). The ring current impound mechanism suggests that a population of energetic electrons on the inner edge of the ring current are distributed in energy and density in just the right way to balance the outward pressure of IPT material and processes in the magnetotail, such as reconnection after plasmoid release, would inject energetic particles that would perturb the ring current and let IPT material leak out ("outside in"). In support of the ring current impound mechanism, Louarn et al. (2014) found that roughly half of the time Galileo was sensitive to detecting them, energetic particle injections were coincident with Jovian hectometeric radio radiation (HOM), associated with auroral activity, and new bursts of narrow-band kilometric radiation (nKOM), associated with plasma leaving the vicinity of the IPT. We present new analyses of a large database of ground-based observations of Io's exosphere in [OI] 6300A. Using the IPT model of Smyth & Marconi (1998, 2000), Oliversen et al. (2001) showed the [OI] flux is a reliable proxy for the thermal electron density at Io's position. The Smyth & Marconi model (triangles in Figure) describes Io's [OI] flux well on most nights, except the two for which we have contemporaneous coverage with that of Louarn et al. (2014). These nights show strong evidence of missing mass from the IPT. We suggest that our observations can be used

  11. Remote sensing of the Io torus plasma ribbon using natural radio occultation of the Jovian radio emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the Jovian hectometric (HOM emissions recorded by the RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment onboard the Cassini spacecraft during its Jupiter flyby. We analyze the attenuation band associated with the intensity extinction of HOM radiation. This phenomenon is interpreted as a refraction effect of the Jovian hectometric emission inside the Io plasma torus. This attenuation band was regularly observed during periods of more than 5 months, from the beginning of October 2000 to the end of March 2001. We estimate for this period the variation of the electron density versus the central meridian longitude (CML. We find a clear local time dependence. Hence the electron density was not higher than 5.0 × 104 cm−3 during 2 months, when the spacecraft approached the planet on the dayside. In the late afternoon and evening sectors, the electron density increases to 1.5 × 105 cm−3 and reach a higher value at some specific occasions. Additionally, we show that ultraviolet and hectometric wavelength observations have common features related to the morphology of the Io plasma torus. The maxima of enhancements/attenuations of UV/HOM observations occur close to the longitudes of the tip of the magnetic dipole in the southern hemisphere (20° CML and in the northern hemisphere (200° CML, respectively. This is a significant indication about the importance of the Jovian magnetic field as a physical parameter in the coupling process between Jupiter and the Io satellite.

  12. X-ray probes of magnetospheric interactions with Jupiter's auroral zones, the Galilean satellites, and the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the jovian system is a source of X-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are both powerful sources of X-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed X-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions. These ions excite atoms in their surfaces leading to fluorescent X-ray emission lines. These lines are produced against an intense background continuum, including bremsstrahlung radiation from surface interactions of primary magnetospheric and secondary electrons. Although the X-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging X-ray spectrometer in orbit around one or more of these moons, operating from 200 eV to 8 keV with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Surface resolution of 40 m for small features could be achieved in a 100-km orbit around one moon while also remotely imaging surfaces of other moons and Jupiter's upper atmosphere at maximum regional resolutions of hundreds of kilometers. Due to its relatively more benign magnetospheric radiation environment, its intrinsic interest as the largest moon in the Solar System, and its mini-magnetosphere, Ganymede would be the ideal orbital location for long-term observational studies of the jovian system. Here we describe the physical processes leading to X-ray emission from the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the properties required for the technique of imaging X-ray spectroscopy to map the elemental composition of their surfaces, as well as studies of the X-ray emission from the planet's aurora and disk and from the Io plasma torus.

  13. Preliminary Results from a Coordinated Hisaki/Chandra/XMM-Newton Study of the Jovian Aurora and Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Ralph; Kimura, Tomoki; Elsner, Ronald; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Gladstone, Randy; Badman, Sarah Victoria; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Murakami, Go; Murray, Stephen S.; Roediger, Elke; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a coordinated Hisaki/Chandra/XMM-Newton observational campaign of the Jovian aurora and Io plasma torus. The data were taken over a three week period in April, 2014. Jupiter was observed continuously with Hisaki, six times with the Chandra/HRC instrument for roughly 12 hours per observation, and twice by XMM-Newton. The goal of this observational campaign was to understand how energy and matter are exchanged between the Jovian aurora, the IPT, and the Solar wind. X-ray observations provide key diagnostics on highly stripped ions and keV electrons in the Jovian magnetosphere. We use the temporal, spatial, and spectral capabilities of the three instruments to search for correlated variability between the Solar wind, the EUV-emitting plasma of the IPT and UV aurora, and the ions responsible for the X-ray aurora. Preliminary analysis suggests a strong 45 min periodicity in the EUV emission from the electron aurora. There is some evidence for complex variability of the X-ray auroras on scales of tens of minutes. There is also clear morphological changes in the X-ray aurora that do not appear to be correlated with either variations in the IPT or Solar wind.

  14. Modeling the Evolution of the System IV Period of the Io Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, D. A.; Delamere, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    The response of the Io plasma torus to superthermal electron modulation and volcanic eruptions is studied using a physical chemistry and radial/azimuthal transport model (Copper et al., 2016). The model includes radial and azimuthal transport, latitudinally-averaged physical chemistry, and prescribed System III superthermal electron modulation following Steffl et al., [2008]. Volcanic eruptions are modelled as a temporal Gaussian enhancement (e.g., 2x) of the neutral source rate and hot electron fraction (e.g., <1%). However, we adopt an alternative approach for the Steffl et al., [2008] System IV electron modulation. Radially-dependent subcorotation is prescribed, consistent with observations [Brown, 1994; Thomas et al., 2001], as well as a hot electron modulation proportional to the radial flux tube content gradient. Coupling hot electron modulation to radial transport and subcorotation, we seek to analyze magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. We find that the model produces a radially-independent periodicity and that eruptions can alter the modeled period, consistent with multi-epoch observations of a variable System IV. This periodicity remains consistent with the prescribed subcorotation period at L = 6.3.

  15. Beta II compact torus experiment plasma equilibrium and power balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, W.C.; Goldenbaum, G.C.; Granneman, E.H.A.; Prono, D.S.; Hartman, C.W.; Taska, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we follow up some of our earlier work that showed the compact torus (CT) plasma equilibrium produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun is nearly force free and that impurity radiation plays a dominant role in determining the decay time of plasma currents in present generation experiments

  16. Variations of System IV period of the sulfur ions in the Io torus for the volcanic event in 2015 observed by the HISAKI/EXCEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, A.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kagitani, M.; Yoshioka, K.; Yoshikawa, I.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.

    2017-12-01

    Previous ground-based and probe observations of Io plasma torus (IPT) in various wavelengths have detected a periodic variation which is longer than System III period (9.925 h). It has been called System IV period. Although various ideas to explain the origin of System IV period are proposed , little progress has been made. A previous study reported that the System IV period was 10.07 h during the Cassini's Jupiter flyby in 2000. This period was shorter than the typical period of 10.21h (Brown 1995). The Io's volcanic event just before Cassini's flyby might shorten the System IV period (Steffl et al., 2006). However, the certainty of this inference is not clear from the Cassini observation. Here, we analyzed time variations in intensities of EUV emissions from IPT obtained by the HISAKI satellite to understand the mechanism responsible for the System IV period and the influence of Io's volcanic event on IPT. The data used in this study was obtained from Dec. 2014 to the middle of May 2015. During this period, the Io's volcanic event from Jan. to Mar. 2015 was reported from the observation of Iogenic sodium emission (Yoneda et al., 2015). To find variations of the System IV period, the temporal variation of System III longitude at peak EUV intensity was derived by fitting light curves of three ion species (S II 76.5 nm + 126 nm, S III 68 nm, and S IV 65.7 nm + 140.5 nm). The System IV periods of S II before and after the Io's volcanic event were 10.16±0.008 h and 10.03±0.006 h, respectively. On the other hands, the System IV period of S II was 9.95±0.003 h during the Io's volcanic event. This is the first observational evidence which shows that the System IV period has shortened during the Io's volcanic event, which is consistent with the result from Cassini observation. Origin of the System IV period has been discussed with sub-corotation of plasma in IPT. Since the sub-corotation occurs due to mass loading of newly picked-up ions into IPT, it is expected that

  17. Multi-species hybrid modeling of plasma interactions at Io and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebek, O.; Travnicek, P. M.; Walker, R. J.; Hellinger, P.

    2017-12-01

    We study the plasma interactions of Galilean satellites, Io and Europa, by means of multi-species global hybrid simulations. For both satellites we consider multi-species background plasma composed of oxygen and sulphur ions and multi-component neutral atmospheres. We consider ionization processes of the neutral atmosphere which is then a source of dense population of pick-up ions. We apply variable background plasma conditions (density, temperature, magnetic field magnitude and orientation) in order to cover the variability in conditions experienced by the satellites when located in different regions of the Jovian plasma torus. We examine global structure of the interactions, formation of Alfvén wings, development of temperature anisotropies and corresponding instabilities, and the fine phenomena caused by the multi-specie nature of the plasma. The results are in good agreement with in situ measurements of magnetic field and plasma density made by the Galileo spacecraft.

  18. Transport and radial electric field in torus plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Masao; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Sugama, Hideo [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Maluckov, Aleksandra A. [University of Nis, Prirodno-Matematicki Fakultet, FR (Yugoslavia); Satake, Shinsuke [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Transport phenomena in torus plasmas are discussed focusing on the generation of the neoclassical radial electric field. A sophisticated {delta}f Monte Carlo particle simulation code 'FORTEC' is developed including the effect of finite orbit width (FOW), which is the non-local property of the plasma transport. It will be shown that the neoclassical radial electric field in the axisymmetric tokamak is generated due to this FOW effect. The Lagrangian approach is applied to construct a non-local transport theory in the region of near-axis. The reduction of the heat diffusivity toward the axis will be shown. From a statistical point of view, diffusion processes are studied in the presence of irregular magnetic fields. It is shown that the diffusion processes are non-local in almost all the cases if there are some irregularities in the magnetic field. (author)

  19. Heating and Stability of Columbia Neutral Torus Stellarator Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Kenneth C.

    This thesis describes physics research carried out at the Columbia Neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator after its adaptation from a non-neutral plasma experiment to a device relevant to magnetic fusion energy research. Results are presented in the areas of plasma heating and related topics (microwave-assisted plasma start-up, overdense heating, inversion of stellarator images), as well as to stellarator stability and related topics (high beta, error fields). This thesis also describes the engineering improvements which enabled the said adaptation of CNT. The first step of that process involved the installation of a low-power, pulsed 2.45 GHz magnetron. In those initial experiments it was found that the simultaneous use of microwave start-up and of an emissive hot cathode resulted in non-linearly increased electron densities, implying a synergy between the two start-up methods. Then, a 10 kW, 2.45 GHz heating system was commissioned including a custom-designed transmission line and launch antenna. Highly overdense plasmas (a factor of 4 above the cutoff density) were obtained with this system, both for O-mode and X-mode polarization. The analysis of Langmuir probe profiles of density and temperature required the accurate mapping of the minor radius in the plasma, which motivated a study of CNT error fields. This resulted in a new numerical method for inferring coil misalignments from flux surface measurements. The improved knowledge of the actual magnetic field geometry of CNT permitted to develop and successfully apply an inversion technique to experimental plasma images. This technique ("onion peeling") reconstructs radial emissivity profiles, and can be considered a 3D generalization of Abel inversion. Finally, simulations of high-beta plasma equilibria in different CNT magnetic configurations indicate that (1) ballooning stability limits should be accessible at volume-averaged beta as low as 0.9% and (2) ballooning-stable beta values as high as 3.0% should be

  20. Plasma diagnostics in compact torus of UNICAMP (Campinas state university)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M; Doi, Y.; Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.; Machida, M.

    1989-08-01

    This paper which describes experiments carried out in the Compact Torus of UNICAMP (TC-1) is divided into 3 parts: 1) summary of TC-1 characteristics and its operation mode; 2) description of diagnostics in use and ones to be installed, 3) recent experimental results using optical and electromagnetical diagnostics. (author)

  1. Influence of globalmagnetic perturbations on plasma behavior in Elmo Bumpy Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, B.H.; Dandl, R.A.; Colestock, P.L.; :Bieniosek, F.M.; Ikegami, H.

    1979-02-01

    The sensitivity of plasma confinement to magnetic field error effects has been tested experimentally using externally introduced global field errors on the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT). Below a critical error field (deltaB/sub r//B)/sub cr/ of approx. = to 0.6-1 x 10/sup -3/ the plasma was observed to be essentially free from convective cells, toroidal currents, and instabilities. This observed critical value is comparable to a neoclassical critical field error (deltaB/sub r//B)/sub cr/ approx. = rho/R, the ratio of the ion Larmor radius to the major radius of the torus.

  2. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  3. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power-law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of the potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied include the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings (and hence the direction of the radial electric field), the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  4. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  5. Measurements of Prompt and MHD-Induced Fast Ion Loss from National Spherical Torus Experiment Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.S. Darrow; S.S. Medley; A.L. Roquemore; W.W. Heidbrink; A. Alekseyev; F.E. Cecil; J. Egedal; V.Ya. Goloborod' ko; N.N. Gorelenkov; M. Isobe; S. Kaye; M. Miah; F. Paoletti; M.H. Redi; S.N. Reznik; A. Rosenberg; R. White; D. Wyatt; V.A. Yavorskij

    2002-10-15

    A range of effects may make fast ion confinement in spherical tokamaks worse than in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Data from neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer, and a fast ion loss diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) indicate that neutral beam ion confinement is consistent with classical expectations in quiescent plasmas, within the {approx}25% errors of measurement. However, fast ion confinement in NSTX is frequently affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, and the effect of MHD can be quite strong.

  6. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs/sup +/ ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs/sup 2 +/ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs/sup 2 +/ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring.

  7. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs + ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs 2+ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs 2+ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring

  8. Juno-UVS observation of the Io footprint: Influence of Io's local environment and passage into eclipse on the strength of the interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, V.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Versteeg, M.; Bonfond, B.; Saur, J.; Davis, M. W.; Roth, L.; Grodent, D. C.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Kammer, J.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Juno mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to study Jupiter, from its internal structure to its magnetospheric environment. Juno-UVS is a UV spectrograph with a bandpass of 70Io footprint and extended tail as Io enters into eclipse. This observation may better constrain whether the atmosphere of Io is sustained via volcanic activity or sublimation. Among other processes, the modulation of Io's footprint brightness correlates to the strength of the interaction between the Io plasma torus and its ionosphere, which, in turn, is likely to be affected by the atmospheric collapse. UVS observed the Io footprint during two eclipses that occurred on PJ1 and PJ3, and one additional eclipse observation is planned during PJ9 (24 Oct. 2017). We present how the electrodynamic coupling between Io and Jupiter is influenced by changes in Io's local environment, e.g. Io's passage in and out of eclipse and Io's traverse of the magnetodisc plasma sheet.

  9. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation. The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths. Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus. Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  10. Ulysses Radio Occultation Observations of the lo Plasma Torus During the Jupiter Encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, M K; Asmar, S W; Brenkle, J P; Edenhofer, P; Funke, O; Pätzold, M; Volland, H

    1992-09-11

    Radio signals from Ulysses were used to probe the lo plasma torus (IPT) shortly after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The frequencies of the two downlinks at S-band (2.3 gigahertz) and X-band (8.4 gigahertz) were recorded, differenced, and integrated in order to derive the columnar electron density of the IPT. The measurements agree qualitatively with contemporary models of the IPT based on Voyager data, but significant differences are apparent as well. The overall level of the IPT electron density is approximately the same as the prediction, implying that the amount of gas (or plasma) injected from lo is similar to that observed during the Voyager era. On the other hand, the IPT seems to be less extended out of the centrifugal equator, implying a smaller plasma temperature than predicted.

  11. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance

  12. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  13. Consideration of magnetic field fluctuation measurements in a torus plasma with heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, A.; Fujisawa, A.; Ohshima, S.; Nakano, H.

    2004-03-01

    The article discusses feasibility of magnetic fluctuation measurement with a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in an axisymmetric torus configuration. In the measurements, path integral fluctuation along the probing beam orbit should be considered as is similar to the density fluctuation measurements with HIBP. A calculation, based on an analytic formula, is performed to estimate the path integral effects for fluctuation patterns that have difference in profile, the correlation length, the radial wavelength, and the poloidal mode number. In addition, the large distance between the plasma and the detector is considered to lessen the path integral effect. As a result, it is found that local fluctuation of magnetic field can be properly detected with a heavy ion beam probe. (author)

  14. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-03-20

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter.

  15. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter

  16. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  17. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Menard, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)) is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change

  18. Torus theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namsrai, Kh.

    2001-11-01

    Geometrical structure and physical characteristics of a torus are investigated in detail. Newtonian and electromagnetic potentials of the torus are defined at short and long distances. It is shown that torus potential at small distances has attractive oscillator behaviour. Motion of a particle in the torus potential is studied. The inertia tensor of the torus and its dynamics are obtained. Rotating torus whose tip is held fixed by two massless rigid threads and moves in a gravitational field is considered. (author)

  19. Confinement of pure electron plasmas in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkery, John W.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Kremer, Jason P.; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Lefrancois, Remi G.; Hahn, Michael S.; Brenner, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) [T. S. Pedersen, J. P. Kremer, R. G. Lefrancois, Q. Marksteiner, N. Pomphrey, W. Reiersen, F. Dahlgreen, and X. Sarasola, Fusion Sci. Technol. 50, 372 (2006)] is a stellarator used to study non-neutral plasmas confined on magnetic surfaces. A detailed experimental study of confinement of pure electron plasmas in CNT is described here. Electrons are introduced into the magnetic surfaces by placing a biased thermionic emitter on the magnetic axis. As reported previously, the insulated rods holding this and other emitter filaments contribute to the radial transport by charging up negatively and creating ExB convective transport cells. A model for the rod-driven transport is presented and compared to the measured transport rates under a number of different conditions, finding good agreement. Neutrals also drive transport, and by varying the neutral pressure in the experiment, the effects of rod-driven and neutral-driven transport are separated. The neutral-driven electron loss rate scales linearly with neutral pressure. The neutral driven transport, presumably caused by electron-neutral collisions, is much greater than theoretical estimates for neoclassical diffusion in a classical stellarator with strong radial electric fields. In fact the confinement time is on the order of the electron-neutral collision time. Ion accumulation, electron attachment, and other effects are considered, but do not explain the observed transport rates

  20. Measurement of The Magnetic Field in a Spherical Torus Plasma via Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Harmonic Overlap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Munsat, T.

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetic field in a spherical torus by observation of harmonic overlap frequencies in the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) spectrum has been previously suggested [V.F. Shevchenko, Plasma Phys. Reports 26 (2000) 1000]. EBW mode conversion to X-mode radiation has been studied in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade spherical torus, [T. Jones, Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1995] with emission measured at blackbody levels [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) article no. 165001]. Sharp transitions in the thermally emitted EBW spectrum have been observed for the first two harmonic overlaps. These transition frequencies are determined by the magnetic field and electron density at the mode conversion layer in accordance with hot-plasma wave theory. Prospects of extending this measurement to higher harmonics, necessary in order to determine the magnetic field profile, and high beta equilibria are discussed for this proposed magnetic field diagnostic

  1. Fabry-Perot ground-based observations of comets and the Jupiter plasma torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherb, F.; Roesler, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Wisconsin 150 mm dual etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer is a powerful instrument for the study of diffuse emission sources such as cometary atmospheres, the Jupiter plasma torus, and various emission nebulae. Since 1985, researchers have concentrated their efforts on extensive observations of Comet Halley and the analysis of the data. Images of Comet Halley in (OI)6300 Angstrom emission were analyzed to obtain the spatial distribution of O(1D) in the cometary atmosphere. The narrow spectral bandpass of the Fabry-Perot (0.2 Angstrom) eliminated contamination from terrestrial airglow (OI)6300 and cometary NH2 lines in the nearby spectrum. The results were modelled to provide photodestruction lifetimes of cometary water abd OH, the predominant parents of O(1D). The Fabry-Perot was also used in the scanning mode to obtain measurements of (OI)6300 and Balmer alpha emissions which were used to determine the H, O(1D) and water production rates as a function of heliocentric distance, both pre-perihelion and post-perihelion. Researchers also analyzed high resolution spectra of the NH2 (0,8,0) band in the 6300 Angstrom region to obtain preliminary values of the NH2 production rate. Assuming NH3 is the major parent of NH2, researchers found that the abundance ratio NH3/water is about (0.12 plus or minus 0.04 percent), assuming thermal equilibrium for the level populations of NH2

  2. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.; Gerdin, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kV by applying d.c. voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer midplane electrode rings. The electric fields, which are responsible for raising the ions to high energies by E x B/B 2 drift, then point radially outward or inward. The influence of electric field direction on ion kinetic temperatures and ion heating efficiency was investigated. Under equivalent conditions of magnetic field, deuterium background pressure, and midplane electrode voltage, the ion kinetic temperatures and ion heating efficiencies were virtually the same whether all 12 midplane electrodes were positive or negative. Deuterium ion kinetic temperatures of 340-2500 eV were observed. The ion heating efficiency ranged from 5 to 22%, increases with increasing background pressure or magnetic field, decreases with increasing anode voltage, and is higher in the high pressure than in the low pressure mode of operation. (author)

  3. Io. [history of studies and current level of understanding of this satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Yoder, Charles F.; Carr, Michael H.; Gradie, Jonathan; Hunten, Donald M.

    1986-01-01

    The present work reviews the history of Io studies and describes the current level of understanding of Io's physics, chemistry, geology, orbital dynamics, and geophysics. Consideration is given to the satellite's internal, superficial, atmospheric, plasma, and magnetospheric properties and how they interrelate. A pictorial map of Io's surface based on Voyager 1 and 2 images is presented. It is found that Io's surface color and spectra are dominated by sulfur compounds which may include various sulfur allotropes. Volcanic processes yielding three kinds of surface features (vent regions, plains, and mountains) dominate Io's surface geology. The Io plasma torus corotates with Jupiter's magnetic field in the plane of Jupiter's centrifugal equator centered at Io's orbital radius.

  4. Integration of Microsoft Windows Applications with MDSplus Data Acquisition on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana M. Mastrovito

    2002-03-01

    Data acquisition on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has increasingly involved the use of Personal Computers (PC's) and specially developed ''turn-key'' hardware and software systems to control diagnostics. Interaction with these proprietary software packages is accomplished through use of Visual Basic, or Visual C++ and COM (Component Object Model) technology. COM is a software architecture that allows the components made by different software vendors to be combined into a variety of applications. This technology is particularly well suited to these systems because of its programming language independence, standards for function calling between components, and ability to transparently reference remote processes. COM objects make possible the creation of acquisition software that can control the experimental parameters of both the hardware and software. Synchronization of these applications for diagnostics, such as CCD camer as and residual gas analyzers, with the rest of the experiment event cycle at PPPL has been made possible by utilization of the MDSplus libraries for Windows. Instead of transferring large data files to remote disk space, Windows MDSplus events and I/O functions allow us to put raw data into MDSplus directly from IDL for Windows and Visual Basic. The combination of COM technology and the MDSplus libraries for Windows provide the tools for many new possibilities in versatile acquisition applications and future diagnostics

  5. Radial and azimuthal distribution of Io's oxygen neutral cloud observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, R.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Yoneda, M.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kimura, T.; Smith, H. T.

    2017-12-01

    We report the spatial distributions of oxygen neural cloud surrounding Jupiter's moon Io and along Io's orbit observed by the HISAKI satellite. Atomic oxygen and sulfur in Io's atmosphere escape from the exobase and move to corona ( 5.8 Io radii) mainly due to atmospheric sputtering. Io plasma torus is formed by ionization of these atoms by electron impact and charge exchange processes. It is essential to examine the dominant source of Io plasma torus, particularly in the vicinity of Io (5.8 Io radii; extended neutral clouds). The spatial distribution of oxygen and sulfur neutral clouds is important to understand the source. The extreme ultraviolet spectrometer called EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) installed on the Hisaki satellite observed Io plasma torus continuously in 2014-2015, and we carried out the monitoring of the distribution of atomic oxygen emission at 130.4 nm. The emission averaged over the distance range of 4.5-6.5 Jovian radii on the dawn and dusk sides strongly depends on the Io phase angle (IPA), and has a emission peak between IPA of 60-90 degrees on the dawn side, and between 240-270 degrees on the dusk side, respectively. It also shows the asymmetry with respect to Io's position: the intensity averaged for IPA 60-90 degrees (13.3 Rayleighs (R)) is 1.2 times greater than that for IPA 90-120 degrees (11.1 R) on the dawn side. The similar tendency is found on the dusk side. Weak atomic oxygen emission (4 R) uniformly distributes in every IPA. We also examined the radial distribution of the oxygen neutral cloud during the same period and found the emission peak near Io's orbit with decreasing the intensity toward 8.0 Jupiter radii. The results show the high density component of the oxygen neutral cloud is concentrated around Io and extends mainly toward leading side of Io. In addition, the low density neutrals uniformly exist along Io's orbit. Both components extend radially outward up to 8 Jovian radii with

  6. Torus type thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Yasuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To attain supporting effect against electromagnetic force and moderate the inner stress applied to toroidal coils due to thermal expansion by intervening a stress relaxation member between the outer circumferential side of a torus and a support device in toroidal coils. Constitution: Toroidal coils for confining a plasma within a torus vacuum container is supported on a support secured to upper and lower bases. A thermoplastic stress relaxation material of a low young's modulus is put between the outer circumferential side of the torus container and the torus outer circumferential side of the support in the toroidal coil. Thermoplastic resin is best suited to the stress relaxation substance, although tetrafluoro resin may be used as the stress relaxation substance while packing non-woven tetron fabric or non-woven glass fabric impregnated with varnish in a gap between the stress relaxation substance and the support or the toroidal coils. (Seki, T.)

  7. The Bumpy Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobble, James Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-09

    This document summarizes the Bumpy Torus Experiment as a viable fusion reactor concept. Conclusions reached include the following: In 30 years, order-of-magnitude technological advances have occurred in multiple areas of plasma heating and confinement. The ORNL bumpy torus of the 1970s was technology limited. Now that ITER is technology limited, an alternate concept is needed. A device built on such a concept should be current free, CW, modular, have a gentle shutdown, and demonstrable stability. The bumpy torus meets or has the potential to meet all of these criteria. Earlier, stability was not possible due to power limits; it has not been fully tested. It is time to revisit the bumpy-torus concept with a modest new machine.

  8. Radio-frequency electromagnetic field measurements for direct detection of electron Bernstein waves in a torus plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuka, Eiichi; Kinjo, Kiyotake; Morikawa, Junji; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2009-02-01

    To identify the mode-converted electron Bernstein wave (EBW) in a torus plasma directly, we have developed an interferometry system, in which a diagnostic microwave injected outside of the plasma column was directly detected with the probing antenna inserted into the plasma. In this work, plasma production and heating are achieved with 2.45 GHz, 2.5 kW electron cyclotron heating (ECH), whereas diagnostics are carried out with a lower power (10 W) separate frequency (1-2.1 GHz) microwave. Three components, i.e., two electromagnetic (toroidal and poloidal directions) and an electrostatic (if refractive index is sufficiently higher than unity, it corresponds to radial component), of ECRF electric field are simultaneously measured with three probing antennas, which are inserted into plasma. Selectivities of each component signal were checked experimentally. Excitation antennas have quite high selectivity of direction of linear polarization. As probing antennas for detecting electromagnetic components, we employed a monopole antenna with a length of 35 mm, and the separation of the poloidal (O-wave) and toroidal (X-wave) components of ECRF electric field could be available with this antenna. To detect EBW, which is an electrostatic wave, a small tip (1 mm) antenna was used. As the preliminary results, we detected signals that have three characteristics of EBW, i.e., short wavelength, backward propagation, and electrostatic.

  9. A dual wavelength imaging system for plasma-surface interaction studies on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, F; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2015-12-01

    A two-channel spectral imaging system based on a charge injection device radiation-hardened intensified camera was built for studies of plasma-surface interactions on divertor plasma facing components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak. By means of commercially available mechanically referenced optical components, the two-wavelength setup images the light from the plasma, relayed by a fiber optic bundle, at two different wavelengths side-by-side on the same detector. Remotely controlled filter wheels are used for narrow bandpass and neutral density filters on each optical path allowing for simultaneous imaging of emission at wavelengths differing in brightness up to 3 orders of magnitude. Applications on NSTX-U will include the measurement of impurity influxes in the lower divertor strike point region and the imaging of plasma-material interaction on the head of the surface analysis probe MAPP (Material Analysis and Particle Probe). The diagnostic setup and initial results from its application on the lithium tokamak experiment are presented.

  10. Road to Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.

    1989-01-01

    The potential study of Io by the Galileo mission is discussed. The mission, which is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in 1989, is expected to fly 20 to 100 times closer to the Galilean moons of Jupiter than the Voyager missions. Topics which the mission hopes to address include volcanism, tidal forces and continental drift on Io, and the torus of charged particles that accompanies Io on its orbit of Jupiter. The Venus-earth-earth gravity assist route of the mission and the NIR mapping spectrometer aboard Galileo are considered

  11. Digital cartography of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.; Duck, B.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution controlled mosaic of the hemisphere of Io centered on longitude 310 degrees is produced. Digital cartographic techniques were employed. Approximately 80 Voyager 1 clear and blue filter frames were utilized. This mosaic was merged with low-resolution color images. This dataset is compared to the geologic map of this region. Passage of the Voyager spacecraft through the Io plasma torus during acquisition of the highest resolution images exposed the vidicon detectors to ionized radiation, resulting in dark-current buildup on the vidicon. Because the vidicon is scanned from top to bottom, more charge accumulated toward the bottom of the frames, and the additive error increases from top to bottom as a ramp function. This ramp function was removed by using a model. Photometric normalizations were applied using the Minnaert function. An attempt to use Hapke's photometric function revealed that this function does not adequately describe Io's limb darkening at emission angles greater than 80 degrees. In contrast, the Minnaert function accurately describes the limb darkening up to emission angles of about 89 degrees. The improved set of discrete camera angles derived from this effort will be used in conjunction with the space telemetry pointing history file (the IPPS file), corrected on 4 or 12 second intervals to derive a revised time history for the pointing of the Infrared Interferometric Spectrometer (IRIS). For IRIS observations acquired between camera shutterings, the IPPS file can be corrected by linear interpolation, provided that the spacecraft motions were continuous. Image areas corresponding to the fields of view of IRIS spectra acquired between camera shutterings will be extracted from the mosaic to place the IRIS observations and hotspot models into geologic context.

  12. New approach to controlling impurity contamination of a plasma-gun-produced compact torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of impurity ions, notably carbon and oxygen, has been determined to be a major factor limiting the lifetime of field-reversed plasma entities produced by coaxial plasma guns such as the Beta II gun at LLNL. Similar problems are encountered in other toroidal plasmas, e.g. those in tokamaks. However, the solution employed there, discharge cleaning, followed by initiation of the plasma at low density (where impurity radiation losses are exceeded by ohmic heating rates) is not applicable here. This note discusses a proposed means for drastically reducing the level of impurities. (These are believed to be evolved from the gun electrode surfaces as a result of thermal shock associated with UV emission from the gun plasma). The idea: take advantage of the UV pulse preferentially to release hydrogen from the electrode surfaces. These surfaces are to be coated with a few-micron-thick layer of titanium, outgassed by preheating and subsequently loaded with hydrogen

  13. Progress in Understanding Error-field Physics in NSTX Spherical Torus Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Menard, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.P. Gerhardt, J.-K. Park, S.A. Sabbagh, J.W. Berkery, A. Egan, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B. LeBlanc, Y.Q. Liu, A. Sontag, D. Swanson, H. Yuh, W. Zhu and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-05-19

    The low aspect ratio, low magnetic field, and wide range of plasma beta of NSTX plasmas provide new insight into the origins and effects of magnetic field errors. An extensive array of magnetic sensors has been used to analyze error fields, to measure error field amplification, and to detect resistive wall modes in real time. The measured normalized error-field threshold for the onset of locked modes shows a linear scaling with plasma density, a weak to inverse dependence on toroidal field, and a positive scaling with magnetic shear. These results extrapolate to a favorable error field threshold for ITER. For these low-beta locked-mode plasmas, perturbed equilibrium calculations find that the plasma response must be included to explain the empirically determined optimal correction of NSTX error fields. In high-beta NSTX plasmas exceeding the n=1 no-wall stability limit where the RWM is stabilized by plasma rotation, active suppression of n=1 amplified error fields and the correction of recently discovered intrinsic n=3 error fields have led to sustained high rotation and record durations free of low-frequency core MHD activity. For sustained rotational stabilization of the n=1 RWM, both the rotation threshold and magnitude of the amplification are important. At fixed normalized dissipation, kinetic damping models predict rotation thresholds for RWM stabilization to scale nearly linearly with particle orbit frequency. Studies for NSTX find that orbit frequencies computed in general geometry can deviate significantly from those computed in the high aspect ratio and circular plasma cross-section limit, and these differences can strongly influence the predicted RWM stability. The measured and predicted RWM stability is found to be very sensitive to the E × B rotation profile near the plasma edge, and the measured critical rotation for the RWM is approximately a factor of two higher than predicted by the MARS-F code using the semi-kinetic damping model.

  14. Influence of plasma diagnostics and constraints on the quality of equilibrium reconstructions on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.; Peluso, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Roma (Italy); Murari, A.; Baruzzo, M. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Lupelli, I.; Hawkes, N.; Brix, M.; Drozdov, V.; Meigs, A.; Romanelli, M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Craciunescu, T. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, NILPRP, Bucharest (Romania); Schmuck, S.; Sieglin, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-10-15

    One of the main approaches to thermonuclear fusion relies on confining high temperature plasmas with properly shaped magnetic fields. The determination of the magnetic topology is, therefore, essential for controlling the experiments and for achieving the required performance. In Tokamaks, the reconstruction of the fields is typically formulated as a free boundary equilibrium problem, described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal geometry and axisymmetric configurations. Unfortunately, this results in mathematically very ill posed problems and, therefore, the quality of the equilibrium reconstructions depends sensitively on the measurements used as inputs and on the imposed constraints. In this paper, it is shown how the different diagnostics (Magnetics Measurements, Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect), together with the edge current density and plasma pressure constraints, can have a significant impact on the quality of the equilibrium on JET. Results show that both the Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect internal diagnostics are crucial in order to obtain reasonable safety factor profiles. The impact of the edge current density constraint is significant when the plasma is in the H-mode of confinement. In this plasma scenario the strike point positions and the plasma last closed flux surface can change even by centimetres, depending on the edge constraints, with a significant impact on the remapping of the equilibrium-dependent diagnostics and of pedestal physics studies. On the other hand and quite counter intuitively, the pressure constraint can severely affect the quality of the magnetic reconstructions in the core. These trends have been verified with several JET discharges and consistent results have been found. An interpretation of these results, as interplay between degrees of freedom and available measurements, is provided. The systematic analysis described in the paper emphasizes the importance of having sufficient diagnostic inputs and of

  15. Influence of plasma diagnostics and constraints on the quality of equilibrium reconstructions on Joint European Torus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfusa, M; Murari, A; Lupelli, I; Hawkes, N; Gaudio, P; Baruzzo, M; Brix, M; Craciunescu, T; Drozdov, V; Meigs, A; Peluso, E; Romanelli, M; Schmuck, S; Sieglin, B

    2013-10-01

    One of the main approaches to thermonuclear fusion relies on confining high temperature plasmas with properly shaped magnetic fields. The determination of the magnetic topology is, therefore, essential for controlling the experiments and for achieving the required performance. In Tokamaks, the reconstruction of the fields is typically formulated as a free boundary equilibrium problem, described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal geometry and axisymmetric configurations. Unfortunately, this results in mathematically very ill posed problems and, therefore, the quality of the equilibrium reconstructions depends sensitively on the measurements used as inputs and on the imposed constraints. In this paper, it is shown how the different diagnostics (Magnetics Measurements, Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect), together with the edge current density and plasma pressure constraints, can have a significant impact on the quality of the equilibrium on JET. Results show that both the Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect internal diagnostics are crucial in order to obtain reasonable safety factor profiles. The impact of the edge current density constraint is significant when the plasma is in the H-mode of confinement. In this plasma scenario the strike point positions and the plasma last closed flux surface can change even by centimetres, depending on the edge constraints, with a significant impact on the remapping of the equilibrium-dependent diagnostics and of pedestal physics studies. On the other hand and quite counter intuitively, the pressure constraint can severely affect the quality of the magnetic reconstructions in the core. These trends have been verified with several JET discharges and consistent results have been found. An interpretation of these results, as interplay between degrees of freedom and available measurements, is provided. The systematic analysis described in the paper emphasizes the importance of having sufficient diagnostic inputs and of

  16. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  17. Advances in compact torus research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    A compact torus is a low aspect ratio, axisymmetric, closed magnetic field line configuration with no vessel wall or magnetic field coils linking the hole in the plasma toroid. This concept offers reactor advantages such as simplicity, high β, and the possibility of translation. Several methods have been used to generate compact toroids, including plasma guns, high energy particle rings, and field-reversed theta pinches. This document summarizes the results of recent work on compact toroids, presented at the first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Compact Torus Research held in Sydney, Australia from 4 to 7 March 1985

  18. Relationship between Jovian Hectometric Attenuation Lanes And Io Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Within the Galileo plasma wave instrument data a narrow (in frequency) attenuation band is seen in the hectometric (HOM) emission that varies in frequency with system III longitude. This attenuation lane is believed to be the result of near-grazing incidence or coherent scattering of radio emission near the outer edge of the Io torus, i.e., when the ray path is nearly tangent to an L shell containing the Io flux tube. Such a process should, therefore, be enhanced when the Io volcanic activity is increased and the Io flux tube has enhanced density. We have performed a systematic study of the existing Galileo radio emission data in an effort to determine the phenomenology and frequency of occurrence of the attenuation lanes and the association, if any, with published volcanic activity of Io. Our results indicate that the attenuation lanes are present almost all of the time but are enhanced on occasion. The best examples of attenuation lanes occur when Galileo is within approximately 65 R(sub J) of Jupiter and thus are probably more apparent because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio of the radio receivers. The lack of continuous monitoring of Io activity and the lack of known activity on the anti-Earthward side of Io are problematic and make detailed correlation with radio emission very difficult at this time. Nevertheless, if the data are displayed for periods when the spacecraft is within 65 R(sub J) (i.e., for each perijove pass), then the highest-contrast lanes occur on most passes when the Io volcanic activity is also high for that pass. These results support our current understanding of attenuation lane formation and suggest that future efforts can be made to better understand the interaction of HOM emission with the Io flux tube.

  19. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  20. Feasibility study for the Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, E.A.; Attenberger, S.E.; Baylor, L.R.

    1985-10-01

    The design of the Spherical Torus Experiment (STX) is discussed. The physics of the plasma are given in a magnetohydrodynamic model. The structural aspects and instrumentation of the device are described. 19 refs., 103 figs

  1. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Bumpy torus annulus startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, J.L.; Hamasaki, S.; Krall, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    In order that a stable bumpy torus plasma configuration can be attained, it is first necessary to irradiate the plasma with sufficient external power to cause annulus formation. To estimate the power required to initiate annuli, it is assumed that quasilinear electron-cyclotron heating by microwaves is the dominant electron heating mechanism. A scaling law for required microwave power is derived which shows that annulus formation is assisted by smaller cross-section areas, lower density, lower microwave frequency, and higher C-mode temperature. The scaling law is quantitatively evaluated for NBT, EBT-1, EBT-S, EBT-P, and EBT-R parameters. The resulting power estimates are consistent with the available microwave power in previous and present experiments. In larger projected bumpy tori, like EBT-P and EBT-R, it may be necessary to initiate annulus formation at densities which are lower than in the stable T-mode so that the necessary microwave power can be reduced to reasonably modest levels. It is suggested that instabilities as well as rf heating can aid the formation of bumpy torus electron annuli. Rf experiments on NBT and EBT-S would be beneficial in determining the capability of rf power to assist annulus startup

  3. Volcanogenic Sulfur on Earth and Io: Composition and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J.S.; Delmelle, P.; Nash, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    any natural sulfur containing significant Na beyond that attributable to silicate inclusions. In sum, the unique physical-chemical properties of S-rich systems and the strong affinity of certain elements for S may have broad implications for the appearance, spectroscopic interpretation, and geologic processes of Io. Identification of impurities in sulfur may be helpful in tracing the geochemical evolution of surface deposits on Io. Perhaps foretelling of new areas of investigation, Cl has recently been reported in the Io torus (M. Kueppers and N. M. Schneider 1999, Eos Trans.80, 5207), suggesting the presence on Io of either salts, such as halite, or sulfur chlorides. Further evidence of minor iogenic impurities should be sought in Io's neutral cloud and plasma torus as well as in further scrutiny of Io's reflectance spectra. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  5. Torus type thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hakaru; Saito, Ryusei.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain toroidal coil supports structures capable of coping with the changes in the elasticity distribution due to thermal expansion and performing elastic support function corresponding to the distribution of stresses exerted on the toroidal coils, by providing elastic function to the inner circumference side of the coil support structures. Constitution: Support structures for supporting toroidal coils from above and below are formed at the torus inner circumference side thereof with ribs in contact with a central block and having elasticity coefficient corresponding to the distribution of stresses exerted on the toroidal coils, and the stresses exerted on the toroidal coils are elastically supported on the ribs. Accordingly, if the stress distribution varies due to the thermal expansion or the like, adequate supporting function can be obtained well-corresponding to such changes, whereby effective plasma confinement can be attained. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  7. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  8. ELMO Bumpy Torus program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandl, R.A.; Dory, R.A.; Eason, H.O.

    1976-04-01

    A sequence of programs and related research objectives are described. The achievement of each of these objectives then permits a rational choice of design parameters for successive devices. The first step proposed here, denoted EBT-S, requires increasing the EBT magnetic field to permit microwave heating at 18 and 28 GHz, as compared to the present 10.6- and 18-GHz configuration. We anticipate a three-fold increase in plasma density, some increases in the temperatures, and opportunity to test the validity of the transport models presently used to predict the plasma parameters. This step will provide important operating experience with the 28-GHz power supplies, which are prototype tubes for millimeter sources at 120 GHz. In the second step a new, superconducting bumpy torus, EBT-II, would be fabricated to permit microwave heating at 90 and 120 GHz. This device would be designed to produce plasma densities and temperatures comparable to those of present-day tokamaks and to test the plasma physics scaling of EBT confinement. The third and less well-defined step is EBT-T, which would be designed to test the technology scaling of a very high-power microwave-heated device. This would be followed by EBT-IT, which would be aimed at ignition, the logical goal for a steady state toroidal device. This report reviews the experimental and theoretical research on EBT that has been carried out to date or formulated for the near future, and provides a status report as well as a research program plan.

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunbodede

    ; 28:105-111. 4. Seah, Y. H. Torus Palatinus and. Torus Mandibularis: a Review of the Literature. Aust. Dent. J. 1995;. 40:318-321. 5. Bernal, B. A.; Moreira, D. E.;. Rodriguez, P., I [Prevalence of. Torus Palatinus and Torus. Mandibularis in the ...

  10. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masayuki Ono

    2000-01-01

    The main aim of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to establish the fusion physics principles of the innovative spherical torus (ST) concept. Physics outcome of the NSTX research program is relevant to near-term applications such as the Volume Neutron Source (VNS) and burning plasmas, and future applications such as the pilot and power plants. The NSTX device began plasma operations in February 1999 and the plasma current was successfully ramped up to the design value of 1 million amperes (MA) on December 14, 1999. The CHI (Coaxial Helicity Injection) and HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) experiments have also started. Stable CHI discharges of up to 133 kA and 130-msec duration have been produced using 20 kA of injected current. Using eight antennas connected to two transmitters, up to 2 MW of HHFW power was successfully coupled to the plasma. The Neutral-beam Injection (NBI) heating system and associated NBI-based diagnostics such as the Charge-exchange Recombination Spectrometer (CHERS) will be operational in October 2000

  11. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus: investigation of diamagnetic diagnostics for the electron rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.H.

    1981-02-01

    Diamagnetic diagnostics for the EBT electron rings are fundamental to the experiment. The diamagnetic flux pickup loops on each cavity output signals proportional to ring perpendicular energy. A data analysis technique is described, which in its simplest form is subtracting 1/4 the signal from each neighboring cavity pickup loop from the central one's, which provides a signal proportional to the energy in a single ring. The calibration factor relating absolute perpendicular energy to diamagnetic signal depends weakly on the geometrical model for the ring. Calculations with a bumpy cylinder MHD equilibrium code give calibration factors in reasonable agreement (20%) to the values obtained using a simple, concentric cylindrical current sheet model. The cylindrical current sheet model is used to show that diamagnetic field components measured external to the plasma require high precision or correlation with other diagnostics in order to fix model parameters. A computer simulation shows an assumption of constant ring thickness and energy density with increasing length (and energy) is compatible to diamagnetic field observations on NBT

  12. The Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Events on Io in 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleer, Katherine R.; de Pater, Imke

    2015-11-01

    The spatial distribution of heat flow on Io is a key prediction of tidal heat dissipation models, and therefore provides an important constraint for understanding Io’s interior. However, the majority of our knowledge about eruption locations is derived from geological features tracing long time periods (e.g. Hamilton et al., 2013), and from activity during the Galileo era (e.g. Davies et al., 2015; Veeder et al., 2015).We report on new results from a campaign to image Io in the near-infrared with adaptive optics on the Keck and Gemini N telescopes. We observed Io on 93 nights between August 2013 and June 2015, detecting volcanic activity at dozens of hot spot locations. We present the spatial distribution of the observed eruption sites during this period, and compare this with the distributions inferred from past hot spot and patera locations by previous authors. We discuss the locations of eruptions of different magnitudes, including a preponderance of bright activity at latitudes polewards of 45 degrees in both hemispheres and an apparent spatial clustering of activity in the months following large eruptions. Finally, we address the durations of the detected eruptions, as well as connecting our findings to the EXCEED Mission’s observations of the Io plasma torus during the same time period.

  13. PICTORIAL INTERLUDE Torus palatinus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [1,4]. Torus palatinus presents in approximately 20% of the population and is occult until adulthood.[1,5] The term was coined by Kupffer and Bessel-Hagen in. 1879, many years after its first observation.[2]. The aetiology of ... express themselves in the individual. There is a prevalence in middle-aged females, with racial and ...

  14. Balogun, IO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Balogun, IO. Vol 3, No 4 (2009) - Articles Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in Nigeria: A Comparative Assessment of Asa and Ilorin West Local Govt. Areas of Kwara State, Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2070-0083. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  15. Torus Breakdown in Noninvertible Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maistrenko, V.; Maistrenko, Yu.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2003-01-01

    We propose a criterion for the destruction of a two-dimensional torus through the formation of an infinite set of cusp points on the closed invariant curves defining the resonance torus. This mechanism is specific to noninvertible maps. The cusp points arise when the tangent to the torus at the p......We propose a criterion for the destruction of a two-dimensional torus through the formation of an infinite set of cusp points on the closed invariant curves defining the resonance torus. This mechanism is specific to noninvertible maps. The cusp points arise when the tangent to the torus...... at the point of intersection with the critical curve L-0 coincides with the eigendirection corresponding to vanishing eigenvalue for the noninvertible map. Further parameter changes lead typically to the generation of loops (self-intersections of the invariant manifolds) followed by the transformation...

  16. Torus palatinus and torus Mandibularis in a Nigerian population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objectives of this study was to determine the prevalence, size, clinical characteristics, and location of torus palatinus (TP) and torus mandibularis (TM) in relation to age, sex and social stratification in a Nigerian population. Methods: One thousand three hundred and ninety two subjects were examined for the ...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunbodede

    Volume 2 Numbers 1 & 2 2005: 30-36. Http://www.ajoh.org. ©African Journal of Oral Health. 30. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis in a Nigerian. Population. J.O. Agbaje, M.O.Arowojolu1, B. Kolude, J.O. Lawoyin. Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University College.

  18. Renormalization on noncommutative torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascanio, D.; Pisani, P. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Instituto de Fisica La Plata-CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Vassilevich, D.V. [Universidade Federal do ABC, CMCC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    We study a self-interacting scalar φ{sup 4} theory on the d-dimensional noncommutative torus. We determine, for the particular cases d = 2 and d = 4, the counterterms required by one-loop renormalization. We discuss higher loops in two dimensions and two-loop contributions to the self-energy in four dimensions. Our analysis points toward the absence of any problems related to the ultraviolet/infrared mixing and thus to renormalizability of the theory. However, we find another potentially troubling phenomenon which is a wild behavior of the two-point amplitude as a function of the noncommutativity matrix θ. (orig.)

  19. ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Hedrick, C.L.; Uckan, N.A.

    1979-03-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) program of experiment, theory, and reactor studies has been a remarkably successful one. In the five years since EBT-I began operating, work has progressed from a demonstration of macrostability to an increasingly detailed understanding of transport properties. Collisionless scaling (tau/sub E/ increases with temperature) has been observed, and the magnitude of the energy confinement time is consistent with neoclassical theory. Experiments on EBT-S (for scale) are now being conducted at the increased magnetic field levels and higher microwave power and frequency made possible by a 28-GHz gyrotron development program. A review of the program is given

  20. Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAlees, D.G.; Uckan, N.A.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    In the Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study the feasibility of achieving a fusion power plant based on the EBT confinement concept was evaluated. If the present understanding of the physics can be extrapolated to reactor scale devices the reactor could operate at high beta, high power density, and at steady state. The high aspect ratio of the device eases the accessibility, structural design and remote maintenance problems which are common to low aspect ratio machines. A version of the EBTR reference design described here could be constructed with only minor extrapolations in available technology

  1. Volcanic activity on Io and its influence on the dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere observed by EXCEED/Hisaki in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Suzuki, Fumiharu; Hikida, Reina; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Murakami, Go; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Tao, Chihiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomoki; Kita, Hajime; Nozawa, Hiromasa; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2017-08-01

    Jupiter's moon Io, which orbits deep inside the magnetosphere, is the most geologically active object in the solar system. Kurdalagon Patera, a volcano on Io, erupted in 2015 and became a substantial source of Jovian magnetospheric plasma. Based on Earth-orbiting spacecraft observations, Io plasma torus (IPT) exhibited the peak intensity (nearly double) of ionic sulfur emissions roughly 2 month later, followed by a decay phase. This environmental change provides a unique opportunity to determine how the more heavily loaded magnetosphere behaves. Indeed, the extreme ultraviolet spectroscope for exospheric dynamics onboard the Earth-orbiting spacecraft Hisaki witnessed the whole interval via aurora and IPT observations. A simple-minded idea would be that the centrifugal force acting on fast co-rotating magnetic flux tubes loaded with heavier contents intensifies their outward transport. At the same time, there must be increased inward convection to conserve the magnetic flux. The latter could be accompanied by (1) increased inward velocity of field lines, (2) increased frequency of inward transport events, (3) increased inward flux carried per event, or (4) combinations of them. The Hisaki observations showed that the densities of major ions in the IPT increased and roughly doubled compared with pre-eruption values. The hot electron fraction, which sustains the EUV radiation from the IPT, gradually increased on a timescale of days. Pairs of intensified aurora and IPT brightening due to the enhanced supply of hot electrons from the mid-magnetosphere to the IPT upon aurora explosions observed during both quiet and active times, enabled the study of the mid-magnetosphere/IPT relationship. Hisaki observations under active Io conditions showed that: (1) the hot electron fraction in the torus gradually increased; (2) brightening pairs were more intense; (3) the energy supplied by the largest event maintained enhanced torus emission for less than a day; (4) the time delay

  2. An alternative to the compact torus ICF driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    Plasma guns have been used in the Controlled Thermonuclear Reaction (CTR) Program to inject energetic deuterium-tritium plasma into a magnetic confinement machine, also for dense-plasma-focus devices to achieve fusion utilizing Z-pinches. In this report we propose another CTR application of a plasma gun: accelerating the plasma in a coaxial geometry to a speed in the neighborhood of a centimeter per shake with a total kinetic energy of about 20 MJ. The kinetic energy is efficiently converted to x-rays in a time of about a shake, and the x-ray pulse is used to implode an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As far as we know the plasma gun application we are proposing has not been explored before, but we observe that the LLNL Compact Torus Program hopes to accelerate a compact-torus-plasma to a comparable speed and energy and, in one of its applications, to generate x-rays for ICF purposes. In fact, the only difference between the LLNL Compact Torus Program and what we are proposing is that our plasma does not rely on imbedded magnetic fields and currents to minimize instabilities. We minimize instabilities by snowplowing the plasma to its required speed in a single shock. Which approach is better requires additional investigation

  3. The incredible shrinking torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischler, W.; Susskind, L.

    1997-01-01

    Using M(atrix) theory, the dualities of toroidally compactified M-theory can be formulated as properties of super Yang Mills theories in various dimensions. We consider the cases of compactification on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-dimensional tori. The dualities required by string theory lead to conjectures of remarkable symmetries and relations between field theories as well as extremely unusual dynamical properties. By studying the theories in the limit of vanishingly small tori, a wealth of information is obtained about strongly coupled fixed points of super Yang-Mills theory in various dimensions. Perhaps the most striking behavior, as noted by Rozali in this context, is the emergence of an additional dimension of space in the case of a 4-torus. (orig.)

  4. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  5. Compositional Impact of Io Volcanic Emissions on Jupiter's Magnetosphere and the Icy Galilean Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John; Fegley, Bruce; Lipatov, Alexander; Richardson, John; Sittler, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The magnetospheric ion population of Jupiter is dominated by the 1000 kg/s of iogenic material constantly ejected by IO volcanism as neutral gas (approx. 1 kg/s goes out as high speed dust grains), subsequent atmospheric losses to the IO torus, and radial transport of torus ions throughout the magnetosphere. As that magnetosphere is greatly distended in radial size by the iogenic plasma loading, so are surfaces of the other Galilean moons also significantly, and perhaps even dominantly, affected by iogenic plasma bombardment, e.g. at the level up to 0.2 kg/s heavy ions (mostly O and S) onto Europa as per local plasma ion measurements. In comparison, cometary impacts onto IO deliver about 0.02 kg/s of impact ejecta to Europa via ballistic transfer through the Jupiter system. The magnetosphere of this system operates as a powerful engine to produce and transport ions from the IO source to the surfaces of these other moons, and any future orbiter missions to these moons must account for surface distributions of the iogenic material and its chemical effects before real assessments can be made of sensible chemical materials otherwise arising from primordial formation and subsequent evolution of these moons. This is a fundamental problem of space weathering that must be addressed for all planetary bodies with thin atmospheres and direct surface exposure to their space plasma environments. Long-standing debates from Galileo Orbiter measurements about the origins of hydrate sulfates at Europa present examples of this problem, as to whether the sulfates arise from oceanic minerals or from iogenic sulfur chemistry. Any orbiter or landed mission to Europa for astrobiological investigations would further need to separate the potential chemical biosignatures of life or its precursors from the highly abundant background of iogenic material. Although no single ion carries a tag identifying it as of iogenic or other origin, the elemental abundance distributions of ions to be

  6. Control System Development Plan for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Mueller, D.; Gates, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has as one of its primary goals the demonstration of the attractiveness of the spherical torus concept as a fusion power plant. Central to this goal is the achievement of high plasma β ( = 2 micro 0 /B 2 a measure of the efficiency of a magnetic plasma confinement system). It has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the maximum achievable β is a strong function of both local and global plasma parameters. It is therefore important to optimize control of the plasma. To this end a phased development plan for digital plasma control on NSTX is presented. The relative level of sophistication of the control system software and hardware will be increased according to the demands of the experimental program in a three phase plan. During Day 0 (first plasma), a simple coil current control algorithm will initiate plasma operations. During the second phase (Day 1) of plasma operations the control system will continue to use the preprogrammed algorithm to initiate plasma breakdown but will then change over to a rudimentary plasma control scheme based on linear combinations of measured plasma fields and fluxes. The third phase of NSTX plasma control system development will utilize the rtEFIT code, first used on DIII-D, to determine, in real-time, the full plasma equilibrium by inverting the Grad-Shafranov equation. The details of the development plan, including a description of the proposed hardware will be presented

  7. Status of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masayuki

    2001-10-01

    The main aim of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to establish the fusion physics principles of the innovative spherical torus (ST) concept. The NSTX experimental facility has been operating reliably and its capabilities steadily improving. Due to relatively efficient ohmic current drive and benign halo current behavior, the plasma current was increased to 1.4 MA, which is well above the design value of 1 MA. The plasmas at 1 MA are now routinely heated by NBI to the average toroidal beta value of 20 percent range at 3 kG with electrons and ions in the 1-2 keV range. Even with the “L-mode” edge, the energy confinement time can well exceed the so-called L-mode (and even H-mode) scaling values. As a part of ST tool development, High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has demonstrated efficient electron heating with the central electron temperatures reaching 3.7 keV. HHFW induced H-modes have been also observed. For CHI (Coaxial Helicity Injection) non-inductive start-up, CHI discharges of up to 300 kA of toroidal current and 300 msec duration have been produced from zero current using = 25 kA of injected current. The poster presentation will also include the near term NSTX facility upgrade plan.

  8. ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) program of experiment, theory, and reactor studies has been a remarkably successful one. In the five years since EBT-I began operating, work has progressed from demonstrating macrostability to an increasingly detailed understanding of transport properties. Collisionless scaling (tau/sub E/ increases with temperature) has been observed and the magnitude of the energy confinement time is consistent with neoclassical theory. Experiments on EBT-S are now being conducted at the increased magnetic field levels and higher microwave power and frequency made possible by a 28-GHz gyrotron development program. Initial results confirm our assumptions of neoclassical scaling. In conjunction with the experimental advances, EBT theory now has a well-developed transport theory which models the physics which we now think to be important: for example, it yields negative ambipolar electric fields which are consistent with those measured. Stability calculations continue to predict stable equilibrium with β/sub ring/ approx. β/sub core/ approx. 20 to 40%

  9. Next-Step Spherical Torus Experiment and Spherical Torus Strategy in the Fusion Energy Development Path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Peng, M.; Kessel, C.; Neumeyer, C.; Schmidt, J.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D.; Grisham, L.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Jarboe, T.; Jun, C.; Kaye, S.; Menard, J.; Raman, R.; Stevenson, T.; Viola, M.; Wilson, J.; Woolley, R.; Zatz, I.

    2003-01-01

    A spherical torus (ST) fusion energy development path which is complementary to proposed tokamak burning plasma experiments such as ITER is described. The ST strategy focuses on a compact Component Test Facility (CTF) and higher performance advanced regimes leading to more attractive DEMO and Power Plant scale reactors. To provide the physics basis for the CTF an intermediate step needs to be taken which we refer to as the ''Next Step Spherical Torus'' (NSST) device and examine in some detail herein. NSST is a ''performance extension'' (PE) stage ST with the plasma current of 5-10 MA, R = 1.5 m, and Beta(sub)T less than or equal to 2.7 T with flexible physics capability. The mission of NSST is to: (1) provide a sufficient physics basis for the design of CTF, (2) explore advanced operating scenarios with high bootstrap current fraction/high performance regimes, which can then be utilized by CTF, DEMO, and Power Plants, and (3) contribute to the general plasma/fusion science of high beta toroidal plasmas. The NSST facility is designed to utilize the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (or similar) site to minimize the cost and time required for the design and construction

  10. Space Propulsion via Spherical Torus Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Juhasz, Albert J.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 204 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1630 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment were performed on all major systems including nuclear fusion reactor, magnetic nozzle, power conversion, fast wave plasma heating, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery, and other systems. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance and utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/X-ray radiation

  11. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  12. Initial Diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquemore, A.L.; McCormack, B.; Johnson, D.; Kugel, H.; Kaita, R.

    1999-01-01

    The spherical torus (ST) approach to magnetic confinement has many attractive features as both a fusion reactor concept and a volume neutron source. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is under construction at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and it is designed to achieve plasma parameters needed for a proof-of-principle test of the ST concept. Discharges with magnetic fields of 2.3 kG on axis and plasma currents of 1 MA will be heated with 6 MW of radio frequency (RF) power and 5 MW of neutral beams, and pulse lengths up to 5 seconds are planned. Central electron temperatures of about 4 keV are expected with RF heating, and theoretical studies show that high values of b and b n can be achieved

  13. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the Jupiter environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; De Villedary, C.; Fainberg, J.; Farrell, W. M.; Goetz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of auroral-like hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the Io plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the Io torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  14. Volcanic features of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Erosional scarps on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, J.F.; Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Irregular or fretted scarps on Io are similar to those found on Earth and Mars. A sapping mechanism involving liquid SO2 is proposed to explain these complexly eroded terrains on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Characteristics of Energy Transport of Li-conditioned and non-Li-conditioned Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, S.; Kaye, S.M.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Paul, S.; Wan, B.

    2009-01-01

    The transport properties of NSTX plasmas obtained during the 2008 experimental campaign have been studied and are reported here. Transport trends and dependences have been isolated, and it is found that both electron and ion energy transport coefficients have strong dependences on local values of n(del)T, which in turn is strongly dependent on local current density profile. Without identifying this dependence, it is difficult to identify others, such as the dependence of transport coefficients on B p (or q), I p and P heat . In addition, a comparison between discharges with and without Lithium wall conditioning has been made. While the trends in the two sets of data are similar, the thermal transport loss, especially in the electron channel, is found to strongly depend on the amount of Lithium deposited, decreasing by up to 50% of its no-Lithium value.

  17. Rigidity theorems of Clifford Torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOUSA JR. LUIZ A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Let M be an n-dimensional closed minimally immersed hypersurface in the unit sphere Sn + 1. Assume in addition that M has constant scalar curvature or constant Gauss-Kronecker curvature. In this note we announce that if M has (n - 1 principal curvatures with the same sign everywhere, then M is isometric to a Clifford Torus .

  18. Heavy Plasma Ions in the Jovian Magnetosphere: What will Juno Encounter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, L.; Bagenal, F.; Bodisch, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io produces a cloud of neutral atoms, dissociation products of SO2 from volcanic outgassing. Electron impact ionization of these particles produces the plasma in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The species of interest have M/Q ratios of 8, 102/3, 16, 32, and 64, where M is in amu and Q is the charge state. The strong magnetic field of Jupiter forces these ions to accelerate to the rotation rate of the planet. The bulk of this plasma is in the Io plasma torus, but it can slowly radially diffuse further into the magnetosphere, corotating with the planetary spin via coupling to the ionosphere. At a certain point, the plasma can no longer be accelerated to the speed of rigid rotation and the speed of the plasma reaches an upper limit. Re-analysis of plasma measurements from the Voyager 1 and 2 plasma instruments provide density, temperature, and flow measurements near the equatorial region in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The plasma is distributed along the field line according to diffusive equilibrium with lighter elements and higher charge states spread further from the centrifugal equator. Using models of the magnetic field and previous plasma measurements, we determine how the plasma is distributed throughout the entire magnetosphere. Combining such models with the orbital path of the Juno spacecraft, we predict the plasma conditions that will be measured by Juno.

  19. Thomson scattering on ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobble, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    Below 10 12 cm -3 density, a Thomson scattering experiment is an exacting task. Aside from the low signal level, the core plasma in this instance is bathed in high-energy x rays, surrounded by a glowing molecular surface plasma, and heated steady state by microwaves. This means that the noise level from radiation is high and the environment is extremely harsh-so harsh that much effort is required to overcome system damage. In spite of this, the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) system has proven itself capable of providing reliable n/sub e/ and T/sub e/ measurements at densities as low as 2 x 10 11 cm -3 . Radial scans across 20 cm of the plasma diameter have been obtained on a routine basis, and the resulting information has been a great help in understanding confinement in the EBT plasma. The bulk electron properties are revealed as flat profiles of n/sub e/ and T/sub e/, with density ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 x 10 12 cm -3 and temperature decreasing from 100 to 20 eV as pressure in the discharge is increased at constant power. Evidence is presented for a suprathermal tail, which amounts to about 10% of the electron distribution at low pressures. The validity of this conclusion is supported by two independent sensitivity calibrations

  20. Io Eclipse Montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this montage of images of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, glowing in the dark of Jupiter's shadow, as the Pluto-bound spacecraft sped through the Jupiter system on Feb. 27, 2007. (A): In this picture from the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), dark blotches and straight lines are artifacts. The brightest spots (including the volcanoes Pele [P] and East Girru [EG]) are incandescent lava from active volcanoes. The more diffuse glows, and the many faint spots, are from gas in the plumes and atmosphere, glowing due to bombardment by plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere, in a display similar to the Earth's aurorae. (B): The same image with a latitude/longitude grid, showing that the cluster of faint spots is centered near longitude 0 degrees, the point on Io that faces Jupiter. The image also shows the locations of the plumes seen in sunlit images (indicated by red diamonds), which glow with auroral emission in eclipse. (C): Simulated sunlit view of Io with the same geometry, based on sunlit LORRI images. (D): A combination of the sunlit image (in cyan) and the eclipse image (in red), showing that all point-like glows in the eclipse image arise from dark volcanoes in the eclipse image. (E): This infrared image, at a wavelength of 2.3 microns, obtained by New Horizons Linear Etalon Spectral Imaging Array (LEISA) an hour after the LORRI image, showing thermal emission from active volcanoes. Elongation of the hot spots is an artifact. (F): Combined visible albedo (cyan) and LEISA thermal emission (red) image, showing the sources of the volcanic emission. That most of the faint point-like glows near longitude zero, seen in visible light in images A, B, and D, do not appear in the infrared view of volcanic heat radiation, is one reason scientists believe that these glows are due to auroral emission, not heat radiation. This image appears in the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine, in a paper by John Spencer, et al.

  1. Evolution of Io's volatile inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, J.B.; Witteborn, F.C.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager data are used to make crude estimates of the rate at which Io loses volatiles, by a variety of processes, to the surrounding magnetosphere, for the case of both the current, SO2-dominated atmosphere and hypothetical paleoatmospheres in which such other gases as N2 may have been the dominant constituent. Among the mechanisms making significant contributions to the prodigious rate at which Io is losing volatiles are: the interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with volcanic plume particles and the background atmosphere, the sputtering of ices on the surface, if the nightside atmospheric pressure is low enough and Jeans' escape of O as a dissociation product of SO2 gas. It is also argued that in the case of paleoatmospheres only the first two alternatives would have been possible and, nevertheless, insufficient to account for N2 loss over the life of the satellite

  2. Broadcasting in the Arrowhead Torus

    OpenAIRE

    D. Désérable

    2012-01-01

    The "arrowhead torus" is a hierarchical Cayley graph that we define on the triangular (or "hexavalent") grid. A 3-port wormhole broadcasting protocol is derived first from construction, then improved by using edge-disjoint forests. A store-and-forward broadcasting protocol is derived afterwards, then improved by mixing pipelining and arc-disjoint spanning trees. Costs are given in constant and linear time and compared with lower bounds.

  3. Composite fermions on a torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Songyang; Wu, Ying-Hai; Jain, J. K.

    2017-11-01

    We achieve an explicit construction of the lowest Landau level (LLL) projected wave functions for composite fermions in the periodic (torus) geometry. To this end, we first demonstrate how the vortex attachment of the composite fermion (CF) theory can be accomplished in the torus geometry to produce the "unprojected" wave functions satisfying the correct (quasi)periodic boundary conditions. We then consider two methods for projecting these wave functions into the LLL. The direct projection produces valid wave functions but can be implemented only for very small systems. The more powerful and more useful projection method of Jain and Kamilla fails in the torus geometry because it does not preserve the periodic boundary conditions and thus takes us out of the original Hilbert space. We have succeeded in constructing a modified projection method that is consistent with both the periodic boundary conditions and the general structure of the CF theory. This method is valid for a large class of states of composite fermions, called "proper states," which includes the incompressible ground states at electron filling factors ν =n/2 p n +1 , their charged and neutral excitations, and also the quasidegenerate ground states at arbitrary filling factors of the form ν =ν/*2pν*+1 , where n and p are integers and ν* is the CF filling factor. Comparison with exact results known for small systems for the ground and excited states at filling factors ν =1 /3 , 2/5, and 3/7 demonstrates our LLL-projected wave functions to be extremely accurate representations of the actual Coulomb eigenstates. Our construction enables the study of large systems of composite fermions on the torus, thereby opening the possibility of investigating numerous interesting questions and phenomena.

  4. A 'Plumefall' on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 15:15 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, nearly 10 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The image is centered at Io coordinates 5 degrees south, 92 degrees west, and the spacecraft was 2.4 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) from Io. Io's diameter is 3,640 kilometers (2,262 miles). Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this image to bring out details on the nightside and in any volcanic plumes that might be present. Io cooperated by producing an enormous plume, 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, from the volcano Tvashtar. Near Io's north pole, Tvashtar was active throughout New Horizons' Jupiter encounter. In this image, volcanic debris from the plume, illuminated by the setting sun, rains down onto Io's nightside. Hot, glowing lava at the source of the plume is the bright point of light on the sunlit side of the terminator (the line separating day and night). Elsewhere along the terminator, mountains catch the setting sun. The nightside of Io is lit up by light reflected from Jupiter.

  5. Pro-torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, it is shown that some of the results of torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces, Borel's dimension formula and topological splitting principle to local weights, hold if `torus' is replaced by `pro-torus'.

  6. Sulphur flows on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagan, C.

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 1 close-encounter photomosaics have clarified both the coloration of Io and its surface variation. These colour patterns seem explicable in terms of liquid sulphur produced in ionian volcanoes and solfataras and quenched at Io ambient temperatures approximately equal to 135 K. The liquid sulphur flow fronts and frozen rivers which appear in the Voyager images are discussed. It is argued that the volcanic deposition rates and the vapour pressure over sulphur melts are both consistent with the notion that the surface of Io changes significantly in geologically very short periods of time. (UK)

  7. Physics Basis for a Spherical Torus Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Menard, J.; Jardin, S.C.; Mau, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    The spherical torus, or low-aspect-ratio tokamak, is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. A special class of wall-stabilized high-beta high-bootstrap fraction low-aspect-ratio tokamak equilibrium are analyzed with respect to MHD stability, bootstrap current and external current drive, poloidal field system requirements, power and particle exhaust and plasma operating regime. Overall systems optimization leads to a choice of aspect ratio A = 1:6, plasma elongation kappa = 3:4, and triangularity delta = 0:64. The design value for the plasma toroidal beta is 50%, corresponding to beta N = 7:4, which is 10% below the ideal stability limit. The bootstrap fraction of 99% greatly alleviates the current drive requirements, which are met by tangential neutral beam injection. The design is such that 45% of the thermal power is radiated in the plasma by Bremsstrahlung and trace Krypton, with Neon in the scrapeoff layer radiating the remainder

  8. Wendelstein 7-X Torus Hall Layout and System Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.; Damiani, C.; Hartfuss, H.-J.; Krampitz, R.; Neuner, U.

    2006-01-01

    Wendelstein 7-X is an experimental fusion device presently under construction in Greifswald, Germany, to study the stellarator concept at reactor relevant parameters und steady-state conditions. The heart of the machine consists of the torus that houses the superconducting coils and the plasma vacuum vessel. It is located nearly in the center of a 30 m x 30 m x 20 m hall. A large number of components need to be placed in close proximity of the torus to provide the system with the required means, e.g. cryogenic gases, cooling water, electricity, and to integrate it with the peripheral diagnostic and heating components. The arrangement of these components has to be supported by suitable structures, and has to be optimized to allow for installation, maintenance, and repair. In addition, space has to be provided for escape routes and for sufficient distance between components that could negatively influence each other's performance, etc. The layout of the components has been done over many years using 3D CAD software. It was based on simple geometric models of the components and of the additionally required space. Presently the layout design is being detailed and updated by replacing the original coarse models with more refined estimates or - in some cases - with as-built models. All interface requirements are carefully taken into account. Detailed routing was specified for the cryo and cooling water supply lines whose design and installation is outsourced. Due to the limited space available and severely restricted access during experimental campaigns, the requirement to put auxiliary components like electronic racks into the torus hall is being queried. The paper summarizes the present state of the component layout in the torus hall, and how the peripheral supply, diagnostics, and heating systems are integrated into the machine. (author)

  9. IOs as Social Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Susan M.; Vetterlein, Antje

    Norms research has made significant inroads into examining their emergence and influence in international relations, while recognizing international organizations (IOs) as key social sites for norms to be created and/or disseminated. This paper interrogates how IOs as “organizational platforms......” (Finnemore 1996) influence the norm building process. Going beyond state-centric approaches to norm construction, it argues that the process of taking up a norm by an IO does affect the norm’s power. A norm’s strength is determined by the extent to which it is uncontested and taken for granted as appropriate...... the norm building process in this way provides insight into the effect of IOs as social sites in strengthening a norm....

  10. Io and Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 4-millisecond exposure of Jupiter and two of its moons at 01:41:04 UTC on January 17, 2007. The spacecraft was 68.5 million kilometers (42.5 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. The volcanic moon Io is the closest planet to the right of Jupiter; the icy moon Ganymede is to Io's right. The shadows of each satellite are visible atop Jupiter's clouds; Ganymede's shadow is draped over Jupiter's northwestern limb. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1.07 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  11. Wormholes in chemical space connecting torus knot and torus link pi-electron density topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepa, Henry S

    2009-03-07

    Möbius aromaticities can be considered as deriving from cyclic delocalized pi-electron densities rho(r)(pi) which have the topological form of either a two-component torus link or a single-component torus knot. These two topological forms are distinguished by their (non-zero) linking number L(k), which describes how many times the two components of a torus link cross each other or the single component of a torus knot crosses with itself. The special case of Hückel or benzenoid aromaticity is associated with a pi-electron density that takes the form of a two-component torus link for which the linking number is zero. A class of molecule has been identified which here is termed a Janus aromatic, and which bears the characteristics of both a two-component torus link and a single-component torus knot in the topology of the pi-electron density. This is achieved by the formation of one (or more) wormholes or throats in the pi-electron density connecting the two torus forms, which can impart a Janus-like dual personality to the aromaticity of the system. The impact of such wormholes on the overall pi-delocalized aromaticity of such molecules is approximately estimated using a NICS(rcp) index, and subdivides into two types; those where the forms of aromaticity associated with a torus link and a torus knot cooperate and those where they oppose.

  12. Io in Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This unusual image shows Io glowing in the darkness of Jupiter's shadow. It is a combination of eight images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 14:25 and 14:55 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 15 hours before the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. Io's surface is invisible in the darkness, but the image reveals glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and volcanic plumes across the moon. The three bright points of light on the right side of Io are incandescent lava at active volcanoes - Pele and Reiden (south of the equator), and a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west near the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position. An auroral glow, produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards Io's atmosphere, outlines the edge of the moon's disk. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. In addition to the near-surface glow, there is a remarkable auroral glow suspended 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position; perhaps this glowing gas was ejected from the new volcano below it. Another glowing gas plume, above a fainter point of light, is visible just inside Io's disk near the 6 o'clock position; this plume is above another new volcanic eruption discovered by New Horizons. On the left side of the disk, near Io's equator, a cluster of faint dots of light is centered near the point on Io that always faces Jupiter. This is the region where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is likely that electrical connections to individual volcanoes are causing the glows seen here, though the details are mysterious. Total exposure time for this image was 16 seconds. The range to Io was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles), and the image is centered at Io coordinates 7 degrees south, 306 degrees west. The image

  13. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus - development of a multichannel Hall-probe based diamagnetic diagnostic instrument and observation and modeling of EBT electron rings. Final report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.H.; Booker, R.H.

    1983-10-01

    Use of multiple Hall effect probes is a cost effective way to observe diamagnetic fields from the hot electron rings in the Elmo Bumpy Torus device at several locations simultaneously. A special diagnostic instrument has been developed having six Hall probe channels with the sensitivity and stability needed for the diamagnetic measurements. The instrument uses an AC carrier system with isolation transformers located remotely from the instrument and near the probe locations. Details of instrument design as well as operating instructions for it are included in this report

  14. Pro-torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, it is shown that some of the results of torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces, Borel's dimension formula and topological splitting principle to local weights, hold if 'torus' is replaced by 'pro-torus'. Keywords. Pro-torus; Poincaré duality space; local weight. 1. Introduction. In the theory of linear representations of ...

  15. Methanol in the L1551 Circumbinary Torus

    OpenAIRE

    White, Glenn J.; Fridlund, C. W. M.; Bergman, P.; Beardsmore, A.; Liseau, Rene; Phillips, R. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report observations of gaseous methanol in an edge-on torus surrounding the young stellar object L1551 IRS5. The peaks in the torus are separated by ~ 10,000 AU from L1551 IRS5, and contain ~ 0.03 earth masses of cold methanol. We infer that the methanol abundance increases in the outer part of the torus, probably as a result of methanol evaporation from dust grain surfaces heated by the shock luminosity associated with the shocks associated with the jets of an externally located x-ray sou...

  16. Io in Eclipse 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 09:35 and 09:41 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. In the darkness, only glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and the moon's volcanic plumes are visible. The brightest points of light in the image are the glow of incandescent lava at several active volcanoes. The three brightest volcanoes south of the equator are, from left to right, Pele, Reiden and Marduk. North of the equator, near the disk center, a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west glows brightly. (The dark streak to its right is an artifact.) The edge of Io's disk is outlined by the auroral glow produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards the atmosphere. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. At the 1 o'clock position the giant glowing plume from the Tvashtar volcano rises 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk, and several smaller plumes are also visible as diffuse glows scattered across the disk. Bright glows at the edge of Io on the left and right sides of the disk mark regions where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere. New Horizons was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Io when this picture was taken, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 2 degrees south, 238 degrees west. The image has been heavily processed to remove scattered light from Jupiter, but some artifacts remain, including a horizontal seam where two sets of frames were pieced together. Total exposure time for this image was 56 seconds.

  17. New Capabilities and Results for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.M. Kaye, H. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, R. Maingi, J.E. Menard, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, D. Stutman and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-02-29

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) produces plasmas with toroidal aspect ratio as low as 1.25, which can be heated by up to 6 MW High-Harmonic Fast Waves and up to 7 MW of deuterium Neutral Beam Injection. Using new poloidal fields coils, plasmas with cross-section elongation up to 2.7, triangularity 0.8, plasma currents Ip up to 1.5 MA and normalized currents Ip/a·BT up to 7.5 MA/m·T have been achieved. A significant extension of the plasma pulse length, to 1.5 s at a plasma current of 0.7 MA, has been achieved by exploiting the bootstrap and NBI-driven currents to reduce the dissipation of poloidal flux. Inductive plasma startup has been supplemented by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) and the production of persistent current on closed flux surfaces by CHI has now been demonstrated in NSTX. The plasma response to magnetic field perturbations with toroidal mode numbers n = 1 or 3 and the effects on the plasma rotation have been investigated using three pairs of coils outside the vacuum vessel. Recent studies of both MHD stability and of transport benefitted from improved diagnostics, including measurements of the internal poloidal field using the motional Stark effect (MSE). In plasmas with a region of reversed magnetic shear in the core, now confirmed by the MSE data, improved electron confinement has been observed.

  18. A program to develop advanced EBT [ELMO Bumpy Torus] concepts and international collaboration on the Bumpy Torus concept: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This project was undertaken to develop innovative concepts for improving the performance of ELMO Bumpy Torus devices in those aspects of plasma confinement that are particularly relevant to an eventual EBT reactor concept. These include effective magnetic utilization using Andreoletti coils, enhanced confinement using positive ambipolar potentials, and attractive divertor concepts that are compatible with formation and maintenance of ELMO rings. Each of the three major objectives was achieved and, except for the divertor studies, documented for publication and presentation at major scientific meetings. This report provides a brief recapitulation of the major results achieved in the form of a collection of those publications, together with this Introduction

  19. Space potential profiles in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Connor, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of the electric space potential in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) have been made by a heavy ion beam probe. The EBT-I device is characterized by positive potentials in the surface plasma the order of 100 V and by a nearly symmetric potential well in the core plasma of up to 300 V with respect to the surface potential. The EBT-S device has a similar potential structure with well depth and peak potential similar to or greater than that of EBT-I. Peak potential and well depth increase as the edge gas pressure is lowered and as the microwave power is increased. The potential structure is strongly linked to the specific heating geometry. The ambipolar electric field is large enough generally to dominate the core electron neoclassical diffusion. The potential profile is approximately parabolic in the core, which is shown to be a natural consequence of the spatially uniform plasma source function

  20. Trajectory optimization in radiotherapy using sectioning (TORUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christopher Barry; Bush, Karl Kenneth

    2017-07-01

    A challenging problem in trajectory optimization for radiotherapy is properly handling the synchronization of the medical accelerators dynamic delivery. The initial coarse sampling of control points implemented in a Progressive Resolution Optimization type approach (VMAT) routinely results in MLC aperture forming contention issues as the sampling resolution increases. This work presents an approach to optimize continuous, beam-on radiation trajectories through exploration of the anatomical topology present in the patient and formation of a novel dual-metric graph optimization problem. This work presents a new perspective on trajectory optimization in radiotherapy using the concept of sectioning (TORUS). TORUS avoids degradation of 3D dose optimization quality by mapping the connectedness of target regions from the BEV perspective throughout the space of deliverable coordinates. This connectedness information is then incorporated into a graph optimization problem to define ideal trajectories. The unique usage of two distance functions in this graph optimization permits the TORUS algorithm to generate efficient dynamic trajectories for delivery while maximizing the angular flux through all PTV voxels. 3D dose optimization is performed for trajectories using a commercial TPS progressive resolution optimizer. The TORUS algorithm is applied to three example treatments: chest wall, scalp, and the TG-119 C-shape phantom. When static collimator coplanar trajectories are generated for the chest wall and scalp cases, the TORUS trajectories are found to outperform both 7 field IMRT and 2 arc VMAT plans in delivery time, organ at risk sparing, conformality, and homogeneity. For the TG-119 phantom, when static couch and collimator non-coplanar trajectories are optimized, TORUS trajectories have superior sparing of the central core avoidance with shorter delivery times, with similar dose conformality and homogeneity. The TORUS algorithm is able to automatically generate

  1. Proposal for FRX-C and multiple-cell Compact Torus experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, H.

    1979-10-01

    A Compact Torus (CT) is a configuration for plasma confinement that offers possible engineering advantages for fusion power generation such as small size, simple blanket geometry, natural divertor, and spatially separable functions of plasma production and fusion energy generation. Two experiments to study the physics and technology of some particular CT configurations are proposed here as part of the LASL Compact Torus Program Plan. One experiment, FRX-C, is designed to study CT stability and transport properties by scaling the parameters of the existing FRX-B field-reversed theta-pinch experiment to higher temperatures, larger size, and increased plasma lifetime. The second experiment, a modification of the existing Scylla IV-P device, would form a linear array of CTs with the aim of understanding the effect on CT transport of improved plasma confinement on the open field lines outside the separatrix, as well as other multiple-cell effects.

  2. Silicate volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  3. FabIO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Sørensen, Henning O.; Wright, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    FabIO is a Python module written for easy and transparent reading of raw two-dimensional data from various X-ray detectors. The module provides a function for reading any image and returning a fabioimage object which contains both metadata (header information) and the raw data. All fabioimage...

  4. Io Surface Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage compares similar sides of Io photographed by the Galileo spacecraft in October 1999 (left) and the New Horizons spacecraft on February 27, 2007. The New Horizons image was taken with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). Most features on Io have changed little in the seven-plus years between these images, despite continued intense volcanic activity. The largest visible feature is the dark oval composed of deposits from the Pele volcano, nearly 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) across its longest dimension. At high northern latitudes, the volcano Dazhbog is prominent as a dark spot in the New Horizons image, near the edge of the disk at the 11 o'clock position. This volcano is much less conspicuous in the Galileo image. This darkening happened after this 1999 Galileo image but before Galileo took its last images of Io in 2001. A more recent change, discovered by New Horizons, can be seen in the southern hemisphere (circled). A new volcanic eruption near 55 degrees south, 290 degrees west has created a roughly circular deposit nearly 500 kilometers (300 miles) in diameter that was not seen by Galileo. Other New Horizons images show that the plume that created this deposit is still active. The New Horizons image is centered at Io coordinates 8 degrees south, 269 degrees west.

  5. IO and OI. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Schmidt, Erik Meineche

    1977-01-01

    A fixed-point characterization of the inside-out (IO) and outside-in (OI) context-free tree languages is given. This characterization is used to obtain a theory of nondeterministic systems of context-free equations with parameters. Several “Mezei-and-Wright-like” results are obtained which relate...

  6. IO and OI. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Schmidt, Erik Meineche

    1978-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper (J. Comput. System Sci. 15, Number 3 (1977)) we presented a fixed point characterization of the (IO and OI) context-free tree languages. We showed that a context-free tree grammar can be viewed as a system of regular equations over a tree language substitution algebra...

  7. University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.; Zawalski, W.; Raman, R.; Decoste, R.; Gregory, B.C.; Martin, F.

    1994-01-01

    University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector (USCTI) has been designed and is being fabricated. The injector will be installed on the STOR-M tokamak (R = 0.46 m, a = 0.12 m) to study CT injection into tokamak discharges. The injector is of coaxial configuration consisting of formation, compression and acceleration sections. Discharge of a 500 μF (2 kV) capacitor bank through a solenoid is capable of inducing a quasi-steady magnetic flux up to 1 mWb. Four fast-acting gas puffing valves inject up to 4 x 10 19 hydrogen particles within 100 μsec into the formation region. Two 20 μF (20 kV) capacitor banks are used for the formation, compression and acceleration of a CT. High density tungsten coating, ac glow discharge cleaning and on-line baking are among the efforts to produce high quality CTs with low impurity contents. The envisaged CT parameters are: r o (outer radius) ∼ 0.05 m, r i (inner radius) ∼ 0.018 m, L (length) ∼ 0.15 m, n (density) ∼ 4 x 10 21 m -3 and v (velocity) ∼ 400 km/sec. CT with these parameters should be able to penetrate 1 Tesla magnetic field in the STOR-M tokamak. Magnetic probes and He-Ne laser interferometer will be used to measure the CT velocity, density, magnetic field, and length. Spectroscopic measurements will be performed to investigate impurity contents in the CT. The CT parameters, especially its particle inventory, are designed to allow disruption-free CT injection into the STOR-M tokamak. The emphasis of this research program is to study physics involved in tokamak plasma refueling by CT injection. Feasibility of plasma heating and current drive will also be investigated. In particular, the dependence of injection processes on the injection angle (130 degree to 40 degree with respect to the plasma current direction) will be studied in detail

  8. Geologic map of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Crown, David A.; Yff, Jessica A.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Geissler, Paul E.; Becker, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Io, discovered by Galileo Galilei on January 7–13, 1610, is the innermost of the four Galilean satellites of the planet Jupiter (Galilei, 1610). It is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System, as recognized by observations from six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft: Voyager 1 (March 1979), Voyager 2 (July 1979), Hubble Space Telescope (1990–present), Galileo (1996–2001), Cassini (December 2000), and New Horizons (February 2007). The lack of impact craters on Io in any spacecraft images at any resolution attests to the high resurfacing rate (1 cm/yr) and the dominant role of active volcanism in shaping its surface. High-temperature hot spots detected by the Galileo Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) usually correlate with darkest materials on the surface, suggesting active volcanism. The Voyager flybys obtained complete coverage of Io's subjovian hemisphere at 500 m/pixel to 2 km/pixel, and most of the rest of the satellite at 5–20 km/pixel. Repeated Galileo flybys obtained complementary coverage of Io's antijovian hemisphere at 5 m/pixel to 1.4 km/pixel. Thus, the Voyager and Galileo data sets were merged to enable the characterization of the whole surface of the satellite at a consistent resolution. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) produced a set of four global mosaics of Io in visible wavelengths at a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel, released in February 2006, which we have used as base maps for this new global geologic map. Much has been learned about Io's volcanism, tectonics, degradation, and interior since the Voyager flybys, primarily during and following the Galileo Mission at Jupiter (December 1995–September 2003), and the results have been summarized in books published after the end of the Galileo Mission. Our mapping incorporates this new understanding to assist in map unit definition and to provide a global synthesis

  9. Io - Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of a volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io (dark fountain-like feature near the limb) was taken March 4, 1979, about 12 hours before Voyager 1's closest approach to Jupiter. This and the accompanying photo present the evidence for the first active volcanic eruption ever observed on another body in the solar system. This photo taken from a distance of 310,000 miles (499,000 kilometers), shows a plume-like structure rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface, a cloud of material being produced by an active eruption. At least four eruptions have been identified on Voyager 1 pictures and many more may yet be discovered on closer analysis. On a nearly airless body like Io, particulate material thrown out of a volcano follows a ballistic trajectory, accounting for the dome-like shape of the top of the cloud, formed as particles reach the top of their flight path and begin to fall back. Spherical expansion of outflowing gas forms an even larger cloud surrounding the dust. Several regions have been identified by the infrared instrument on Voyager 1 as being several hundred degrees Fahrenheit warmer than surrounding terrain, and correlated with the eruptions. The fact that several eruptions appear to be going on simultaneously makes Io the most active surface in the solar system and suggests to scientists that Io is undergoing continuous volcanism, revising downward the age of Io's surface once again. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  10. An Eruption on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The first images returned to Earth by New Horizons during its close encounter with Jupiter feature the Galilean moon Io, snapped with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 0840 UTC on February 26, while the moon was 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) from the spacecraft. Io is intensely heated by its tidal interaction with Jupiter and is thus extremely volcanically active. That activity is evident in these images, which reveal an enormous dust plume, more than 150 miles high, erupting from the volcano Tvashtar. The plume appears as an umbrella-shaped feature of the edge of Io's disk in the 11 o'clock position in the right image, which is a long-exposure (20-millisecond) frame designed specifically to look for plumes like this. The bright spots at 2 o'clock are high mountains catching the setting sun; beyond them the night side of Io can be seen, faintly illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter itself. The left image is a shorter exposure -- 3 milliseconds -- designed to look at surface features. In this frame, the Tvashtar volcano shows as a dark spot, also at 11 o'clock, surrounded by a large dark ring, where an area larger than Texas has been covered by fallout from the giant eruption. This is the clearest view yet of a plume from Tvashtar, one of Io's most active volcanoes. Ground-based telescopes and the Galileo Jupiter orbiter first spotted volcanic heat radiation from Tvashtar in November 1999, and the Cassini spacecraft saw a large plume when it flew past Jupiter in December 2000. The Keck telescope in Hawaii picked up renewed heat radiation from Tvashtar in spring 2006, and just two weeks ago the Hubble Space Telescope saw the Tvashtar plume in ultraviolet images designed to support the New Horizons flyby. Most of those images will be stored onboard the spacecraft for downlink to Earth in March and April.

  11. IoT gateway architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Leleika, Paulius

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of HTTP, CoAP, AMQP, DDS, MQTT, XMPP communication protocols. The main IoT problem is that IoT devices uses many different communication protocols and devices cannot communicate with each other directly. IoT gateway helps to solve that problem. This paper also identifies requirements for IoT gateway software. Provides solution for communication between devices which are using different messaging architectures. Presents security aspects and ways to secure IoT ga...

  12. Io Through Different 'Eyes'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This montage demonstrates New Horizons' ability to observe the same target in complementary ways using its diverse suite of instruments. Previously released views taken at visible and slightly longer infrared wavelengths with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), New Horizons' high-resolution black-and-white camera, and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), its color camera, are here compared with a nearly simultaneous view from the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which observes its targets in more than 200 separate wavelengths of infrared light. This color LEISA view of Io (bottom right) combines three wavelength ranges, centered at 1.80, 2.04, and 2.31 micrometers. The LORRI image (left) shows fine details on Io's sunlit crescent and in the partially sunlit plume from the Tvashtar volcano, and reveals the bright nighttime glow of the hot lavas at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The MVIC image (top right) shows the contrasting colors of the red lava and blue plume at Tvashtar, and the sulfur and sulfur dioxide deposits on Io's sunlit surface. The LEISA image shows that the glow of the Tvashtar volcano is even more intense at infrared wavelengths and reveals the infrared glow of at least 10 fainter volcanic hot spots on the moon's nightside. The brightest of these, Amirani/Maui, which is visible to the lower right of Tvashtar, is less than 4% as bright as Tvashtar. All of these are long-lived hot spots that have been observed previously by the Galileo orbiter. Further analysis of the LEISA data will provide information on the volcanoes' temperatures, and data on the sunlit crescent of Io will reveal details of Io's surface composition. The LORRI, MVIC and LEISA images were taken March 1, 2007, at 00:35, 00:25 and 00:31 Universal Time, respectively, from a range of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles). The images are centered at Io coordinates 4 degrees south, 164 degrees west.

  13. Method to prevent ejecta from damaging the Compact Torus Accelerator driver of an inertial fusion energy power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, S.E.K.; Moir, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the conceptual design of fusion reactors using a Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA). A CTA accelerates a plasma torus toward a fusion target. When the torus nears the target, it is compressed and focused down to a small volume, creating a very high energy density and initiating a fusion micro explosion. The focusing cone is destroyed with each shot due to the stress from the passage of the torus as well as from the force of the explosion (1 800 MJ of yield, ∼0.5 Ton TNT equivalent). The focusing cone could be made of solidified Li 2 BeF 4 ; the same material used in liquid state to protect the reaction chamber from the micro explosion and to transport heat away to a power plant. The problem with this design is that when the focusing cone is shattered, the resulting small pieces of solid and liquid debris (ejecta) might be carded along by the expanding vapor of the explosion and might enter the CTA itself, causing damage and shortening the life of the CTA. The proposed solution for this possible problem is to bend the focusing cone so that the ejecta no longer have a clear path to the CTA. Calculations show that the plasma torus may be sent through a radius of curvature of less than 0.5 m just after the focusing cone, without significantly disturbing the plasma

  14. Magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; De Graef, Marc; Millev, Yonko

    2009-01-01

    We provide an exhaustive description of the magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus and its derivative self-intersecting (spindle) shapes. In the process, two complementary approaches have been implemented, position-space analysis of the Laplace equation with inhomogeneous boundary...... conditions and a Fourier-space analysis, starting from the determination of the shape amplitude of this topologically non-trivial body. The stray field and the demagnetization tensor have been determined as rapidly converging series of toroidal functions. The single independent demagnetization......-tensor eigenvalue has been determined as a function of the unique aspect ratio α of the torus. Throughout the range of values of the ratio, corresponding to a multiply connected torus proper, the axial demagnetization factor Nz remains close to one half. There is no breach of smoothness of Nz(α) at the topological...

  15. Geology of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Craddock, R. A.; Crown, D. A.; Leshin, L. A.; Schaber, G. G.

    1987-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Jovian satellite Io has been completed at 1:15,000,000 scale for an area lying between +40 and -90 deg latitude and 230 and 45 deg longitude, which includes portions of the Ruwa Patera quadrangle (Ji2) and the Lerna Region (Ji4) and the westernmost section of the Colchis Region (Ji3). Image resolution in the mapped area is commonly 0.5 to 2 km/pxl. High resolution areas (less than .5 km/pxl) are located near the south pole (Lerna Region) and in eastern Ruwa Patera quadrangle. Geologic maps for the Ruwa Patera quadrangle (Ji2) and the Lerna Region (Ji4) have been produced at 1:5,000,000 scale. The present effort reexamines the previously mapped areas and synthesizes the geology of Io on a global scale.

  16. Changes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A: A global map of Jupiter's moon Io derived from eight images taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft, as it passed Jupiter on its way to Pluto in late February 2007. Details as small as 12 kilometers (7 miles) are visible. The map shows the comprehensive picture of Io's volcanism obtained by New Horizons. Yellow ovals denote areas with new, faded or shifted plume deposits since the last images taken by the Galileo spacecraft in 2001. Green circles denote areas where probable new lava flows have occurred. Cyan diamonds indicate locations of active volcanic plumes, and orange hexagons are volcanic hot spots detected by the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) instrument. For plumes and hot spots, symbol size indicates the approximate relative size and brightness of the features. B-F: Comparison of New Horizons (NH) and earlier images of major surface changes discovered by New Horizons at Io's volcanoes Masubi (45 degrees S, 57 degrees West) and North Lerna (55 degrees S, 290 degrees W). The scale bars are 200 kilometers long, and a is the solar phase angle. At Masubi, old lava flows seen by Voyager and Galileo (B) have been obscured at low phase angles (C) by deposits from two active plumes associated with a new 240-kilometer (150-mile) long dark lava flow, which is the longest lava flow known to have been erupted in the solar system since the discovery of Io volcanism in 1979. At North Lerna, a recent eruption has generated a 130-km long lava flow (F), as well as an active plume that has produced a concentric pattern of deposits.

  17. Various semiclassical limits of torus conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of General and Applied Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Institutskiy per. 7, Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Geiko, Roman [Mathematics Department, National Research University Higher School of Economics,Usacheva str. 6, Moscow, 119048 (Russian Federation); Rappoport, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, Moscow, 127994 (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-12

    We study four types of one-point torus blocks arising in the large central charge regime. There are the global block, the light block, the heavy-light block, and the linearized classical block, according to different regimes of conformal dimensions. It is shown that the blocks are not independent being connected to each other by various links. We find that the global, light, and heavy-light blocks correspond to three different contractions of the Virasoro algebra. Also, we formulate the c-recursive representation of the one-point torus blocks which is relevant in the semiclassical approximation.

  18. Voyager photometry of Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonelli, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed disk-integrated and disk-resolved photometric studies of the Jovian moon Io were carried out using Voyager images. Disk-integrated properties derived from the Voyager data, such as phase curves, rotation curves, geometric albedos, phase integrals, and the Bond albedo, are generally consistent with earth-based estimates. Near-opposition limb-darkening behavior, as parameterized by the Minnaert photometric function, has been accurately measured for regions on the surface of Io in three distinct color classes: Bright (white), Average (orange), and Polar (brown). The limb-darkening results allow derivation of accurate near-opposition disk-resolved phase curves, revealing substantial differences in opposition surge among the color classes. Modeling of the phase curves using the Hapke photometric function supports the contention that the uppermost layer of the Ionian surface is on average extremely porous, and suggests that this layer is substantially more porous in Average and Polar areas than in the Bright regions, a difference consistent with models of Io's surface layer. Combination of limb-darkening and phase information leads to determination of accurate normal reflectance spectra for the color classes; careful comparison with laboratory data supports earlier claims that the spectra of Ionian materials can be explained by mixtures of sulfur and SO 2 frost, although this is not a unique diagnostic identification

  19. Pro-torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    duality spaces, Borel's dimension formula and topological splitting principle to local weights, hold if 'torus' is replaced by 'pro-torus'. Keywords. Pro-torus; Poincaré duality space; local weight. 1. Introduction. In the theory of linear representations of compact connected Lie groups, the crucial first step is restriction to the ...

  20. Cirugía de torus mandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramon Osorio Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLos huesos maxilares no son ajenos a las patologías que se pueden presentar en el sistema esquelético. Algunas de esas condiciones y patologías son singulares por sus características clínicas, su distribución y prevalencia. Los torus palatinos, los torus mandibulares (TM y las exostosis de los maxilares son un claro ejemplo de ellos. Hasta la presente existen ideas especulativas acerca de su etiopatogenia, de los factores asociados, de su incidencia y prevalencia, de su necesidad de tratamiento, lo que puede crear confusión entre los clínicos tanto en diagnóstico como en el manejo.El torus como tumor óseo benigno puede localizarse en el maxilar a nivel del paladar, o en la mandíbula a nivel de las tablas internas; o puede aparecer en cualquier parte del esqueleto. El TM es una exostosis o crecimiento óseo en la superficie lingual de la mandíbula. Este crecimiento ocurre generalmente cerca de la línea milohioidea, opuesto a los premolares, pero se puede extender del canino al primer molar. La mucosa que los recubre tiende a ser fina y no tolera por lo general las fuerzas de las prótesis que se colocan encima de ellos. La incidencia del torus de la mandíbula es baja en el 6% a 12.5% entre caucásicos y en los habitantes de la llanura africana. De manera contraria, algunos autores reportan una prevalencia mucho más elevada en la Costa Atlántica Colombiana.Se presenta el caso de un paciente con torus mandibulares bilaterales, con muchos años de crecimiento, hasta que por situaciones tanto fonéticas como de ulceraciones repetitivas decidió someterse al acto quirúrgico de forma bilateral. Se presentan algunas consideraciones para el manejo de esta. (Duazary 2008; 111-114AbstractThe jawbone is not a strange to the pathologies that can occur in the skeletal system. Some of these terms and conditions are unique for their clinical features, distribution and prevalence. The torus palate, jawbone torus (TM in spanish and

  1. Design of the torus interface for the neutral beam injectors of Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocentini, R., E-mail: riccardo.nocentini@ipp.mpg.de; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Rust, N.; Orozco, G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Two NBI injectors are installed in W7-X, each capable of hosting four ion sources. • The NBI boxes and their NBI ports in W7-X are connected by NBI–torus interfaces. • Each NBI–torus interface includes a DN800 bellow, copper scrapers and diagnostics. • The design of the NBI–torus interface has been challenging due to the shape of W7-X. • The design includes the numerical shape optimization of one of the beam scrapers. - Abstract: A neutral beam injection (NBI) heating system for the stellarator project Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is currently under construction at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) Greifswald, Germany. The NBI at W7-X is based on the similar system in operation on the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade at IPP in Garching, Germany, and makes use of radio-frequency-driven positive ion sources. Two NBI injectors are going to be installed in W7-X, each being capable of hosting four ion sources. Initially each injector is being equipped with two ion sources of 1.8 (2.5) MW beam power each in H (D). Accelerated positive ions are going to be neutralized and transported inside an NBI-box, which also hosts a residual ion dump, titanium sublimation pumps and a calorimeter. The beams are focused at a point 6.5 m downstream of the ion sources and are injected into the plasma vessel of W7-X through two ports. The NBI boxes and their NBI ports are connected by NBI–torus interfaces, which are made of several components that minimize beam losses while protecting the port walls and bellows from energetic re-ionized particles and beam intersection. This paper describes the design of the NBI–torus interface, including the shape optimization of a beam scraper and the integration of beam diagnostics.

  2. Surgical management of palatine Torus - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Sumie Nozu Imada

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Torus palatinus is a specific name to identify exostoses developed in the hard palate along the median palatine suture. Despite of not being a pathological condition, its presence requires attention and knowledge regarding its management. Surgical removal of exostoses is indicated when the patient frequently traumatizes the area of palatine torus during mastication and speech or when it is necessary for the rehabilitation of the upper arcade with complete dentures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to present three cases of Torus palatinus and to discuss the management of them. CASE REPORT: In the first case, a 57-year-old Caucasian man sought oral rehabilitation of his edentulous maxilla but presented a hard nodules in the hard palate; in the second case, a 40-year-old Caucasian woman was referred for frequent trauma of palatal mucosa during mastication, aesthetic complaint, and discomfort caused by the trauma of her tongue in this area; and in the third case, a 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a lesion on the palate that caused difficulty swallowing. When the Torus palatinus was impairing the basic physiological functions of the patients, all cases were surgically treated, improving the patients' quality of life. FINAL CONSIDERATION: The dentist should be properly prepared to choose the best from among the existing surgical approaches for each individual lesion in order to improve the results and avoid possible complications.

  3. Large N reduction on a twisted torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arroyo, A.; Narayanan, R.; Neuberger, H.

    2005-01-01

    We consider SU(N) lattice gauge theory at infinite N defined on a torus with a CP invariant twist. Massless fermions are incorporated in an elegant way, while keeping them quenched. We present some numerical results which suggest that twisting can make numerical simulations of planar QCD more efficient

  4. Equilibrium-torus bifurcation in nonsmooth systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubahyev, Z.T.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Considering a set of two coupled nonautonomous differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides describing the behavior of a DC/DC power converter, we discuss a border-collision bifurcation that can lead to the birth of a two-dimensional invariant torus from a stable node equilibrium...

  5. The Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) on The Europa Clipper Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Kasper, J. C.; Battista, C.; Case, A. W.; Cochrane, C.; Grey, M.; Jia, X.; Kivelson, M.; Kim, C.; Korth, H.; Khurana, K. K.; Krupp, N.; Paty, C. S.; Roussos, E.; Rymer, A. M.; Stevens, M. L.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, H. T.; Saur, J.; Coren, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Europa Clipper mission is equipped with a sophisticated suite of 9 instruments to study Europa's interior and ocean, geology, chemistry, and habitability from a Jupiter orbiting spacecraft. The Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) on Europa Clipper is a Faraday Cup based plasma instrument whose heritage dates back to the Voyager spacecraft. PIMS will measure the plasma that populates Jupiter's magnetosphere and Europa's ionosphere. The science goals of PIMS are to: 1) estimate the ocean salinity and thickness by determining Europa's magnetic induction response, corrected for plasma contributions; 2) assess mechanisms responsible for weathering and releasing material from Europa's surface into the atmosphere and ionosphere; and 3) understand how Europa influences its local space environment and Jupiter's magnetosphere and vice versa. Europa is embedded in a complex Jovian magnetospheric plasma, which rotates with the tilted planetary field and interacts dynamically with Europa's ionosphere affecting the magnetic induction signal. Plasma from Io's temporally varying torus diffuses outward and mixes with the charged particles in Europa's own torus producing highly variable plasma conditions at Europa. PIMS works in conjunction with the Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG) investigation to probe Europa's subsurface ocean. This investigation exploits currents induced in Europa's interior by the moon's exposure to variable magnetic fields in the Jovian system to infer properties of Europa's subsurface ocean such as its depth, thickness, and conductivity. This technique was successfully applied to Galileo observations and demonstrated that Europa indeed has a subsurface ocean. While these Galileo observations contributed to the renewed interest in Europa, due to limitations in the observations the results raised major questions that remain unanswered. PIMS will greatly refine our understanding of Europa's global liquid ocean by

  6. Jupiter-Io Montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image is an infrared color composite taken by the spacecraft's near-infrared imaging spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) at 1:40 UT on Feb. 28, 2007. The infrared wavelengths used (red: 1.59 um, green: 1.94 um, blue: 1.85 um) highlight variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot. The observation was made at a solar phase angle of 75 degrees but has been projected onto a crescent to remove distortion caused by Jupiter's rotation during the scan. The Io image, taken at 00:25 UT on March 1st 2007, is an approximately true-color composite taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the 0.5 um ('blue') and 0.9 um ('methane') channels of the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The image shows a major eruption in progress on Io's night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a 330-kilometer high volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles in the plume This montage appears on the cover of the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine.

  7. Java I/O

    CERN Document Server

    Harold, Elliotte Rusty

    2006-01-01

    All of Java's Input/Output (I/O) facilities are based on streams, which provide simple ways to read and write data of different types. Java provides many different kinds of streams, each with its own application. The universe of streams is divided into four largecategories: input streams and output streams, for reading and writing binary data; and readers and writers, for reading and writing textual (character) data. You're almost certainly familiar with the basic kinds of streams--but did you know that there's a CipherInputStream for reading encrypted data? And a ZipOutputStream for automati

  8. Io's tenuous atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.V.; Matson, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of observational evidence adduced to date for the various extant models of the Io atmosphere. SO2 and its various photochemical products have been noted to play a major role in the atmosphere; such atomic species as Na and K are present in smaller quantities, and play an important role in the atmosphere's ion chemistry. The vapor pressure equilibrium between condensed SO 2 on the surface and the atmospheric gas is an important factor in the global control of SO 2 gas distribution, but cannot account for the neutral densities at the terminator required for ionospheric models in view of realistic surface temperature distributions

  9. First observation of ELM pacing with vertical jogs in a spherical torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Ahn, J.-W.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R.; Gates, D.; Goldston, R.; Hawryluk, R.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S.; Tritz, K.

    2010-06-01

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies.

  10. Reliability and availability assessments for the next European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunde, R.

    1988-01-01

    To achieve its targets in reasonable time, the Next European Torus (NET) must be operated with considerable reliability and availability (R and A). Therefore, failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis (FMECA) of the overall plant and of its major components is already being performed as the design evolves. The present status of the R and A work is described in four steps: First, the R and A targets envisaged for the NET operation are discussed. Then an FMECA covering the overall plant is described, and a more detailed FMECA of major components is presented concerning the toroidal field coil systeml plasma heating systems; protection, instrumentation, and control systems; first wall and blanket, as well as the cooling system. Finally, the R and A results are compared with the targets, and measures for improvements are given

  11. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  12. Experimental device for in-torus handling - EDITH intermediate report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppan, A.; Krieg, R.; Krumm, H.G.; Kuehnapfel, U.; Leinemann, K.; Reim, J.; Woll, J.

    1993-10-01

    The Experimental Device for In-Torus Handling (EDITH) is based on articulated boom system (ABS), consisting of a support structure, the articulated boom transporter (ABT), the end-effector positioning unit (EEPU) and different end-effectors (EE's). It is the prototype of an in-vessel handling system for NET/ITER. In combination with a Full Scale Mock-up, EDITH is required to demonstrate that maintenance of plasma facing components can be carried out with the anticipated reliability and in time. A further aim of EDITH is to allow testing of the articulated boom components and subassemblies. The testbed EDITH and the Full Scale Mock-up are described. In addition, the performance and results of the commissioning and the qualification are summarized and an outlook is given for future tasks. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Energy and helicity of magnetic torus knots and braids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Chiara; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2018-02-01

    By considering steady magnetic fields in the shape of torus knots and unknots in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, we compute some fundamental geometric and physical properties to provide estimates for magnetic energy and helicity. By making use of an appropriate parametrization, we show that knots with dominant toroidal coils that are a good model for solar coronal loops have negligible total torsion contribution to magnetic helicity while writhing number provides a good proxy. Hence, by the algebraic definition of writhe based on crossing numbers, we show that the estimated values of writhe based on image analysis provide reliable information for the exact values of helicity. We also show that magnetic energy is linearly related to helicity, and the effect of the confinement of magnetic field can be expressed in terms of geometric information. These results can find useful application in solar and plasma physics, where braided structures are often present.

  14. Energetic Ion Behavior in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; A.L. Roquemore

    2003-06-26

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately equal to 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral beam injection (NBI) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating. Typical NSTX parameters are R(sub)0 = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(sub)p less than or equal to 1.5 MA, B(sub)T = 0.3-0.6 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral beam sources have injected P(sub)NB less than or equal to 6.2 MW at energies E(sub)b less than or equal to 100 keV. HHFW heating has delivered up to P(sub)RF approximately equal to 6 MW to deuterium and helium plasmas.

  15. Scientific Mission for National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, M.; Ono, M.; Kaye, S.; Goldston, R.

    1996-11-01

    The NSTX will be designed and built to test innovative scientific principles of high-temperature collisionless spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST plasmas promise, for example, stability with high average beta ( ~ 45 %) and pressure-driven current fraction ( ~ 90 %); confinement associated with strong magnetic well and shear; current startup and sustainment for minimized magnetic flux and helicity per plasma current; and power and particle handling in thick SOL plasmas dominated by MHD instabilities. Successful outcome from NSTX and complementary experiments (e.g., MAST in U.K. and GLOBUS-M in R.F.) would establish for the first time the physics basis for small, efficient and economical D-T fusion cores. The ST fusion cores could permit in a decade several exciting applications, such as testing D-T fusion burn; developing neutron science; developing fusion materials, engineering, and technology; eliminating difficult fission wastes; and producing tritium. These applications would in turn establish the scientific and technical basis for proceeding with the Pilot, Demonstration, and eventually Power Plants to produce relatively clean and economic energy.

  16. Revisiting the Inner Magnetospheric Oxygen Torus with DE 1 RIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Goldstein, J.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 35 years ago direct observations of cold plasmaspheric ions found enhanced O(+), O(++), and even N(+) densities in the outer plasmasphere, in particular during storm recovery conditions. Enhancements were seen inside or just outside of the plasmapause at all magnetic local times. Whereas nominal O(+) concentrations were found to be 1% or less inside the plasmasphere, enhanced O(+) in the vicinity of the plasmapause was found to reach densities comparable to H(+). Enhanced ion outflow (including oxygen) from high latitudes has also become part of our picture of storm-time phenomena. More recently it has become apparent that high latitude outflow is a source of inner magnetospheric warm ions that convect into morning and afternoon local times, to form what we now call the warm plasma cloak. Low to middle latitude ionospheric outflow and high latitude outflow are thought to result from very different processes and can be expected to contribute differently as a function of conditions and locations to the dynamic processes of energy and particle transport in the inner magnetosphere. Given the apparent proximity of their delivery to the vicinity of the plasmapause during plasmaspheric refilling conditions it becomes worthwhile to question the origin of the oxygen torus and its role in this region. While the observations do not yet exist to settle this question, there are measurements that contribute to the discussion in the new emerging context of cold plasma in the inner magnetosphere. In this paper we present and discuss DE 1 RIMS derived ion densities and temperatures that contribute to answering these outstanding questions about the origin and dynamics of the oxygen torus.

  17. Eruption on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, shows a new blue-colored volcanic plume extending about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) into space from Jupiter's moon Io (see inset at lower left). The blue color of the plume is consistent with the presence of sulfur dioxide gas and 'snow' condensing from the gas as the plume expands and cools. Galileo images have also shown that the Ra Patera plume glows in the dark, perhaps due to the fluorescence of sulfur and oxygen ions created by the breaking apart of sulfur dioxide molecules by energetic particles in the Jovian magnetosphere. The images at right show a comparison of changes seen near the volcano Ra Patera since the Voyager spacecraft flybys of 1979 (windows at right show Voyager image at top and Galileo image at bottom). This eruptive plume is an example of a new type of volcanic activity discovered during Voyager's flyby in 1979, believed to be geyser-like eruptions driven by sulfur dioxide or sulfur gas erupting and freezing in Io's extremely tenuous atmosphere. Volcanic eruptions on Earth cannot throw materials to such high altitudes. Ra Patera is the site of dramatic surface changes. An area around the volcano of about 40,000 square kilometers, area about the size of New Jersey, has been covered by new volcanic deposits. The image was taken in late June 28, 1996 from a distance of 972,000 kilometers (604,000 miles). The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  18. Hybrid I/O automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A. Lynch; R. Segala; F.W. Vaandrager (Frits); H.B. Weinberg

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new hybrid I/O automaton model that is capable of describing both continuous and discrete behavior. The model, which extends the timed I/O automaton model of Lynch et al and the phase transition system models of Manna et al, allows communication among components using both

  19. ROOT I/O improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canal, Ph. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    In the past year, the development of ROOT I/O has focused on improving the existing code and increasing the collaboration with the experiments experts. Regular I/O workshops have been held to share and build upon the various experiences and points of view. The resulting improvements in ROOT I/O span many dimensions including reduction and more control over the memory usage, reduction in CPU usage as well as optimization of the file size and the hardware I/O utilization. Many of these enhancements came as a result of an increased collaboration with the experiments development teams and their direct contributions both in code and quarterly ROOT I/O workshops.

  20. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  1. The Joint European Torus (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebut, Paul-Henri

    2017-02-01

    This paper addresses the history of JET, the Tokamak that reached the highest performances and the experiment that so far came closest to the eventual goal of a fusion reactor. The reader must be warned, however, that this document is not a comprehensive study of controlled thermonuclear fusion or even of JET. The next step on this road, the ITER project, is an experimental reactor. Actually, several prototypes will be required before a commercial reactor can be built. The fusion history is far from been finalised. JET is still in operation some 32 years after the first plasma and still has to provide answers to many questions before ITER takes the lead on research. Some physical interpretations of the observed phenomena, although coherent, are still under discussion. This paper also recalls some basic physics concepts necessary to the understanding of confinement: a knowledgeable reader can ignore these background sections. This fascinating story, comprising successes and failures, is imbedded in the complexities of twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries at a time when world globalization is evolving and the future seems loaded with questions. The views here expressed on plasma confinement are solely those of the author. This is especially the case for magnetic turbulence, for which other scientists may have different views.

  2. Semiclassical quantization of hyperbolic map on torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Mitsusada M

    2004-01-01

    We consider the semiclassical quantization of two hyperbolic maps on torus, i.e., the baker's map and the sawtooth map. We demonstrate that for both maps, the semiclassical quantization scheme based on the Riemann-Siegel lookalike formula fails to yield its eigenvalues. The reason for this failure is that the truncation of the infinite series w.r.t. the periodic orbits cannot work for the quantized hyperbolic map on a torus. We show that for the baker's map, an alternative semiclassical quantization scheme including all periodic orbit contribution yields its eigenvalues with reasonable accuracy, although they are, in general, complex-valued. The same scheme for the sawtooth map is constructed

  3. TORUS Annual Continuation and Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbanas, Goran [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elster, Charlotte [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Echer, Jutta [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nunes, Filomena [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thompson, Ian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-24

    The TORUS collaboration derives its name from the research it focuses on, namely the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes. It is a Topical Collaboration in Nuclear Theory, and funded by the Nuclear Theory Division of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. The funding supports one postdoctoral researcher for the years 1 through 4. The collaboration brings together as Principal Investigators a large fraction of the nuclear reaction theorists currently active within the USA. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve directreaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort is directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability; microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory.

  4. Exploring Torus Universes in Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budd, Timothy George; Loll, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we consider Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in 2+1 dimensions with the spatial topology of a torus. This system is of particular interest, because one can study not only the global scale factor, but also global ....... Apart from setting the stage for the analysis of shape dynamics on the torus, the new set-up highlights the role of nontrivial boundaries and topology....... shape variables in the presence of arbitrary quantum fluctuations of the geometry. Our initial investigation focusses on the dynamics of the scale factor and uncovers a qualitatively new behaviour, which leads us to investigate a novel type of boundary conditions for the path integral. Comparing large...

  5. FIRE - Flyby of Io with Repeat Encounters: A conceptual design for a New Frontiers mission to Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suer, Terry-Ann; Padovan, Sebastiano; Whitten, Jennifer L.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Shkolyar, Svetlana; Cable, Morgan; Walker, Catherine; Szalay, Jamey; Parker, Charles; Cumbers, John; Gentry, Diana; Harrison, Tanya; Naidu, Shantanu; Trammell, Harold J.; Reimuller, Jason; Budney, Charles J.; Lowes, Leslie L.

    2017-09-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a low complexity, heritage-based flyby mission to Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite and the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The design addresses the 2011 Decadal Survey's recommendation for a New Frontiers class mission to Io and is based upon the result of the June 2012 NASA-JPL Planetary Science Summer School. A science payload is proposed to investigate the link between the structure of Io's interior, its volcanic activity, its surface composition, and its tectonics. A study of Io's atmospheric processes and Io's role in the Jovian magnetosphere is also planned. The instrument suite includes a visible/near-IR imager, a magnetic field and plasma suite, a dust analyzer, and a gimbaled high gain antenna to perform radio science. Payload activity and spacecraft operations would be powered by three Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG). The primary mission includes 10 flybys with close-encounter altitudes as low as 100 km. The mission risks are mitigated by ensuring that relevant components are radiation tolerant and by using redundancy and flight-proven parts in the design. The spacecraft would be launched on an Atlas V rocket with a delta-v of 1.3 km/s. Three gravity assists (Venus, Earth, Earth) would be used to reach the Jupiter system in a 6-year cruise. The resulting concept demonstrates the rich scientific return of a flyby mission to Io.

  6. Operational Regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Mueller; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; T. Bigelow; P. Bonoli; M. Carter; J. Ferron; E. Fredrickson; D. Gates; L. Grisham; J.C. Hosea; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; H. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; R. Maqueda; J. Menard; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; R. Raman; S.A. Sabbagh; C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson; G.A. Wurden; S. Zweben

    2002-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a proof-of-principle experiment designed to study the physics of Spherical Tori (ST), i.e., low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasmas. Important issues for ST research are whether the high-eta stability and reduced transport theoretically predicted for this configuration can be realized experimentally. In NSTX, the commissioning of a digital real-time plasma control system, the provision of flexible heating systems, and the application of wall conditioning techniques were instrumental in achieving routine operation with good confinement. NSTX has produced plasmas with R/a(approx) 0.85 m/0.68 m, A(approx) 1.25, Ip* 1.1 MA, BT= 0.3-0.45 T, k* 2.2, d* 0.5, with auxiliary heating by up to 4 MW of High Harmonic Fast Waves, and 5 MW of 80 keV D0 Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The energy confinement time in plasmas heated by NBI has exceeded 100 ms and a toroidal beta (bT= 2m0 and lt;p and gt;/BT02, where BT0 is the central vacuum toroidal magnetic field) up to 22% has be en achieved. HHFW power of 2.3 MW has increased the electron temperature from an initial 0.4 keV to 0.9 keV both with and without producing a significant density rise in the plasma. The early application of both NBI and HHFW heating has slowed the penetration of the inductively produced plasma current, modifying the current profile and, thereby, the observed MHD stability

  7. Operational Regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Bigelow, T.; Bonoli, P.; Carter, M.; Ferron, J.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Grisham, L.; Hosea, J.C.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Maqueda, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.A; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Wurden, G.A.; Zweben, S.

    2002-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a proof-of-principle experiment designed to study the physics of Spherical Tori (ST), i.e., low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasmas. Important issues for ST research are whether the high-eta stability and reduced transport theoretically predicted for this configuration can be realized experimentally. In NSTX, the commissioning of a digital real-time plasma control system, the provision of flexible heating systems, and the application of wall conditioning techniques were instrumental in achieving routine operation with good confinement. NSTX has produced plasmas with R/a ∼ 0.85 m/0.68 m, A ∼ 1.25, Ip * 1.1 MA, BT = 0.3-0.45 T, k * 2.2, d * 0.5, with auxiliary heating by up to 4 MW of High Harmonic Fast Waves, and 5 MW of 80 keV D0 Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The energy confinement time in plasmas heated by NBI has exceeded 100 ms and a toroidal beta (bT = 2m0 /BT02, where BT0 is the central vacuum toroidal magnetic field) up to 22% has be en achieved. HHFW power of 2.3 MW has increased the electron temperature from an initial 0.4 keV to 0.9 keV both with and without producing a significant density rise in the plasma. The early application of both NBI and HHFW heating has slowed the penetration of the inductively produced plasma current, modifying the current profile and, thereby, the observed MHD stability

  8. Overview of Keda Torus eXperiment initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wandong; Lan, Tao; Mao, Wenzhe; Li, Hong; Xie, Jinlin; Liu, Ahdi; Wan, Shude; Wang, Hai; Zheng, Jian; Wen, Xiaohui; Zhou, Haiyang; You, Wei; Li, Chenguang; Bai, Wei; Tu, Cui; Tan, Mingsheng; Luo, Bing; Fu, Chenshuo; Huang, Fangcheng; Xu, Hangqi; Deng, Tijian; Zhu, Junfeng; Zhang, Sen; Adil, Yolbarsop; Hu, Jintong; Xiao, Bingjia; Luo, Zhengping; Wang, Huazhong; Shen, Biao; Fu, Peng; Yang, Lei; Song, Yuntao; Yang, Qingxi; Zheng, Jinxing; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Chijin; Ding, Weixing

    2017-11-01

    The Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) is a new reversed field pinch (RFP) device at the University of Science and Technology of China. The construction and assembly of KTX, including the vacuum chamber, conducting shell, magnetic field windings, power supply system, active control coils, vacuum pump and data acquisition system, have been completed on August 1, 2015. Immediately following that, the first plasma was obtained on August 15, 2015. Intensive conditioning of the machine is underway to ramp up the plasma current toward its full operation. An active feedback mode control system has been built and has been implemented to control the error field around the vertical gaps of the conducting shell. The pulsed power supply systems of ohmic heating field and toroidal field (TF), using thyristor and energy storage capacitors, have been tested and commissioned. The TF power supply has flexibility in being able to operate with a reversed TF configuration and stable TF configuration. The fundamental diagnostic tools are developed for early KTX operation. Currently, the plasma current is up to 205 kA and the maximum discharge length is 21 ms, approaching to the conducting shell penetration time. Furthermore, typical RFP discharges are being produced with RFP state lasting 2 ms. These initial operation results for KTX are described in detail.

  9. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, Doug; Baeumel, Stefan; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias; Werner, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005-06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  10. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  11. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes

  12. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  13. Volcanic eruptions on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, R. G.; Schneider, N. M.; Terrile, R. J.; Cook, A. F.; Hansen, C.

    1981-09-01

    Nine eruption plumes which were observed during the Voyager 1 encounter with Io are discussed. During the Voyager 2 encounter, four months later, eight of the eruptions were still active although the largest became inactive sometime between the two encounters. Plumes range in height from 60 to over 300 km with corresponding ejection velocities of 0.5 to 1.0 km/s and plume sources are located on several plains and consist of fissures or calderas. The shape and brightness distribution together with the pattern of the surface deposition on a plume 3 is simulated by a ballistic model with a constant ejection velocity of 0.5 km/s and ejection angles which vary from 0-55 deg. The distribution of active and recent eruptions is concentrated in the equatorial regions and indicates that volcanic activity is more frequent and intense in the equatorial regions than in the polar regions. Due to the geologic setting of certain plume sources and large reservoirs of volatiles required for the active eruptions, it is concluded that sulfur volcanism rather than silicate volcanism is the most likely driving mechanism for the eruption plumes.

  14. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  15. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B.; Mau, T.K.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.I.; Raman, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J.

    2003-01-01

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge

  16. Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolemen, E.; Gates, D.A.; Rowley, C.W.; Kasdin, N.J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving 'snowflake' divertor configuration in NSTX.

  17. Regimes of operation in the Princeton Large Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosea, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    In the quest for optimum discharge conditions in the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), a variety of discharge regimes have been produced. These separate broadly into two main categories - those regimes with m greater than or equal to 2 oscillatory MHD instabilities and often hollow electron profiles for tungsten limiters, and those regimes for which the electron temperature is sufficiently peaked to support the internal sawtooth or near-sawtooth (m = 1) instability. The internal sawtooth regime is found to be optimum for confinement but to be more difficult to select when low-Z impurity concentrations have been reduced with low power discharge cleaning or gettering to permit extension of the high density operation limit. Gas programming is used to cool the plasma periphery, thereby reducing the high-Z impurity concentrations and causing the current channel to constrict into the sawtooth regime, and then to attain the desired plasma density. With discharges selected in this manner, gross energetic confinement times up to approx. 100 msec have been obtained at densities of approx. 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/, and very high ion and electron temperatures have been produced with neutral beam injection heating at lower densities with no observable deleterious effect on energy confinement.

  18. Er:YAG Laser: A New Technical Approach to Remove Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J. P.; Raybaud, H.; Merigo, E.; Vescovi, P.; Fornaini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Er:YAG laser to remove by excision torus mandibularis and to smooth torus palatinus exostosis. Materials and Methods. Torus mandibularis (TM) and torus palatinus (TP) were surgically eliminated via the Er:YAG laser using the following parameters: TM: output power ranging from 500 to 1000 mJ, frequency from 20 to 30 Hz, sapphire tips (diameter 0.8 mm), air-water spray (ratio 5/5), pulse duration 150 μsec, fluence ranging from 99592 J/cm2 to 199044,586 J/cm2. TP: a peeling technique was used to eliminate TP, as excision by slicing being impossible here. Results. TM: excision was obtained after 12730 pulses. TP: smoothing technique took more time compared with excision. Once peeling was considered to be accomplished, the use of a surgical rasp was necessary to eliminate bone spicules that could delay the wound to heal in good conditions. Conclusion. Er:YAG excision (TM) or Er:YAG peeling (TP) are safe clinical techniques easy to practice even if the time required for excision or surface smoothing is more than the time required with bony burs and high speed instruments. PMID:22792500

  19. Er:YAG Laser: A New Technical Approach to Remove Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Rocca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Er:YAG laser to remove by excision torus mandibularis and to smooth torus palatinus exostosis. Materials and Methods. Torus mandibularis (TM and torus palatinus (TP were surgically eliminated via the Er:YAG laser using the following parameters: TM: output power ranging from 500 to 1000 mJ, frequency from 20 to 30 Hz, sapphire tips (diameter 0.8 mm, air-water spray (ratio 5/5, pulse duration 150 μsec, fluence ranging from 99592 J/cm2 to 199044,586 J/cm2. TP: a peeling technique was used to eliminate TP, as excision by slicing being impossible here. Results. TM: excision was obtained after 12730 pulses. TP: smoothing technique took more time compared with excision. Once peeling was considered to be accomplished, the use of a surgical rasp was necessary to eliminate bone spicules that could delay the wound to heal in good conditions. Conclusion. Er:YAG excision (TM or Er:YAG peeling (TP are safe clinical techniques easy to practice even if the time required for excision or surface smoothing is more than the time required with bony burs and high speed instruments.

  20. The Schwinger Model on the torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azakov, S.

    1996-08-01

    The classical and quantum aspects of the Schwinger model on the torus are considered. First we find explicitly all zero modes of the Dirac operator in the topological sectors with nontrivial Chern index and its spectrum. In the second part we determine the regularized effective action and discuss the propagators related to it. Finally we calculate the gauge invariant averages of the fermion bilinears and correlation functions of currents and densities. We show that in the infinite volume limit the well-known result for the chiral condensate can be obtained and the clustering property can be established. (author). 23 refs

  1. Direct detection of the Enceladus water torus with Herschel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Cassidy, T.; Rengel, M.; Jarchow, C.; Cavalie, T.; Crovisier, J.; Helmich, F. P.; Kidger, M.

    Cryovolcanic activity near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus produces plumes of H2O-dominated gases and ice particles, which escape and populate a torus-shaped cloud. Using submillimeter spectroscopy with Herschel, we report the direct detection of the Enceladus water vapor torus in four

  2. On some Closed Magnetic Curves on a 3-torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munteanu, Marian Ioan, E-mail: marian.ioan.munteanu@gmail.com [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, Faculty of Mathematics (Romania); Nistor, Ana Irina, E-mail: ana.irina.nistor@gmail.com [Gh. Asachi Technical University of Iaşi, Department of Mathematics and Informatics (Romania)

    2017-06-15

    We consider two magnetic fields on the 3-torus obtained from two different contact forms on the Euclidean 3-space and we study when their corresponding normal magnetic curves are closed. We obtain periodicity conditions analogues to those for the closed geodesics on the torus.

  3. Plasma shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

  5. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D; Ahn, J; Allain, J; Andre, R; Bastasz, R; Bell, M; Bell, R; Belova, E; Berkery, J; Betti, R; Bialek, J; Biewer, T; Bigelow, T; Bitter, M; Boedo, J; Bonoli, P; Bozzer, A; Brennan, D; Breslau, J; Brower, D; Bush, C; Canik, J; Caravelli, G; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Chang, C; Choe, W; Crocker, N; Darrow, D; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Diem, S; D' Ippolito, D; Domier, C; Dorland, W; Efthimion, P; Ejiri, A; Ershov, N; Evans, T; Feibush, E; Fenstermacher, M; Ferron, J; Finkenthal, M; Foley, J; Frazin, R; Fredrickson, E; Fu, G; Funaba, H; Gerhardt, S; Glasser, A; Gorelenkov, N; Grisham, L; Hahm, T; Harvey, R; Hassanein, A; Heidbrink, W; Hill, K; Hillesheim, J; Hillis, D; Hirooka, Y; Hosea, J; Hu, B; Humphreys, D; Idehara, T; Indireshkumar, K; Ishida, A; Jaeger, F; Jarboe, T; Jardin, S; Jaworski, M; Ji, H; Jung, H; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Katsuro-Hopkins, O; Kawahata, K; Kawamori, E; Kaye, S; Kessel, C; Kim, J; Kimura, H; Kolemen, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Krstic, P; Ku, S; Kubota, S; Kugel, H; La Haye, R; Lao, L; LeBlanc, B; Lee, W; Lee, K; Leuer, J; Levinton, F; Liang, Y; Liu, D; Luhmann, N; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Manickam, J; Mansfield, D; Maqueda, R; Mazzucato, E; McCune, D; McGeehan, B; McKee, G; Medley, S; Menard, J; Menon, M; Meyer, H; Mikkelsen, D; Miloshevsky, G; Mitarai, O; Mueller, D; Mueller, S; Munsat, T; Myra, J; Nagayama, Y; Nelson, B; Nguyen, X; Nishino, N; Nishiura, M; Nygren, R; Ono, M; Osborne, T; Pacella, D; Park, H; Park, J; Paul, S; Peebles, W; Penaflor, B; Peng, M; Phillips, C; Pigarov, A; Podesta, M; Preinhaelter, J; Ram, A; Raman, R; Rasmussen, D; Redd, A; Reimerdes, H; Rewoldt, G; Ross, P; Rowley, C; Ruskov, E; Russell, D; Ruzic, D; Ryan, P; Sabbagh, S; Schaffer, M; Schuster, E; Scott, S; Shaing, K; Sharpe, P; Shevchenko, V; Shinohara, K; Sizyuk, V; Skinner, C; Smirnov, A; Smith, D; Smith, S; Snyder, P; Soloman, W; Sontag, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Stotler, D; Strait, T; Stratton, B; Stutman, D; Takahashi, R; Takase, Y; Tamura, N; Tang, X; Taylor, G; Taylor, C; Ticos, C; Tritz, K; Tsarouhas, D; Turrnbull, A; Tynan, G; Ulrickson, M; Umansky, M; Urban, J; Utergberg, E; Walker, M; Wampler, W; Wang, J; Wang, W; Weland, A

    2009-01-05

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high {beta} operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies confirm the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance l{sub i} {approx} 0.4 with strong shaping ({kappa} {approx} 2.7, {delta} {approx} 0.8) with {beta}{sub N} approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction f{sub NI} {approx} 71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfvenic ions are an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfvenic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n = 3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with {beta} above the no-wall limit. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. Other highlights are

  6. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D. A.; Ahn, J.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Bastasz, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; D’Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Efthimion, P.; Ejiri, A.; Ershov, N.; Evans, T.; Feibush, E.; Fenstermacher, M.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Funaba, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grisham, L.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hillesheim, J.; Hillis, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, B.; Humphreys, D.; Idehara, T.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ishida, A.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Ji, H.; Jung, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kawahata, K.; Kawamori, E.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kimura, H.; Kolemen, E.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Krstic, P.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, Jr., N.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mitarai, O.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, S.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Nelson, B.; Nguyen, X.; Nishino, N.; Nishiura, M.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Pacella, D.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Ram, A.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redd, A.; Reimerdes, H.; Rewo, G.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scott, S.; Shaing, K.; Sharpe, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, S.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Strait, T.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, R.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Ticos, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Turrnbull, A.; Tynan, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Umansky, M.; Urban, J.; Utergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Welander, A.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Xu, X.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zweben, S.

    2009-03-24

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high β operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies are consistent with the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap current fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance li ~0.4 with strong shaping (κ ~ 2.7, δ ~ 0.8) with βN approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction fNI ~71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfv´enic ions will be an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfv´enic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n=3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with β above the no-wall limit. Other highlights are: results

  7. iOS 6 foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Feiler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    A practical introduction for using iOS 6 to create universal apps If you have prior experience programming in an object-oriented language and are eager to start building universal apps for iPad and iPhone (including the iPod touch), then this is the book for you! Using the latest version of iOS (iOS 6) along with the latest version of Xcode (Xcode 4.5), this book is a practical introduction rather than just a catalog of components. Full-color and packed with groundbreaking, innovative designs, this book teaches you how to create eye-catching, unique apps. Teaches you the va

  8. Io and Europa Meet Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa is a combination of two New Horizons images taken March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. A lower-resolution color image snapped by the Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 universal time (UT) has been merged with a higher-resolution black-and-white image taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 10:23 UT. The composite image shows the relative positions of Io and Europa, which were moving past each other during the image sequence, as they were at the time the LORRI image was taken. This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close together in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. Io's night side is lit up by light reflected from Jupiter, which is off the frame to the right. Europa's night side is dark, in contrast to Io, because this side of Europa faces away from Jupiter. Here Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are also visible: that from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The Tvashtar plume appears blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The images are centered at 1 degree North, 60 degrees West on Io, and 0 degrees North, 149 degrees West on Europa. The color in this image was

  9. Confinement of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, R.W.; Ferguson, H.R.; Fletcher, H.J.; Gardner, J.H.; Harrison, B.K.; Larsen, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature plasma is confined in the shape of a topological torus by a topologically stable magnetic field which is everywhere constant on and tangent to the surface of the torus. There are exactly an even finite number of closed magnetic field lines on the plasma surface and all other magnetic field lines on the surface are asymptotic to the closed field lines. This magnetic field configuration is achieved by a set of current carrying conductors appropriately arranged with respect to the plasma and carrying suitably selected currents

  10. iOS 5 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, Steven F

    2012-01-01

    Each chapter will take you through a new major feature of iOS 5. You will learn how to integrate each feature into your applications. If you ever wanted to learn about the latest features of iOS 5 and learn how to incorporate Twitter, iCloud and Core Image framework effects functionality into your applications, then this book is for you. You should have a good knowledge of programming experience with Objective-C, and have used Xcode 4. iPhone programming experience is not required.

  11. Subsidence of topography on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Erik K.; Stevenson, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying roots of Io's topographic features are softened and eroded by contact with the hot mantle, resulting in a subsidence which is analogous to the progress of a butter pat on a frying pan. This process would be offset by crustal thickening due to continuing volcanism if the rate for this phenomenon were more than the observed 1 cm/year or less. Because the crustal thinning would occur at about 50 cm/year if the material underneath were a pure magma ocean, Io cannot have a global magna ocean, and interior viscosities greater than about 10 to the 10th P are implied.

  12. Real Time Control System for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Gates, D.; Hatcher, R.; Kaye, S.; Gibney, T.

    1999-01-01

    The NSTX is a national facility for the study of plasma confinement, heating, and current drive in a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration. The ST configuration is an alternate magnetic confinement concept which is characterized by high β (ratio plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure) and low toroidal field compared to conventional tokamaks, and could provide a pathway to the realization of a practical fusion power source. The NSTX depends on a real time, high speed, synchronous, and deterministic control system acting on a system of thyristor rectifier power supplies to (1) establish the initial magnetic field configuration; (2) initiate plasma within the vacuum vessel; (3) inductively drive plasma current; and (4) control plasma position and shape. For the initial ''day 0'' 1st plasma operations (Feb. 1999), the system was limited to closed loop proportional-integral current control of the power supplies based on preprogrammed reference waveforms. For the next ''day 1'' phase of operations beginning mid-summer 1999 the loop will be closed on plasma current and position. The ultimate ''day 2'' system is envisioned to include real time reconstruction of the plasma internal current distribution so that control can be exercised over internal plasma parameters such as current and pressure profile. This paper addresses the day 1 system, with emphasis on the magnet power supply control. Companion papers address plasma control

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the IO + IO reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The flash photolysis-absorption technique has been used to measure the rate constant for the reaction IO + IO over the temperature range 250-373 K and pressure range 20-700 torr of N2. The rate constant for the overall reaction was found to be independent of pressure and equal to 1.73 x 10 to the -12th exp (1020 + or - 200)/T cu cm/molecule s. Branching ratios for the reaction channels forming 2I + O2, I2 + O2, and I2O2, were found to be pressure dependent, with the I2 channel accounting for less than 5 percent of the total reaction over the observed pressure range. A stable reaction product was observed between 230 and 300 nm which was formed on a long time scale compared to IO disappearance. The rate constant for the reaction I + O3 + yields to IO + O2 was measured at 298 K and found to be (9.5 + or - 1.5) x 10 to the -13th cu cm/molecule s.

  14. Tritium systems concepts for the next European torus (NET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, S.K.; Bagli, K.S.; Busigin, A.; Kveton, O.K.; Dombra, A.H.; Miller, A.I.

    1986-09-01

    The study deals with the design of the various tritium processing facilities that will be required for the Next European Torus (NET) design. The reference data for the design of the NET Tritium Systems was provided by the NET team. Significant achievements of this study were: (a) Identification of new ways of handling some problems for example: 1) Recovery of tritium from the helium purge of the lithium-ceramic blanket using a novel Adsoprtion and Catalytic Exchange Process, 2) A new way of combining fuel component separation and coolant water detritiation using cryogenic distillation, 3) The use of parasitic refrigeration for the cryogenic isotope separation, 4) Tritium extraction from effluent gas streams at their respective sources, 5) Attempt to eliminate the need for Air Cleanup Systems. (b) Identification of uncertainties, for example: composition of plasma exhaust, required helium purge rate of Li-Pb for tritium recovery, uncertainty in requirements for decontaminating blanket sectors, etc. (c) Review of ways to limit tritium permeation into steam by swamping with hydrogen and to provide quantitative estimates for this permeation

  15. Students versus IoT Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    What happens when you introduce students to IoT security for the first time? In this talk I will tell you about my first experience with IoT Security and the thought process behind the decisions I made.

  16. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D.S.; Diem, S.J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Garstka, G.D.; Gates, D.A.; Gray, T.; Grisham, L.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.H.; Kissick, M.W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.G.; Lewicki, B.T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T.K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S.S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B.A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C.N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P.H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R.J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C.H.; Sontag, A.C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K.L.; Unterberg, E.A.; Von Halle, A.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S.J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J.M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P.T.; Carter, M.D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R.J.; Hatcher, R.E.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L.L.; Levinton, F.M.; Luhmann, N.C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M.M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G.D.; Ram, A.K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Wurden, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction (∼60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted

  17. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  18. Pressure limits of an axisymmetric torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1986-03-01

    In order to clarify the pressure limit of a toroidal plasma equilibrium in a three-dimensional geometry, an azimuthally symmetric toroidal plasma was considered. In a tokamak-like plasma, the net toroidal current is necessary for a finite β plasma equilibrium. If external conductors are used to provide the rotational transform, iota, the plasma pressure is limited to β = (iota/2π) 2 /2A, where A is the aspect ratio

  19. IOS SAFETY APPLICATION FOR UITM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMAD FAHMI HUSSIN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an iOS application, which is developed, to ensure that every task related to safety and health such as inspection, deviation analysis and accident reporting becomes more simple and easier. Normally, these three (3 tasks are done separately and the data are saved in different ways. These situations make the tasks become complicated and consume a lot of time. Therefore, this application is developed to overcome all the problems that occurred. The main objective of this application is to allow the user to handle inspection checklist, deviation analysis and accident reporting efficiently by using iOS devices such as iPhone and iPad. Hence, using iOS device, instead of using a lot of paper, can do all the tasks. Using Xcode SDK, which is the software that is used to develop iOS application, developed this application. Xcode use Objective-C as the programming language, which is quite similar with other programming languages such as C and C++. The final result of this project is that this application can handle all the three (3 tasks and the form or the findings can be emailed to the Safety and Health Officer (SHO. This application will reduce time consume to conduct safety inspection, deviation and reporting tasks as well as avoid delay that might happen while using the traditional method.

  20. Learning iOS forensics

    CERN Document Server

    Epifani, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    If you are a digital forensics examiner daily involved in the acquisition and analysis of mobile devices and want to have a complete overview of how to perform your work on iOS devices, this book is definitely for you.

  1. Investigating Trapped Particle Asymmetry Modes and Temperature Effects in the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirwan, R.; Swanson, P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    Electron plasma is confined in the Lawrence Non-Neutral Torus II using a purely toroidal magnetic field (R0 = 18 cm, B LNT II can be configured for fully toroidal traps or variable-length partial toroidal traps. The behavior of the plasma is observed by monitoring the image charge on isolated wall sectors. The plasma is excited by application of a sinusoidal tone burst to selected wall sectors. Phase-space separatrices are introduced by applying squeeze potentials to toroidally localized, but poloidally continuous sectors and the resulting interaction between trapped and passing particles populations results in asymmetry modes and transport. These experiments provide a comparison with similar experiments in cylindrical traps. We also report on the development of temperature measurement techniques and assess temperature affects on diocotron and asymmetry modes. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1202540.

  2. Dirac operator zero-modes on a torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenjinbayashi, Yasushi; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Takanori

    2007-01-01

    We study Dirac operator zero-modes on a torus for gauge background with uniform field strengths. Under the basic translations of the torus coordinates the wave functions are subject to twisted periodic conditions. In suitable torus coordinates the zero-mode wave functions can be related to holomorphic functions of the complex torus coordinates. Half of the twisted boundary conditions for the holomorphic part of the zero-mode wave function can be made periodic or anti-periodic. The remaining half is until coordinate dependent but diagonal. We completely solve the twisted boundary conditions and construct the zero-mode wave functions. The chirality and the degeneracy of the zero-modes are uniquely determined by the gauge background and are consistent with the index theorem

  3. High performance parallel I/O

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    Gain Critical Insight into the Parallel I/O EcosystemParallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing (HPC), especially in storing and processing very large datasets to facilitate scientific discovery. Revealing the state of the art in this field, High Performance Parallel I/O draws on insights from leading practitioners, researchers, software architects, developers, and scientists who shed light on the parallel I/O ecosystem.The first part of the book explains how large-scale HPC facilities scope, configure, and operate systems, with an emphasis on choices of I/O har

  4. Torus as phase space: Weyl quantization, dequantization, and Wigner formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligabò, Marilena, E-mail: marilena.ligabo@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    The Weyl quantization of classical observables on the torus (as phase space) without regularity assumptions is explicitly computed. The equivalence class of symbols yielding the same Weyl operator is characterized. The Heisenberg equation for the dynamics of general quantum observables is written through the Moyal brackets on the torus and the support of the Wigner transform is characterized. Finally, a dequantization procedure is introduced that applies, for instance, to the Pauli matrices. As a result we obtain the corresponding classical symbols.

  5. Bi2(IO3)(IO6): First combination of [IO3]- and [IO6]5- anions in three-dimensional framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuanling; Wu, Yuandong; Mei, Dajiang; Doert, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    A new bismuth (III) iodate periodate, Bi2(IO3)(IO6) was obtained from hydrothermal reactions using Bi(NO3)3·5H2O, and H5IO6 as starting materials. Bi2(IO3)(IO6) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c (No. 14) with lattice parameters ɑ = 8.1119(6), b = 5.4746(4), c = 16.357(1) Å, β = 99.187(2)°, V = 717.07(9) Å3, Z = 4. The structure of Bi2(IO3)(IO6) features a three-dimensional framework which is a combination of [Bi(1)O5] tetragonal pyramids, [Bi(2)O8] bicapped trigonal prisms and [IO3]- and [IO6]5- anions. Thermal analysis shows that the compound is thermally stable up to about 350 °C. The solid state UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum indicates that Bi2(IO3)(IO6) is a semiconductor with a band gap of 2.76 eV.

  6. Coupling circuit model and discharge waveform prediction for Keda Torus eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Wei [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lan, Tao, E-mail: lantao@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chijin [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, Wenzhe; You, Wei; Li, Chenguang; Tu, Cui; Tan, Mingsheng; Luo, Bin; Fu, Chengshuo; Huang, Fangchen; Xu, Hangqi; Deng, Tijian; Zhu, Junfeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fu, Peng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wen, Xiaohui; Zhou, Haiyang; Wang, Hai; Wan, Shude [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A coupling circuit model has been successfully developed for Keda Torus eXperiment to predict discharge waveforms. • The multigroup poloidal and toroidal winding circuits are adopt in the coupling model. • The delay effect due to resistive vacuum vessel is considered in the coupling model. • The results shows the design of power supply system is capable of achieving the expected discharge waveforms. - Abstract: A poloidal and toroidal magnetic field coupling circuit model is developed to simulate discharge waveforms of the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) reversed field pinch (RFP) to ensure that the design of the power supply systems is able to achieve the typical discharge parameters. The radial profiles of plasma current density and magnetic field used in the coupling model are characterized by modified Bessel function model (MBFM) derived from the well-known Taylor's theory. The power balance in the energy conservation of poloidal and toroidal fields is used to establish the connection between these two fields. The numerical solutions of the coupling show that the KTX power supply system is capable of achieving the designed discharge parameters, such as field reversal parameter (F), pinch parameter (Θ), magnetic field, plasma current and loop voltage. Furthermore, the delay of magnetic field penetration due to the effect of vacuum vessel is also considered in the model.

  7. Programming iOS 6

    CERN Document Server

    Neuburg, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Get a solid grounding in all the fundamentals of Cocoa Touch, and avoid problems during iPhone and iPad app development. With this revised and expanded edition, you'll dig into Cocoa and learn how to work effectively with Objective-C and Xcode. This book covers iOS 6 in a rigorous, orderly fashion-ideal whether you're approaching iOS for the first time or need a reference to bolster existing skills. Learn about features introduced with iOS 6, including Objective-C language advances, autosynthesis, autolayout, new view controller rotation rules, unwind segues, state restoration, styled text, and collection views. * Learn Objective-C language details and object-oriented programming concepts * Understand the anatomy of an Xcode project and all the stages of its lifecycle * Grasp key Cocoa concepts such as relationships between classes, receiving events, and model-view-controller architecture * Learn how views and layers are managed, drawn, composited, and animated * Become familiar with view controllers and thei...

  8. Engineering features of the Madison Symmetric Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.N.; Kerst, D.W.; Lovell, T.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    We describe the design parameters, unconventional features, and status of the Madison Symmetric Torus, MST, an RFP now approaching completion. A desire to minimize field errors dominated the design, leading to flanged gaps and inclusion of a pumping duct with small pump ports into the shell. No liner was to be used in the initial configuration, the versatile aluminum shell being the vacuum containment vessel (VCV). Simplified access to the inside of the vacuum vessel was accomplished by using the tank itself as single-turn poloidal as well as single-turn toroidal field coil. Thus none of the familiar toroidal or poloidal field coil sets surround the tank. A girder structure has been installed to permit removing the core-keeper and top-half of the vacuum vessel for insertion of internal shells or liners. More routinely, we intend to lift core-keeper and top half of the VCV together for entry of personnel into the VCV for changes of internal diagnostics or limiting surfaces, or for installation of movable limiters, etc. All structural features were designed to ease disassembly. 5 figs

  9. Comparing the Atmospheric Losses at Io and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, V. J.; Bagenal, F.; Crary, F. J.; Cassidy, T.

    2017-12-01

    At Io and Europa, the interaction of the Jovian plasma with the moon atmosphere leads to a significant loss of atomic/molecular neutrals and ions to space. The processes that lead to atmospheric escape are diverse: atmospheric sputtering, molecular dissociation, molecular ion recombination, Jeans escape etc. Each process leads to neutrals escaping at different velocities (i.e. electron impact dissociation leads to very slow atomic neutrals, sputtering might eject faster molecular neutrals). Some neutrals will be ejected out of the Jovian system; others will form extended neutral clouds along the orbit of the moons. These atomic/molecular extended neutral clouds are probably the main source of plasma for the Jovian magnetosphere. They are difficult to observe directly thus their composition and density are still poorly constrained. A future modeling of the formation of these extended clouds requires an estimate of their atmospheric sources. We estimate the atmospheric losses at Io and Europa for each loss process with a multi-species chemistry model, using a prescribed atmospheric distribution consistent with the observations. We compare the neutral losses at Io and Europa.

  10. A Megawatt-level 28z GHz Heating System For The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Gary

    2014-04-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will operate at axial toroidal fields of < 1 T and plasma currents, Ip < 2 MA. The development of non-inductive (NI) plasmas is a major long-term research goal for NSTX-U. Time dependent numerical simulations of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating of low density NI start-up plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U predict a significant and rapid increase of the central electron temperature (Te(0)) before the plasma becomes overdense. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is planned for heating NI start-up plasmas in NSTX-U. In addition to EC heating of CHI start-up discharges, this system will be used for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) plasma start-up, and eventually for EBW heating and current drive during the Ip flattop.

  11. Effect of electric fields and fluctuations on confinement in a bumpy torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroe, S.; Glowienka, J.C.; Hillis, D.L.

    1986-06-01

    In order to understand the relationships between confinement and space potential (electric field) and between confinement and density fluctuations, plasma parameters in the ELMO Bumpy Torus Scale (EBT-S) have been measured systematically for a wide range of operating conditions. Present EBT plasma parameters do not show a strong dependence on the potential profile, but rather exhibit a correlation with the fluctuations. The plasma pressure profile is found to be consistent with the profile anticipated on the basis of the flute stability criterion for a marginally stable plasma. For a heating power of 100 kW, the stored energy density is found to be restricted to the range between 4.5 x 10 13 eV-cm -3 and 7 x 10 13 eV-cm -3 . The lower limit remains constant regardless of heating power and pertains to plasmas lacking an equilibrium and/or stability. The upper limit increases with heating power and is found to result from the onset of instabilities. In between the two limits is a plasma that is in an equilibrium state and is marginally stable. Operational trajectories exist that take the EBT plasma from one limit to the other

  12. Behavior of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, Hajime; Craig, Darren; Anderson, Jay K.; Chapman, Brett E.; Den-Hartog, Daniel J.; Prager, Stewart C.; Biewer, Ted M.; Terry, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on passive measurements of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. During PPCD, the electron temperature increased and a sudden reduction of magnetic fluctuations was observed. For this change, we have studied whether plasma velocity is affected. Plasma rotation is observed to decrease during PPCD. From measurements of line intensities for several impurities at 10 poloidal chords, it is found that the impurity line emission shifts outward. The ion temperature of impurities is reasonably connected to that measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy from core to edge. (author)

  13. Hybrid Simulation of the Interaction of Europa's Atmosphere with the Jovian Plasma: Multiprocessor Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, V. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Cassidy, T. A.; Crary, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We model the interaction of Europa's tenuous atmosphere with the plasma of Jupiter's torus with an improved version of our hybrid plasma code. In a hybrid plasma code, the ions are treated as kinetic Macro-particles moving under the Lorentz force and the electrons as a fluid leading to a generalized formulation of Ohm's law. In this version, the spatial simulation domain is decomposed in 2 directions and is non-uniform in the plasma convection direction. The code is run on a multi-processor supercomputer that offers 16416 cores and 2GB Ram per core. This new version allows us to tap into the large memory of the supercomputer and simulate the full interaction volume (Reuropa=1561km) with a high spatial resolution (50km). Compared to Io, Europa's atmosphere is about 100 times more tenuous, the ambient magnetic field is weaker and the density of incident plasma is lower. Consequently, the electrodynamic interaction is also weaker and substantial fluxes of thermal torus ions might reach and sputter the icy surface. Molecular O2 is the dominant atmospheric product of this surface sputtering. Observations of oxygen UV emissions (specifically the ratio of OI 1356A / 1304A emissions) are roughly consistent with an atmosphere that is composed predominantely of O2 with a small amount of atomic O. Galileo observations along flybys close to Europa have revealed the existence of induced currents in a conducting ocean under the icy crust. They also showed that, from flyby to flyby, the plasma interaction is very variable. Asymmetries of the plasma density and temperature in the wake of Europa were also observed and still elude a clear explanation. Galileo mag data also detected ion cyclotron waves, which is an indication of heavy ion pickup close to the moon. We prescribe an O2 atmosphere with a vertical density column consistent with UV observations and model the plasma properties along several Galileo flybys of the moon. We compare our results with the magnetometer

  14. Simulation and design of feedback control on resistive wall modes in Keda Torus eXperiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chenguang; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) (Liu et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 094009 (2014)) is investigated by simulation. A linear model is built to describe the growth of the unstable modes in the absence of feedback and the resulting mode suppression due to feedback, given the typical reversed field pinch plasma equilibrium. The layout of KTX with two shell structures (the vacuum vessel and the stabilizing shell) is taken into account. The feedback performance is explored both in the scheme of “clean mode control” (Zanca et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1425 (2007)) and “raw mode control.” The discrete time control model with specific characteristic times will mimic the real feedback control action and lead to the favored control cycle. Moreover, the conceptual design of feedback control system is also presented, targeting on both RWMs and tearing modes

  15. Realizing "2001: A Space Odyssey": Piloted Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast, piloted outer solar system travel was created predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. The initial requirements were satisfied by the vehicle concept, which could deliver a 172 mt crew payload from Earth to Jupiter rendezvous in 118 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1,690 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all major systems including artificial gravity payload, central truss, nuclear fusion reactor, power conversion, magnetic nozzle, fast wave plasma heating, tankage, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery bank, refrigeration, reaction control, communications, mission design, and space operations. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance/utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/x-ray radiation. Technical comparisons are made between the vehicle concept and the interplanetary spacecraft depicted in the motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey.

  16. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  17. Trilinos I/O Support (Trios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron A. Oldfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trilinos I/O Support (Trios is a new capability area in Trilinos that serves two important roles: (1 it provides and supports I/O libraries used by in-production scientific codes; (2 it provides a research vehicle for the evaluation and distribution of new techniques to improve I/O on advanced platforms. This paper provides a brief overview of the production-grade I/O libraries in Trios as well as some of the ongoing research efforts that contribute to the experimental libraries in Trios.

  18. uFlip: Understanding Flash IO Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouganim, Luc; Jonsson, Bjørn; Bonnet, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    want to establish what kind of IOs should be favored (or avoided) when designing algorithms and architectures for flash-based systems. In this paper, we focus on flash IO patterns, that capture relevant distribution of IOs in time and space, and our goal is to quantify their performance. We define u......FLIP, a benchmark for measuring the response time of flash IO patterns. We also present a benchmarking methodology which takes into account the particular characteristics of flash devices. Finally, we present the results obtained by measuring eleven flash devices, and derive a set of design hints that should drive...

  19. Hybrid simulation of toroidal Alfvén eigenmode on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D., E-mail: deyongl@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fu, G. Y.; Podestà, M.; Breslau, J. A.; Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Energetic particle modes and Alfvén eigenmodes driven by super-Alfvénic fast ions are routinely observed in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX). These modes can significantly impact fast ion transport and thus cause fast ion redistribution or loss. Self-consistent linear simulations of Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAEs) in NSTX plasmas have been carried out with the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic hybrid code M3D-K using experimental plasma parameters and profiles including plasma toroidal rotation. The simulations show that unstable TAEs with n=3,4, or 5 can be excited by the fast ions from neutral beam injection. The simulated mode frequency, mode radial structure, and phase shift are consistent with measurements from a multi-channel microwave reflectometer diagnostic. A sensitivity study on plasma toroidal rotation, safety factor q profile, and initial fast ion distribution is performed. The simulations show that rotation can have a significant destabilizing effect when the rotation is comparable or larger than the experimental level. The mode growth rate is sensitive to q profile and fast ion distribution. Although mode structure and peak position depend somewhat on q profile and plasma rotation, the variation of synthetic reflectometer response is within experimental uncertainty and it is not sensitive enough to see the difference clearly.

  20. Electromagnetic diagnostic system for the Keda Torus eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Cui; Liu, Adi; Li, Zichao; Tan, Mingsheng; Luo, Bing; You, Wei; Li, Chenguang; Bai, Wei; Fu, Chenshuo; Huang, Fangcheng; Xiao, Bingjia; Shen, Biao; Shi, Tonghui; Chen, Dalong; Mao, Wenzhe; Li, Hong; Xie, Jinglin; Lan, Tao; Ding, Weixing; Xiao, Chijin; Liu, Wandong

    2017-09-01

    A system for electromagnetic measurements was designed and installed on the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) reversed field pinch device last year. Although the unique double-C structure of the KTX, which allows the machine to be opened easily without disassembling the poloidal field windings, makes the convenient replacement and modification of the internal inductive coils possible, it can present difficulties in the design of flux coils and magnetic probes at the two vertical gaps. Moreover, the KTX has a composite shell consisting of a 6 mm stainless steel vacuum chamber and a 1.5 mm copper shell, which results in limited space for the installation of saddle sensors. Therefore, the double-C structure and composite shell should be considered, especially during the design and installation of the electromagnetic diagnostic system (EDS). The inner surface of the vacuum vessel includes two types of probes. One type is for the measurement of the global plasma parameters, and the other type is for studying the local behavior of the plasma and operating the new saddle coils. In addition, the probes on the outer surface of the composite shell are used for measurements of eddy currents. Finally, saddle sensors for radial field measurements for feedback control were installed between the conducting shell and the vacuum vessel. The entire system includes approximately 1100 magnetic probes, 14 flux coils, 4 ×26 ×2 saddle sensors, and 16 Rogowski coils. Considering the large number of probes and limited space available in the vacuum vessel, the miniaturization of the probes and optimization of the probe distribution are necessary. In addition, accurate calibration and careful mounting of the probes are also required. The frequency response of the designed magnetic probes is up to 200 kHz, and the resolution is 1 G. The EDS, being spherical and of high precision, is one of the most basic and effective diagnostic tools of the KTX and meets the demands imposed by requirements on

  1. The CLAS12 Torus Detector Magnet at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luongo, Cesar [Jefferson Lab; Ballard, Joshua [Jefferson Lab; Biallas, George [Jefferson Lab; Elouadrhiri, Latifa [Jefferson Lab; Fair, Ruben [Jefferson Lab; Ghoshal, Probir [Jefferson Lab; Kashy, Dave [Jefferson Lab; Legg, Robert [Jefferson Lab; Pastor, Orlando [Jefferson Lab; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka [Jefferson Lab; Rode, Claus [Jefferson Lab; Wiseman, Mark [Jefferson Lab; Young, Glenn [Jefferson Lab; Elementi, Luciano [Fermilab; Krave, Steven [Fermilab; Makarov, Alexander [Fermilab; Nobrega, Fred [Fermilab; Velev, George [Fermilab

    2015-12-17

    The CLAS12 Torus is a toroidal superconducting magnet, which is part of the detector for the 12-GeV accelerator upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The coils were wound/fabricated by Fermilab, with JLab responsible for all other parts of the project scope, including design, integration, cryostating the individual coils, installation, cryogenics, I&C, etc. This paper provides an overview of the CLAS12 Torus magnet features and serves as a status report of its installation in the experimental hall. Completion and commissioning of the magnet is expected in 2016.

  2. Smooth invariant densities for random switching on the torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtin, Yuri; Hurth, Tobias; Lawley, Sean D.; Mattingly, Jonathan C.

    2018-04-01

    We consider a random dynamical system obtained by switching between the flows generated by two smooth vector fields on the 2d-torus, with the random switchings happening according to a Poisson process. Assuming that the driving vector fields are transversal to each other at all points of the torus and that each of them allows for a smooth invariant density and no periodic orbits, we prove that the switched system also has a smooth invariant density, for every switching rate. Our approach is based on an integration by parts formula inspired by techniques from Malliavin calculus.

  3. On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of On Approach: Jupiter and Io This sequence of images was taken on Jan. 8, 2007, with the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), while the spacecraft was about 81 million kilometers (about 50 million miles) from Jupiter. Jupiter's volcanic moon Io is to the right; the planet's Great Red Spot is also visible. The image was one of 11 taken during the Jan. 8 approach sequence, which signaled the opening of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter. Even in these early approach images, Jupiter shows different face than what previous visiting spacecraft -- such as Voyager 1, Galileo and Cassini -- have seen. Regions around the equator and in the southern tropical latitudes seem remarkably calm, even in the typically turbulent 'wake' behind the Great Red Spot. The New Horizons science team will scrutinize these major meteorological features -- including the unexpectedly calm regions -- to understand the diverse variety of dynamical processes on the solar system's largest planet. These include the newly formed Little Red Spot, the Great Red Spot and a variety of zonal features.

  4. IoT Architectural Framework: Connection and Integration Framework for IoT Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Uviase, Onoriode; Kotonya, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    The proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT) has since seen a growing interest in architectural design and adaptive frameworks to promote the connection between heterogeneous IoT devices and IoT systems. The most widely favoured software architecture in IoT is the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), which aims to provide a loosely coupled systems to leverage the use and reuse of IoT services at the middle-ware layer, to minimise system integration problems. However, despite the flexibil...

  5. EDGE TECHNOLOGIES IN IoT AND APPLICATION SCENARIO OF RFID BASED IoT

    OpenAIRE

    Dharam Gami *, Asst. Prof. Dhaval Nimavat, Asst. Prof. Shubham Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Internet of Things possesses the power to change the era. IoT will offer an advance connectivity between objects which will change the face of machine-to-machine communication. IoT will connect autonomous systems, devices and heterogeneous machines and make them communicate without human interactions. Many technologies will play significant role in IoT implementation. In this paper, we aim to describe the candidate of edge technologies in IoT and demonstrate how RFID based IoT system will loo...

  6. Understanding Information Hiding in iOS

    OpenAIRE

    Caviglione, Luca; Mazurczyk, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The Apple operating system (iOS) has so far proved resistant to information-hiding techniques, which help attackers covertly communicate. However, Siri - a native iOS service that controls iPhones and iPads via voice commands - could change this trend.

  7. Sesame IO Library User Manual Version 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhold, Hilary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Young, Ginger Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-15

    This document is a user manual for SES_IO, a low-level library for reading and writing sesame files. The purpose of the SES_IO library is to provide a simple user interface for accessing and creating sesame files that does not change across sesame format type (such as binary, ascii, and xml).

  8. Ground-Based Observattions of IO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, D. L.

    1986-06-01

    Io is the most geologically active of all the planets or satellites in the solar system. Most of what is known about it has been discovered in the past decade. This paper reviews recent advances in the knowledge of Io's surface, with emphasis placed on facts obtained using astronomical instruments on the ground and in Earth-orbit.

  9. Human‐Centric IoT Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Prasad, Ramjee; Pejanovic, Milica

    2017-01-01

    . This concept has also been introduced elsewhere as “human center sensing (HCS).” The vision pushed by the authors of this chapter for the IoT beyond 2050 is one of the large‐scale and dense HCS connectivities, the complexity of which can be used to extract new IoT value proposition....

  10. iOS app development for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Feiler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    If you've got incredible iOS ideas, get this book and bring them to life! iOS 7 represents the most significant update to Apple's mobile operating system since the first iPhone was released, and even the most seasoned app developers are looking for information on how to take advantage of the latest iOS 7 features in their app designs. That's where iOS App Development For Dummies comes in! Whether you're a programming hobbyist wanting to build an app for fun or a professional developer looking to expand into the iOS market, this book will walk you through the fundamentals of building a univer

  11. Sources of Na for the Io atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, D. S.; Ellis, Susan B.; Rice, A.; Epstein, S.

    1993-01-01

    The physics and geology of Io have been extensively studied, but there has been little discussion of the chemistry. Relatively little is known about Io chemistry, but there are constraints. Further, it will be a long time before improvements will result from direct observation, given the severe difficulties with the Galileo mission. Via laboratory simulation experiments, plausible thermochemical and photochemical processes which determine the nature and amounts of surface constituents of Io are explored. The well-known density of Io shows that the planet overall is rocky. Because the orbit of Io is well within the magnetosphere of Jupiter and because Io only has a thin, transient SO2 atmosphere, the surface is continually sputtered with magnetospheric ions. Complex processes ionize and accelerate the Io surface atoms to keV and MeV energies. Remarkably, only S, O, and Na ions were found by Voyager. Sputtering also produces an atomic cloud of Na and S (O not observable) with a trace of K. Both gaseous and solid SO2 are known from spectroscopic studies. A trace of H2S and possibly CO2 are present. Geologic features are interpreted in terms of elemental S, but there is no direct evidence for this constituent. We thus have a rocky planet which does not have rocks on the surface. Our general goal is to understand the cycling of Na, S, and O through the crust and atmosphere on present-day Io and to understand how Io evolved to this state. A specific objective was to determine the phases on the surface which are the source of the Na in the atmosphere of Io.

  12. Ion cyclotron instability at Io: Hybrid simulation results compared to in situ observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebek, Ondřej; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Walker, R. J.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 8 (2016), s. 7514-7534 ISSN 2169-9380 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Io * ionization processes * ion cyclotron waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022477/abstract

  13. A showcase of torus canards in neuronal bursters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Rapid action potential generation - spiking - and alternating intervals of spiking and quiescence - bursting - are two dynamic patterns commonly observed in neuronal activity. In computational models of neuronal systems, the transition from spiking to bursting often exhibits complex bifurcation structure. One type of transition involves the torus canard, which we show arises in a broad array of well-known computational neuronal models with three different classes of bursting dynamics: sub-Hopf/fold cycle bursting, circle/fold cycle bursting, and fold/fold cycle bursting. The essential features that these models share are multiple time scales leading naturally to decomposition into slow and fast systems, a saddle-node of periodic orbits in the fast system, and a torus bifurcation in the full system. We show that the transition from spiking to bursting in each model system is given by an explosion of torus canards. Based on these examples, as well as on emerging theory, we propose that torus canards are a common dynamic phenomenon separating the regimes of spiking and bursting activity. PMID:22657918

  14. Torus quotients of homogeneous spaces of the general linear group ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 119; Issue 1. Torus Quotients of Homogeneous Spaces of the General Linear Group and the Standard Representation of Certain Symmetric Groups. S S Kannan Pranab Sardar. Volume 119 Issue 1 February ...

  15. Atomic force microscopy of torus-bearing pit membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland R. Dute; Thomas Elder

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to compare the structures of dried, torus-bearing pit membranes from four woody species, three angiosperms and one gymnosperm. Tori of Osmanthus armatus are bipartite consisting of a pustular zone overlying parallel sets of microfibrils that form a peripheral corona. Microfibrils of the corona form radial spokes as they traverse the...

  16. Pele Plume Deposit on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The varied effects of Ionian volcanism can be seen in this false color infrared composite image of Io's trailing hemisphere. Low resolution color data from Galileo's first orbit (June, 1996) have been combined with a higher resolution clear filter picture taken on the third orbit (November, 1996) of the spacecraft around Jupiter.A diffuse ring of bright red material encircles Pele, the site of an ongoing, high velocity volcanic eruption. Pele's plume is nearly invisible, except in back-lit photographs, but its deposits indicate energetic ejection of sulfurous materials out to distances more than 600 kilometers from the central vent. Another bright red deposit lies adjacent to Marduk, also a currently active ediface. High temperature hot spots have been detected at both these locations, due to the eruption of molten material in lava flows or lava lakes. Bright red deposits on Io darken and disappear within years or decades of deposition, so the presence of bright red materials marks the sites of recent volcanism.This composite was created from data obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The region imaged is centered on 15 degrees South, 224 degrees West, and is almost 2400 kilometers across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 3 kilometers across. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the west.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  18. Results from the RACE [Ring ACceleration Experiment] Compact Torus Acceleration Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Kusse, B.

    1987-06-01

    RACE (Ring ACceleration Experiment) is a proof-of-principle experiment aimed at demonstrating acceleration of magnetically confined compact torus plasma rings to directed kinetic energies well in excess of their magnetic and thermal energies. In the course of the first year of operation the following have been observed: successful formation of rings in the RACE geometry; acceleration of rings with large forces, F/sub accelerate/ ∼F/sub equilibrium/ without apparent degradation of the ring structure; peak velocities of ≅2.5 x 10 8 cm/sec; acceleration efficiency of >30% at speeds of 1.5 x 10 8 cm/sec inferred from trajectory and capacitor bank data; kinetic to magnetic energy ratios ∼10 were observed. Experiments in the near future will be aimed at confirmation of the mass/energy measurements by calorimetry and direct density measurements

  19. Particle orbits in a force-balanced, wave-driven, rotating torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, I. E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-09-01

    A wave-driven rotating torus is a recently proposed fusion concept where the rotational transform is provided by the E × B drift resulting from a minor radial electric field. This field can be produced, for instance, by the RF-wave-mediated extraction of fusion-born alpha particles. In this paper, we discuss how macroscopic force balance, i.e., balance of the thermal hoop force, can be achieved in such a device. We show that this requires the inclusion of a small plasma current and vertical magnetic field and identify the desirable reactor regime through free energy considerations. We then analyze particle orbits in this desirable regime, identifying velocity-space anisotropies in trapped (banana) orbits, resulting from the cancellation of rotational transforms due to the radial electric and poloidal magnetic fields. The potential neoclassical effects of these orbits on the perpendicular conductivity, current drive, and transport are discussed.

  20. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; D. Liu; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-03-25

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (I{sub p} {approx} 0.5 MA) and electron density (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented.

  1. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  2. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.Y., E-mail: brbbebbero@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Y.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H{sub 2}/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H{sub 2} GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10{sup −5} Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  3. Operation and reliability of a pneumatic hydrogen pellet injection system on the Joint European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Jernigan, T.C.; Baylor, L.R.; Milora, S.L.; Foust, C.R.; Kupschus, P.; Gadeberg, M.; Bailey, W.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon

    1989-01-01

    A pneumatic-based, hydrogen isotope pellet injector that was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the plasma fueling application on the Joint European Torus (JET) was described at the last Symposium on Fusion Engineering (1987). The injector was installed on JET during 1987 and has since been used in plasma fueling experiments. The injector consists of three independent machine-gun-like mechanisms (nominal pellet sizes of 2.7, 4.0, and 6.0 mm in diameter), and it features repetitive operation (1-5 Hz) for quasi-steady-state conditions (>10 s). An extensive set of injector diagnostics permits evaluation of parameters for each pellet shot, including speed, mass, and integrity. Pellet speeds can be varied but typically range from 1.0 to 1.5 km/s. Over 5000 pellets have been fired with the equipment at JET, including about 2000 pellets shot for plasma fueling experiments. In recent experiments, the system performance has been outstanding, including excellent reproducibility in pellet speed and mass and a reliability of >98% in delivery of pellets to the plasma. 7 refs., 5 figs

  4. Human‐Centric IoT Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Prasad, Ramjee; Pejanovic, Milica

    2017-01-01

    The current Internet of things (IoT) concept is characterized with billions and billions of devices interworking through a myriad of technologies for the delivery of smart personalized services and applications. At the center of these is the human user who drives his/her own interconnected cluster....... This concept has also been introduced elsewhere as “human center sensing (HCS).” The vision pushed by the authors of this chapter for the IoT beyond 2050 is one of the large‐scale and dense HCS connectivities, the complexity of which can be used to extract new IoT value proposition....

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  7. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http

  8. Structure and motion of edge turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, S. J.; Maqueda, R. J.; Terry, J. L.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D.; Russell, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; LeBlanc, B.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D. P.; Williams, K. M.; Bush, C. E.; Maingi, R.; Grulke, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; White, A. E.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we compare the structure and motion of edge turbulence observed in L-mode vs. H-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A335 (2003)]. The radial and poloidal correlation lengths are not significantly different between the L-mode and the H-mode in the cases examined. The poloidal velocity fluctuations are lower and the radial profiles of the poloidal turbulence velocity are somewhat flatter in the H-mode compared with the L-mode plasmas. These results are compared with similar measurements Alcator C-Mod [E. Marmar, B. Bai, R. L. Boivin et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1610 (2003)], and with theoretical models.

  9. Perception Management: A Core IO Capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaman, Khyber

    2007-01-01

    This thesis postulates that in today's media environment, with adversaries skillfully using propaganda to skirt nations' resolve, Perception Management is key to military success and should be an Information Operations (IO) Core Capability...

  10. IoT Contextual Factors on Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Konstantinos; Caridakis, George

    2017-01-01

    With the emergence of the Internet of Things, new services in healthcare will be available and existing systems will be integrated in the IoT framework, providing automated medical supervision and efficient medical treatment. Context awareness plays a critical role in realizing the vision of the IoT, providing rich contextual information that can help the system act more efficiently. Since context in healthcare has its unique characteristics, it is necessary to define an appropriate context aware framework for healthcare IoT applications. We identify this context as perceived in healthcare applications and describe the context aware procedures. We also present an architecture that connects the sensors that measure biometric data with the sensory networks of the environment and the various IoT middleware that reside in the geographical area. Finally, we discuss the challenges for the realization of this vision.

  11. Two Word CAMAC I/O module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    This note describes the 2 Word I/O subsystem and details its operating characteristics. SLAC drawings in the 926-306 series support this device and should be referenced for construction and connection details

  12. Characteristics of axisymmetric viscous incompressible flow passing a torus rotating about its centerline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pairin Suwannasri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present numerically investigates the axisymmetric flow past a rotating torus in a viscous incompressible fluid. The surface of the torus rotates with constant velocity around its centerline. A numerical model has been developed for the governing equation in the toroidal coordinate system. The rotating boundary of a torus generates inertia in the surrounding fluid. There are two interesting regimes. In one of them, a rotation of torus surface generates a toroidal fluid region which envelopes the torus. In another one a rotation of torus surface generates the jet of fluid expelled from the hole downward. We focus on the hydrodynamics of a torus effected by a rotational rate ( and the aspect ratios (Ar. The numerical simulations are performed for three aspect ratios, Ar = 2, 3 and 5, where Ar is defined as ratio of torus radius (b to cross-section radius of torus (a and the range of rotational rate    4.0 2.0,  where  is defined as ratio of tangential tank-treading motion of torus surface to the uniform far-field velocity.

  13. Global Geologic Mapping of Io: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Crown, D. A.; Geissler, P. E.; Schenk, P. M.; Yff, Jessica; Jaeger, W. L.; Rathbun, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    A new global geologic map of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io is being prepared, with the focus being on completion of a draft map by July 2008. Here initial results of the mapping are reported: a preliminary distribution of material units in terms of areas and a visual representation. Additionally, the mapping hopes to address some of the problems in Io geology. Thus far it has been discovered that Io's surface is dominated by plains material, thought to consist of Io's silicate crust covered by pyroclastic deposits and lava flows of silicate and sulfur-bearing composition. Many plains areas contain flow fields that cannot be mapped separately due to a lack of resolution or modification by alteration processes. Discrete lava flows and flow fields are the next most abundant unit, with bright (sulfur?) flows in greater abundance than dark (silicate?) flows. The source of most of Io's heat flow, the paterae, are the least abundant unit in terms of areal extent.Upon completion of the draft map for peer review, it will be used to investigate several specific questions about the geological evolution of Io that previously could not be well addressed, including: comparison of the areas versus the heights of Ionian mountains to assess their stability and evolution; correlation and comparison of Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer hot spot locations with the mapped location of dark versus bright lava flows and patera floors to assess any variations in the types of sources for Io's active volcanism; and the creation of a global inventory of the areal coverage of dark and bright laval flows to assess the relative importance of sulfur versus silicate volcanism in resurfacing Io, and to assess whether there are regional concentrations of either style of volcanism that may have implications on interior processes.

  14. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a uniform hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into core fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER and NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). Unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection is similar to compact toroid injection but with much higher plasma density and total mass, and consequently lower required injection velocit...

  15. Recent results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingi, R; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Bialek, J; Bourdelle, C; Bush, C E; Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gates, D A; Gilmore, M; Gray, T; Jarboe, T R; Johnson, D W; Kaita, R; Kaye, S M; Kubota, S; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R J; Mastrovito, D; Medley, S S; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Nelson, B A; Ono, M; Paoletti, F; Park, H K; Paul, S F; Peebles, T; Peng, Y-K M; Phillips, C K; Raman, R; Rosenberg, A L; Roquemore, A L; Ryan, P M; Sabbagh, S A; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Stutman, D; Swain, D W; Synakowski, E J; Taylor, G; Wilgen, J; Wilson, J R; Wurden, G A; Zweben, S J

    2003-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect-ratio fusion research facility whose research goal is to make a determination of the attractiveness of the spherical torus concept in the areas of high-β stability, confinement, current drive, and divertor physics. Remarkable progress was made in extending the operational regime of the device in FY 2002. In brief, β t of 34% and β N of 6.5 were achieved. H-mode became the main operational regime, and energy confinement exceeded conventional aspect-ratio tokamak scalings. Heating was demonstrated with the radiofrequency antenna, and signatures of current drive were observed. Current initiation with coaxial helicity injection produced discharges of 400 kA, and first measurements of divertor heat flux profiles in H-mode were made

  16. BPS States, Torus Links and Wild Character Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Duiliu-Emanuel; Donagi, Ron; Pantev, Tony

    2018-02-01

    A string theoretic framework is constructed relating the cohomology of wild character varieties to refined stable pair theory and torus link invariants. Explicit conjectural formulas are derived for wild character varieties with a unique irregular point on the projective line. For this case, this leads to a conjectural colored generalization of existing results of Hausel, Mereb and Wong as well as Shende, Treumann and Zaslow.

  17. Torus quotients of homogeneous spaces of the general linear group ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: kannan@cmi.ac.in; pranab@cmi.ac.in. Dedicated to Professor C De Concini on the occasion of his 60th birthday. MS received 28 August 2007; revised 28 December 2007. Abstract. We give a stratification of the GIT quotient of the Grassmannian G2,n modulo the normaliser of a maximal torus of SLn(k) with respect ...

  18. Twin-Peak QPOs from Oscillating Torus with Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramkova, Eva

    2017-08-01

    We propose a model of HF twin-peak quasi-periodic oscillations assuming an oscillating torus with cusp that changes location of its centre around radii very close to innermost stable circular orbit. The observed variability is assigned to global modes of accreted fluid motion that may give rise to strong modulation of both the accretion disc radiation and the accretion rate. We illustrate that predictions of the model well match observational data for a dozen of sources.

  19. Macroscopic stability and β limits in the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.B.; Hedrick, C.L.

    1977-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic stability limits are determined for the ELMO Bumpy Torus. The relativistic hot electron annuli are considered to be rigid, modifying the magnetic field but not interacting with the instability. A modified energy principle is used, and the stability problem is reduced to determination of the eigenvalues of an ordinary differential equation along each field line. A threshold hot electron current is required for stability; its value agrees with experimental measurements. The calculations show that stable high β equilibria are easily created

  20. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume II. Toroidal vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Toroidal Vessel provides the vacuum enclosure for containing the high temperature steady state plasma. In addition, the Toroidal Vessel must provide several viewing ports for plasma diagnostics, vacuum pumping ports for both high vacuum and roughing vacuum, feed-through ports for ECRH waveguides, limiter feed throughs for cooling and supporting the limiters, and ports for ion gages. The vessel must operate in an intense environment comprised of x-rays, microwaves, magnetic fields and plasma heat loads as well as the atmosphere pressure and gravity loads and the internal thermal stress loads due to heating and cooling of the torus. A key issue addressed was the choice of vacuum vessel seal and wall materials. In addition, during the course of the study, ORNL requested that horsecollar diagnostic ports be incorporated in the design. A comprehensive trade study was performed considering the vessel material issues in concert with the impact of the horsecollar port design. A change in baseline from an aluminum vessel with elastomer seals and circular diagnostic ports to austenitic stainless steel vessel with metal seals and horsecollar ports was agreed upon by both MDAC and ORNL towards the end of Title I

  1. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Kolesnikov, R A; LeBlance, B P; Rewolldt, G; Wang, W X

    2010-04-07

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-Neo [W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)], which has been updated to handle impurities. __________________________________________________

  2. Observations of toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostek, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The macroscopic rotation of plasma in a toroidal containment device is an important feature of the equilibrium. Toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II is measured experimentally by examining the Doppler shift of the 4685.75 A He II line emitted from the plasma. The toroidal flow at an average velocity of 1.6 x 10 6 cm/sec, a small fraction of the ion thermal speed, moves in the same direction as the toroidal plasma current. The poloidal flow follows the ion diamagnetic current direction, also at an average speed of 1.6 x 10 6 cm/sec. In view of certain ordering parameters, the toroidal flow is compared with predictions from neoclassical theory in the collosional, Pfirsch-Schluter regime. The poloidal motion, however results from an E x B drift in a positive radial electric field, approaching a stable ambipolar state. This radial electric field is determined from theory by using the measured poloidal velocity. Mechanisms for the time evolution of rotation are also examined. It appears that the circulation damping is governed by a global decay of the temperature and density gradients which, in turn, may be functions of radiative cooling, loss of equilibrium due to external field decay, or the emergence of a growing instability, occasionally observed in CO 2 interferometry measurements

  3. Tomography of a simply magnetized toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, BARNI; Stefano, CALDIROLA; Luca, FATTORINI; Claudia, RICCARDI

    2018-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is a passive diagnostic technique, which does not perturb the plasma state. In particular, in a hydrogen plasma, Balmer-alpha (H α ) emission can be easily measured in the visible range along a line of sight from outside the plasma vessel. Other emission lines in the visible spectral range from hydrogen atoms and molecules can be exploited too, in order to gather complementary pieces of information on the plasma state. Tomography allows us to capture bi-dimensional structures. We propose to adopt an emission spectroscopy tomography for studying the transverse profiles of magnetized plasmas when Abel inversion is not exploitable. An experimental campaign was carried out at the Thorello device, a simple magnetized torus. The characteristics of the profile extraction method, which we implemented for this purpose are discussed, together with a few results concerning the plasma profiles in a simply magnetized torus configuration.

  4. 76 FR 50152 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines (L)O-360, (L)IO-360, AEIO-360, O-540, IO-540, AEIO-540...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ...)O-360, (L)IO-360, AEIO-360, O-540, IO-540, AEIO-540, (L)TIO-540, IO-580, and IO-720 Series... 2006-20-09, Amendment 39-14778 (71 FR 57407, September 29, 2006), for Lycoming Engines (L)O-360, (L)IO-360, AEIO-360, O-540, IO-540, AEIO-540, (L)TIO-540, IO-580, and IO-720 series reciprocating engines...

  5. Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the H.I.T. teststand and the JFT-2M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuramoto, Keiji; Ageishi, Masaya; Nagata, Masayoshi; Uyama, Tadao; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Kasai, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Shibata, Takatoshi

    1997-11-01

    A spheromak-type compact torus (CT) acceleration and injection experiment has been carried out using the Himeji Institute of Technology Compact Torus Injector (HIT-CTI). We investigate the possibility of refueling, density control, current drive, and edge electric field control of tokamak plasmas by means of CT injection. The HIT-CTI produces a CT with a speed of 200 km/s and a density of 1× 10^21m-3. We have constructed new electrodes and power supplies, and will install the HIT-CTI on the JFT-2M tokamak at JAERI in Autumn 1997. The outer electrode serves as a common ground for both the formation bank (144μF, 20kV) and the acceleration bank (92.4μF, 40kV). If the external toroidal field of the tokamak is applied across the CT acceleration region, the CT kinetic energy might decrease during penetration into the field lines joining the inner and outer electrode. This could result in the CT not being able to reach the core of the tokamak plasma. Determining the optimum position of the inner electrode is one of the near term goals of this research. We will present magnetic probe, He-Ne interferometer and fast framing camera data from experiments at H.I.T., where a CT was accelerated into a transverse field. We will also present initial results from the operation of the HIT-CTI on the JFT-2M tokamak.

  6. There is no I/O like no I/O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, T.Y.

    1985-01-01

    On most computer systems the most common cause of performance degradation is I/O contention. This paper will examine some efforts that can be taken in a VM environment to reduce I/O or its effect at both the global and local levels

  7. AP-IO: asynchronous pipeline I/O for hiding periodic output cost in CFD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoguang, Ren; Xinhai, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation often needs to periodically output intermediate results to files in the form of snapshots for visualization or restart, which seriously impacts the performance. In this paper, we present asynchronous pipeline I/O (AP-IO) optimization scheme for the periodically snapshot output on the basis of asynchronous I/O and CFD application characteristics. In AP-IO, dedicated background I/O processes or threads are in charge of handling the file write in pipeline mode, therefore the write overhead can be hidden with more calculation than classic asynchronous I/O. We design the framework of AP-IO and implement it in OpenFOAM, providing CFD users with a user-friendly interface. Experimental results on the Tianhe-2 supercomputer demonstrate that AP-IO can achieve a good optimization effect for the periodical snapshot output in CFD application, and the effect is especially better for massively parallel CFD simulations, which can reduce the total execution time up to about 40%.

  8. Status and future prospects of the spherical torus research. Exploratory Spherical Torus experiments. Approach from the Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.

    2000-01-01

    The optimistic predictions for the Spherical Torus (Spherical Tokamak) have been verified in a range of small devices world-wide. Although some equilibrium features (e.g. the naturally large elongation) were fully expected, the ST appears to have substantially improved energy confinement, beta exceeding the Troyon scaling, and a resilience to the major disruption. These exploratory experiments have produced great interest in the ST concept. (author)

  9. Reverberation Mapping the Dusty Torus in Active Galactic Nuclei: the Influence of Torus Geometry and Structure on the Measured Reverberation Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeyda, Triana

    2018-01-01

    The obscuring circumnuclear dusty torus is a cornerstone of AGN unification, yet its shape, composition, and structure have not been well constrained. Infrared (IR) interferometry can partially resolve the dust structures in nearby AGN. However, the size and structure of the torus can also be investigated at all redshifts by reverberation mapping, that is, analyzing the temporal variability of the torus dust emission in response to changes in the AGN luminosity. In simple models, the lag between the AGN optical continuum variations and the torus IR response is directly related to the effective size of the emitting region. However, the IR response is sensitive to many poorly constrained variables including the geometry and illumination of the torus, which complicates the interpretation of measured reverberation lags. I will present results from the first comprehensive analysis of the multi-wavelength IR torus response, showing how various structural and geometrical torus parameters influence the measured lag. A library of torus response functions has been computed using a new code, TORMAC, which simulates the temporal response of the IR emission of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds given an input optical light curve. TORMAC accounts for anisotropic emission from the dust clouds, inter-cloud and AGN-cloud shadowing, and anisotropic illumination of the torus by the AGN continuum source. We can use the model grid to quantify the relationship between the lag and the effective size of the torus for various torus parameters at any selected wavelength. Although the shapes of the response functions vary widely over our grid parameter range, the reverberation lag provides an estimate of the effective torus radius that is always within a factor of 2.5. TORMAC can also be used to model observed IR light curves; we present preliminary simulations for the “changing-look” Seyfert galaxy, NGC 6418, which exhibited large IR variability during a recent Spitzer monitoring campaign

  10. iOS app development portable genius

    CERN Document Server

    Wentk, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The essential skills and technologies needed for iOS development in one handy guide! The unprecedented popularity of iOS devices, such as the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, has led to a development boom. If you’re eager to become part of the action, then this is the book for you! Packed with must-have information on iOS development, this handy guide covers Objective-C, Xcode, Frameworks, and sound design principles and explains how to upload an app to the app store and integrate apps with the latest advances that Apple offers developers. The featured tips and tricks will get you up and ru

  11. IoTFLiP: IoT-based flipped learning platform for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqbool Ali

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Case-Based Learning (CBL has become an effective pedagogy for student-centered learning in medical education, which is founded on persistent patient cases. Flippped learning and Internet of Things (IoTs concepts have gained significant attention in recent years. Using these concepts in conjunction with CBL can improve learning ability by providing real evolutionary medical cases. It also enables students to build confidence in their decision making, and efficiently enhances teamwork in the learing environment. We propose an IoT-based Flip Learning Platform, called IoTFLiP, where an IoT infrastructure is exploited to support flipped case-based learning in a cloud environment with state of the art security and privacy measures for personalized medical data. It also provides support for application delivery in private, public, and hybrid approaches. The proposed platform is an extension of our Interactive Case-Based Flipped Learning Tool (ICBFLT, which has been developed based on current CBL practices. ICBFLT formulates summaries of CBL cases through synergy between students' and medical expert knowledge. The low cost and reduced size of sensor device, support of IoTs, and recent flipped learning advancements can enhance medical students' academic and practical experiences. In order to demonstrate a working scenario for the proposed IoTFLiP platform, real-time data from IoTs gadgets is collected to generate a real-world case for a medical student using ICBFLT.

  12. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  13. Testing of new Torus shaped vacuum vessel of Aditya upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K.A.; Patel, K.M.; Bhatt, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    The Aditya upgrade tokamak has been configured for divertor operation by changing old toroidal vacuum vessel of rectangular cross section to a toroidal vacuum vessel of circular cross section. The new toroidal vacuum vessel with circular cross section has been designed by the Aditya Upgrade team in the Institute for Plasma Research and has been successfully fabricated by M/s Godrej and Boyce Mfg. Co. Ltd., Mumbai. The new vessel is designed to accommodate more number of diagnostics and hence has total 112 number of large and small circular and non-circular port openings compared to 48 ports in old vessel. More number of weld joints and demountable joints like wire seal, CF gasket in the newly fabricated vessel made the fabrication job highly challenging in terms of a state of art complete leak-proof vacuum system. The new vacuum vessel is designed to achieve ultimate vacuum ∼1 X 10 -9 mbar. To achieve this, the system must be leak proof and having low out-gassing. In this paper, we present the technical details of all the tests carried out on Aditya upgrade torus vacuum vessel to ascertain its suitability for the plasma experiments

  14. The confinement of dilute populations of beam ions in the national spherical torus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Miah, M.; Darrow, D.; Le Blanc, B.; Medley, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Cecil, F.E.

    2003-01-01

    Short ∼3 ms pulses of 80 keV deuterium neutrals are injected at three different tangency radii into the national spherical torus experiment. The confinement is studied as a function of tangency radius, plasma current (between 0.4 and 1.0 MA), and toroidal field (between 2.5 and 5.0 kG). The jump in neutron emission during the pulse is used to infer prompt losses of beam ions. In the absence of MHD, the neutron data show the expected dependences on beam angle and plasma current; the average jump in the neutron signal is 88±39% of the expected jump. The decay of the neutron and neutral particle signals following the blip are compared to the expected classical deceleration to detect losses on a 10 ms timescale. The temporal evolution of these signals are consistent with Coulomb scattering rates, implying an effective beam-ion confinement time > or ∼ 100 ms. The confinement is insensitive to the toroidal field despite large values of ρ∇B/B < or ∼(0.25), so any effects of non-conservation of the adiabatic invariant μ are smaller than the experimental error. (author)

  15. Professional iOS database application programming

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Updated and revised coverage that includes the latest versions of iOS and Xcode Whether you're a novice or experienced developer, you will want to dive into this updated resource on database application programming for the iPhone and iPad. Packed with more than 50 percent new and revised material - including completely rebuilt code, screenshots, and full coverage of new features pertaining to database programming and enterprise integration in iOS 6 - this must-have book intends to continue the precedent set by the previous edition by helping thousands of developers master database

  16. Grabens on Io: Evidence for Extensional Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, T.; Schenk, P.

    2012-12-01

    Io may well be the most geologically active body in the solar system. A variety of volcanic features have been identified, including a few fissure eruptions, but tectonism is generally assumed to be limited to compression driven mountain formation (Schenk et al., 2001). A wide range of structural features can also be identified including scarps, lineaments, faults, and circular depressions (pits and patera rims). Narrow curvilinear graben (elongated, relatively depressed crustal unit or block that is bounded by faults on its sides) are also scattered across Io's volcanic plains. These features are dwarfed by the more prominent neighboring volcanoes and mountains, and have been largely ignored in the literature. Although they are likely to be extensional in origin, their relationship to local or global stress fields is unknown. We have mapped the locations, length and width of graben on Io using all available Voyager and Galileo images with a resolution better than 5 km. We compare the locations of graben with existing volcanic centers, paterae and mountain data to determine the degree of correlation between these geologic features and major topographic variations (basins/swells) in our global topographic map of Io (White et al., 2011). Graben are best observed in > 1-2 km low-sun angle images. Approximately 300 images were converted from ISIS to ArcMap format to allow easy comparison with the geological map of Io (Williams et al., 2012) along with previous higher resolution structural mapping of local areas (e.g. Crown et al., 1992). We have located >45 graben to date. Typically 1-3 kilometers across, some of these features can stretch for over 500 kilometers in length. Their formation may be related to global tidal stresses or local deformation. Io's orbit is eccentric and its solid surface experiences daily tides of up to ˜0.1 km, leading to repetitive surface strains of 10-4 or greater. These tides flex and stress the lithosphere and can cause it to fracture

  17. Modular HPC I/O characterization with Darshan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Shane; Carns, Philip; Harms, Kevin; Ross, Robert; Lockwood, Glenn K.; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-13

    Contemporary high-performance computing (HPC) applications encompass a broad range of distinct I/O strategies and are often executed on a number of different compute platforms in their lifetime. These large-scale HPC platforms employ increasingly complex I/O subsystems to provide a suitable level of I/O performance to applications. Tuning I/O workloads for such a system is nontrivial, and the results generally are not portable to other HPC systems. I/O profiling tools can help to address this challenge, but most existing tools only instrument specific components within the I/O subsystem that provide a limited perspective on I/O performance. The increasing diversity of scientific applications and computing platforms calls for greater flexibililty and scope in I/O characterization.

  18. Turbomolecular pump vacuum system for the Princeton Large Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1977-10-01

    A turbomolecular pump vacuum system has been designed and installed on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT). Four vertical shaft, oil-bearing, 1500 l/s turbomolecular pumps have been interfaced to the 6400 liter PLT Vacuum vessel to provide a net pumping speed of 3000 l/s for H 2 . The particular requirements and problems of tokamak vacuum systems are enumerated. A vacuum control system is described which protects the vacuum vessel from contamination, and protects the turbomolecular pumps from damage under a variety of possible failure modes. The performance of the vacuum system is presented in terms of pumping speed measurements and residual gas behavior

  19. The torus parametrization of quasiperiodic LI-classes

    CERN Document Server

    Baake, M; Pleasants, P A B

    2002-01-01

    The torus parametrization of quasiperiodic local isomorphism classes is introduced and used to determine the number of elements in such a class with special symmetries or inflation properties. The method is explained in an illustrative fashion for some widely used tiling classes with golden mean rescaling, namely for the Fibonacci chain (1D), the triangle and Penrose patterns (2D) and for Kramer's and Danzer's icosahedral tilings (3D). We obtain a rather complete picture of the orbit structure within these classes, but discuss also various general results.

  20. Punctured torus groups and 2-bridge knot groups

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyoshi, Hirotaka; Wada, Masaaki; Yamashita, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    This monograph is Part 1 of a book project intended to give a full account of Jorgensen's theory of punctured torus Kleinian groups and its generalization, with application to knot theory. Although Jorgensen's original work was not published in complete form, it has been a source of inspiration. In particular, it has motivated and guided Thurston's revolutionary study of low-dimensional geometric topology. In this monograph, we give an elementary and self-contained description of Jorgensen's theory with a complete proof. Through various informative illustrations, readers are naturally led to an intuitive, synthetic grasp of the theory, which clarifies how a very simple fuchsian group evolves into complicated Kleinian groups.

  1. Intervascular pit membranes with a torus in the wood of Ulmus (Ulmaceae) and related genera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.; Choat, B.; Vinckier, S.; Lens, F.; Schols, P.; Smets, E.

    2004-01-01

    • The distribution of intervascular pit membranes with a torus was investigated in juvenile wood samples of 19 species of Ulmus and seven related genera. • A staining solution of safranin and alcian blue (35 : 65) was recommended to distinguish torus-bearing pit membranes using light microscopy. •

  2. Certain approximation problems for functions on the infinite-dimensional torus: Lipschitz spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, S. S.

    2018-02-01

    We consider some questions about the approximation of functions on the infinite-dimensional torus by trigonometric polynomials. Our main results are analogues of the direct and inverse theorems in the classical theory of approximation of periodic functions and a description of the Lipschitz spaces on the infinite-dimensional torus in terms of the best approximation.

  3. IoT for Smart City Services: Lifecycle Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hefnawy , Ahmed; Bouras , Abdelaziz; Cherifi , Chantal

    2016-01-01

    International audience; " Internet of Things " (IoT) and " Smart City " are widely recognized to address the complexity of modern city operation. Concentration of population, scarcity of resources and environmental concerns are the main challenges that face city operators, and make ordinary service provisioning less efficient. In city environment, IoT sensors can be sources of real-time data; and, IoT actuators can execute real-time actions in the physical domain. IoT systems range from domai...

  4. Synthesizing Knowledge on Internet of Things (IoT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    2016-01-01

    Research on Internet of Things (IoT) has been booming for past couple of years due to technological advances and its potential for application. Nonetheless, the rapid growth of IoT articles as well as the heterogeneous nature of IoT pose challenges in synthesizing prior research on the phenomenon...

  5. AntibIoTic: Protecting IoT Devices Against DDoS Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Donno, Michele; Dragoni, Nicola; Giaretta, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    The 2016 is remembered as the year that showed to the world how dangerous Distributed Denial of Service attacks can be. Gauge of the disruptiveness of DDoS attacks is the number of bots involved: the bigger the botnet, the more powerful the attack. This character, along with the increasing availa...... availability of connected and insecure IoT devices, makes DDoS and IoT the perfect pair for the malware industry. In this paper we present the main idea behind AntibIoTic, a palliative solution to prevent DDoS attacks perpetrated through IoT devices.......The 2016 is remembered as the year that showed to the world how dangerous Distributed Denial of Service attacks can be. Gauge of the disruptiveness of DDoS attacks is the number of bots involved: the bigger the botnet, the more powerful the attack. This character, along with the increasing...

  6. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through the plume and is

  7. Fabricating of full denture acrylic protheses with palatine torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Hariyati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Full denture acrylic protheses can substitute all maxillary or mandibulary teeth naturally. The objective of fabricating full denture protheses is to substitute the tissue lost that was occupied by teeth or connective tissue before ward. This is a case of a 43 year old female with lost of all her upper and lower teeth. At the maxilla there is a palatine torus spreading along the midline with 25 mm length, 10 mm width and 6mm height. She has never worn prothese before. The process of full denture protheses fabrication were carried out in several steps, starting from making anatomical impression  to get study model, making of individual stock tray, making functional impression to get working model, choosing the design, making of midline, making of bite rim, inserting the model on articulator, preparing artificial teeth arrangement, fitting the wax, countoring wax, flasking, boiling out, packing, curing, deflasking, finishing, polishing and inserting the protheses. The process of this full denture protheses fabrication used tin foil as reducer to prevent overpressure of the tissue around the thin torus area so the prothesis will be more comfortable for the patient. The result was the protheses can be used by the patient, nicely and comfortably.

  8. Jet and torus orientations in high redshift radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouart, G.; De Breuck, C.; Vernet, J.; Laing, R. A.; Seymour, N.; Stern, D.; Haas, M.; Pier, E. A.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the relative orientation of radio jets and dusty tori surrounding the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in powerful radio galaxies at z > 1. The radio core dominance R = Pcore^20 GHz/P_extended^500 MHz serves as an orientation indicator, measuring the ratio between the anisotropic Doppler-beamed core emission and the isotropic lobe emission. Assuming a fixed cylindrical geometry for the hot, dusty torus, we derive its inclination i by fitting optically-thick radiative transfer models to spectral energy distributions obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find a highly significant anti-correlation (p < 0.0001) between R and i in our sample of 35 type 2 AGN combined with a sample of 18 z ~ 1 3CR sources containing both type 1 and 2 AGN. This analysis provides observational evidence both for the Unified scheme of AGN and for the common assumption that radio jets are in general perpendicular to the plane of the torus. The use of inclinations derived from mid-infrared photometry breaks several degeneracies which have been problematic in earlier analyses. We illustrate this by deriving the core Lorentz factor Γ from the R-i anti-correlation, finding Γ ≳ 1.3. Figures 11, 12, and Tables 1, 2, 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  10. Zabezpečení platformy iOS

    OpenAIRE

    Nidl, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis is focused on security of operating system iOS from Apple. The thesis is divided into six chapters. The first chapter describes iOS and Apple company. The second chapter deals with iOS security architecture in terms of security model and security mechanisms. The third chapter deals with the security of iOS applications and options of their testing. The fourth chapter describes software attacks against iOS in the form of malware and exploitation. The fifth chapter descri...

  11. Structure Formation in Complex Plasma - Quantum Effects in Cryogenic Complex Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    particle moves upward against gravity. Dust particles form a fat torus structure in a complex plasma with a magnetic field. The toroidal axis is...perpendicular to the magnetic field. The dust particles rotate both in the toroidal and the poloidal directions. Under a certain value of the magnetic

  12. Magnetic translation groups in an n-dimensional torus and their representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    A charged particle in a uniform magnetic field in a two-dimensional torus has a discrete noncommutative translation symmetry instead of a continuous commutative translation symmetry. We study topology and symmetry of a particle in a magnetic field in a torus of arbitrary dimensions. The magnetic translation group (MTG) is defined as a group of translations that leave the gauge field invariant. We show that the MTG in an n-dimensional torus is isomorphic to a central extension of a cyclic group Z ν 1 x···xZ ν 2l xT m by U(1) with 2l+m=n. We construct and classify irreducible unitary representations of the MTG in a three-torus and apply the representation theory to three examples. We briefly describe a representation theory for a general n-torus. The MTG in an n-torus can be regarded as a generalization of the so-called noncommutative torus

  13. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  14. L-H Mode Transitions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.M. Kaye; C.E. Bush; E. Fredrickson; B. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; S.A. Sabbagh

    2003-07-24

    Edge data from plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. Kaye et al., Fusion Technology 36 (1999) 16] have been compared to theories of transport suppression that have been used to develop a physics framework for low-confinement (L) to high-confinement (H) mode transitions. The NSTX data were obtained in low aspect ratio (R/a approximately equal to 1.3) discharges taken from a variety of discharge phases, including L-modes, L-H transitions, and H-modes with and without edge localized modes (ELMs). The comparisons show that the group of points taken just before the L-H mode transition are well mixed with the purely L-mode group to within the measurement uncertainties, indicating that changes in these parameters leading up to the transition are subtle. One of the theory parameters, alpha{sub MHD} = -R{sub q}{sup 2}dbeta{sub t/dr}, does show a clear threshold alpha{sub MHD} = 1 to 2 between the H-mode grouping of points and those remaining in the L-mode or taken just prior to the transition. Additionally, there is no evidence for an edge temperature threshold necessary for transitioning into the H-mode. NSTX data indicate further a possible connection between L-H transitions and non-ambipolar beam ion losses.

  15. Design of a repeating pneumatic pellet injector for the Joint European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Sparks, D.O.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    A three-barrel pneumatic pellet injector has been developed for plasma fueling of the Joint European Torus (JET). The versatile device consists of three independent machine-gun-like mechanisms that operate at cryogenic temperatures (14 0 K to 20 0 K). Individual high speed extruders provide a continuous supply of solid deuterium to each gun assembly, where a reciprocating breech-side cutting mechanism forms and chambers cylindrical pellets from the extrusion; deuterium pellets are then accelerated in the gun barrels with controlled amounts of compressed hydrogen gas (pressures up to 100 bars) to velocities ≤ 1.5 km/s. The injector features three nominal pellet sizes (2.7 mm, 4.0 mm, and 6.0 mm) and has been tested at repetition rates of 5 Hz, 2.5 Hz, and 1 Hz, respectively. Each gun is capable of operating (individually or simultaneously) at the design repetition rate for 15-second duration pulses (limited only by the capacity of the extruder feed system). A remote, stand-alone control and data acquisition system is used for injector operation. 7 refs

  16. High frequency fast wave results from the CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) is the first spherical torus (ST) to investigate radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive. To address the concern that large magnetic field line pitch at the outboard midplane of ST's could inhibit successful coupling to the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW), a rotatable, two strap antenna was installed on CDX-U. Parasitic loading and impurity generation were discovered to be weak and nearly independent of antenna phasing and angle over a wide range, and fast wave electron heating has been observed. Plasma densities up to about 10 12 cm -3 were obtained with noninductive startup solely with HHFW. New ST diagnostics under development on CDX-U include a multilayer mirror (MLM) detector to measure ultrasoft X-rays, a twelve spatial point Thomson scattering (TS) system, and an Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) system for both electron heating and electron temperature measurements. Preliminary experiments with a boron low velocity edge micropellet injector have also been performed, and further studies of its effectiveness for impurity control will be conducted with a variety of spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics on CDX-U. (author)

  17. Disruptions, disruptivity and safer operating windows in the high-β spherical torus NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Gates, D.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Tritz, K.; Yuh, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses disruption rates, disruption causes and disruptivity statistics in the high-β N National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557). While the overall disruption rate is rather high, configurations with high β N , moderate q * , strong boundary shaping, sufficient rotation and broad pressure and current profiles are found to have the lowest disruptivity; active n = 1 control further reduces the disruptivity. The disruptivity increases rapidly for q * min > 1.25 is generally acceptable for avoiding the onset of core rotating n = 1 kink/tearing modes; when EPM and ELM disturbances are present, the required q min for avoiding those modes is raised to ∼1.5. The current ramp and early flat-top phase of the discharges are prone to n = 1 core rotating modes locking to the wall, leading to a disruption. Small changes to the discharge fuelling during this phase can often mitigate the rotation damping associated with these modes and eliminate the disruption. The largest stored-energy disruptions are those that occur at high current when a plasma current ramp-down is initiated incorrectly. (paper)

  18. Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqueda, R.J.; Stotler, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in D α ; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of 'magnetic shear disconnection' due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

  19. Design of a repeating pneumatic pellet injector for the Joint European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.; Sparks, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    A three-barrel pneumatic pellet launcher developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) serves as the principal component of a plasma fueling system for the Joint European Torus (JET). The versatile device consists of three independent machine gun-like mechanisms that operate at cryogenic temperatures (14-20K). Individual high-speed extruders provide a continuous supply of solid deuterium to each gun assembly, where a reciprocating breech-side cutting mechanism forms and chambers cylindrical pellets from the extrusion; the deuterium pellets are then accelerated in the gun barrels with controlled amounts of compressed hydrogen gas (pressures up to 100 bar) to velocities of ≤1.5 km/s. The injector features three nominal pellet sizes (2.7,4.0, and 6.0 mm) and has been tested at pellet repetition rates of 5,2.5, and 1 Hz, respectively. Each gun can operate (individually or simultaneously) at the design repetition rate for 15-s pulses (limited only by the capacity of the extruder feed system). A remote, stand-alone control and data acquisition system is used for injector operation

  20. Using Formal Grammars to Predict I/O Behaviors in HPC: The Omnisc'IO Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorier, Matthieu; Ibrahim, Shadi; Antoniu, Gabriel; Ross, Rob

    2016-08-01

    The increasing gap between the computation performance of post-petascale machines and the performance of their I/O subsystem has motivated many I/O optimizations including prefetching, caching, and scheduling. In order to further improve these techniques, modeling and predicting spatial and temporal I/O patterns of HPC applications as they run has become crucial. In this paper we present Omnisc'IO, an approach that builds a grammar-based model of the I/O behavior of HPC applications and uses it to predict when future I/O operations will occur, and where and how much data will be accessed. To infer grammars, Omnisc'IO is based on StarSequitur, a novel algorithm extending Nevill-Manning's Sequitur algorithm. Omnisc'IO is transparently integrated into the POSIX and MPI I/O stacks and does not require any modification in applications or higher-level I/O libraries. It works without any prior knowledge of the application and converges to accurate predictions of any N future I/O operations within a couple of iterations. Its implementation is efficient in both computation time and memory footprint.

  1. Micromanaging the IoT space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Irak Vicarte

    2017-05-01

    The speed of IoT devices currently connected in our daily lives has drastically accelerated in the last couple of years. The lack of standardization, regulation, and an efficient process to integrate these devices to our ecosystem has led to a relaxed security and an ineffective use of the data generated. This paper presents a new approach to the IoT ecosystem management that improves data sharing and security by categorizing and micromanaging the connected devices. The use of micromanaging multiple access points (M2AP) allows the architecture to respond faster and efficiently to events and attacks to the digital hive. The "local beehive"/ "master beehive" approach seals a compromise of delegating tasks and improving the network management capacity. Finally, an efficient data storage and compact reports of the raw information collected can then be transmitted to cloud services for further analysis if required.

  2. iOS cloud development dor dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Neal

    2012-01-01

    Want to create robust, data-driven, iOS cloud apps? This book makes it easier! Apple's mobile operating system (iOS) supports iPhones, iPads, iPods and other Apple devices, and while even beginners can now develop apps to run just on these devices themselves, sometimes you want to create an app with more heft. Applications such as live weather reports or multi-player games require a lot of data to be pulled from outside—often from cloud-based Web Services, such as Google or Amazon. This book, written by application development experts Sujee Maniyam and Neal Goldstein, shows you how to we

  3. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  4. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, M.; Bell, R.E.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Crocker, N.A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  5. Imaging the Obscuring Torus in Nearby Active Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew S.; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Morris, Simon

    2000-02-01

    We propose to study a sample of Seyfert galaxies with the aim of resolving spatially the torus of dense molecular gas and dust which is believed to surround the nuclei of these objects. The galaxies, selected to have strong molecular hydrogen emission and jet-like radio continuum sources, will be imaged in various molecular hydrogen lines and in [Fe II] or Br (gamma). The goals are to a) confirm the existence of such tori, b) determine whether the extended molecular gas is excited thermally or through fluorescence, and c) compare with the distribution of ionized gas, which may show an ionization cone structure from polar escape of ionizing photons. The availability of IR imaging capabilities with tip-tilt and narrow-band filters, which allow imaging in the H_2(lambda) 2.122(micron) line up to a recession velocity of 6,000 km s^-1, makes the Blanco 4m telescope very well suited to this project.

  6. ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor and power plant: conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Dudziak, D.J.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is presented. An emphasis is placed on those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are more generic to magnetic fusion being adapted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs. Similar to the latter tokamak studies, this conceptual EBTR design also emphasizes the use of conventional or near state-of-the-art engineering technology and materials. An emphasis is also placed on system accessibility, reliability, and maintainability, as these crucial and desirable characteristics relate to the unique high-aspect-ratio configuration of EBTs. Equal and strong emphasis is given to physics, engineering/technology, and costing/economics components of this design effort. Parametric optimizations and sensitivity studies, using cost-of-electricity as an object function, are reported. Based on these results, the direction for future improvement on an already attractive reactor design is identified

  7. Transient waveform acquisition system for the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.G.; Burris, R.D.; Hillis, D.H.; Overbey, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    The transient waveform system described in this report is designed to acquire analog waveforms from the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) diagnostic experiments. Pressure, density, synchrotron radiation, etc., are acquired and digitized with a Kinetic Systems TR812 transient recorder and associated modules located in a CAMAC crate. The system can simultaneously acquire, display, and transmit sets of data consisting of identification parameters and up to 1024 data points for 1 to 64 input signals (frequency range = 0.01 pulse/s to 100 kHz) of data every one or more minutes; thus, it can run continuously without operator intervention. The data are taken on a VAX 11/780 and transmitted to a data base on a DECSystem-10. To aid the programmer in making future modifications to the system, detailed documentation using the Yourdon structural methods has been given

  8. Quadratic rational rotations of the torus and dual lattice maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kouptsov, K L; Vivaldi, F

    2002-01-01

    We develop a general formalism for computed-assisted proofs concerning the orbit structure of certain non ergodic piecewise affine maps of the torus, whose eigenvalues are roots of unity. For a specific class of maps, we prove that if the trace is a quadratic irrational (the simplest nontrivial case, comprising 8 maps), then the periodic orbits are organized into finitely many renormalizable families, with exponentially increasing period, plus a finite number of exceptional families. The proof is based on exact computations with algebraic numbers, where units play the role of scaling parameters. Exploiting a duality existing between these maps and lattice maps representing rounded-off planar rotations, we establish the global periodicity of the latter systems, for a set of orbits of full density.

  9. Polynomials for torus links from Chern-Simons gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isidro, J.M.; Labastida, J.M.F.; Ramallo, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Invariant polynomials for torus links are obtained in the framework of the Chern-Simons topological gauge theory. The polynomials are computed as vacuum expectation values on the three-sphere of Wilson line operators representing the Verlinde algebra of the corresponding rational conformal field theory. In the case of the SU(2) gauge theory our results provide explicit expressions for the Jones polynomial as well as for the polynomials associated to the N-state (N>2) vertex models (Akutsu-Wadati polynomials). By means of the Chern-Simons coset construction, the minimal unitary models are analyzed, showing that the corresponding link invariants factorize into two SU(2) polynomials. A method to obtain skein rules from the Chern-Simons knot operators is developed. This procedure yields the eigenvalues of the braiding matrix of the corresponding conformal field theory. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic field due to helical currents on a torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, W.N.C.

    1981-01-01

    By means of coordinate transformations on different forms of the Biot-Savart law, general expressions are derived for both the magnetic vector potential and the magnetic field in two systems of toroidal coordinates. For the cases of interest, it is shown that the integrations can be performed exactly in proper toroidal coordinates, whereas approximations are necessary in quasi-toroidal coordinates. Different forms of helical windings are discussed. The results are applied to the calculation of a stellarator magnetic field of arbitrary polarity l, produced by a distribution of helical current filaments on a torus. The components of the magnetic field are given in terms of infinite series. In the intermediate region, away from the external separatrices and the central region, simple analytic expressions for the magnetic surfaces are obtained. (author)

  11. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume IV. Microwave system. Preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.N.

    1982-02-26

    The EBT-P Microwave System provides microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to both stabilize and heat the EBT-P plasma. A 28 gigahertz (GHz) system is required to form the hot electron annulus plasma that provides MHD stabilization to the core plasma. A 60 GHz system is required to heat the core plasma and will provide some second harmonic heating of the hot electron annulus. The principal microwave system elements and their design characteristics are summarized. The microwave system includes 200 kilowatt (kW) gyrotrons at 60 GHz for core heating and 200 kW gyrotrons at 28 GHz for annulus heating. The basic operating complement will be six (6) 60 GHz tubes and two (2) 28 GHz tubes. PACE (Plant and Capital Equipment) procurement will include four (4) 60 GHz gyrotrons with two (2) GHz tubes procured under operations and the two (2) 28 GHz tubes will be provided, with mounts, from the EBT-S program. Each tube is rigidly mounted on an oil filled tank assembly which provides electrical isolation and cooling. All tubes and mounts will be located in the lower level of the torus enclosure. An extensive demineralized water flow system is required to provide gyrotron cooling.

  13. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Electron temperature structures associated with magnetic tearing modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Hillary Dianne

    Tearing mode induced magnetic islands have a significant impact on the thermal characteristics of magnetically confined plasmas such as those in the reversed-field-pinch. Using a state-of-the-art Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic, electron temperature fluctuations correlated with magnetic tearing modes have been observed on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field-pinch. The TS diagnostic consists of two independently triggerable Nd:YAG lasers that can each pulse up to 15 times each plasma discharge and 21 General Atomics polchromators equipped with avalanche photodiode modules. Detailed calibrations focusing on accuracy, ease of use and repeatability and in-situ measurements have been performed on the system. Electron temperature (Te) profiles are acquired at 25 kHz with 2 cm or less resolution along the minor radius, sufficient to measure the effect of an island on the profile as the island rotates by the measurement point. Bayesian data analysis techniques are developed and used to detect fluctuations over an ensemble of shots. Four cases are studied; standard plasmas in quiescent periods, through sawteeth, through core reconnection events and in plasmas where the tearing mode activity is decreased. With a spectrum of unstable tearing modes, remnant islands that tend to flatten the temperature profile are present in the core between sawtooth-like reconnection events. This flattening is characteristic of rapid parallel heat conduction along helical magnetic field lines. The spatial structure of the temperature fluctuations show that the location of the rational surface of the m/n = 1/6 tearing mode is significantly further in than equilibrium suggestions predict. The fluctuations also provide a measurement of the remnant island width which is significantly smaller than the predicted full island width. These correlated fluctuations disappear during both global and core reconnection events. In striking contrast to temperature flattening, a temperature gradient

  15. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE RESOLVES VOLCANOES ON IO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This picture is a composite of a black and white near infrared image of Jupiter and its satellite Io and a color image of Io at shorter wavelengths taken at almost the same time on March 5, 1994. These are the first images of a giant planet or its satellites taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since the repair mission in December 1993. Io is too small for ground-based telescopes to see the surface details. The moon's angular diameter of one arc second is at the resolution limit of ground based telescopes. Many of these markings correspond to volcanoes that were first revealed in 1979 during the Voyager spacecraft flyby of Jupiter. Several of the volcanoes periodically are active because Io is heated by tides raised by Jupiter's powerful gravity. The volcano Pele appears as a dark spot surrounded by an irregular orange oval in the lower part of the image. The orange material has been ejected from the volcano and spread over a huge area. Though the volcano was first discovered by Voyager, the distinctive orange color of the volcanic deposits is a new discovery in these HST images. (Voyager missed it because its cameras were not sensitive to the near-infrared wavelengths where the color is apparent). The sulfur and sulfur dioxide that probably dominate Io's surface composition cannot produce this orange color, so the Pele volcano must be generating material with a more unusual composition, possibly rich in sodium. The Jupiter image, taken in near-infrared light, was obtained with HST's Wide Field and Planetary Camera in wide field mode. High altitude ammonia crystal clouds are bright in this image because they reflect infrared light before it is absorbed by methane in Jupiter's atmosphere. The most prominent feature is the Great Red Spot, which is conspicuous because of its high clouds. A cap of high-altitude haze appears at Jupiter's south pole. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced

  16. Electron Bernstein wave emission based diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B-T less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T-e measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T-e measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T-e(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T-e(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T-e < 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T-e inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  17. Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Based Diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.; Wilgen, John B.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B(T) less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T(e) measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T(e) measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T(e)(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T(e)(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T(e)< 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T(e) inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  18. Temperature and density characteristics of the Helicity Injected Torus-II spherical tokamak indicating closed flux sustainment using coaxial helicity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, W. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A. J.; Stewart, B. T.; Mueller, D.

    2008-08-01

    The electron temperature and density profiles of plasmas in the Helicity Injected Torus [HIT-II: T. R. Jarboe et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)] experiment are measured by multipoint Thomson scattering (MPTS). The HIT-II device is a small low-aspect-ratio tokamak (major radius 0.3m, minor radius 0.2m, toroidal field of up to 0.5T), capable of inductive ohmic (OH) current drive, Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive, or combinations of both. The temperature and density characteristics have been characterized by a ruby laser MPTS diagnostic at up to six locations within the plasma for a single diagnostic time per discharge. Observed hollow temperature profiles of CHI discharges are inconsistent with open flux only predictions for CHI and indicate a closed flux region during CHI current drive.

  19. Conceptual design of the Purdue compact torus/passive liner fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    This proposal describes a program for the conceptual development of a novel fusion reactor design, the Purdue Compact Torus/Passive Liner Reactor. The key features of the concept are described and a comparison is made with a conventional tokamak

  20. The Arabidopsis Malectin-Like/LRR-RLK IOS1 Is Critical for BAK1-Dependent and BAK1-Independent Pattern-Triggered Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Huang, Pin-Yao; Chien, Hsiao-Chiao; Chu, Po-Wei; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2), EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 (CERK1) recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) to activate pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). A reverse genetics approach on genes responsive to the priming agent β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) revealed IMPAIRED OOMYCETE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (IOS1) as a critical PTI player. Arabidopsis thaliana ios1 mutants were hypersusceptible to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Accordingly, ios1 mutants showed defective PTI responses, notably delayed upregulation of the PTI marker gene FLG22-INDUCED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE1, reduced callose deposition, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation upon MAMP treatment. Moreover, Arabidopsis lines overexpressing IOS1 were more resistant to bacteria and showed a primed PTI response. In vitro pull-down, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, coimmunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry analyses supported the existence of complexes between the membrane-localized IOS1 and BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1)-dependent PRRs FLS2 and EFR, as well as with the BAK1-independent PRR CERK1. IOS1 also associated with BAK1 in a ligand-independent manner and positively regulated FLS2-BAK1 complex formation upon MAMP treatment. In addition, IOS1 was critical for chitin-mediated PTI. Finally, ios1 mutants were defective in BABA-induced resistance and priming. This work reveals IOS1 as a novel regulatory protein of FLS2-, EFR-, and CERK1-mediated signaling pathways that primes PTI activation. PMID:27317676

  1. 10D massive type IIA supergravities as the uplift of parabolic M2-brane torus bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Restuccia, Alvaro [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Dept. de Fisica

    2016-04-15

    We remark that the two 10D massive deformations of the N = 2 maximal type IIA supergravity (Romans and HLW supergravity) are associated to the low energy limit of the uplift to 10D of M2-brane torus bundles with parabolic monodromy linearly and non-linearly realized respectively. Romans supergravity corresponds to M2-brane compactified on a twice-punctured torus bundle. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. SDN Data Center Performance Evaluation of Torus and Hypercube Interconnecting Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Mehmeri, Victor

    2015-01-01

    — By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures......— By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures...

  3. Application development with Parse using iOS SDK

    CERN Document Server

    Birani, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide, featuring step-by-step instructions showing you how to use Parse iOS, and handle your data on cloud.If you are a developer who wants to build your applications instantly using Parse iOS as a back end application development, this book is ideal for you. This book will help you to understand Parse, featuring examples to help you get familiar with the concepts of Parse iOS.

  4. Sensitive Information Tracking in Commodity IoT

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Z. Berkay; Babun, Leonardo; Sikder, Amit K.; Aksu, Hidayet; Tan, Gang; McDaniel, Patrick; Uluagac, A. Selcuk

    2018-01-01

    Broadly defined as the Internet of Things (IoT), the growth of commodity devices that integrate physical processes with digital connectivity has had profound effects on society--smart homes, personal monitoring devices, enhanced manufacturing and other IoT apps have changed the way we live, play, and work. Yet extant IoT platforms provide few means of evaluating the use (and potential avenues for misuse) of sensitive information. Thus, consumers and organizations have little information to as...

  5. Xamarin mobile application development for iOS

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    This book is a standard tutorial aimed at teaching you everything you need to know about iOS app development using Xamarin.This book is written for those who are new to iOS app development as well as more experienced developers who just need a quick reference book. It is assumed that you are already comfortable using C#. Those teaching iOS to new students will also find this book invaluable as a form of reference material.

  6. Multiple Independent File Parallel I/O with HDF5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. C.

    2016-07-13

    The HDF5 library has supported the I/O requirements of HPC codes at Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) since the late 90’s. In particular, HDF5 used in the Multiple Independent File (MIF) parallel I/O paradigm has supported LLNL code’s scalable I/O requirements and has recently been gainfully used at scales as large as O(106) parallel tasks.

  7. Investigating the dusty torus of Seyfert galaxies using SOFIA/FORCAST photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Lindsay; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Packham, Christopher C.; Ramos-Almeida, Cristina; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Levenson, Nancy; Radomski, James; Ichikawa, Kohei; Garcia-Bernete, Ismael; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Diaz Santos, Tanio; Martinez-Paredes, Mariela

    2017-06-01

    We present 31.5 μm imaging photometry of 11 nearby Seyfert galaxies observed from the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) using the Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST). We tentatively detect extended 31 μm emission for the first time in our sample. In combination with this new data set, subarcsecond resolution 1-18 μm imaging and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopic observations were used to compute the nuclear spectral energy distribution (SED) of each galaxy. We found that the turnover of the torus emission does not occur at wavelengths ≤31.5 μm, which we interpret as a lower-limit for the wavelength of peak emission. We used Clumpy torus models to fit the nuclear infrared (IR) SED and infer trends in the physical parameters of the AGN torus for the galaxies in the sample. Including the 31.5 μm nuclear flux in the SED 1) reduces the number of clumpy torus models compatible with the data, and 2) modifies the model output for the outer radial extent of the torus for 10 of the 11 objects. Specifically, six (60%) objects show a decrease in radial extent while four (40%) show an increase. We find torus outer radii ranging from <1pc to 8.4 pc. We also present new 37.1 μm imaging data for 4 of the 11 Seyfert galaxies, as well as 3 additional Seyferts.

  8. Io as a source of the jovian dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graps; Grun; Svedhem; Kruger; Horanyl; Heck; Lammers

    2000-05-04

    Streams of dust emerging from the direction of Jupiter were discovered in 1992 during the flyby of the Ulysses spacecraft, but their precise origin within the jovian system remained unclear. Further data collected by the Galileo spacecraft, which has been orbiting Jupiter since December 1995, identified the possible sources of dust as Jupiter's main ring, its gossamer ring, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (ref. 8) and Io. All but Jupiter's gossamer ring and Io have since been ruled out. Here we find that the dominant source of the jovian dust streams is Io, on the basis of periodicities in the dust impact signal. Io's volcanoes, rather than impact ejecta, are the dust sources.

  9. IoT interoperability:a hub-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Blackstock, Michael; Lea, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Interoperability in the Internet of Things is critical for emerging services and applications. In this paper we advocate the use of IoT ‘hubs’ to aggregate things using web protocols, and suggest a staged approach to interoperability. In the context of a UK government funded project involving 8 IoT projects to address cross-domain IoT interoperability, we introduce the HyperCat IoT catalogue specification. We then describe the tools and techniques we developed to adapt an existing data portal...

  10. Strong tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter from astrometric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainey, Valéry; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Karatekin, Ozgür; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2009-06-18

    Io is the volcanically most active body in the Solar System and has a large surface heat flux. The geological activity is thought to be the result of tides raised by Jupiter, but it is not known whether the current tidal heat production is sufficiently high to generate the observed surface heat flow. Io's tidal heat comes from the orbital energy of the Io-Jupiter system (resulting in orbital acceleration), whereas dissipation of energy in Jupiter causes Io's orbital motion to decelerate. Here we report a determination of the tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter through its effect on the orbital motions of the Galilean moons. Our results show that the rate of internal energy dissipation in Io (k(2)/Q = 0.015 +/- 0.003, where k(2) is the Love number and Q is the quality factor) is in good agreement with the observed surface heat flow, and suggest that Io is close to thermal equilibrium. Dissipation in Jupiter (k(2)/Q = (1.102 +/- 0.203) x 10(-5)) is close to the upper bound of its average value expected from the long-term evolution of the system, and dissipation in extrasolar planets may be higher than presently assumed. The measured secular accelerations indicate that Io is evolving inwards, towards Jupiter, and that the three innermost Galilean moons (Io, Europa and Ganymede) are evolving out of the exact Laplace resonance.

  11. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three multispectral mosaics of Io have been produced from Voyager imaging data: a global mosaic from each of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region surrounding the volcano Ra Patera. The mosaics are maps of normal albedo and color in accurate geometric map formats. Io's photometric behavior, mapped with a two-image technique, is spatially variable, especially in the bright white areas. The disk-integrated color and albedo of the satellite have been remarkably constant over recent decades, despite the volcanic activity and the many differences between Voyager 1 and 2 images (acquired just 4 months apart). This constancy is most likely due to the consistent occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits in the region from long 240 to 360??. A transient brightening southeast of Pele during the Voyager 1 encounter was probably due to real changes in surface and/or atmospheric materials, rather than to photometric behavior. The intrinsic spectral variability of Io, as seen in a series of two-dimensional histograms of the multispectral mosaics, consists of continuous variation among three major spectral end members. The data were mapped into five spectral units to compare them with laboratory measurements of candidate surface materials and to show the planimetric distributions. Unit 1 is best fit by the spectral reflectance of ordinary elemental sulfur, and it is closely associated with the Peletype plume deposits. Unit 2 is strongly confined to the polar caps above about latitude ??50??, but its composition is unknown. Unit 5 is probably SO2 with relatively minor contamination; it is concentrated in the equatorial region and near the long-lived Prometheus-type plumes. Units 3 and 4 are gradational between units 1 and 5. In addition to SO2 and elemental sulfur, other plausible components of the surface are polysulfur oxides, FeCl2, Na2S, and NaHS. ?? 1988.

  12. Neutral hydrogen in elliptical and IO galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.

    1979-01-01

    New HI detections have been obtained using the Nancay radiotelescope for NGC 2974 and 3962. These results and the large scale distribution obtained for NGC 3962 indicate that the HI-rich elliptical galaxies exhibit common properties which are not easily explained by accretion of an intergalactic cloud. The field aroud NGC 1052 has been mapped and there is an HI connection with the neighbouring galaxies. The HI content of several IO galaxies indicates that the galaxies which are members of groups are relatively HI-rich; this could be produced by additional HI coming from companion galaxies [fr

  13. ULY JUP SCE DOPPLER HI-RES DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Ulysses spacecraft was occulted by the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) during its Jupiter encounter on 8 February 1992. The Ulysses dual-frequency radio subsystem used by...

  14. ULYSSES JUPITER SOLAR CORONA EXPER. RANGING DATA 10 MIN AVG

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Ulysses spacecraft was occulted by the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) during its Jupiter encounter on 8 February 1992. The Ulysses dual-frequency radio subsystem used by...

  15. Ramp-up of CHI Initiated Plasmas on NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B; Roquemore, A L; Raman, R; Jarboe, T R; Nelson, B A

    2009-10-29

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus (NSTX) have now demonstrated flux savings using transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI). In these discharges, the discharges initiated by CHI are ramped up with an inductive transformer and exhibit higher plasma current than discharges without the benefit of CHI initiation.

  16. Control strategy for plasma equilibrium in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskell, R.V.

    1975-08-01

    Dynamic control of the plasma position within the torus of a TOKAMAK fusion device is a significant factor in the development of nuclear fusion as an energy source. This investigation develops a state variable model of a TOKAMAK thermonuclear device, suitable for application of modern control theory techniques. (auth)

  17. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Tvashtar Catena (63 N, 120 W) is one of the most interesting features on Io. This chain of large paterae (caldera-like depressions) has exhibited highly variable volcanic activity in a series of observations. Tvashtar is the type example of a style of volcanism seen only at high latitudes, with short-lived Pele-type plumes and short-lived by intense thermal events. Evidence for a hot spot at Tvashtar was first detected in an eclipse observation in April 1997 (orbit G7) by the Solid State Imager (SSI) on the Galileo Spacecraft. Tvashtar was originally targeted for observation at higher resolution in the close flyby in November 1999 (I25) because of its interesting large-scale topography. There are relatively few but generally larger paterae at high latitudes on Io. I25 images revealed a 25 km long, 1-2 km high lava curtain via a pattern of saturation and bleeding in the CCD image, which requires very high temperatures.

  19. Transient Density Enhancements of the Martian Orbiting Dust Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, A.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The moons Phobos and Deimos have been suggested to be responsible for sustaining a permanently present dust cloud around Mars. The equilibrium size and spatial distribution of this dust torus has been the subject of numerous theoretical studies. However, no observational evidence has been found as of yet. Because of the renewed interest in Phobos and Deimos as potential targets for human precursor mission to Mars, there is a new opportunity for the detection of the putative Martian dust clouds using in situ measurements. Both Phobos and Deimos, as all airless bodies in the solar system, are continually bombarded by interplanetary dust grains, generating secondary ejecta particles. The surface gravity escape of these objects are low, hence most secondary particles escapethem, but remain in orbit about Mars. Subsequent perturbations by solar radiation pressure, electromagnetic forces acting on charged grains, and collisions with the moons or Mars itself limit the lifetime of the produced particles. The size dependent production rates and lifetimes set the most abundant particle size range of 10 - 30 micron in radius. Large, but short-lived, dust density enhancements can be predicted during periods of meteor showers. Also, comet Siding Spring will flyby Mars in October, 2014. Its dust tail can 'sand-blast' both Phobos and Deimos, dramatically increasing their dust production for a few hours. We present the results of our numerical studies on the temporal and spatial evolution of the dust clouds raised during highly enhanced production rates that last only hours-to-days.

  20. Nonlinear coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.R.; Assadi, S.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    Three-wave, nonlinear, tearing mode coupling has been measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP) [Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using bispectral analysis of edge magnetic fluctuations resolved in ''k-space. The strength of nonlinear three-wave interactions satisfying the sum rules m 1 + m 2 = m 3 and n 1 + n 2 = n 3 is measured by the bicoherency. In the RFP, m=l, n∼2R/a (6 for MST) internally resonant modes are linearly unstable and grow to large amplitude. Large values of bicoherency occur for two m=l modes coupled to an m=2 mode and the coupling of intermediate toroidal modes, e.g., n=6 and 7 coupled to n=13. These experimental bispectral features agree with predicted bispectral features derived from MHD computation. However, in the experiment, enhanced coupling occurs in the ''crash'' phase of a sawtooth oscillation concomitant with a broadened mode spectrum suggesting the onset of a nonlinear cascade

  1. ITER - torus vacuum pumping system remote handling issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, J.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes design issues concerning remote maintenance of the ITER torus vacuum pumping system. Key issues under investigation in this report are bearings for inert gas operation, transporter integration options, cryopump access, gate valve maintenance frequency, tritium effects on materials, turbomolecular pump design, and remote maintenance. Alternative bearing materials are explored for inert gas operation. Encapsulated motors and rotary feedthroughs offer an alternative option where space requirements are restrictive. A number of transporter options are studied. The preferred scheme depends on the shielded reconfigured ducts to prevent streaming and activation of RH (remote handling) equipment. A radiation mapping of the cell is required to evaluate this concept. Valve seal and bellow life are critical issues and need to be evaluated, as they have a direct bearing on the provision of adequate RH equipment to meet scheduled and unscheduled maintenance outages. The limited space on the inboard side of the cryopumps for RH equipment access requires a reconfigured duct and manifold. A modified shielded duct arrangement is proposed, which would provide more access space, reduced activation of components, and the potential for improved valve seal life. Work at Mound Laboratories has shown the adverse effects of tritium on some bearing lubricants. Silicone-based lubricants should be avoided. (11 refs., 2 tabs., 31 figs.)

  2. Neutral beam power measurements inside the ASDEX torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zengliang, Y.; Staebler, A.; Vollmer, O.

    1982-11-01

    Neutral beam power measurements inside the ASDEX torus are done with a retractable calorimeter which is only radiation cooled. The calorimeter plate made from Molybdenum is subdivided into nine segments whose increase in energy content due to a shot yields the absorbed beam power. Different models for the backward extrapolation of the measured temperature curves are examined for a series of low energy shots with the result that pure radiation cooling is a valid assumption. Furthermore, a temperature correction to the measured power is derived from these experiments. The evaluation of the shots onto this calorimeter is done by a computer program. The application of this program to a few full power shots shows that a neutral power up to 3.2 MW has been injected into the ASDEX vessel by the two injectors with an overall efficiency of up to 40%. Reionization losses due to the ASDEX stray field are less than 10%; they do not show any dependence upon the pulse length for shots up to 200 ms. (orig.)

  3. How fast does a random walk cover a torus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, Peter

    2017-07-01

    We present high statistics simulation data for the average time that a random walk needs to cover completely a two-dimensional torus of size L ×L . They confirm the mathematical prediction that ˜(LlnL ) 2 for large L , but the prefactor seems to deviate significantly from the supposedly exact result 4 /π derived by Dembo et al. [Ann. Math. 160, 433 (2004), 10.4007/annals.2004.160.433], if the most straightforward extrapolation is used. On the other hand, we find that this scaling does hold for the time TN (t )=1(L ) at which the average number of yet unvisited sites is 1, as also predicted previously. This might suggest (wrongly) that and TN (t )=1(L ) scale differently, although the distribution of rescaled cover times becomes sharp in the limit L →∞ . But our results can be reconciled with those of Dembo et al. by a very slow and nonmonotonic convergence of /(LlnL ) 2 , as had been indeed proven by Belius et al. [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 167, 461 (2017), 10.1007/s00440-015-0689-6] for Brownian walks, and was conjectured by them to hold also for lattice walks.

  4. Ion power balance in neutral beam heated discharges on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick William

    In this dissertation, ion power balance is studied in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to fully understand all the terms in the power balance equation, an experiment was conducted in which the input power of the NSTX discharges was modulated using the neutral beam input power. Individual neutral beam sources were turned on or off to increase or decrease the input power. The modulations were designed to create a localized perturbation in the fast ion phase space distribution. Measurements were taken with diagnostics on NSTX including the neutral particle analyzer (NPA), the NSTX Thomson scattering diagnostic (MPTS) and the charge exchange diagnostic (CHERS), which measure the ion and electron density and temperature. Reconstructions of the plasma equilibrium were made using the LRDFIT code and power balance was calculated using the TRANSP transport code. The TRANSP code inputs the electron and ion temperatures and densities, and calculates the various power balance terms. Excess ion heating is shown to exist for some neutral beam heated discharges on NSTX. When all three neutral beam sources are on, the total power outflow through the various loss terms exceeds the input power calculated through classical heating of the ions by the slowing down of the neutral beams. The excess heating is approximately 0.5 MW of power, which represents 8% of the total power put into the plasma from the neutral beams. This excess heating occurs at the same time as an increase in the amplitude of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) with frequencies of 0.5--1.4 MHz. The CAE amplitudes coincide both temporally and spatially with the onset of the excess heating. The high-k microwave scattering diagnostic and magnetic pickup coils were used to estimate the amplitudes of these modes. Full orbit calculations were then performed using these modes, which demonstrate that thermal ions can be heated by the CAEs. The Edge Neutral Density Diagnostic (ENDD

  5. Scenario development during commissioning operations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Boyer, M. D.; Gerhardt, S.; Mueller, D.; Myers, C. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Menard, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Scotti, F.; Bedoya, F.; Bell, R. E.; Berkery, J. W.; Diallo, A.; Ferraro, N.; Kaye, S. M.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Ono, M.; Park, J.-K.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; NSTX-U Research, the; Operations; Engineering Team

    2018-04-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will advance the physics basis required for achieving steady-state, high-beta, and high-confinement conditions in a tokamak by accessing high toroidal fields (1 T) and plasma currents (1.0-2.0 MA) in a low aspect ratio geometry (A  =  1.6-1.8) with flexible auxiliary heating systems (12 MW NBI, 6 MW HHFW). This paper describes the progress in the development of L- and H-mode discharge scenarios and the commissioning of operational tools in the first ten weeks of operation that enable the scientific mission of NSTX-U. Vacuum field calculations completed prior to operations supported the rapid development and optimization of inductive breakdown at different values of ohmic solenoid current. The toroidal magnetic field (B T0  =  0.65 T) exceeded the maximum values achieved on NSTX and novel long-pulse L-mode discharges with regular sawtooth activity exceeded the longest pulses produced on NSTX (t pulse  >  1.8 s). The increased flux of the central solenoid facilitated the development of stationary L-mode discharges over a range of density and plasma current (I p). H-mode discharges achieved similar levels of stored energy, confinement (H98y,2  >  1) and stability (β N/β N-nowall  >  1) compared to NSTX discharges for I p  ⩽  1 MA. High-performance H-mode scenarios require an L-H transition early in the I p ramp-up phase in order to obtain low internal inductance (l i) throughout the discharge, which is conducive to maintaining vertical stability at high elongation (κ  >  2.2) and achieving long periods of MHD quiescent operations. The rapid progress in developing L- and H-mode scenarios in support of the scientific program was enabled by advances in real-time plasma control, efficient error field identification and correction, effective conditioning of the graphite wall and excellent diagnostic availability.

  6. A disrupted molecular torus around Eta Carinae as seen in 12CO with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John

    2018-03-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of 12CO 2-1 emission from circumstellar material around the massive star Eta Carinae (η Car). These observations reveal new structural details about the cool equatorial torus located ˜4000 au from the star. The CO torus is not a complete azimuthal loop, but rather, is missing its near side, which appears to have been cleared away. The missing material matches the direction of apastron in the eccentric binary system, making it likely that η Car's companion played an important role in disrupting portions of the torus soon after ejection. Molecular gas seen in ALMA data aligns well with the cool dust around η Car previously observed in mid-infrared (IR) maps, whereas hot dust resides at the inner surface of the molecular torus. The CO also coincides with the spatial and velocity structure of near-IR H2 emission. Together, these suggest that the CO torus seen by ALMA is actually the pinched waist of the Homunculus polar lobes, which glows brightly because it is close to the star and warmer than the poles. The near side of the torus appears to be a blowout, associated with fragmented equatorial ejecta. We discuss implications for the origin of various features north-west of the star. CO emission from the main torus implies a total gas mass in the range of 0.2-1 M⊙ (possibly up to 5 M⊙ or more, although with questionable assumptions). Deeper observations are needed to constrain CO emission from the cool polar lobes.

  7. Beginning iOS 3D unreal games development

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Aims to be first book on the market concerning iOS 3D game apps development using the Unreal UDK Unreal UDK and scripting engine are popular emerging tools used for building games like those you see from Epic iOS and mobile game apps development are popular tech and book markets

  8. Interaction between users and IoT clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Gitanjali; Olesen, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is paving the way for a vast number of objects in our environment to react, respond and work autonomously as and when required and as per their capability, role and position. They will be able to announce and offer their services to the users, and together this will e......The Internet of Things (IoT) is paving the way for a vast number of objects in our environment to react, respond and work autonomously as and when required and as per their capability, role and position. They will be able to announce and offer their services to the users, and together...... this will enable the vision of an "Internet of People, Things and Services" (IoPTS). Application areas for IoT include smart cities, smart homes, environmental control, security & emergency, retail, logistics, industrial control, smart farming, and e-Health. All the IoT objects are organized in clusters, which...... framework that is needed to realize IoPTS. In particular, we focus on the interaction between the users and the IoT clusters, where the user profile (role, privileges, and preferences) should be matched with the services offered by the IoT cluster, including the initial set-up, access control...

  9. Performance analysis of routing protocols for IoT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Sridhar; Nalini, N.

    2018-04-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is an arrangement of advancements that are between disciplinary. It is utilized to have compelling combination of both physical and computerized things. With IoT physical things can have personal virtual identities and participate in distributed computing. Realization of IoT needs the usage of sensors based on the sector for which IoT is integrated. For instance, in healthcare domain, IoT needs to have integration with wearable sensors used by patients. As sensor devices produce huge amount of data, often called big data, there should be efficient routing protocols in place. To the extent remote systems is worried there are some current protocols, for example, OLSR, DSR and AODV. It additionally tosses light into Trust based routing protocol for low-power and lossy systems (TRPL) for IoT. These are broadly utilized remote directing protocols. As IoT is developing round the corner, it is basic to investigate routing protocols that and evaluate their execution regarding throughput, end to end delay, and directing overhead. The execution experiences can help in settling on very much educated choices while incorporating remote systems with IoT. In this paper, we analyzed different routing protocols and their performance is compared. It is found that AODV showed better performance than other routing protocols aforementioned.

  10. A survey of IoT cloud platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Ray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT envisages overall merging of several “things” while utilizing internet as the backbone of the communication system to establish a smart interaction between people and surrounding objects. Cloud, being the crucial component of IoT, provides valuable application specific services in many application domains. A number of IoT cloud providers are currently emerging into the market to leverage suitable and specific IoT based services. In spite of huge possible involvement of these IoT clouds, no standard cum comparative analytical study has been found across the literature databases. This article surveys popular IoT cloud platforms in light of solving several service domains such as application development, device management, system management, heterogeneity management, data management, tools for analysis, deployment, monitoring, visualization, and research. A comparison is presented for overall dissemination of IoT clouds according to their applicability. Further, few challenges are also described that the researchers should take on in near future. Ultimately, the goal of this article is to provide detailed knowledge about the existing IoT cloud service providers and their pros and cons in concrete form.

  11. The role of SO2 in volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Kieffer, S.W.; Cook, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    Io and Earth are the only planetary bodies known to be volcanically active; the energetics of the eruptive plumes on Io have important structural implications and are closely linked with the presence of sulphur and SO 2. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Which IO model best simulates the real thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Floyd S; Yee, Linton L; Garcia, Francisco J; Grisham, Jonathan E; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2003-12-01

    To determine which model best simulates the actual IO procedure in children. Forty emergency and critical care physicians with significant IO experience (6 or more IO procedures) in real children were recruited at 4 academic centers. Study subjects were provided with a kit containing 15 gauge IO needles and 5 IO models; a plastic IO doll leg (PL), a turkey femur/thigh (TT), a turkey tibia/drumstick (TD), a chicken femur/thigh (CT), and a pork rib (PR). Study participants scored the similarity of the bone model to that of placing an IO in a child (0 = no experience, 1 = perfect simulation, 2 = excellent, but not perfect, 3 = good, 4 = moderate, 5 = poor) and the hardness of the bone (H = too hard, J = just right, S = too soft) for each age group (preterm, newborn, 1-4 months, 5-12 months, 12-36 months, 3-6 years, 6-12 years, and >12 years old) of whom they had previous experience. Mean scores were calculated and compared to determine which model provided the best simulation. After excluding zero scores, overall mean scores for the CT, TD, TT, PL, and PR models were 3.2, 3.3, 3.3, 3.3, and 4.4 (P IO research and teaching purposes, bone models should be age appropriate. This study suggests that there is great variability in preference with the chicken, turkey, and plastic models.

  13. Volcanic origin of the eruptive plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.F.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Smith, B.A.; Danielson, G.E.; Johnson, T.V.; Synnott, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    A quadruple long exposure of Io in eclipse exhibits faint auroral emission from the eruptive plumes. No luminous spots in the vents, predicted by Gold, were observed. Heat from the interior of Io appears to be the predominant source of energy in the plumes. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  14. Transient induced tungsten melting at the Joint European Torus (JET).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coenen, J.W.; Matthews, G.F.; Krieger, K.; Iglesias, D.; Bunting, P.; Corre, Y.; Silburn, S.; Balboa, I.; Bazylev, B.; Conway, N.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gauthier, E.; Gaspar, J.; Jachmich, S.; Jepu, I.; Makepeace, C.; Scannell, R.; Stamp, M.; Petersson, P.; Pitts, R.A.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.

    T170, December (2017), č. článku 014013. ISSN 0031-8949. [PFMC 2017: 16th International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. Düsseldorf, 16.05.2017-19.05.2017] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * melting * plasma wall interaction * tungsten * plasma facing components Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 1.3 Physical sciences Impact factor: 1.280, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/ article /10.1088/1402-4896/aa8789/meta

  15. Powered intraosseous device (EZ-IO) for critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksan, Derinoz; Ayfer, Keles

    2013-07-01

    We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent powered intraosseous line insertion between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2010 to determine its users, indications, procedural details, success rates, and complications. Intraosseous (IO) line was inserted in the anteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia in all patients. The first attempt was successful in 80%, and the median duration for insertion of the IO line was 4 hours. Extravasation was the most common complication. Ninety-six percent of the physicians had undergone prior training in IO insertion. Because of its high success and short procedure time, IO access should be the first alternative to failed vascular access in critically ill children. Training in IO should be extended to all who care for pediatric patients in inpatient as well as in prehospital and emergency department settings.

  16. Future of IoT Networks: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Kyu Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of mobile devices has changed our daily lives. They enable users to obtain information even in a nomadic environment and provide information without limitations. A decade after the introduction of this technology, we are now facing the next innovation that will change our daily lives. With the introduction of the Internet of Things (IoT, our communication ability will not be restricted to only mobile devices. Rather, it will expand to all things with which we coexist. Many studies have discussed IoT-related services and platforms. However, there are only limited discussions about the IoT network. In this paper, we will thoroughly analyze the technical details about the IoT network. Based on our survey of papers, we will provide insight about the future IoT network and the crucial components that will enable it.

  17. Jet-torus connection in radio galaxies. Relativistic hydrodynamics and synthetic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, C. M.; Perucho, M.; Porth, O.; Younsi, Z.; Ros, E.; Mizuno, Y.; Zensus, J. A.; Rezzolla, L.

    2018-01-01

    Context. High resolution very long baseline interferometry observations of active galactic nuclei have revealed asymmetric structures in the jets of radio galaxies. These asymmetric structures may be due to internal asymmetries in the jets or they may be induced by the different conditions in the surrounding ambient medium, including the obscuring torus, or a combination of the two. Aims: In this paper we investigate the influence of the ambient medium, including the obscuring torus, on the observed properties of jets from radio galaxies. Methods: We performed special-relativistic hydrodynamic (SRHD) simulations of over-pressured and pressure-matched jets using the special-relativistic hydrodynamics code Ratpenat, which is based on a second-order accurate finite-volume method and an approximate Riemann solver. Using a newly developed radiative transfer code to compute the electromagnetic radiation, we modelled several jets embedded in various ambient medium and torus configurations and subsequently computed the non-thermal emission produced by the jet and thermal absorption from the torus. To better compare the emission simulations with observations we produced synthetic radio maps, taking into account the properties of the observatory. Results: The detailed analysis of our simulations shows that the observed properties such as core shift could be used to distinguish between over-pressured and pressure matched jets. In addition to the properties of the jets, insights into the extent and density of the obscuring torus can be obtained from analyses of the single-dish spectrum and spectral index maps.

  18. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  19. Vortex flow in a torus - a method for arc stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polman, R.W.

    1976-08-01

    Experiments on ring vortices inside a torus and experiments on semi-toroidal arcs stabilized by such vortices are described. The studies were performed in two separate devices. One of the toroidal vortex chambers - 'Cogion', with R = 0.45 m and r = 0.10 m - permits the establishment of a gas flow only. In the other device - 'Tovorex', with R = 0.19 m and r = 0.04 m - it is also possible to draw a semi-toroidal arc. The measurements surprisingly show that it is possible to describe the radial distribution of the poloidal flow in terms of a plane turbulent wall jet discharging in an external stream. The velocity profile and the growth of the width of the jet are in accordance with experimental data on this subject. A different behaviour is found for the decay of the maximum velocity. The core of the flow proves to be almost stagnant; the axis of rotation is displaced outwardly with respect to the centre of the cross-section over a distance of 6 mm. In 'Tovorex' information about the rotating flow is obtained without the presence of an arc in the vortex core. The velocity profiles prove to be independent of the pressure (50-400 Torr). For experiments with arcs nitrogen is used. It has been found that the semi-toroidal DC-arc, surrounded by a continuous metal wall can be stabilized by the toroidal vortices in the experimental range30 -1 , 0.6 -1 , depends on the current and on the pressure and is independent of Usub(j) and a. Temperatures of the discharge are estimated at approximately 6000 K. The velocity profiles in both vortex chambers are obtained with a hot-wire anemometer operated at constant resistance

  20. Power balance in ELMO Bumpy Torus: bulk electrons and ions in a 37 kW discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The power balance of the bulk electrons and ions in discharges with 37 kW of applied microwave power in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is examined in a zero-dimensional model using data on the intensity and linewidth of the molecular and atomic hydrogen emission. At least 60% of the applied power is ultimately dissipated by processes involving the neutral particles, including dissociation of molecules, ionization of and radiation from atoms, and heating of cold electrons produced during atomic ionization. The molecular influx rate and the density of atoms are used independently to determine the bulk electron particle confinement time, and an upper bound estimate is made of the diffusional power loss from the bulk plasma electrons. Parameters derived from the basic spectroscopic data presented in this paper include the neutral atom density 2 - 5x10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/, incident molecular flux 3 - 5x10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, bulk ion temperature approx. =3 eV, and particle confinement time <1.1 ms. The bulk electron energy confinement time is 0.7 ms or less in the standard operating regime. Published data on the nonthermal electron and ion populations in the plasma are used to evaluate approximately the overall energy flow in the discharge. 54 refs.

  1. Power balance in ELMO Bumpy Torus: bulk electrons and ions in a 37 kW discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The power balance of the bulk electrons and ions in discharges with 37 kW of applied microwave power in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is examined in a zero-dimensional model using data on the intensity and linewidth of the molecular and atomic hydrogen emission. At least 60% of the applied power is ultimately dissipated by processes involving the neutral particles, including dissociation of molecules, ionization of and radiation from atoms, and heating of cold electrons produced during atomic ionization. The molecular influx rate and the density of atoms are used independently to determine the bulk electron particle confinement time, and an upper bound estimate is made of the diffusional power loss from the bulk plasma electrons. Parameters derived from the basic spectroscopic data presented in this paper include the neutral atom density 2 - 5x10 10 cm -3 , incident molecular flux 3 - 5x10 15 cm -2 s -1 , bulk ion temperature approx. =3 eV, and particle confinement time <1.1 ms. The bulk electron energy confinement time is 0.7 ms or less in the standard operating regime. Published data on the nonthermal electron and ion populations in the plasma are used to evaluate approximately the overall energy flow in the discharge. 54 refs

  2. RapidIO as a multi-purpose interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baymani, Simaolhoda; Alexopoulos, Konstantinos; Valat, Sébastien

    2017-10-01

    RapidIO (http://rapidio.org/) technology is a packet-switched high-performance fabric, which has been under active development since 1997. Originally meant to be a front side bus, it developed into a system level interconnect which is today used in all 4G/LTE base stations world wide. RapidIO is often used in embedded systems that require high reliability, low latency and scalability in a heterogeneous environment - features that are highly interesting for several use cases, such as data analytics and data acquisition (DAQ) networks. We will present the results of evaluating RapidIO in a data analytics environment, from setup to benchmark. Specifically, we will share the experience of running ROOT and Hadoop on top of RapidIO. To demonstrate the multi-purpose characteristics of RapidIO, we will also present the results of investigating RapidIO as a technology for high-speed DAQ networks using a generic multi-protocol event-building emulation tool. In addition we will present lessons learned from implementing native ports of CERN applications to RapidIO.

  3. IoT Platforms: Analysis for Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusu Liviu DUMITRU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a general survey of IoT platforms in terms of features for IoT project de-velopers. I will briefly summarize the state of knowledge in terms of technology regarding “In-ternet of Things” first steps in developing this technology, history, trends, sensors and micro-controllers used. I have evaluated a number of 5 IoT platforms in terms of the features needed to develop a IoT project. I have listed those components that are most appreciated by IoT pro-ject developers and the results have been highlighted in a comparative analysis of these plat-forms from the point of view of IoT project developers and which are strictly necessary as a de-velopment environment for an IoT project based. I’ve also considered the users' views of such platforms in terms of functionality, advantages, disadvantages and dangers presented by this technology.

  4. Volume independence for Yang-Mills fields on the twisted torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pérez, Margarita; González-Arroyo, Antonio; Okawa, Masanori

    2014-10-01

    We review some recent results related to the notion of volume independence in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories. The topic is discussed in the context of gauge theories living on a d-dimensional torus with twisted boundary conditions. After a brief introduction reviewing the formalism for introducing gauge fields on a torus, we discuss how volume independence arises in perturbation theory. We show how, for appropriately chosen twist tensors, perturbative results to all orders in the 't Hooft coupling depend on a specific combination of the rank of the gauge group (N) and the periods of the torus (l), given by lN2/d, for d even. We discuss the well-known relation to noncommutative field theories and address certain threats to volume independence associated to the occurrence of tachyonic instabilities at one-loop order. We end by presenting some numerical results in 2+1 dimensions that extend these ideas to the nonperturbative domain.

  5. Imaging Aspects of Palatal Torus in Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achkar, Vivian Narana Ribeiro; Lopes, Sérgio Lucio Pereira de Castro; Pinto, Antonione Santos Bezerra; do Prado, Renata Falchete; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2016-12-01

    The torus palatinus is a unilocular or multilocular exostosis that occurs in the midline of the hard palate. It is considered a common clinical finding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not commonly used in dentistry and descriptions of the torus by this imaging method are therefore rare in the literature. This case study reports on a female patient referred to the dentist to elucidate a bone enlargement detected by MRI, which was requested by the physician who accompanied the patient for migraine treatment. Additional routine dental imaging exams were performed for the planning of different treatments. Here is a description of the torus palatinus along with MRI in order to provide a complete representation of the clinical finding.

  6. THE DIFFERENCES IN THE TORUS GEOMETRY BETWEEN HIDDEN AND NON-HIDDEN BROAD LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Packham, Christopher; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Alsip, Crystal D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; González-Martín, Omaira [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Díaz-Santos, Tanio [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Elitzur, Moshe [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Hönig, Sebastian F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levenson, Nancy A. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Mason, Rachel E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Perlman, Eric S., E-mail: ichikawa@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    We present results from the fitting of infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions of 21 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with clumpy torus models. We compiled high spatial resolution (∼0.3–0.7 arcsec) mid-IR (MIR) N-band spectroscopy, Q-band imaging, and nuclear near- and MIR photometry from the literature. Combining these nuclear near- and MIR observations, far-IR photometry, and clumpy torus models enables us to put constraints on the torus properties and geometry. We divide the sample into three types according to the broad line region (BLR) properties: type-1s, type-2s with scattered or hidden broad line region (HBLR) previously observed, and type-2s without any published HBLR signature (NHBLR). Comparing the torus model parameters gives us the first quantitative torus geometrical view for each subgroup. We find that NHBLR AGNs have smaller torus opening angles and larger covering factors than HBLR AGNs. This suggests that the chance to observe scattered (polarized) flux from the BLR in NHBLR could be reduced by the dual effects of (a) less scattering medium due to the reduced scattering volume given the small torus opening angle and (b) the increased torus obscuration between the observer and the scattering region. These effects give a reasonable explanation for the lack of observed HBLR in some type-2 AGNs.

  7. Modeling the Infrared Reverberation Response of the Circumnuclear Dusty Torus in AGNs: The Effects of Cloud Orientation and Anisotropic Illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeyda, Triana; Robinson, Andrew; Richmond, Michael; Vazquez, Billy; Nikutta, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The obscuring circumnuclear torus of dusty molecular gas is one of the major components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The torus can be studied by analyzing the time response of its infrared (IR) dust emission to variations in the AGN continuum luminosity, a technique known as reverberation mapping. The IR response is the convolution of the AGN ultraviolet/optical light curve with a transfer function that contains information about the size, geometry, and structure of the torus. Here, we describe a new computer model that simulates the reverberation response of a clumpy torus. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the emission of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time at selected IR wavelengths, taking into account light travel delays. We present simulated dust emission responses at 3.6, 4.5, and 30 μ m that explore the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field. We also briefly explore the effects of cloud shadowing (clouds are shielded from the AGN continuum source). Example synthetic light curves have also been generated, using the observed optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6418 as input. The torus response is strongly wavelength-dependent, due to the gradient in cloud surface temperature within the torus, and because the cloud emission is strongly anisotropic at shorter wavelengths. Anisotropic illumination of the torus also significantly modifies the torus response, reducing the lag between the IR and optical variations.

  8. A communication model based on n-dimensional Torus Architecture using dead-lock-free wormhole routing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Schepers, Erik; Bach, Wouter; Jonker, Mischa; Sikkes, Bart; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Routing on a two-dimensional torus architecture by means of the wormhole routing algorithm is introduced and extended to an n-dimensional torus model. To prevent blocking deadlocks caused by this algorithm, a multiple virtual channel solution is introduced. An implementation of virtual channels is

  9. Modeling the Infrared Reverberation Response of the Circumnuclear Dusty Torus in AGNs: The Effects of Cloud Orientation and Anisotropic Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeyda, Triana; Robinson, Andrew; Richmond, Michael; Vazquez, Billy [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Nikutta, Robert, E-mail: tra3595@rit.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The obscuring circumnuclear torus of dusty molecular gas is one of the major components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The torus can be studied by analyzing the time response of its infrared (IR) dust emission to variations in the AGN continuum luminosity, a technique known as reverberation mapping. The IR response is the convolution of the AGN ultraviolet/optical light curve with a transfer function that contains information about the size, geometry, and structure of the torus. Here, we describe a new computer model that simulates the reverberation response of a clumpy torus. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the emission of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time at selected IR wavelengths, taking into account light travel delays. We present simulated dust emission responses at 3.6, 4.5, and 30 μ m that explore the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field. We also briefly explore the effects of cloud shadowing (clouds are shielded from the AGN continuum source). Example synthetic light curves have also been generated, using the observed optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6418 as input. The torus response is strongly wavelength-dependent, due to the gradient in cloud surface temperature within the torus, and because the cloud emission is strongly anisotropic at shorter wavelengths. Anisotropic illumination of the torus also significantly modifies the torus response, reducing the lag between the IR and optical variations.

  10. TMACS I/O termination point listing. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides a listing of all analog and discrete input/output (I/O) points connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). The list also provides other information such as the point tag name, termination location, description, drawing references and other parameters. The purpose is to define each point's unique tag name and to cross reference the point with other associated information that may be necessary for activities such as maintenance, calibration, diagnostics, or design changes. It provides a list in one document of all I/O points that would otherwise only be available by referring to all I/O termination drawings

  11. RubyMotion iOS develoment essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Nalwaya, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    This is a step-by-step book that builds on your knowledge by adding to an example app over the course of each chapter. Each topic uses example code that can be compiled and tested to show how things work practically instead of just telling you the theory. Complicated tasks are broken down into easy to follow steps with clear explanations of what each line of code is doing.Whether you are a novice to iOS development or looking for a simpler alternative to Objective-C; with RubyMotion iOS Development Essentials, you will become a pro at writing great iOS apps

  12. OS X and iOS Kernel Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Halvorsen, Ole Henry

    2011-01-01

    OS X and iOS Kernel Programming combines essential operating system and kernel architecture knowledge with a highly practical approach that will help you write effective kernel-level code. You'll learn fundamental concepts such as memory management and thread synchronization, as well as the I/O Kit framework. You'll also learn how to write your own kernel-level extensions, such as device drivers for USB and Thunderbolt devices, including networking, storage and audio drivers. OS X and iOS Kernel Programming provides an incisive and complete introduction to the XNU kernel, which runs iPhones, i

  13. Beginning Swift games development for iOS

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwill, James

    2015-01-01

    Game apps are one of the most popular categories in the Apple iTunes App Store. Well, the introduction of the new Swift programming language will make game development even more appealing and easier to existing and future iOS app developers. In response, James Goodwill, Wesley Matlock and Apress introduce you to this book, Beginning Swift Games Development for iOS. In this book, you'll learn the fundamental elements of the new Swift language as applied to game development for iOS. In part 1, you'll start with a basic 2D game idea and build the game throughout the book introducing each Sprit

  14. TMACS I/O termination point listing. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaief, C.C. III

    1994-09-13

    This document provides a listing of all analog and discrete input/output (I/O) points connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). The list also provides other information such as the point tag name, termination location, description, drawing references and other parameters. The purpose is to define each point`s unique tag name and to cross reference the point with other associated information that may be necessary for activities such as maintenance, calibration, diagnostics, or design changes. It provides a list in one document of all I/O points that would otherwise only be available by referring to all I/O termination drawings.

  15. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Center Stack Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Avasarala, S.; Chrzanowski, J.; Dudek, L.; Fan, H.; Hatcher, H.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Titus, P.; Woolley, R.; Zhan, H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the NSTX Center Stack Upgrade project is to expand the NSTX operational space and thereby the physics basis for next-step ST facilities. The plasma aspect ratio (ratio of plasma major to minor radius) of the upgrade is increased to 1.5 from the original value of 1.26, which increases the cross sectional area of the center stack by a factor of ∼ 3 and makes possible higher levels of performance and pulse duration.

  16. The Coulomb gas representation of critical RSOS models on the sphere and the torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Nienhuis, B.

    1989-01-01

    We derive the Coulomb gas formulation of the c<1 discrete unitary series, on the sphere and the torus, starting from the corresponding regime-III RSOS models on a square lattice with appropriate topology. We clarify the origin of the background charge, the screening charges, and the choice of operator representations in a correlation function. In the scaling limit, we obtain a bosonic action coupled to the background curvature in addition to topological terms that vanish on the Riemann sphere. Its Virasoro algebra has the central charge expected on the basis of comparing conformal dimensions. As an application, we derive general expressions for the correlation functions on the torus. (orig.)

  17. The Coulomb gas representation of critical RSOS models on the sphere and the torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica); Nienhuis, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Inst. Lorentz voor Theoretische Natuurkunde)

    1989-10-02

    We derive the Coulomb gas formulation of the c<1 discrete unitary series, on the sphere and the torus, starting from the corresponding regime-III RSOS models on a square lattice with appropriate topology. We clarify the origin of the background charge, the screening charges, and the choice of operator representations in a correlation function. In the scaling limit, we obtain a bosonic action coupled to the background curvature in addition to topological terms that vanish on the Riemann sphere. Its Virasoro algebra has the central charge expected on the basis of comparing conformal dimensions. As an application, we derive general expressions for the correlation functions on the torus. (orig.).

  18. Novel routes to chaos through torus breakdown in non-invertible maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai; Mosekilde, Erik

    2009-01-01

    -doubling and/or pitchfork bifurcations of the saddle cycle on an ordinary resonance torus. We then describe several different mechanisms for the destruction of five-layered tori in a system of two linearly coupled logistic maps. One of these scenarios involves the destruction of the two intermediate layers...... of the five-layered torus through the transformation of two unstable node cycles into unstable focus cycles, followed by a saddle-node bifurcation that destroys the middle layer and a pair of simultaneous homoclinic bifurcations that produce two invariant closed curves with quasiperiodic dynamics along...

  19. A CASE STUDY OF MODELING A TORUS IN DIFFERENT MODELING SOFTWARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELJKOVIĆ Milica

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the complex geometric shapes requires the use of appropriate softwares. This study analyzes the process of modeling with two different computer softwares, AutoCAD and Rhinoceros. The aim is to demonstrate the similarities and differences between these softwares when used for modeling torus, a double curved geometric surface. The two modeling processes are compared in order to investigate the potentials of these softwares in the modeling of an architectural structure comprising a shell of the torus. After a detailed comparative analysis, the essential characteristics and shortcomings of these programs are emphasized and they were used to recommend the more appropriate one.

  20. The Haskell Programmer's Guide to the IO Monad : Don't Panic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinger, S.

    2005-01-01

    Now, that you have started with Haskell, have you written a program doing IO yet, like reading a file or writing on the terminal? Then you have used the IO monad—but do you understand how it works? The standard explanation is, that the IO monad hides the non-functional IO actions —which do have side

  1. Towards IoT platforms’ integration : Semantic Translations between W3C SSN and ETSI SAREF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, João Luiz; Daniele, L.M.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Wasielewska, Katarzyna; Szmeja, Pawel; Pawlowski, Wieslaw; Ganzha, Maria; Paprzycki, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Several IoT ontologies have been developed lately to improve the semantic interoperability of IoT solutions. The most popular of these ontologies, the W3C Semantic Sensor Network (SSN), is considered an ontological foundation for diverse IoT initiatives, particularly OpenIoT. With characteristics

  2. EDONIO: Extended distributed object network I/O library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Mathematical Sciences Section

    1995-03-01

    This report describes EDONIO (Extended Distributed Object Network I/O), an enhanced version of DONIO (Distributed Object Network I/O Library) optimized for the Intel Paragon Systems using the new M-ASYNC access mode. DONIO provided fast file I/O capabilities in the Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon distributed memory parallel environments by caching a copy of the entire file in memory distributed across all processors. EDONIO is more memory efficient by caching only a subset of the disk file at a time. DONIO was restricted by the high memory requirements and use of 32-bit integer indexing to handle files no larger than 2 Gigabytes. EDONIO overcomes this barrier by using the extended integer library routines provided by Intel`s NX operating system. For certain applications, EDONIO may show a ten-fold improvement in performance over the native NX I/O routines.

  3. Analysis of DDoS-capable IoT malwares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Donno, Michele; Dragoni, Nicola; Giaretta, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    a security perspective, this IoT revolution represents a potential disaster. This plethora of IoT devices that flooded the market were very badly protected, thus an easy prey for several families of malwares that can enslave and incorporate them in very large botnets. This, eventually, brought back......The Internet of Things (IoT) revolution promises to make our lives easier by providing cheap and always connected smart embedded devices, which can interact on the Internet and create added values for human needs. But all that glitters is not gold. Indeed, the other side of the coin is that, from......, in terms of their nature and evolution through the years. It also explores the additional offensive capabilities that this arsenal of IoT malwares has available, to mine the security of Internet users and systems. We think that this up-to-date picture will be a valuable reference to the scientific...

  4. iOS 7 programming pushing the limits

    CERN Document Server

    Napier, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Get ready to create killer apps for iPad and iPhone on the new iOS 7! With Apple's introduction of iOS 7, demand for developers who know the new iOS will be high. You need in-depth information about the new characteristics and capabilities of iOS 7, and that's what you'll find in this book. If you have experience with C or C++, this guide will show you how to create amazing apps for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. You'll also learn to maximize your programs for mobile devices using iPhone SDK 7.0. Advanced topics such as security services, running on multiple iPlatforms, and local networking w

  5. BRC/IoP standard importance in packaging quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kawecka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BRC/IoP (British Retail Consortium / Institute of Packaging is the only industry standard dedicated entrepreneurs operating in the packaging industry, primarily intended for contact with food. The requirements of the BRC / IoP guarantee the safety of packaging and fulfillment of all legal and hygienic requirements. The article presents the main features of the standard, the basic requirements contained in the document and the results of research on the implementation of quality management systems, including standard BRC / IoP and the actions that are required checklists. It is noticeable that there is little interest in certification BRC / IoP, due to low awareness of the standard, despite the fulfillment of some of the basic requirements of the surveyed companies.

  6. Io Science Opportunities with JIMO: Ultraviolet and Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. R.; Lopes, R.; Smythe, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission to possibly study Io's spectacular time-variable phenomena from moderate range which was not achieved by Galileo, Voyager, or Earth-based studies.

  7. Volcanism on Io: Insights from Global Geologic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Crown, D. A.; Geissler, P. E.; Schenk, P. M.; Yff, Jessica; Jaeger, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    We are preparing a new global geo-logic map of Jupiter s volcanic moon, Io. Here we report the type of data that are now available from our global mapping efforts, and how these data can be used to investigate questions regarding the volcano-tectonic evolution of Io. We are using the new map to investigate several specific questions about the geologic evolution of Io that previously could not be well addressed, including (for example) a comparison of the areas vs. the heights of Ionian mountains to assess their stability and evolution (Fig. 1). The area-height relationships of Io s visible mountains show the low abundance and low relief of volcanic mountains (tholi) relative to tectonic mountains, consistent with formation from low-viscosity lavas less likely to build steep edifices. Mottled mountains are generally less high than lineated mountains, consistent with a degradational formation.

  8. Intraosseous access EZ-IO in a prehospital emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Francisco; Galán, Maria Dolores; Alonso, Maria del Mar; Suárez, Rosa; Camacho, Carmen; Almagro, Veronica

    2013-09-01

    Several scientific and professional associations have made reports and recommendations to regulate the use of intraosseous (IO) access as an alternative to conventional intravenous access (IA) in emergency situations when IA cannot be obtained. It has been well documented that IO access is safe and effective for fluid resuscitation, drug delivery, and blood collection. IO access is attainable in all age groups. The objective of this prospective study was to test the use of a semi-automatic IO infusion system (EZ-IO) as an alternative to vascular access in critical patients treated in a prehospital emergency setting. This prospective, cross-sectional study included patients who required immediate peripheral vascular access. This study was performed by reviewing clinical records and through a questionnaire (created by and for nurses who perform the insertion with the EZ-IO). During the study period we identified 107 patients who underwent EZ-IO insertion (114 insertions were performed). Patients were predominantly male (66%) and middle aged (mean age 56 years; range 3-94). Overall, insertion was performed via the proximal tibia (49.4%) distal tibia (25.2%), radius (14.9%), and humerus (10.5%). During the study period, 14 insertions were performed in 2007, 44 in 2008, and 56 in 2009. A majority of patients (50.9%) had medical cardiac arrest, (25.4%) were injured trauma patients, and 12.3% had traumatic cardiac arrest. All patients were transported to a hospital with 2 sites of peripheral vascular access. The first site of access in these patients was IO (100% of cases) and the second site (in 79% of cases) was peripheral intravenous access. All EZ-IO insertions were achieved within 30 seconds and were successful upon the first attempt. The use of the EZ-IO provides a quick (100% performed within 30 seconds), easy, and reliable alternative to conventional venous access in critically ill patients. Traditional peripheral venous access requires a minimal preparation that

  9. Integrating Facebook iOS SDK with your application

    CERN Document Server

    Macrì, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    A tutorial-based guide with chapters focusing on learning and embedding crucial Facebook features.If you are a developer who wishes to develop and monetize your apps on the App store, then this is the book for you. This book assumes you have basic knowledge of iOS programming using Objective-C and XCode, however, prior knowledge of Facebook iOS SDK is not required.

  10. Efficient Data Management with Applications to IoT

    OpenAIRE

    Belli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) consists of a worldwide “network of networks,” composed by billions of interconnected heterogeneous devices denoted as things or “Smart Objects” (SOs). Significant research efforts have been dedicated to port the experience gained in the design of the Internet to the IoT, with the goal of maximizing interoperability, using the Internet Protocol (IP) and designing specific protocols like the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP), which have been widel...

  11. Practical comparison of distributed ledger technologies for IoT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Red, Val A.

    2017-05-01

    Existing distributed ledger implementations - specifically, several blockchain implementations - embody a cacophony of divergent capabilities augmenting innovations of cryptographic hashes, consensus mechanisms, and asymmetric cryptography in a wide variety of applications. Whether specifically designed for cryptocurrency or otherwise, several distributed ledgers rely upon modular mechanisms such as consensus or smart contracts. These components, however, can vary substantially among implementations; differences involving proof-of-work, practical byzantine fault tolerance, and other consensus approaches exemplify distinct distributed ledger variations. Such divergence results in unique combinations of modules, performance, latency, and fault tolerance. As implementations continue to develop rapidly due to the emerging nature of blockchain technologies, this paper encapsulates a snapshot of sensor and internet of things (IoT) specific implementations of blockchain as of the end of 2016. Several technical risks and divergent approaches preclude standardization of a blockchain for sensors and IoT in the foreseeable future; such issues will be assessed alongside the practicality of IoT applications among Hyperledger, Iota, and Ethereum distributed ledger implementations suggested for IoT. This paper contributes a comparison of existing distributed ledger implementations intended for practical sensor and IoT utilization. A baseline for characterizing distributed ledger implementations in the context of IoT and sensors is proposed. Technical approaches and performance are compared considering IoT size, weight, and power limitations. Consensus and smart contracts, if applied, are also analyzed for the respective implementations' practicality and security. Overall, the maturity of distributed ledgers with respect to sensor and IoT applicability will be analyzed for enterprise interoperability.

  12. Industry IoT Gateway for Cloud Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Zolotová, Iveta; Bundzel, Marek; Lojka, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Part 2: Open Cloud Computing Architecture for Smart Manufacturing and Cyber Physical Production Systems; International audience; New approaches and technologies like Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and Big Data are giving rise to another industrial revolution. We propose here an implementation of an industrial gateway architecture adopting the idea of IoT, intelligent methods, Machine-to-Machine and Cyber-Physical Systems. The proposed gateway creates a virtual representation of the...

  13. Current parallel I/O limitations to scalable data analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, Ajith Arthur; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the limitations to parallel scalability which we have encountered when applying our otherwise optimally scalable parallel statistical analysis tool kit to large data sets distributed across the parallel file system of the current premier DOE computational facility. This report describes our study to evaluate the effect of parallel I/O on the overall scalability of a parallel data analysis pipeline using our scalable parallel statistics tool kit [PTBM11]. In this goal, we tested it using the Jaguar-pf DOE/ORNL peta-scale platform on a large combustion simulation data under a variety of process counts and domain decompositions scenarios. In this report we have recalled the foundations of the parallel statistical analysis tool kit which we have designed and implemented, with the specific double intent of reproducing typical data analysis workflows, and achieving optimal design for scalable parallel implementations. We have briefly reviewed those earlier results and publications which allow us to conclude that we have achieved both goals. However, in this report we have further established that, when used in conjuction with a state-of-the-art parallel I/O system, as can be found on the premier DOE peta-scale platform, the scaling properties of the overall analysis pipeline comprising parallel data access routines degrade rapidly. This finding is problematic and must be addressed if peta-scale data analysis is to be made scalable, or even possible. In order to attempt to address these parallel I/O limitations, we will investigate the use the Adaptable IO System (ADIOS) [LZL+10] to improve I/O performance, while maintaining flexibility for a variety of IO options, such MPI IO, POSIX IO. This system is developed at ORNL and other collaborating institutions, and is being tested extensively on Jaguar-pf. Simulation code being developed on these systems will also use ADIOS to output the data thereby making it easier for other systems, such as ours, to

  14. Semantic Interoperability in Heterogeneous IoT Infrastructure for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Jabbar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability remains a significant burden to the developers of Internet of Things’ Systems. This is due to the fact that the IoT devices are highly heterogeneous in terms of underlying communication protocols, data formats, and technologies. Secondly due to lack of worldwide acceptable standards, interoperability tools remain limited. In this paper, we proposed an IoT based Semantic Interoperability Model (IoT-SIM to provide Semantic Interoperability among heterogeneous IoT devices in healthcare domain. Physicians communicate their patients with heterogeneous IoT devices to monitor their current health status. Information between physician and patient is semantically annotated and communicated in a meaningful way. A lightweight model for semantic annotation of data using heterogeneous devices in IoT is proposed to provide annotations for data. Resource Description Framework (RDF is a semantic web framework that is used to relate things using triples to make it semantically meaningful. RDF annotated patients’ data has made it semantically interoperable. SPARQL query is used to extract records from RDF graph. For simulation of system, we used Tableau, Gruff-6.2.0, and Mysql tools.

  15. An Application-Driven Modular IoT Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Yelamarthi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Building upon the advancements in the recent years, a new paradigm in technology has emerged in Internet of Things (IoT. IoT has allowed for communication with the surrounding environment through a multitude of sensors and actuators, yet operating on limited energy. Several researchers have presented IoT architectures for respective applications, often challenged by requiring major updates for adoption to a different application. Further, this comes with several uncertainties such as type of computational device required at the edge, mode of wireless connectivity required, methods to obtain power efficiency, and not ensuring rapid deployment. This paper starts with providing a horizontal overview of each layer in IoT architecture and options for different applications. Then it presents a broad application-driven modular architecture, which can be easily customized for rapid deployment. This paper presents the diverse hardware used in several IoT layers such as sensors, embedded processors, wireless transceivers, internet gateway, and application management cloud server. Later, this paper presents implementation results for diverse applications including healthcare, structural health monitoring, agriculture, and indoor tour guide systems. It is hoped that this research will assist the potential user to easily choose IoT hardware and software as it pertains to their respective needs.

  16. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Pritchard, Michael [Auburn University; Wang, Bin [Auburn University; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  17. 3-D ICs as a Platform for IoT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    3-D ICs are a natural platform for IoT devices.IoT devices exhibit a small footprint, integrate disparatetechnologies, and require long term...sustainability (extremelylow power or self powered). The 3-D structure exhibits opportunitiesessential for IoT devices, including heterogeneity,small form...factor, and reduced power dissipation, making3-D integration a favorable candidate for IoT devices. Thechallenges of IoT devices and related

  18. Overview of results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gates, D.A.; Ahn, J.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Bastasz, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Brower, D.; Bush, C.; Canik, J.; Caravelli, G.; Carter, M.; Caughman, J.; Chang, C.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; D’Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Efthimion, P.; Ejiri, A.; Ershov, N.; Evans, T.; Feibush, E.; Fenstermacher, M.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Funaba, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grisham, L.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hillesheim, J.; Hillis, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Hosea, J.; Hu, B.; Humphreys, D.; Idehara, T.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ishida, A.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Ji, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kawahata, K.; Kawamori, E.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kimura, H.; Kolemen, E.; Krasheninnikov, H.; Krstic, P.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Luhmann Jr, N.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mitarai, O.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, S.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Nelson, B.; Nguyen, X.; Nishino, N.; Nishiura, M.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Pacella, D.; Park, J.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Ram, A.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redd, A.; Reimerdes, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scott, S.; Shaing, K.; Sharpe, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Strait, T.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, R.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Ticos, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Turrnbull, A.; Tynan, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Umansky, M.; Urban, Jakub; Utergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, M.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Welander, A.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Xu, X.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zweben, S.; Choe, W.; Jung, H.; Kim, J.; Lee, W.; Park, H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104016-104016 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/22nd./. Geneva, 13.10.2008-18.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : NSTX * Spherical tokamaks * Overdense plasma * Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Elektron Bernstein waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://www.iop.org/EJ/article/0029-5515/49/10/104016/nf9_10_104016

  19. Asymmetry of W7-X magnet system introduced by torus assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, Joris, E-mail: joris.fellinger@ipp.mpg.de; Egorov, Konstantin; Kallmeyer, Johannes Peter; Bykov, Victor; Schauer, Felix

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Torus assembly introduces magnet system asymmetry up to 2 mm. •Asymmetry due to torus assembly is of same magnitude as caused by uncertainties of magnet system properties (material, contacts, geometry and initial preload). •Asymmetry is input for EM field error calculation. -- Abstract: The magnet system of the stellerator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) consists of 5 modules of 14 superconducting coils with complex 3D shape each. After manufacturing the coils and assembly of the modules on temporary stands, the position of each module on the machine base was successfully optimized to minimize the electromagnetic (EM) field asymmetry. This asymmetry originates from inevitable geometric deviations of the coils from the target shape due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. However, new deviations were introduced after module optimization due to bolting the modules of the magnet system together to a torus, removing temporary supports and further loading of the machine base with weight of additional components. In this paper, the geometrical deviations along the centre line of the coil currents are assessed through detailed step-by-step non-linear finite element (FE) simulation of the assembly procedure of the complete torus. The model is evaluated against measured displacements and reaction forces monitored during consequent assembly steps. The results are being used to quantify the obtained field asymmetry and countermeasures to minimize it.

  20. One-to-one embedding between honeycomb mesh and Petersen-Torus networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung-Hyun; Sim, Hyun; Park, Dae-Heon; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Yang-Sun

    2011-01-01

    As wireless mobile telecommunication bases organize their structure using a honeycomb-mesh algorithm, there are many studies about parallel processing algorithms like the honeycomb mesh in Wireless Sensor Networks. This paper aims to study the Peterson-Torus graph algorithm in regard to the continuity with honeycomb-mesh algorithm in order to apply the algorithm to sensor networks. Once a new interconnection network is designed, parallel algorithms are developed with huge research costs to use such networks. If the old network is embedded in a newly designed network, a developed algorithm in the old network is reusable in a newly designed network. Petersen-Torus has been designed recently, and the honeycomb mesh has already been designed as a well-known interconnection network. In this paper, we propose a one-to-one embedding algorithm for the honeycomb mesh (HMn) in the Petersen-Torus PT(n,n), and prove that dilation of the algorithm is 5, congestion is 2, and expansion is 5/3. The proposed one-to-one embedding is applied so that processor throughput can be minimized when the honeycomb mesh algorithm runs in the Petersen-Torus.

  1. On the existence of star products on quotient spaces of linear Hamiltonian torus actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbig, Hans-Christian; Iyengar, Srikanth B.; Pflaum, Markus J.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss BFV deformation quantization (Bordemann et al. in A homological approach to singular reduction in deformation quantization, singularity theory, pp. 443–461. World Scientific, Hackensack, 2007) in the special case of a linear Hamiltonian torus action. In particular, we show...

  2. On the geometry of certain irreducible non-torus plane sextics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyral, Christophe; Oka, Mutsuo

    2009-01-01

    An irreducible non-torus plane sextic with simple singularities is said to be special if its fundamental group factors to a dihedral group. There exist (exactly) ten configurations of simple singularities that are realizable by such curves. Among them, six are realizable by non-special sextics...

  3. A fully nonlinear generalized Monge-Ampere PDE on a torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi P. Pingali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We prove an existence result for a "generalized" Monge-Ampere equation, introduced in [11], under some assumptions on a flat complex 3-torus. As an application we prove the existence of Chern connections on certain kinds of holomorphic vector bundles on complex 3-tori whose top Chern character forms are given representatives.

  4. Edge fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency ( e > p e /p e where φ and p e are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs

  5. The spectrum of the torus profile to a geometric variational problem with long range interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaofeng; Wei, Juncheng

    2017-08-01

    The profile problem for the Ohta-Kawasaki diblock copolymer theory is a geometric variational problem. The energy functional is defined on sets in R3 of prescribed volume and the energy of an admissible set is its perimeter plus a long range interaction term related to the Newtonian potential of the set. This problem admits a solution, called a torus profile, that is a set enclosed by an approximate torus of the major radius 1 and the minor radius q. The torus profile is both axially symmetric about the z axis and reflexively symmetric about the xy-plane. There is a way to set up the profile problem in a function space as a partial differential-integro equation. The linearized operator L of the problem at the torus profile is decomposed into a family of linear ordinary differential-integro operators Lm where the index m = 0 , 1 , 2 , … is called a mode. The spectrum of L is the union of the spectra of the Lm's. It is proved that for each m, when q is sufficiently small, Lm is positive definite. (0 is an eigenvalue for both L0 and L1, due to the translation and rotation invariance.) As q tends to 0, more and more Lm's become positive definite. However no matter how small q is, there is always a mode m of which Lm has a negative eigenvalue. This mode grows to infinity like q - 3 / 4 as q → 0.

  6. EW[OIII] as an Orientation Indicator for Quasars: Implications for the Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, Susanna [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Florence (Italy); Marconi, Alessandro; Risaliti, Guido [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Lusso, Elisabeta, E-mail: susanna.bisogni@cfa.harvard.edu [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-21

    We present an analysis of the average spectral properties of 12,000 SDSS quasars as a function of accretion disc inclination, as measured from the equivalent width of the [OIII] 5007Å line. The use of this indicator on a large sample of quasars from the SDSS DR7 has proven the presence of orientation effects on the features of UV/optical spectra, confirming the presence of outflows in the NLR gas and that the geometry of the BLR is disc-like. Relying on the goodness of this indicator, we are now using it to investigate other bands/components of AGN. Specifically, the study of the UV/optical/IR SED of the same sample provides information on the obscuring “torus.” The SED shows a decrease of the IR fraction moving from face-on to edge-on sources, in agreement with models where the torus is co-axial with the accretion disc. Moreover, the fact we are able to observe the broad emission lines also in sources in an edge-on position, suggests that the torus is rather clumpy than smooth as in the Unified Model. The behavior of the SED as a function of EW[OIII] is in agreement with the predictions of the clumpy torus models as well.

  7. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  8. Source location of Jupiter's decametric radiation and UV aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koitiro; Carr, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The source region of a component of Jovian Io-unrelated decametric radiation is inferred geometrically based on simultaneous observations from Voyager spacecraft and a ground-based observatory with the aid of a hollow cone beam model and model of the Jovian magnetic field. The results indicate that the sources of this component lie above the northern hemisphere, and on field lines that connect the Io plasma torus and the Jovian ionosphere in the so-called active sector. It is concluded that an interaction between the Io-torus plasma and the ionospheric plasma through a thin flux tube initiates the decametric radiation.

  9. Intermittency in the Helimak, a simple magnetic torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E. I.; Rowan, W. L.; Gentle, K. W.; Horton, W.; Bernard, T.

    2017-10-01

    Irregularly-spaced, large-amplitude bursts are observed in the Helimak plasma turbulence with sufficient definition to investigate their physical basis and possibly improve understanding of the induced particle transport. The Helimak is an experimental realization of a sheared cylindrical slab that generates and heats a plasma with microwaves and confines it in a helical magnetic field. Although it is MHD stable, the plasma is always in a nonlinearly saturated state of microturbulence. The intermittency in this turbulence manifests itself in highly skewed PDFs of the normalized electron density. Cross-conditional averaging exposes large amplitude structures propagating down the density gradient at a few hundred meters per second. Introduction of a radial electric field via bias plates appears to suppress these intermittent transport events (ITEs) for Er pointing down the density gradient. In addition, the cross-conditionally averaged waveforms are relatively unchanged as connection length is varied. Within certain regimes, our measurements are consistent with the predictions of a stochastic model that represents the plasma fluctuations as a random sequence of burst events. Furthermore, we attempt to gain insight into the physical origin of these ITEs by searching for similar statistical behavior in fluid and gyrokinetic simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02- 04ER5476.

  10. High-performance file I/O in Java : existing approaches and bulk I/O extensions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonachea, D.; Dickens, P.; Thakur, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Illinois Institute of Technology

    2001-07-01

    There is a growing interest in using Java as the language for developing high-performance computing applications. To be successful in the high-performance computing domain, however, Java must not only be able to provide high computational performance, but also high-performance I/O. In this paper, we first examine several approaches that attempt to provide high-performance I/O in Java - many of which are not obvious at first glance - and evaluate their performance on two parallel machines, the IBM SP and the SGI Origin2000. We then propose extensions to the Java I/O library that address the deficiencies in the Java I/O API and improve performance dramatically. The extensions add bulk (array) I/O operations to Java, thereby removing much of the overhead currently associated with array I/O in Java. We have implemented the extensions in two ways: in a standard JVM using the Java Native Interface (JNI) and in a high-performance parallel dialect of Java called Titanium. We describe the two implementations and present performance results that demonstrate the benefits of the proposed extensions.

  11. Applications of advanced kinetic collisional radiative modeling and Bremsstrahlung emission to quantitative impurity analysis on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    An advanced kinetic collisional radiative model is used to predict beam into plasma charge-exchange visible and extreme UV (XUV ∽ 50 -700 Å ) light emission to quantify impurity density profiles on NSTX. This kinetic model is first benchmarked by predicting line-of-sight integrated emission for the visible λ = 5292.0 Å line of carbon (C VI n = 8 → 7), and comparing these predictions to absolute calibrated measurements from the active CHarge-Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy diagnostic (CHERS) on NSTX. Once benchmarked, the model is used to predict charge-exchange emission for the 182.1 Å line of carbon (C VI n = 3 → 2) that is used to scale Bremsstrahlung continuum emission in the UV/XUV region. The scaled Bremsstrahlung emission is used as a base to estimate an absolute intensity calibration curve of a XUV Transmission Grating-based Imaging Spectrometer (TGIS) diagnostic installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX and upgrade NSTX-U). The TGIS diagnostic operates in the wavelength region ∽ 50 -700 Å , and it is used to measure impurity spectra from charge-exchange emission. Impurity densities are estimated by fitting synthetic emission from the kinetic charge-exchange model to TGIS spectral measurements.

  12. Three-dimensional thermomechanical analysis of a stainless steel and copper divertor plate for the next European torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, V.; Papa, L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the performance and limits of a diverter plate for the Next European Torus (NET) are assessed. The design is a plasma-facing component that integrates the diverter plates and the inboard first wall in a monoblock panel. It is made of stainless steel poloidal U-tubes embedded in a copper matrix and protected by a carbon-fiber composite graphite armor. The thermal and thermomechanical behavior are analyzed in the high thermal flux zone taking into account the actual surface heating, which ranges from 5 to 10 MW/m 2 . A simplified preliminary analysis assesses the water flow and the component geometry in accordance with the system and material data foreseen for NET. It is shown that if the surface temperature of the armor is limited to 1273 K, the graphite thickness must be limited to 7.5 mm. Detailed thermal and mechanical finite element analyses, performed by the CASTEM 2000 code, show that the cooling tubes remain just below the creep regime temperature. The allowable limits prescribed by international standards are met, and the component's lifetime is 3000 cycles

  13. Relaxed plasmas in external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Li, J.

    1991-08-01

    The well-known theory of relaxed plasmas (Taylor states) is extended to external magnetic fields whose field lines intersect the conducting toroidal boundary. Application to an axially symmetric, large-aspect-ratio torus with circular cross section shows that the maximum pinch ratio, and hence the phenomenon of current saturation, is independent of the external field. The relaxed state is explicitly given for an external octupole field. In this case, field reversal is inhibited near parts of the boundary if the octupole generates magnetic x-points within the plasma. (orig.)

  14. Edge plasma fluctuations measurements in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Ionitha, C.; Balan, P.C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Figueiredo, H.F.C.; Silva, C.; Stoeckel, J.; Adamek, J.; Hron, M.; Tichy, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Calderon, E.; Martines, E.; Van Oost, G.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    We report on investigations on electrostatic fluctuations in the edge plasma region which have been carried out during the last few years at several European fusion experiments. Various methods and probe arrangements have been used to determine fluctuations of the plasma potential, the electric field and the electron temperature. Investigations were under-taken in ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak), Lisbon, Portugal, in CASTOR (Czech Academy of Science TORus), Prague, Czech Republic, and the TJ-II Flexible Heliac at CIEMAT in Madrid, Spain. (author)

  15. Two classes of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 images of the south polar region of Io has revealed that a major volcanic eruption occured there during the period between the two spacecraft encounters. An annular deposit ???1400 km in diameter formed around the Aten Patera caldera (311??W, 48??S), the floor of which changed from orange to red-black. The characteristics of this eruption are remarkably similar to those described earlier for an eruption centered on Surt caldera (338??W, 45??N) that occured during the same period, also at high latitude, but in the north. Both volcanic centers were evidently inactive during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters but were active sometime between the two. The geometric and colorimetric characteristics, as well as scale of the two annular deposits, are virtually identical; both resemble the surface features formed by the eruption of Pele (255??W, 18??S). These three very large plume eruptions suggest a class of eruption distinct from that of six smaller plumes observed to be continously active by both Voyagers 1 and 2. The smaller plumes, of which Prometheus is the type example, are longer-lived, deposit bright, whitish material, erupt at velocities of ???0.5 km sec-1, and are concentrated at low latitudes in an equatorial belt around the satellite. The very large Pele-type plumes, on the other hand, are relatively short-lived, deposit darker red materials, erupt at ???1.0 km sec-1, and (rather than restricted to a latitudinal band) are restricted in longitude from 240?? to 360??W. Both direct thermal infrared temperature measurements and the implied color temperatures for quenched liquid sulfur suggest that hot spot temperatures of ???650??K are associated with the large plumes and temperatures 650??K), sulfur is a low-viscosity fluid (orange and black, respectively); at other temperatures it is either solid or has a high viscosity. As a result, there will be two zones in Io's crust in which liquid sulfur will flow freely: a shallow zone

  16. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Andre, R.; Bell, R.E.; Darrow, D.S.; Domier, C.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.C.; Levinton, F.M.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Menard, J.E.; Park, H.; Stutman, D.; Roquemore, A.L.; Tritz, K.; Yuh, H

    2007-01-01

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ∼ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvenic (f ∼ 20-150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvenic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  17. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley, R. Andre, R.E. Bell, D.S. Darrow, C.W. Domier, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, K.C. Lee, F.M. Levinton, D. Liu, N.C. Luhmann, Jr., J.E. Menard, H. Park, D. Stutman, A.L. Roquemore, K. Tritz, H. Yuh and the NSTX Team

    2007-11-15

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ~ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvénic (f ~ 20 – 150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvénic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  18. A Return to Io: Science Goals and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Io remains one of the most fascinating objects in the solar system: the only place beyond Earth where we can watch hard-rock geology in action. In its high heat flow Io resembles the early Earth, providing a present-day analog to some of the processes that dominated the Earth's geology at the time that life first appeared. Io's usefulness as an early-Earth analog has been underscored recently by the detection of very high eruption temperatures, hotter than terrestrial basaltic lavas. These temperatures are most plausibly interpreted as resulting from ultramafic lava compositions, analagous to the komatiites that were common on Earth in the Precambrian but which have been virtually absent during the Phanerozoic. The large scale of many Io eruptions also provides useful analogs to Phanerozoic terrestrial eruptions, such as flood basalts, which are important for the Earth's geological and biological evolution but which occur too rarely to be witnessed by humans on our own planet. By providing living examples, Io can thus play the same role in understanding large-scale planetary volcanism that volcanically active terrestrial regions have played in understanding the results of smaller-scale volcanic processes seen in the geological record worldwide. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Temperatures on Io: Implications to Geophysics, Volcanology, and Volatile Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A. S.; Isbell, N. R.; Edwards, K. E.; Pearl, J. C.

    1996-03-01

    Voyager 1 IRIS spectra of Io from 4- to 55 micrometers wavelength have been further analyzed. We report two advances here: improved pointing corrections for the IRIS observations and improved background thermal models. The pointing corrections allow detailed mapping of thermal anomalies relative to surface features, thus enabling improved geologic interpretations. The identification of low-temperature (T) thermal anomalies due to cooling flows and pyroclastics, and to determination of Io's heat flow. The background Ts also provide important constraints on models of Io's atmosphere and volatile transfers. A new model for Io's surface that has emerged from this and other studies includes 3 basic thermophysical units: (1) bright, SO2-rich regolith with a high thermal inertia over ~80% of the surface; (2) darker, SO2-poor regolith with a low thermal inertia over ~18% of Io; and (3) high-T hot spots over ~2% of the surface. We present new evidence that unit 2 contains ubiquitous low-T geothermal anomalies from cooling volcanic deposits.

  20. Landform Degradation and Slope Processes on Io: The Galileo View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Chuang, Frank C.; Head, James W., III; McEwen, Alfred S.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Nixon, Brian E.; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Schenk, Paul M.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo mission has revealed remarkable evidence of mass movement and landform degradation on Io. We recognize four major slope types observed on a number of intermediate resolution (250 m/pixel) images and several additional textures on very high resolution (10 m/pixel) images. Slopes and scarps on Io often show evidence of erosion, seen in the simplest form as alcove-carving slumps and slides at all scales. Many of the mass movement deposits on Io are probably mostly the consequence of block release and brittle slope failure. Sputtering plays no significant role. Sapping as envisioned by McCauley et al. remains viable. We speculate that alcove-lined canyons seen in one observation and lobed deposits seen along the bases of scarps in several locations may reflect the plastic deformation and 'glacial' flow of interstitial volatiles (e.g., SO2) heated by locally high geothermal energy to mobilize the volatile. The appearance of some slopes and near-slope surface textures seen in very high resolution images is consistent with erosion from sublimation-degradation. However, a suitable volatile (e.g., H2S) that can sublimate fast enough to alter Io's youthful surface has not been identified. Disaggregation from chemical decomposition of solid S2O and other polysulfur oxides may conceivably operate on Io. This mechanism could degrade landforms in a manner that resembles degradation from sublimation, and at a rate that can compete with resurfacing.

  1. I/O load balancing for big data HPC applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Arnab K. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Goyal, Arpit [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Butt, Ali R. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Brim, Michael J. [ORNL; Srinivasa, Sangeetha B. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2018-01-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) big data problems require efficient distributed storage systems. However, at scale, such storage systems often experience load imbalance and resource contention due to two factors: the bursty nature of scientific application I/O; and the complex I/O path that is without centralized arbitration and control. For example, the extant Lustre parallel file system-that supports many HPC centers-comprises numerous components connected via custom network topologies, and serves varying demands of a large number of users and applications. Consequently, some storage servers can be more loaded than others, which creates bottlenecks and reduces overall application I/O performance. Existing solutions typically focus on per application load balancing, and thus are not as effective given their lack of a global view of the system. In this paper, we propose a data-driven approach to load balance the I/O servers at scale, targeted at Lustre deployments. To this end, we design a global mapper on Lustre Metadata Server, which gathers runtime statistics from key storage components on the I/O path, and applies Markov chain modeling and a minimum-cost maximum-flow algorithm to decide where data should be placed. Evaluation using a realistic system simulator and a real setup shows that our approach yields better load balancing, which in turn can improve end-to-end performance.

  2. I/O Performance of Virtualized Cloud Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Devarshi; Canon, Shane; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-11-03

    The scientific community is exploring the suitability of cloud infrastructure to handle High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. The goal of Magellan, a project funded through DOE ASCR, is to investigate the potential role of cloud computing to address the computing needs of the Department of Energy?s Office of Science, especially for mid-range computing and data-intensive applications which are not served through existing DOE centers today. Prior work has shown that applications with significant communication orI/O tend to perform poorly in virtualized cloud environments. However, there is a limited understanding of the I/O characteristics in virtualized cloud environments. This paper will present our results in benchmarking the I/O performance over different cloud and HPC platforms to identify the major bottlenecks in existing infrastructure. We compare the I/O performance using IOR benchmark on two cloud platforms - Amazon and Magellan. We analyze the performance of different storage options available, different instance types in multiple availability zones. Finally, we perform large-scale tests in order to analyze the variability in the I/O patterns over time and region. Our results highlight the overhead and variability in I/O performance on both public and private cloud solutions. Our results will help applications decide between the different storage options enabling applications to make effective choices.

  3. A New Cross-By-Pass-Torus Architecture Based on CBP-Mesh and Torus Interconnection for On-Chip Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzari, Usman Ali; Sajid, Muhammad; Anjum, Sheraz; Agha, Shahrukh; Torres, Frank Sill

    2016-01-01

    A Mesh topology is one of the most promising architecture due to its regular and simple structure for on-chip communication. Performance of mesh topology degraded greatly by increasing the network size due to small bisection width and large network diameter. In order to overcome this limitation, many researchers presented modified Mesh design by adding some extra links to improve its performance in terms of network latency and power consumption. The Cross-By-Pass-Mesh was presented by us as an improved version of Mesh topology by intelligent addition of extra links. This paper presents an efficient topology named Cross-By-Pass-Torus for further increase in the performance of the Cross-By-Pass-Mesh topology. The proposed design merges the best features of the Cross-By-Pass-Mesh and Torus, to reduce the network diameter, minimize the average number of hops between nodes, increase the bisection width and to enhance the overall performance of the network. In this paper, the architectural design of the topology is presented and analyzed against similar kind of 2D topologies in terms of average latency, throughput and power consumption. In order to certify the actual behavior of proposed topology, the synthetic traffic trace and five different real embedded application workloads are applied to the proposed as well as other competitor network topologies. The simulation results indicate that Cross-By-Pass-Torus is an efficient candidate among its predecessor's and competitor topologies due to its less average latency and increased throughput at a slight cost in network power and energy for on-chip communication.

  4. A New Cross-By-Pass-Torus Architecture Based on CBP-Mesh and Torus Interconnection for On-Chip Communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ali Gulzari

    Full Text Available A Mesh topology is one of the most promising architecture due to its regular and simple structure for on-chip communication. Performance of mesh topology degraded greatly by increasing the network size due to small bisection width and large network diameter. In order to overcome this limitation, many researchers presented modified Mesh design by adding some extra links to improve its performance in terms of network latency and power consumption. The Cross-By-Pass-Mesh was presented by us as an improved version of Mesh topology by intelligent addition of extra links. This paper presents an efficient topology named Cross-By-Pass-Torus for further increase in the performance of the Cross-By-Pass-Mesh topology. The proposed design merges the best features of the Cross-By-Pass-Mesh and Torus, to reduce the network diameter, minimize the average number of hops between nodes, increase the bisection width and to enhance the overall performance of the network. In this paper, the architectural design of the topology is presented and analyzed against similar kind of 2D topologies in terms of average latency, throughput and power consumption. In order to certify the actual behavior of proposed topology, the synthetic traffic trace and five different real embedded application workloads are applied to the proposed as well as other competitor network topologies. The simulation results indicate that Cross-By-Pass-Torus is an efficient candidate among its predecessor's and competitor topologies due to its less average latency and increased throughput at a slight cost in network power and energy for on-chip communication.

  5. Fabrication of an overdenture covering a torus palatinus using a combination of denture base materials: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Stephen; Hellen, Warren

    2006-04-01

    A maxillary torus provides a challenge when restoring an edentulous arch. Tori tend to have very thin mucosa and can be intolerant of normal pressures from a denture base. The tori tend to have large undercuts and at times extend to the junction with the soft palate, preventing the creation of a good palatal seal. Triple lamination involves combining 3 materials to fabricate a denture base that utilizes the retentive aspects of the torus. The thermoplastic flange provides a measure of flexibility, allowing the denture to seat over the torus. The resilient liner provides a cushion to diffuse the occlusal load, while the rigid acrylic base provides the support for the denture teeth. Using this approach, a very retentive denture was fabricated using the maxillary torus as a key element in anchoring the prosthesis.

  6. Acentric La3(IO3)8(OH) and La(IO3)2(NO3): Partial Substitution of Iodate Anions in La(IO3)3 by Hydroxide or Nitrate Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fei-Fei; Hu, Chun-Li; Li, Bing-Xuan; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2017-11-20

    Partial substitution of iodate anions in La(IO 3 ) 3 by OH - or NO 3 - anion led to acentric La 3 (IO 3 ) 8 (OH) and chiral La(IO 3 ) 2 (NO 3 ). The structure of La 3 (IO 3 ) 8 (OH) can be seen as a complex three-dimensional (3D) network composed of two-dimensional [La 3 (IO 3 ) 2 (OH)] 6+ cationic layers that are further bridged by remaining iodate anions, or alternatively as a 3D network composed of one-dimensional [La 3 (IO 3 ) 6 (OH)] 2+ cationic columns being further interconnected by additional iodate anions, while the structure of La(IO 3 ) 2 (NO 3 ) can be seen as a novel 3D structure with planar NO 3 groups serving as linkage between the [La 3 (IO 3 ) 6 ] 3+ triple layers. Compared to La(IO 3 ) 3 , both compounds show considerably wide band gaps and enhanced thermal stability. La(IO 3 ) 2 (NO 3 ) shows a moderate second harmonic generation (SHG) response of ∼0.6 times that of KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ), a wide band gap of 4.23 eV, and a high LDT value (22 × AgGaS 2 ). Optical property measurements, thermal analysis, as well as theoretical calculations on SHG origin, were performed. It can be deduced that partial substitution of iodate anions can be a facile route to design new noncentrosymmetric metal iodates with novel structure and potential application.

  7. Lava lakes on Io: Observations of Io's volcanic activity from Galileo NIMS during the 2001 fly-bys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Kamp, L.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E.P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D.A.; Carlson, R.W.; Doute, S.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) obtained its final observations of Io during the spacecraft's fly-bys in August (I31) and October 2001 (I32). We present a summary of the observations and results from these last two fly-bys, focusing on the distribution of thermal emission from Io's many volcanic regions that give insights into the eruption styles of individual hot spots. We include a compilation of hot spot data obtained from Galileo, Voyager, and ground-based observations. At least 152 active volcanic centers are now known on Io, 104 of which were discovered or confirmed by Galileo observations, including 23 from the I31 and I32 Io fly-by observations presented here. We modify the classification scheme of Keszthelyi et al. (2001, J. Geophys. Res. 106 (E12) 33 025-33 052) of Io eruption styles to include three primary types: promethean (lava flow fields emplaced as compound pahoehoe flows with small plumes 200 km high plumes and rapidly-emplaced flow fields), and a new style we call "lokian" that includes all eruptions confined within paterae with or without associated plume eruptions). Thermal maps of active paterae from NIMS data reveal hot edges that are characteristic of lava lakes. Comparisons with terrestrial analogs show that Io's lava lakes have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes. The majority of activity on Io, based on locations and longevity of hot spots, appears to be of this third type. This finding has implications for how Io is being resurfaced as our results imply that eruptions of lava are predominantly confined within paterae, thus making it unlikely that resurfacing is done primarily by extensive lava flows. Our conclusion is consistent with the findings of Geissler et al. (2004, Icarus, this issue) that plume eruptions and deposits, rather than the eruption of copious amounts of effusive lavas, are responsible for Io's high resurfacing rates. The origin and longevity of islands within ionian

  8. Transient induced tungsten melting at the Joint European Torus (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Matthews, G. F.; Krieger, K.; Iglesias, D.; Bunting, P.; Corre, Y.; Silburn, S.; Balboa, I.; Bazylev, B.; Conway, N.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, R.; Gauthier, E.; Gaspar, J.; Jachmich, S.; Jepu, I.; Makepeace, C.; Scannell, R.; Stamp, M.; Petersson, P.; Pitts, R. A.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Melting is one of the major risks associated with tungsten (W) plasma-facing components (PFCs) in tokamaks like JET or ITER. These components are designed such that leading edges and hence excessive plasma heat loads deposited at near normal incidence are avoided. Due to the high stored energies in ITER discharges, shallow surface melting can occur under insufficiently mitigated plasma disruption and so-called edge localised modes—power load transients. A dedicated program was carried out at the JET to study the physics and consequences of W transient melting. Following initial exposures in 2013 (ILW-1) of a W-lamella with leading edge, new experiments have been performed on a sloped surface (15{}\\circ slope) during the 2015/2016 (ILW-3) campaign. This new experiment allows significantly improved infrared thermography measurements and thus resolved important issue of power loading in the context of the previous leading edge exposures. The new lamella was monitored by local diagnostics: spectroscopy, thermography and high-resolution photography in between discharges. No impact on the main plasma was observed despite a strong increase of the local W source consistent with evaporation. In contrast to the earlier exposure, no droplet emission was observed from the sloped surface. Topological modifications resulting from the melting are clearly visible between discharges on the photographic images. Melt damage can be clearly linked to the infrared measurements: the emissivity drops in zones where melting occurs. In comparison with the previous leading edge experiment, no runaway melt motion is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the escape of thermionic electrons emitted from the melt zone is largely suppressed in this geometry, where the magnetic field intersects the surface at lower angles than in the case of perpendicular impact on a leading edge. Utilising both exposures allows us to further test the model of the forces driving melt motion that

  9. Evidence of a global magma ocean in Io's interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Krishan K; Jia, Xianzhe; Kivelson, Margaret G; Nimmo, Francis; Schubert, Gerald; Russell, Christopher T

    2011-06-03

    Extensive volcanism and high-temperature lavas hint at a global magma reservoir in Io, but no direct evidence has been available. We exploited Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a sounding signal and show that the magnetometer data collected by the Galileo spacecraft near Io provide evidence of electromagnetic induction from a global conducting layer. We demonstrate that a completely solid mantle provides insufficient response to explain the magnetometer observations, but a global subsurface magma layer with a thickness of over 50 kilometers and a rock melt fraction of 20% or more is fully consistent with the observations. We also place a stronger upper limit of about 110 nanoteslas (surface equatorial field) on the dynamo dipolar field generated inside Io.

  10. Development of eStudent iOS mobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladjan Antic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— iOS is the Apple mobile operating system, for Apple mobile devices. Initially developed for iPhone, and later for iPod Touch, iPad, AppleTV. The Metropolitan University has a Web application titled eStudent, which enables students by Web to get information about their marks for all subjects, their financies, exam scheduling, professors and assistents, and send exam registration and feedback about teaching, etc. This paper explains the development of the mobile application eStudent on the iOS platform. This application enables students whenever they want, by using their iPhone mobile phone, to get access to the information from the eStudent Web application, and to present it on their iPhone User Interface (UI. This paper explains in details software requirements analysis, system architecture, system modelling, and UI of the eStudent iOS mobile application.

  11. Tractable policy management framework for IoT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goynugur, Emre; de Mel, Geeth; Sensoy, Murat; Calo, Seraphin

    2017-05-01

    Due to the advancement in the technology, hype of connected devices (hence forth referred to as IoT) in support of automating the functionality of many domains, be it intelligent manufacturing or smart homes, have become a reality. However, with the proliferation of such connected and interconnected devices, efficiently and effectively managing networks manually becomes an impractical, if not an impossible task. This is because devices have their own obligations and prohibitions in context, and humans are not equip to maintain a bird's-eye-view of the state. Traditionally, policies are used to address the issue, but in the IoT arena, one requires a policy framework in which the language can provide sufficient amount of expressiveness along with efficient reasoning procedures to automate the management. In this work we present our initial work into creating a scalable knowledge-based policy framework for IoT and demonstrate its applicability through a smart home application.

  12. First Mile Challenges for Large-Scale IoT

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2017-03-16

    The Internet of Things is large-scale by nature. This is not only manifested by the large number of connected devices, but also by the sheer scale of spatial traffic intensity that must be accommodated, primarily in the uplink direction. To that end, cellular networks are indeed a strong first mile candidate to accommodate the data tsunami to be generated by the IoT. However, IoT devices are required in the cellular paradigm to undergo random access procedures as a precursor to resource allocation. Such procedures impose a major bottleneck that hinders cellular networks\\' ability to support large-scale IoT. In this article, we shed light on the random access dilemma and present a case study based on experimental data as well as system-level simulations. Accordingly, a case is built for the latent need to revisit random access procedures. A call for action is motivated by listing a few potential remedies and recommendations.

  13. ROOT I/O: The Fast and Furious

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canal, Philippe; Bockelman, Brian; Brun, Rene

    2011-01-01

    The increases of data size and in the geographical distribution of analysis intensify the demand on the I/O subsystem. Over the last year, we greatly improved the I/O throughput, in some case by several factors, when reading ROOT files. ROOT'S improved techniques include improving the pre-existing prefetching, the automatic flushing of data buffers at regular intervals and streaming objects member-wise. These advances reduce the number of transactions with the local disk or the network. We worked in close collaboration with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments to optimize the I/O access to their use cases and to help adapt their framework to take full advantage of these advances. This presentation will describe in details these improvements and how users can benefit from them.

  14. Synthesis and structure of In(IO3)3 and vibrational spectroscopy of M(IO3)3 (M=Al, Ga, In)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Nhan; Kalachnikova, Katrina; Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, Richard G.; Sykora, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of Al, Ga, or In metals and H 5 IO 6 in aqueous media at 180 o C leads to the formation of Al(IO 3 ) 3 , Ga(IO 3 ) 3, or In(IO 3 ) 3 , respectively. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments have shown In(IO 3 ) 3 contains the Te 4 O 9 -type structure, while both Al(IO 3 ) 3 and Ga(IO 3 ) 3 are known to exhibit the polar Fe(IO 3 ) 3 -type structure. Crystallographic data for In(IO 3 ) 3 , trigonal, space group R3-bar , a=9.7482(4)A, c=14.1374(6)A, V=1163.45(8) Z=6, R(F)=1.38% for 41 parameters with 644 reflections with I>2σ(I). All three iodate structures contain group 13 metal cations in a distorted octahedral coordination environment. M(IO 3 ) 3 (M=Al, Ga) contain a three-dimensional network formed by the bridging of Al 3+ or Ga 3+ cations by iodate anions. With In(IO 3 ) 3 , iodate anions bridge In 3+ cations in two-dimensional layers. Both materials contain distorted octahedral holes in their structures formed by terminal oxygen atoms from the iodate anions. The Raman spectra have been collected for these metal iodates; In(IO 3 ) 3 was found to display a distinctively different vibrational profile than Al(IO 3 ) 3 or Ga(IO 3 ) 3 . Hence, the Raman profile can be used as a rapid diagnostic tool to discern between the different structural motifs

  15. Proof of Concept of Home IoT Connected Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsun; Oh, Hyunggoy; Kang, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    The way in which we interact with our cars is changing, driven by the increased use of mobile devices, cloud-based services, and advanced automotive technology. In particular, the requirements and market demand for the Internet of Things (IoT) device-connected vehicles will continuously increase. In addition, the advances in cloud computing and IoT have provided a promising opportunity for developing vehicular software and services in the automotive domain. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a home IoT connected vehicle with a voice-based virtual personal assistant comprised of a vehicle agent and a home agent. The proposed concept is evaluated by implementing a smartphone linked with home IoT devices that are connected to an infotainment system for the vehicle, a smartphone-based natural language interface input device, and cloud-based home IoT devices for the home. The home-to-vehicle connected service scenarios that aim to reduce the inconvenience due to simple and repetitive tasks by improving the urban mobility efficiency in IoT environments are substantiated by analyzing real vehicle testing and lifestyle research. Remarkable benefits are derived by making repetitive routine tasks one task that is executed by a command and by executing essential tasks automatically, without any request. However, it should be used with authorized permission, applied without any error at the right time, and applied under limited conditions to sense the habitants’ intention correctly and to gain the required trust regarding the remote execution of tasks. PMID:28587246

  16. Proof of Concept of Home IoT Connected Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsun; Oh, Hyunggoy; Kang, Sungho

    2017-06-05

    The way in which we interact with our cars is changing, driven by the increased use of mobile devices, cloud-based services, and advanced automotive technology. In particular, the requirements and market demand for the Internet of Things (IoT) device-connected vehicles will continuously increase. In addition, the advances in cloud computing and IoT have provided a promising opportunity for developing vehicular software and services in the automotive domain. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a home IoT connected vehicle with a voice-based virtual personal assistant comprised of a vehicle agent and a home agent. The proposed concept is evaluated by implementing a smartphone linked with home IoT devices that are connected to an infotainment system for the vehicle, a smartphone-based natural language interface input device, and cloud-based home IoT devices for the home. The home-to-vehicle connected service scenarios that aim to reduce the inconvenience due to simple and repetitive tasks by improving the urban mobility efficiency in IoT environments are substantiated by analyzing real vehicle testing and lifestyle research. Remarkable benefits are derived by making repetitive routine tasks one task that is executed by a command and by executing essential tasks automatically, without any request. However, it should be used with authorized permission, applied without any error at the right time, and applied under limited conditions to sense the habitants' intention correctly and to gain the required trust regarding the remote execution of tasks.

  17. Analysis of 2D Torus and Hub Topologies of 100Mb/s Ethernet for the Whitney Commodity Computing Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Kevin T.; Fineberg, Samuel A.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A variety of different network technologies and topologies are currently being evaluated as part of the Whitney Project. This paper reports on the implementation and performance of a Fast Ethernet network configured in a 4x4 2D torus topology in a testbed cluster of 'commodity' Pentium Pro PCs. Several benchmarks were used for performance evaluation: an MPI point to point message passing benchmark, an MPI collective communication benchmark, and the NAS Parallel Benchmarks version 2.2 (NPB2). Our results show that for point to point communication on an unloaded network, the hub and 1 hop routes on the torus have about the same bandwidth and latency. However, the bandwidth decreases and the latency increases on the torus for each additional route hop. Collective communication benchmarks show that the torus provides roughly four times more aggregate bandwidth and eight times faster MPI barrier synchronizations than a hub based network for 16 processor systems. Finally, the SOAPBOX benchmarks, which simulate real-world CFD applications, generally demonstrated substantially better performance on the torus than on the hub. In the few cases the hub was faster, the difference was negligible. In total, our experimental results lead to the conclusion that for Fast Ethernet networks, the torus topology has better performance and scales better than a hub based network.

  18. Theoretical Emission-Line Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Unified Model. I. The Face-on Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintilio, R.; Viegas, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Theoretical emission-line profiles are obtained for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taking into account the presence of an obscuring torus around the central energy source. For the sake of simplicity, the torus is represented by a cylindrical shell characterized by the inner and outer radius and the opening angle. In this paper we discuss the results with angle of sight equal to 0, i.e., for a face-on torus. Different line profiles are obtained following the torus parameters. The line profiles may show more than one peak and bumps, depending on the torus dimensions. The main parameter determining the number of peaks or bumps is the opening angle. Thus, the observed line shape may be a good indicator of the torus characteristics. As an example, the fit to the observed [O III] λ5007 emission line of NGC 4151 is presented. The model reproduces the FWHM and the asymmetrical bumps observed. Partially supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) under Grant 92/4335-9.

  19. An iOS implementation of the Shannon switching game

    OpenAIRE

    Macík, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Shannon switching game is a logical graph game for two players. The game was created by American mathematician Claude Shannon. iOS is an operating system designed for iPhone cellular phone, iPod music player and iPad tablet. The thesis describes existing implementations of the game and also specific implementation for iOS operating system created as a part of this work. This implementation allows you to play against virtual opponent and also supports multiplayer game consisting of two players...

  20. Experimental performance evaluation of IoT security solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Caro, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    [SPA]Internet de las Cosas (Internet of Things, IoT) plantea dudas importantes e introduce nuevos retos en la privacidad de las personas y en la seguridad de los sistemas y de los procesos. Algunas aplicaciones de IoT están estrechamente vinculadas a infraestructuras sensibles y servicios estratégicos tales como la distribución de agua y electricidad. Otras aplicaciones manejan información sensible acerca de las personas, tales como su ubicación y sus desplazamientos, o sus preferencias de sa...

  1. Instant OpenCV for iOS

    CERN Document Server

    Kornyakov, Kirill

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. This book uses a very practical approach, with each recipe and their associated sample projects or examples focusing on a particular aspect of the technology.This book is intended for OpenCV developers who are interested in porting their applications to the iOS platform. Basic experience with OpenCV, computer vision, Objective C, and other iOS tools is encouraged.

  2. Io Science Opportunities with JIMO: Observing in the Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Lopes, R.; Spencer, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter presents an opportunity to greatly improve our understanding of the most dynamic body in the solar system. Io is the best place to study tidal heating of the Galilean moons, provides unique insights into Earth history and is a unique laboratory for basic planetary physics. Many important questions about Io remain after Galileo that cannot be addressed from Earth or Earth orbit, but could be answered by limited observing time from JIMO with the appropriate instrumentation. Here we outline the requirements in the infrared.

  3. Volcanism on Io: Results from Global Geologic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Crown, D. A.; Geissler, P. E.; Schenk, P. M.; Yff, Jessica; Jaeger, W. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have completed a new 1:15,000,000 global geologic map of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, based on a set of 1 km/pixel combined Galileo- Voyager mosaics produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. The map was produced over the last three years using ArcGIS(TM) software, and has undergone peer-review. Here we report some of the key results from our global mapping efforts, and how these results relate to questions regarding the volcano-tectonic evolution of Io.

  4. Lagrange multiplier and Wess-Zumino variable as extra dimensions in the torus universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Salman Abarghouei; Dehghani, Mehdi; Monemzadeh, Majid

    2018-01-01

    We study the effect of the simplest geometry which is imposed via the topology of the universe by gauging non-relativistic particle model on torus and 3-torus with the help of symplectic formalism of constrained systems. Also, we obtain generators of gauge transformations for gauged models. Extracting corresponding Poisson structure of existed constraints, we show the effect of the shape of the universe on canonical structure of phase-spaces of models and suggest some phenomenology to prove the topology of the universe and probable non-commutative structure of the space. In addition, we show that the number of extra dimensions in the phase-spaces of gauged embedded models are exactly two. Moreover, in classical form, we talk over modification of Newton's second law in order to study the origin of the terms appeared in the gauged theory.

  5. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume IX. Support structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlee, J.L.

    1982-02-26

    The EBT-P support structure provides structural support for the 36 mirror coil magnets, magnet protection system, the toroidal vessel, and much of the device ancillary equipment. The structure is comprised of a primary support and a superstructure. The primary support is a reinforced concrete ring located directly inboard of the torus and is supported by nine columns. The toroidal vessel and the mirror coil magnets are cantilevered from the ring with the centerline of the torus located eight feet above the floor. The superstructure is an aluminum truss structure that rests on the concrete ring. The superstructure provides support for the device ancillary equipment. Engineering drawings of the support structure are given.

  6. Bilateral Mandibular Torus and an Ankylosed Third Molar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Şimşek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors, genetic heritage, increased biting function and nutrition are some of the reason for intraoral exostosis to get developed. Torus mandibularis is one of the types of exostosis in the oral region, which is unilaterally or bilaterally located in the lingual aspect of the body of the mandible above the mylohyoid line. There is usually no need for biopsy for the diagnosis of tori. In symptomatic cases, excision is the treatment of choice. In this paper, a 65-year-old man with a wide bilateral mandibular torus and an ankylosed mandibular right third molar tooth with mucosal retention is presented and general information was given about tori. In relation with this case, it was thought that dental ankylosis and tori may occur together because of similar etiological factors.

  7. Super element model development and analysis on the mark I torus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Mark I BWR pressure suppression system consists of a toroidal shell suppression chamber and a vent pipe system. The suppression system is presently under structural performance evaluations for the static and dynamic loads resulting from the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Safety Relief Valve (SRV) discharge. This evaluation necessitates the accurate determination of the system response and structural stresses under all SRV and LOCA related loading conditions. The purpose of this report is to describe the development of a finite element model and analysis procedures, using the 'super element' capability of the NASTRAN computer program, for the static and dynamic analysis of the Mark I torus structure; and to present the results of the analyses performed in this work for a specific Mark I torus. (orig.)

  8. On the runaway instability of self-gravitating torus around black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, Jose A; Montero, Pedro J; Shibata, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Black holes surrounded by self-gravitating tori are astrophysical systems which may naturally form following the core collapse of a massive star or the merger of two neutron stars. We present here results from fully general relativistic numerical simulations of such systems in order to assess the influence of the torus self-gravity on the onset of the so-called runaway instability. This instability, which might drive the rapid accretion of the disk on shorter timescales than those required to power a relativistic fireball, potentially challenges current models of gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations indicate that the self-gravity of the torus does not actually favour the onset of the instability.

  9. Variation of Mumford quotients by torus actions on full flag varieties. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhgoon, V S

    2008-01-01

    This paper continues the study of the variation of the Mumford quotient by the action of a maximal torus T on a flag variety G/B in terms of its dependence on the projective embedding G/B→P(V(χ)). In the case when G is of type A l , the Picard group of the quotient (G/B) ss //T is calculated under the assumption that the T-linearization comes from the standard G-linearization. Bibliography : 12 titles

  10. A CASE STUDY OF MODELING A TORUS IN DIFFERENT MODELING SOFTWARES

    OpenAIRE

    VELJKOVIĆ Milica; KRASIĆ Sonja; PEJIĆ Petar; TOŠIĆ Zlata

    2017-01-01

    Modeling of the complex geometric shapes requires the use of appropriate softwares. This study analyzes the process of modeling with two different computer softwares, AutoCAD and Rhinoceros. The aim is to demonstrate the similarities and differences between these softwares when used for modeling torus, a double curved geometric surface. The two modeling processes are compared in order to investigate the potentials of these softwares in the modeling of an architectural structure comprising a s...

  11. An Optimizing Compiler for Petascale I/O on Leadership Class Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Alok [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Kandemir, Mahmut [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    In high-performance computing systems, parallel I/O architectures usually have very complex hierarchies with multiple layers that collectively constitute an I/O stack, including high-level I/O libraries such as PnetCDF and HDF5, I/O middleware such as MPI-IO, and parallel file systems such as PVFS and Lustre. Our project explored automated instrumentation and compiler support for I/O intensive applications. Our project made significant progress towards understanding the complex I/O hierarchies of high-performance storage systems (including storage caches, HDDs, and SSDs), and designing and implementing state-of-the-art compiler/runtime system technology that targets I/O intensive HPC applications that target leadership class machine. This final report summarizes the major achievements of the project and also points out promising future directions.

  12. CPRF/ZTH front-end torus design and fabrication status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, E.O.; Baker, C.; Gomez, T.; Prince, P.P.; Smith, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Design of the ZTH front-end torus has been completed for a new generation Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) machine to be assembled at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 92. The Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) houses the ZTH front-end torus. The ZTH torus consists of an Inconel 625 vacuum vessel supported by an external electrically conducting 304L stainless steel shell. Interspace support rings support the vacuum vessel to the shell and also provide accurate radial support for the interspace electrical diagnostics. The shell also supports 48 toroidal field coils that are mounted to the shell's external surface. The shell consists of an explosion bonded stainless steel-copper composite with water-cooling tube assemblies attached to the outer surface. The 0.135-in. thick copper is on the inside surface of the shell, and provides an electrically conducting path with the required electrical time constant of 50 ms. The shell plate will be formed to the required toroidal configuration, after which the poloidal and toroidal flanges will be welded to the structure and machined. The Inconel vacuum vessel consists of bellows segments, armor support rings, and diagnostic stations welded together to form the complete vacuum vessel assembly. The necessity for accurate positioning of the vacuum vessel within the shell requires that the shell and vacuum vessel be fabricated with major diameter tolerances within 0.050-in. true position of the nominal diameters of 188.0-in. and 188.820-in., respectively. 7 figs

  13. Two intervals Rényi entanglement entropy of compact free boson on torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Feihu; Liu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    We compute the N=2 Rényi entanglement entropy of two intervals at equal time in a circle, for the theory of a 2D compact complex free scalar at finite temperature. This is carried out by performing functional integral on a genus 3 ramified cover of the torus, wherein the quantum part of the integral is captured by the four point function of twist fields on the worldsheet torus, and the classical piece is given by summing over winding modes of the genus 3 surface onto the target space torus. The final result is given in terms of a product of theta functions and certain multi-dimensional theta functions. We demonstrate the T-duality invariance of the result. We also study its low temperature limit. In the case in which the size of the intervals and of their separation are much smaller than the whole system, our result is in exact agreement with the known result for two intervals on an infinite system at zero temperature http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-5468/2009/11/P11001. In the case in which the separation between the two intervals is much smaller than the interval length, the leading thermal corrections take the same universal form as proposed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.171603, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.91.105013 for Rényi entanglement entropy of a single interval.

  14. Two intervals Rényi entanglement entropy of compact free boson on torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feihu; Liu, Xiao [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China,Chengdu (China)

    2016-01-11

    We compute the N=2 Rényi entanglement entropy of two intervals at equal time in a circle, for the theory of a 2D compact complex free scalar at finite temperature. This is carried out by performing functional integral on a genus 3 ramified cover of the torus, wherein the quantum part of the integral is captured by the four point function of twist fields on the worldsheet torus, and the classical piece is given by summing over winding modes of the genus 3 surface onto the target space torus. The final result is given in terms of a product of theta functions and certain multi-dimensional theta functions. We demonstrate the T-duality invariance of the result. We also study its low temperature limit. In the case in which the size of the intervals and of their separation are much smaller than the whole system, our result is in exact agreement with the known result for two intervals on an infinite system at zero temperature http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-5468/2009/11/P11001. In the case in which the separation between the two intervals is much smaller than the interval length, the leading thermal corrections take the same universal form as proposed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.171603, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.91.105013 for Rényi entanglement entropy of a single interval.

  15. Designing Efficient Access Control to Comply Massive-Multiservice IoT over Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Mohammad Istiak

    2017-01-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) has come in reality to improve our living quality. Automation is embraced in all the possible business verticals that have diverse communication needs ranged from static devices’ sporadic transmission to mobile devices’ every minute transmission. Despite, there are many technologies available today to support IoT services; cellular systems can play a vital role for IoT services, like wearables, vehicular, and industrial IoT, rollout which have either mobility or secur...

  16. EZ-IO(®) intraosseous device implementation in German Helicopter Emergency Medical Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Matthias; Haunstein, Benedikt; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Ruppert, Matthias; Lampl, Lorenz; Gäßler, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Intraosseous access (IO) is a rapid and safe alternative when peripheral venous access is difficult. Our aim was to summarize the first three years experience with the use of a semi-automatic IO device (EZ-IO(®)) in German Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS). Included were all patients during study period (January 2009-December 2011) requiring an IO access performed by HEMS team. Outcome variables were IO rate, IO insertion success rates, site of IO access, type of EZ-IO(®) needle set used, strategy of vascular access, procedure related problems and operator's satisfaction. IO rate was 0.3% (348/120.923). Overall success rate was 99.6% with a first attempt success rate of 85.9%; there was only one failure (0.4%). There were three insertion sites: proximal tibia (87.2%), distal tibia (7.5%) and proximal humerus (5.3%). Within total study group IO was predominantly the second-line strategy (39% vs. 61%, pIO was more often first-line strategy (64% vs. 28%, pIO access were significantly younger (41.7±28.7 vs. 56.5±24.4 years; pIO access generally presented with more severely compromised vital signs associated with the need for more invasive resuscitation actions such as intubation, chest drains, CPR and defibrillation. In 93% EZ-IO(®) needle set handling was rated "good". Problems were reported in 1.6% (needle dislocation 0.8%, needle bending 0.4% and parafusion 0.4%). The IO route was generally used in the most critically ill of patients. Our relatively low rate of usage would indicate that this would be compatible with the recommendations of established guidelines. The EZ-IO(®) intraosseous device proved feasible with a high success rate in adult and pediatric emergency patients in HEMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of Non-Volatile Memories in Automotive and IoT Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Role of Non-Volatile Memories in Automotive and IoT Markets Vipin Tiwari Director, Business Development and Product Marketing SST – A Wholly Own...automotive and Internet of Things ( IoT ) markets. Keywords: Embedded flash; Microcontrollers, Automotive; Internet of Things, IoT ; Non-volatile memories...volatile memory. The Internet of Things ( IoT ) is centered on providing distributed intelligence, sensing and connectivity to electronics around

  18. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-01-01

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation

  19. Building IoT Services for Aging in Place Using Standard-Based IoT Platforms and Heterogeneous IoT Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Sheik Mohammad Mostakim; Sung, Nak-Myoung; Ahn, Il-Yeup; Ryu, Minwoo; Yun, Jaeseok

    2017-01-01

    An aging population and human longevity is a global trend. Many developed countries are struggling with the yearly increasing healthcare cost that dominantly affects their economy. At the same time, people living with old adults suffering from a progressive brain disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease are enduring even more stress and depression than those patients while caring for them. Accordingly, seniors’ ability to live independently and comfortably in their current home for as long as possible has been crucial to reduce the societal cost for caregiving and thus give family members peace of mind, called ‘aging in place’ (AIP). In this paper we present a way of building AIP services using standard-based IoT platforms and heterogeneous IoT products. An AIP service platform is designed and created by combining previous standard-based IoT platforms in a collaborative way. A service composition tool is also created that allows people to create AIP services in an efficient way. To show practical usability of our proposed system, we choose a service scenario for medication compliance and implement a prototype service which could give old adults medication reminder appropriately at the right time (i.e., when it is time to need to take pills) through light and speaker at home but also wrist band and smartphone even outside the home. PMID:29019964

  20. Building IoT Services for Aging in Place Using Standard-Based IoT Platforms and Heterogeneous IoT Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheik Mohammad Mostakim Fattah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An aging population and human longevity is a global trend. Many developed countries are struggling with the yearly increasing healthcare cost that dominantly affects their economy. At the same time, people living with old adults suffering from a progressive brain disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease are enduring even more stress and depression than those patients while caring for them. Accordingly, seniors’ ability to live independently and comfortably in their current home for as long as possible has been crucial to reduce the societal cost for caregiving and thus give family members peace of mind, called ‘aging in place’ (AIP. In this paper we present a way of building AIP services using standard-based IoT platforms and heterogeneous IoT products. An AIP service platform is designed and created by combining previous standard-based IoT platforms in a collaborative way. A service composition tool is also created that allows people to create AIP services in an efficient way. To show practical usability of our proposed system, we choose a service scenario for medication compliance and implement a prototype service which could give old adults medication reminder appropriately at the right time (i.e., when it is time to need to take pills through light and speaker at home but also wrist band and smartphone even outside the home.

  1. Building IoT Services for Aging in Place Using Standard-Based IoT Platforms and Heterogeneous IoT Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Sheik Mohammad Mostakim; Sung, Nak-Myoung; Ahn, Il-Yeup; Ryu, Minwoo; Yun, Jaeseok

    2017-10-11

    An aging population and human longevity is a global trend. Many developed countries are struggling with the yearly increasing healthcare cost that dominantly affects their economy. At the same time, people living with old adults suffering from a progressive brain disorder such as Alzheimer's disease are enduring even more stress and depression than those patients while caring for them. Accordingly, seniors' ability to live independently and comfortably in their current home for as long as possible has been crucial to reduce the societal cost for caregiving and thus give family members peace of mind, called 'aging in place' (AIP). In this paper we present a way of building AIP services using standard-based IoT platforms and heterogeneous IoT products. An AIP service platform is designed and created by combining previous standard-based IoT platforms in a collaborative way. A service composition tool is also created that allows people to create AIP services in an efficient way. To show practical usability of our proposed system, we choose a service scenario for medication compliance and implement a prototype service which could give old adults medication reminder appropriately at the right time (i.e., when it is time to need to take pills) through light and speaker at home but also wrist band and smartphone even outside the home.

  2. IoT-Forensics Meets Privacy: Towards Cooperative Digital Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Nieto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IoT-Forensics is a novel paradigm for the acquisition of electronic evidence whose operation is conditioned by the peculiarities of the Internet of Things (IoT context. As a branch of computer forensics, this discipline respects the most basic forensic principles of preservation, traceability, documentation, and authorization. The digital witness approach also promotes such principles in the context of the IoT while allowing personal devices to cooperate in digital investigations by voluntarily providing electronic evidence to the authorities. However, this solution is highly dependent on the willingness of citizens to collaborate and they may be reluctant to do so if the sensitive information within their personal devices is not sufficiently protected when shared with the investigators. In this paper, we provide the digital witness approach with a methodology that enables citizens to share their data with some privacy guarantees. We apply the PRoFIT methodology, originally defined for IoT-Forensics environments, to the digital witness approach in order to unleash its full potential. Finally, we show the feasibility of a PRoFIT-compliant digital witness with two use cases.

  3. Stakeholder Management in IOS projects : Lessons from a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an effective inter-organizational system (IOS) requires significant organizational as well as technical changes. These will affect stakeholders with varying degrees of power and with varying degrees of interest in the system – yet promoters depend on them if the project is to succeed.

  4. Learn Unity 4 for iOS game development

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The only book on Unity 4 game development The only up-to-date book on Unity for iOS Philip Chu is the author of a very popular online Unity tutorial, frequently recommended on sites like StackOverflow

  5. IoT-Forensics Meets Privacy: Towards Cooperative Digital Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Ana; Rios, Ruben; Lopez, Javier

    2018-02-07

    IoT-Forensics is a novel paradigm for the acquisition of electronic evidence whose operation is conditioned by the peculiarities of the Internet of Things (IoT) context. As a branch of computer forensics, this discipline respects the most basic forensic principles of preservation, traceability, documentation, and authorization. The digital witness approach also promotes such principles in the context of the IoT while allowing personal devices to cooperate in digital investigations by voluntarily providing electronic evidence to the authorities. However, this solution is highly dependent on the willingness of citizens to collaborate and they may be reluctant to do so if the sensitive information within their personal devices is not sufficiently protected when shared with the investigators. In this paper, we provide the digital witness approach with a methodology that enables citizens to share their data with some privacy guarantees. We apply the PRoFIT methodology, originally defined for IoT-Forensics environments, to the digital witness approach in order to unleash its full potential. Finally, we show the feasibility of a PRoFIT-compliant digital witness with two use cases.

  6. Application-Tailored I/O with Streamline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, W.J.; Bos, H.J.; Bal, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Streamline is a stream-based OS communication subsystem that spans from peripheral hardware to userspace processes. It improves performance of I/O-bound applications (such as webservers and streaming media applications) by constructing tailor-made I/O paths through the operating system for each

  7. UbiCompass: An IoT Interaction Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Alce

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lately, different wearable form factors have reached the consumer domain. Wearables enable at-a-glance access to information and can continually sense the surrounding environment. Internet of Things (IoT researchers have focused on the main enabling factors: the integration of several technologies and communication solutions. Less effort has been devoted to exploring how not-so-tech-savvy end users can discover and directly interact with the numerous connected things predicted by the IoT vision. This paper presents a novel IoT interaction concept called UbiCompass. A functional, smartwatch face prototype of the UbiCompass was developed and integrated with an existing smart home system, in which five different connected devices could be controlled using simple interaction. It was then compared to a traditional smartphone mobile application in a controlled experiment. The results show statistically significant differences in favor of the proposed concept. This highlights the potential the UbiCompass has as an IoT interaction concept.

  8. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Uncovering the Images and Meanings of International Organizations (IOs) in Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, Riyad A.; Madden, Meggan

    2015-01-01

    Employing Stuart Hall's concept of representation, we examine how international organizations (IOs) are presented in the higher education literature. This paper examines how IOs, such as the World Bank, OECD, and UNESCO, are conceptualized and represented by higher education researchers. We focus on three main representations of IOs in the higher…

  10. 78 FR 2392 - Startrans IO, LLC; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-26-000] Startrans IO, LLC; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective Date On December 31, 2012, the Commission... proposed transmission revenue requirement rates by Startrans IO, LLC. Startrans IO, LLC, 141 FERC ] 61,271...

  11. 76 FR 56637 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... directive (AD) for certain model IO-720-A1B Lycoming Engines reciprocating engines. This AD requires a... two Lycoming Engines model IO- 720-A1B reciprocating engines, installed on airplanes of U.S. registry...

  12. A fluctuation-induced plasma transport diagnostic based upon fast-Fourier transform spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, J. Y.; Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A diagnostic, based on fast Fourier-transform spectral analysis techniques, that provides experimental insight into the relationship between the experimentally observable spectral characteristics of the fluctuations and the fluctuation-induced plasma transport is described. The model upon which the diagnostic technique is based and its experimental implementation is discussed. Some characteristic results obtained during the course of an experimental study of fluctuation-induced transport in the electric field dominated NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma are presented.

  13. The origins of active galactic nuclei obscuration: the 'torus' as a dynamical, unstable driver of accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Narayanan, Desika; Hernquist, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Recent multiscale simulations have made it possible to follow gas inflows responsible for high-Eddington ratio accretion on to massive black holes (BHs) from galactic scales to the BH accretion disc. When sufficient gas is driven towards a BH, gravitational instabilities generically form lopsided, eccentric discs that propagate inwards from larger radii. The lopsided stellar disc exerts a strong torque on the gas, driving inflows that fuel the growth of the BH. Here, we investigate the possibility that the same disc, in its gas-rich phase, is the putative 'torus' invoked to explain obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the cosmic X-ray background. The disc is generically thick and has characteristic ˜1-10 pc sizes and masses resembling those required of the torus. Interestingly, the scale heights and obscured fractions of the predicted torii are substantial even in the absence of strong stellar feedback providing the vertical support. Rather, they can be maintained by strong bending modes and warps/twists excited by the inflow-generating instabilities. A number of other observed properties commonly attributed to 'feedback' processes may in fact be explained entirely by dynamical, gravitational effects: the lack of alignment between torus and host galaxy, correlations between local star formation rate (SFR) and turbulent gas velocities and the dependence of obscured fractions on AGN luminosity or SFR. We compare the predicted torus properties with observations of gas surface density profiles, kinematics, scale heights and SFR densities in AGN, and find that they are consistent in all cases. We argue that it is not possible to reproduce these observations and the observed column density distribution without a clumpy gas distribution, but allowing for simple clumping on small scales the predicted column density distribution is in good agreement with observations from NH˜ 1020-1027 cm-2. We examine how the NH distribution scales with galaxy and AGN properties

  14. Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasky, Scott (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schwan, Karsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-01-01

    As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be

  15. Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F. II

    2010-01-01

    As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while

  16. Design and construction of the movable limiters for holding the plasma in position in the nuclear fusion experiment TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butzek, D.A.; Derichs, K.

    1983-11-01

    The nuclear fusion experiment TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research) has been constructed for investigation of plasma-wall-interaction. The plasma is generated inside a torus-shaped vacuum vessel. In addition to the magnetic fields mechanical limiters are provided to hold the plasma in position. The limiter scheme of textor consists of main limiters and reference limiters (measuring limiters). Main and reference limiters are mounted in different cross sections of the torus. The main limiters are movable during the plasma discharge while the reference limiters are kept fixed. They are adjustable. Thus, by moving the main limiters, the reference limiters can be exposed to different thermal loads during the discharge. Exposing the reference limiters to the plasma, first results have been obtained concerning the scrape off layer: thickness, fluxes of hydrogen and chromium through this layer. The limiter scheme, the final design and construction of the limiters and the first phase of operation are described in this report. (orig.) [de

  17. Effects of torus wall flexibility on forces in the Mark I Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Suppression System. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-09-01

    The authors investigated the effects of torus wall flexibility in the pressure suppression system of a Mark I boiling water reactor (BWR) when the torus wall is subjected to hydrodynamic loadings. Using hypothetical models, they examined these flexibility effects under two hydrodynamic loading conditions: (1) a steam relief valve (SRV) discharge pulse, and (2) a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) chugging pulse. In the analyses of these events they used a recently developed two-dimensional finite element computer code. Taking the basic geometry and dimensions of the Monticello Mark I BWR nuclear power plant (in Monticello, Minnesota, U.S.A.), they assessed the effects of flexibility in the torus wall by changing values of the inside-diameter-to-wall-thickness ratio. Varying the torus wall thickness (t) with respect to the inside diameter (D) of the torus, they assigned values to the ratio D/t ranging from 0 (infinitely rigid) to 600 (highly flexible). In the case of a modeled steam relief valve (SRV) discharge pulse, they found the peak vertical reaction force on the torus was reduced from that of a rigid wall response by a factor of 3 for the most highly flexible, plant-simulated wall (D/t = 600). The reduction factor for a modeled loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) chugging pulse was shown to be 1.5. The two-dimensional analyses employed overestimate these reduction factors but have provided, as intended, definition of the effect of torus boundary stiffness. In the work planned for FY79, improved modeling of the structure and of the source is expected to result in factors more directly applicable to actual pressure suppression systems

  18. Classical torus conformal block, = 2∗ twisted superpotential and the accessory parameter of Lamé equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, Marcin

    2014-03-01

    In this work the correspondence between the semiclassical limit of the DOZZ quantum Liouville theory on the torus and the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of the = 2∗ (Ω-deformed) U(2) super-Yang-Mills theory is used to propose new formulae for the accessory parameter of the Lamé equation. This quantity is in particular crucial for solving the problem of uniformization of the one-punctured torus. The computation of the accessory parameters for torus and sphere is an open longstanding problem which can however be solved if one succeeds to derive an expression for the so-called classical Liouville action. The method of calculation of the latter has been proposed some time ago by Zamolod-chikov brothers. Studying the semiclassical limit of the four-point function of the quantum Liouville theory on the sphere they have derived the classical action for the Riemann sphere with four punctures. In the present work Zamolodchikovs idea is exploited in the case of the Liouville field theory on the torus. It is found that the Lamé accessory parameter is determined by the classical Liouville action on the one-punctured torus or more concretely by the torus classical block evaluated on the saddle point intermediate classical weight. Secondly, as an implication of the aforementioned correspondence it is obtained that the torus accessory parameter is related to the sum of all rescaled column lengths of the so-called "critical" Young diagrams extremizing the instanton "free energy" for the = 2∗ gauge theory. Finally, it is pointed out that thanks to the known relation the sum over the "critical" column lengths can be expressed in terms of a contour integral in which the integrand is built out of certain special functions.

  19. Internet of Tangible Things (IoTT: Challenges and Opportunities for Tangible Interaction with IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Angelini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Internet of Things era, an increasing number of everyday objects are able to offer innovative services to the user. However, most of these devices provide only smartphone or web user interfaces. As a result, the interaction is disconnected from the physical world, decreasing the user experience and increasing the risk of user alienation from the physical world. We argue that tangible interaction can counteract this trend and this article discusses the potential benefits and the still open challenges of tangible interaction applied to the Internet of Things. After an analysis of open challenges for Human-Computer Interaction in IoT, we summarize current trends in tangible interaction and extrapolate eight tangible interaction properties that could be exploited for designing novel interactions with IoT objects. Through a systematic review of tangible interaction applied to IoT, we show what has been already explored in the systems that pioneered the field and the future explorations that still have to be conducted. In order to guide future work in this field, we propose a design card set for supporting the generation of tangible interfaces for IoT objects. The card set has been evaluated during a workshop with 21 people and the results are discussed.

  20. IoT-B&B: Edge-Based NFV for IoT Devices with CPE Crowdsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For embracing the ubiquitous Internet-of-Things (IoT devices, edge computing and Network Function Virtualization (NFV have been enabled in branch offices and homes in the form of virtual Customer-Premises Equipment (vCPE. A Service Provider (SP deploys vCPE instances as Virtual Network Functions (VNFs on top of generic physical Customer-Premises Equipment (pCPE to ease administration. Upon a usage surge of IoT devices at a certain part of the network, vCPU, memory, and other resource limitations of a single pCPE node make it difficult to add new services handling the high demand. In this paper, we present IoT-B&B, a novel architecture featuring resource sharing of pCPE nodes. When a pCPE node has sharable resources available, the SP will utilize its free resources as a “bed-and-breakfast” place to deploy vCPE instances in need. A placement algorithm is also presented to assign vCPE instances to a cost-efficient pCPE node. By keeping vCPE instances at the network edge, their costs of hosting are reduced. Meanwhile, the transmission latencies are maintained at acceptable levels for processing real-time data burst from IoT devices. The traffic load to the remote, centralized cloud can be substantially reduced.

  1. TRANSIT OF EXOMOON PLASMA TORI: NEW DIAGNOSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi [UPMC, University of Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Ballester, Gilda E., E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr, E-mail: gilda@pirl.lpl.arizona.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1541 E. University Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85721-0063 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    In the solar system, moons largely exceed planets in number. The Kepler database has been shown to be sensitive to exomoon detection down to the mass of Mars, but the first search has been unsuccessful. Here, we use a particles-in-cell code to predict the transit of the plasma torus produced by a satellite. Despite the small size of a moon, the spatial extent of its plasma torus can be large enough to produce substantial transit absorptions. The model is used for the interpretation of Hubble Space Telescope early ingress absorptions apparently observed during the WASP-12 b and HD 189733 b UV transits for which no consistent explanation exists. For HD 189733 b an exomoon transiting ∼16 R{sub p} ahead of the planet and loading ∼10{sup 29} C II ions s{sup –1} into space is required to explain the tentative early ingress absorption observed for C II. For WASP-12b, a moon transiting ∼6 R{sub p} ahead from the planet and ejecting ∼10{sup 28} Mg II ions per second is required to explain the NUV early ingress absorption feature. Interestingly, both HD 189733 b and WASP-12b predicted satellites are outside the Hill sphere of their planets, an indication that the moons, if present, were not formed in situ but probably captured later. Finally, our simulations show a strong electromagnetic coupling between the polar regions of planets and the orbital position of the moons, an expected outcome of the unipolar induction DC circuit model. Future observations should test our predictions with a potential opportunity to unambiguously detect the first exomoon plasma torus.

  2. Reduction of hypervalent iodine by coordination to iron(iii) and the crystal structures of PhIO and PhIO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Frankær, Christian Grundahl; McKenzie, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    complex of iodosylbenzene (PhIO), [Fe(tpena)OIPh]2+ (tpena- = N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate), which was found to be +1.6. Thus the iodine oxidation state is reduced by 1.4 compared with that in precursor uncoordinated PhIO. On the basis of a combination of X-ray diffraction...... and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we have determined the unknown crystal structure of PhIO, along with a new phase of iodylbenzene (β-PhIO2) using the Rietveld method. Analogous 1-D chains of halogen bonded [O-IO-I] motifs are the dominant supramolecular interactions between PhIO...... and PhIO2 monomers in each structure respectively and the polymeric structures rationalise the general insolubility of these oxygen atom transfer reagents. A double stack of phenyl units in PhIO is found between the layers of the halogen bonded O/I chains. In the case of PhIO, C-Hπ interactions between...

  3. Green IoT: An Investigation on Energy Saving Practices for 2020 and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad, R.; Zahoor, S.; Shah, M.A.; Wahid, A.; Yu, Hongnian

    2017-01-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging concept which aims to connect billions of devices with each other. The IoT devices sense, collect and transmit important information from their surroundings. This exchange of very large amount of information amongst billions of devices creates a massive energy need. Green IoT envisions the concept of reducing the energy consumption of IoT devices and making the environment safe. Inspired by achieving a sustainable environment for IoT, we first give the ...

  4. TORUS AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PROPERTIES OF NEARBY SEYFERT GALAXIES: RESULTS FROM FITTING INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Mason, Rachel; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Rodriguez Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Perez-Garcia, Ana M.; Roche, Patrick F.; Levenson, Nancy A.; Elitzur, Moshe; Packham, Christopher; Young, Stuart; Diaz-Santos, Tanio

    2011-01-01

    We used the CLUMPY torus models and a Bayesian approach to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions and ground-based high angular resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy of 13 nearby Seyfert galaxies. This allowed us to put tight constraints on torus model parameters such as the viewing angle i, the radial thickness of the torus Y, the angular size of the cloud distribution σ torus , and the average number of clouds along radial equatorial rays N 0 . We found that the viewing angle i is not the only parameter controlling the classification of a galaxy into type 1 or type 2. In principle, type 2s could be viewed at any viewing angle i as long as there is one cloud along the line of sight. A more relevant quantity for clumpy media is the probability for an active galactic nucleus (AGN) photon to escape unabsorbed. In our sample, type 1s have relatively high escape probabilities, P esc ∼ 12%-44%, while type 2s, as expected, tend to have very low escape probabilities. Our fits also confirmed that the tori of Seyfert galaxies are compact with torus model radii in the range 1-6 pc. The scaling of the models to the data also provided the AGN bolometric luminosities L bol (AGN), which were found to be in good agreement with estimates from the literature. When we combined our sample of Seyfert galaxies with a sample of PG quasars from the literature to span a range of L bol (AGN) ∼ 10 43 -10 47 erg s -1 , we found plausible evidence of the receding torus. That is, there is a tendency for the torus geometrical covering factor to be lower (f 2 ∼ 0.1-0.3) at high AGN luminosities than at low AGN luminosities (f 2 ∼ 0.9-1 at ∼10 43 -10 44 erg s -1 ). This is because at low AGN luminosities the tori appear to have wider angular sizes (larger σ torus ) and more clouds along radial equatorial rays. We cannot, however, rule out the possibility that this is due to contamination by extended dust structures not associated with the dusty torus at low AGN luminosities

  5. Dynamics of magnetic fields in Maxwell, Yang-Mills and Chern-Simons theories on the torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.; McLachlan, A.; Toms, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of uniform magnetic fields passing perpendicularly through a 2-torus, Abelian and Non-Abelian, is considered. Focus is on dynamical effects of non-integrable phases on the torus at non zero B and from magnetic fields themselves in the vacuum. The spectrum is computed and is shown to be always independent of the non-integrable phases on the torus. It is concluded that a Chern-Simons term will always be induced by radiative corrections to fermions on the torus when B ≠ 0. The special case of an electromagnetically uncharged anyon gas in noted and shown to be a system whose spectrum can depend on the non-integrable phases in the two torus directions, subject to a consistency requirement. In three and four dimensions, dynamical symmetry breaking of non-Abelian fields and associated condensate formation is possible by radiative corrections. The classification on non-Abelian magnetic fields in terms of ''flux integers'' is discussed, and a method for obtaining such integers for an arbitrary gauge algebra is presented. This provides a rigorous generalisation of Hooft's su (2) classification. 72 refs., 5 figs

  6. Tailoring of the flip effect in the orientation of a magnet levitating over a superconducting torus: Geometrical dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Sander, Berit; Timm, Lauri; Perez-Diaz, Jose-Luis

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A local model is used to demonstrate a flip effect in the orientation of a magnet over a superconductor. → A superconducting torus shape is studied. → Increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. → There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that help to fit the flip effect point. - Abstract: In a previous study, a general local model was used in order to demonstrate the apparition of a flip effect in the equilibrium orientation of a magnet when it is over a superconducting torus. This effect can be easily used in devices such as binary position detectors for magneto-microscopy, contactless sieves or magnetic levels amongst others. We present an initial study useful to design devices based on the flip effect between magnets and torus superconductors. It demonstrates that varying different geometrical parameters the flip effect point can be fixed. Also, it can be observed that increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. A magneto-mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is exposed. For an increment of cross-section diameter occurs the same behavior. There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that can be used for a more accurate fitting of the flip effect point.

  7. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul; McEwen, Alfred; Phillips, Cynthia; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Spencer, John

    2004-05-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO 2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO 2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  8. Magnetic Fluctuations in the Jovian Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher T.

    2002-01-01

    The engine that drives the jovian magnetosphere is the mass added to the Io ion torus, accelerated to corotational velocities by field-aligned currents that couple the Io torus to the jovian ionosphere. The mass of the torus builds up to an amount that the magnetic forces cannot contain and the plasma, first slowly and then more rapidly, drifts outward. Numerous authors have treated this problem based first on the observations of the Pioneer 10 and 11 flybys; then on Voyager 1 and 2, and Ulysses; and finally most recently the Galileo orbiter. The initial observations revealed the now familiar magnetodisk, in which the field above and below the magnetic equator became quite radial in orientation and much less dipolar. The Galileo observations show this transformation to occur on average at 24 R(sub J) and to often be quite abrupt. These observations are consistent with outward transport of magnetized plasma that moves ever faster radially until about 50 R(sub J) on the nightside where the field lines stretch to the breaking point, reconnection occurs, and plasma and field islands are transported down the tail ultimately removing the mass from the magnetosphere that Io had deposited deep in the inner torus. The reconnection process creates empty flux tubes connected to Jupiter that are buoyant and thought to float inward and replace the flux carried out with the torus plasma. As described above, the jovian magnetosphere could very well be in a state of steady laminar circulation, but indeed it is not. The process is very unsteady and the wave levels can be very intense. The existence of these waves in turn can lead to processes that compete with the radial circulation pattern in removing plasma from the system. These waves can scatter particles so that they precipitate into the ionosphere. This process should be important in the Io torus where the atmospheric loss cone is relatively large and becomes less important as the loss cone decreases in size with radial

  9. Toroidal Geometry Stabilizing a Latitudinal Ring of Point Vortices on a Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakajo, Takashi; Shimizu, Yuuki

    2018-01-01

    We carry out the linear stability analysis of a polygonal ring configuration of N point vortices, called an N-ring, along the line of latitude θ _0 on a torus with the aspect ratio α . Deriving a criterion for the stability depending on the parameters N, θ _0 and α , we reveal how the aspect ratio α contributes to the stability of the N-ring. While the N-ring necessarily becomes unstable when N is sufficiently large for fixed α , the stability is closely associated with the geometric property of the torus for variable α ; for low aspect ratio α ˜ 1 , N=7 is a critical number determining the stability of the N-ring when it is located along a certain range of latitudes, which is an analogous result to those in a plane and on a sphere. On the other hand, the stability is determined by the sign of curvature for high aspect ratio α ≫ 1 . That is to say, the N-ring is neutrally stable if it is located on the inner side of the toroidal surface with a negative curvature, while the N-ring on its outer side with a positive curvature is unstable. Furthermore, based on the linear stability analysis, we describe nonlinear evolution of the N-ring when it becomes unstable. It is difficult to deal with this problem, since the evolution equation of the N point vortices is formulated as a Hamiltonian system with N degrees of freedom, which is in general non-integrable. Thus, we reduce the Hamiltonian system to a simple integrable system by introducing a cyclic symmetry. Owing to this reduction, we successfully find some periodic orbits in the reduced system, whose local bifurcations and global transitions for variable α are characterized in terms of the fundamental group of the torus.

  10. I/O Strategies for Multicore Processing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    van Gemmeren, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Calafiura, P; Lavrijsen, W; Malon, D; Tsulaia, V

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of any multicore/manycore application architecture is the handling of input and output. Even in the simplest of models, design decisions interact both in obvious and in subtle ways with persistence strategies. When multiple workers handle I/O independently using distinct instances of a serial I/O framework, for example, it may happen that because of the way data from consecutive events are compressed together, there may be serious inefficiencies, with workers redundantly reading the same buffers, or multiple instances thereof. With shared reader strategies, caching and buffer management by the persistence infrastructure and by the control framework may have decisive performance implications for a variety of design choices. Providing the next event may seem straightforward when all event data are contiguously stored in a block, but there may be performance penalties to such strategies when only a subset of a given event's data are needed; conversely, when event data are partitioned by type...

  11. I/O Speculation for the Microsecond Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Michael Yung Chung; Bjørling, Matias; Bonnet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    address the challenges that microsecond scale devices will bring. We measure applications for the potential benefit to be gained from speculation and examine several classes of speculation techniques. In addition, we propose two new techniques, hardware checkpoint and checkpoint-free speculation. Our......Microsecond latencies and access times will soon dominate most datacenter I/O workloads, thanks to improvements in both storage and networking technologies. Current techniques for dealing with I/O latency are targeted for either very fast (nanosecond) or slow (millisecond) devices. These techniques...... are suboptimal for microsecond devices - they either block the processor for tens of microseconds or yield the processor only to be ready again microseconds later. Speculation is an alternative technique that resolves the issues of yielding and blocking by enabling an application to continue running until...

  12. Beginning iPhone 4 Development Exploring the IOS SDK

    CERN Document Server

    Nutting, Jack; LaMarche, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The authors of the bestselling Beginning iPhone 3 Development are back, with the same excellent material completely updated for iOS 4 and written from the ground up using the latest version of Apple's Xcode 3. All source code has been updated to use the latest Xcode templates and current APIs, and all-new screenshots show Xcode 3 in action. Beginning iPhone 4 Development is a complete course in iOS development. You'll master techniques that work on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. We start with the basics, showing you how to download and install the tools you'll need, and how to create your first

  13. Izrada 2D video igre za iOS platformu

    OpenAIRE

    Kampuš, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Tema ovog završnog rada temelji se na izradi 2D video igre za iOS mobilni uređaj te njezinoj demonstraciji na istom. Kroz rad su opisane sve bitne funkcije GameSalad Creator-a koje su potrebne kod izrade igre bazirane na 2 dimenzije. Također se prolazi kroz iOS operativni sustav, što je on i kako se razvijao. Spominje se i tema koja govori općenito o igrama na mobilnim uređajima. U završnom dijelu rada prikazan je postupak izrade, koje funkcije programa se točno koriste i kako se igra može te...

  14. Observations of industrial sulfur flows - Implications for Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeley, R.; Lee, S.W.; Crown, D.A.; Lancaster, N.

    1990-01-01

    A study of industrial liquid sulfur flows at about 130 C yields information on the thermal and rheological characteristics of the sulfur encountered in Io's volcanic activity. As the local sulfur flow cools and/or the local flow rate decreases, the formation of a crust over much of the surface does not prevent a continuation of flow underneath. Subsequent rapid development of a durable crust implies the formation of extensive crusts on Ionian sulfur flows, significantly reducing heat loss and extending flow length. It is suggested on the basis of the present laboratory results that the colors of proposed sulfur flows on Io may correlate with neither the temperature nor the inferred rheological properties attributed to the colors. 52 refs

  15. The surface of Io - Geologic units, morphology, and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1980-09-01

    The geologic units, morphology and tectonics evident on a preliminary geological map obtained from best-resolution Voyager 1 images and a preliminary pictorial map of the surface of Io are discussed. Nine volcanic units are identified on the surface which are composed of mountain materials, intervent, layered and eroded layered plains, and wall and floor, pit crater flow, shield crater flow, fissure flow and crater cone units associated with volcanic vents, along with seven types of structural features. The cumulative volcanic crater size distribution of 170 Ionian vents with craters greater than 14 km is similar to that of impact craters on other solar system bodies, with a surplus of small craters and a preponderance of volcanic vents in the Io equatorial zone. The observed surface morphologies provide evidence for a mixture of silicates and sulfur as the dominant surface material. Lineaments and grabens are also apparent on the surface, in a common planetary grid pattern.

  16. EVIO - A lightweight object-oriented I/O package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolin, E.; Abbott, D.; Gurjyan, V.; Heyes, G.; Jastrzembski, E.; Lawrence, D.; Timmer, C.

    2008-01-01

    The EVIO package implements I/O between disk and an in-memory hierarchical object tree. Tree nodes are either container nodes, holding other nodes, or leaf nodes, containing any amount of data of a single type (int64 t ,..., int8 t , float, double, and string). Trees can easily be constructed using factory methods and stream operators; queried using STL-like algorithms, function object, etc; or modified using tree or node methods. The tree logically maps to XML, and utilities exist to transform between binary and ASCII XML formats. The binary representation is compact, I/O is simple and efficient, and endian conversions are handled automatically. EVIO will be used by the next generation of experiments at Jefferson Lab.

  17. IoT-based flood embankments monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michta, E.; Szulim, R.; Sojka-Piotrowska, A.; Piotrowski, K.

    2017-08-01

    In the paper a concept of flood embankments monitoring system based on using Internet of Things approach and Cloud Computing technologies will be presented. The proposed system consists of sensors, IoT nodes, Gateways and Cloud based services. Nodes communicates with the sensors measuring certain physical parameters describing the state of the embankments and communicates with the Gateways. Gateways are specialized active devices responsible for direct communication with the nodes, collecting sensor data, preprocess the data, applying local rules and communicate with the Cloud Services using communication API delivered by cloud services providers. Architecture of all of the system components will be proposed consisting IoT devices functionalities description, their communication model, software modules and services bases on using a public cloud computing platform like Microsoft Azure will be proposed. The most important aspects of maintaining the communication in a secure way will be shown.

  18. Optical fiber sensors for IoT and smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    Domingues, Maria de Fátima F

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a review of the evolution of optical fiber sensing solutions and related applications. Unique production methods are presented and discussed, highlighting their evolution and analyzing their complexity. Under this scope, this brief presents the existing silica optical fiber sensors and polymer optical fiber sensors solutions, comparing its field of action (sensitivity, accuracy), complexity of manufacture and economic cost. Special attention is given to low-cost production methods. This brief evaluates the different existing techniques, assessing the accuracy and suitability of these sensors for possible Internet of Things (IoT) integration in different considered scenarios. Critical analytical techniques, also covered in this brief, are expected to play a key role in the world of IoT and the smart city of tomorrow.

  19. Io's Thermal Regions and Non-SO2 Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Soderblom, L. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Several absorptions have been identified in the Galileo NIMS spectra of Io that are not related to SO2. [1,2]. These absorptions have band centers at 2.97, 3.15, 3.85, and 3.91 microns. There are also broad absorptions in the regions 1-1.3 and 3- 3.4 microns. Patterning noise in wavelength registration, arising from the pushbroom imaging and grating motion of the NIMS instrument have previously inhibited reliable mapping of weak absorptions. Recent improvements in techniques to remove the coherent pattern noise from the NIMS dataset have been made by Soderblom. This greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and enables mapping of weak spectral signatures such as the 3.15 micron absorption on Io.

  20. Mapping of the Culann-Tohil Region of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jaeger, W. L.; Radebaugh, J.; Milazzo, M. P.; McEwen, A. S.; Moore, J. M.; Schenk, P. M.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft completed its observations of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io in October 2001 with the orbit I32 flyby, during which new local (13-55 m/pixel) and regional (130-400 m/pixel) resolution images and spectroscopic data were returned of the antijovian hemisphere. We have combined a I32 regional mosaic (330 m/pixel) with lower-resolution C21 color data (1.4 km/pixel, Figure 1) and produced a geomorphologic map of the Culann-Tohil area of this hemisphere. Here we present the geologic features, map units, and structures in this region, and give preliminary conclusions about geologic activity for comparison with other regions to better understand Io's geologic evolution.