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Sample records for involuntary muscle twitching

  1. Muscle fatigue estimation with twitch force derived from sEMG peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Youngjin; Lee, Hae-Dong; Kim, Jung

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new method - twitch force - for estimation of the muscle behavior during voluntary contraction for assessing localized muscle fatigue. The proposed method uses the sEMG peaks as input and the measured force as output. The twitch force, which is a transfer function to generate force, was estimated during fatiguing contraction. We verified the estimated twitch force based on the measured results with electrical stimulation. The participants performed isometric little finger flexion until exhaustion. SEMG was recorded on the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle for the proposed method and the electrical stimulation electrodes on the ulnar nerve induced involuntary contraction for reference. As the muscle fatigue level increased, the twitch peaks decreased in both methods. The proposed method can be widely used in the quantitative analysis of muscle fatigue during voluntary contraction.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis of fast twitch muscle and slow twitch muscle in Takifugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kailun; Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Wang, Haoze; Kong, Derong; Jiang, Chen; Wang, Xiuli; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Xuemei

    2017-12-01

    Fast twitch muscle and slow twitch muscle are two important organs of Takifugu rubripes. Both tissues are of ectodermic origin, and the differences between the two muscle fibers reflect the differences in their myofibril protein composition and molecular structure. In order to identify and characterize the gene expression profile in the two muscle fibers of T. rubripes, we generated 54 million and 44 million clean reads from the fast twitch muscle and slow twitch muscle, respectively, using RNA-Seq and identified a total of 580 fast-muscle-specific genes, 1533 slow-muscle-specific genes and 11,806 genes expressed by both muscles. Comparative transcriptome analysis of fast and slow twitch muscles allowed the identification of 1508 differentially expressed genes, of which 34 myosin and 30 ubiquitin family genes were determined. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were also analyzed by Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway. In addition, alternative splicing analysis was also performed. The generation of larger-scale transcriptomic data presented in this work would enrich the genetic resources of Takifugu rubripes, which could be valuable to comparative studies of muscles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2)-knock out mice: unexpected adaptive changes of fast-twitch muscles only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Giorgia; Vergani, Barbara; Sacchetto, Roberta; Reggiani, Carlo; De Rosa, Edith; Maccatrozzo, Lisa; Nori, Alessandra; Villa, Antonello; Volpe, Pompeo

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the functional role of calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles by using CASQ2-/- mice; CASQ2 is expressed throughout life in slow-twitch muscles, but only in the developmental and neonatal stages in fast-twitch muscles. CASQ2-/- causes increase in calsequestrin 1 (CASQ1) expression, but without functional changes in both muscle types. CASQ2-/- mice have ultrastructural changes in fast-twitch muscles only, i.e., formation of pentads and stacks in the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Twitch interpolation technique in testing of maximal muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to study the methodological aspects of the muscle twitch interpolation technique in estimating the maximal force of contraction in the quadriceps muscle utilizing commercial muscle testing equipment. Six healthy subjects participated in seven sets of experiments testing the effects...... on twitch size of potentiation, time lag after potentiation, magnitude of voluntary force, stimulus amplitude, stimulus duration, angle of the knee, and angle of the hip. In addition, the consequences of submaximal potentiation on the estimation of maximal force from twitch sizes were studied in five...... healthy subjects. We found an increase in twitch size with increasing levels of potentiation and twitch size decreased exponentially following potentiation. We found a curvilinear relationship between twitch size and voluntary force, and these properties were more obvious when the stimulation intensity...

  5. Inflammatory response during slow- and fast-twitch muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimowska, Malgorzata; Kasprzycka, Paulina; Bocian, Katarzyna; Delaney, Kamila; Jung, Piotr; Kuchcinska, Kinga; Kaczmarska, Karolina; Gladysz, Daria; Streminska, Wladyslawa; Ciemerych, Maria Anna

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscles are characterized by their unique ability to regenerate. Injury of a so-called fast-twitch muscle, extensor digitorum longus (EDL), results in efficient regeneration and reconstruction of the functional tissue. In contrast, slow-twitch muscle (soleus) fails to properly reconstruct and develops fibrosis. This study focuses on soleus and EDL muscle regeneration and associated inflammation. We determined differences in the activity of neutrophils and M1 and M2 macrophages using flow cytometry and differences in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines using Western blotting and immunolocalization at different times after muscle injury. Soleus muscle repair is accompanied by increased and prolonged inflammation, as compared to EDL. The proinflammatory cytokine profile is different in the soleus and ED muscles. Muscle repair efficiency differs by muscle fiber type. The inflammatory response affects the repair efficiency of slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Muscle Nerve 55: 400-409, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Water deprivation decreases strength in fast twitch muscle in contrast to slow twitch muscle in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, F; Grosset, J F; Canon, F

    2018-04-06

    The effects of dehydration on muscle performance in human are still contradictory, notably regarding muscle force. The effect of water deprivation (WD) on mechanical properties of skeletal muscle, and more precisely its impact on slow and fast muscles remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time whether WD leads to changes in contractile properties of skeletal muscle and whether these changes were muscle type-specific. Sixteen-week old male rats were assigned to either a control group (C) with water, or a 96 h WD group. At the end of the period, twitch and tetanus properties as well as biochemical and structural analysis were performed on soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Absolute twitch (Pt) and tetanic (P 0 ) tension were respectively 17% and 14% lower in EDL of WD rats as compared with C rats, whereas unexpected increases of 43% and 25% were observed in SOL. Tensions normalized with respect to muscle mass were not affected by WD in EDL whereas they were increased by more than 40% in SOL. A 96 h WD period leads to a decrease in fibre cross-sectional area and absolute myofibrillar content only in EDL. It is hypothesized that differences in the results between slow and fast muscles may come from i) a muscle type-specific effect of WD on protein balance, EDL showing a greater myofibrillar protein breakdown, and ii) a greater sensitivity to osmolality changes induced by WD in EDL than in SOL. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Twitch interpolation technique in testing of maximal muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to study the methodological aspects of the muscle twitch interpolation technique in estimating the maximal force of contraction in the quadriceps muscle utilizing commercial muscle testing equipment. Six healthy subjects participated in seven sets of experiments testing the effects...

  8. Passive muscle length changes affect twitch potentiation in power athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Paulo; Marques, Mário Cardoso; Marinho, Daniel Almeida; Ekblom, Maria M

    2014-07-01

    A conditioning maximal voluntary muscle action (MVC) has been shown to induce postactivation potentiation, that is, improved contractile muscle properties, when muscles are contracted isometrically. It is still uncertain how the contractile properties are affected during ongoing muscle length changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-s conditioning MVC on twitch properties of the plantarflexors during ongoing muscle length changes. Peak twitch, rate of torque development, and rate of torque relaxation, rising time, and half relaxation time were measured from supramaximal twitches evoked in the plantarflexors of 11 highly trained athletes. Twitches were evoked before a 6-s MVC and subsequently on eight different occasions during a 10-min recovery for five different modes: fast lengthening, slow lengthening, isometric, fast shortening, and slow shortening of the plantarflexors. The magnitude and the duration of effects from the conditioning MVC were significantly different between modes. Peak twitch, rate of torque development, and rate of torque relaxation significantly increased for all modes but more so for twitches evoked during fast and slow shortening as compared with lengthening. Rising time was reduced in the lengthening modes but slightly prolonged in the shortening modes. Half relaxation time was significantly reduced for all modes, except fast lengthening. The findings show that the effects of a conditioning MVC on twitch contractile properties are dependent on direction and velocity of ongoing muscle length changes. This may imply that functional enhancements from a conditioning MVC might be expected to be greatest for concentric muscle actions but are still present in isometric and eccentric parts of a movement.

  9. Effects of caffeine at different temperatures on contractile properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch rat muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondmikun, Y; Soukup, T; Asmussen, G

    2006-01-01

    The slow-twitch soleus muscle (SOL) exhibits decreased twitch tension (cold depression) in response to a decreased temperature, whereas the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle shows enhanced twitch tension (cold potentiation). On the other hand, the slow-twitch SOL muscle is more sensitive to twitch potentiation and contractures evoked by caffeine than the fast-twitch EDL muscle. In order to reveal the effects of these counteracting conditions (temperature and caffeine), we have studied the combined effects of temperature changes on the potentiation effects of caffeine in modulating muscle contractions and contractures in both muscles. Isolated muscles, bathed in a Tyrode solution containing 0.1-60 mM caffeine, were stimulated directly and isometric single twitches, fused tetanic contractions and contractures were recorded at 35 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Our results showed that twitches and tetani of both SOL and EDL were potentiated and prolonged in the presence of 0.3-10 mM caffeine. Despite the cold depression, the extent of potentiation of the twitch tension by caffeine in the SOL muscle at 20 degrees C was by 10-15 % higher than that at 35 degrees C, while no significant difference was noted in the EDL muscle between both temperatures. Since the increase of twitch tension was significantly higher than potentiation of tetani in both muscles, the twitch-tetanus ratio was enhanced. Higher concentrations of caffeine induced contractures in both muscles; the contracture threshold was, however, lower in the SOL than in the EDL muscle at both temperatures. Furthermore, the maximal tension was achieved at lower caffeine concentrations in the SOL muscle at both 35 degrees C and 20 degrees C compared to the EDL muscle. These effects of caffeine were rapidly and completely reversed in both muscles when the test solution was replaced by the Tyrode solution. The results have indicated that the potentiation effect of caffeine is both time- and temperature

  10. Differences between glycogen biogenesis in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cussó, R; Lerner, L R; Cadefau, J

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen is an essential energy substrate for muscular activity. The biochemical properties of the enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen were analysed in two types of rabbit skeletal muscle fiber (fast- and slow-twitch). Glycogen concentration was higher in fast......-twitch muscle than in slow-twitch muscle, but the latter contained many more small intermediate-acceptor molecules that could act as glycogen synthase substrates. The enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen in fast-twitch muscle were strongly stimulated by Glc-6-P, but those in slow-twitch muscle were...

  11. Differences between glycogen biogenesis in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cussó, R; Lerner, L R; Cadefau, J

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen is an essential energy substrate for muscular activity. The biochemical properties of the enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen were analysed in two types of rabbit skeletal muscle fiber (fast- and slow-twitch). Glycogen concentration was higher in fast-twitch...... muscle than in slow-twitch muscle, but the latter contained many more small intermediate-acceptor molecules that could act as glycogen synthase substrates. The enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen in fast-twitch muscle were strongly stimulated by Glc-6-P, but those in slow-twitch muscle were...

  12. External recording of twitch time course in cat ankle muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerbeek, O.; Kernell, D.

    1991-01-01

    In chronic experiments concerning the activity-dependent plasticity of muscle properties, a simple and noninvasive method was used for monitoring changes of twitch speed in conscious adult cats. The animals had been provided with implanted electrodes for nerve stimulation, and a hand-held force

  13. Eye Twitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affecting all aspects of life. Hemifacial spasm involves twitches of muscles on one side of the face, ... few weeks Your eyelid completely closes with each twitch or you have difficulty opening the eye Twitching ...

  14. Intracellular calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, action potentials elicit contractions by releasing calcium ions (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Experiments on individual mouse muscle fibers micro-injected with a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye reveal that the amount of Ca2+ released is three- to fourfold larger in fast-twitch fibers than in slow-twitch fibers, and the proportion of the released Ca2+ that binds to troponin to activate contraction is substantially smaller. PMID:22450485

  15. Cyclosporin A preferentially attenuates skeletal slow-twitch muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabara E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, is associated with muscle regeneration via NFATc1/GATA2-dependent pathways. However, it is not clear whether calcineurin preferentially affects the regeneration of slow- or fast-twitch muscles. We investigated the effect of a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, on the morphology and fiber diameter of regenerating slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Adult Wistar rats (259.5 ± 9 g maintained under standard conditions were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight, ip for 5 days, submitted to cryolesion of soleus and tibialis anterior (TA muscles on the 6th day, and then treated with CsA for an additional 21 days. The muscles were removed, weighed, frozen, and stored in liquid nitrogen. Cryolesion did not alter the body weight gain of the animals after 21 days of regeneration (P = 0.001 and CsA significantly reduced the body weight gain (15.5%; P = 0.01 during the same period. All treated TA and soleus muscles showed decreased weights (17 and 29%, respectively, P < 0.05. CsA treatment decreased the cross-sectional area of both soleus and TA muscles of cryoinjured animals (TA: 2108 ± 930 vs 792 ± 640 µm²; soleus: 2209 ± 322 vs 764 ± 439 m²; P < 0.001. Histological sections of both muscles stained with Toluidine blue revealed similar regenerative responses after cryolesion. In addition, CsA was able to minimize these responses, i.e., centralized nuclei and split fibers, more efficiently so in TA muscle. These results indicate that calcineurin preferentially plays a role in regeneration of slow-twitch muscle.

  16. Size and Proportions of Slow-Twitch and Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers in Human Costal Diaphragm.

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    Meznaric, Marija; Cvetko, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Smaller diaphragmatic motor unit potentials (MUPs) compared to MUPs of limb muscles lead to the hypothesis that diaphragmatic muscle fibers, being the generators of MUPs, might be also smaller. We compared autopsy samples of costal diaphragm and vastus lateralis of healthy men with respect to fibers' size and expression of slow myosin heavy chain isoform (MyHC-1) and fast 2A isoform (MyHC-2A). Diaphragmatic fibers were smaller than fibers in vastus lateralis with regard to the mean minimal fiber diameter of slow-twitch (46.8 versus 72.2  μ m, p twitch (45.1 versus 62.4  μ m, p twitch (2376.0 versus 5455.9  μ m 2 , p twitch (2258.7 versus 4189.7  μ m 2 , p twitch fibers was higher (50.2 versus 36.3%, p twitch fibers (47.2 versus 58.7%, p < 0.01) was lower. The numerical proportion of hybrid fibers did not differ. Muscle fibers of costal diaphragm have specific characteristics which support increased resistance of diaphragm to fatigue.

  17. Cyclic muscle twitch contraction inhibits immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ayana; Sakamoto, Junya; Honda, Yuichiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Nakano, Jiro; Okita, Minoru

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of cyclic muscle twitch contraction caused by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats. Twenty-nine rats were divided into control, immobilization, and immobilization with muscle contraction groups. The ankle joints of the immobilization and muscle contraction rats were fixed in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for 4 weeks. In the muscle contraction group, cyclic muscle twitch contraction of the soleus muscle was induced using a commercial device (1 Hz, 4 ± 2 mA, 60 min/day, 5 times/week) with the ankle joint immobilized. The dorsiflexion range of ankle joint motion in the muscle contraction group was significantly greater than that in the immobilization group. The expressions of fibrosis-related genes (i.e., hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, α-smooth muscle actin, and types I and III collagen) were significantly decreased in the muscle contraction group compared to the immobilization group. The fluorescence intensities of type I and type III collagen in the perimysium and endomysium in the muscle contraction group were significantly decreased compared to the immobilization group. These results suggest that cyclic muscle twitch contraction induced by NMES might alleviate skeletal muscle fibrosis, reducing immobilization-induced muscle contracture.

  18. The twitch interpolation technique for study of fatigue of human quadriceps muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Mehlsen, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine if the twitch interpolation technique could be used to objectively measure fatigue in the quadriceps muscle in subjects performing submaximally. The 'true' maximum isometric quadriceps torque was determined in 21 healthy subject using the twitch interpolation...... technique. Then an endurance test was performed in which the subjects made repeated isometric contractions at 50% of the 'true' maximum torque for 4 s, separated by 6 s rest periods. During the test, the force response to single electrical stimulation (twitch amplitude) was measured at 50% and 25......). In conclusion, the twitch technique can be used for objectively measuring fatigue of the quadriceps muscle....

  19. Size and Proportions of Slow-Twitch and Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers in Human Costal Diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Meznaric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smaller diaphragmatic motor unit potentials (MUPs compared to MUPs of limb muscles lead to the hypothesis that diaphragmatic muscle fibers, being the generators of MUPs, might be also smaller. We compared autopsy samples of costal diaphragm and vastus lateralis of healthy men with respect to fibers’ size and expression of slow myosin heavy chain isoform (MyHC-1 and fast 2A isoform (MyHC-2A. Diaphragmatic fibers were smaller than fibers in vastus lateralis with regard to the mean minimal fiber diameter of slow-twitch (46.8 versus 72.2 μm, p<0.001, fast-twitch (45.1 versus 62.4 μm, p<0.001, and hybrid fibers (47.3 versus 65.0 μm, p<0.01 as well as to the mean fiber cross-sectional areas of slow-twitch (2376.0 versus 5455.9 μm2, p<0.001, fast-twitch (2258.7 versus 4189.7 μm2, p<0.001, and hybrid fibers (2404.4 versus 4776.3 μm2, p<0.01. The numerical proportion of slow-twitch fibers was higher (50.2 versus 36.3%, p<0.01 in costal diaphragm and the numerical proportion of fast-twitch fibers (47.2 versus 58.7%, p<0.01 was lower. The numerical proportion of hybrid fibers did not differ. Muscle fibers of costal diaphragm have specific characteristics which support increased resistance of diaphragm to fatigue.

  20. Twitch potentiation influences the time course of twitch depression in muscle relaxant studies : A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic explanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    2006-01-01

    The time course of twitch depression following neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) administration is influenced by the duration of control neuromuscular monitoring (twitch stabilization). The physiological mechanism for this interaction is not known. During twitch stabilization twitch response often

  1. The twitch interpolation technique for study of fatigue of human quadriceps muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Mehlsen, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine if the twitch interpolation technique could be used to objectively measure fatigue in the quadriceps muscle in subjects performing submaximally. The 'true' maximum isometric quadriceps torque was determined in 21 healthy subject using the twitch interpolation...

  2. Coexistence of twitch potentiation and tetanic force decline in rat hindlimb muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Lucinda L.; Enoka, Roger M.; Volz, Kathryn A.; Stuart, Douglas G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of whole-muscle fatigue on the isometric twitch was investigated in various hindlimb muscles of anesthetized rats, using an experimental protocol designed to assess the levels of fatigability in motor units. The results of EMG and force measurements revealed the existence of a linear relationship between fatigability and the magnitude of the twitch force following the fatigue test in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles.

  3. Contractures and involuntary muscle overactivity in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan; Rockstroh, Günter; Rückriem, Stefan; Koch, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of contractures with an increase or reduction of non-spastic muscle overactivity due to severe cerebral damage. Forty-five patients with tetraparesis after severe cerebral damage were investigated. Three groups were defined based on the presence of spasticity (revealed as resistance to passive stretch (= hypertonia)), and the presence of contracture of the relevant knee joint: Group(s) (17 patients with hypertonia without contracture), Group(s+c) (20 patients with hypertonia and contracture), and Group(c) (eight patients without hypertonia and with contracture). In all groups spontaneous involuntary muscle activity was assessed continuously over a 12-hour period through isometric measurement of knee joint flexion torque. A mathematical algorithm differentiated an hourly muscle activity spectrum (PI(h)). The frequency of peaks (peaks(h)) from the activity spectrum was determined. We revealed that Group(s) had higher PI(h) and more frequent peaks(h) compared with Group(s+c) and Group(c) (p0.05). The presence of contractures was associated with lower involuntary muscle overactivity in terms of lower PI(h) and less frequent peaks(h), indicating that contractures may be associated with reduced non-spastic positive features of the upper motor neurone syndrome in patients with severe brain damage.

  4. Resveratrol exhibits differential protective effects on fast- and slow-twitch muscles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Chun; Yang, Meng-Hsuan; Tung, Hung-Chun; Chang, Chieh-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Huang, Jiung-Pang; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Hung, Li-Man

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differential protective effect of resveratrol (RSV) on oxidative stress and metabolic signaling pathways in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats with diabetes. Diabetic rats were induced by streptozotocin (STZ) for 2 weeks and then administered with RSV (1, 10 and 100 μg/kg per day) for 1 week. We determined oxidative stress and protein expression by lucigenin-mediated chemiluminescence and Western immunoblot. The superoxide anion production and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein level were increased in fast-twitch muscle than in slow-twitch muscle of diabetes. The Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) phosphorylations were reduced in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Oxidative stress and GSK-3 dephosphorylation were corrected by RSV treatment in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Furthermore, RSV treatment downregulated CuZnSOD protein level in diabetic fast-twitch muscle. In diabetic slow-twitch muscle, RSV treatment elevated manganese SOD (MnSOD) and phosphorylated Akt protein levels and reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Our results suggested that fast-twitch muscle incurred more oxidative stress, whereas slow-twitch muscle altered metabolic signaling molecules activities under diabetic status. The antidiabetic effect of RSV on fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles was mediated by different antioxidative and metabolic signals. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Slow twitch soleus muscle is not protected from sarcopenia in senescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, E E; Thomas, M M; Murynka, Tanya; Rowan, Sharon L; Wright, Kathryn J; Huba, Elaine; Hepple, Russell T

    2010-09-01

    Although most literature suggests a relative protection of slow twitch muscle with aging, there is limited data in senescence when muscle atrophy and functional decline markedly accelerate. To address this issue we examined age-related changes in muscle mass, contractile function, mitochondrial enzyme activities, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the slow twitch soleus (Sol) and fast twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle of young adult (YA) and senescent (SEN) rats. Muscle mass declined between YA and SEN in the Sol by 35% compared to 55% in the Gas muscle. After normalizing for muscle mass, tetanic force per g of muscle declined by 58% in Sol and by 36% in Gas muscle. Time-to-peak tension was increased only in the Gas (30%), whereas time-to-half relaxation was increased by 70% in Sol and 51% in Gas. Citrate synthase and complex IV activity declined in homogenates of Sol (30-36%) and red oxidative region of Gas (46-51%), but not white glycolytic region of Gas. Strikingly, the shift away from the dominant adult MHC isoform with aging was much greater in Sol (fibers positive for MHC fast: 11+/-2% in YA versus 36+/-3% in SEN) than in Gas (fibers positive for MHC slow: 12+/-1% in YA versus 26+/-3% in SEN) muscle. Collectively, these results show that the slow twitch Sol muscle undergoes large phenotypic alterations in very old age and for several measures (tetanic tension per g, time-to-half relaxation and shift in adult MHC expression) that is of greater magnitude than fast twitch muscle, underscoring the importance of including age-related changes in slow twitch muscle in seeking potential treatments for sarcopenia. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  7. A short-term statin treatment changes the contractile properties of fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Antoine Boulanger; Dufresne, Sébastien S; Frenette, Jérôme

    2016-10-28

    Cumulative evidence indicates that statins induce myotoxicity. However, the lack of understanding of how statins affect skeletal muscles at the structural, functional, and physiological levels hampers proper healthcare management. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the early after-effects of lovastatin on the slow-twitch soleus (Sol) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Adult C57BL/6 mice were orally administrated with placebo or lovastatin [50 mg/kg/d] for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the isometric ex vivo contractile properties of the Sol and EDL muscles were measured. Subtetanic and tetanic contractions were assessed and contraction kinetics were recorded. The muscles were then frozen for immunohistochemical analyses. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by an a posteriori Tukey's test. The short-term lovastatin treatment did not induce muscle mass loss, muscle fiber atrophy, or creatine kinase (CK) release. It had no functional impact on slow-twitch Sol muscles. However, subtetanic stimulations at 10 Hz provoked greater force production in fast-twitch EDL muscles. The treatment also decreased the maximal rate of force development (dP/dT) of twitch contractions and prolonged the half relaxation time (1/2RT) of tetanic contractions of EDL muscles. An early short-term statin treatment induced subtle but significant changes in some parameters of the contractile profile of EDL muscles, providing new insights into the selective initiation of statin-induced myopathy in fast-twitch muscles.

  8. Calorie restriction enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscle of 24-month-old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequea, Donel A; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2012-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) induces enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in fast-twitch (type II) muscle from old rats, but the effect of CR on slow-twitch (type I) muscle from old rats is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins in isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from 24-month-old ad libitum fed and CR (consuming 65% of ad libitum, intake) rats. Muscles were incubated with and without 1.2 nM insulin. CR versus ad libitum rats had greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) on T308 and S473 for both muscles incubated with insulin. GLUT4 protein abundance and phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (Y1162/1163) and AS160 (T642) were unaltered by CR in both muscles. These results implicate enhanced pAkt as a potential mechanism for the CR-induced increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by the fast-twitch epitrochlearis and slow-twitch soleus of old rats.

  9. Recovery of Action Potentials and Twitches after K-contractures in Frog Skeletal Muscle(Physiology)

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuko, Suzuki; Ibuki, Shirakawa; Kazunari, Noguchi; Hirohiko, Kishi; Haruo, Sugi; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University:(Present office)Department of Physical Therapy, Health Science University; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University

    2004-01-01

    To give information about intracellular Ca^ translocation during and after K-contractures in vertebrate skeletal muscle fibers, we examined recovery of action potentials and twitches after interruption and spontaneous relaxation of K-contractures at low temperature (3℃) that greatly reduced the rate of Ca^ reuptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. On membrane repolarization interrupting K-contractures, the amplitude of both action potentials and twitches recovered quickly, while the falling pha...

  10. Is cricothyroid muscle twitch predictive of the integrity of the EBSLN in Thyroid Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eui-Suk; Chang, Jae Hyeok; Kim, Jia; Cha, Wonjae

    2018-03-24

    Cricothyroid (CT) muscle twitch inspection with neurostimulation is a widely accepted method to identify the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) and its integrity in thyroid surgery. However, there has been no large-scale research to evaluate the diagnostic values of CT muscle twitch inspection based on postoperative electromyography (EMG) results, which are considered the gold standard. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the diagnostic value of CT muscle twitch inspection based on postoperative EMG. Prospective cohort study. A total of 454 patients underwent primary thyroid surgery. Among them, 55 patients were excluded because of preoperative vocal fold palsy, problems with the stimulator, or refusal to participate in the EMG study. Finally, 399 patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Intraoperatively, CT muscle twitch was inspected with neurostimulation. Bilateral EMG examination of the CT muscle was performed 2 to 3 months postoperatively in all patients. A total of 712 EBSLNs at risk were analyzed in this study. Of these, 21 (2.9%) nerves were visually identified, and positive CT muscle twitch by neurostimulation was observed in 694 (97.5%). Normal results on postoperative EMG of the CT muscle were reported in 657 (92.3%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 97.7%, 5.5%, 92.5%, and 16.7%, respectively. CT muscle twitch inspection could be a useful intraoperative tool to determine EBSLN integrity considering its high sensitivity and PPV. However, the test may not completely replace EMG for evaluating EBSLN integrity due to its low specificity and NPV. 2b. Laryngoscope, 2018. © 2018 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Osteoprotegerin and β2-Agonists Mitigate Muscular Dystrophy in Slow- and Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Frenette, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Our recent work showed that daily injections of osteoprotegerin (OPG)-immunoglobulin fragment complex (OPG-Fc) completely restore the function of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles in dystrophic mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, despite marked improvements, OPG-Fc was not as effective in preventing the loss of function of slow-twitch soleus and diaphragm muscles. Because β 2 -agonists enhance the function of slow- and fast-twitch dystrophic muscles and because their use is limited by their adverse effects on bone and cardiac tissues, we hypothesized that OPG-Fc, a bone and skeletal muscle protector, acts synergistically with β 2 -agonists and potentiates their positive effects on skeletal muscles. We observed that the content of β 2 -adrenergic receptors, which are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, is significantly reduced in dystrophic muscles but is rescued by the injection of OPG-Fc. Most important, OPG-Fc combined with a low dose of formoterol, a member of a new generation of β 2 -agonists, histologically and functionally rescued slow-twitch dystrophic muscles. This combination of therapeutic agents, which have already been tested and approved for human use, may open up new therapeutic avenues for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and possibly other neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Force estimation in fatigue condition using a muscle-twitch model during isometric finger contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Youngjin; Kim, Sangjoon J; Kim, Jung

    2017-12-01

    We propose a force estimation method in fatigue condition using a muscle-twitch model and surface electromyography (sEMG). The twitch model, which is an estimate of force by a single spike, was obtained from sEMG features and measured forces. Nine healthy subjects performed isometric index finger abduction until exhaustion for a series of dynamic contractions (0-20% MVC) to characterize the twitch model and static contractions (50% MVC) to induce muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue was identified based on the changes of twitch model; the twitch peak decreased and the contraction time increased as muscle fatigue developed. Force estimation performance in non-fatigue and fatigue conditions was evaluated and its results were compared with that of a conventional method using the mean absolute value (MAV). In non-fatigue conditions, the performance of the proposed method (0.90 ± 0.05) and the MAV method (0.88 ± 0.06) were comparable. In fatigue conditions, the performance was significantly improved for the proposed method (0.87 ± 0.05) compared with the MAV (0.78 ± 0.09). Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic hypobaric hypoxia increases isolated rat fast-twitch and slow-twitch limb muscle force and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, R; Bradford, A; O'Halloran, K D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia alters respiratory muscle force and fatigue, effects that could be attributed to hypoxia and/or increased activation due to hyperventilation. We hypothesized that chronic hypoxia is associated with phenotypic change in non-respiratory muscles and therefore we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypobaric hypoxia increases limb muscle force and fatigue. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to normoxia or hypobaric hypoxia (PB=450 mm Hg) for 6 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were removed under pentobarbitone anaesthesia and strips were mounted for isometric force determination in Krebs solution in standard water-jacketed organ baths at 25 °C. Isometric twitch and tetanic force, contractile kinetics, force-frequency relationship and fatigue characteristics were determined in response to electrical field stimulation. Chronic hypoxia increased specific force in SOL and EDL compared to age-matched normoxic controls. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased endurance in both limb muscles. We conclude that hypoxia elicits functional plasticity in limb muscles perhaps due to oxidative stress. Our results may have implications for respiratory disorders that are characterized by prolonged hypoxia such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  14. Dietary nitrate increases tetanic [Ca2+]i and contractile force in mouse fast-twitch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Andrés; Schiffer, Tomas A; Ivarsson, Niklas; Cheng, Arthur J; Bruton, Joseph D; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-08-01

    Dietary inorganic nitrate has profound effects on health and physiological responses to exercise. Here, we examined if nitrate, in doses readily achievable via a normal diet, could improve Ca(2+) handling and contractile function using fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles from C57bl/6 male mice given 1 mm sodium nitrate in water for 7 days. Age matched controls were provided water without added nitrate. In fast-twitch muscle fibres dissected from nitrate treated mice, myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] was significantly greater than in Control fibres at stimulation frequencies from 20 to 150 Hz, which resulted in a major increase in contractile force at ≤ 50 Hz. At 100 Hz stimulation, the rate of force development was ∼35% faster in the nitrate group. These changes in nitrate treated mice were accompanied by increased expression of the Ca(2+) handling proteins calsequestrin 1 and the dihydropyridine receptor. No changes in force or calsequestrin 1 and dihydropyridine receptor expression were measured in slow-twitch muscles. In conclusion, these results show a striking effect of nitrate supplementation on intracellular Ca(2+) handling in fast-twitch muscle resulting in increased force production. A new mechanism is revealed by which nitrate can exert effects on muscle function with applications to performance and a potential therapeutic role in conditions with muscle weakness.

  15. Twitch mouth pressure for detecting respiratory muscle weakness in suspicion of neuromuscular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Desmarais, Gilbert; Falaize, Line; Ogna, Adam; Cognet, Sandrine; Louis, Bruno; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Twitch mouth pressure using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves and an automated inspiratory trigger is a noninvasive, non-volitional assessment of diaphragmatic strength. Our aims were to validate this method in patients with suspected neuromuscular disease, to determine the best inspiratory-trigger pressure threshold, and to evaluate whether twitch mouth pressure decreased the overdiagnosis of muscle weakness frequently observed with noninvasive volitional tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure, sniff nasal pressure, and twitch mouth pressure were measured in 112 patients with restrictive disease and suspected neuromuscular disorder. Esophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured in 64 of these patients to confirm or infirm inspiratory muscle weakness. Magnetic stimulation was triggered by inspiratory pressures of -1 and -5 cmH 2 O. The -5 cmH 2 O trigger produced the best correlation between twitch mouth pressure and twitch esophageal pressure (R 2  = 0.86; P neuromuscular disorder for invasive inspiratory-muscle investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ca sensitivity and acetylcholine receptor currents of twitch and tonic snake muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, R L; Spiegel, P

    1990-12-01

    Myofibrillar Ca sensitivity and single-channel acetylcholine receptor (AChR) currents were studied in garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis) costocutaneous muscle fibers. Nomarski optics were used to identify tonic and fast- and slow-twitch fibers. Measurements of tension generation were made using chemically skinned fibers. The maximum tensions of the three types of fibers were similar, and the fast- and slow-twitch fibers had similar Ca sensitivities. Compared with twitch fibers, tonic fibers had lower threshold Ca concentrations for tension generation and a larger range of Ca concentrations between threshold and maximum tension. The AChR channels were studied by enzymatically removing the nerve terminals and performing patch-clamp recordings on the exposed postsynaptic membrane. Twitch fibers had only one class of end-plate channel with a conductance of approximately 51 pS. Tonic fibers had two types of synaptic channels. One AChR channel in the tonic fibers resembled the type seen in twitch fibers. The other channel in tonic fibers had a smaller conductance of approximately 33 pS and resembled extrajunctional AChRs on denervated twitch fibers.

  17. Fasting-related autophagic response in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomonori; Oishi, Yasuharu; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Muraoka, Isao

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated regulation of autophagy in slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles in fasting-related atrophy. Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to fasting for 1, 2, or 3 days. Greater weight loss was observed in plantaris muscle than in soleus muscle in response to fasting. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LC3-II, a marker protein for macroautophagy, was expressed at a notably higher level in plantaris than in soleus muscle, and that the expression level was fasting duration-dependent. To identify factors related to LC3-II enhancement, autophagy-related signals were examined in both types of muscle. Phosphorylated mTOR was reduced in plantaris but not in soleus muscle. FOXO3a and ER stress signals were unchanged in both muscle types during fasting. These findings suggest that preferential atrophy of fast-twitch muscle is associated with induction of autophagy during fasting and that differences in autophagy regulation are attributable to differential signal regulation in soleus and plantaris muscle. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating the minimum stimulation frequency necessary to evoke tetanic progression based on muscle twitch parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shogo; Fukuhara, Shinichi; Fujinaga, Takeshi; Oka, Hisao

    2017-03-01

    The summation of the muscle force caused by an increase in the firing rate is named a tetanic contraction (tetanus), and the minimum stimulation frequency necessary to evoke an unfused/fused tetanus is related to the contraction time (CT) and relaxation time (RT) of the twitch. In particular, the fusion index (FI) is a very useful indicator, and it is used to evaluate the change in the muscle fiber component ratio. However, the measurement of the FI is invasive, because most patients experience pain during the electrical stimulation for tetanus. We expect that the twitch parameters CT and RT can substitute for the FI in the future. We found that the minimum stimulation frequency necessary to evoke the unfused/fused tetanus can be estimated from the twitch parameters as a first step. The results showed that (1) the minimum stimulation frequencies calculated from twitch parameters during unfused/fused tetanus were very similar to those calculated from FI parameters, and (2) they were also strongly correlated with FI parameters regardless of fiber components. The basic characteristics of tetanic progression in different fiber types could be estimated from twitch parameters.

  19. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  20. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. DESIGN: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. SETTING: University research

  1. Stabilization and stability of twitch force during mechanomyography of the adductor pollicis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, G; Fidler, [No Value; Wierda, JMKH

    1998-01-01

    Objective. In order to study the stabilization time, the increase in twitch force during stabilization and the maintenance of stability during mechanomyography of the adductor pollicis muscle, neuromuscular function was monitored in 20 patients anaesthetized without the use of a neuromuscular

  2. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. Design: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. Setting: University research

  3. Age-related differences in twitch properties and muscle activation of the first dorsal interosseous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Sterczala, Adam J; Ciccone, Anthony B; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-06-01

    To examine twitch force potentiation and twitch contraction duration, as well as electromyographic amplitude (EMG RMS ) and motor unit mean firing rates (MFR) at targeted forces between young and old individuals in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Ultrasonography was used to assess muscle quality. Twenty-two young (YG) (age=22.6±2.7years) and 14 older (OD) (age=62.1±4.7years) individuals completed conditioning contractions at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction, (MVC) during which EMG RMS and MFRs were assessed. Evoked twitches preceded and followed the conditioning contractions. Ultrasound images were taken to quantify muscle quality (cross-sectional area [CSA] and echo intensity [EI]). No differences were found between young and old for CSA, pre-conditioning contraction twitch force, or MFRs (P>0.05). However, OD individuals exhibited greater EI and contraction duration (PMFRs. Ultrasonography suggested age-related changes in muscle structure contributed to altered contractile properties in the OD. Greater muscle activation requirements can have negative implications on fatigue resistance at low to moderate intensities in older individuals. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The relationship between passive stiffness and evoked twitch properties: the influence of muscle CSA normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, E D; Thompson, B J; Sobolewski, E J; Herda, T J; Costa, P B; Walter, A A; Cramer, J T

    2011-01-01

    Passive stiffness measurements are often used as a clinical tool to examine a muscle's passive lengthening characteristics. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between passive stiffness and evoked twitch properties prior to and following normalization of passive stiffness to muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Ten healthy volunteers (mean ± SD age = 23 ± 3 year) performed passive range of motion, evoked twitch, and muscle CSA assessments of the plantar flexor muscles. Passive stiffness was determined from the slope of the final 5° of the angle–torque curve. Peak twitch torque (PTT) and rate of torque development (RTD) were determined via transcutaneous electrical stimulation, and muscle CSA was assessed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography scanner. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients (r) were used to assess the relationships between passive stiffness and PTT and RTD and normalized passive stiffness (passive stiffness . muscle CSA −1 ) and PTT and RTD. Significant positive relationships were observed between passive stiffness and PTT (P = 0.003, r = 0.828) and RTD (P = 0.003, r = 0.825). There were no significant relationships between normalized passive stiffness and PTT (P = 0.290, r = 0.372) or RTD (P = 0.353, r = 0.329) demonstrating that stiffness did not account for a significant portion of the variance in twitch properties. Passive stiffness was largely influenced by the amount of muscle tissue in this study. Future studies that examine muscle stiffness and its relationship with performance measures, among different populations, and following various interventions may consider normalizing stiffness measurements to muscle CSA

  5. Fast-twitch glycolytic skeletal muscle is predisposed to age-induced impairments in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Díaz, Víctor; Soldini, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    -resolution respirometry and mitochondrial protein expression in soleus, quadricep, and lateral gastrocnemius skeletal muscles, which represent type 1 slow-twitch oxidative muscle (soleus) and type 2 fast-twitch glycolytic muscle (quadricep and gastrocnemius), respectively, in young (10-12 weeks) and mature (74-76 weeks......) mice. Electron transport through mitochondrial complexes I and III increases with age in quadricep and gastrocnemius, which is not observed in soleus. Mitochondrial coupling efficiency during respiration through complex I also deteriorates with age in gastrocnemius and shows a tendency (p = .085......) to worsen in quadricep. These data demonstrate actual alterations in electron transport function that occurs with age and are dependent on skeletal muscle type....

  6. Homer 2 antagonizes protein degradation in slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoloso, Elena; Megighian, Aram; Furlan, Sandra; Gorza, Luisa; Volpe, Pompeo

    2013-01-01

    Homer represents a new and diversified family of proteins made up of several isoforms. The presence of Homer isoforms, referable to 1b/c and 2a/b, was investigated in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles from both rat and mouse. Homer 1b/c was identical irrespective of the muscle, and Homer 2a/b was instead characteristic of the slow-twitch phenotype. Transition in Homer isoform composition was studied in two established experimental models of atrophy, i.e., denervation and disuse of slow-twitch skeletal muscles of the rat. No change of Homer 1b/c was observed up to 14 days after denervation, whereas Homer 2a/b was found to be significantly decreased at 7 and 14 days after denervation by 70 and 90%, respectively, and in parallel to reduction of muscle mass; 3 days after denervation, relative mRNA was reduced by 90% and remained low thereafter. Seven-day hindlimb suspension decreased Homer 2a/b protein by 70%. Reconstitution of Homer 2 complement by in vivo transfection of denervated soleus allowed partial rescue of the atrophic phenotype, as far as muscle mass, muscle fiber size, and ubiquitinazion are concerned. The counteracting effects of exogenous Homer 2 were mediated by downregulation of MuRF1, Atrogin, and Myogenin, i.e., all genes known to be upregulated at the onset of atrophy. On the other hand, slow-to-fast transition of denervated soleus, another landmark of denervation atrophy, was not rescued by Homer 2 replacement. The present data show that 1) downregulation of Homer 2 is an early event of atrophy, and 2) Homer 2 participates in the control of ubiquitinization and ensuing proteolysis via transcriptional downregulation of MuRF1, Atrogin, and Myogenin. Homers are key players of skeletal muscle plasticity, and Homer 2 is required for trophic homeostasis of slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

  7. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  8. Interplay Between Aging and Unloading on Oxidative Stress in Fast-Twitch Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of aging on the adaptation potential of antioxidants and the accumulation of oxidative damage in fast-twitch muscles in response to non–weight-bearing conditions. Adult and old rats were randomized into 4 groups: normal weight bearing, hind-limb unloading for 3, 7, and 14 days. Activities of manganese superoxide dismutase, copper–zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and contents of glutathione, carbonylated proteins, and malondialdehyde were determined in tibialis anterior muscles. We found that the adaptability of most antioxidants in fast-twitch muscles with unloading is intact in aged rats except copper–zinc superoxide dismutase where its activity decreased with 14 days of unloading. Additionally, malondialdehyde accumulated in aged muscles with 14 days of unloading but not adult muscles. Collectively, the adaptation of copper–zinc superoxide dismutase in fast-twitch muscles with unloading is impaired with aging, which may be related to the greater accumulation of malondialdehyde. PMID:23213028

  9. Capturing Physiology of Emotion along Facial Muscles: A Method of Distinguishing Feigned from Involuntary Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood Mehmood; Ward, Robert D.; Ingleby, Michael

    The ability to distinguish feigned from involuntary expressions of emotions could help in the investigation and treatment of neuropsychiatric and affective disorders and in the detection of malingering. This work investigates differences in emotion-specific patterns of thermal variations along the major facial muscles. Using experimental data extracted from 156 images, we attempted to classify patterns of emotion-specific thermal variations into neutral, and voluntary and involuntary expressions of positive and negative emotive states. Initial results suggest (i) each facial muscle exhibits a unique thermal response to various emotive states; (ii) the pattern of thermal variances along the facial muscles may assist in classifying voluntary and involuntary facial expressions; and (iii) facial skin temperature measurements along the major facial muscles may be used in automated emotion assessment.

  10. EXERCISE MYOPATHY: CHANGES IN MYOFIBRILS OF FAST-TWITCH MUSCLE FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kaasik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationships between the changes of myofibrils in fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic (type IIA fibres and fast-twitch glycolytic (type IIB muscle fibres, protein synthesis and degradation rate in exercise-induced myopathic skeletal muscle. Exhaustive exercise was used to induce myopathy in Wistar rats. Intensity of glycogenolysis in muscle fibres during exercise, protein synthesis rate, degradation rate and structural changes of myofibrils were measured using morphological and biochemical methods. Myofibril cross sectional area (CSA in type IIA fibres decreased 33% and type IIB fibres 44%. Protein degradation rate increased in both type IIA and IIB fibres, 63% and 69% respectively in comparison with the control group. According to the intensity of glycogenolysis, fast oxidative-glycolytic fibres are recruited more frequently during overtraining. Myofibrils in both types of fast-twitch myopathic muscle fibres are significantly thinner as the result of more intensive protein degradation. Regeneration capacity according to the presence of satellite cells is higher in type IIA fibres than in type IIB fibres in myopathic muscle.

  11. Impact of TIEG1 on the structural properties of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Malek; Meme, Sandra; Meme, William; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Hawse, John R; Canon, Francis; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2017-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) is a transcription factor that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to characterize the structural properties of both fast-twitch (EDL) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles in the hindlimb of TIEG1-deficient (TIEG1 -/- ) mice. Ten slow and 10 fast muscles were analyzed from TIEG1 -/- and wild-type (WT) mice using MRI texture (MRI-TA) and histological analyses. MRI-TA could discriminate between WT slow and fast muscles. Deletion of the TIEG1 gene led to changes in the texture profile within both muscle types. Specifically, muscle isolated from TIEG1 -/- mice displayed hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and a modification of fiber area distribution. We demonstrated that TIEG1 plays an important role in the structural properties of skeletal muscle. This study further implicates important roles for TIEG1 in the development of skeletal muscle and suggests that defects in TIEG1 expression and/or function may be associated with muscle disease. Muscle Nerve 55: 410-416, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Differential gene expression of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase MAFbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in response to immobilization-induced atrophy of slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Torii, Suguru; Machida, Shuichi

    2011-11-01

    We examined muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases MAFbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression resulting from immobilization-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to hindlimb immobilization, which induced similar percentage decreases in muscle mass in the soleus and plantaris muscles. Expression of MAFbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 was significantly greater in the plantaris muscle than in the soleus muscle during the early stage of atrophy. After a 3-day period of atrophy, total FOXO3a protein level had increased in both muscles, while phosphorylated FOXO3a protein had decreased in the plantaris muscle, but not in the soleus muscle. PGC-1α protein expression did not change following immobilization in both muscles, but basal PGC-1α protein in the soleus was markedly higher than that in plantaris muscles. These data suggest that although soleus and plantaris muscles atrophied to a similar extent and that muscle-specific ubiquitin protein ligases (E3) may contribute more to the atrophy of fast-twitch muscle than to that of slow-twitch muscle during immobilization.

  13. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  14. Accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers marks the acceleration of sarcopenia in slow and fast twitch muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Sharon L; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-08-01

    The age-related decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, exhibits a marked acceleration in advanced age. Although many studies have remarked upon the accumulation of very small myofibers, particularly at advanced stages of sarcopenia, the significance of this phenomenon in the acceleration of sarcopenia has never been examined. Furthermore, although mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by a lack of cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity has been implicated in myofiber atrophy in sarcopenia, the contribution of this phenotype to the accumulation of severely atrophied fibers in aged muscles has never been determined. To this end, we examined the fiber size distribution in the slow twitch soleus (Sol) and fast twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscles between young adulthood (YA) and senescence (SEN). We also quantified the abundance of COX deficient myocytes and their size attributes to gain insight into the contribution of this phenotype to myofiber atrophy with aging. Our data showed that the progression of muscle atrophy, particularly its striking acceleration between late middle age and SEN, was paralleled by an accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers (≤ 1000 μm(2) in size) in both Sol and Gas. On the other hand, we observed no COX deficient myofibers in Sol, despite nearly 20% of the myofibers being severely atrophic. Similarly, only 0.17 ± 0.06% of all fibers in Gas were COX deficient, and their size was generally larger (2375 ± 319 μm(2)) than the severely atrophied myofibers noted above. Collectively, our results suggest that similar processes likely contribute to the acceleration of sarcopenia in both slow twitch and fast twitch muscles, and that COX deficiency is not a major contributor to this phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of myoplasmic calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in frog twitch and mouse fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Single twitch fibers from frog leg muscles were isolated by dissection and micro-injected with furaptra, a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. Indicator resting fluorescence (FR) and the change evoked by an action potential (ΔF) were measured at long sarcomere length (16°C); ΔF/FR was scaled to units of ΔfCaD, the change in fraction of the indicator in the Ca2+-bound form. ΔfCaD was simulated with a multicompartment model of the underlying myoplasmic Ca2+ movements, and the results were compared with previous measurements and analyses in mouse fast-twitch fibers. In frog fibers, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release evoked by an action potential appears to be the sum of two components. The time course of the first component is similar to that of the entire Ca2+ release waveform in mouse fibers, whereas that of the second component is severalfold slower; the fractional release amounts are ∼0.8 (first component) and ∼0.2 (second component). Similar results were obtained in frog simulations with a modified model that permitted competition between Mg2+ and Ca2+ for occupancy of the regulatory sites on troponin. An anatomical basis for two release components in frog fibers is the presence of both junctional and parajunctional SR Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors [RyRs]), whereas mouse fibers (usually) have only junctional RyRs. Also, frog fibers have two RyR isoforms, RyRα and RyRβ, whereas the mouse fibers (usually) have only one, RyR1. Our simulations suggest that the second release component in frog fibers functions to supply extra Ca2+ to activate troponin, which, in mouse fibers, is not needed because of the more favorable location of their triadic junctions (near the middle of the thin filament). We speculate that, in general, parajunctional RyRs permit increased myofilament activation in fibers whose triadic junctions are located at the z-line. PMID:23630340

  16. Role of the JP45-Calsequestrin Complex on Calcium Entry in Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Barbara; Eckhardt, Jan; Bergamelli, Leda; Treves, Susan; Bongianino, Rossana; De Negri, Marco; Priori, Silvia G; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-07-08

    We exploited a variety of mouse models to assess the roles of JP45-CASQ1 (CASQ, calsequestrin) and JP45-CASQ2 on calcium entry in slow twitch muscles. In flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers isolated from JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO mice, calcium transients induced by tetanic stimulation rely on calcium entry via La(3+)- and nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels. The comparison of excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) between FDB fibers from WT, JP45KO, CASQ1KO, CASQ2KO, JP45-CASQ1 double KO, JP45-CASQ2 double KO, and JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO shows that ECCE enhancement requires ablation of both CASQs and JP45. Calcium entry activated by ablation of both JP45-CASQ1 and JP45-CASQ2 complexes supports tetanic force development in slow twitch soleus muscles. In addition, we show that CASQs interact with JP45 at Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum at rest, whereas Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the SR lumen after depolarization-induced calcium release cause the dissociation of JP45 from CASQs. Our results show that the complex JP45-CASQs is a negative regulator of ECCE and that tetanic force development in slow twitch muscles is supported by the dynamic interaction between JP45 and CASQs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Relation between equatorial x-ray intensities and isometric twitch forces in frog skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiro; Tameyasu, Tsukasa; Sugi, Haruo

    1983-01-01

    The sartorius muscle of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) was mounted vertically in an experimental chamber. The nuscle was continuously perfused with Ringer solution, and stimulated with single 2 msec supramaximal current pulses. The equatorial X-ray diffraction pattern (specimen to detector distance, 40 cm) during isometric twitches was recorded with a linear position-sensitive proportional counter, and the data were registered in a computer memory system. With an increase of temperature from 5 to 22 0 C, the magnitude of peak twitch force was reduced by about 50% with a marked decrease in the duration of mechanical response, while the minimum value of Isub(1.0)/Isub(1.1) attained during a twitch increased by more than twofold. On the other hand, the equatorial reflection from resting and fully tetanized muscles showed no appreciable dependence on temperature, though the steady tetanic force P 0 increased by about 10% with an increase in temperature from 5 to 25 0 C. The intensity ratio is not a linear function of isometric force developed. (Namekawa, k.)

  18. The effects of beta-adrenoceptor activation on contraction in isolated fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, S. P.; Dulhunty, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    1. The aim of the experiments was to examined the effects of beta-adrenoceptor activation on twitch and tetanic contractions in fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle fibres. Isometric force was recorded from bundles of intact fibres isolated from the normal and denervated slow-twitch soleus and normal fast-twitch sternomastoid muscles of the rat. 2. Terbutaline (10 microM), a beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist, induced an average 15% potentiation of peak twitch and peak tetanic force in no...

  19. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels; Relu, Mihai U.

    2008-01-01

    without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P CON, CP decreased (P ... fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle VO2 was higher (P CON (425 +/- 25 (+/- S.E.M.) versus 332 +/- 30 ml min(-1)) and remained higher (P ... was slower (P CON (55 +/- 6 versus 33 +/- 5 s). During CUR and CON, muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P CON (37.8 +/- 4.1 versus 35.2 +/- 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19...

  20. Charge Movement in a Fast Twitch Skeletal Muscle from Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, B. J.; Beam, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle was investigated using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. The charge that moved during a depolarization from the holding potential (-90 mV) to the test potential, V, increased with increasing V, saturating around 0 mV. The charge vs. voltage relationship was well fitted by Q = Qmax/{1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]}, with Qmax = 28.5 nC/μF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Repolarization of the fiber from the test potential back to t...

  1. Charge movement in a fast twitch skeletal muscle from rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Beam, K G

    1983-02-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle was investigated using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. The charge that moved during a depolarization from the holding potential (-90 mV) to the test potential, V, increased with increasing V, saturating around 0 mV. The charge vs. voltage relationship was well fitted by Q = Q(max)/{1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]}, with Q(max) = 28.5 nC/muF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Repolarization of the fiber from the test potential back to the holding potential caused an equal but opposite amount of charge to move. The kinetics of ON charge movement could be well described by a model developed for frog muscle by Horowicz and Schneider (1981b), which suggests that rat and frog charge movements are similar. This model failed to describe the kinetics of OFF charge movement for steps in potential from 0 mV to test potentials of -10 to -90 mV. OFF-charge movement rose to a peak more slowly and decayed more slowly than predicted by the theory.

  2. Distinct signal transductions in fast- and slow- twitch muscles upon denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongbo; Li, Yi-Fan

    2018-02-01

    Denervation induces skeletal muscle atrophy, which primarily impairs oxidative slow twitch fibers. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon, however, remains to be addressed. We hypothesize that denervation-induced fiber-specific atrophy may result from the distinct activities of different signaling pathways that are involved in protein synthesis and degradation in fast- and slow-twitch fibers. In this study, 1-month-old male mice were subjected to unilateral sciatic denervation for 4 days. Fast-twitch muscle extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch muscle soleus were collected from the denervated side and the control side of hind limbs. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of key factors of major signaling pathways in these tissues were determined using western blot assay. Our data showed that total AKT and FoxO3 protein levels were upregulated in denervated muscles as compared with control sides. Phosphorylation of AKT and FoxO3 were proportionally enhanced in denervated EDL but not soleus, indicating AKT activation drives phosphorylation of FoxO3 in EDL but not in soleus upon denervation. As a result, FoxO3-targeted atrogenes MurF1 and Atrogin1 protein abundances were reduced in denervated EDL but not altered in soleus. In consistent with this change, polyubiquitination were significantly increased in denervated soleus, but only a slight increase in ubiquitination was found in denervated EDL. Autophagy marker LC3 protein level was significantly increased in both muscle types, but in greater extent in EDL after denervation. IRS1 protein level and active ERK were reduced in both muscles upon denervation, which might contribute to the upregulation of total AKT protein level and FoxO3 abundance in EDL and soleus. Total and phosphorylated AMPK protein levels were increased in denervated soleus but not in EDL. Overall, these data reveal that the key signaling pathways that regulate protein synthesis and degradation are more sensitive in soleus than EDL

  3. Contractile properties of rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle during reinnervation - Effects of testosterone and castration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeagle, S. P.; Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The peroneal nerve of subject rats were crushed 1 cm from the muscle in order to examine the isometric contractile properties of skeletal muscle in the recovery sequency during reinnervation of normal, castrated, and testosterone-treated rats. The particular muscle studied was the extensor digitorum longus, with functional reinnervation first observed 8-9 days after nerve crush. No evidence was found that either castration or testosterone injections altered the process of reinnervation after the nerve crush, with the conclusion being valid at the 0.05 p level. The most reliable index of reinnervation was found to be the twitch:tetanus ratio, a factor of use in future studies of the reinnervation of skeletal muscle.

  4. Cycle Training Increased GLUT4 and Activation of mTOR in Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E.A.; Baker, Jonathan D.; Dykes, Rhesa J.; Duffourc, Michelle M.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if cycle training of sedentary subjects would increase the expression of the principle muscle glucose transporters, six volunteers completed six weeks of progressively increasing intensity stationary cycle cycling. Methods In vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, changes in expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, GLUT5, and GLUT12 were compared using quantitative immunoblots with specific protein standards. Regulatory pathway components were evaluated by immunoblots of muscle homogenates and immunohistochemistry of microscopic sections. Results GLUT1 was unchanged, GLUT4 increased 66%, GLUT12 increased 104%, and GLUT5 decreased 72%. A mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c) and regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and phospho-AMPK) were unchanged, but the muscle hypertrophy pathway component, phospho-mTOR increased 83% after the exercise program. In baseline biopsies, GLUT4 by immunohistochemical techniques was 37% greater in Type I (slow twitch, red) muscle fibers, but the exercise training increased GLUT4 expression in Type II (fast twitch, white) fibers by 50%, achieving parity with the Type I fibers. Baseline phospho-mTOR expression was 50% higher in Type II fibers and increased more in Type II fibers (62%) with training, but also increased in Type I fibers (34%). Conclusion Progressive intensity stationary cycle training of previously sedentary subjects increased muscle insulin-responsive glucose transporters (GLUT4 and GLUT12) and decreased the fructose transporter (GLUT5). The increase in GLUT4 occurred primarily in Type II muscle fibers and this coincided with activation of the mTOR muscle hypertrophy pathway. There was little impact on Type I fiber GLUT4 expression and no evidence of change in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20010125

  5. L-carnitine pretreatment protects slow-twitch skeletal muscles in a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Mert; Kaya, Burak; Cerkez, Cem; Ertunc, Mert; Sara, Yildirim

    2013-10-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury negatively affects the outcome of surgical interventions for amputated or severely traumatized extremities. This study aimed to evaluate the protective role of l-carnitine on the contractile properties of fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus [EDL]) and slow-twitch (soleus [SOL]) skeletal muscles following I/R-induced injury in a rat model. Rats were divided into 4 groups (1) saline pretreatment, (2) l-carnitine pretreatment, (3) saline pretreatment and I/R, and (4) l-carnitine pretreatment and I/R. Twitch and tetanic contractions in the EDL and SOL muscles in each group were recorded. Additionally, a fatigue protocol was performed in these muscles. Twitch and tetanic contraction amplitudes were lower in the EDL and SOL muscles in which I/R was induced (P < .01). l-Carnitine pretreatment significantly increased tetanic contraction amplitude in the SOL muscles following I/R (P < .01) but not in the EDL muscles. l-Carnitine pretreatment did not alter the fatigue response in any of the muscles.

  6. Sarcomere length-dependence of activity-dependent twitch potentiation in mouse skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacIntosh Brian R

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that potentiation of a skeletal muscle twitch response is proportional to muscle length with a negative slope during staircase, and a positive slope during posttetanic potentiation. This study was done to directly compare staircase and posttetanic responses with measurement of sarcomere length to compare their length-dependence. Methods Mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were dissected to small bundles of fibers, which permit measurement of sarcomere length (SL, by laser diffraction. In vitro fixed-end contractions of EDL fiber bundles were elicited at 22°C and 35°C at sarcomere lengths ranging from 2.35 μm to 3.85 μm. Twitch contractions were assessed before and after 1.5 s of 75 Hz stimulation at 22°C or during 10 s of 10 Hz stimulation at 22°C or 35°C. Results Staircase potentiation was greater at 35°C than 22°C, and the relative magnitude of the twitch contraction (Pt*/Pt was proportional to sarcomere length with a negative slope, over the range 2.3 μm – 3.7 μm. Linear regression yielded the following: Pt*/Pt = -0.59·SL+3.27 (r2 = 0.74; Pt*/Pt = -0.39·SL+2.34 (r2 = 0.48; and Pt*/Pt = -0.50·SL+2.45 (r2 = 0.80 for staircase at 35°C, and 22°C and posttetanic response respectively. Posttetanic depression rather than potentiation was present at long SL. This indicates that there may be two processes operating in these muscles to modulate the force: one that enhances and a second that depresses the force. Either or both of these processes may have a length-dependence of its mechanism. Conclusion There is no evidence that posttetanic potentiation is fundamentally different from staircase in these muscles.

  7. Increased postexercise insulin sensitivity is accompanied by increased AS160 phosphorylation in slow-twitch soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabe, Maiko; Kawamoto, Emi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    A single bout of exercise can enhance insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both fast-twitch (type II) and slow-twitch (type I) skeletal muscle for several hours postexercise. Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is most distal insulin signaling proteins that have been proposed to contribute to the postexercise enhancement of insulin action in fast-twitch muscle. In this study, we examined whether the postexercise increase in insulin action of glucose uptake in slow-twitch muscle is accompanied by increased phosphorylation of AS160 and its paralog TBC1D1. Male Wistar rats (~1-month-old) were exercised on a treadmill for 180 min (9 m/min). Insulin (50 μU/mL)-stimulated glucose uptake was increased at 2 h after cessation of exercise in soleus muscle composed of predominantly slow-twitch fibers. This postexercise increase in insulin action of glucose uptake was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of AS160 (detected by phospho-Thr642 and phospho-Ser588 antibody). On the other hand, prior exercise did not increase phosphorylation of TBC1D1 (detected by phospho-Thr590) at 2 h postexercise. These results suggest the possibility that an enhancement in AS160 phosphorylation but not TBC1D1 phosphorylation is involved with increased postexercise insulin action of glucose uptake in slow-twitch muscle. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Activation of fast-twitch fibers assessed with twitch potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazushige; Tomioka, Yukie; Ishii, Naokata

    2012-08-01

    The augmentation of twitch response following brief muscle activation, called twitch potentiation, has been shown to be much more pronounced in fast-twitch than in slow-twitch fibers. We thus explored the possibility of twitch potentiation as a noninvasive measure of fast-twitch fiber activation, by studying its dependence on the intensity of preceding contraction. Twitch contraction of plantar flexor muscles was evoked with supramaximal stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve, before and immediately after 6-s voluntary contractions at intensities of 10-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Except for low-intensity contractions (twitch potentiation, the magnitude of which increased with increasing contraction intensity (P twitch potentiation reflects the activation of fast-twitch fibers during a brief contraction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Trigeminal Proprioception Evoked by Strong Stretching of the Mechanoreceptors in Müller's Muscle Induces Reflex Contraction of the Orbital Orbicularis Oculi Slow-Twitch Muscle Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Ban, Midori; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The mixed orbicularis oculi muscle lacks an intramuscular proprioceptive system such as muscle spindles, to induce reflex contraction of its slow-twitch fibers. We evaluated whether the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle function as extrinsic mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the slow-twitch fibers of the orbicularis oculi in addition to those of the levator and frontalis muscles. We evaluated in patients with aponeurosis-disinserted blepharoptosis whether strong stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle from upgaze with unilateral lid load induced reflex contraction of the orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers and whether anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the contraction. We compared the electromyographic responses of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles to unilateral intraoperative direct stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve with those to unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. Upgaze with a unilateral 3-g lid load induced reflex contraction of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles with ipsilateral dominance. Anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the reflex contraction. The orbicularis oculi reflex evoked by stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve differed from that by electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve in terms of the intensity of current required to induce the reflex, the absence of R1, and duration. The mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle functions as an extramuscular proprioceptive system to induce reflex contraction of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers. Whereas reflex contraction of the pretarsal orbicularis fast-twitch fibers functions in spontaneous or reflex blinking, that of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers may factor in grimacing and blepharospasm.

  10. Estimating Isometric Tension of Finger Muscle Using Needle EMG Signals and the Twitch Contraction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    We address an estimation method of isometric muscle tension of fingers, as fundamental research for a neural signal-based prosthesis of fingers. We utilize needle electromyogram (EMG) signals, which have approximately equivalent information to peripheral neural signals. The estimating algorithm comprised two convolution operations. The first convolution is between normal distribution and a spike array, which is detected by needle EMG signals. The convolution estimates the probability density of spike-invoking time in the muscle. In this convolution, we hypothesize that each motor unit in a muscle activates spikes independently based on a same probability density function. The second convolution is between the result of the previous convolution and isometric twitch, viz., the impulse response of the motor unit. The result of the calculation is the sum of all estimated tensions of whole muscle fibers, i.e., muscle tension. We confirmed that there is good correlation between the estimated tension of the muscle and the actual tension, with >0.9 correlation coefficients at 59%, and >0.8 at 89% of all trials.

  11. Muscle Twitch Torque During Two Different in Volume Isometric Exercise Protocols: Fatigue Effects on Postactivation Potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenofondos, Anthi; Bassa, Eleni; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Kotzamanidis, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios A

    2018-02-01

    Xenofondos, A, Bassa, E, Vrabas, IS, Kotzamanidis, C, and Patikas, D. Muscle twitch torque during two different in volume isometric exercise protocols: fatigue effects on postactivation potentiation. J Strength Cond Res 32(2): 578-586, 2018-The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of the contraction duration of 2 isometric exercise protocols on the postactivation potentiation of 14 well-trained men (age: 22.6 ± 2.8 years, height: 180.3 ± 5.9 cm, and body mass: 72.3 ± 37.9 kg). The protocols consisted of 4 × 6 maximal plantar flexions, of 3-second (P3) or 6-second (P6) duration, performed in random order, with a 2-minute and 15-second intervals between the sets and repetitions, respectively. The torque during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC), the peak twitch torque (TT), and the rate of torque development (RTD) after each MIVC were analyzed for the first and the last trial of each set, the average of all trials of each set, and the trials within each set that had the highest peak TT. The MIVC had an overall greater reduction during P6 compared with P3 (P3: -4.6 ± 2.3 vs. P6: -16.0 ± 1.9%). P6 showed higher potentiation in TT during the initial repetitions of the first 2 sets (p twitch RTD presented no systematic difference between the 2 protocols (p > 0.05). These data demonstrate the dependence of the TT potentiation on the conditioning stimulus and verify the cumulative effect of potentiation, suggesting the implementation of longer contractions to achieve maximal but temporal TT potentiation and shorter contractions for less variable but prolonged potentiation.

  12. High-speed jaw-opening exercise in training suprahyoid fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsubara M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mariko Matsubara,1,2 Haruka Tohara,1 Koji Hara,1 Hiromichi Shinozaki,1 Yasuhiro Yamazaki,1 Chiaki Susa,1 Ayako Nakane,1 Yoko Wakasugi,1 Shunsuke Minakuchi1 1Gerodontology and Oral Rehabilitation, Department of Gerontology and Gerodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, 2Department of Oral Surgery, Ichigao Carillon Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan Purpose: This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of a high-speed jaw-opening exercise, which targets the contraction of fast-twitch muscle fibers, in improving swallowing function.Subjects and methods: Twenty-one subjects (mean age 74.0±5.7 years with dysphagia-related symptoms, such as coughing or choking during eating, performed the exercise. None of the included subjects had neurological symptoms or history of surgery that could cause significant dysphagia. All subjects took regular meals, and maintained independent activities of daily life. The exercise schedule consisted of 3 sets of 20 repetitions each of rapid and maximum jaw-opening movement with a 10-second interval between sets. The exercise was performed twice daily for 4 weeks.Results: Following the intervention, there was a significant increase in the vertical position of the hyoid bone at rest. Furthermore, during swallowing, the elevation of the hyoid bone and the velocity of its movement and esophageal sphincter opening increased significantly while the duration of the hyoid elevation and the pharyngeal transit time reduced significantly.Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that high-speed jaw-opening exercise resulted in increased elevation velocity of the hyoid bone during swallowing, indicating its role in effectively strengthening the fast-twitch muscle fibers of suprahyoid muscles. Furthermore, since the rest position of the hyoid bone appeared to have improved, this exercise may be especially useful in elderly individuals with a lower position of the hyoid bone at

  13. Comparison of regulated passive membrane conductance in action potential-firing fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Macdonald, William Alexander; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; de Paoli, Frank Vinzenco; Gurung, Iman Singh; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2009-10-01

    In several pathological and experimental conditions, the passive membrane conductance of muscle fibers (G(m)) and their excitability are inversely related. Despite this capacity of G(m) to determine muscle excitability, its regulation in active muscle fibers is largely unexplored. In this issue, our previous study (Pedersen et al. 2009. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910291) established a technique with which biphasic regulation of G(m) in action potential (AP)-firing fast-twitch fibers of rat extensor digitorum longus muscles was identified and characterized with temporal resolution of seconds. This showed that AP firing initially reduced G(m) via ClC-1 channel inhibition but after approximately 1,800 APs, G(m) rose substantially, causing AP excitation failure. This late increase of G(m) reflected activation of ClC-1 and K(ATP) channels. The present study has explored regulation of G(m) in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers of soleus muscle and compared it to G(m) dynamics in fast-twitch fibers. It further explored aspects of the cellular signaling that conveyed regulation of G(m) in AP-firing fibers. Thus, in both fiber types, AP firing first triggered protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ClC-1 channel inhibition that reduced G(m) by approximately 50%. Experiments with dantrolene showed that AP-triggered SR Ca(2+) release activated this PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition that was associated with reduced rheobase current and improved function of depolarized muscles, indicating that the reduced G(m) enhanced muscle fiber excitability. In fast-twitch fibers, the late rise in G(m) was accelerated by glucose-free conditions, whereas it was postponed when intermittent resting periods were introduced during AP firing. Remarkably, elevation of G(m) was never encountered in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers, even after 15,000 APs. These observations implicate metabolic depression in the elevation of G(m) in AP-firing fast-twitch fibers. It is concluded that regulation of G(m) is

  14. Regenerative responses in slow- and fast-twitch muscles following moderate contusion spinal cord injury and locomotor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arun; Liu, Min; Ye, Fan; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the rat moderate spinal cord contusion model to investigate the effects of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) on the muscle regeneration process, comparing regeneration of slow-twitch plantarflexor soleus muscle and fast-twitch dorsiflexor tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Additionally, we wanted to examine the effect of a week of locomotor training following incomplete SCI on the muscle regeneration process in these muscles and also determine if a week of similar locomotor training is sufficient to initiate muscle regeneration in control, non-injured rats. Thirty-two, adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the study. Moderate, midthoracic contusion SCIs were produced using a NYU (New York University) impactor in all rats except controls. Animals were randomly assigned to treadmill training or untrained groups. Rats in the treadmill training group were manually treadmill trained starting at 1 week after SCI, for 10 bouts (2 sessions of 20 min of actual stepping) over 5 days and control rats in the training group received similar training. Our results indicate that a muscle regenerative response was initiated only in the slow-twitch soleus muscle in the initial 2 weeks following SCI, the addition of 1 week of locomotor treadmill training led to a significant increase in soleus regenerative process. No significant regenerative process was observed in the fast-twitch TA. Increased muscle regeneration in soleus is suggested by our findings of increased expression of (1) insulin-like growth factor-1, involved in the activation of satellite cells; (2) Pax7, a marker of satellite cell activation; (3) myogenin, a muscle regulatory protein; and (4) embryonic myosin, an indicator of new muscle fiber formation. Locomotor training in control, non-injured animals did not induce similar changes towards the regenerative process.

  15. A persistent increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles after a single exercise session by old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Castorena, Carlos M; Cartee, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to enhance subsequent insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) by predominantly type II (fast-twitch) muscle of old rats, but previous research has not evaluated exercise effects on GU by type I (slow-twitch) muscle from old rats. Accordingly, we studied male Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats (24 months old) and determined GU (0, 100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) of isolated soleus (predominantly type I) and epitrochlearis (predominantly type II) muscles after one exercise session. Epitrochlearis (100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) and soleus (100 and 200 μU/ml insulin) GU were greater at 3-h postexercise vs. age-matched sedentary controls. Insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr1162/1163) was unaltered by exercise in either muscle. Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Ser473 and Thr308 with 100 and 200 μU/ml, respectively) and soleus (Ser473 with 200 μU/ml). AS160 phosphorylation (pAS160) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Thr642 with 100 μU/ml), but not the soleus. Exercised vs. sedentary rats did not differ for total protein abundance of insulin receptor, Akt, AS160, or GLUT4 in either muscle. These results demonstrate that both predominantly type I and type II muscles from old rats are susceptible to exercise-induced improvement in insulin-mediated GU by mechanisms that are independent of enhanced insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation or altered abundance of important signaling proteins or GLUT4. Exercise-induced elevation in pAkt, and possibly pAS160, may contribute to this effect in the epitrochlearis of old rats, but other mechanisms are likely important for the soleus.

  16. Prdm1a and miR-499 act sequentially to restrict Sox6 activity to the fast-twitch muscle lineage in the zebrafish embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XinGang; Ono, Yosuke; Tan, Swee Chuan; Chai, Ruth JinFen; Parkin, Caroline; Ingham, Philip W

    2011-10-01

    Sox6 has been proposed to play a conserved role in vertebrate skeletal muscle fibre type specification. In zebrafish, sox6 transcription is repressed in slow-twitch progenitors by the Prdm1a transcription factor. Here we identify sox6 cis-regulatory sequences that drive fast-twitch-specific expression in a Prdm1a-dependent manner. We show that sox6 transcription subsequently becomes derepressed in slow-twitch fibres, whereas Sox6 protein remains restricted to fast-twitch fibres. We find that translational repression of sox6 is mediated by miR-499, the slow-twitch-specific expression of which is in turn controlled by Prdm1a, forming a regulatory loop that initiates and maintains the slow-twitch muscle lineage.

  17. DNA methylation assessment from human slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begue, Gwénaëlle; Raue, Ulrika; Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott

    2017-04-01

    A new application of the reduced representation bisulfite sequencing method was developed using low-DNA input to investigate the epigenetic profile of human slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers. Successful library construction was completed with as little as 15 ng of DNA, and high-quality sequencing data were obtained with 32 ng of DNA. Analysis identified 143,160 differentially methylated CpG sites across 14,046 genes. In both fiber types, selected genes predominantly expressed in slow or fast fibers were hypomethylated, which was supported by the RNA-sequencing analysis. These are the first fiber type-specific methylation data from human skeletal muscle and provide a unique platform for future research. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study validates a low-DNA input reduced representation bisulfite sequencing method for human muscle biopsy samples to investigate the methylation patterns at a fiber type-specific level. These are the first fiber type-specific methylation data reported from human skeletal muscle and thus provide initial insight into basal state differences in myosin heavy chain I and IIa muscle fibers among young, healthy men. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Effects of involuntary eccentric contraction training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the enhancement of muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jongsang; Lee, Dongyeop; Kim, Youngho

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation is well-known as a modality to improve the performance of neuromuscular system, but its clinical value on muscle strengthening remains equivocal. In this study, we designed a system for an involuntary eccentric contraction of biceps brachii muscles using continuous passive movement and commercial neuromuscular electrical stimulation devices. To investigate the effects of involuntary eccentric contraction training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the enhancement of muscle strength, seven healthy men between the ages of 24 and 29 years participated in this study. Participants were trained two times per week for 12 weeks. Each exercise session was performed for 30 min with no rest intervals. Isometric elbow flexion torque and biceps brachii muscle thickness were chosen as evaluation indices, and were measured at pre-/post-training. After the 12-week training, the isometric elbow flexion torque of the trained side significantly increased by approximately 23% compared to the initial performance (Pcontraction (P<0.01). The developed system and the technique show promising results, suggesting that it has the potential to be used to increase the muscle strength in patients with neuromuscular disease and to be implemented in design rehabilitative protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-speed jaw-opening exercise in training suprahyoid fast-twitch muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Mariko; Tohara, Haruka; Hara, Koji; Shinozaki, Hiromichi; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Susa, Chiaki; Nakane, Ayako; Wakasugi, Yoko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2018-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of a high-speed jaw-opening exercise, which targets the contraction of fast-twitch muscle fibers, in improving swallowing function. Twenty-one subjects (mean age 74.0±5.7 years) with dysphagia-related symptoms, such as coughing or choking during eating, performed the exercise. None of the included subjects had neurological symptoms or history of surgery that could cause significant dysphagia. All subjects took regular meals, and maintained independent activities of daily life. The exercise schedule consisted of 3 sets of 20 repetitions each of rapid and maximum jaw-opening movement with a 10-second interval between sets. The exercise was performed twice daily for 4 weeks. Following the intervention, there was a significant increase in the vertical position of the hyoid bone at rest. Furthermore, during swallowing, the elevation of the hyoid bone and the velocity of its movement and esophageal sphincter opening increased significantly while the duration of the hyoid elevation and the pharyngeal transit time reduced significantly. Our results demonstrated that high-speed jaw-opening exercise resulted in increased elevation velocity of the hyoid bone during swallowing, indicating its role in effectively strengthening the fast-twitch muscle fibers of suprahyoid muscles. Furthermore, since the rest position of the hyoid bone appeared to have improved, this exercise may be especially useful in elderly individuals with a lower position of the hyoid bone at rest and those with decreased elevation of the hyoid bone during swallowing, which are known to be associated with an increased risk of aspiration.

  20. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Reversal of TMS-induced motor twitch by training is associated with a reduction in excitability of the antagonist muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregni Felipe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single session of isolated repetitive movements of the thumb can alter the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, such that the related muscle twitch measured post-training occurs in the trained direction. This response is attributed to transient excitability changes in primary motor cortex (M1 that form the early part of learning. We investigated; (1 whether this phenomenon might occur for movements at the wrist, and (2 how specific TMS activation patterns of opposing muscles underlie the practice-induced change in direction. Methods We used single-pulse suprathreshold TMS over the M1 forearm area, to evoke wrist movements in 20 healthy subjects. We measured the preferential direction of the TMS-induced twitch in both the sagittal and coronal plane using an optical goniometer fixed to the dorsum of the wrist, and recorded electromyographic (EMG activity from the flexor carpi radialis (FCR and extensor carpi radialis (ECR muscles. Subjects performed gentle voluntary movements, in the direction opposite to the initial twitch for 5 minutes at 0.2 Hz. We collected motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by TMS at baseline and for 10 minutes after training. Results Repetitive motor training was sufficient for TMS to evoke movements in the practiced direction opposite to the original twitch. For most subjects the effect of the newly-acquired direction was retained for at least 10 minutes before reverting to the original. Importantly, the direction change of the movement was associated with a significant decrease in MEP amplitude of the antagonist to the trained muscle, rather than an increase in MEP amplitude of the trained muscle. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that a TMS-twitch direction change following a simple practice paradigm may result from reduced corticospinal drive to muscles antagonizing the trained direction. Such findings may have implications for training paradigms in

  2. In Vivo Sarcomere Length Measurement in Whole Muscles during Passive Stretch and Twitch Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin W; Kuo, Bill P-P; O'Connor, Shawn M; Radic, Stojan; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-28

    Muscle force is dictated by micrometer-scale contractile machines called sarcomeres. Whole-muscle force drops from peak force production to zero with just a few micrometers of sarcomere length change. No current technology is able to capture adequate dynamic sarcomere data in vivo, and thus we lack fundamental data needed to understand human movement and movement disorders. Methods such as diffraction, endoscopy, and optical coherence tomography have been applied to muscle but are prohibitively invasive, sensitive to motion artifact, and/or imprecise. Here, we report dynamic sarcomere length measurement in vivo using a combination of our recently validated resonant reflection spectroscopy method combined with optical frequency domain interferometry. Using a 250-μm-wide fiber optic probe, we captured nanometer sarcomere length changes from thousands of sarcomeres on the sub-millisecond timescale during whole-muscle stretch and twitch contraction. We believe that this demonstrates the first large-scale sensing of sarcomere dynamics in vivo, which is a necessary first step to understand movement disorders and to create patient-specific surgical interventions and rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Multiple causes of fatigue during shortening contractions in rat slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Halvorsen Hortemo

    Full Text Available Fatigue in muscles that shorten might have other causes than fatigue during isometric contractions, since both cross-bridge cycling and energy demand are different in the two exercise modes. While isometric contractions are extensively studied, the causes of fatigue in shortening contractions are poorly mapped. Here, we investigate fatigue mechanisms during shortening contractions in slow twitch skeletal muscle in near physiological conditions. Fatigue was induced in rat soleus muscles with maintained blood supply by in situ shortening contractions at 37°C. Muscles were stimulated repeatedly (1 s on/off at 30 Hz for 15 min against a constant load, allowing the muscle to shorten and perform work. Fatigue and subsequent recovery was examined at 20 s, 100 s and 15 min exercise. The effects of prior exercise were investigated in a second exercise bout. Fatigue developed in three distinct phases. During the first 20 s the regulatory protein Myosin Light Chain-2 (slow isoform, MLC-2s was rapidly dephosphorylated in parallel with reduced rate of force development and reduced shortening. In the second phase there was degradation of high-energy phosphates and accumulation of lactate, and these changes were related to slowing of muscle relengthening and relaxation, culminating at 100 s exercise. Slowing of relaxation was also associated with increased leak of calcium from the SR. During the third phase of exercise there was restoration of high-energy phosphates and elimination of lactate, and the slowing of relaxation disappeared, whereas dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening prevailed. Prior exercise improved relaxation parameters in a subsequent exercise bout, and we propose that this effect is a result of less accumulation of lactate due to more rapid onset of oxidative metabolism. The correlation between dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening was confirmed in various experimental settings, and we suggest MLC-2s as an

  4. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M L

    2014-08-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4-8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K(+) contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R(2) ~ 0.76). SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, relative to Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments.

  5. Attenuated fatigue in slow twitch skeletal muscle during isotonic exercise in rats with chronic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Munkvik

    Full Text Available During isometric contractions, slow twitch soleus muscles (SOL from rats with chronic heart failure (chf are more fatigable than those of sham animals. However, a muscle normally shortens during activity and fatigue development is highly task dependent. Therefore, we examined the development of skeletal muscle fatigue during shortening (isotonic contractions in chf and sham-operated rats. Six weeks following coronary artery ligation, infarcted animals were classified as failing (chf if left ventricle end diastolic pressure was >15 mmHg. During isoflurane anaesthesia, SOL with intact blood supply was stimulated (1s on 1s off at 30 Hz for 15 min and allowed to shorten isotonically against a constant afterload. Muscle temperature was maintained at 37°C. In resting muscle, maximum isometric force (F(max and the concentrations of ATP and CrP were not different in the two groups. During stimulation, F(max and the concentrations declined in parallel sham and chf. Fatigue, which was evident as reduced shortening during stimulation, was also not different in the two groups. The isometric force decline was fitted to a bi-exponential decay equation. Both time constants increased transiently and returned to initial values after approximately 200 s of the fatigue protocol. This resulted in a transient rise in baseline tension between stimulations, although this effect which was less prominent in chf than sham. Myosin light chain 2s phosphorylation declined in both groups after 100 s of isotonic contractions, and remained at this level throughout 15 min of stimulation. In spite of higher energy demand during isotonic than isometric contractions, both shortening capacity and rate of isometric force decline were as well or better preserved in fatigued SOL from chf rats than in sham. This observation is in striking contrast to previous reports which have employed isometric contractions to induce fatigue.

  6. The effects of tetracaine on charge movement in fast twitch rat skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, S; Marshall, M W; Robson, E

    1990-02-01

    1. The effects of tetracaine, a local anaesthetic that inhibits muscle contraction, on membrane potential and intramembrane charge movements were investigated in fast twitch rat muscle fibres (extensor digitorum longus). 2. The resting membrane potentials of surface fibres from muscles bathed in isotonic Ringer solution containing 2 mM-tetracaine were well maintained, but higher concentrations of tetracaine caused a time-dependent fall of potential. Muscle fibres bathed in hypertonic solutions containing 2 mM-tetracaine were rapidly depolarized. In both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, the depolarizing effect of tetracaine could not be reversed. 3. Charge movement measurements were made using the middle-of-the-fibre voltage clamp technique. The voltage dependence of charge movements measured in cold isotonic solutions was well fitted by a Boltzmann distribution (Q(V) = Qmax/(1 + exp(-(V-V)/k] where Qmax = 37.3 +/- 2.8 nC muF-1, V = -17.9 +/- 1.2 mV and k = 12.6 +/- 0.8 mV (n = 6, 2 degrees C; means +/- S.E. of means). Similar values were obtained when 2 mM-tetracaine was added to the isotonic bathing fluid (Qmax = 40.6 +/- 2.3 nC microF-1, V = -14.1 +/- 1.3 mV, k = 15.3 +/- 0.8 mV; n = 8, 2 degrees C). 4. Charge movements measured around mechanical threshold in muscle fibres bathed in hypertonic solutions were reduced when 2 mM-tetracaine was added to the bathing fluid. The tetracaine-sensitive component of charge was well fitted with an unconstrained Boltzmann distribution which gave: Qmax = 7.5 nC microF-1, V = -46.5 mV, k = 5.5 mV. The e-fold rise of the foot of the curve was 9.3 mV.

  7. From twitch to tetanus : Performance of excitation dynamics optimized for a twitch in predicting tetanic muscle forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zandwijk, Jan Peter; Bobbert, Maarten F.; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    In models of the excitation of muscles it is often assumed that excitation during a tetanic contraction can be obtained by the linear summation of responses to individual stimuli from which the active state of the muscle is calculated. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether such a

  8. Glycolytic fast-twitch muscle fiber restoration counters adverse age-related changes in body composition and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Yuichi; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Bernardo, Barbara L; Lebrasseur, Nathan K; Walsh, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with the development of insulin resistance, increased adiposity, and accumulation of ectopic lipid deposits in tissues and organs. Starting in mid-life there is a progressive decline in lean muscle mass associated with the preferential loss of glycolytic, fast-twitch myofibers. However, it is not known to what extent muscle loss and metabolic dysfunction are causally related or whether they are independent epiphenomena of the aging process. Here, we utilized a skeletal-muscle-specific, conditional transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active form of Akt1 to examine the consequences of glycolytic, fast-twitch muscle growth in young vs. middle-aged animals fed standard low-fat chow diets. Activation of the Akt1 transgene led to selective skeletal muscle hypertrophy, reversing the loss of lean muscle mass observed upon aging. The Akt1-mediated increase in muscle mass led to reductions in fat mass and hepatic steatosis in older animals, and corrected age-associated impairments in glucose metabolism. These results indicate that the loss of lean muscle mass is a significant contributor to the development of age-related metabolic dysfunction and that interventions that preserve or restore fast/glycolytic muscle may delay the onset of metabolic disease. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of endotoxaemia on protein metabolism in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle and myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Murton

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear if the rat myocardium undergoes the same rapid reductions in protein content that are classically observed in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during endotoxaemia.To investigate this further, and to determine if there is any divergence in the response of skeletal muscle and myocardium in the mechanisms that are thought to be largely responsible for eliciting changes in protein content, Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with vascular catheters and administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 150 microg kg(-1 h(-1 intravenously for 2 h, 6 h or 24 h (saline administered control animals were also included, after which the extensor digitorum longus (EDL and myocardium were removed under terminal anaesthesia. The protein-to-DNA ratio, a marker of protein content, was significantly reduced in the EDL following 24 h LPS administration (23%; P<0.05, but was no different from controls in the myocardium. At the same time point, a significant increase in MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA (3.7+/-0.7- and 19.5+/-1.9-fold increase vs. controls, respectively; P<0.05, in addition to protein levels of alpha1-3, 5-7 subunits of the 20S proteasome, were observed in EDL but not myocardium. In contrast, elevations in phosphorylation of p70 S6K residues Thr(421/Ser(424, and 4E-BP1 residues Thr(37/Thr(46 (P<0.05, consistent with an elevation in translation initiation, were seen exclusively in the myocardium of LPS-treated animals.In summary, these findings suggest that the myocardium does not undergo the same catabolic response as skeletal muscle during early endotoxaemia, partly due to the absence of transcriptional and signalling events in the myocardium typically associated with increased muscle proteolysis and the suppression of protein synthesis.

  10. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on peak isometric torque, muscle twitch torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M; Norris, S; Smith, D; Herzog, W

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) with a static squat on resting muscle twitch torque, peak isometric torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors during an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty-four healthy, strength-trained males were recruited for this randomized, cross-over design investigation. The WBV treatment consisted of three sets of 60 s of vibration (30 Hz, +/-4 mm) while standing in a semi-squat position. Voluntary muscle activation, peak isometric torque during MVC and resting muscle twitch torque (RTT) through percutaneous femoral nerve stimulation were obtained before and following the treatment. Change in peak isometric torque, voluntary muscle activation and the RTT were calculated as the difference between pre- and post-treatment values. There was no observable post-activation potentiation of muscle twitch torque or enhancement in voluntary muscle activation or peak isometric torque. However, decreases in the peak isometric torque (P=0.0094) and voluntary muscle activation (P=0.0252) were significantly smaller post WBV interventions compared with the control treatment. Based on the current data, it is unclear whether or not this was attributable to the effects of WBV but further research into this possibility is warranted.

  11. A Reduction in Selenoprotein S Amplifies the Inflammatory Profile of Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscle in the mdx Dystrophic Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Robert Wright

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive inflammation is a hallmark of muscle myopathies, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. There is interest in characterising novel genes that regulate inflammation due to their potential to modify disease progression. Gene polymorphisms in Selenoprotein S (Seps1 are associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines, and in vitro SEPS1 is protective against inflammatory stress. Given that SEPS1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle, we investigated whether the genetic reduction of Seps1 exacerbated inflammation in the mdx mouse. F1 male mdx mice with a heterozygous Seps1 deletion (mdx:Seps1−/+ were generated. The mdx:Seps1−/+ mice had a 50% reduction in SEPS1 protein expression in hindlimb muscles. In the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles, mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (Mcp-1 (P=0.034, macrophage marker F4/80 (P=0.030, and transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1 (P=0.056 were increased in mdx:Seps1−/+ mice. This was associated with a reduction in muscle fibre size; however, ex vivo EDL muscle strength and endurance were unaltered. In dystrophic slow twitch soleus muscles, SEPS1 reduction had no effect on the inflammatory profile nor function. In conclusion, the genetic reduction of Seps1 appears to specifically exacerbate the inflammatory profile of fast-twitch muscle fibres, which are typically more vulnerable to degeneration in dystrophy.

  12. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction from frog skeletal muscle during an isotonic twitch under a small load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugi, Haruo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Hashizume, Hiroo.

    1978-01-01

    A time-resolved x-ray diffraction technique was used to study the time course of change in the intensity ratio Isub(1,0)/Isub(1,1) during isotonic twitch (initial sarcomere, 2.4 μm) under a small load and to determine the kinetic properties of the crossbridges responsible for muscle contraction. Isotonic twitches in four other preparations with an initial sarcomere of 2.4 μm and in two with an initial sarcomere of 2.3 μm and 2.2 μm, respectively, were examined. In each case, the intensity ratio started to decrease at stimulation, reached a minimum value of 0.8 - 1.0 within the first 20 - 30% of the shortening phase, and maintained this value until the beginning of the relaxation phase. Gradual recovery of the intensity ratio to the resting value was seen during the relaxation phase. During the recovery phase, the intensity ratio appeared to exhibit oscillatory changes. Though the extent of shortening was reduced by about 30% at the end of each experiment, the duration of the shortening phase remained almost unchanged in all the preparations examined. The time course of change in the intensity ratio was also examined during an isometric twitch in four preparations (sarcomere, 2.4 μm) with the tibial end connected to a strain gauge. The extent of internal shortening of muscle fibres against the tendons and the recording system during an isometric twitch or a tetanus at low temperatures was estimated. The intensity ratio decreased to a minimum value of 0.5 - 0.6 during the rising phase of isometric tension and started to return to the resting value after the beginning of relaxation. In both isotonic and isometric twitches, a decrease in the intensity ratio resulted from both a decrease in the 1,0 intensity and an increase in the 1,1 intensity. (J.P.N.)

  13. Effects of caffeine at different temperatures on contractile properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch rat muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wondmikun, Y.; Soukup, Tomáš; Asmussen, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 641-652 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant - others:Schwerpunkt Muskelforschung(DE) As 74/1-2; MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : MyHC mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms * altered thyroid status * rat muscles Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  14. Incubating isolated mouse EDL muscles with creatine improves force production and twitch kinetics in fatigue due to reduction in ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stewart I; Greenaway, Bronwen; Chan, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12-14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i) before fatigue; (ii) immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii) after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation.

  15. Muscle cramps/pain · weakness · muscle twitching · Dx?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldulaimi, Sommer

    2017-02-01

    A 39-year-old man who worked in construction presented to our clinic with complaints of muscle cramps and muscle pain that had been bothering him for several months. The cramps and pain started in both of his arms and subsequently became diffuse and generalized. He also reported an unintentional 15-pound weight loss.

  16. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  17. Venous Thromboprophylaxis With Neuromuscular Stimulation: Is It Calf Muscle Pumping or Just Twitches and Jerks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, Christopher R; Zymvragoudakis, Vassilios; Geroulakos, George; Kalodiki, Evi

    2018-04-01

    The common peroneal nerve stimulator (CPNS) is a UK-approved device for reducing venous thromboembolism risk. It resembles a wrist watch and is placed over the common peroneal nerve to fire at 1 electrical impulse/sec. The aim was to quantify the claim that it drives the venous muscle pump and imitates walking. Twelve healthy volunteers performed 10 tip-toe maneuvers and 10 ankle dorsiflexions to imitate walking movements. The reductions in calf volume were recorded using air plethysmography (APG). The common peroneal nerve was stimulated for over 10 seconds at each of the 7 increasing electrical impulse settings, and the volume reductions were measured for comparison. The results are expressed as median (interquartile range) absolute (mL), and percentage reduction in calf volume. Tip-toe and dorsiflexion pumping maneuvers were not significantly different: 59 (33.6-96.1), 81.9% vs 51.4 (34-68.5), 59.7%, respectively ( P = .53). However, they both outperformed the CPNS: 10.8 (7.3-18), 13.2% at P = .002 and P = .002, respectively. Qualitatively, the CPNS registered on the tracings as a small spike (muscle twitch) at low settings, with larger amplitudes (ankle jerk) at higher settings. The CPNS activity spikes were discrete, lasting a median (range) of 0.24 (0.16- .3) seconds. The claim that the CPNS empties veins by pumping is supported statistically. However, the amount is small versus the tip-toe and dorsiflexion maneuvers. Furthermore, the CPNS has a short activity profile on the APG trace. Innovations that produce sustained contraction and involve the posterior calf compartments may improve pumping.

  18. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  19. Slow- and fast-twitch hindlimb skeletal muscle phenotypes 12 wk after ⅚ nephrectomy in Wistar rats of both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Luz M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; López, Ignacio; Chamizo, Verónica E; Pineda, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2015-10-01

    This study describes fiber-type adaptations in hindlimb muscles, the interaction of sex, and the role of hypoxia on this response in 12-wk ⅚ nephrectomized rats (Nx). Contractile, metabolic, and morphological features of muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of Nx rats, and compared with sham-operated controls. Rats of both sexes were considered in both groups. A slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation occurred in the tibialis cranialis of Nx rats, particularly in males. This adaptation was accomplished by impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity, increased glycolytic capacity, and no changes in size and nuclear density of muscle fiber types. An oxidative-to-glycolytic metabolic transformation was also found in the soleus muscle of Nx rats. However, a modest fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation, fiber hypertrophy, and nuclear proliferation were observed in soleus muscle fibers of male, but not of female, Nx rats. Serum testosterone levels decreased by 50% in male but not in female Nx rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level decreased by 42% in the tibialis cranialis muscle of male Nx rats. These data demonstrate that 12 wk of Nx induces a muscle-specific adaptive response in which myofibers do not change (or enlarge minimally) in size and nuclear density, but acquire markedly different contractile and metabolic characteristics, which are accompanied by capillary rarefaction. Muscle function and sex play relevant roles in these adaptations. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The association between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain and muscle function in patients with low back pain: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Rettig, Charles; Davis, Joel; Nelson, Chenae; Su, Jonathan; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Hebert, Jeffrey J

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain, disability, nociceptive sensitivity, and lumbar multifidus muscle function, in patients with low back pain (LBP). Quasi-experimental study. Department of Defense Academic Institution. Sixty-six patients with mechanical LBP (38 men, 28 women, age: 41.3 [9.2] years). Dry needling treatment to the lumbar multifidus muscles between L3 and L5 bilaterally. Examination procedures included numeric pain rating, the Modified Oswestry Disability Index, pressure algometry, and real-time ultrasound imaging assessment of lumbar multifidus muscle function before and after dry needling treatment. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) was used to measure nocioceptive sensitivity. The percent change in muscle thickness from rest to contraction was calculated to represent muscle function. Participants were dichotomized and compared based on whether or not they experienced at least one twitch response on the most painful side and spinal level during dry needling. Participants experiencing local twitch response during dry needling exhibited greater immediate improvement in lumbar multifidus muscle function than participants who did not experience a twitch (thickness change with twitch: 12.4 [6]%, thickness change without twitch: 5.7 [11]%, mean difference adjusted for baseline value, 95%CI: 4.4 [1 to 8]%). However, this difference was not present after 1-week, and there were no between-groups differences in disability, pain intensity, or nociceptive sensitivity. The twitch response during dry needling might be clinically relevant, but should not be considered necessary for successful treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P < 0.05); i.e., 3 time points were significantly higher than control and 6 were significantly less than control. These data suggest that the cAMP concentration of untrained skeletal muscle after a single bout of endurance-type exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  2. The acute effect of neuromuscular activation in resistance exercise on human skeletal muscle with the interpolated twitch technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Yeon; Yoon, Wan-Young

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to perform a quantitative assessment of neuromechanical adaptation in skeletal muscles and to propose the scientific underpinnings of the acute effects induced by resistance exercise. [Subjects] The subjects in this study were 11 healthy adult men in their 20s who had no orthopedic history at the time of the study. To examine any signs of resistance exercise-induced changes in the ankle plantar flexor, the subjects were directed to perform a standing barbell calf raise routine. [Methods] Subjects were to carry a load equal to their weights and to perform five sets of ten repetitions. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, resting twitch torque, muscle inhibition, root mean square of muscular activation, contraction time, and half relaxation time were analyzed by synchronizing a dynamometer, an electrical stimulator, and an electromyography system. [Results] The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque appeared to decline, but the change was not statistically significant. The decline of resting twitch torque, on the other hand, was found to be statistically significant. Muscle inhibition and root mean square of muscular activation were both reduced, but both changes were not statistically significant. Lastly, contraction time and half relaxation time both statistically decreased significantly after resistance exercise. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the acute effects of resistance exercise have a greater impact on the peripheral mechanical system itself, rather than on neurological factors, in terms of the generation of muscle force.

  3. Impact of TIEG1 Deletion on the Passive Mechanical Properties of Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Malek; Pouletaut, Philippe; Canon, Francis; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Hawse, John R; Vayssade, Muriel; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2016-01-01

    As transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle, the effect of TIEG1 gene deletion on the passive mechanical properties of slow and fast twitch muscle fibers was analyzed. Twenty five muscle fibers were harvested from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from TIEG1-/- (N = 5) and control (N = 5) mice. Mechanical tests were performed on fibers and the dynamic and static stresses were measured. A viscoelastic Hill model of 3rd order was used to fit the experimental relaxation test data. In parallel, immunohistochemical analyses were performed on three serial transverse sections to detect the myosin isoforms within the slow and fast muscles. The percentage and the mean cross sectional area of each fiber type were calculated. These tests revealed a significant increase in the mechanical stress properties for the TIEG1-/- Sol fibers while a significant decrease appeared for the TIEG1-/- EDL fibers. Hill model tracked the shape of the experimental relaxation curve for both genotypes and both fiber types. Immunohistochemical results showed hypertrophy of all fiber types for TIEG1-/- muscles with an increase in the percentage of glycolytic fibers (IIX, and IIB) and a decrease of oxidative fibers (I, and IIA). This study has provided new insights into the role of TIEG1, known as KLF10, in the functional (SoltypeI: more resistant, EDLtypeIIB: less resistant) and morphological (glycolytic hypertrophy) properties of fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles. Further investigation at the cellular level will better reveal the role of the TIEG1 gene in skeletal muscle tissue.

  4. Impact of TIEG1 Deletion on the Passive Mechanical Properties of Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles in Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Kammoun

    Full Text Available As transforming growth factor (TGF-β inducible early gene-1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle, the effect of TIEG1 gene deletion on the passive mechanical properties of slow and fast twitch muscle fibers was analyzed. Twenty five muscle fibers were harvested from soleus (Sol and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles from TIEG1-/- (N = 5 and control (N = 5 mice. Mechanical tests were performed on fibers and the dynamic and static stresses were measured. A viscoelastic Hill model of 3rd order was used to fit the experimental relaxation test data. In parallel, immunohistochemical analyses were performed on three serial transverse sections to detect the myosin isoforms within the slow and fast muscles. The percentage and the mean cross sectional area of each fiber type were calculated. These tests revealed a significant increase in the mechanical stress properties for the TIEG1-/- Sol fibers while a significant decrease appeared for the TIEG1-/- EDL fibers. Hill model tracked the shape of the experimental relaxation curve for both genotypes and both fiber types. Immunohistochemical results showed hypertrophy of all fiber types for TIEG1-/- muscles with an increase in the percentage of glycolytic fibers (IIX, and IIB and a decrease of oxidative fibers (I, and IIA. This study has provided new insights into the role of TIEG1, known as KLF10, in the functional (SoltypeI: more resistant, EDLtypeIIB: less resistant and morphological (glycolytic hypertrophy properties of fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles. Further investigation at the cellular level will better reveal the role of the TIEG1 gene in skeletal muscle tissue.

  5. Differential microRNA Expression in Fast- and Slow-Twitch Skeletal Muscle of Piaractus mesopotamicus during Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bruno Oliveira da Silva; Fernandez, Geysson Javier; Mareco, Edson Assunção; Moraes, Leonardo Nazario; Salomão, Rondinelle Artur Simões; Gutierrez de Paula, Tassiana; Santos, Vander Bruno; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli; Dal-Pai-Silvca, Maeli

    2015-01-01

    Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) is a Brazilian fish with a high economic value in pisciculture due to its rusticity and fast growth. Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle in fish occurs by hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy, processes that are dependent on the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. A class of small noncoding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), represses the expression of target mRNAs, and many studies have demonstrated that miR-1, miR-133, miR-206 and miR-499 regulate different processes in skeletal muscle through the mRNA silencing of hdac4 (histone deacetylase 4), srf (serum response factor), pax7 (paired box 7) and sox6 ((sex determining region Y)-box 6), respectively. The aim of our work was to evaluate the expression of these miRNAs and their putative target mRNAs in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle of pacu during growth. We used pacus in three different development stages: larval (aged 30 days), juvenile (aged 90 days and 150 days) and adult (aged 2 years). To complement our study, we also performed a pacu myoblast cell culture, which allowed us to investigate miRNA expression in the progression from myoblast proliferation to differentiation. Our results revealed an inverse correlation between the expression of the miRNAs and their target mRNAs, and there was evidence that miR-1 and miR-206 may regulate the differentiation of myoblasts, whereas miR-133 may regulate the proliferation of these cells. miR-499 was highly expressed in slow-twitch muscle, which suggests its involvement in the specification of the slow phenotype in muscle fibers. The expression of these miRNAs exhibited variations between different development stages and between distinct muscle twitch phenotypes. This work provides the first identification of miRNA expression profiles in pacu skeletal muscle and suggests an important role of these molecules in muscle growth and in the maintenance of the muscle phenotype.

  6. Cardinal features of involuntary force variability can arise from the closed-loop control of viscoelastic afferented muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Christopher M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2018-01-01

    Involuntary force variability below 15 Hz arises from, and is influenced by, many factors including descending neural drive, proprioceptive feedback, and mechanical properties of muscles and tendons. However, their potential interactions that give rise to the well-structured spectrum of involuntary force variability are not well understood due to a lack of experimental techniques. Here, we investigated the generation, modulation, and interactions among different sources of force variability using a physiologically-grounded closed-loop simulation of an afferented muscle model. The closed-loop simulation included a musculotendon model, muscle spindle, Golgi tendon organ (GTO), and a tracking controller which enabled target-guided force tracking. We demonstrate that closed-loop control of an afferented musculotendon suffices to replicate and explain surprisingly many cardinal features of involuntary force variability. Specifically, we present 1) a potential origin of low-frequency force variability associated with co-modulation of motor unit firing rates (i.e.,‘common drive’), 2) an in-depth characterization of how proprioceptive feedback pathways suffice to generate 5-12 Hz physiological tremor, and 3) evidence that modulation of those feedback pathways (i.e., presynaptic inhibition of Ia and Ib afferents, and spindle sensitivity via fusimotor drive) influence the full spectrum of force variability. These results highlight the previously underestimated importance of closed-loop neuromechanical interactions in explaining involuntary force variability during voluntary ‘isometric’ force control. Furthermore, these results provide the basis for a unifying theory that relates spinal circuitry to various manifestations of altered involuntary force variability in fatigue, aging and neurological disease. PMID:29309405

  7. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Laine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5 to 9 % of each individual’s maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function target phase. Force variability in either the 1 to 5 or 6 to 15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will

  8. Obesity-induced discrepancy between contractile and metabolic phenotypes in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles of female obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Luz M; Raya, Ana I; Ríos, Rafael; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2017-07-01

    A clear picture of skeletal muscle adaptations to obesity and related comorbidities remains elusive. This study describes fiber-type characteristics (size, proportions, and oxidative enzyme activity) in two typical hindlimb muscles with opposite structure and function in an animal model of genetic obesity. Lesser fiber diameter, fiber-type composition, and histochemical succinic dehydrogenase activity (an oxidative marker) of muscle fiber types were assessed in slow (soleus)- and fast (tibialis cranialis)-twitch muscles of obese Zucker rats and compared with age (16 wk)- and sex (females)-matched lean Zucker rats ( n = 16/group). Muscle mass and lesser fiber diameter were lower in both muscle types of obese compared with lean animals even though body weights were increased in the obese cohort. A faster fiber-type phenotype also occurred in slow- and fast-twitch muscles of obese rats compared with lean rats. These adaptations were accompanied by a significant increment in histochemical succinic dehydrogenase activity of slow-twitch fibers in the soleus muscle and fast-twitch fiber types in the tibialis cranialis muscle. Obesity significantly increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines but did not significantly affect protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PPARγ or PGC1α in either muscle. These data demonstrate that, in female Zucker rats, obesity induces a reduction of muscle mass in which skeletal muscles show a diminished fiber size and a faster and more oxidative phenotype. It was noteworthy that this discrepancy in muscle's contractile and metabolic features was of comparable nature and extent in muscles with different fiber-type composition and antagonist functions. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study demonstrates a discrepancy between morphological (reduced muscle mass), contractile (shift toward a faster phenotype), and metabolic (increased mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activity) characteristics in skeletal muscles of female Zucker

  9. Influence of Hamstring Fatigue on the Estimated Percentage of Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers for the Vastus Lateralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Jacob A; Stock, Matt S; Carrillo, Elias C; Olinghouse, Kendra D; Drusch, Alexander S; Thompson, Brennan J

    2015-12-01

    A previous study has demonstrated the ability to roughly estimate the percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibers for the vastus lateralis through the analysis of peak torque values during fatiguing isokinetic testing. We examined whether use of the hamstrings influenced peak torque and electromyographic (EMG) responses for the quadriceps during fatiguing isokinetic muscle actions. On 2 separate occasions, 21 men (mean age = 23 years) performed 50 repeated, maximal concentric isokinetic muscle actions of the left leg extensors at a velocity of 180°·s. For 1 trial, the subjects maximally flexed the knee joint after each full extension to bring the dynamometer's lever arm back to the starting position. For the other trial, the subjects relaxed after each maximal extension and an investigator assisted in returning the lever arm. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris throughout testing. Dependent variables that assessed the decline in peak torque and EMG mean frequency for the vastus lateralis were examined using dependent samples t-tests, effect size statistics, and the number of subjects who exceeded the minimal difference needed to be considered real. Our results showed small mean differences between the trials (Cohen's d ≤0.136). For the estimated percentage of fast-twitch fibers, none of the subjects showed a difference between trials that we considered meaningful. The mean estimated percentages of fast-twitch fibers were 61.6 and 60.1. Collectively, use of the hamstrings during fatiguing isokinetic testing of the quadriceps had little influence on peak torque and EMG.

  10. A quantitative description of tubular system Ca(2+) handling in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Tanya R; Edwards, Joshua N; Murphy, Robyn M; Launikonis, Bradley S

    2016-06-01

    Current methods do not allow a quantitative description of Ca(2+) movements across the tubular (t-) system membrane without isolating the membranes from their native skeletal muscle fibre. Here we present a fluorescence-based method that allows determination of the t-system [Ca(2+) ] transients and derivation of t-system Ca(2+) fluxes in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres. Differences in t-system Ca(2+) -handling properties between fast- and slow-twitch fibres from rat muscle are resolved for the first time using this new technique. The method can be used to study Ca(2+) handling of the t-system and allows direct comparisons of t-system Ca(2+) transients and Ca(2+) fluxes between groups of fibres and fibres from different strains of animals. The tubular (t-) system of skeletal muscle is an internalization of the plasma membrane that maintains a large Ca(2+) gradient and exchanges Ca(2+) between the extracellular and intracellular environments. Little is known of the Ca(2+) -handling properties of the t-system as the small Ca(2+) fluxes conducted are difficult to resolve with conventional methods. To advance knowledge in this area we calibrated t-system-trapped rhod-5N inside skinned fibres from rat and [Ca(2+) ]t-sys , allowing confocal measurements of Ca(2+) -dependent changes in rhod-5N fluorescence during rapid changes in the intracellular ionic environment to be converted to [Ca(2+) ] transients in the t-system ([Ca(2+) ]t-sys (t)). Furthermore, t-system Ca(2+) -buffering power was determined so that t-system Ca(2+) fluxes could be derived from [Ca(2+) ]t-sys (t). With this new approach, we show that rapid depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) induced a robust store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch fibres, reducing [Ca(2+) ]t-sys to twitch fibres were greater than that in slow-twitch fibres. In addition, simultaneous imaging of t-system and SR Ca(2+) signals indicated that both membrane compartments accumulated Ca(2+) at

  11. A quantitative description of tubular system Ca2+ handling in fast‐ and slow‐twitch muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Tanya R.; Edwards, Joshua N.; Murphy, Robyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Current methods do not allow a quantitative description of Ca2+ movements across the tubular (t‐) system membrane without isolating the membranes from their native skeletal muscle fibre.Here we present a fluorescence‐based method that allows determination of the t‐system [Ca2+] transients and derivation of t‐system Ca2+ fluxes in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres. Differences in t‐system Ca2+‐handling properties between fast‐ and slow‐twitch fibres from rat muscle are resolved for the first time using this new technique.The method can be used to study Ca2+ handling of the t‐system and allows direct comparisons of t‐system Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ fluxes between groups of fibres and fibres from different strains of animals. Abstract The tubular (t‐) system of skeletal muscle is an internalization of the plasma membrane that maintains a large Ca2+ gradient and exchanges Ca2+ between the extracellular and intracellular environments. Little is known of the Ca2+‐handling properties of the t‐system as the small Ca2+ fluxes conducted are difficult to resolve with conventional methods. To advance knowledge in this area we calibrated t‐system‐trapped rhod‐5N inside skinned fibres from rat and [Ca2+]t‐sys, allowing confocal measurements of Ca2+‐dependent changes in rhod‐5N fluorescence during rapid changes in the intracellular ionic environment to be converted to [Ca2+] transients in the t‐system ([Ca2+]t‐sys (t)). Furthermore, t‐system Ca2+‐buffering power was determined so that t‐system Ca2+ fluxes could be derived from [Ca2+]t‐sys (t). With this new approach, we show that rapid depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ induced a robust store‐operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in fast‐ and slow‐twitch fibres, reducing [Ca2+]t‐sys to twitch fibres were greater than that in slow‐twitch fibres. In addition, simultaneous imaging of t‐system and SR Ca2+ signals indicated that both membrane

  12. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  13. Connexin 39.9 Protein Is Necessary for Coordinated Activation of Slow-twitch Muscle and Normal Behavior in Zebrafish*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiromi; Wen, Hua; Kawakami, Yu; Naganawa, Yuriko; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Low, Sean E.; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Sprague, Shawn M.; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Muto, Akira; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    In many tissues and organs, connexin proteins assemble between neighboring cells to form gap junctions. These gap junctions facilitate direct intercellular communication between adjoining cells, allowing for the transmission of both chemical and electrical signals. In rodents, gap junctions are found in differentiating myoblasts and are important for myogenesis. Although gap junctions were once believed to be absent from differentiated skeletal muscle in mammals, recent studies in teleosts revealed that differentiated muscle does express connexins and is electrically coupled, at least at the larval stage. These findings raised questions regarding the functional significance of gap junctions in differentiated muscle. Our analysis of gap junctions in muscle began with the isolation of a zebrafish motor mutant that displayed weak coiling at day 1 of development, a behavior known to be driven by slow-twitch muscle (slow muscle). We identified a missense mutation in the gene encoding Connexin 39.9. In situ hybridization found connexin 39.9 to be expressed by slow muscle. Paired muscle recordings uncovered that wild-type slow muscles are electrically coupled, whereas mutant slow muscles are not. The further examination of cellular activity revealed aberrant, arrhythmic touch-evoked Ca2+ transients in mutant slow muscle and a reduction in the number of muscle fibers contracting in response to touch in mutants. These results indicate that Connexin 39.9 facilitates the spreading of neuronal inputs, which is irregular during motor development, beyond the muscle cells and that gap junctions play an essential role in the efficient recruitment of slow muscle fibers. PMID:22075003

  14. Differences in histone modifications between slow- and fast-twitch muscle of adult rats and following overload, denervation, or valproic acid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Fuminori; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Nakai, Naoya; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in skeletal muscle properties and phenotypes in response to various stimuli such as exercise, unloading, and gene mutation. However, a shift in muscle fiber phenotype from fast twitch to slow twitch is not completely induced by stimuli. This limitation is hypothesized to result from the epigenetic differences between muscle types. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the differences in histone modification for the plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles of adult rats. Genome-wide analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and acetylation of histone 3, which occurs at transcriptionally active gene loci, was less prevalent in the genes specific to the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Conversely, gene loci specific to the fast-twitch plantaris muscle were associated with the aforementioned histone modifications. We also found that upregulation of slow genes in the plantaris muscle, which are related to enhanced muscular activity, is not associated with activating histone modifications. Furthermore, silencing of muscle activity by denervation caused the displacement of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in 5' ends of genes in plantaris, but minor effects were observed in soleus. Increased recruitment of Pol II induced by forced acetylation of histone was also suppressed in valproic acid-treated soleus. Our present data indicate that the slow-twitch soleus muscle has a unique set of histone modifications, which may relate to the preservation of the genetic backbone against physiological stimuli. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Quantifying Ca2+ release and inactivation of Ca2+ release in fast- and slow-twitch muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, C J

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the Ca2+ release underlying twitch contractions of mammalian fast- and slow-twitch muscle and to comprehensively describe the transient inactivation of Ca2+ release following a stimulus. Experiments were performed using bundles of fibres from mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ca2+ release was quantified from the amount of ATP used to remove Ca2+ from the myoplasm following stimulation. ATP turnover by crossbridges was blocked pharmacologically (N-benzyl-p-toluenesulphonamide for EDL, blebbistatin for soleus) and muscle heat production was used as an index of Ca2+ pump ATP turnover. At 20°C, Ca2+ release in response to a single stimulus was 34 and 84 μmol (kg muscle)−1 for soleus and EDL, respectively, and increased with temperature (30°C: soleus, 61 μmol kg−1; EDL, 168 μmol kg−1). Delivery of another stimulus within 100 ms of the first produced a smaller Ca2+ release. The maximum magnitude of the decrease in Ca2+ release was greater in EDL than soleus. Ca2+ release recovered with an exponential time course which was faster in EDL (mean time constant at 20°C, 32.1 ms) than soleus (65.6 ms) and faster at 30°C than at 20°C. The amounts of Ca2+ released and crossbridge cycles performed are consistent with a scheme in which Ca2+ binding to troponin-C allowed an average of ∼1.7 crossbridge cycles in the two muscles. PMID:23027818

  16. Incubating isolated mouse EDL muscles with creatine improves force production and twitch kinetics in fatigue due to reduction in ionic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12-14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i before fatigue; (ii immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. CONCLUSION: Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca(2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation.

  17. The effect of work cycle frequency on the potentiation of dynamic force in mouse fast twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterini, Daniel; Gittings, William; Huang, Jian; Vandenboom, Rene

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the potentiation of concentric twitch force during work cycles is dependent upon both the speed and direction of length change. Concentric and eccentric forces were elicited by stimulating muscles during the shortening and lengthening phases, respectively, of work cycles. Work cycle frequency was varied in order to vary the speed of muscle shortening and/or lengthening; all forces were measured as the muscle passed though optimal length (L(o)). Both concentric and eccentric force were assessed before (unpotentiated control) and after (potentiated) the application of a tetanic conditioning protocol known to potentiate twitch force output. The influence of the conditioning protocol on relative concentric force was speed dependent, with forces increased to 1.19±0.01, 1.25±0.01 and 1.30±0.01 of controls at 1.5, 3.3 and 6.9 Hz, respectively (all data N=9-10 with Pwork (force × distance) was also speed dependent, being decreased at 1.5 Hz (0.84±0.01) and increased at 3.3 and 6.9 Hz (1.05±0.01 and 1.39±0.01, respectively). In contrast, eccentric work was not increased at any frequency (range: 0.88±0.02 to 0.99±0.01). Thus, our results reveal a hysteresis-like influence of activity-dependent potentiation such that concentric force and/or work were increased but eccentric force and/or work were not. These outcomes may have implications for skeletal muscle locomotor function in vivo.

  18. Long-term, but not short-term high-fat diet induces fiber composition changes and impaired contractile force in mouse fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshima, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Kakehi, Saori; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Murayama, Takashi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Kakigi, Ryo; Okada, Takao; Sakurai, Takashi; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of a short-term and long-term high-fat diet (HFD) on morphological and functional features of fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (60% fat) for 4 weeks (4-week HFD) or 12 weeks (12-week HFD). Subsequently, the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle was isolated, and the composition of muscle fiber type, expression levels of proteins involved in muscle contraction, and force production on electrical stimulation were analyzed. The 12-week HFD, but not the 4-week HFD, resulted in a decreased muscle tetanic force on 100 Hz stimulation compared with control (5.1 ± 1.4 N/g in the 12-week HFD vs. 7.5 ± 1.7 N/g in the control group; P  twitch muscle fibers. Given that skeletal muscle strength largely depends on muscle fiber type, the impaired muscle contractile force by a HFD might result from morphological changes of fiber type composition. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Exhausting treadmill running causes dephosphorylation of sMLC2 and reduced level of myofilament MLCK2 in slow twitch rat soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortemo, Kristin Halvorsen; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Lunde, Ida G; Sjaastad, Ivar; Lunde, Per Kristian; Sejersted, Ole M

    2015-02-01

    Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) is a small protein in the myosin complex, regulating muscle contractile function by modulating Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofilaments. MLC2 can be modified by phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation, two reversible and dynamic posttranslational modifications. The slow isoform of MLC2 (sMLC2) is dephosphorylated in soleus muscle during in situ loaded shortening contractions, which correlates with reduction in shortening capacity. Here, we hypothesize that exhausting in vivo treadmill running induces dephosphorylation of MLC2 in slow twitch soleus, but not in fast twitch EDL muscle, and that there are reciprocal changes in MLC2 O-GlcNAcylation. At rest, both phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of MLC2 were lower in slow than fast twitch muscles. One bout of exhausting treadmill running induced dephosphorylation of sMLC2 in soleus, paralleled by reduced levels of the kinase MLCK2 associated to myofilaments, suggesting that the acute reduction in phosphorylation is mediated by dissociation of MLCK2 from myofilaments. O-GlcNAcylation of MLC2 did not change significantly, and seems of limited importance in the regulation of MLC2 phosphorylation during in vivo running. After 6 weeks of treadmill running, the dephosphorylation of sMLC2 persisted in soleus along with reduction in MLCK2 both in myofilament- and total protein fraction. In EDL on the contrary, phosphorylation of MLC2 was not altered after one exercise bout or after 6 weeks of treadmill running. Thus, in contrast to fast twitch muscle, MLC2 dephosphorylation occurs in slow twitch muscle during in vivo exercise and may be linked to reduced myofilament-associated MLCK2 and reduced shortening capacity. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  20. Hexamethonium-induced augmentation of the electrical twitch response in the guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid; Holzer-Petsche, Ulrike

    2014-08-08

    Longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strips of the guinea-pig ileum were used to investigate the nature of the hexamethonium-induced augmentation of the twitch response. All preparations were set up in Tyrode solution and intermittent longitudinal twitch contractions were evoked by single pulse electrical field stimulation. Hexamethonium, a blocker of nicotinic ganglionic transmission, at 300 μmol/l and 1 mmol/l augmented the twitch contractions by 21% and 35%, respectively. First we tested for a possible nicotinic drive onto an inhibitory neuronal component to the longitudinal smooth muscle cells. However, guanethidine (5 μmol/l), naloxone (1 μmol/l), or l-NAME (300 μmol/l) were without effect on the hexamethonium-induced augmentation. The P2 purinoceptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS), 25-100 μmol/l, without altering the control twitch responses, dose-dependently reduced the hexamethonium-induced augmentation; at 100 μmol/l a statistically significantly inhibition was observed. Based on these functional experiments we found no evidence that blocking nicotinic transmission removed a tonic adrenergic, opioidergic or nitrergic inhibitory input to the longitudinal muscle. However, we provide evidence for a hexamethonium-induced augmentation of the P2 purinergic input to cholinergic motoneurons of the guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle. The P2-nicotinic receptor interaction presents a novel modulatory mechanism to cholinergic myenteric motor neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. S1P3 receptor influences key physiological properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germinario, Elena; Bondì, Michela; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Nocella, Marta; Colombini, Barbara; Betto, Romeo; Bruni, Paola; Bagni, Maria Angela; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    To examine the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 3 (S1P3) in modulating muscle properties, we utilized transgenic mice depleted of the receptor. Morphological analyses of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle did not show evident differences between wild-type and S1P3-null mice. The body weight of 3-mo-old S1P3-null mice and the mean cross-sectional area of transgenic EDL muscle fibers were similar to those of wild-type. S1P3 deficiency enhanced the expression level of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors mRNA in S1P3-null EDL muscle. The contractile properties of S1P3-null EDL diverge from those of wild-type, largely more fatigable and less able to recover. The absence of S1P3 appears responsible for a lower availability of calcium during fatigue. S1P supplementation, expected to stimulate residual S1P receptors and signaling, reduced fatigue development of S1P3-null muscle. Moreover, in the absence of S1P3, denervated EDL atrophies less than wild-type. The analysis of atrophy-related proteins in S1P3-null EDL evidences high levels of the endogenous regulator of mitochondria biogenesis peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); preserving mitochondria could protect the muscle from disuse atrophy. In conclusion, the absence of S1P3 makes the muscle more sensitive to fatigue and slows down atrophy development after denervation, indicating that S1P3 is involved in the modulation of key physiological properties of the fast-twitch EDL muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Intersession reliability of the interpolated twitch technique applied during isometric, concentric, and eccentric actions of the human knee extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Martin; Husmann, Florian; Gube, Martin; Felser, Sabine; Weippert, Matthias; Bruhn, Sven; Zschorlich, Volker; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2017-08-01

    Although it has been shown that voluntary activation (%VA) of the knee extensors during isometric contractions can be reliably assessed with the interpolated twitch technique, little is known about the reliability of %VA during concentric and eccentric muscle actions. Therefore, relative and absolute intersession reliability of quadriceps muscle's %VA during different contraction modes was determined. After a familiarization session, 21 participants (17 males, 25 ± 2 yrs) completed two testing sessions. Paired supramaximal electrical stimuli were administered to the femoral nerve during isometric, concentric, eccentric MVCs, and at rest to assess %VA (stimuli were applied at 70° knee flexion). Data indicate that %VA of the knee extensors can be reliably measured during isometric [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.89, coefficient of variation (CV) = 4.1%], concentric (ICC = 0.87, CV = 6.6%), and eccentric muscle actions (ICC = 0.86, CV = 7.0%). Muscle Nerve 56: 324-327, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Differential effects of peroxynitrite on contractile protein properties in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutka, T L; Mollica, J P; Lamb, G D

    2011-03-01

    Oxidative modification of contractile proteins is thought to be a key factor in muscle weakness observed in many pathophysiological conditions. In particular, peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a potent short-lived oxidant, is a likely candidate responsible for this contractile dysfunction. In this study ONOO(-) or 3-morpholinosydnonimine (Sin-1, a ONOO(-) donor) was applied to rat skinned muscle fibers to characterize the effects on contractile properties. Both ONOO(-) and Sin-1 exposure markedly reduced maximum force in slow-twitch fibers but had much less effect in fast-twitch fibers. The rate of isometric force development was also reduced without change in the number of active cross bridges. Sin-1 exposure caused a disproportionately large decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, evidently due to coproduction of superoxide, as it was prevented by Tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. The decline in maximum force with Sin-1 and ONOO(-) treatments could be partially reversed by DTT, provided it was applied before the fiber was activated. Reversal by DTT indicates that the decrease in maximum force was due at least in part to oxidation of cysteine residues. Ascorbate caused similar reversal, further suggesting that the cysteine residues had undergone S-nitrosylation. The reduction in Ca(2+) sensitivity, however, was not reversed by either DTT or ascorbate. Western blot analysis showed cross-linking of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, appearing as larger protein complexes after ONOO(-) exposure. The findings suggest that ONOO(-) initially decreases maximum force primarily by oxidation of cysteine residues on the myosin heads, and that the accompanying decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity is likely due to other, less reversible actions of hydroxyl or related radicals.

  4. Differential effects of low-intensity motor cortical stimulation on the inspiratory activity in scalene muscles during voluntary and involuntary breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Taylor, Janet L; Murray, Nicholas P S

    2011-01-01

    ) hypercapnic involuntary ventilation (end-tidal CO(2), 6.0±0.7%). Electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded from the scalene muscles (obligatory inspiratory muscles) and was significantly suppressed by TMS at short latency (17.2±1.7ms). The scalene EMG was reduced to 76±8% and 76±7% in voluntary breathing...

  5. Glycogen content regulates insulin- but not contraction-mediated glycogen synthase activation in the rat slow-twitch soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y-C; Lin, F-C; Jensen, J

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glycogen content on glycogen synthase (GS) activation and phosphorylation in the slow-twitch soleus muscles after contraction, during insulin stimulation and when these two stimuli were combined. Glycogen content was manipulated in vivo with 24 h fasting and fasting followed by 24 h refeeding. Soleus strips were electrically stimulated for 30 min in vitro, and GS activation and phosphorylation were investigated after an additional 30 min incubation with or without insulin. Fasting reduced glycogen content in soleus muscle by 40% and refeeding enhanced by 40%, compared to rats with free access to chow. Insulin-stimulated GS fractional activity was inversely correlated with glycogen content (R = -0.95, P glycogen synthesis was also inversely correlated with glycogen content (R = -0.70, P glycogen content; rate of glycogen synthesis after contraction was also similar. After contraction, insulin additively increased GS activation at all glycogen contents. Group means of GS fractional activity was inversely correlated with GS Ser(641) (R = -0.93, P Glycogen content regulates insulin- but not contraction-stimulated GS activation and glycogen synthesis in soleus muscles. Furthermore, phosphorylation of GS Ser(641) and Ser(645,649,653,657) seems to regulate GS activity in soleus.

  6. Guanidine affects differentially the twitch response of diaphragm, extensor digitorum longus and soleus nerve-muscle preparations of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rosana; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; da Cruz Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-06-15

    Guanidine has been used with some success to treat myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndrome because it increases acetylcholine release at nerve terminals through K⁺, Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ channels-involving mechanisms. Currently, guanidine derivatives have been proposed for treatment of several diseases. Studies aimed at providing new insights to the drug are relevant. Experimentally, guanidine (10 mM) induces on mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations neurotransmission facilitation followed by blockade and a greatest secondary facilitation after its removal from bath. Herein, we hypothesized that this peculiar triphasic response may differ in muscles with distinct twitch/metabolic characteristics. Morphological alterations and contractile response of PND, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) preparations incubated with guanidine (10 mM) for 15, 30, 60 min were analyzed. Guanidine concentrations of 5 mM (for PND and EDL) and 1 mM (for EDL) were also tested. Guanidine triphasic effect was only observed on PND regardless the concentration. The morphological alterations in muscle tissue varied along time but did not impede the PND post-wash facilitation. Higher doses (20-25 mM) did not increase EDL or SOL neurotransmission. The data suggest a complex mechanism likely dependent on the metabolic/contractile muscle phenotype; muscle fiber types and density/type of ion channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria organization may have profound impact on the levels and isoform expression pattern of Ca²⁺ regulatory membrane proteins so reflecting regulation of calcium handling and contractile response in different types of muscle.

  7. Guanidine Affects Differentially the Twitch Response of Diaphragm, Extensor Digitorum Longus and Soleus Nerve-Muscle Preparations of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice da Cruz Höfling

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Guanidine has been used with some success to treat myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndrome because it increases acetylcholine release at nerve terminals through K+, Na+ and Ca2+ channels-involving mechanisms. Currently, guanidine derivatives have been proposed for treatment of several diseases. Studies aimed at providing new insights to the drug are relevant. Experimentally, guanidine (10 mM induces on mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND preparations neurotransmission facilitation followed by blockade and a greatest secondary facilitation after its removal from bath. Herein, we hypothesized that this peculiar triphasic response may differ in muscles with distinct twitch/metabolic characteristics. Morphological alterations and contractile response of PND, extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus (SOL preparations incubated with guanidine (10 mM for 15, 30, 60 min were analyzed. Guanidine concentrations of 5 mM (for PND and EDL and 1 mM (for EDL were also tested. Guanidine triphasic effect was only observed on PND regardless the concentration. The morphological alterations in muscle tissue varied along time but did not impede the PND post-wash facilitation. Higher doses (20–25 mM did not increase EDL or SOL neurotransmission. The data suggest a complex mechanism likely dependent on the metabolic/contractile muscle phenotype; muscle fiber types and density/type of ion channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria organization may have profound impact on the levels and isoform expression pattern of Ca2+ regulatory membrane proteins so reflecting regulation of calcium handling and contractile response in different types of muscle.

  8. The Effect of Endurance Exercise on the Expression of miR-1 in Slow- and Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles in Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fathi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: MicroRNA-1 (miR-1 is involved in various cellular processes, but the effect of endurance exercise on miR-1 expression in fast- and slow- twitch skeletal muscles has still remained unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of one period of endurance exercise on miR-1 expression in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles in male Wistar rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 14 rats weighing 113±20 grams were housed under controlled conditions (animal laboratory of Tarbiat Modares university, 2014, and after familiarization (weight, 231±24 grams were randomly divided into two groups of control (n=7 and experimental (n=7 groups. The experimental group did an endurance activity program (30m/min, 50 min/session, 6 session/week for 14 weeks on a treadmill and 48 hours after the end of the last session, was anesthetized and sacrificed together with the control group. Then, the soleus and EDL muscles were removed. The expression level of miR-1 was measured using real-time RT-PCR. In the following, data were evaluated and compared using t-test. Results: According to t-test results, The mean expression of miR-1 of soleus and EDL muscles in the experimental group, respectively, increased 2.77- and 4.48- fold, compared to the control group due to 14 weeks of endurance exercise, which these increases were significant at p<0.01 level. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that despite the difference in twitch type and muscle fiber properties, endurance exercise has the same effect on miR-1 expression in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

  9. Ischemia Increases the Twitch Latent Period in the Soleus and Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus Muscles from Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Camilo; Fierro, Leonardo

    2017-10-01

    Complete ischemia and reperfusion effects on twitch force (∫(F·t)), twitch latent period (TLP), maximal rate of rise of twitch tension (δF/δt) max , and twitch maximum relaxation rate (TMRR) were assessed. We divided 36 adult rats into four groups; two control groups (n = 9), a group undergoing 1 hour of ischemia followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (n = 9), and one group exposed to 2 hours of ischemia followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (n = 9). We have induced twitch contractions every 10 minutes in the soleus and the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL). Twitch contractions were recorded and then analyzed for ∫(F·t), TLP, (δF/δt) max , and TMRR. During 1 hour and 40 minutes of ischemia, TLP increased to 179 ± 24% (p values.

  10. Desensitization of the Mechanoreceptors in Müller's Muscle Reduces the Increased Reflex Contraction of the Orbicularis Oculi Slow-Twitch Fibers in Blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Ban, Midori

    2014-01-01

    Although the mixed orbicularis oculi muscle lacks the muscle spindles required to induce reflex contraction of its slow-twitch fibers, the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle function as extrinsic mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction. We hypothesize that strong stretching of these mechanoreceptors increases reflex contraction of the orbicularis oculi slow-twitch muscle fibers, resulting in blepharospasm. We examined a 71-year-old man with right blepharospasm and bilateral aponeurosis-disinserted blepharoptosis to determine whether the patient's blepharospasm was worsened by increased trigeminal proprioceptive evocation via stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle owing to a 60° upward gaze and serrated eyelid closure, and whether local anesthesia of the mechanoreceptors via lidocaine administration to the upper fornix as well as surgical disinsertion of Müller's muscle from the tarsus and fixation of the disinserted aponeurosis to the tarsus decreased trigeminal proprioceptive evocation and improved patient's blepharospasm. Before pharmacological desensitization, 60° upward gaze and serrated eyelid closure exacerbated the patient's blepharospasm. In contrast, these maneuvers did not worsen his blepharospasm following lidocaine administration. One year after surgical desensitization, the blepharospasm had disappeared and a 60° upward gaze did not induce blepharospasm. Strong stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appeared to increase reflex contraction of the orbicularis oculi slow-twitch muscle fibers, resulting in blepharospasm. In addition to botulinum neurotoxin injections into the involuntarily contracted orbicularis oculi muscle and myectomy, surgical desensitization of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle may represent an additional procedure to reduce blepharospasm.

  11. In Vivo Sarcomere Length Measurement in Whole Muscles during Passive Stretch and Twitch Contractions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Kevin W.; Kuo, Bill P.-P.; O’Connor, Shawn M.; Radic, Stojan; Lieber, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle force is dictated by micrometer-scale contractile machines called sarcomeres. Whole-muscle force drops from peak force production to zero with just a few micrometers of sarcomere length change. No current technology is able to capture adequate dynamic sarcomere data in vivo, and thus we lack fundamental data needed to understand human movement and movement disorders. Methods such as diffraction, endoscopy, and optical coherence tomography have been applied to muscle but are prohibitive...

  12. Slow-twitch fiber proportion in skeletal muscle correlates with insulin responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A; McCurry, Melanie P; Marino, Anna; South, Mark A; Howell, Mary E A; Layne, Andrew S; Ramsey, Michael W; Stone, Michael H

    2013-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome, characterized by central obesity with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, identifies people at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to determine how the insulin resistance of the metabolic syndrome is related to muscle fiber composition. Thirty-nine sedentary men and women (including 22 with the metabolic syndrome) had insulin responsiveness quantified using euglycemic clamps and underwent biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. Expression of insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate-1, glucose transporter 4, and ATP synthase were quantified with immunoblots and immunohistochemistry. Participants were nondiabetic, metabolic syndrome volunteers and sedentary control subjects studied at an outpatient clinic. Insulin responsiveness during an insulin clamp and the fiber composition of a muscle biopsy specimen were evaluated. There were fewer type I fibers and more mixed (type IIa) fibers in metabolic syndrome subjects. Insulin responsiveness and maximal oxygen uptake correlated with the proportion of type I fibers. Insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and glucose transporter 4 expression were not different in whole muscle but all were significantly less in the type I fibers of metabolic syndrome subjects when adjusted for fiber proportion and fiber size. Fat oxidation and muscle mitochondrial expression were not different in the metabolic syndrome subjects. Lower proportion of type I fibers in metabolic syndrome muscle correlated with the severity of insulin resistance. Even though whole muscle content was normal, key elements of insulin action were consistently less in type I muscle fibers, suggesting their distribution was important in mediating insulin effects.

  13. Twitch and Tetanic Tension during Culture of Mature Xenopus laevis Single Muscle Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, R.T.; Feenstra, Hiske; Lee-de Groot, M.B.E.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; van der Laarse, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms of muscle adaptation requires independent control of the regulating factors. The aim of the present study was to develop a serum-free medium to culture mature single muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. As an example, we used the culture system to study adaptation of

  14. Increase in twitch force of the adductor pollicis muscle with stabilized preload at constant thumb abduction before and after administration of muscle relaxant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, G; Wierda, JMKH; Fidler, [No Value

    Objective. To determine whether the twitch force of the adductor pollicis remains stable when 0.1 Hz single twitch stimulation is started after stabilization of the thumb preload at a constant degree of thumb abduction; also to study any possible increase in twitch force before the onset of and

  15. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  16. Interaction of Mechanical Load with Growth Hormone (GH) and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) on Slow-Twitch Skeletal Muscle and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Exogenous humoral growth factors, combined with increased mechanical loading, reportedly induce hypertrophy of fast-, but not slow-twitch skeletal muscles, and have little effect in attenuating atrophy of slow-twitch muscle associated with exposure to microgravity in animals with intact neuroendocrine systems. These observations suggest that anabolic adjuvants and muscle tension do not interact to stimulate growth or maintenance of slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a chronic increase in mechanical loading (synergistic ablation) or hindlimb unweighting (hindlimb suspension) interact with exogenous GH and IGF-I (Genentech, So San Francisco, CA) in the slow-twitch soleus muscles of female rats (approx. 250 g). Bilateral ablation of the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles induced 38% and 40% increases in the absolute (mg/pair) and relative (mg/100 g body weight) weights of the soleus, respectively (p less than or = 0.05), in ambulatory rats. GH and IGF-I interacted with chronic loading to increase absolute soleus mass an additional 20% (p less than or = 0.05), and mixed and myofibrillar protein contents an additional 12% and 7%, respectively (NS). In contrast, hindlimb suspension (HLS) resulted in 20% and 18% decreases in the absolute and relative weights of the soleus, respectively (p less than or = 0.05); GH and IGF-I did not spare loss of soleus mass or protein content in HLS rats. HLS decreased tibial plate thickness approx. 11% (p less than or = 0.05), but not weights of the tibia or femus. GH and IGF-I increased tibial plate thickness approx. 30% (p less than or = 0.05), in ambulatory and HLS rats, and increased femur and tibial weights 12% (p less than or = 0.05) and 8% (NS), respectively, in ambulatory rats, but had no effect in HLS rats. Results of the present investigation suggest that GH and IGF-I can stimulate hypertrophy of slow-twitch skeletal muscle when chronically overloaded, but can also stimulate

  17. ATP consumption by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps accounts for 50% of resting metabolic rate in mouse fast and slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Sarah Michelle; Bombardier, Eric; Smith, Ian Curtis; Vigna, Chris; Tupling, Allan Russell

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to directly quantify the relative contribution of Ca(2+) cycling to resting metabolic rate in mouse fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) and slow-twitch (soleus) skeletal muscle. Resting oxygen consumption of isolated muscles (Vo(2), microl.g wet wt(-1).s(-1)) measured polarographically at 30 degrees C was approximately 25% higher in soleus (0.61 +/- .03) than in EDL (0.46 +/- .03). To quantify the specific contribution of Ca(2+) cycling to resting metabolic rate, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a highly specific inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases (SERCAs), was added to the bath at different concentrations (1, 5, 10, and 15 microM). There was a concentration-dependent effect of CPA on Vo(2), with increasing CPA concentrations up to 10 microM resulting in progressively greater reductions in muscle Vo(2). There were no differences between 10 and 15 microM CPA, indicating that 10 microM CPA induces maximal inhibition of SERCAs in isolated muscle preparations. Relative reduction in muscle Vo(2) in response to CPA was nearly identical in EDL (1 microM, 10.6 +/- 3.0%; 5 microM, 33.2 +/- 3.4%; 10 microM, 49.2 +/- 2.9%; 15 microM, 50.9 +/- 2.1%) and soleus (1 microM, 11.2 +/- 1.5%; 5 microM, 37.7 +/- 2.4%; 10 microM, 50.0 +/- 1.3%; 15 microM, 49.9 +/- 1.6%). The results indicate that ATP consumption by SERCAs is responsible for approximately 50% of resting metabolic rate in both mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles at 30 degrees C. Thus SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle could represent an important control point for energy balance regulation and a potential target for metabolic alterations to oppose obesity.

  18. Drug action of benzocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Croce, D; Trinks, P W; Grifo, M B; Takara, D; Sánchez, G A

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic benzocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from fast-twitch muscles was tested. The effects on Ca-ATPase activity, calcium binding and uptake, phosphoenzyme accumulation and decomposition were assessed using radioisotopic methods. The calcium binding to the Ca-ATPase was noncompetitively inhibited, and the enzymatic activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 47.1 mM). The inhibition of the activity depended on the presence of the calcium ionophore calcimycin and the membrane protein concentration. The pre-exposure of the membranes to benzocaine enhanced the enzymatic activity in the absence of calcimycin, supporting the benzocaine permeabilizing effect, which was prevented by calcium. Benzocaine also interfered with the calcium transport capability by decreasing the maximal uptake (IC50 40.3 mM) without modification of the calcium affinity for the ATPase. It inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme, and at high benzocaine concentration, the dephosphorylation step became rate-limiting as suggested by the biphasic profile of phosphoenzyme accumulation at different benzocaine concentrations. The data reported in this paper revealed a complex pattern of inhibition involving two sites for interaction with low and high benzocaine concentrations. It is concluded that benzocaine not only exerts an indirect action on the membrane permeability to calcium but also affects key steps of the Ca-ATPase enzymatic cycle.

  19. AMPK alpha1 activation is required for stimulation of glucose uptake by twitch contraction, but not by H2O2, in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Schjerling, Peter; Viollet, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    into muscle by certain stimuli. In contrast, no clear function has yet been determined for alpha(1) AMPK in skeletal muscle, possibly due to alpha-AMPK isoform signaling redundancy. By applying low-intensity twitch-contraction and H(2)O(2) stimulation to activate alpha(1) AMPK, but not alpha(2) AMPK......, in wildtype and alpha-AMPK transgenic mouse muscles, this study aimed to define conditions where alpha(1) AMPK is required to increase muscle glucose uptake. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Following stimulation with H(2)O(2) (3 mM, 20 min) or twitch-contraction (0.1 ms pulse, 2 Hz, 2 min), signaling and 2......-deoxyglucose uptake were measured in incubated soleus muscles from wildtype and muscle-specific kinase-dead AMPK (KD), alpha(1) AMPK knockout or alpha(2) AMPK knockout mice. H(2)O(2) increased the activity of both alpha(1) and alpha(2) AMPK in addition to Akt phosphorylation, and H(2)O(2)-stimulated glucose...

  20. Effect of spaceflight on the maximal shortening velocity, morphology, and enzyme profile of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers in rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; De La Cruz, L.; Widrick, J. J.; Desplanches, D.

    2000-01-01

    Weightlessness has been shown to cause limb muscle wasting and a reduced peak force and power in the antigravity soleus muscle. Despite a reduced peak power, Caiozzo et al. observed an increased maximal shortening velocity in the rat soleus muscle following a 14-day space flight. The major purpose of the present investigation was to determine if weightlessness induced an elevated velocity in the antigravity slow type I fibers of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), as well as to establish a cellular mechanism for the effect. Spaceflight or models of weightlessness have been shown to increase glucose uptake, elevate muscle glycogen content, and increase fatigability of the soleus muscle. The latter appears to be in part caused by a reduced ability of the slow oxidative fibers to oxidize fats. A second goal of this study was to establish the extent to which weightlessness altered the substrate profile and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme capacity of individual slow- and fast-twitch fibers.

  1. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-07-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake (V˙O2) response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the V˙O2 slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW(-1) min(-1)) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. V˙O2 kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW(-1)) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW(-1)) at 6 min of INT (P twitch fibers, and did not change V˙O2 kinetics. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  2. Size and metabolic properties of fibers in rat fast-twitch muscles after hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Roland R.; Bello, Maureen A.; Bouissou, Phillip; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb suspension (HS) on single fibers of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were studied in rats. Fiber area and the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) were determined in tissue sections using an image analysis system. After 28 days of HS, the MG atrophied 28 percent, whereas the TA weight was maintained. Both dark- and light-ATPase fibers in the deep region of the MG had decreased cross-sectional areas following HS, with the atrophic response being twice as great in the light-ATPase fibers than in the dark-ATPase fibers. Following HS, mean SDH activities of both fiber types were significantly lower in the MG and TA than in the CON; by contrast, mean GPD activities were either maintained at the CON level or were higher in both MG and TA muscles. The data suggest an independence of the mechanisms determining the muscle fiber size and the metabolic adaptations associated with HS.

  3. Calcium currents in a fast-twitch skeletal muscle of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P L; Beam, K G

    1983-10-01

    Slow ionic currents were measured in the rat omohyoid muscle with the three-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Sodium and delayed rectifier potassium currents were blocked pharmacologically. Under these conditions, depolarizing test pulses elicited an early outward current, followed by a transient slow inward current, followed in turn by a late outward current. The early outward current appeared to be a residual delayed rectifier current. The slow inward current was identified as a calcium current on the basis that (a) its magnitude depended on extracellular calcium concentration, (b) it was blocked by the addition of the divalent cations cadmium or nickel, and reduced in magnitude by the addition of manganese or cobalt, and (c) barium was able to replace calcium as an inward current carrier. The threshold potential for inward calcium current was around -20 mV in 10mM extracellular calcium and about -35 mV in 2 mM calcium. Currents were net inward over part of their time course for potentials up to at least +30 mV. At temperatures of 20-26 degrees C, the peak inward current (at approximately 0 mV) was 139 +/- 14 microA/cm2 (mean +/- SD), increasing to 226 +/- 28 microA/cm2 at temperatures of 27-37 degrees C. The late outward current exhibited considerable fiber-to-fiber variability. In some fibers it was primarily a time-independent, nonlinear leakage current. In other fibers it was primarily a time-independent, nonlinear leakage current. In other fibers it appeared to be the sum of both leak and a slowly activated outward current. The rate of activation of inward calcium current was strongly temperature dependent. For example, in a representative fiber, the time-to-peak inward current for a +10-mV test pulse decreased from approximately 250 ms at 20 degrees C to 100 ms at 30 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, the time-to-peak current was typically approximately 25 ms. The earliest phase of activation was difficult to quantify because the ionic current was partially

  4. Accumulation of ceramide in slow-twitch muscle contributes to the development of insulin resistance in the obese JCR:LA-cp rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Kelly, Sandra E; Proctor, Spencer D; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Ussher, John R

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether the accumulation of ceramide contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance in the JCR obese rat. What is the main finding and its importance? Our main new finding is that ceramides accumulate only in slow-twitch skeletal muscle in the JCR obese rat and that reducing ceramide content in this muscle type by inhibition of serine palmitoyl transferase-1 halts the progression of insulin resistance in this rat model predisposed to early development of type 2 diabetes. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing insulin signalling/sensitivity and lipid intermediate accumulation in different muscle fibre types. It has been postulated that insulin resistance results from the accumulation of cytosolic lipid metabolites (i.e. diacylglycerol/ceramide) that impede insulin signalling and impair glucose homeostasis. De novo ceramide synthesis is catalysed by serine palmitoyl transferase-1. Our aim was to determine whether de novo ceramide synthesis plays a role during development of insulin resistance in the JCR:LA-cp obese rat. Ten-week-old JCR:LA-cp obese rats were supplemented with either vehicle or the serine palmitoyl transferase-1 inhibitor l-cycloserine (360 mg l(-1) ) in their drinking water for a 2 week period, and glycaemia was assessed by meal tolerance testing. Treatment of JCR:LA-cp obese rats with l-cycloserine improved their plasma glucose and insulin levels during a meal tolerance test. Examination of muscle lipid metabolites and protein phosphorylation patterns revealed differential signatures in slow-twitch (soleus) versus fast-twitch muscle (gastrocnemius), in that ceramide levels were increased in soleus but not gastrocnemius muscles of JCR:LA-cp obese rats. Likewise, improved glycaemia in l-cycloserine-treated JCR:LA-cp obese rats was associated with enhanced Akt and pyruvate dehydrogenase signalling in soleus but not gastrocnemius muscles, probably as a result of l

  5. Differentiation of the intracellular structure of slow- versus fast-twitch muscle fibers through evaluation of the dielectric properties of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, B.; Li, J.; Bragos, R.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    Slow-twitch (type 1) skeletal muscle fibers have markedly greater mitochondrial content than fast-twitch (type 2) fibers. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the dielectric properties of these two fiber types differed, consistent with their distinct intracellular morphologies. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric spectrum of the ex vivo rat soleus (a predominantly type 1 muscle) and the superficial layers of rat gastrocnemius (predominantly type 2) (n = 15) were measured in the 1 kHz-10 MHz frequency range and modeled to a resistivity Cole-Cole function. Major differences were especially apparent in the dielectric spectrum in the 1 to 10 MHz range. Specifically, the gastrocnemius demonstrated a well-defined, higher center frequency than the soleus muscle, whereas the soleus muscle showed a greater difference in the modeled zero and infinite resistivities than the gastrocnemius. These findings are consistent with the fact that soleus tissue has larger and more numerous mitochondria than gastrocnemius. Evaluation of tissue at high frequency could provide a novel approach for assessing intracellular structure in health and disease.

  6. Activation of L-type calcium channel in twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francini, F; Bencini, C; Squecco, R

    1996-07-01

    1. The activation of the L-type calcium current (ICa) was studied in normally polarized (-100 mV) cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog with the double Vaseline-gap voltage-clamp technique. Both external and internal solutions were Ca2+ buffered. Solutions were made in order to minimize all but the Ca2+ current. 2. The voltage-dependent components of the time course of activation were determined by two procedures: fast and slow components were evaluated by multiexponential fitting to current traces elicited by long voltage pulses (5 s) after removing inactivation; fast components were also determined by short voltage pulses having different duration (0.5-70 ms). 3. The components of deactivation were evaluated after removing the charge-movement current from the total tail current by the difference between two short (50 and 70 ms) voltage pulses to 10 mV, moving the same intramembrane charge. Two exponential components, fast and slow (time constants, 6 +/- 0.3 and 90 +/- 7 ms at -100 mV; n = 26), were found. 4. The time onset of ICa was evaluated either by multiexponential fitting to the ICa activation or by pulses of different duration to test the beginning of the 'on' and 'off' inequality. This was at about 2 ms, denoting that it was very early. 5. The time constant vs. voltage plots indicated the presence of four voltage-dependent components in the activation pathway. Various kinetic models are discussed. Models with independent transitions, like a Hodgkin-Huxley scheme, were excluded. Suitable models were a five-state sequential and a four-state cyclic with a branch scheme. The latter gave the best simulation of the data. 6. The steady-state activation curve saturated at high potentials. It had a half-voltage value of 1 +/- 0.2 mV and the opening probability was only 0.82 +/- 0.2 at 20 mV (n = 32). This result implies a larger number of functional calcium channels than was previously supposed and is in agreement with the number of dihydropyridine (DHP

  7. NHE- and diffusion-dependent proton fluxes across the tubular system membranes of fast-twitch muscle fibers of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Cully, Tanya R; Csernoch, Laszlo; Stephenson, D George

    2018-01-02

    The complex membrane structure of the tubular system (t-system) in skeletal muscle fibers is open to the extracellular environment, which prevents measurements of H + movement across its interface with the cytoplasm by conventional methods. Consequently, little is known about the t-system's role in the regulation of cytoplasmic pH, which is different from extracellular pH. Here we describe a novel approach to measure H + -flux measurements across the t-system of fast-twitch fibers under different conditions. The approach involves loading the t-system of intact rat fast-twitch fibers with a strong pH buffer (20 mM HEPES) and pH-sensitive fluorescent probe (10 mM HPTS) before the t-system is sealed off. The pH changes in the t-system are then tracked by confocal microscopy after rapid changes in cytoplasmic ionic conditions. T-system sealing is achieved by removing the sarcolemma by microdissection (mechanical skinning), which causes the tubules to pinch off and seal tight. After this procedure, the t-system repolarizes to physiological levels and can be electrically stimulated when placed in K + -based solutions of cytosolic-like ionic composition. Using this approach, we show that the t-system of fast-twitch skeletal fibers displays amiloride-sensitive Na + /H + exchange (NHE), which decreases markedly at alkaline cytosolic pH and has properties similar to that in mammalian cardiac myocytes. We observed mean values for NHE density and proton permeability coefficient of 339 pmol/m 2 of t-system membrane and 158 µm/s, respectively. We conclude that the cytosolic pH in intact resting muscle can be quantitatively explained with respect to extracellular pH by assuming that these values apply to the t-system membrane and the sarcolemma. © 2018 Launikonis et al.

  8. Fiber-type-specific sensitivities and phenotypic adaptations to dietary fat overload differentially impact fast- versus slow-twitch muscle contractile function in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciapaite, Jolita; van den Berg, Sjoerd A; Houten, Sander M; Nicolay, Klaas; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jeneson, Jeroen A

    2015-02-01

    High-fat diets (HFDs) have been shown to interfere with skeletal muscle energy metabolism and cause peripheral insulin resistance. However, understanding of HFD impact on skeletal muscle primary function, i.e., contractile performance, is limited. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD containing lard (HFL) or palm oil (HFP), or low-fat diet (LFD) for 5weeks. Fast-twitch (FT) extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch (ST) soleus muscles were characterized with respect to contractile function and selected biochemical features. In FT EDL muscle, a 30%-50% increase in fatty acid (FA) content and doubling of long-chain acylcarnitine (C14-C18) content in response to HFL and HFP feeding were accompanied by increase in protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes and acyl-CoA dehydrogenases involved in mitochondrial FA β-oxidation. Peak force of FT EDL twitch and tetanic contractions was unaltered, but the relaxation time (RT) of twitch contractions was 30% slower compared to LFD controls. The latter was caused by accumulation of lipid intermediates rather than changes in the expression levels of proteins involved in calcium handling. In ST soleus muscle, no evidence for lipid overload was found in any HFD group. However, particularly in HFP group, the peak force of twitch and tetanic contractions was reduced, but RT was faster than LFD controls. The latter was associated with a fast-to-slow shift in troponin T isoform expression. Taken together, these data highlight fiber-type-specific sensitivities and phenotypic adaptations to dietary lipid overload that differentially impact fast- versus slow-twitch skeletal muscle contractile function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscle-specific SIRT1 gain-of-function increases slow-twitch fibers and ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkiadaki, Angeliki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nasamu, Armiyaw Sebastian; Knezevic, Jovana; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-07-01

    SIRT1 is a metabolic sensor and regulator in various mammalian tissues and functions to counteract metabolic and age-related diseases. Here we generated and analyzed mice that express SIRT1 at high levels specifically in skeletal muscle. We show that SIRT1 transgenic muscle exhibits a fiber shift from fast-to-slow twitch, increased levels of PGC-1α, markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, and decreased expression of the atrophy gene program. To examine whether increased activity of SIRT1 protects from muscular dystrophy, a muscle degenerative disease, we crossed SIRT1 muscle transgenic mice to mdx mice, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. SIRT1 overexpression in muscle reverses the phenotype of mdx mice, as determined by histology, creatine kinase release into the blood, and endurance in treadmill exercise. In addition, SIRT1 overexpression also results in increased levels of utrophin, a functional analogue of dystrophin, as well as increased expression of PGC-1α targets and neuromuscular junction genes. Based on these findings, we suggest that pharmacological interventions that activate SIRT1 in skeletal muscle might offer a new approach for treating muscle diseases.

  10. Muscle-specific SIRT1 gain-of-function increases slow-twitch fibers and ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Chalkiadaki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 is a metabolic sensor and regulator in various mammalian tissues and functions to counteract metabolic and age-related diseases. Here we generated and analyzed mice that express SIRT1 at high levels specifically in skeletal muscle. We show that SIRT1 transgenic muscle exhibits a fiber shift from fast-to-slow twitch, increased levels of PGC-1α, markers of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, and decreased expression of the atrophy gene program. To examine whether increased activity of SIRT1 protects from muscular dystrophy, a muscle degenerative disease, we crossed SIRT1 muscle transgenic mice to mdx mice, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. SIRT1 overexpression in muscle reverses the phenotype of mdx mice, as determined by histology, creatine kinase release into the blood, and endurance in treadmill exercise. In addition, SIRT1 overexpression also results in increased levels of utrophin, a functional analogue of dystrophin, as well as increased expression of PGC-1α targets and neuromuscular junction genes. Based on these findings, we suggest that pharmacological interventions that activate SIRT1 in skeletal muscle might offer a new approach for treating muscle diseases.

  11. Potentiation of diaphragmatic twitch after voluntary contraction in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Wragg, S.; Hamnegard, C.; Road, J.; Kyroussis, D.; Moran, J.; Green, M.; Moxham, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Skeletal muscle twitch responses may be transiently increased by previous contractions, a phenomenon termed twitch potentiation. The aim of this study was to examine the extent and time course of diaphragmatic twitch potentiation and its relationship to both the magnitude and duration of the preceding voluntary diaphragmatic contraction. METHODS--Twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure (PDI) was measured in six normal subjects, before and after voluntary diaphragm contractions of 100%,...

  12. Mechanisms for increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calorie-restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Bhat, Abhijit D; Sequea, Donel A; Ho, Steve; Croff, Kelsey K; Sajan, Mini P; Farese, Robert V; Cartee, Gregory D

    2011-06-01

    Calorie restriction [CR; ~65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] improves insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. We aimed to elucidate the effects of CR on 1) processes that regulate Akt phosphorylation [insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine phosphorylation, IR substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (IRS-PI3K) activity, and Akt binding to regulatory proteins (heat shock protein 90, Appl1, protein phosphatase 2A)]; 2) Akt substrate of 160-kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on key phosphorylation sites; and 3) atypical PKC (aPKC) activity. Isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from AL or CR (6 mo duration) 9-mo-old male F344BN rats were incubated with 0, 1.2, or 30 nM insulin and 2-deoxy-[(3)H]glucose. Some CR effects were independent of insulin dose or muscle type: CR caused activation of Akt (Thr(308) and Ser(473)) and GU in both muscles at both insulin doses without CR effects on IRS1-PI3K, Akt-PP2A, or Akt-Appl1. Several muscle- and insulin dose-specific CR effects were revealed. Akt-HSP90 binding was increased in the epitrochlearis; AS160 phosphorylation (Ser(588) and Thr(642)) was greater for CR epitrochlearis at 1.2 nM insulin; and IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity were greater for CR in both muscles with 30 nM insulin. On the basis of these data, our working hypothesis for improved insulin-stimulated GU with CR is as follows: 1) elevated Akt phosphorylation is fundamental, regardless of muscle or insulin dose; 2) altered Akt binding to regulatory proteins (HSP90 and unidentified Akt partners) is involved in the effects of CR on Akt phosphorylation; 3) Akt effects on GU depend on muscle- and insulin dose-specific elevation in phosphorylation of Akt substrates, including, but not limited to, AS160; and 4) greater IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity may contribute at higher insulin doses.

  13. Mechanisms for increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calorie-restricted rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B.; Bhat, Abhijit D.; Sequea, Donel A.; Ho, Steve; Croff, Kelsey K.; Sajan, Mini P.; Farese, Robert V.

    2011-01-01

    Calorie restriction [CR; ∼65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] improves insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. We aimed to elucidate the effects of CR on 1) processes that regulate Akt phosphorylation [insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine phosphorylation, IR substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (IRS-PI3K) activity, and Akt binding to regulatory proteins (heat shock protein 90, Appl1, protein phosphatase 2A)]; 2) Akt substrate of 160-kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on key phosphorylation sites; and 3) atypical PKC (aPKC) activity. Isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from AL or CR (6 mo duration) 9-mo-old male F344BN rats were incubated with 0, 1.2, or 30 nM insulin and 2-deoxy-[3H]glucose. Some CR effects were independent of insulin dose or muscle type: CR caused activation of Akt (Thr308 and Ser473) and GU in both muscles at both insulin doses without CR effects on IRS1-PI3K, Akt-PP2A, or Akt-Appl1. Several muscle- and insulin dose-specific CR effects were revealed. Akt-HSP90 binding was increased in the epitrochlearis; AS160 phosphorylation (Ser588 and Thr642) was greater for CR epitrochlearis at 1.2 nM insulin; and IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity were greater for CR in both muscles with 30 nM insulin. On the basis of these data, our working hypothesis for improved insulin-stimulated GU with CR is as follows: 1) elevated Akt phosphorylation is fundamental, regardless of muscle or insulin dose; 2) altered Akt binding to regulatory proteins (HSP90 and unidentified Akt partners) is involved in the effects of CR on Akt phosphorylation; 3) Akt effects on GU depend on muscle- and insulin dose-specific elevation in phosphorylation of Akt substrates, including, but not limited to, AS160; and 4) greater IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity may contribute at higher insulin doses. PMID:21386065

  14. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Thomassen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake (V˙O2) response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the V˙O2 slow component and muscle metabolic...... perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50...... between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW(-1)) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW(-1)) at 6 min of INT (P training with a volume reduction did not increase the content...

  15. Expression of cAMP-responsive element binding proteins (CREBs) in fast- and slow-twitch muscles: a signaling pathway to account for the synaptic expression of collagen-tailed subunit (ColQ) of acetylcholinesterase at the rat neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Roy C Y; Chen, Vicky P; Luk, Wilson K W; Yung, Amanda W Y; Ng, Alice H M; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2013-03-25

    The gene encoding the collagen-tailed subunit (ColQ) of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains two distinct promoters that drive the production of two ColQ mRNAs, ColQ-1 and ColQ-1a, in slow- and fast-twitch muscles, respectively. ColQ-1a is expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in fast-twitch muscle, and this expression depends on trophic factors supplied by motor neurons signaling via a cAMP-dependent pathway in muscle. To further elucidate the molecular basis of ColQ-1a's synaptic expression, here we investigated the expression and localization of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) at the synaptic and extra-synaptic regions of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from adult rats. The total amount of active, phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) present in slow-twitch soleus muscle was higher than that in fast-twitch tibialis muscle, but P-CREB was predominantly expressed in the fast-twitch muscle at NMJs. In contrast, P-CREB was detected in both synaptic and extra-synaptic regions of slow-twitch muscle. These results reveal, for the first time, the differential distribution of P-CREB in fast- and slow-twitch muscles, which might support the crucial role of cAMP-dependent signaling in controlling the synapse-specific expression of ColQ-1a in fast-twitch muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequential effects of GSNO and H2O2 on the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Timothy; Posterino, Giuseppe S

    2009-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO), have been shown to differentially alter the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus of fast-twitch skeletal muscle, leading to the proposal that normal muscle function is controlled by perturbations in the amounts of these two groups of molecules (28). However, no previous studies have examined whether these opposing actions are retained when the contractile apparatus is subjected to both molecule types. Using mechanically skinned fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers of the rat, we compared the effects of sequential addition of nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a NO donor, and H(2)O(2) on the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. As expected from previous reports in fast-twitch fibers, when added separately, GSNO (1 mM) reduced the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, whereas H(2)O(2) (10 mM; added during contractions) increased the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. When added sequentially to the same fiber, such that the oxidation by one molecule (e.g., GSNO) preceded the oxidation by the other (e.g., H(2)O(2)), and vice versa, the individual effects of both molecules on the Ca(2+) sensitivity were retained. Interestingly, neither molecule had any effect on the Ca(2+) sensitivity of slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The data show that H(2)O(2) and GSNO retain the capacity to independently affect the contractile apparatus to modulate force. Furthermore, the absence of effects in slow-twitch muscle may further explain why this fiber type is relatively insensitive to fatigue.

  17. Similar mitochondrial activation kinetics in wild-type and creatine kinase-deficient fast-twitch muscle indicate significant Pi control of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeneson, Jeroen A L; ter Veld, Frank; Schmitz, Joep P J; Meyer, Ronald A; Hilbers, Peter A J; Nicolay, Klaas

    2011-06-01

    Past simulations of oxidative ATP metabolism in skeletal muscle have predicted that elimination of the creatine kinase (CK) reaction should result in dramatically faster oxygen consumption dynamics during transitions in ATP turnover rate. This hypothesis was investigated. Oxygen consumption of fast-twitch (FT) muscle isolated from wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice deficient in the myoplasmic (M) and mitochondrial (Mi) CK isoforms (MiM CK(-/-)) were measured at 20°C at rest and during electrical stimulation. MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption activation kinetics during a step change in contraction rate were 30% faster than WT (time constant 53 ± 3 vs. 69 ± 4 s, respectively; mean ± SE, n = 8 and 6, respectively). MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption deactivation kinetics were 380% faster than WT (time constant 74 ± 4 s vs. 264 ± 4 s, respectively). Next, the experiments were simulated using a computational model of the oxidative ATP metabolic network in FT muscle featuring ADP and Pi feedback control of mitochondrial respiration (J. A. L. Jeneson, J. P. Schmitz, N. A. van den Broek, N. A. van Riel, P. A. Hilbers, K. Nicolay, J. J. Prompers. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 297: E774-E784, 2009) that was reparameterized for 20°C. Elimination of Pi control via clamping of the mitochondrial Pi concentration at 10 mM reproduced past simulation results of dramatically faster kinetics in CK(-/-) muscle, while inclusion of Pi control qualitatively explained the experimental observations. On this basis, it was concluded that previous studies of the CK-deficient FT muscle phenotype underestimated the contribution of Pi to mitochondrial respiratory control.

  18. The effect of taurine depletion on the contractile properties and fatigue in fast-twitch skeletal muscle of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, E J; Berg, H M; Easton, C J; Bakker, A J

    2006-10-01

    Taurine increases force production in skeletal muscle, and taurine levels may fall during exercise. The contractile properties and fatigability of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles depleted of taurine by guanodinoethane sulfonate (GES) treatment were investigated. GES treatment decreased muscle taurine levels to muscles (p muscles compared to controls at stimulation frequencies from 50 to 100 Hz (p muscles exhibited significantly slower rates of fatigue than controls (p effect on force production, indicating that GES may have some minor taurine-like effects. In this study, a fall in taurine levels decreased force output, and increased the endurance of EDL skeletal muscles.

  19. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Epigallocatechin Gallate Reduces Slow-Twitch Muscle Fiber Formation and Mitochondrial Biosynthesis in C2C12 Cells by Repressing AMPK Activity and PGC-1α Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Kelin; Shu, Gang; Wang, Songbo; Gao, Ping; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-08-31

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major active compound in green tea polyphenols. EGCG acts as an antioxidant to prevent the cell damage caused by free radicals and their derivatives. In skeletal muscle, exercise causes the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and promotes the formation of slow-type muscle fiber. To determine whether EGCG, as a ROS scavenger, has any effect on skeletal muscle fiber type, we applied different concentrations (0, 5, 25, and 50 μM) of EGCG in the culture medium of differentiated C2C12 cells for 2 days. The fiber-type composition, mitochondrial biogenesis-related gene expression, antioxidant and glucose metabolism enzyme activity, and ROS levels in C2C12 cells were then detected. According to our results, 5 μM EGCG significantly decreased the cellular activity of SDH, 25 μM EGCG significantly downregulated the MyHC I, PGC-1α, NRF-1, and p-AMPK levels and SDH activity while enhancing the CAT and GSH-Px activity and decreasing the intracellular ROS levels, and 50 μM EGCG significantly downregulated MyHC I, PGC-1α, and NRF-1 expression and HK and SDH activity while increasing LDH activity. Furthermore, 300 μM H2O2 and 0.5 mM AMPK agonist (AICAR) improved the expression of MyHC I, PGC-1α, and p-AMPK, which were all reversed by 25 μM EGCG. In conclusion, the effect of EGCG on C2C12 cells may occur through the reduction of the ROS level, thereby decreasing both AMPK activity and PGC-1α expression and eventually reducing slow-twitch muscle fiber formation and mitochondrial biosynthesis.

  1. Disturbances of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in 24-h electrostimulated fast-twitch skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frías, J A; Cadefau, J A; Prats, C

    2005-01-01

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle over a 24-h period induces a conspicuous loss of isometric tension that is unrelated to muscle energy metabolism (J.A. Cadefau, J. Parra, R. Cusso, G. Heine, D. Pette, Responses of fatigable and fatigue-resistant fibres of rabbit...

  2. From twitch to tetanus for human muscle : experimental data and model predictions for m-triceps surae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zandwijk, JP; Bobbert, MF; Harlaar, J; Hof, AL

    In models describing the excitation of muscle by the central nervous system, it is often assumed that excitation during a tetanic contraction can be obtained by the linear summation of responses to individual stimuli, from which the active state of the muscle is calculated. We investigate here the

  3. Disuse Induced Changes in the Cholinergic System of Sciatic Nerve and Slow and Fast Twitch Muscle of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension was used as a model of disuse in experiments studing the effects of reduced muscle activity on AChE and its molecular forms, choline acetyltransferase and nicotinic receptor binding in innervated slow and fast muscle. The weight of SOL was reduced to 64% within one week and continued to decrease progressively up to the third week when the weight was reduced to 40% as compared to controls. EDL showed a significant decrease in its weight only at the end of three weeks hypokinesia when it was reduced to 71% of control. Biochemical and histochemical findings are summarized. From these data and from morphological findings it is evident that some properties of skeletal muscles are strongly dependent on patterns and level of loadbearing and on motor unit activiy. With suspension-induced disuse, the usually slow SOL appeared to change its characteristics such as fiber type distribution and AChE activity to one that more resembled a faster muscle. It is important to note that hypokinesia induced changes either physiological, biochemical or morphological, are totally reversible as the induced changes returned to control levels within a week after cessation of disuse.

  4. Voluntary activation of trapezius measured with twitch interpolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Janet L; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of measuring voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle with twitch interpolation. Subjects (n=8) lifted the right shoulder or both shoulders against fixed force transducers. Stimulation of the accessory nerve in the neck was used to evoke maximal twitche...

  5. Use and disuse and the control of acetylcholinesterase activity in fast and slow twitch muscle of rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Groswald, D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in neuromuscular transmission is relatively well established, little is known, however, of the mechanisms that regulate its synthesis and control its specific distribution in fast and slow muscle. Innervation plays an important role in the regulation of AChE and elimination of the influence of the nerve by surgical denervation results in a loss of AChE. The influences of the nerve and how they are mediated was investigated. It is suggested that muscle usage and other factors such as materials carried by axonal transport may participate in the regulation of this enzyme. The mechanisms that regulate AChE and its molecular forms in two functionally different forms are studied.

  6. Actions of lyotropic anions on the mechanical properties of fast and slow twitch rat muscles at different temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wondmikun, Y.; Soukup, Tomáš; Asmussen, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2003), s. 123-129 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) -; Schwerpunkt Muskelforschung(DE) As 74/1-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : slow and fast muscles * contractile properties * lyotropic anions Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  7. Twitch interpolation: superimposed twitches decline progressively during a tetanic contraction of human adductor pollicis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandevia, S C; McNeil, C J; Carroll, T J; Taylor, J L

    2013-03-01

    The assessment of voluntary activation of human muscles usually depends on measurement of the size of the twitch produced by an interpolated nerve or cortical stimulus. In many forms of fatiguing exercise the superimposed twitch increases and thus voluntary activation appears to decline. This is termed 'central' fatigue. Recent studies on isolated mouse muscle suggest that a peripheral mechanism related to intracellular calcium sensitivity increases interpolated twitches. To test whether this problem developed with human voluntary contractions we delivered maximal tetanic stimulation to the ulnar nerve (≥60 s at physiological motoneuronal frequencies, 30 and 15 Hz). During the tetani (at 30 Hz) in which the force declined by 42%, the absolute size of the twitches evoked by interpolated stimuli (delivered regularly or only in the last second of the tetanus) diminished progressively to less than 1%. With stimulation at 30 Hz, there was also a marked reduction in size and area of the interpolated compound muscle action potential (M wave). With a 15 Hz tetanus, a progressive decline in the interpolated twitch force also occurred (to ∼10%) but did so before the area of the interpolated M wave diminished. These results indicate that the increase in interpolated twitch size predicted from the mouse studies does not occur. Diminution in superimposed twitches occurred whether or not the M wave indicated marked impairment at sarcolemmal/t-tubular levels. Consequently, the increase in superimposed twitch, which is used to denote central fatigue in human fatiguing exercise, is likely to reflect low volitional drive to high-threshold motor units, which stop firing or are discharging at low frequencies.

  8. Effect of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum function and force in skinned fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Anthony J; Berg, Helen M

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effect of taurine on depolarisation-induced force responses and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the rat. Taurine (20 mM) produced a small but significant (P Taurine had no statistically significant effect on the slope of the force-pCa curve. Depolarisation-induced force responses in the skinned fibres were markedly increased in peak value by 20 mM taurine, to 120.8 +/- 5.3 % of control measurements (P = 0.0006, n = 27). Taurine (20 mM) significantly increased the SR Ca(2+) accumulation in the skinned fibres by 34.6 +/- 9.3 % compared to control conditions (measured by comparing the integral of caffeine contractures in fibres previously loaded with Ca(2+) in the absence or presence of taurine; P = 0.0014, n = 10). Taurine (20 mM) also increased both the peak and rate of rise of caffeine-induced force responses in the fibres by 29.2 +/- 9.7 % (P = 0.0298, n = 6) and 27.6 +/- 8.9 % (P = 0.037), respectively, compared with controls. This study shows that taurine is a modulator of contractile function in mammalian skeletal muscle. Taurine may increase the size of depolarisation-induced force responses by augmenting SR Ca(2+) accumulation and release.

  9. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  10. A Temporally Controlled Inhibitory Drive Coordinates Twitch Movements during REM Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Patricia L; Peever, John

    2016-05-09

    During REM sleep, skeletal muscles are paralyzed in one moment but twitch and jerk in the next. REM sleep twitches are traditionally considered random motor events that result from momentary lapses in REM sleep paralysis [1-3]. However, recent evidence indicates that twitches are not byproducts of REM sleep, but are in fact self-generated events that could function to promote motor learning and development [4-6]. If REM twitches are indeed purposefully generated, then they should be controlled by a coordinated and definable mechanism. Here, we used behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and neuroanatomical methods to demonstrate that an inhibitory drive onto skeletal motoneurons produces a temporally coordinated pattern of muscle twitches during REM sleep. First, we show that muscle twitches in adult rats are not uniformly distributed during REM sleep, but instead follow a well-defined temporal trajectory. They are largely absent during REM initiation but increase steadily thereafter, peaking toward REM termination. Next, we identify the transmitter mechanism that controls the temporal nature of twitch activity. Specifically, we show that a GABA and glycine drive onto motoneurons prevents twitch activity during REM initiation, but progressive weakening of this drive functions to promote twitch activity during REM termination. These results demonstrate that REM twitches are not random byproducts of REM sleep, but are instead rather coherently generated events controlled by a temporally variable inhibitory drive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models of muscle relaxants using potentiation modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, DJ; Proost, JH; De Haes, A; Wierda, JMKH

    Repeated motor nerve stimulation performed during neuromuscular monitoring enhances the evoked mechanical response of the corresponding muscle resulting in an increased twitch response. This is known as twitch potentiation or the staircase phenomenon. For neuromuscular modelling research twitch

  12. Development of twitching in sleeping infant mice depends on sensory experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Mark S.; Coleman, Cassandra M.; Sokoloff, Greta; Weiner, Joshua A.; Fritszch, Bernd; McMurray, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myoclonic twitches are jerky movements that occur exclusively and abundantly during active (or REM) sleep in mammals, especially in early development [1–4]. In rat pups, limb twitches exhibit a complex spatiotemporal structure that changes across early development [5]. However, it is not known whether this developmental change is influenced by sensory experience, which is a prerequisite to the notion that sensory feedback from twitches not only activates sensorimotor circuits, but modifies them [4]. Here we investigated the contributions of proprioception to twitching in newborn ErbB2 conditional knockout mice that lack muscle spindles and grow up to exhibit dysfunctional proprioception [6–8]. High-speed videography of forelimb twitches unexpectedly revealed a category of reflex-like twitching—comprising an agonist twitch followed immediately by an antagonist twitch—that developed postnatally in wild types/heterozygotes but not in knockouts. Contrary to evidence from adults that spinal reflexes are inhibited during twitching [9–11], this finding suggests that twitches trigger the monosynaptic stretch reflex and, by doing so, contribute to its activity-dependent development [12–14]. Next, we assessed developmental changes in the frequency and organization (i.e., entropy) of more complex, multi-joint patterns of twitching; again, wild types/heterozygotes exhibited developmental changes in twitch patterning that were not seen in knockouts. Thus, targeted deletion of a peripheral sensor alters the normal development of local and global features of twitching, demonstrating that twitching is shaped by sensory experience. These results also highlight the potential use of twitching as a uniquely informative diagnostic tool for assessing the functional status of spinal and supraspinal circuits. PMID:25702578

  13. Fast-twitch skeletal muscle fiber adaptation to SERCA1 deficiency in a Dutch Improved Red and White calf pseudomyotonia case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorotea, Tiziano; Grünberg, Walter; Murgiano, Leonardo; Plattet, Philippe; Drögemüller, Cord; Mascarello, Francesco; Sacchetto, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    Missense mutations in ATP2A1 gene, encoding SERCA1 protein, cause a muscle disorder designed as congenital pseudomyotonia (PMT) in Chianina and Romagnola cattle or congenital muscular dystonia1 (CMD1) in Belgian Blue cattle. Although PMT is not life-threatening, CMD1 affected calves usually die within a few weeks of age as a result of respiratory complication. We have recently described a muscular disorder in a double muscle Dutch Improved Red and White cross-breed calf. Mutation analysis revealed an ATP2A1 mutation identical to that described in CMD1, even though clinical phenotype was quite similar to that of PMT. Here, we provide evidence for a deficiency of mutated SERCA1 in PMT affected muscles of Dutch Improved Red and White calf, but not of its mRNA. The reduced expression of SERCA1 is selective and not compensated by the SERCA2 isoform. By contrast, pathological muscles are characterized by a broad distribution of mitochondrial markers in all fiber types, not related to intrinsic features of double muscle phenotype and by an increased expression of sarcolemmal calcium extrusion pump. Calcium removal mechanisms, operating in muscle fibers as compensatory response aimed at lowering excessive cytoplasmic calcium concentration caused by SERCA1 deficiency, could explain the difference in severity of clinical signs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  15. Response of mef2 Gene of Slow and Fast Twitch Muscles of Wistar Male Rats to One Bout of Resistance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fathi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (mef2 gene relates with multiple myogenic transcriptional factors that induces activation Muscle-specific genes. MEF2 contributes in muscular cells development and differentiation as well as in fibers transition in response to stimulants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of one bout of resistance exercise (RE on mef2 gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscles of Wistar male rats. Methods: For this experimental study, 15 rats from Pasteur Institute were prepared and housed under natural conditions (temperature, light/dark (12:12 cycle, with ad libitum access to food and water and then randomly divided assigned to RE (n=10 and control groups (n=5; the RE group performed one RE session. 3 and 6 hours following, the rats were anaesthetized and sacrificed, then the soleus and Extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were removed. determine mef2 gene expression rate, the Quantitative Real time RT-PCR was used. Data were analyzed by one sample and independent samples t test. Results: In EDL muscle, in response to one RE session, the mef2 gene expression increased non significantly at 3 hour (p=0/093 and increased significantly (p=/008 at 6 hour after exercise, but in soleus muscle, the mef2 gene expression decreased significantly at 3 hour (p=0/01, and at 6 hour after RE session there was no observed significant change (p=0.247. Conclusion: Mef2 expression gene is differently changes in muscle fibers, which are likely associated with changes in fiber type in response to resistance exercise.

  16. Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. General Practitioners and Involuntary Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Britta; Lomborg, Kirsten; Engberg, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Background: In many countries, medical authorities are responsible for involuntary admissions of mentally ill patients. Nonetheless, very little is known about GPs' experiences with involuntary admission. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore GP's experiences from participating in invo...... by the psychiatric system. Conclusion: The unpleasant experiences and induced feelings resulting from involuntary admissions reflect an undesirable and stressful working environment.......Background: In many countries, medical authorities are responsible for involuntary admissions of mentally ill patients. Nonetheless, very little is known about GPs' experiences with involuntary admission. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore GP's experiences from participating...... in involuntary admissions. Setting: General practice, Aarhus, Denmark. Method: One focus group interview and six individual interviews were conducted with 13 Danish GPs, who had recently sectioned one of their own patients. Results: GPs experienced stress and found the admission procedure time consuming...

  18. Involuntary memories and restrained eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christopher T

    2015-05-01

    Most involuntary memories are elicited by external cues (e.g., smells, sounds) that have unique associations with specific memories (Berntsen's cue-retrieval hypothesis), but involuntary memories can sometimes be elicited by weak, even imperceptible, cues that raise the activation level of an already primed memory (Berntsen's motivation-priming hypothesis) to also reach conscious awareness during times of low attentional focus. The current study examined the effects of a motivation bias (restrained eating) on the involuntary memories recorded in daily diaries for seven days by 56 female participants. A large proportion of the involuntary memories were elicited by food-related cues and occurred in food-related contexts. A significant correlation was found between the participants' scores on a restrained eating scale and the percentage of involuntary memories involving cooking and eating content. These results parallel previous research involving voluntary memory retrievals during restrained eating. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Twitch mechanical properties after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Andrzejewska, Renata; Jaskólski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if the protective adaptation after eccentric exercise affects changes of twitch contractile properties of the biceps brachii muscle. Maximal isometric torque (MVC), twitch contractile properties, muscle soreness, and relaxed elbow angle (RANG) assessments were measured in 12 untrained, right-handed male volunteers (age, 23 ± 2 years; height, 182 ± 5 cm; mass, 75 ± 7 kg) before, immediately after, 48 h, and 120 h following each bout of eccentric exercise that consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to 75% of each individual's maximal isometric torque of the right elbow flexors. MVC, peak twitch torque, maximal rate of twitch torque development, maximal rate of relaxation, muscle soreness, and RANG changes were significantly attenuated after the second bout of eccentric exercise when compared with the first bout. In contrast, time to twitch peak torque and half relaxation time did not change significantly after both the first and the second bout. The findings indicate that the mechanisms responsible for rapid adaptation affect some twitch mechanical properties such as peak torque, maximal rate of torque development, and maximal rate of relaxation but not time to peak torque and half relaxation time.

  20. Effect of body posture on involuntary swallow in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Shogo; Takeishi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Ito, Kayoko; Tsukada, Tetsu; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Clinically, reclining posture has been reported to reduce risk of aspiration. However, during involuntary swallow in reclining posture, changes in orofacial and pharyngeal movement before and during pharyngeal swallow should be considered. Further, the mechanisms underlying the effect of body posture on involuntary swallow remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of body posture on activity patterns of the suprahyoid muscles and on patterns of bolus transport during a natural involuntary swallow. Thirteen healthy male adults participated in a water infusion test and a chewing test. In the water infusion test, thickened water was delivered into the pharynx at a very slow rate until the first involuntary swallow was evoked. In the chewing test, subjects were asked to eat 10 g of gruel rice. In both tests, the recording was performed at four body postures between upright and supine positions. Results showed that reclining changed the location of the bolus head at the start of swallow and prolonged onset latency of the swallowing initiation. Muscle burst duration and whiteout time measured by videoendoscopy significantly increased with body reclining and prolongation of the falling time. In the chewing test, reclining changed the location of the bolus head at the start of swallow, and the frequency of bolus residue after the first swallow increased. Duration and area of EMG burst and whiteout time significantly increased with body reclining. These data suggest that body reclining may result in prolongation of pharyngeal swallow during involuntary swallow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TWITCH PARAMETERS IN TRANSVERSAL AND LONGITUDINAL BICEPS BRACHII RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Šimunič

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the contractile properties of skeletal muscles is continuing to be an important issue and a difficult task methodologically. Longitudinal direction of skeletal muscle contraction blurs intrinsic muscle belly contractile properties with many factors. This study evaluates and explains contractile properties such as: delay time (Td, contraction time (Tc, half relaxation time (Tr and maximal amplitude (Dm extracted from twitch transversal response and compare them with torque response. In fifteen healthy males (age 23.7 ± 3.4 years isometric twitch transversal and torque responses were simultaneously recorded during graded electrically elicited contractions in the biceps brachii muscle. The amplitude of electrical stimulation was increased in 5 mA steps from a threshold up to a maximal response. The muscles’ belly transversal response was measured by a high precision mechanical displacement sensor while elbow joint torque was calculated from force readings. Results indicate a parabolic relation between the transversal displacement and the torque Dm. A significantly shorter Tc was found in transversal response without being correlated to torque Tc (r = -0.12; > 0.05. A significant correlation was found between torque Tc and the time occurrence of the second peak in the transversal response (r = 0.83; < 0.001. Electrical stimulation amplitude dependant variation of the Tc was notably different in transversal than in torque response. Td was similar at submaximal and maximal responses but larger in transversal at just above threshold contractions. Tr has a similar linear trend in both responses, however, the magnitude and the slope are much larger in the transversal response. We could conclude that different mechanisms affect longitudinal and transversal twitch skeletal muscle deformations. Contractile properties extracted from the transversal response enable alternative insights into skeletal muscle contraction mechanics.

  2. Nitrate supplementation enhances the contractile properties of human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Georg; Folland, Jonathan P

    2014-12-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation positively affects cardiovascular function at rest and energy metabolism during exercise in humans and has recently also been reported to markedly enhance the in vitro contractile properties of mouse fast-twitch muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term nitrate supplementation on the in vivo contractile properties of the skeletal muscle and voluntary muscle function of humans. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 19 healthy untrained men (21 ± 3 yr) ingested a nitrate-rich concentrated beetroot juice (NIT; nitrate dosage, approximately 9.7 mmol·d) and a placebo (PLA) for seven consecutive days. After the last supplementation dose, force was recorded while participants completed a series of voluntary and involuntary (electrically evoked) unilateral isometric contractions of the knee extensors. NIT enhanced the peak force response to low-frequency electrical stimulation, as follows: maximal twitch (NIT, 149 ± 41 N, vs PLA, 138 ± 37 N; P = 0.008; effect size, r (ES) = 0.56) and submaximal 1- to 20-Hz contractions (5%-10%, ES = 0.53-0.63). Whereas explosive (rising phase) force production during the first 50 ms of evoked maximal twitch and octet contractions (eight electrical impulses at 300 Hz) was also 3%-15% greater after NIT compared with that after PLA (P = 0.023-0.048, ES = 0.52-0.59), explosive voluntary force remained similar (P = 0.510, ES = 0.16). Maximum voluntary force was also unchanged after NIT (P = 0.539, ES = 0.15). These results indicate that 7 d of dietary nitrate supplementation enhanced the in vivo contractile properties of the human skeletal muscle. Specifically, nitrate supplementation improved excitation-contraction coupling at low frequencies of stimulation and enhanced evoked explosive force production but did not affect maximum or explosive voluntary force production in untrained individuals.

  3. The Click and Twitch in Contemporary Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Bernard

    It is the creative writing instructor's role to help the student turn "twitch" poems into "click" poems ("twitch" being a kind of verbal hypertension that takes shape in the absence of anything humanly important to say on the poet's part and "click" being the finished poem that makes a sound like the click of the lid on a perfectly made box).…

  4. Nicotine-Induced Modulation of the Cholinergic Twitch Response in the Ileum of Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the direct drug effects of nicotine and its effects on the cholinergic twitch responses of the electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strip from the ileum of guinea pig were investigated. Nicotine dose-dependently (0.3-10 µmol/l) evoked the well-known contractile responses on its own. Whereas the interposed twitch responses remained present without a change in height at 1 µmol/l nicotine, a nicotine concentration of 3 µmol/l slightly and a concentration of 10 µmol/l markedly diminished the twitch during their presence. After the washout of 1-10 µmol/l nicotine, the height of the twitch response was also temporarily and significantly reduced by 30-77%. The P2X purinoceptor agonist αβ-methylene ATP (1-10 µmol/l) dose-dependently induced contractions on its own and reduced the twitch response during its presence in the organ bath; however, it did not diminish the twitch responses after washout of the drug as nicotine did. The P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulphonic acid, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 and the inhibitor of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels apamin reduced the contractile effect of 1 µmol/l nicotine. Apamin also significantly prevented the 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' following the washout of 1-3 µmol/l nicotine. As a conclusion, we provide evidence for a functional interaction between nicotinic receptors and the P2X receptors in the ileum of the guinea pig. The 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' is not due to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization or transmitter depletion, but most probably the secondary effects of nicotine on SK channels determine the reduced cholinergic motor neuron excitability. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Fatigue accumulation and twitch potentiation during complex MVC-relative profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Michael W; Potvin, Jim R

    2015-08-01

    Fatigue accumulation can be significantly influenced by post-activation potentiation (PAP). This phenomenon leads to increased force generating capacity after a series of conditioning efforts. The purpose of our study was to examine how the order of force demands impacted muscle fatigue accumulation, and how fatigue was affected by potentiation. We had 33 participants complete one of four different force orders, consisting of 5 cycles of 12-s submaximal isometric "task plateaus". Every order consisted of 8 force plateaus of the different intensity, arranged in a different ways. A subset of 18 participants then received a stimulated muscle twitch, and all participants performed a brief MVC. Each task plateau was followed by a 12s long 10% MVC "reference plateau" also followed by twitch and MVC. Overall, the order of the force presentation only had an impact on fatigue levels and twitch potentiation during the first cycle. Maximum voluntary forces decreased, and twitch forces increased, at different rates between orders during the first cycle. At the end of each cycle, there was no difference between any of the orders in terms of twitch potentiation or decrease in MVC force. In a task that features identical force patterns, arranged in different orders, the order did not affect the final fatigue accumulation or potentiation level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Mechanisms of Involuntary Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzmetal, William; Ha, Ruby; Khani, Aniss

    2010-01-01

    We tested 3 mechanisms of involuntary attention: (1) a perceptual enhancement mechanism, (2) a response-decision mechanism, and (3) a serial-search mechanism. Experiment 1 used a response deadline technique to compare the perceptual enhancement and the decision mechanisms and found evidence consistent with the decision mechanism. Experiment 2 used…

  7. Potentiation increases peak twitch torque by enhancing rates of torque development and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando Gabe; Jensen, Jørgen; Noakes, Timothy David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which potentiation changes in response to an isometric maximal voluntary contraction. Eleven physically active subjects participated in two separate studies. Single stimulus of electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure torque at rest in unpotentiated quadriceps muscles (study 1 and 2), and potentiated quadriceps muscles torque in a 10 min period after a 5 s isometric maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps muscles (study 1). Additionally, potentiated quadriceps muscles torque was measured every min after a further 10 maximal voluntary contractions repeated every min (study 2). Electrical stimulation repeated several times without previous maximal voluntary contraction showed similar peak twitch torque. Peak twitch torque 4 s after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction increased by 45±13% (study 1) and by 56±10% (study 2), the rate of torque development by 53±13% and 82±29%, and the rate of relaxation by 50±17% and 59±22%, respectively, but potentiation was lost already two min after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction. There was a tendency for peak twitch torque to increase for the first five repeated maximal voluntary contractions, suggesting increased potentiation with additional maximal voluntary contractions. Correlations for peak twitch torque vs the rate of torque development and for the rate of relaxation were r(2)= 0.94 and r(2)=0.97. The correlation between peak twitch torque, the rate of torque development and the rate of relaxation suggests that potentiation is due to instantaneous changes in skeletal muscle contractility and relaxation.

  8. Involuntary transfer of Intellectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed habiba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available IPR owners have a right about voluntary transfer but sometimes Intellectual property right transfer by force and thus, there are challenge that this article regard for its. IPR shall be devolved to their legitimate heirs after their death unless, owner indicate otherwise in their wills. The heirs have the exclusive right to exercise economic and moral rights, they decide upon publication of the work and in general do every exploitation. But, they shall exercise The decisive manner that IPR of holder intended before his death. On other hand, IPR may be liable to seizure or IPR have been used in mortgage loan. Thus they can be transfer to new person.Here, we regard to Involuntary transfer.This article highlight subject of involuntary transfer and analysis on aspects

  9. Insiders, Outsiders, and Involuntary Unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Daniel L.; Sethi, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual harassment is perceived to be a major impediment to female labor force participation. We use the random assignment of U.S. federal judges setting geographically-local precedent, and the fact that judges’ biographies predict decisions in sexual harassment cases, to document the causal impact of forbidding sexual harassment. Consistent with an insider-outsider theory of involuntary unemployment, but in contrast to a mandated benefits theory of employment protections, pro-plaintiff sexual...

  10. Myomaker is required for the fusion of fast-twitch myocytes in the zebrafish embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weibin; Roy, Sudipto

    2017-03-01

    During skeletal muscle development, myocytes aggregate and fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers. Inhibition of myocyte fusion is thought to significantly derail the differentiation of functional muscle fibers. Despite the purported importance of fusion in myogenesis, in vivo studies of this process in vertebrates are rather limited. Myomaker, a multipass transmembrane protein, has been shown to be the first muscle-specific fusion protein essential for myocyte fusion in the mouse. We have generated loss-of-function alleles in zebrafish myomaker, and found that fusion of myocytes into syncytial fast-twitch muscles was significantly compromised. However, mutant myocytes could be recruited to fuse with wild-type myocytes in chimeric embryos, albeit rather inefficiently. Conversely, overexpression of Myomaker was sufficient to induce hyperfusion among fast-twitch myocytes, and it also induced fusion among slow-twitch myocytes that are normally fusion-incompetent. In line with this, Myomaker overexpression also triggered fusion in another myocyte fusion mutant compromised in the function of the junctional cell adhesion molecule, Jam2a. We also provide evidence that Rac, a regulator of actin cytoskeleton, requires Myomaker activity to induce fusion, and that an approximately 3kb of myomaker promoter sequence, with multiple E-box motifs, is sufficient to direct expression within the fast-twitch muscle lineage. Taken together, our findings underscore a conserved role for Myomaker in vertebrate myocyte fusion. Strikingly, and in contrast to the mouse, homozygous myomaker mutants are viable and do not exhibit discernible locomotory defects. Thus, in the zebrafish, myocyte fusion is not an absolute requirement for skeletal muscle morphogenesis and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Myofilament kinetics in isometric twitch dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K B; Razumova, M V; Kirkpatrick, R D; Slinker, B K

    2001-05-01

    To better understand the relationship between kinetic processes of contraction and the dynamic features of an isometric twitch, studies were conducted using a mathematical model that included: (1) kinetics of cross bridge (XB) cycling; (2) kinetics of thin filament regulatory processes; (3) serial and feedback interactions between these two kinetic processes; and (4) time course of calcium activation. Isometric twitch wave forms were predicted, morphometric features of the predicted twitch wave form were evaluated, and sensitivities of wave form morphometric features to model kinetic parameters were assessed. Initially, the impulse response of the XB cycle alone was analyzed with the findings that dynamic constants of the twitch transient were much faster than turnover number of steady-state XB cycling, and, although speed and duration of the twitch wave form were sensitive to XB cycle kinetic constants. parameters of wave shape were not. When thin filament regulatory unit (RU) kinetics were added to XB cycle kinetics, the system impulse response was slowed with only little effect on wave shape. When cooperative neighbor interactions between RU and XB were added, twitch wave shape (as well as amplitude, speed and duration) proved to be sensitive to variation in cooperativity. Importantly, persistence and shape of the falling phase could be strongly modified. When kinetic coefficients of XB attachment were made to depend on sarcomere length, changes in wave shape occurred that did not occur when only sliding filament mechanisms were operative. Indeed, the force-length relationship proved to be highly sensitive to length-dependent XB attachment in combination with cooperative interactions. These model findings are the basis of hypotheses for the role of specific kinetic events of contraction in generating twitch wave form features.

  12. Fiber-type-specific sensitivities and phenotypic adaptations to dietary fat overload differentially impact fast- versus slow-twitch muscle contractile function in C57BL/6J mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciapaite, Jolita; van den Berg, Sjoerd A.; Houten, Sander M.; Nicolay, Klaas; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jeneson, Jeroen A.

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diets (HFDs) have been shown to interfere with skeletal muscle energy metabolism and cause peripheral insulin resistance. However, understanding of HFD impact on skeletal muscle primary function, i.e., contractile performance, is limited. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD containing lard

  13. Fiber-type-specific sensitivities and phenotypic adaptations to dietary fat overload differentially impact fast- versus slow-twitch muscle contractile function in C57BL/6J mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciapaite, Jolita; van den Berg, Sjoerd A.; Houten, Sander M.; Nicolay, Klaas; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jeneson, Jeroen

    High-fat diets (HFDs) have been shown to interfere with skeletal muscle energy metabolism and cause peripheral insulin resistance. However, understanding of HFD impact on skeletal muscle primary function, i.e., contractile performance, is limited. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD containing lard

  14. Special involuntary conversion situations involving timberland

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Siegal

    2001-01-01

    If standing timber is destroyed or stolen, or if forest land is condemned for public use, the owner may be entitled to take a deduction on his or her income tax return. These types of losses are called involuntary conversions. In previous National Woodlands articles I've discussed in detail casualty losses, which represent the major type of timber involuntary...

  15. 29 CFR 785.28 - Involuntary attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Involuntary attendance. 785.28 Section 785.28 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.28 Involuntary attendance. Attendance is not voluntary, of...

  16. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment of the Mentally Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Ruta J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the issue of involuntary outpatient commitment, and its implications for social workers working in the health system. Describes a nationwide movement to establish a new system of involuntary outpatient commitment to address the failure of deinstitutionalization, mandating mental health treatment in the community for persons ineligible for…

  17. Gender, personality, and involuntary autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Chris R; Soni, Mira

    2011-08-01

    We utilised the recently developed continuous word association task (CWAT) to investigate whether attributes of involuntary autobiographical memory, including gender and cue valence effects, were similar to those found for voluntary autobiographical memory, as well as investigating the role of individual differences in memory production. A total of 80 undergraduate volunteers reported involuntary memories that came to mind during the word association task and completed measures of trait dissociation and psychosis-proneness. Involuntary memories showed similar cue valence effects to those typically found with voluntary memories but the usual gender effect was only apparent once participants learned the task involved autobiographical memory. The total number of involuntary autobiographical memories produced in response to negative cue words was related to greater trait dissociation and psychosis-proneness. The implications for differences between voluntary and involuntary autobiographical memory are discussed.

  18. Involuntary admission: the case of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzenis, Athanasios; Michopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Involuntary treatment of psychiatric disorders has always been controversial; this is especially true for eating disorders. Patients with anorexia nervosa of life threatening severity frequently refuse psychiatric hospitalization. Ambivalence toward treatment is characteristic of eating disorders and patients are often admitted to inpatient programs under pressure from family and doctors. In this article, we report research on the positive or negative impact of involuntary admission in the treatment of eating disorders, its application and effectiveness as well as the adverse consequences of coercive treatment in eating disorders. A literature review was done. From a total of 134 publications which were retrieved from the literature search, 50 studies were directly relevant to the scope of this review and fulfilled all inclusion criteria. There are trends and arguments for both sides; for and against involuntary treatment in anorexia nervosa. The scientific literature so far is inconclusive, although in the short term, involuntary hospitalization has benefits. This review has also shown that involuntary hospitalization can have adverse long-term consequences for the patient-therapist allegiance. We conclude that in some cases, involuntary treatment can save lives of young patients with anorexia nervosa; however, in other cases, it can break the psychotherapeutic relationship and make the patient abandon treatment. It is the clinician who has to decide for whom and when to approve involuntary treatment or not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The sag response in human muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian C; Ali, Jahaan; Power, Geoffrey A; Herzog, Walter

    2018-03-08

    We examined how muscle length and time between stimuli (inter-pulse interval, IPI) influence declines in force (sag) seen during unfused tetani in the human adductor pollicis muscle. A series of 16-pulse contractions were evoked with IPIs between 1 × and 5 × the twitch time to peak tension (TPT) at large (long muscle length) and small (short muscle length) thumb adduction angles. Unfused tetani were mathematically deconstructed into a series of overlapping twitch contractions to examine why sag exhibits length- and IPI-dependencies. Across all IPIs tested, sag was 62% greater at short than long muscle length, and sag increased as IPI was increased at both muscle lengths. Force attributable to the second stimulus increased as IPI was decreased. Twitch force declined from maximal values across all IPI tested, with the greatest reductions seen at short muscle length and long IPI. At IPI below 2 × TPT, the twitch with highest force occurred earlier than the peak force of the corresponding unfused tetani. Contraction-induced declines in twitch duration (TPT + half relaxation time) were only observed at IPI longer than 1.75 × TPT, and were unaffected by muscle length. Sag is an intrinsic feature of healthy human adductor pollicis muscle. The length-dependence of sag is related to greater diminution of twitch force at short relative to long muscle length. The dependence of sag on IPI is related to IPI-dependent changes in twitch duration and twitch force, and the timing of peak twitch force relative to the peak force of the associated unfused tetanus.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include involuntary muscle twitches (myoclonus), liver disease, depression, migraine headaches, or ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  1. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  2. Priming involuntary autobiographical memories in the lab

    OpenAIRE

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Niedźwieńska, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs) are recollections of personal past that frequently and spontaneously occur in daily life. Initial studies by Mace. Priming involuntary autobiographical memories. Showed that deliberately reminiscing about a certain lifetime period (e.g., high school) significantly increased the number of different IAMs from the same period in subsequent days, suggesting that priming may play a significant role in the retrieval of IAMs in everyday life. In the prese...

  3. Denervation of rabbit gastrocnemius and soleus muscles: effect on muscle-specific enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, M; Merkulova, T; Keller, A; Janmot, C; Lompré, A M; D'Albis, A; Lucas, M

    1999-07-01

    We report here, for the first time, the expression of the muscle-specific isoform of the glycolytic enzyme, enolase (EC 4.2.1. 11) (beta enolase), in rabbit skeletal muscles. We have analysed the fast-twitch gastrocnemius and the slow-twitch soleus muscles during normal postnatal development and following denervation. We show that, in rabbit, as already described in rodents, beta enolase gene expression behaves as a good marker of the fast-twitch fibers. In soleus muscle, the beta enolase transcript level is 10-20% of that found in gastrocnemius. Denervation, performed at 8 postnatal days, induces an important drop of beta enolase transcript levels in both developing soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, with a 80% decrease observed 1 week after denervation in the operated muscles, as compared to the corresponding contralateral muscles. Thereafter, the beta enolase transcript level continues to decrease in the fast-twitch muscle, with the beta enolase subunit being detectable only in the atrophic fast-twitch fibers. In contrast, the beta transcript level tends to increase in the denervated slow-twitch muscle, reaching about 50% of that in contralateral soleus, at 7 weeks after surgery. The level of beta enolase transcripts still expressed after denervation seems to stabilize at the same low level in both types of inactive muscles. This suggests that the small fraction of beta enolase expression which is not controlled by the nerve, or by the contractile activity imposed by it, is independent of the muscle phenotype.

  4. Sensorimotor organization of a sustained involuntary movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Alexander De Havas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary movements share much of the motor control circuitry used for voluntary movement, yet the two can be easily distinguished. The Kohnstamm phenomenon (where a sustained, hard push produces subsequent involuntary arm raising is a useful experimental model for exploring differences between voluntary and involuntary movement. Both central and peripheral accounts have been proposed, but little is known regarding how the putative Kohnstamm generator responds to afferent input. We addressed this by obstructing the involuntary upward movement of the arm. Obstruction prevented the rising EMG pattern that characterizes the Kohnstamm. Importantly, once the obstruction was removed, the EMG signal resumed its former increase, suggesting a generator that persists despite peripheral input. When only one arm was obstructed during bilateral involuntary movements, only the EMG signal from the obstructed arm showed the effect. Upon release of the obstacle, the obstructed arm reached the same position and EMG level as the unobstructed arm. Comparison to matched voluntary movements revealed a preserved stretch response when a Kohnstamm movement first contacts an obstacle, and also an overestimation of the perceived contact force. Our findings support a hybrid central and peripheral account of the Kohnstamm phenomenon. The strange subjective experience of this involuntary movement is consistent with the view that movement awareness depends strongly on efference copies, but that the Kohnstamm generator does not produces efference copies.

  5. Magnetic versus electrical stimulation in the interpolation twitch technique of elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulou, Sofia I; Nowicky, Alexander V; Marston, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB) in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT). 14 healthy participants (31±7 years) participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum) at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG) from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB) and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB) were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA) of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N) and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N) stimulation (p > 0.05), and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95%) and magnetic (93%) stimulation (p > 0. 05). No differences (p >0.05) were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms) and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms) stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05) but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05). The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising new application of peripheral magnetic stimulation as an alternative to the

  6. MAGNETIC VERSUS ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IN THE INTERPOLATION TWITCH TECHNIQUE OF ELBOW FLEXORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia I. Lampropoulou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT. 14 healthy participants (31±7 years participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N stimulation (p > 0.05, and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95% and magnetic (93% stimulation (p > 0. 05. No differences (p >0.05 were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05 but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p < 0.05. The twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p < 0.05. Reduction of the inter-electrodes distance reduced the twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05. The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising

  7. Interaction of αβ-Methylene ATP with the Cholinergic Twitch Response in the Guinea-Pig Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, direct effects of the P2X purinoceptor agonist αβ-methylene ATP (αβ-meATP) and effects on the cholinergic twitch response of the electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus (LMMP) strip of the guinea-pig ileum, were investigated. αβ-meATP (1, 3, and 10 µmol/l) induced short-lasting contractions on its own, followed by an inhibition of the twitch response during its presence in the organ bath. The inhibitor of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, apamin (100 nmol/l), prevented the inhibitory effect of αβ-meATP on the twitch response, whereas tetraethylammonium (300 µmol/l), a blocker of voltage-gated K+ channels and an inhibitor at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, augmented the inhibitory effect of αβ-meATP on the twitch response. It is concluded, that there is a functional interaction between P2X receptors and nicotinic receptors in the LMMP strip, and that a major part of the excitatory input to the cholinergic motor neuron evoking the twitch response is purinergic and not nicotinergic. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Isokinetic and isometric muscle strength combined with transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation in primary fibromyalgia syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    of superimposed twitches was 65% in the patient group and 15% in the control group (p = 0.003). Patients with primary fibromyalgia have a lower maximum voluntary muscle strength than expected. The increased presence of superimposed electrically elicited twitches during maximum voluntary contraction indicates...

  9. Involuntary Psychiatric Holds in Preadolescent Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Santillanes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the use of involuntary psychiatric holds in preadolescent children. The primary objective was to characterize patients under the age of 10 years on involuntary psychiatric holds. Methods: This was a two-year retrospective study from April 2013 – April 2015 in one urban pediatric emergency department (ED. Subjects were all children under the age of 10 years who were on an involuntary psychiatric hold at any point during their ED visit. We collected demographic data including age, gender, ethnicity and details about living situation, child protective services involvement and prior mental health treatment, as well as ED disposition. Results: There were 308 visits by 265 patients in a two-year period. Ninety percent of involuntary psychiatric holds were initiated in the prehospital setting. The following were common characteristics: male (75%, in custody of child protective services (23%, child protective services involvement (42%, and a prior psychiatric hospitalization (32%. Fifty-six percent of visits resulted in discharge from the ED, 42% in transfer to a psychiatric hospital and 1% in admission to the pediatric medical ward. Median length of stay was 4.7 hours for discharged patients and 11.7 hours for patients transferred to psychiatric hospitals. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this study presents the first characterization of preadolescent children on involuntary psychiatric holds. Ideally, mental health screening and services could be initiated in children with similar high-risk characteristics before escalation results in placement of an involuntary psychiatric hold. Furthermore, given that many patients were discharged from the ED, the current pattern of utilization of involuntary psychiatric holds in young children should be reconsidered.

  10. Robust estimation of average twitch contraction forces of populations of motor units in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Francesco; Orizio, Claudio

    2017-12-01

    The characteristics of motor unit force twitch profiles provide important information for the understanding of the muscle force generation. The twitch force is commonly estimated with the spike-triggered averaging technique, which, despite the many limitations, has been important for clarifying central issues in force generation. In this study, we propose a new technique for the estimation of the average twitch profile of populations of motor units with uniform contractile properties. The method encompasses a model-based deconvolution of the force signal using the identified discharge times of a population of motor units. The proposed technique was validated using simulations and tested on signals recorded during voluntary activation. The results of the simulations showed that the proposed method provides accurate estimates (relative error twitch force when the number of identified motor units is between 5% and 15% of the total number of active motor units. It is discussed that current detection and decomposition methods of multi-channel surface EMG signals allow decoding this relative sample of the active motor unit pool. However, even when this condition is not met, our results show that the estimates provided by the new method are anyway always superior to those obtained by the spike triggered average approach, especially for high motor unit synchronization levels and when a relatively small number of triggers is available. In conclusion, we present a new method that overcome the main limitations of the spike-triggered average for the study of contractile properties of individual motor units. The method provides a new reliable tool for the investigation of the determinants of muscle force. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dihydromyricetin prevents obesity-induced slow-twitch-fiber reduction partially via FLCN/FNIP1/AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qicheng; Gu, Yeyun; Lang, Hedong; Wang, Xiaolan; Chen, Ka; Gong, Xinhua; Zhou, Min; Ran, Li; Zhu, Jundong; Mi, Mantian

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by decreases in the proportion of skeletal muscle slow-twitch fibers and insulin sensitivity. Increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) levels are responsible for obesity-associated insulin resistance. Palmitate, one of the most elevated plasma NEFA in obesity, has been recognized as the principle inducer of insulin resistance. The present study showed that increased plasma NEFA levels were negatively linked to slow-twitch fiber proportion and insulin sensitivity, while slow-twitch fiber proportion was positively correlated to insulin sensitivity in high fat diet (HFD)-fed and ob/ob mice. Dihydromyricetin (DHM) intervention increased slow-twitch fiber proportion and improved insulin resistance. In cultured C2C12 myotubes, palmitate treatment resulted in decrease of slow-twitch fiber specific Myh7 expression and insulin resistance, concomitant with folliculin (FLCN) and folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) expression increase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inactivation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression decrease. Those palmitate-induced effects could be blocked by knock-down of FLCN expression or DHM intervention. Meanwhile, the protective effects of DHM were alleviated by over-expression of FLCN. In addition, the changes in AMPK activity and expression of FLCN and FNIP1 in vivo were consistent with those occurring in vitro. These findings suggest that DHM treatment prevents palmitate-induced slow-twitch fibers decrease partially via FLCN-FNIP1-AMPK pathway thereby improving insulin resistance in obesity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. 32 CFR 644.102 - Examples of involuntary acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Examples of involuntary acquisitions. 644.102... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Acquisition Involuntary Acquisition by the United States § 644.102 Examples... property, as prescribed by Pub. L. 91-646. Examples of involuntary acquisition are: (a) Damage to real...

  13. Shear flow influences the twitching motility of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Siryaporn, Albert; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Twitching motility is one of the mechanisms by which bacteria can spread on surfaces and is important in the process of biofilm formation. Flow is often involved in biofilm formation, for instance when bacteria contaminate medical devices or water systems. We have studied the twitching mobility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in straight microfluidic channels under laminar shear flow at low Reynolds number. We tracked all the bacteria adhering and moving on the immersed glass surface. We observed that upon applying a flow, a significant fraction of bacteria started to twitch, and that many twitched upstream, opposite to the flow direction. By measuring the displacement and residence time of the bacteria staying on the surface, we found that the flow not only tuned the direction of twitching by orienting bacteria, but also that the shear rate significantly influenced the fraction of bacteria moving upstream, with an optimal shear rate about 500 s -1 . Princeton University MAE Complex fluids group.

  14. Twitch and M-wave potentiation induced by intermittent maximal voluntary quadriceps contractions: differences between direct quadriceps and femoral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Place, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in twitch and M-wave potentiation in the quadriceps femoris when electrical stimulation is applied over the quadriceps muscle belly versus the femoral nerve trunk. M-waves and mechanical twitches were evoked using direct quadriceps muscle and femoral nerve stimulation between 48 successive isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) from 10 young, healthy subjects. Potentiation was investigated by analyzing the changes in M-wave amplitude recorded from the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles and in quadriceps peak twitch force. Potentiation of twitch, VM M-wave, and VL M-wave were greater for femoral nerve than for direct quadriceps stimulation (P < 0.05). Despite a 50% decrease in MVC force, the amplitude of the M-waves increased significantly during exercise. In addition to enhanced electrogenic Na(+) -K(+) pumping, other factors (such as synchronization in activation of muscle fibers and muscle architectural properties) may significantly influence the magnitude of M-wave enlargement. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Compulsory outpatient treatment can prevent involuntary commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene Nørregård; Svensson, Eva Maria Birgitta; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2014-01-01

    Compulsory outpatient treatment (co-pt) has been possible in Denmark since 2010. The aim is to secure necessary treatment, reduce involuntary commitment and improve quality of life for patients with a severe psychiatric illness. Co-pt has been brought into use in 33 cases. This case report...

  16. Limitations of the spike-triggered averaging for estimating motor unit twitch force: a theoretical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Negro

    Full Text Available Contractile properties of human motor units provide information on the force capacity and fatigability of muscles. The spike-triggered averaging technique (STA is a conventional method used to estimate the twitch waveform of single motor units in vivo by averaging the joint force signal. Several limitations of this technique have been previously discussed in an empirical way, using simulated and experimental data. In this study, we provide a theoretical analysis of this technique in the frequency domain and describe its intrinsic limitations. By analyzing the analytical expression of STA, first we show that a certain degree of correlation between the motor unit activities prevents an accurate estimation of the twitch force, even from relatively long recordings. Second, we show that the quality of the twitch estimates by STA is highly related to the relative variability of the inter-spike intervals of motor unit action potentials. Interestingly, if this variability is extremely high, correct estimates could be obtained even for high discharge rates. However, for physiological inter-spike interval variability and discharge rate, the technique performs with relatively low estimation accuracy and high estimation variance. Finally, we show that the selection of the triggers that are most distant from the previous and next, which is often suggested, is not an effective way for improving STA estimates and in some cases can even be detrimental. These results show the intrinsic limitations of the STA technique and provide a theoretical framework for the design of new methods for the measurement of motor unit force twitch.

  17. Limitations of the Spike-Triggered Averaging for Estimating Motor Unit Twitch Force: A Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Francesco; Yavuz, Utku Ş.; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Contractile properties of human motor units provide information on the force capacity and fatigability of muscles. The spike-triggered averaging technique (STA) is a conventional method used to estimate the twitch waveform of single motor units in vivo by averaging the joint force signal. Several limitations of this technique have been previously discussed in an empirical way, using simulated and experimental data. In this study, we provide a theoretical analysis of this technique in the frequency domain and describe its intrinsic limitations. By analyzing the analytical expression of STA, first we show that a certain degree of correlation between the motor unit activities prevents an accurate estimation of the twitch force, even from relatively long recordings. Second, we show that the quality of the twitch estimates by STA is highly related to the relative variability of the inter-spike intervals of motor unit action potentials. Interestingly, if this variability is extremely high, correct estimates could be obtained even for high discharge rates. However, for physiological inter-spike interval variability and discharge rate, the technique performs with relatively low estimation accuracy and high estimation variance. Finally, we show that the selection of the triggers that are most distant from the previous and next, which is often suggested, is not an effective way for improving STA estimates and in some cases can even be detrimental. These results show the intrinsic limitations of the STA technique and provide a theoretical framework for the design of new methods for the measurement of motor unit force twitch. PMID:24667744

  18. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  19. Muscle and liver glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Sonne, Bente; Joensen Mikines, Kari

    1984-01-01

    -adrenal system. In control rats, both swimming and running decreased the concentration of glycogen in fast-twitch red and slow-twitch red muscle whereas concentrations of protein and triglyceride did not decrease. In the liver, swimming depleted glycogen stores but protein and triglyceride concentrations did...

  20. Myocardial twitch duration and the dependence of oxygen consumption on pressure-volume area: experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J-C; Tran, K; Taberner, A J; Nickerson, D P; Kirton, R S; Nielsen, P M F; Ward, M-L; Nash, M P; Crampin, E J; Loiselle, D S

    2012-09-15

    We tested the proposition that linear length dependence of twitch duration underlies the well-characterised linear dependence of oxygen consumption (V(O(2)) ) on pressure–volume area (PVA) in the heart. By way of experimental simplification, we reduced the problem from three dimensions to one by substituting cardiac trabeculae for the classically investigated whole-heart. This allowed adoption of stress–length area (SLA) as a surrogate for PVA, and heat as a proxy for V(O(2)) . Heat and stress (force per cross-sectional area), at a range of muscle lengths and at both 1 mM and 2 mM [Ca(2+)](o), were recorded from continuously superfused rat right-ventricular trabeculae undergoing fixed-end contractions. The heat–SLA relations of trabeculae (reported here, for the first time) are linear. Twitch duration increases monotonically (but not strictly linearly) with muscle length. We probed the cellular mechanisms of this phenomenon by determining: (i) the length dependence of the duration of the Ca(2+) transient, (ii) the length dependence of the rate of force redevelopment following a length impulse (an index of Ca(2+) binding to troponin-C), (iii) the effect on the simulated time course of the twitch of progressive deletion of length and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms of crossbridge cooperativity, using a detailed mathematical model of the crossbridge cycle, and (iv) the conditions required to achieve these multiple length dependencies, using a greatly simplified model of twitch mechano-energetics. From the results of these four independent investigations, we infer that the linearity of the heat–SLA relation (and, by analogy, the V(O(2))–PVA relation) is remarkably robust in the face of departures from linearity of length-dependent twitch duration.

  1. Myocardial twitch duration and the dependence of oxygen consumption on pressure–volume area: experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J-C; Tran, K; Taberner, A J; Nickerson, D P; Kirton, R S; Nielsen, P M F; Ward, M-L; Nash, M P; Crampin, E J; Loiselle, D S

    2012-01-01

    We tested the proposition that linear length dependence of twitch duration underlies the well-characterised linear dependence of oxygen consumption () on pressure–volume area (PVA) in the heart. By way of experimental simplification, we reduced the problem from three dimensions to one by substituting cardiac trabeculae for the classically investigated whole-heart. This allowed adoption of stress–length area (SLA) as a surrogate for PVA, and heat as a proxy for . Heat and stress (force per cross-sectional area), at a range of muscle lengths and at both 1 mm and 2 mm[Ca2+]o, were recorded from continuously superfused rat right-ventricular trabeculae undergoing fixed-end contractions. The heat–SLA relations of trabeculae (reported here, for the first time) are linear. Twitch duration increases monotonically (but not strictly linearly) with muscle length. We probed the cellular mechanisms of this phenomenon by determining: (i) the length dependence of the duration of the Ca2+ transient, (ii) the length dependence of the rate of force redevelopment following a length impulse (an index of Ca2+ binding to troponin-C), (iii) the effect on the simulated time course of the twitch of progressive deletion of length- and Ca2+-dependent mechanisms of crossbridge cooperativity, using a detailed mathematical model of the crossbridge cycle, and (iv) the conditions required to achieve these multiple length dependencies, using a greatly simplified model of twitch mechano-energetics. From the results of these four independent investigations, we infer that the linearity of the heat–SLA relation (and, by analogy, the –PVA relation) is remarkably robust in the face of departures from linearity of length-dependent twitch duration. PMID:22570375

  2. Treatment efficacy of lower eyelid twitch shift joint outer canthal ligament shortening surgery in degenerative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe and compare efficacy of the lower eyelid twitch shift joint outer canthal ligament shortening surgery and orbicularis muscle resection surgery to treat degenerative entropion. METHODS: Patients with degenerative entropion in our hospital were selected. The test group was 40 cases(70 eyes, of which double eyes with attack(30 cases, and lower eyelid twitch shift joint outer canthal ligament shortening surgery was applied to the test group. Control group was 20 cases(26 eyes, of which double eyes with attack(6 cases, and the control group was used by orbicularis muscle resection surgery. The correction rate, double eyelid symmetry and overcorrection rate were observed in two groups at postoperative 1wk. The long- term recurrence rate, double eyelid symmetry and overcorrection rate with follow-up 6mo were observed. RESULTS: After 1wk, the correction rate of experimental group 98.6%,undercorrection rate of that was 1.4%, all the eyelid was symmetry, only one eye with a slight overcorrection. Correction rate of control group was 92.3%; all the eyelid was symmetry, and the poor rate of this group was 7.7%. After 6mo, correction rate of experimental group was 95.2%; undercorrection rate of experimental group was 3.2%, and overcorrection rate was 1.6%. Correction rate of control group was 87%, and 2 eyes of recurrence, 1 eye with a poor overcorrection. Double eyelid was symmetry, overcorrection rate difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05, and the correction rate were significantly different(PCONCLUSION: Compared toorbicularis muscle resection surgery, postoperative recurrence rate of lower eyelid twitch shift joint outer canthal ligament shortening surgery is significantly lowered.

  3. [Quality of involuntary hospital administration in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Matthias; Ospelt, Isabelle; Kawohl, Wolfram; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Rössler, Wulf; Hoff, Paul

    2014-05-21

    This study aims at investigating the formal and content-related quality of medical certificates directing compulsory hospital admissions before the scheduled alteration of the Swiss civil legislation in January 2013. A comparison between physicians with different professional backgrounds concerning certificates and patients was conducted. Retrospective investigation of medical records of involuntary inpatients at the University Hospital of Psychiatry in Zurich during a period of six months (N=489). Considerable deficits concerning formal and particularly content-related aspects of the certificates were found. Psychiatrists issued certificates of the highest quality followed by emergency physicians, hospital doctors and general practitioners. Patients differed with respect to several sociodemographic and clinical variables. The quality of certificates directing involuntary hospital admission has to be improved considering the impact on the individual concerned. The consequences of the new legislation on the quality of the admission practices should be inquired in order to improve professional training on the issue.

  4. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual's maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise.

  5. A temporary decrease in twitch response following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block with a small dose of sugammadex in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hajime; Takahoko, Kenichi; Otomo, Shigeaki; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    We report a temporary decrease in twitch response following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block with a small dose of sugammadex in our dose-finding study in pediatric patients. A 19-month-old female infant (9.6 kg, 80 cm) was scheduled for elective cheiloplasty surgery. Anesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 50% and sevoflurane 5% and maintained with air, oxygen, sevoflurane 3%, and fentanyl (total, 3 μg/kg). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed at the adductor pollicis muscle after induction of anesthesia but before the administration of rocuronium. Total dose of rocuronium during the surgery was 0.9 mg/kg. Neuromuscular block was reversed with 0.5 mg/kg sugammadex when one response was observed with post-tetanic count stimulation. Twitch responses after sugammadex administration showed a temporary decrease after its initial recovery. Maximum decreases in twitch responses were observed 17 min after initial dose of sugammadex. Twitch responses recovered to their control values after additional doses of 3.5 mg/kg sugammadex (4 mg/kg in total). Time from sugammadex administration to maximum decreases in twitch responses is earlier than has been reported in adults (20-70 min). It is demonstrated that following neuromuscular block reversal with insufficient dose of sugammadex, there is a possibility of the recurrence of residual paralysis within less than 20 min in pediatric patients.

  6. Involuntary inter-prison transfer of prisoners in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Minke, Linda

    Involuntary inter prison transfer are for most prisoners very intrusive. In Denmark official record shows in average 669 incidences of involuntary inter prison transfers for disciplinary reasons in the period 2006-2013. Involuntary transfers because of prison capacity are not registered statistic....... A rule in Danish administrative law states that prisoners can be involuntary transferred from one prison to the other without prior notice, statement of reasons or hearing. In a legal protective perspective it is problematic that prisoners can be transferred without apparent reasons....

  7. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. GLUT11, but not GLUT8 or GLUT12, is expressed in human skeletal muscle in a fibre type-specific pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Schürmann, A

    2004-01-01

    or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were studied. GLUT8 and 12 immunoreactivity was below detection level in both developing and adult muscle fibres. GLUT11 immunoreactivity, however, was present in slow-twitch muscle fibres, but not in fast twitch fibres. Since, in contrast, GLUT4 was expressed in all...

  9. Twitching in sensorimotor development from sleeping rats to robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Mark S; Marques, Hugo Gravato; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-06-17

    It is still not known how the 'rudimentary' movements of fetuses and infants are transformed into the coordinated, flexible and adaptive movements of adults. In addressing this important issue, we consider a behavior that has been perennially viewed as a functionless by-product of a dreaming brain: the jerky limb movements called myoclonic twitches. Recent work has identified the neural mechanisms that produce twitching as well as those that convey sensory feedback from twitching limbs to the spinal cord and brain. In turn, these mechanistic insights have helped inspire new ideas about the functional roles that twitching might play in the self-organization of spinal and supraspinal sensorimotor circuits. Striking support for these ideas is coming from the field of developmental robotics: when twitches are mimicked in robot models of the musculoskeletal system, the basic neural circuitry undergoes self-organization. Mutually inspired biological and synthetic approaches promise not only to produce better robots, but also to solve fundamental problems concerning the developmental origins of sensorimotor maps in the spinal cord and brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and cognitive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    Involuntary autobiographical memories are memories of personal experiences that pop into mind without a conscious attempt at their retrieval. This study investigated individual differences in the number of involuntary autobiographical memories, and explored the relationship between the frequency of occurrence in involuntary autobiographical memory and cognitive failures in everyday memory, as indexed by metamemory questionnaires. A total of 24 undergraduate students reported involuntary autobiographical memories in controlled field interviews, and completed the Everyday Memory Questionnaire and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. The results showed that, despite controlled conditions, considerable individual differences were observed in the number of involuntary autobiographical memories reported while walking along a prescribed route on the campus, and that reported memories were predominantly serving self function. In addition, the number of involuntary autobiographical memories was positively related to cognitive failures in everyday memory: participants who acknowledged more problems in everyday memory had a higher frequency of involuntary memories. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the complementary function of involuntary autobiographical memory in everyday life.

  11. Evaluation of a Hill based muscle model for the energy cost and efficiency of muscular contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houdijk, J.H.P.; Bobbert, M.F.; de Haan, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a Hill-based mathematical model of muscle energetics and to disclose inconsistencies in existing experimental data. For this purpose, we simulated iso-velocity contractions of mouse fast twitch EDL and slow twitch SOL fibers, and we compared the outcome to

  12. Social workers and involuntary treatment in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Floyd Taylor

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary treatment is often a reality in mental health social work. The current research examined 330 mental health social workers' involvement in and opinions about involuntary treatment as part of their primary job functions. Varieties of involuntary intervention and typical frequency were investigated. The most often cited areas of involuntary treatment experience proved to be mandated outpatient counseling and emergency hospitalization. In general, participants reported a high level of support for the existence of involuntary intervention, both in "idea" and "implementation." The study also explored the attitudes social workers have about these sometimes "ethically-complex" social work interventions and how these attitudes may have changed over the life of their practice careers due to practice experience and personal growth, job changes, and exposure to the reality of mental illness.

  13. Social Workers and Involuntary Treatment in Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa F. Taylor

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary treatment is often a reality in mental health social work. The current research examined 330 mental health social workers’ involvement in and opinions about involuntary treatment as part of their primary job functions. Varieties of involuntary intervention and typical frequency were investigated. The most often cited areas of involuntary treatment proved to be mandated outpatient counseling and emergency hospitalization. In general, participants reported high level of support for the existence of involuntary intervention, both in “idea” and “implementation.” The study also explored the attitudes social workers have about these sometimes “ethically-complex” social work interventions and how these attitudes may have changed over the life of their practice careers due to practice experience and personal growth, job changes, and exposure to the reality of mental illness.

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreaves, M; Richter, Erik

    1988-01-01

    Muscle-glycogen breakdown during exercise is influenced by both local and systemic factors. Contractions per se increase glycogenolysis via a calcium-induced, transient increase in the activity of phosphorylase a, and probably also via increased concentrations of Pi. In fast-twitch muscle...

  15. Autonomic components of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) are favourably affected by Electrical Twitch-Obtaining Intramuscular Stimulation (ETOIMS): effects on blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jennifer; Bruyninckx, Frans; Neuhauser, Duncan V

    2017-07-01

    autonomous twitches due to pain-induced muscle hypertonicity, are pathognomonic of this problem.

  16. EXERCISE, MANUAL THERAPY AND POSTURAL RE-EDUCATION FOR UNCONTROLLED EAR TWITCHING AND RELATED IMPAIRMENTS AFTER WHIPLASH INJURY: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Kelsey; Feldner, Heather

    2017-10-01

    presentations in the future. Further research is needed to examine the etiology of ear twitching caused by muscle spasm and to develop additional evidence-based interventions for Whiplash Associated Disorders. Level 4.

  17. Facial Involuntary Movements and Respiratory Failure in CANOMAD, Responsive to IVIG Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CANOMAD is a rare chronic neuropathy, characterized by chronic sensory ataxia and intermittent brain stem symptoms due to antidisialosyl antibodies. The disorder results in significant morbidity but is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. We describe a unique case of CANOMAD, associated with involuntary movements of the face; patient reported exacerbations with citrus and chocolate and respiratory muscle weakness. Our patient was initially misdiagnosed with Miller Fisher Syndrome, highlighting the need for vigilance should neurological symptoms recur in patients initially diagnosed with a Guillain Barre variant. Moreover, the optimal treatment is unknown. This patient responded remarkably to intravenous immunoglobulin and has been maintained on this treatment, without further exacerbations.

  18. Patient experiences with involuntary out-of-network charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyanko, Kelly A; Pong, Denise D; Bahan, Kathleen; Curry, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    Approximately 40 percent of individuals using out-of-network physicians experience involuntary out-of-network care, leading to unexpected and sometimes burdensome financial charges. Despite its prevalence, research on patient experiences with involuntary out-of-network care is limited. Greater understanding of patient experiences may inform policy solutions to address this issue. To characterize the experiences of patients who encountered involuntary out-of-network physician charges. Qualitative study using 26 in-depth telephone interviews with a semi-structured interview guide. Participants were a purposeful sample of privately insured adults from across the United States who experienced involuntary out-of-network care. They were diverse with regard to income level, education, and health status. Recurrent themes were generated using the constant comparison method of data analysis by a multidisciplinary team. Four themes characterize the perspective of individuals who experienced involuntary out-of-network physician charges: (1) responsibilities and mechanisms for determining network participation are not transparent; (2) physician procedures for billing and disclosure of physician out-of-network status are inconsistent; (3) serious illness requiring emergency care or hospitalization precludes ability to choose a physician or confirm network participation; and (4) resources for mediation of involuntary charges once they occur are not available. Our data reveal that patient education may not be sufficient to reduce the prevalence and financial burden of involuntary out-of-network care. Participants described experiencing involuntary out-of-network health care charges due to system-level failures. As policy makers seek solutions, our findings suggest several potential areas of further consideration such as standardization of processes to disclose that a physician is out-of-network, holding patients harmless not only for out-of-network emergency room care but also for

  19. Four weeks of high- versus low-load resistance training to failure on the rate of torque development, electromechanical delay, and contractile twitch properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, N Dm; Housh, T J; Buckner, S L; Bergstrom, H C; Smith, C M; Cochrane, K C; Hill, E C; Miramonti, A A; Schmidt, R J; Johnson, G O; Cramer, J T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 4-weeks of high- versus low-load resistance training to failure on rate of torque development (RTD), electromechanical delay (EMD), and contractile twitch characteristics. Fifteen men (mean±SD; age=21.7±2.4 yrs) were randomly assigned to either a high- (80% 1RM; n=7) or low-load (30% 1RM; n=8) training group and completed elbow flexion resistance training to failure 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The participants were tested at baseline, 2-, and 4-weeks of training. Peak RTD (pRTDV) and RTD at 0-30 (RTD30V), 0-50 (RTD50V), 0-100 (RTD100V), and 0-200 (RTD200V) ms, integrated EMG amplitude (iEMG) at 0-30, 0-50, and 0-100 ms, and EMD were quantified during maximal voluntary isometric muscle actions. Peak twitch torque, peak RTD, time to peak twitch, 1/2 relaxation time and the peak relaxation rate were quantified during evoked twitches. Four weeks of high-load, but not low-load resistance training, increased RTD200V. There were also increases in iEMG during the first 30 ms of muscle activation for the high- and low-load groups, which may have indirectly indicated increases in early phase motor unit recruitment and/or firing frequency. There were no significant training-induced adaptations in EMD or contractile twitch properties.

  20. Current concerns in involuntary and voluntary autobiographical memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2010-01-01

    Involuntary autobiographical memories are conscious memories of personal events that come to mind with no preceding attempts at retrieval. It is often assumed that such memories are closely related to current concerns - i.e., uncompleted personal goals. Here we examined involuntary versus voluntary...... (deliberately retrieved) autobiographical memories in relation to earlier registered current concerns measured by the Personal Concern Inventory (PCI; Cox & Klinger, 2000). We found no differences between involuntary and voluntary memories with regard to frequency or characteristics of current concern related...

  1. Performing Play: Cultural Production on Twitch.tv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicone, Anthony James

    2017-01-01

    Streaming is an emerging practice of videogame culture, where a player broadcasts a live capture of their game-play to an audience. Every day Twitch.tv, the most popular streaming platform, features thousands of streams broadcast to millions of viewers. Streams are detailed multimedia artifacts, and their study allows us to understand how the…

  2. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of single twitch and train-of-four stimulation on twitch forces during stable neuromuscular block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, G; Fidler, [No Value; Houwertjes, MC; Top, WMC; Wierda, JMKH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. We investigated whether the response to a single twitch (ST) stimulus or the first response (T1) to a train-of-four (TOF; 4 stimuli at 2 Hz) stimulus following a stimulus interval of 10 s (i.e., the time between two consecutive ST or TOF stimuli) is influenced by the preceding stimulus in

  4. Muscle sarcomere lesions and thrombosis after spaceflight and suspension unloading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.A.; Ellis, S.; Giometti, C.S.; Hoh, J.F.Y.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.I.; Oganov, V.S.; Slocum, G.R.; Bain, J.L.W.; Sedlak, F.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Extended exposure of humans to spaceflight produces a progressive loss of skeletal muscle strength. This process must be understood to design effective countermeasures. The present investigation examined hindlimb muscles from flight rats killed as close to landing as possible. Spaceflight and tail suspension-hindlimb unloading (unloaded) produced significant decreases in fiber cross-sectional areas of the adductor longus (AL), a slow-twitch antigravity muscle. However, the mean wet weight of the flight AL muscles was near normal, whereas that of the suspension unloaded AL muscles was significantly reduced. Interstitial edema within the flight AL, but not in the unloaded AL, appeared to account for this apparent disagreement.In both conditions, the slow-twitch oxidative fibers atrophied more than the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers. Microcirculation was also compromised by spaceflight, such that there was increased formation of thrombi in the postcapillary venules and capillaries.

  5. INVOLUNTARY CHILDLESSNESS, STIGMA AND WOMEN’S IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Stephanie Panggabean

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article described how to control reproduction and the development of contraception in some case studies: Indonesia, Yunani dan India. The case studies are utilised to illustrate how normative gender roles in the society create stigmatisation of women in involuntary childlessness. They are also used to elaborate how stigma affects women’s construction of identity. The three case studies and other literatures about involuntary childlessness and infertility show how the narrow gendered roles in society affect women negatively.

  6. Role of the AMPKgamma3 isoform in hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport in glycolytic skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Glund, Stephan; Tom, Robby Z

    2009-01-01

    in hypoxia-mediated energy status signaling and glucose transport in fast-twitch glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle from AMPKgamma3-knockout (KO) mice and wild-type mice. Although hypoxia increased glucose transport (P

  7. Priming involuntary autobiographical memories in the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Niedźwieńska, Agnieszka

    2018-02-01

    Involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs) are recollections of personal past that frequently and spontaneously occur in daily life. Initial studies by Mace (2005) showed that deliberately reminiscing about a certain lifetime period (e.g., high school) significantly increased the number of different IAMs from the same period in subsequent days, suggesting that priming may play a significant role in the retrieval of IAMs in everyday life. In the present study, we used a modified experimental paradigm, originally used by Schlagman and Kvavilashvili (2008), to study IAMs under well-controlled laboratory conditions. Participants completed a monotonous vigilance task twice and reported the occurrence of any spontaneous thoughts that were later classed as IAMs or other thoughts. Priming was manipulated by having experimental participants reminiscing about high school period between the two vigilance tasks and control participants playing simple games. Results showed that participants in the experimental group reported IAMs relating to high school period more frequently during the second vigilance task than those in the control group. In the experimental group, the number of high school memories was marginally higher in the second vigilance task compared to the first vigilance task with the medium effect size, but this within subjects effect was not significant in the control group. Finally, priming also enhanced the retrieval of more remote IAMs in the experimental group compared to the control group. These results suggest that priming may play a significant role in the activation and recall of IAMs and open up interesting avenues for future research.

  8. SOCIAL CAPITAL IN INVOLUNTARY DISPLACEMENT AND RESETTLEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Quetulio-Navarra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Social capital is often seen as a substitute for lack of other types of capital amongpoor people. Because of the recognized applicability of the social capital conceptand its correlation with the different dimensions of poverty, it has been used inevaluating the adaptation and integration of involuntarily displaced individualsinto their new environment. This paper presents insights based on a review of thefindings of studies that looked into the role of social capital in conflict- anddevelopment-induced displacement contexts. Althoughboth types of displace-ments are involuntary or forced in nature, they differ in terms of the role of socialcapital regarding its main sources, the formation pattern and its determinants.Social capital studies in forced resettlement appear to be relatively small innumber and are heavily concentrated on first worldcountries and conflict- anddevelopment-induced displacements. The conduct of similar studies in developingcountries and in a disaster-induced resettlement context, the third type ofinvoluntary displacement, should generate new and relevant findings regardingthe role of social capital in resettlement communities.

  9. Fatigue and contraction of slow and fast muscles in hypokinetic/hypodynamic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, R. D.; Gladden, L. B.; Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) on the fatigability and contractile properties of the rat soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles have been investigated experimentally. Whole body suspension for one week was used to induce H/H, and fatigue was brought on by train stimulation for periods of 45 and 16 minutes. Following stimulation, rapid rates of fatigue were observed in the G-muscles of the suspended rats, while minimal fatigue was observed in the S-muscles. The twitch and tetanic contractile properties of the muscles were measured before and after train stimulation. It is found that H/H suspension increased twitch tension in the G-muscles, but did not change any contractile properties in the S-muscles. The peak twitch, train, tetanic tensions and time to peak were unchanged in the S-muscles of the suspended rats. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that 1 wk of muscle atropy induced by H/H significantly increases fatigability in G-muscles, but does not affect the contractile properties of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles.

  10. Effect of Age and Sex on Histomorphometrical Characteristics of Two Muscles of Laticauda Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Velotto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present experiment was to determine the effect of sex and age on histochemical and morphometric characteristics of muscle fibres (myocytes in lambs born by single, twin, triplet and quadruplet birth. Thirty lambs were slaughtered at 60 days of age; thirty were weaned at 60 days and fed until 120 days with flakes (60% and food supplements, and then slaughtered. Muscle tissues were obtained from two muscles, namely m. semitendinosus and m. longissimus dorsi of all lambs. For each fibre type, area perimeter and diameter (maximum and minimum were measured and slow-twitch oxidative fibres, fast-twitch glycolytic fibres, fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibres were histochemically differentiated. The muscles were stained for myosin ATPase, and succinic dehydrogenase. At 60 days, females had fibres larger than males, whereas the opposite was observed at 120 days. Besides, at 60 days, the lambs born by single birth had fibres larger than those born by multiple birth, whereas the opposite was observed at 120 days. Single lambs were heavier than twin lambs and multiple lambs. Fast-twitch glycolytic fibres had the largest size, followed by slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic fibres. The dimensions of fibre types in m. longissimus dorsi were larger than in m. semitendinosus (P < 0.001.These muscle fibre characteristics are thought to be important factors influencing meat quality, which is often related to metabolic and contractile properties as determined by the muscle fibre type distribution.

  11. Morphology and histochemistry of primary flight muscles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two primary flight muscles of Rhinolophus mehelyii were studied using morphological and histochemical analysis. Two fast-twitch fiber types are histochemically identified in pectoralis muscles of R. mehelyii. These were classified as type IIa and type IIb according to glycine-calcium-formalin preincubation staining protocol ...

  12. A multiscale chemo-electro-mechanical skeletal muscle model to analyze muscle contraction and force generation for different muscle fiber arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHeidlauf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented chemo-electro-mechanical skeletal muscle model relies on a continuum mechanical formulation describing the muscle’s deformation and force generation on the macroscopic muscle level. Unlike other three-dimensional models, the description of the activation-induced behavior of the mechanical model is entirely based on chemo-electro-mechanical principles on the microscopic sarcomere level. Yet, the multiscale model reproduces key characteristics of skeletal muscles such as experimental force-length and force-velocity data on the macroscopic whole muscle level. The paper presents the methodological approaches required to obtain such a multiscale model, and demonstrates the feasibility of using such a model to analyze differences in the mechanical behavior of parallel-fibered muscles, in which the muscle fibers either span the entire length of the fascicles or terminate intrafascicularly. The presented results reveal that muscles, in which the fibers span the entire length of the fascicles, show lower peak forces, more dispersed twitches and fusion of twitches at lower stimulation frequencies. In detail, the model predicted twitch rise times of 38.2ms and 17.2ms for a 12 cm long muscle, in which the fibers span the entire length of the fascicles and with twelve fiber compartments in series, respectively. Further, the twelve-compartment model predicted peak twitch forces that were 19% higher than in the single-compartment model. The analysis of sarcomere lengths during fixed-end single twitch contractions at optimal length predicts rather small sarcomere length changes. The observed lengths range from 75 to 111% of the optimal sarcomere length, which corresponds to a region with maximum filament overlap. This result suggests that stability issues resulting from activation-induced stretches of non-activated sarcomeres are unlikely in muscles with passive forces appearing at short muscle length.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: chorea-acanthocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat. These muscle twitches can cause vocal tics (such as grunting), involuntary belching, and limb spasms. ... direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Depression GABA- ...

  14. Muscle force compensation among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzig, Norman; Siebert, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine control strategies among synergistic muscles after fatigue of a single muscle. It was hypothesized that the compensating mechanism is specific for each fatigued muscle. The soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and medialis (GM) were fatigued in separate sessions on different days. In each experiment, subjects (n = 11) performed maximal voluntary contractions prior to and after fatiguing a single muscle (SOL, GL or GM) while the voluntary muscle activity and torque were measured. Additionally, the maximal single twitch torque of the plantarflexors and the maximal spinal reflex activity (H-reflex) of the SOL, GL and GM were determined. Fatigue was evoked using neuromuscular stimulation. Following fatigue the single twitch torque decreased by -20.1%, -19.5%, and -23.0% when the SOL, GL, or GM, have been fatigued. The maximal voluntary torque did not decrease in any session but the synergistic voluntary muscle activity increased significantly. Moreover, we found no alterations in spinal reflex activity. It is concluded that synergistic muscles compensate each other. Furthermore, it seems that self-compensating mechanism of the fatigued muscles occurred additionally. The force compensation does not depend on the function of the fatigued muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  16. The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-time Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel; Lalé, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Employed individuals in the USA are increasingly more likely to move to involuntarily part-time work than to unemployment. Spells of involuntary part-time work are different from unemployment spells: a full-time worker who takes on a part-time job suffers an earnings loss while remaining employed......-time work faced by involuntary part-time workers, and use our model to tabulate its value in consumption-equivalent units.......Employed individuals in the USA are increasingly more likely to move to involuntarily part-time work than to unemployment. Spells of involuntary part-time work are different from unemployment spells: a full-time worker who takes on a part-time job suffers an earnings loss while remaining employed...... with US institutions and labour market dynamics shows that involuntary part-time work generates lower welfare losses relative to unemployment. This finding relies critically on the much higher probability to return to full-time employment from part-time work. We interpret it as a premium in access to full...

  17. Involuntary resettlement: A cross-country study on urban inequality ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This research project will examine the interplay between involuntary displacement, violence, inequality, and poverty on re-settled populations living in urban ... also seeks to identify the most effective strategies for addressing these challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues

  19. 12 CFR 614.4513 - Uninsured voluntary and involuntary accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uninsured voluntary and involuntary accounts. 614.4513 Section 614.4513 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN... conditional payments intended to be applied to future maturities. The monies in the advance conditional...

  20. State Involuntary Commitment Laws: Beyond Deinstitutionalization. Human Resources Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Rebecca T.; Paterson, Andrea

    1985-01-01

    Involuntary commitment laws, once seen as reform, now questioned as roadblocks to needed treatment, are discussed. The ineffectiveness of state's commitment laws, lack of community resources for treating the mentally ill, and homelessness among the mentally ill are discussed in the introduction. The history of the right of a state to commit…

  1. Social Work Students' Attitudes about Working with Involuntary Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Natalie D.; Kang, Byungdeok

    2011-01-01

    Social workers employed in areas such as public child welfare, substance abuse, and corrections often provide services to involuntary clients. These individuals do not seek social work services on their own volition and may be actively opposed to the services they are receiving. This study explores social work students' attitudes about working…

  2. Cognitive Control of Involuntary Distraction by Deviant Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Hebrero, Maria

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that a task-irrelevant sound (deviant sound) departing from an otherwise repetitive sequence of sounds (standard sounds) elicits an involuntary capture of attention and orienting response toward the deviant stimulus, resulting in the lengthening of response times in an ongoing task. Some have argued that this type of…

  3. [Involuntary placement and treatment of persons with mental health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary placement and treatment of persons with mental health problems were initially discussed from the perspective of personal liberty. However, the autonomy of persons with mental health problems has been growing in importance as an issue of involuntary placement and treatment since the last part of the twentieth century, because the purpose of involuntary placement is not the deprivation of liberty but to provide adequate treatment under medical supervision. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) adds a new perspective from non-discrimination and equality. Article 14 of CRPD states that "the existence of a disability shall in no case justify a deprivation of liberty." This provision should be construed from a perspective of non-discrimination. Conventional types of involuntary placement mainly based on dangerousness (UN-MI Principle 16-1a) and incompetency (UN-MI Principle16-1b) are not allowed by Article 14. There is a discussion on the difference between "mental disability" and "mental illness". Some people argue that CRPD should apply not to persons with mental illness, but to those with mental disabilities. However, CRPD does not provide a definition of "disability". It states that its definition is developing. ICF also mentions that ICD-10 and ICF should complement each other. Thus, CRPD should apply to the involuntary placement and treatment of persons with mental illness as well. It is clear that Article 14 intends to change the situation whereby persons who have been described using various terms, such as madness, lunacy, insanity, mental illness, mental disability, mental health problems, and users, are involuntarily hospitalized/placed. The significance of Article 14 will be lost if it cannot be applied to psychiatric hospitalization. From the perspective of non-discrimination, we have to universalize involuntary placement and treatment or completely abolish them. We cannot tolerate a situation where a type of

  4. INTERACTION OF VERAPAMIL AND LITHIUM AT THE NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION ON RAT ISOLATED MUSCLE-HEMIDIAPHRAGM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Sadeghipour

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that cither lithium or verapamil can potentiate the neuromuscular blocking activity of certain neuromuscular blockers. In the present investigation, possible interaction of verapamil with lithium has been described. The dose ■ response effects of verapamil and lithium on diaphragmatic contractility were assessed in vitro. Mechanical responses of the muscle to indirect (nerve and direct (muscle electrical stimulation were recorded. Verapamil depressed rat diaphragm twitch tensions induced by nerve stimulation in a dose - dependent manner with the 50 percent depression of the original twitch tensions (ICSQ by 5.6 xlO^mmol/l."nThe IC50 of verapamil for direct stimulation of the muscle was LI x W'5 mmol II. Partial replacement of sodium chloride by lithium chloride (0.5, 1.5 and 5 mmol /1 in the medium did not change the depressant effect of verapamil on muscle twitches induced by direct (muscle or indirect (nerve electrical stimulation.

  5. Involuntary psychiatric admission based on risk rather than need for treatment: report from the Dublin Involuntary Admission Study (DIAS).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, BD

    2018-04-01

    Involuntary psychiatric admission in Ireland is based on the presence of mental disorder plus serious risk to self\\/others and\\/or need for treatment. This study aimed to examine differences between use of risk and treatment criteria, about which very little is known.

  6. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  7. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryger Ann I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. Methods Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low frequency (2 Hz percutaneous electrical stimulation. Twitch forces were measured before, immediately after and 15 minutes into recovery of an extensor isometric wrist extension for ten minutes at 15 % Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC. Results The average MVC wrist extension force and baseline stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17–37 versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20. This difference in twitch force response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. Conclusion Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive response to exposure without any pathophysiological significance, or represents a part of a causal pathway leading to pain.

  8. Isokinetic and isometric muscle strength combined with transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation in primary fibromyalgia syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    Twenty women with primary fibromyalgia syndrome and 20 age matched healthy women were investigated. The subjects performed maximum voluntary isokinetic contractions of the right quadriceps in an isokinetic dynamometer. Maximum voluntary isometric contractions of the right quadriceps were performed...... of superimposed twitches was 65% in the patient group and 15% in the control group (p = 0.003). Patients with primary fibromyalgia have a lower maximum voluntary muscle strength than expected. The increased presence of superimposed electrically elicited twitches during maximum voluntary contraction indicates...... submaximal force application in primary fibromyalgia syndrome....

  9. Origin and development of muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Holobar, Aleš; Botter, Alberto; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Cramps are sudden, involuntary, painful muscle contractions. Their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. One hypothesis is that cramps result from changes in motor neuron excitability (central origin). Another hypothesis is that they result from spontaneous discharges of the motor nerves (peripheral origin). The central origin hypothesis has been supported by recent experimental findings, whose implications for understanding cramp contractions are discussed.

  10. Abnormal Involuntary Movements: Side-Effect of Neuroleptic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Oyewumi, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Neuroleptics are antipsychotic drugs. In addition to their antipsychotic properties, many physicians use them as anti-anxiety or antiemetics. Indeed, most patients referred to psychiatrists would have been given one, or a combination, of these drugs. Physicians should therefore be aware of their side-effects. Abnormal involuntary movements, now recognized as side-effects of neuroleptics, are broadly classified as acute early occurring movement disorders and late appearing movement disorders. ...

  11. Muscle strength and fiber composition in athletes and sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensson, A; Larsson, L; Tesch, P; Karlsson, J

    1977-01-01

    Members of Swedish national teams in track and field events (sprinting and jumping), downhill skiing, race walking, orienteering, and a group of sedentary men were studied to examine the relationship between muslce fiber characteristics in needle biopsy samples form m. vastus lateralis and muscle strength measured as peak torque during isokinectic knee extensions. In comparison with the sedentary group the following differences were found: a) percentage fast twitch fibers was lower in the endurance athetes, b) fast to slow twitch muscle fiber area ratio was higher in the track athletes, c)track athletes and downhill skier attained higher peak torque values at all angular velocities examined. The track athletes had, however, higher torque values at the fastest angular velocity as compared to the downhill skiers, whereas there was no differnce under isometric conditions. The proportion of fast twitch fibers was related to torque produced, especially at high motion velocity. The training also appeared to affect the force-velocity relationship.

  12. A cardiorespiratory classifier of voluntary and involuntary electrodermal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdic Ervin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrodermal reactions (EDRs can be attributed to many origins, including spontaneous fluctuations of electrodermal activity (EDA and stimuli such as deep inspirations, voluntary mental activity and startling events. In fields that use EDA as a measure of psychophysiological state, the fact that EDRs may be elicited from many different stimuli is often ignored. This study attempts to classify observed EDRs as voluntary (i.e., generated from intentional respiratory or mental activity or involuntary (i.e., generated from startling events or spontaneous electrodermal fluctuations. Methods Eight able-bodied participants were subjected to conditions that would cause a change in EDA: music imagery, startling noises, and deep inspirations. A user-centered cardiorespiratory classifier consisting of 1 an EDR detector, 2 a respiratory filter and 3 a cardiorespiratory filter was developed to automatically detect a participant's EDRs and to classify the origin of their stimulation as voluntary or involuntary. Results Detected EDRs were classified with a positive predictive value of 78%, a negative predictive value of 81% and an overall accuracy of 78%. Without the classifier, EDRs could only be correctly attributed as voluntary or involuntary with an accuracy of 50%. Conclusions The proposed classifier may enable investigators to form more accurate interpretations of electrodermal activity as a measure of an individual's psychophysiological state.

  13. Neural regulation of muscle acetylcholinsterase: effects of batrachotoxin and 6-aminonicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, S R; Deshpande, S S; Albuquerque, E X

    1977-07-08

    Batrachotoxin (BTX), which causes increased Na+ permeability and blocks axoplasmic transport, or 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), which causes neuronal damage, was injected into the subarachnoid space of rat lumbar spinal cord. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was measured in homogenates of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscle 10 days after injection. Both drug treatments significantly decreased AChE in EDL and SOL. Correlative electrophysiological measurements were made in intact EDL and SOL after injection of BTX or 6-AN. The results support the hypothesis that AChE in muscle is neurotrophically controlled.

  14. Role of phosphodiesterase 4 expression in the Epac1 signaling-dependent skeletal muscle hypertrophic action of clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Nariyama, Megumi; Ito, Aiko; Kawamura, Naoya; Yagisawa, Yuka; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Clenbuterol (CB), a selective β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and counteracts muscle atrophy. However, it is paradoxically less effective in slow-twitch muscle than in fast-twitch muscle, though slow-twitch muscle has a greater density of β-AR We recently demonstrated that Epac1 (exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP [cAMP]1) plays a pivotal role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy through activation of the Akt and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII)/histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) signaling pathways. Here, we investigated the role of Epac1 in the differential hypertrophic effect of CB using tibialis anterior muscle (TA; typical fast-twitch muscle) and soleus muscle (SOL; typical slow-twitch muscle) of wild-type (WT) and Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The TA mass to tibial length (TL) ratio was similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased after CB infusion in WT, but not in Epac1KO The SOL mass to TL ratio was also similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline, but CB-induced hypertrophy was suppressed in both mice. In order to understand the mechanism involved, we measured the protein expression levels of β-AR signaling-related molecules, and found that phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) expression was 12-fold greater in SOL than in TA These results are consistent with the idea that increased PDE4-mediated cAMP hydrolysis occurs in SOL compared to TA, resulting in a reduced cAMP concentration that is insufficient to activate Epac1 and its downstream Akt and CaMKII/HDAC4 hypertrophic signaling pathways in SOL of WT This scenario can account for the differential effects of CB on fast- and slow-twitch muscles. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  15. New Insights into Muscle Fibre Types in Casertana Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Velotto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the Casertana pig. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sex on histochemical and morphometrical characteristics of muscle fibres (myocytes in this pure breed and to verify the presence of giant fibres as well as vascularity of the muscle. Finally, maximum shortening velocity and isometric tension were measured in single muscle fibres. Sixteen Casertana pigs (8 males, 8 females from a farm in Campania (Italy were slaughtered at one year of age. Muscle tissues were obtained from psoas minor, rhomboideus and longissimus dorsi. Myofibres were stained for myosin adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase, and α-amylase-periodic acid schiff. For all fibre types, the area and perimeter were measured. Slowtwitch oxidative fibres, fast-twitch glycolytic fibres and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibres were histochemically differentiated; an image-analyzing system was used. The results showed significant differences between the sexes in the size of all three fibre types. The psoas minor muscle had a high percentage of slow-twitch oxidative fibres and contained more capillaries per fibre and per mm2 than rhomboideus and longissimus dorsi, in which fast-twitch glycolytic fibres dominated. The cross-sectional area of all fibre types was larger in longissimus dorsi than in rhomboideus and psoas minor muscles; the giant fibres were present in the longissimus dorsi muscle only. Besides, isometric tension values were higher in fast-twitch glycolytic fibres than in the other ones. Variations in fibre type composition may contribute to meat quality.

  16. Fish protein intake induces fast-muscle hypertrophy and reduces liver lipids and serum glucose levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Fuminori; Mizushige, Takafumi; Uozumi, Keisuke; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Han, Li; Tsuji, Tomoko; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, fish protein was proven to reduce serum lipids and body fat accumulation by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing basal energy expenditure in rats. In the present study, we examined the precise effects of fish protein intake on different skeletal muscle fiber types and metabolic gene expression of the muscle. Fish protein increased fast-twitch muscle weight, reduced liver triglycerides and serum glucose levels, compared with the casein diet after 6 or 8 weeks of feeding. Furthermore, fish protein upregulated the gene expressions of a fast-twitch muscle-type marker and a glucose transporter in the muscle. These results suggest that fish protein induces fast-muscle hypertrophy, and the enhancement of basal energy expenditure by muscle hypertrophy and the increase in muscle glucose uptake reduced liver lipids and serum glucose levels. The present results also imply that fish protein intake causes a slow-to-fast shift in muscle fiber type.

  17. Muscle glycogen depletion and lactate concentration during downhill skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P; Larsson, L; Eriksson, A; Karlsson, J

    1978-01-01

    Skilled and unskilled skiers were studied during downhill skiing. Muscle glycogen and muscle lactate concentrations in the vastus lateralis muscle were determined following different skiing conditions. Heavy glycogen utilization was found in the groups studied during a day of skiing. The skilled and unskilled skiers differed with respect to selective glycogen depletion pattern and the skilled subjects demonstrated greater depletion of slow twitch fibers than the unskilled subjects. Lactate concentrations ranged from approximately 5-26 mmoles x kg-1 wet muscle after approximately one minute of maximal skiing. This wide range was not found to be related to the level of skiing proficiency. However, skiing with varyingly angled boots, resulting in different knee angles, did affect lactate concentration. Lactate concentration was positively correlated to individual muscle fiber composition expressed as a percent of fast twitch fibers. The results suggest more pronounced involvement of aerobic energy metabolism in skilled skiers than in unskilled skiers.

  18. High glycogen levels enhance glycogen breakdown in isolated contracting skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    and after 15 min of intermittent electrical muscle stimulation. Before stimulation, glycogen was higher in rats that swam on the preceding day (supercompensated rats) compared with controls. During muscle contractions, glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch red and white fibers was larger in supercompensated...

  19. Effects of subacute pyridostigmine administration on mammalian skeletal muscle function. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, M.; Deshpande, S.S.; Foster, R.E.; Maxwell, D.M.; Albuquerque, E.X.

    1992-12-31

    The subacute effects of pyridostigmine bromide were investigated on the contractile properties of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles. The cholinesterase inhibitor was delivered via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps (Alzet) at 9 microns g h-1 (low dose) or 60 micro g h-1 (high dose). Animals receiving high-dose pyridostigmine pumps exhibited marked alterations in muscle properties within the first day of exposure that persisted for the remaining 13 days. With 0.1 Hz stimulation, EDL twitch tensions of treated animals were elevated relative to control. Repetitive stimulation at frequencies > 1 Hz led a use-dependent depression in the amplitude of successive twitches during the train. Recovery from pyridostigmine was essentially complete by 1 day of withdrawal. Rats implanted with low-dose pyridostigmine pumps showed little or no alteration of in vivo twitch tensions during the entire 14 days of treatment. Diaphragm and EDL muscles excised from pyridostigmine-treated rats and tested in vitro showed no significant alterations in twitch and tetanic tensions and displayed the same sensitivity as muscles of control animals to subsequent pyridostigmine exposures. In the presence of atropine, subacutely administered pyridostigmine protected rats from two LD5O doses of the irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor, soman. In the absence of atropine, the LD50 of soman was not altered by subacute pyridostigmine treatment. Extensor digitorum longus; diaphragm; twitch tension; ACh release; subacute; Alzet pumps; tolerance; anticholinesterase; pyridostigmine; soman.

  20. THE EFFECT OF STIMULUS ANTICIPATION ON THE INTERPOLATED TWITCH TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane C. Button

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of expected and unexpected interpolated stimuli (IT during a maximum voluntary contraction on quadriceps force output and activation. Two groups of male subjects who were either inexperienced (MI: no prior experience with IT tests or experienced (ME: previously experienced 10 or more series of IT tests received an expected or unexpected IT while performing quadriceps isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs. Measurements included MVC force, quadriceps and hamstrings electromyographic (EMG activity, and quadriceps inactivation as measured by the interpolated twitch technique (ITT. When performing MVCs with the expectation of an IT, the knowledge or lack of knowledge of an impending IT occurring during a contraction did not result in significant overall differences in force, ITT inactivation, quadriceps or hamstrings EMG activity. However, the expectation of an IT significantly (p < 0.0001 reduced MVC force (9.5% and quadriceps EMG activity (14.9% when compared to performing MVCs with prior knowledge that stimulation would not occur. While ME exhibited non-significant decreases when expecting an IT during a MVC, MI force and EMG activity significantly decreased 12.4% and 20.9% respectively. Overall, ME had significantly (p < 0.0001 higher force (14.5% and less ITT inactivation (10.4% than MI. The expectation of the noxious stimuli may account for the significant decrements in force and activation during the ITT

  1. Orofacial Involuntary Movements in Neurosyphilis: Beyond the Candy Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Abhishek; Thota, Naveen; Stezin, Albert; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Yadav, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in patients with syphilis (neurosyphilis) may result in several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Rarely, patients with neurosyphillis may develop movement disorders with different phenomenology. Subtle orofacial dyskinesias have been reported in patients with neurosyphilis, known as the candy sign. We describe a patient with neurosyphilis who presented with severe orofacial involuntary movements. Our patient had orofacial movements at presentation and severity of the movements was much higher than the candy sign that has been reported in patients with neurosyphilis. This report contributes towards the ever-expanding clinical spectrum of neurosyphilis.

  2. Positive and negative staircase effect during single twitch and train-of-four stimulation: a laboratory study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, Manuel; Tseng, Chia T; Sakai, Daniel M; Romano, Marta; Campoy, Luis; Gleed, Robin D

    2017-04-01

    A positive staircase effect is well documented during neuromuscular monitoring. However, the increase in twitch amplitude may not remain stable over time. We compared the staircase phenomenon and twitch stability during single twitch (ST) or train-of-four (TOF) stimulation in anesthetized dogs. Force of contraction was measured in ten dogs. Each thoracic limb was stimulated with ST 0.1 Hz or TOF q 12 s for 25 min (random order). No neuromuscular blockers were administered. Every 5 min, ST and T1 amplitudes were compared within and between groups. Stability of twitch amplitude (5 % with TOF. An initial increase in ST amplitude remained stable over the observation period, but the increase in T1 amplitude during TOF was frequently followed by a decay. A stable twitch amplitude (variation twitch amplitude.

  3. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  4. The Functional Role of Calcineurin in Hypertrophy, Regeneration, and Disorders of Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle uses calcium as a second messenger to respond and adapt to environmental stimuli. Elevations in intracellular calcium levels activate calcineurin, a serine/threonine phosphatase, resulting in the expression of a set of genes involved in the maintenance, growth, and remodeling of skeletal muscle. In this review, we discuss the effects of calcineurin activity on hypertrophy, regeneration, and disorders of skeletal muscle. Calcineurin is a potent regulator of muscle remodeling, enhancing the differentiation through upregulation of myogenin or MEF2A and downregulation of the Id1 family and myostatin. Foxo may also be a downstream candidate for a calcineurin signaling molecule during muscle regeneration. The strategy of controlling the amount of calcineurin may be effective for the treatment of muscular disorders such as DMD, UCMD, and LGMD. Activation of calcineurin produces muscular hypertrophy of the slow-twitch soleus muscle but not fast-twitch muscles.

  5. Mucosal fluid glycoprotein DMBT1 suppresses twitching motility and virulence of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally thought that mucosal fluids protect underlying epithelial surfaces against opportunistic infection via their antimicrobial activity. However, our published data show that human tear fluid can protect against the major opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa independently of bacteriostatic activity. Here, we explored the mechanisms for tear protection, focusing on impacts of tear fluid on bacterial virulence factor expression. Results showed that tear fluid suppressed twitching motility, a type of surface-associated movement conferred by pili. Previously, we showed that twitching is critical for P. aeruginosa traversal of corneal epithelia, exit from epithelial cells after internalization, and corneal virulence. Inhibition of twitching by tear fluid was dose-dependent with dilutions to 6.25% retaining activity. Purified lactoferrin, lysozyme, and contrived tears containing these, and many other, tear components lacked the activity. Systematic protein fractionation, mass spectrometry, and immunoprecipitation identified the glycoprotein DMBT1 (Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 in tear fluid as required. DMBT1 purified from human saliva also inhibited twitching, as well as P. aeruginosa traversal of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro, and reduced disease pathology in a murine model of corneal infection. DMBT1 did not affect PilA expression, nor bacterial intracellular cyclicAMP levels, and suppressed twitching motility of P. aeruginosa chemotaxis mutants (chpB, pilK, and an adenylate cyclase mutant (cyaB. However, dot-immunoblot assays showed purified DMBT1 binding of pili extracted from PAO1 suggesting that twitching inhibition may involve a direct interaction with pili. The latter could affect extension or retraction of pili, their interactions with biotic or abiotic surfaces, or cause their aggregation. Together, the data suggest that DMBT1 inhibition of twitching motility contributes to the mechanisms by which

  6. Visualization of Twitching Motility and Characterization of the Role of the PilG in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangyang; Lin, Hong

    2016-04-08

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative non-flagellated bacterium that causes a number of economically important diseases of plants. The twitching motility provides X. fastidiosa a means for long-distance intra-plant movement and colonization, contributing toward pathogenicity in X. fastidiosa. The twitching motility of X. fastidiosa is operated by type IV pili. Type IV pili of Xylella fastidiosa are regulated by pilG, a chemotaxis regulator in Pil-Chp operon encoding proteins that are involved with signal transduction pathways. To elucidate the roles of pilG in the twitching motility of X. fastidiosa, a pilG-deficient mutant XfΔpilG and its complementary strain XfΔpilG-C containing native pilG were developed. A microfluidic chambers integrated with a time-lapse image recording system was used to observe twitching motility in XfΔpilG, XfΔpilG-C and its wild type strain. Using this recording system, it permits long-term spatial and temporal observations of aggregation, migration of individual cells and populations of bacteria via twitching motility. X. fastidiosa wild type and complementary XfΔpilG-C strain showed typical twitching motility characteristics directly observed in the microfluidic flow chambers, whereas mutant XfΔpliG exhibited the twitching deficient phenotype. This study demonstrates that pilG contributes to the twitching motility of X. fastidiosa. The microfluidic flow chamber is used as a means for observing twitching motility.

  7. Sympathetic-induced changes in discharge rate and spike-triggered average twitch torque of low-threshold motor units in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Farina, Dario

    2008-11-15

    Animal and in vitro studies have shown that the sympathetic nervous system modulates the contractility of skeletal muscle fibres, which may require adjustments in the motor drive to the muscle in voluntary contractions. In this study, these mechanisms were investigated in the tibialis anterior muscle of humans during sympathetic activation induced by the cold pressor test (CPT; left hand immersed in water at 4 degrees C). In the first experiment, 11 healthy men performed 20 s isometric contractions at 10% of the maximal torque, before, during and after the CPT. In the second experiment, 12 healthy men activated a target motor unit at the minimum stable discharge rate for 5 min in the same conditions as in experiment 1. Intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) signals and torque were recorded and used to assess the motor unit discharge characteristics (experiment 1) and spike-triggered average twitch torque (experiment 2). CPT increased the diastolic blood pressure and heart rate by (mean +/- S.D.) 18 +/- 9 mmHg and 4.7 +/- 6.5 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01), respectively. In experiment 1, motor unit discharge rate increased from 10.4 +/- 1.0 pulses s(-1) before to 11.1 +/- 1.4 pulses s(-1) (P < 0.05) during the CPT. In experiment 2, the twitch half-relaxation time decreased by 15.8 +/- 9.3% (P < 0.05) during the CPT with respect to baseline. These results provide the first evidence of an adrenergic modulation of contractility of muscle fibres in individual motor units in humans, under physiological sympathetic activation.

  8. Voluntary inhibitory motor control over involuntary tic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Rothwell, John; Haggard, Patrick

    2018-03-06

    Inhibitory control is crucial for normal adaptive motor behavior. In hyperkinesias, such as tics, disinhibition within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loops is thought to underlie the presence of involuntary movements. Paradoxically, tics are also subject to voluntary inhibitory control. This puzzling clinical observation questions the traditional definition of tics as purely involuntary motor behaviors. Importantly, it suggests novel insights into tic pathophysiology. In this review, we first define voluntary inhibitory tic control and compare it with other notions of tic control from the literature. We then examine the association between voluntary inhibitory tic control with premonitory urges and review evidence linking voluntary tic inhibition to other forms of executive control of action. We discuss the somatotopic selectivity and the neural correlates of voluntary inhibitory tic control. Finally, we provide a scientific framework with regard to the clinical relevance of the study of voluntary inhibitory tic control within the context of the neurodevelopmental disorder of Tourette syndrome. We identify current knowledge gaps that deserve attention in future research. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. 32 CFR 634.38 - Involuntary extraction of bodily fluids in traffic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Involuntary extraction of bodily fluids in... Supervision § 634.38 Involuntary extraction of bodily fluids in traffic cases. (a) General. The procedures... cause exists to believe that such individual is intoxicated. Extractions of body fluids in furtherance...

  10. Treatment or Involuntary Euthanasia for Severely Handicapped Newborns: Issues of Philosophy and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, T. Hennessy; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated that parents and/or physicians occasionally decide not to provide life-sustaining treatment (referred to as involuntary euthanasia), thus ensuring that the severely handicapped newborn will die. The issues involved relative to treatment or involuntary euthanasia are reviewed from two opposing perspectives…

  11. 7 CFR 766.357 - Involuntary liquidation of real property and chattel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Involuntary liquidation of real property and chattel... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS DIRECT LOAN SERVICING-SPECIAL Loan Liquidation § 766.357 Involuntary liquidation of real property and chattel. (a) General. The Agency will liquidate...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1033(a)-3 - Involuntary conversion of principal residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Involuntary conversion of principal residence. 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1033(a)-3 Involuntary conversion of principal residence. Section 1033 shall apply in the case of property used by the taxpayer as...

  13. Does Involuntary Mental Time Travel Make Sense in Prospective Teachers' Feelings and Behaviors during Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay; Yesilbursa, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of involuntary mental time travel into the past and into the future on prospective teachers' feelings and behaviors during the period of a class hour. A total of 110 prospective teachers participated voluntarily in the study. The results of the present study showed that (a) the involuntary mental time travel into…

  14. Involuntary Subordination and Its Relation to Personality, Mood, and Submissive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    According to social rank theory, involuntary subordination may be adaptive in species that compete for resources as a mechanism to switch off fighting behaviors when loss is imminent (thus saving an organism from injury). In humans, major depression is thought to occur when involuntary subordination becomes prolonged. The present study sought to…

  15. Short-term risk experience of involuntary resettled households in the Philippines and Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarra, M.Q.; Niehof, Anke; Horst, van der H.M.; Vaart, van der W.

    2014-01-01

    Involuntary resettlement often impoverishes the displaced households. Cernea argued that impover-ishment can be avoided with his Involuntary Risks and Reconstruction Model (IRR). The IRR Model has been widely utilized in resettlement studies and identi¿es nine interlinked potential risks inherent to

  16. The frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and future thoughts in relation to daydreaming, emotional distress, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C; Salgado, Sinue

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new scale, the Involuntary Autobiographical Memory Inventory (IAMI), for measuring the frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and involuntary future thoughts. Using the scale in relation to other psychometric and demographic measures provided three important, novel findings. First, the frequency of involuntary and voluntary memories and future thoughts are similarly related to general measures of emotional distress. This challenges the idea that the involuntary mode is uniquely associated with emotional distress. Second, the frequency of involuntary autobiographical remembering does not decline with age, whereas measures of daydreaming, suppression of unwanted thoughts and dissociative experiences all do. Thus, involuntary autobiographical remembering relates differently to aging than daydreaming and other forms of spontaneous and uncontrollable thoughts. Third, unlike involuntary autobiographical remembering, the frequency of future thoughts does decrease with age. This finding underscores the need for examining past and future mental time travel in relation to aging and life span development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Frequency of Involuntary Autobiographical Memories and Future Thoughts in Relation to Daydreaming, Emotional Distress, and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.; Salgado, Sinue

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new scale, the Involuntary Autobiographical Memory Inventory (IAMI), for measuring the frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and involuntary future thoughts. Using the scale in relation to other psychometric and demographic measures provided three important, novel findings. First, the frequency of involuntary and voluntary memories and future thoughts are similarly related to general measures of emotional distress. This challenges the idea that the involuntary mode is uniquely associated with emotional distress. Second, the frequency of involuntary autobiographical remembering does not decline with age, whereas measures of daydreaming, suppression of unwanted thoughts and dissociative experiences all do. Thus, involuntary autobiographical remembering relates differently to aging than daydreaming and other forms of spontaneous and uncontrollable thoughts. Third, unlike involuntary autobiographical remembering, the frequency of future thoughts does decrease with age. This finding underscores the need for examining past and future mental time travel in relation to aging and life span development. PMID:26241025

  18. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  19. The influence of inspiratory muscle work history and specific inspiratory muscle training upon human limb muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Alison K; Lomax, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of the work history of the inspiratory muscles upon the fatigue characteristics of the plantar flexors (PF). We hypothesized that under conditions where the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex has been elicited, PF fatigue would be hastened due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Eight volunteers undertook seven test conditions, two of which followed 4 week of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The inspiratory metaboreflex was induced by inspiring against a calibrated flow resistor. We measured torque and EMG during isometric PF exercise at 85% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Supramaximal twitches were superimposed upon MVC efforts at 1 min intervals (MVCTI); twitch interpolation assessed the level of central activation. PF was terminated (Tlim) when MVCTI was inspiratory muscle work (6.28 ± 2.24 min; P = 0.009). Resting the inspiratory muscles for 30 min restored the PF Tlim to control. After 4 weeks, IMT, inspiratory muscle work at the same absolute intensity did not influence PF Tlim, but Tlim was significantly shorter at the same relative intensity. The data are the first to provide evidence that the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex accelerates the rate of calf fatigue during PF, and that IMT attenuates this effect. PMID:16973699

  20. Swimming and twitching motility are essential for attachment and virulence of Pantoea ananatis in onion seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller-Stuart, Tania; Toth, Ian; De Maayer, Pieter; Coutinho, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Pantoea ananatis is a widespread phytopathogen with a broad host range. Despite its ability to infect economically important crops, such as maize, rice and onion, relatively little is known about how this bacterium infects and colonizes host tissue or spreads within and between hosts. To study the role of motility in pathogenicity, we analysed both swimming and twitching motility in P. ananatis LMG 20103. Genetic recombineering was used to construct four mutants affected in motility. Two flagellar mutants were disrupted in the flgK and motA genes, required for flagellar assembly and flagellar rotation, respectively. Similarly, two twitching motility mutants were generated, impaired in the structure (pilA) and functioning (pilT) of the type IV pili. The role of swimming and twitching motility during the infection cycle of P. ananatis in onion seedlings was determined by comparing the mutant- and wild-type strains using several in vitro and in planta assays. From the results obtained, it was evident that flagella aid P. ananatis in locating and attaching to onion leaf surfaces, as well as in pathogenicity, whereas twitching motility is instrumental in the spread of the bacteria on the surface once attachment has occurred. Both swimming and twitching motility contribute towards the ability of P. ananatis to cause disease in onions. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. Kinetics of glucose transport in rat muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik; Vinten, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    -MG concentration exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Uptake by simple diffusion could not be detected. The maximum 3-O-MG transport velocity (Vmax) was increased more by maximum isometric contractions (10- to 40-fold, depending on fiber type) than by insulin (20,000 microU/ml; 3- to 20-fold) in both red and white...... transport (apparent Km) in all three muscles, in fast-twitch fibers from 70 to approximately 7 mM and in slow-twitch fibers from 12 to 7 mM. After contractions, reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport was monoexponential in red fibers, with a half-time of 7 and 15 min in slow- and fast......-twitch fibers, respectively. In white muscle, Vmax continued to increase after contractions, reached a plateau after 10 min, and had only decreased 45% after 70 min. In contrast to the prevailing opinion, in all fiber types, reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport took place in the absence of muscle...

  2. Sympathetic control of skeletal muscle function: possible co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y in rabbit jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Santarelli, R; Azzena, G B; Passatore, M

    1996-07-19

    Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve at 10/s increases by 12.9 +/- 0.7% peak tension of maximal twitches in the directly stimulated jaw muscles and markedly depresses (41.6 +/- 1.3%) the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in the same muscles by vibration of the mandible. Both effects are not significantly influenced by administration of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. When both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors are blocked, sympathetic stimulation induces a very small increase in twitch tension (3.8 +/- 0.7%), while no detectable change in the TVR is observed. Close arterial injection of alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine mimics the effects induced by sympathetic stimulation on twitch tension and TVR, dose-dependently. The noradrenaline co-transmitter neuropeptide Y also produces a long-lasting, dose-dependent increase in the twitch tension which is unaffected by blockade of adrenergic receptors as well as of the neuromuscular junctions. Contribution of neuropeptide Y to the sympathetically-induced reduction of the stretch reflex is not clearly demonstrated. These data suggest that co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y may be effective in determining sympathetic modulation of skeletal muscle function.

  3. Expression of sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isoforms in masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Trinks, Pablo W; Richard, Susana B; Di Croce, Daniel E; Takara, Delia

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoforms in rabbit masticatory muscles compared with those in fast-twitch muscle. It was hypothesized that combined expression of the SERCA isoforms in fast- and slow-twitch muscles accounts for lower Ca-ATPase activity. SERCA was isolated by differential centrifugation, the isoforms were determined by ELISA, and the activity of each isoform was measured using a colorimetric method. Activity was tested for significance by anova, and the distribution of isoforms was assessed using the chi-square test (P < 0.05) and correlated to SERCA activity using Spearman's rank correlation. SERCA1 was predominant (90.5%) in fast-twitch muscle, whereas a mixture of SERCA isoforms was found in masticatory muscles: 62-78% was SERCA2, 20-37% was SERCA1, and the SERCA3 content was negligible. Depressor muscles showed a significantly higher content (77.8%) of SERCA2, and elevator muscles showed a higher content (35.4%) of SERCA1. Elevator muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2a (58%), and depressor muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2b (20%). The SERCA1 content was mainly SERCA1a and significantly higher for elevator muscles (33%), whereas depressor muscles showed a higher content of SERCA1b (4%). The SERCA1 content of fast-twitch muscle was mainly SERCA1a (88.5%). It is concluded that the mixture of different SERCA isoforms, along with a substantial content of SERCA2b, in masticatory muscles would support lower Ca-ATPase activity and calcium transport. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. The role of mast cells and fibre type in ischaemia reperfusion injury of murine skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolotto Susan K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischaemia reperfusion (IR injury of skeletal muscle, is a significant cause of morbidity following trauma and surgical procedures, in which muscle fibre types exhibit different susceptibilities. The relative degree of mast cell mediated injury, within different muscle types, is not known. Methods In this study we compared susceptibility of the fast-twitch, extensor digitorum longus (EDL, mixed fast/slow-twitch gastrocnemius and the predominately slow-twitch soleus, muscles to ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in four groups of mice that harbour different mast cell densities; C57/DBA mast cell depleted (Wf/Wf, their heterozygous (Wf/+ and normal littermates (+/+ and control C57BL/6 mice. We determined whether susceptibility to IR injury is associated with mast cell content and/or fibre type and/or mouse strain. In experimental groups, the hind limbs of mice were subjected to 70 minutes warm tourniquet ischemia, followed by 24 h reperfusion, and the muscle viability was assessed on fresh whole-mount slices by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT histochemical assay. Results Viability was remarkably higher in the Wf/Wf strain irrespective of muscle type. With respect to muscle type, the predominately slow-twitch soleus muscle was significantly more resistant to IR injury than gastrocnemius and the EDL muscles in all groups. Mast cell density was inversely correlated to muscle viability in all types of muscle. Conclusion These results show that in skeletal muscle, IR injury is dependent upon both the presence of mast cells and on fibre type and suggest that a combination of preventative therapies may need to be implemented to optimally protect muscles from IR injury.

  5. Myosin phosphorylation improves contractile economy of mouse fast skeletal muscle during staircase potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunda, Jordan; Gittings, William; Vandenboom, Rene

    2018-01-30

    Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by skeletal myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) potentiates rodent fast twitch muscle but is an ATP-requiring process. Our objective was to investigate the effect of skMLCK-catalyzed RLC phosphorylation on the energetic cost of contraction and the contractile economy (ratio of mechanical output to metabolic input) of mouse fast twitch muscle in vitro (25°C). To this end, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from wild-type (WT) and from skMLCK-devoid (skMLCK -/- ) mice were subjected to repetitive low-frequency stimulation (10 Hz for 15 s) to produce staircase potentiation of isometric twitch force, after which muscles were quick frozen for determination of high-energy phosphate consumption (HEPC). During stimulation, WT muscles displayed significant potentiation of isometric twitch force while skMLCK -/- muscles did not (i.e. 23% versus 5% change, respectively). Consistent with this, RLC phosphorylation was increased ∼3.5-fold from the unstimulated control value in WT but not in skMLCK -/- muscles. Despite these differences, the HEPC of WT muscles was not greater than that of skMLCK -/- muscles. As a result of the increased contractile output relative to HEPC, the calculated contractile economy of WT muscles was greater than that of skMLCK -/- muscles. Thus, our results suggest that skMLCK-catalyzed phosphorylation of the myosin RLC increases the contractile economy of WT mouse EDL muscle compared with skMLCK -/- muscles without RLC phosphorylation. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Measurement of voluntary activation of the back muscles using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagan, James; Lang, Peter; Strutton, Paul H

    2008-12-01

    Twitch interpolation using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used to measure the level of drive from the motor cortex to contracting muscles of the upper and lower limbs, termed voluntary activation. It has yet to be used to assess voluntary activation in trunk muscles. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using TMS to measure voluntary activation in back muscles. Sixteen healthy subjects performed a series of brief maximal and submaximal isometric contractions of the back extensors during which TMS was delivered to the motor cortex. The evoked (superimposed) twitch was measured using dynamometry and simultaneous surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings were taken from the left and right erector spinae at vertebral level T12. Voluntary activation was derived using the expression: (1-superimposed twitch amplitude/resting twitch amplitude)x100. The resting twitch amplitude was estimated by extrapolation of the linear correlation between voluntary torque and superimposed twitch amplitude to zero torque. The relationship between superimposed twitch size and voluntary contraction strength for contraction strengths of 50-100% MVC was linear but regression revealed variability between subjects. When data were included from those subjects with a good linear regression fit a strong linear relationship was found for the group means between voluntary contraction strength and voluntary activation (r(2)=1) and superimposed twitch size (r(2)=0.99) for contraction strengths of 50-100% MVC. Voluntary activation was found to be less than maximal (67.71+/-5.22%) during maximal efforts. Time-to-peak amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque. The amplitudes of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) increased with increasing voluntary torque. Twitch interpolation using TMS can be used to quantify voluntary activation in back extensors. The results of this study reveal that neural drive to the back extensors during strong

  7. Effects of aging on human skeletal muscle after immobilization and retraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, C; Hvid, L G; Justesen, L

    2009-01-01

    Inactivity is a recognized compounding factor in sarcopenia and muscle weakness in old age. However, while the negative effects of unloading on skeletal muscle in young individuals are well elucidated, only little is known about the consequence of immobilization and the regenerative capacity...... in elderly individuals. Thus the aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging on changes in muscle contractile properties, specific force, and muscle mass characteristics in 9 old (61-74 yr) and 11 young men (21-27 yr) after 2 wk of immobilization and 4 wk of retraining. Both young and old...... experienced decreases in maximal muscle strength, resting twitch peak torque and twitch rate of force development, quadriceps muscle volume, pennation angle, and specific force after 2 wk of immobilization (P

  8. Twitch potentiation induced by two different modalities of neuromuscular electrical stimulation: implications for motor unit recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina Dias Da Silva, Sarah; Neyroud, Daria; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Gondin, Julien; Place, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that twitch potentiation would be greater following conventional (CONV) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (50-µs pulse width and 25-Hz frequency) compared with wide-pulse high-frequency (WPHF) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (1-ms, 100-Hz) and voluntary (VOL) contractions, because of specificities in motor unit recruitment (random in CONV vs. random and orderly in WPHF vs. orderly in VOL). A single twitch was evoked by means of tibial nerve stimulation before and 2 s after CONV, WPHF, and VOL conditioning contractions of the plantar flexors (intensity: 10% maximal voluntary contraction; duration: 10 s) in 13 young healthy subjects. Peak twitch increased (Ptwitch potentiation results. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Performing on a digital stage : A Twitch.tv case study on streamer behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Runeson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Twitch.tv är en växande livestreaming-plattform, främst inriktad på spel. Streamers presenterar sig själva framför en livepublik. Detta leder till nya och intressanta interaktioner. I denna studie studerar jag två Twitch.tv livestreamers för att undersöka skillnaderna i beteende baserat på den interaktion som förekommer mellan dem och deras publik. Streamers publikstorlek varierade. För att undersöka skillnaderna användes följande forskningsfråga: Hur använder två livestreamers Twitch.tv för ...

  10. Scopolamine alleviates involuntary lingual movements: tardive dyskinesia or dystonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu JB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianbo Hu,1,2,* Jianbo Lai,1,2,* Shaohua Hu,1,2 Yi Xu1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China; 2The Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder’s Management in Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cholinergic hypofunction was believed to be associated with the pathogenesis of tardive dyskinesia, and therefore, anticholinergic treatment might exacerbate the condition. We describe herein a middle-aged male with feeble chewing movements, involuntary rolling motions of the tongue, and abnormally tightened cheeks which developed after consuming different psychotropic medications. These symptoms did not improve after routine treatment for tardive dyskinesia, but responded well to anticholinergic agents, such as scopolamine and benzhexol hydrochloride. This case extended our understanding of the complexity of extrapyramidal effects and their pharmacologic management. Keywords: neuroleptic, scopolamine, tardive dyskinesia, dystonia

  11. Modifying the frequency and characteristics of involuntary autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Manila; Batool, Iram; Pelagatti, Claudia; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs) can be elicited in the laboratory. Here we assessed whether the specific instructions given to participants can change the nature of the IAMs reported, in terms of both their frequency and their characteristics. People were either made or not made aware that the aim of the study was to examine IAMs. They reported mental contents either whenever they became aware of them or following a predetermined schedule. Both making people aware of the aim of the study and following a fixed schedule of interruptions increased significantly the number of IAMs reported. When aware of the aim of the study, participants reported more specific memories that had been retrieved and rehearsed more often in the past. These findings demonstrate that the number and characteristics of memories depend on the procedure used. Explanations of these effects and their implications for research on IAMs are discussed.

  12. Modifying the frequency and characteristics of involuntary autobiographical memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manila Vannucci

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs can be elicited in the laboratory. Here we assessed whether the specific instructions given to participants can change the nature of the IAMs reported, in terms of both their frequency and their characteristics. People were either made or not made aware that the aim of the study was to examine IAMs. They reported mental contents either whenever they became aware of them or following a predetermined schedule. Both making people aware of the aim of the study and following a fixed schedule of interruptions increased significantly the number of IAMs reported. When aware of the aim of the study, participants reported more specific memories that had been retrieved and rehearsed more often in the past. These findings demonstrate that the number and characteristics of memories depend on the procedure used. Explanations of these effects and their implications for research on IAMs are discussed.

  13. Visualization of twitching motility and characterization of the role of the PilG in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative non-flagellated bacterium that causes a number of economically important diseases of plants. Twitching motility provides X. fastidiosa a means for long-distance intra-plant movement and colonization, contributing toward pathogenicity of X. fastidiosa. Twitching ...

  14. The age related slow and fast contributions to the overall changes in tibialis anterior contractile features disclosed by maximal single twitch scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, Claudio; Cogliati, Marta; Bissolotti, Luciano; Diemont, Bertrand; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to verify if maximal electrically evoked single twitch (STmax) scan discloses the relative functional weight of fast and slow small bundles of fibres (SBF) in determining the contractile features of tibialis anterior (TA) with ageing. SBFs were recruited by TA main motor point stimulation through 60 increasing levels of stimulation (LS): 20 stimuli at 2Hz for each LS. The lowest and highest LS provided the least ST and STmax, respectively. The scanned STmax was decomposed into individual SBF STs. They were identified when twitches from adjacent LS were significantly different and then subtracted from each other. Nine young (Y) and eleven old (O) subjects were investigated. Contraction time (CT) and STarea/STpeak (A/PT) were calculated per each SBF ST. 143 and 155 SBF STs were obtained in Y and O, respectively. Y: CT and A/PT range: 45-105ms and 67-183mNs/mN, respectively. Literature data set TA fast fibres at 34% so, from the arrays of CT and A/PT, 65ms and 100mNs/mN were identified as the upper limit for SBF fast ST classification. O: no SBF ST could be classified as fast. STmax scan reveals age-related changes in the relative contribution of fast and slow SBFs to the overall muscle mechanics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  16. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  17. Spontaneous or intentional? Involuntary versus voluntary episodic memories in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rasmussen, Anne S; Miles, Amanda N; Nielsen, Niels Peter; Ramsgaard, Stine B

    2017-03-01

    Involuntary episodic memories are memories of past events that come to mind with no preceding attempt of retrieval. Such memories have received little attention in relation to aging compared with voluntary episodic memories (i.e., intentionally retrieved memories of past events). It is well documented that older compared with younger adults have reduced access to episodic memories, when retrieval is voluntary, but little is known about their involuntary episodic recall. Recent evidence suggests that involuntary autobiographical memories are at least as frequent as voluntary autobiographical memories in daily life, but this research has been limited to younger adults. Here older and younger adults recorded involuntary and voluntary episodic memories in relation to a film of a simulated event (Study 1) and during a normal day in their lives (Study 2). Across both studies, no age differences were found regarding the frequency of involuntary episodic memories, whereas older adults showed slower (Study 1) and less frequent (Study 2) voluntary remembering compared with younger adults. The findings suggest that involuntary relative to voluntary episodic remembering is enhanced in older adults, consistent with reduced executive functioning and increased processing of task irrelevant information with aging. Involuntary episodic remembering may provide an adaptive compensation for reductions in strategic retrieval in later adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The organization of the Golgi complex and microtubules in skeletal muscle is fiber type-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Ploug, Thorkil

    1999-01-01

    and experimentally denervated. The total number of GC elements, small polarized stacks of cisternae, is quite similar in all fibers, but their intracellular distribution is fiber type-dependent. Thus, in slow-twitch, type I fibers, approximately 75% of all GC elements are located within 1 micrometer from the plasma...... membrane, and each nucleus is surrounded by a belt of GC elements. In contrast, in the fast-twitch type IIB fibers, most GC elements are in the fiber core, and most nuclei only have GC elements at their poles. Intermediate, type IIA fibers also have an intermediate distribution of GC elements...... of the hindlimb muscles, GC elements as well as microtubules converge toward a common pattern, that of the slow-twitch fibers, in all fibers. Our data suggest that innervation regulates the distribution of microtubules, which in turn organize the Golgi complex according to muscle fiber type....

  19. The Defense of Involuntary Intoxication by Prescribed Medications: An Appellate Case Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    The defense of involuntary intoxication has long been an exception to the general notion that intoxication is not a defense to criminal liability. The consumption of medications prescribed by a physician can form the basis of an involuntary-intoxication defense. In this article, I review cases where defendants relied on the use of prescribed medications for an involuntary-intoxication defense. The medications most frequently implicated by defendants are listed by name and by class. From the case law, I provide a summary of the defense and a review of the pitfalls of the defense to serve as practice pointers for forensic evaluators. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  20. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters

  1. Model to describe the degree of twitch potentiation during neuromuscular monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, D.J.; Kopman, A.F.; Proost, Johannes H; Wierda, J.MKH

    Background Neuromuscular block is estimated by comparing the evoked peak twitch with a control value measured in the absence of neuromuscular block. In practice, this control value is often difficult to determine because repeated motor nerve stimulation enhances the evoked mechanical response of the

  2. Identification of an operon, Pil-Chp, that controls twitching motility and virulence in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursino, Luciana; Galvani, Cheryl D; Athinuwat, Dusit; Zaini, Paulo A; Li, Yaxin; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases, including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Disease manifestation by X. fastidiosa is associated with the expression of several factors, including the type IV pili that are required for twitching motility. We provide evidence that an operon, named Pil-Chp, with genes homologous to those found in chemotaxis systems, regulates twitching motility. Transposon insertion into the pilL gene of the operon resulted in loss of twitching motility (pilL is homologous to cheA genes encoding kinases). The X. fastidiosa mutant maintained the type IV pili, indicating that the disrupted pilL or downstream operon genes are involved in pili function, and not biogenesis. The mutated X. fastidiosa produced less biofilm than wild-type cells, indicating that the operon contributes to biofilm formation. Finally, in planta the mutant produced delayed and less severe disease, indicating that the Pil-Chp operon contributes to the virulence of X. fastidiosa, presumably through its role in twitching motility.

  3. Effect of inactivity and passive stretch on protein turnover in phasic and postural rat muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughna, P.; Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.F.

    1986-07-01

    Muscle atrophy in humans can occur during prolonged bed rest, plaster cast immobilization, and space flight. In the present study, the suspension model used by Musacchia et al. (1983) is employed to investigate changes in protein synthesis and degradation in fast-twitch phasic (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch postural (soleus) muscles in the rat, following hypokinesia and hypodynamia. In addition, the use of passive stretch was examined as a means of preventing atrophy. The obtained results suggest that the mechanisms controlling the processes of protein synthesis and protein breakdown during muscle disuse atrophy may be independent of each other. It appears, however, that the muscle atrophy due to hypokinesia and hypodynamia can be temporarily prevented by passively stretching a muscle. 38 references.

  4. Effect of hindlimb suspension and clenbuterol treatment on polyamine levels in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukhalaf, Imad K.; von Deutsch, Daniel A.; Wineski, Lawrence E.; Silvestrov, Natalia A.; Abera, Saare A.; Sahlu, Sinafikish W.; Potter, David E.; Thierry-Palmer, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Polyamines are unbiquitous, naturally occurring small aliphatic, polycationic, endogenous compounds. They are involved in many cellular processes and may serve as secondary or tertiary messengers to hormonal regulation. The relationship of polyamines and skeletal muscle mass of adductor longus, extensor digitorum longus, and gastrocnemius under unloading (hindlimb suspension) conditions was investigated. Unloading significantly affected skeletal muscle polyamine levels in a fiber-type-specific fashion. Under loading conditions, clenbuterol treatment increased all polyamine levels, whereas under unloading conditions, only the spermidine levels were consistently increased. Unloading attenuated the anabolic effects of clenbuterol in predominately slow-twitch muscles (adductor longus), but had little impact on clenbuterol's action as a countermeasure in fast- twitch muscles such as the extensor digitorum longus. Spermidine appeared to be the primary polyamine involved in skeletal muscle atrophy/hypertrophy. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A novel noninvasive method for measuring fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Rose, Martin Høyer; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic) of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values) and the slope of the regression line...... of peak torque values were primary outcome measures. For twitch contractions, maximum peak torque and rise time were calculated. Relative (intraclass correlation, ICC3.1) and absolute (standard error of measurement, SEM) reliability were assessed and minimum detectable change was calculated using a 95...... fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions....

  6. The Frequency of Voluntary and Involuntary Autobiographical Memories across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Ratings of the memory of an important event from the last week on the frequency of voluntary and involuntary retrieval, belief in its accuracy, visual imagery, auditory imagery, setting, emotional intensity, valence, narrative coherence, and centrality to the life story were obtained from 988 adults whose age ranged from 15 to over 90. Another 992 adults provided the same ratings for a memory from their confirmation day when they were about age 14. The frequencies of involuntary and voluntary retrieval were similar. Both frequencies were predicted by emotional intensity and centrality to the life story. The results from this study, which is the first to measure the frequency of voluntary and involuntary retrieval for the same events, are counter to both cognitive and clinical theories, which consistently claim that involuntary memories are infrequent compared to voluntary memories. Age and gender differences are noted. PMID:19487759

  7. External control of the stream of consciousness: Stimulus-based effects on involuntary thought sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Christina; Farnia, Melika; Jantz, Tiffany K; Gazzaley, Adam; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2015-05-01

    The stream of consciousness often appears whimsical and free from external control. Recent advances, however, reveal that the stream is more susceptible to external influence than previously assumed. Thoughts can be triggered by external stimuli in a manner that is involuntary, systematic, and nontrivial. Based on these advances, our experimental manipulation systematically triggered a sequence of, not one, but two involuntary thoughts. Participants were instructed to (a) not subvocalize the name of visual objects and (b) not count the number of letters comprising object names. On a substantial proportion of trials, participants experienced both kinds of involuntary thoughts. Each thought arose from distinct, high-level processes (naming versus counting). This is the first demonstration of the induction of two involuntary thoughts into the stream of consciousness. Stimulus word length influenced dependent measures systematically. Our findings are relevant to many fields associated with the study of consciousness, including attention, imagery, and action control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Involuntary memories of emotional scenes: The effects of cue discriminability and emotion over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Søren Risløv; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    suffering from psychological disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, have stressful, repetitive, and unwanted involuntary memories about negative events in their past. These unwanted recollections are disturbing and debilitating. Although such intrusive involuntary memories are observed across......Involuntary episodic memories come to mind spontaneously--that is, with no preceding retrieval attempts. Such memories are frequent in daily life, in which they are predominantly positive and often triggered by situational features matching distinctive parts of the memory. However, individuals...... a range of clinical disorders, there is no broadly agreed upon explanation of their underlying mechanisms and no successful experimental simulations of their retrieval. In a series of experiments, we experimentally manipulated the activation of involuntary episodic memories for emotional and neutral...

  9. Changes in antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in extensor digitorum longus muscles of streptozotocin-diabetic rats may contribute to muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Koji; Une, S; Tatsuta, N; Ito, K; Akiyama, J

    2014-12-01

    We investigated muscle atrophy, major antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, predominantly fast fibers) and soleus (predominantly slow fibers) muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into a control (n = 5) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group (n = 5). Eight weeks after diabetes induction the EDL and soleus muscles were removed and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels measured. The CAT activity increased in both the EDL and soleus muscles of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01), whereas the GPX and SOD activities were increased only in the EDL muscle (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). The TBARS levels were only increased in the EDL muscle of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01). Both muscles showed significant atrophy but the EDL muscle elicited the greatest atrophy. In conclusion, it appears that adaptive responses to oxidative stress were adequate in the soleus muscle, but not in the EDL muscle, of diabetic rats. Thus fast twitch muscle fibers may be more susceptible to oxidative stress than slow twitch muscle fibers and this may contribute to muscle atrophy under diabetic conditions.

  10. The impossibility of involuntary unemployment in an overlapping generations model with rational expectation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    1992-01-01

    If there is unemployment no matter how low the wage rate becomes, one speaks of involuntary unemployment. This phenomenon has been shown to arise in a variety of temporary or atemporal macro models with imperfect competition in the goods markets. In this paper we investigate whether the phenomenon...... of involuntary unemployment arises in a Hartian overlapping generations model with rational expectations. It does not, neither in the short nor in the long run...

  11. Development's Collateral Damage : The World Bank, involuntary resettlement and human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Deirdre Christine

    2011-01-01

    Each year millions of people throughout the world are forced from their homes to make way for new roads, dams and other infrastructure developments. The World Bank funds many of these projects in developing countries and has been both harshly criticised for its track record with involuntary resettlement and a global leader in producing guidelines aimed at ensuring those forced to relocate are not harmed by the process. The Bank’s policy on involuntary resettlement is backed up by an Inspecti...

  12. Involuntary Neuromuscular Coupling between the Thumb and Finger of Stroke Survivors during Dynamic Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Jones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Finger–thumb coordination is crucial to manual dexterity but remains incompletely understood, particularly following neurological injury such as stroke. While being controlled independently, the index finger and thumb especially must work in concert to perform a variety of tasks requiring lateral or palmar pinch. The impact of stroke on this functionally critical sensorimotor control during dynamic tasks has been largely unexplored. In this study, we explored finger–thumb coupling during close–open pinching motions in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis. Two types of perturbations were applied randomly to the index with a novel Cable-Actuated Finger Exoskeleton: a sudden joint acceleration stretching muscle groups of the index finger and a sudden increase in impedance in selected index finger joint(s. Electromyographic signals for specific thumb and index finger muscles, thumb tip trajectory, and index finger joint angles were recorded during each trial. Joint angle perturbations invoked reflex responses in the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS, first dorsal interossei (FDI, and extensor digitorum communis muscles of the index finger and heteronymous reflex responses in flexor pollicis brevis of the thumb (p < 0.017. Phase of movement played a role as a faster peak reflex response was observed in FDI during opening than during closing (p < 0.002 and direction of perturbations resulted in shorter reflex times for FDS and FDI (p < 0.012 for extension perturbations. Surprisingly, when index finger joint impedance was suddenly increased, thumb tip movement was substantially increased, from 2 to 10 cm (p < 0.001. A greater effect was seen during the opening phase (p < 0.044. Thus, involuntary finger–thumb coupling was present during dynamic movement, with perturbation of the index finger impacting thumb activity. The degree of coupling modulated with the phase of motion. These findings reveal a potential

  13. Moving People from Science Adjacent to Science Doers with Twitch.tv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela L.; CosmoQuest

    2017-10-01

    The CosmoQuest community is testing the ability to attract people from playing online videogames to doing fully online citizen science by engaging people through the Twitch.tv streaming platform. Twitch.tv launched in 2011 as an online platform for video gamers to stream their gameplay while providing narrative. In its six years of regular growth, the platform has added support for people playing non-video games, and for those participating in non-game activities. As part of their expansion, in April 2017, Twitch.tv hosted a science week during which they streamed the Cosmos series and allowed different feeds provide real-time commentary. They also hosted panel discussions on a variety of science topics. CosmoQuest participated in this event and used it as a jumping off point for beginning to interact with Twitch.tv community members online. With CosmoQuest’s beta launch of Image Detectives, they expanded their use of this streaming platform to include regular “office hours”, during which team members did science with CosmoQuest’s online projects, took questions from community members, and otherwise promoted the CosmoQuest community. This presentation examines this case study, and looks at how well different kinds of Twitter engagements attracted audiences, the conversion rate from viewer to subscriber, and at how effectively CosmoQuest was able to migrate users from viewing citizen science on Twitch.tv to participating in citizen science on CosmoQuest.org.This project was supported through NASA cooperative agreement NNX17AD20A.

  14. The chemical and energetic properties of muscles poisoned with fluorodinitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydyńska, M; Wilkie, D R

    1966-06-01

    1. The heat production and mechanical responses of frogs' sartorii have been recorded at 0 degrees C after immersion in normal Ringer solution, and also after poisoning with 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (FDNB) and nitrogen. The muscles were later analysed chemically for changes in ATP, phosphocreatine (PC), inorganic phosphate (P(i)), lactate, total adenine nucleotide and total inosine nucleotide.2. Analysis of paired resting muscles established that the resting levels of these substances found in our experiments were similar to those reported elsewhere.3. Resting muscles that had been poisoned with FDNB and N(2) contained significantly more PC and less ATP than unpoisoned controls. Moreover, some of their adenine had been deaminated to inosine.4. In a normal muscle in oxygen, the PC that breaks down as a result of a 30 sec tetanus is restored with a roughly exponential time course whose half-time is about 10 min. Thus at least 40 min rest must be allowed between the different stages of an experiment.5. Isometric twitches of the poisoned muscle rapidly decline in size, but small twitches continue to be produced for a very long time. If stimulation is discontinued, substantial recovery takes place. The total tension development is equivalent to at least thirty normal twitches, and correspondingly, the total heat production is greater than could be accounted for even by complete break-down of the ATP in the muscle. In fact, the ATP break-down, though highly significant, is not nearly complete.6. In short series of isometric twitches there is significant break-down of ATP and, less consistently, of PC; also a significant increase in P(i) but no additional deamination of adenine. The rate of development of isometric tension is slightly decreased.7. The results described under (6) are definitely due to the presence of FDNB. In similar experiments with the muscles in N(2) but not otherwise poisoned the only significant change is a break-down of PC.8. In a long series of

  15. Effect of Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on a Child with Involuntary Movement after Hypoxic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Nagai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation to the supplementary motor area to inhibit involuntary movements of a child. An 8-year-old boy who developed hypoxic encephalopathy after asphyxia at the age of 2 had difficulty in remaining standing without support because of involuntary movements. He was instructed to remain standing with his plastic ankle-foot orthosis for 10 s at three time points by leaning forward with his forearms on a desk. He received cathodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation to the supplementary motor area at 1 mA for 10 min. Involuntary movements during standing were measured using an accelerometer attached to his forehead. The low-frequency power of involuntary movements during cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation significantly decreased compared with that during sham stimulation. No adverse effects were observed. Involuntary movement reduction by cathodal stimulation to supplementary motor areas suggests that stimulations modulated the corticobasal ganglia motor circuit. Cathodal stimulation to supplementary motor areas may be effective for reducing involuntary movements and may be safely applied to children with movement disorders.

  16. Involuntary emotional expressive disorder: a case for a deeper neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Peter J; Waller, Sara

    2007-07-01

    Understanding why we produce labels for neuropsychiatric conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), and how we use those words to tell stories about our brain, as well as which groups control such diagnostic discourse, is important to a wise understanding of our cognitive abilities, their limitations, and even our very human nature. Here, we explore the history and current focus of a newly emerging field called neuroethics and explore its relationship (or lack thereof) to a newly created clinical syndrome called involuntary emotional expressive disorder (IEED). The main argument concerns the lack of neuroethical discussion of issues pertinent to social influences on disease and the construction of professional specialization. We are critical of the processes associated with the creation of both the field and the syndrome, and express concern about their eventual outcomes. The interaction of social, political, and business institutions, the inherent interests of the advancement of larger research projects (and the individuals that compose them), their potential for profit, and other incentives to enhance marketability and public attention toward certain research programs will be examined as we discuss the development of the field of neuroethics. Similarly, we argue that these social factors and forces are instrumental in the development of IEED as a recognizable category and condition. Our critique is guided by the hope that through such analyses we can improve our understanding of how we go about our academic activities in cognitive neuroscience and also improve our efforts to help people suffering from neuropsychiatric conditions, such as dementia.

  17. Does sleep quality affect involuntary attention switching system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Juha; Huotilainen, Minna; Pakarinen, Satu; Siren, Teo; Alho, Kimmo; Aronen, Eeva T

    2005-12-30

    We studied the relationship between sleep quality and quantity and subsequently recorded automatically evoked event-related potential (ERP) responses. In previous studies decrement of attentional processing has been associated with changes in sleep. Sleep is shown to associate also with ERPs elicited by unattended sound stream, however, there is no consensus on these effects. A recent study suggested that the early anterior P3a to novel stimuli in attended stream is attenuated and the late parietal P3a is strengthened by total sleep deprivation. We carried out 72-h consecutive actigraphy measurements in a naturalistic setting to collect information about variation in sleep duration, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, and percentage of sleep. MMN and P3a deflections to infrequent changes in sound duration and pitch in unattended sound stream were obtained in a separate recording session from the same subjects when they were awake. No significant correlations were found between sleep and MMN parameters, indicating that MMN is resistant to normal variation in sleep. However, P3a to both pitch and duration changes correlated positively with sleep onset latency, and P3a to duration changes correlated negatively with sleep efficiency and percentage of sleep. The correlation was higher in the posterior scalp areas. Our results suggest that the involuntary attention switching system, reflected by the P3a is sensitized as a function of decreased sleep quality.

  18. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment and the Elusive Pursuit of Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Marvin S; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Robertson, Allison G; Swanson, Jeffrey W

    2017-02-01

    Involuntary outpatient commitment (OPC)-also referred to as 'assisted outpatient treatment' or 'community treatment orders'-are civil court orders whereby persons with serious mental illness and repeated hospitalisations are ordered to adhere to community-based treatment. Increasingly, in the United States, OPC is promoted to policy makers as a means to prevent violence committed by persons with mental illness. This article reviews the background and context for promotion of OPC for violence prevention and the empirical evidence for the use of OPC for this goal. Relevant publications were identified for review in PubMed, Ovid Medline, PsycINFO, personal communications, and relevant Internet searches of advocacy and policy-related publications. Most research on OPC has focussed on outcomes such as community functioning and hospital recidivism and not on interpersonal violence. As a result, research on violence towards others has been limited but suggests that low-level acts of interpersonal violence such as minor, noninjurious altercations without weapon use and arrests can be reduced by OPC, but there is no evidence that OPC can reduce major acts of violence resulting in injury or weapon use. The impact of OPC on major violence, including mass shootings, is difficult to assess because of their low base rates. Effective implementation of OPC, when combined with intensive community services and applied for an adequate duration to take effect, can improve treatment adherence and related outcomes, but its promise as an effective means to reduce serious acts of violence is unknown.

  19. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Williamson

    Full Text Available The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies.

  20. Sticky Tunes: How Do People React to Involuntary Musical Imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J.; Liikkanen, Lassi A.; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or ‘earworms’; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  1. Mean sarcomere length-force relationship of rat muscle fibre bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, C. J.; Heslinga, J. W.; Lee-de Groot, M. B.; van der Laarse, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    To study how sarcomere length inhomogeneities and the duration of activation affect sarcomere length-force characteristics of muscle, the mean sarcomere length-force relationship was determined for twitches and at 100 and 300 ms during tetanic activation for rat extensor digitorum longus and

  2. Characterization of the C-protein from posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of the adult chicken: heterogeneity within a single sarcomere

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Specific isoforms of myofibrillar proteins are expressed in different muscles and in various fiber types within a single muscle. We have isolated and characterized monoclonal antibodies against C-proteins from slow tonic (anterior latissimus dorsi, ALD) and fast twitch (pectoralis major) muscles of the chicken. Although the antibody against "fast" C-protein (MF-1) did not bind to the "slow" isoform and the antibody to the "slow" C-protein (ALD-66) did not bind to the "fast" isoform, we observ...

  3. Carbonic Anhydrase III Is Expressed in Mouse Skeletal Muscles Independent of Fiber Type-Specific Myofilament Protein Isoforms and Plays a Role in Fatigue Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is a metabolic enzyme and a regulator for intracellular pH. CAIII has been reported with high level expression in slow twitch skeletal muscles. Here we demonstrate that CAIII is expressed in multiple slow and fast twitch muscles of adult mouse independent of the expression of myosin isoforms. Expressing similar fast type of myofilament proteins, CAIII-positive tibial anterior (TA) muscle exhibits higher tolerance to fatigue than that of CAIII-negative fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in in situ contractility studies. We further studied the muscles of CAIII knockout ( Car3 -KO) mice. The loss of CAIII in soleus and TA muscles in Car3 -KO mice did not change muscle mass, sarcomere protein isoform contents, and the baseline twitch and tetanic contractility as compared with age-matched wild type (WT) controls. On the other hand, Car3 -KO TA muscle showed faster force reduction at the beginning but higher resistance at the end during a fatigue test, followed by slower post fatigue recovery than that of WT TA muscle. Superfused Car3 -KO soleus muscle also had faster total force reduction during fatigue test than that of WT soleus. However, it showed a less elevation of resting tension followed by a better post fatigue recovery under acidotic stress. CAIII was detected in neonatal TA and EDL muscle, downregulated during development, and then re-expressed in adult TA but not EDL muscles. The expression of CAIII in Tnnt1 -KO myopathy mouse soleus muscle that has diminished slow fiber contents due to the loss of slow troponin T remained high. Car3 -KO EDL, TA, and soleus muscles showed no change in the expression of mitochondria biomarker proteins. The data suggest a fiber type independent expression of CAIII with a role in the regulation of intracellular pH in skeletal muscle and may be explored as a target for improving fatigue resistance and for the treatment of TNNT1 myopathies.

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase III Is Expressed in Mouse Skeletal Muscles Independent of Fiber Type-Specific Myofilament Protein Isoforms and Plays a Role in Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is a metabolic enzyme and a regulator for intracellular pH. CAIII has been reported with high level expression in slow twitch skeletal muscles. Here we demonstrate that CAIII is expressed in multiple slow and fast twitch muscles of adult mouse independent of the expression of myosin isoforms. Expressing similar fast type of myofilament proteins, CAIII-positive tibial anterior (TA) muscle exhibits higher tolerance to fatigue than that of CAIII-negative fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in in situ contractility studies. We further studied the muscles of CAIII knockout (Car3-KO) mice. The loss of CAIII in soleus and TA muscles in Car3-KO mice did not change muscle mass, sarcomere protein isoform contents, and the baseline twitch and tetanic contractility as compared with age-matched wild type (WT) controls. On the other hand, Car3-KO TA muscle showed faster force reduction at the beginning but higher resistance at the end during a fatigue test, followed by slower post fatigue recovery than that of WT TA muscle. Superfused Car3-KO soleus muscle also had faster total force reduction during fatigue test than that of WT soleus. However, it showed a less elevation of resting tension followed by a better post fatigue recovery under acidotic stress. CAIII was detected in neonatal TA and EDL muscle, downregulated during development, and then re-expressed in adult TA but not EDL muscles. The expression of CAIII in Tnnt1-KO myopathy mouse soleus muscle that has diminished slow fiber contents due to the loss of slow troponin T remained high. Car3-KO EDL, TA, and soleus muscles showed no change in the expression of mitochondria biomarker proteins. The data suggest a fiber type independent expression of CAIII with a role in the regulation of intracellular pH in skeletal muscle and may be explored as a target for improving fatigue resistance and for the treatment of TNNT1 myopathies. PMID:28018233

  5. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump and metabolic enzyme expression in rabbit fast-type and slow-type denervated skeletal muscles. A time course study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, M; Lompré, A M; Janmot, C; D'Albis, A

    1996-06-15

    Recent reports by d'Albis et al. have shown that denervation of 8-day-old rabbit fast-twitch muscle (gastrocnemius) leads to the transformation of the muscle towards a slow phenotype but the changes towards slow-type myosin isoforms and contractile properties of the muscle were temporally uncoordinated. We analyzed the time course of the effects of denervation of the gastrocnemius on the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoforms (SERCA) and on the metabolic state of the muscle. Northern-blot analysis showed a rapid loss of the fast Ca2+ pump isoform (SERCA 1) mRNA from the denervated gastrocnemius which became of the oxidative type. The changes observed were complete as early as 35 days post-natal, i.e at the time when changes in contractile properties were previously observed. Denervation of the slow-twitch soleus led to a 50% decrease in the level of the slow Ca2+ pump isoform (SERCA 2) mRNA and was without effect on the metabolic state of the muscle. These findings extend previous results suggesting that in rabbit, continuous innervation is required for differentiation of fast-twitch muscles but is not an absolute requirement for differentiation of the slow-twitch muscle.

  6. Virtual muscle: a computational approach to understanding the effects of muscle properties on motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E J; Brown, I E; Loeb, G E

    2000-09-15

    This paper describes a computational approach to modeling the complex mechanical properties of muscles and tendons under physiological conditions of recruitment and kinematics. It is embodied as a software package for use with Matlab and Simulink that allows the creation of realistic musculotendon elements for use in motor control simulations. The software employs graphic user interfaces (GUI) and dynamic data exchange (DDE) to facilitate building custom muscle model blocks and linking them to kinetic analyses of complete musculoskeletal systems. It is scalable in complexity and accuracy. The model is based on recently published data on muscle and tendon properties measured in feline slow- and fast-twitch muscle, and incorporates a novel approach to simulating recruitment and frequency modulation of different fiber-types in mixed muscles. This software is distributed freely over the Internet at http://ami.usc.edu/mddf/virtualmuscle.

  7. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway is differentially involved in beta-agonist-induced hypertrophy in slow and fast muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H; Zeng, C; Ricome, A; Hannon, K M; Grant, A L; Gerrard, D E

    2007-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling beta-adrenergic receptor agonist (BA)-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy are not well known. We presently report that BA exerts a distinct muscle- and muscle fiber type-specific hypertrophy. Moreover, we have shown that pharmacologically or genetically attenuating extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in muscle fibers resulted in decreases (P muscle ablated (P muscles revealed that ERK1/2 is activated to a greater extent in fast- than in slow-twitch muscles. These data indicate that ERK signaling is differentially involved in BA-induced hypertrophy in slow and fast skeletal muscles, suggesting that the increased abundance of phospho-ERK1/2 and ERK activity found in fast-twitch myofibers, compared with their slow-twitch counterparts, may account, at least in part, for the fiber type-specific hypertrophy induced by BA stimulation. These data suggest that fast myofibers are pivotal in the adaptation of muscle to environmental cues and that the mechanism underlying this change is partially mediated by the MAPK signaling cascade.

  8. Plasticity in central neural drive with short-term disuse and recovery - effects on muscle strength and influence of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, L G; Aagaard, P; Ørtenblad, N; Kjaer, M; Suetta, C

    2018-02-21

    While short-term disuse negatively affects mechanical muscle function (e.g. isometric muscle strength) little is known of the relative contribution of adaptions in central neural drive and peripheral muscle contractility. The present study investigated the relative contribution of adaptations in central neural drive and peripheral muscle contractility on changes in isometric muscle strength following short-term unilateral disuse (4 days, knee brace) and subsequent active recovery (7 days, one session of resistance training) in young (n = 11, 24 yrs) and old healthy men (n = 11, 67 yrs). Maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVC) (isokinetic dynamometer), voluntary muscle activation (superimposed twitch technique), and electrically evoked muscle twitch force (single and doublet twitch stimulation) were assessed prior to and after disuse, and after recovery. Following disuse, relative decreases in MVC did not differ statistically between old (16.4 ± 3.7%, p plasticity in voluntary muscle activation (~central neural drive) is a dominant mechanism affecting short-term disuse- and recovery-induced changes in muscle strength in older adults. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Involuntary social cue integration in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumkaya, Selim; Karadag, Filiz; Jellema, Tjeerd; Oguzhanoglu, Nalan Kalkan; Ozdel, Osman; Atesci, Figen Culha; Varma, Gulfizar

    2014-01-01

    Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have inferior social functioning compared to healthy controls, but the exact nature of these social deficits, and the underpinning mechanisms, are unknown. We sought to investigate social functioning in patients with OCD by measuring their involuntary/spontaneous processing of social cues using a specifically designed test, which might reveal deficits in these patients that explicit voluntary tasks do not detect. The sample of the study consisted of an OCD group (n = 25) and a control group (n = 26). Both groups performed an adaptation of the Social Distance Judgment Task (SDJT; Jellema et al., 2009), in which participants have to judge the geometrical distance between two human cartoon figures presented on a computer screen. Head/gaze direction and body direction were manipulated to be either compatible, i.e. both directed to the left or to the right (Compatible condition) or incompatible, i.e. body directed toward the observer (frontal view) and head/gaze directed to the left or right (Incompatible condition). In the Compatible condition, controls nor OCD patients were influenced by the social cues in their judgments of the geometrical distances. However, in the Incompatible condition, where the attentional cue was more conspicuous, both groups were influenced by the cues, but the controls to a significantly larger extent than the OCD patients. This study showed that patients with OCD are less likely, compared to controls, to automatically/spontaneously integrate the other's direction of attention into their visual percept. This may have resulted in their judgments of the geometrical distances between the agents to be more accurate than those of controls. The suggested impairment in automatically integrating social cues may have important repercussions for the social functioning of OCD patients. © 2014.

  10. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  11. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes prolongs twitch duration without affecting the energetics of isolated ventricular trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, June-Chiew; Tran, Kenneth; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J; Loiselle, Denis S

    2014-04-15

    Diabetes induces numerous electrical, ionic and biochemical defects in the heart. A general feature of diabetic myocardium is its low rate of activity, commonly characterised by prolonged twitch duration. This diabetes-induced mechanical change, however, seems to have no effect on contractile performance (i.e., force production) at the tissue level. Hence, we hypothesise that diabetes has no effect on either myocardial work output or heat production and, consequently, the dependence of myocardial efficiency on afterload of diabetic tissue is the same as that of healthy tissue. We used isolated left ventricular trabeculae (streptozotocin-induced diabetes versus control) as our experimental tissue preparations. We measured a number of indices of mechanical (stress production, twitch duration, extent of shortening, shortening velocity, shortening power, stiffness, and work output) and energetic (heat production, change of enthalpy, and efficiency) performance. We calculated efficiency as the ratio of work output to change of enthalpy (the sum of work and heat). Consistent with literature results, we showed that peak twitch stress of diabetic tissue was normal despite suffering prolonged duration. We report, for the first time, the effect of diabetes on mechanoenergetic performance. We found that the indices of performance listed above were unaffected by diabetes. Hence, since neither work output nor change of enthalpy was affected, the efficiency-afterload relation of diabetic tissue was unaffected, as hypothesised. Diabetes prolongs twitch duration without having an effect on work output or heat production, and hence efficiency, of isolated ventricular trabeculae. Collectively, our results, arising from isolated trabeculae, reconcile the discrepancy between the mechanical performance of the whole heart and its tissues.

  12. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes prolongs twitch duration without affecting the energetics of isolated ventricular trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes induces numerous electrical, ionic and biochemical defects in the heart. A general feature of diabetic myocardium is its low rate of activity, commonly characterised by prolonged twitch duration. This diabetes-induced mechanical change, however, seems to have no effect on contractile performance (i.e., force production) at the tissue level. Hence, we hypothesise that diabetes has no effect on either myocardial work output or heat production and, consequently, the dependence of myocardial efficiency on afterload of diabetic tissue is the same as that of healthy tissue. Methods We used isolated left ventricular trabeculae (streptozotocin-induced diabetes versus control) as our experimental tissue preparations. We measured a number of indices of mechanical (stress production, twitch duration, extent of shortening, shortening velocity, shortening power, stiffness, and work output) and energetic (heat production, change of enthalpy, and efficiency) performance. We calculated efficiency as the ratio of work output to change of enthalpy (the sum of work and heat). Results Consistent with literature results, we showed that peak twitch stress of diabetic tissue was normal despite suffering prolonged duration. We report, for the first time, the effect of diabetes on mechanoenergetic performance. We found that the indices of performance listed above were unaffected by diabetes. Hence, since neither work output nor change of enthalpy was affected, the efficiency-afterload relation of diabetic tissue was unaffected, as hypothesised. Conclusions Diabetes prolongs twitch duration without having an effect on work output or heat production, and hence efficiency, of isolated ventricular trabeculae. Collectively, our results, arising from isolated trabeculae, reconcile the discrepancy between the mechanical performance of the whole heart and its tissues. PMID:24731754

  13. Lifestyles and routine activities of South African teenagers at risk of being trafficked for involuntary prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutya, Thozama Mandisa

    2010-12-01

    The United Nations estimates that 79% of teenage girls trafficked globally every year are forced into involuntary prostitution. About 247 000 South African children work in exploitative conditions; about 40 000 South African female teenagers work as prostitutes. This paper investigates lifestyles and routine activities of teenagers at risk of being trafficked for involuntary prostitution. The key concepts involuntary prostitution, intergenerational sex and exploitative conditions are defined in relation to the lifestyles and routine activities of South African female teenagers. Human trafficking for involuntary prostitution is described, based on a literature review. Lifestyle exposure and routine activities theories help to explain the potential victimisation of these teenagers in human trafficking for involuntary prostitution. Actual lifestyle and routine activities of South African teenagers and risky behaviours (substance abuse, intergenerational sex and child prostitution) are discussed as factors that make teens vulnerable to such trafficking. This paper recommends that human trafficking prevention efforts (awareness programmes and information campaigns) be directed at places frequented by human traffickers and teenagers in the absence of a capable guardian to reduce victimisation, as traffickers analyse the lifestyles and routine activities of their targets. South Africa should also interrogate entrenched practices such as intergenerational sex.

  14. Decisions to initiate involuntary commitment: the role of intensive community services and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Elizabeth Lloyd; Leon-Verdin, MaGuadalupe; Wanchek, Tanya Nicole; Bonnie, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the predictors of actions to initiate involuntary commitment of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Emergency services clinicians throughout Virginia completed a questionnaire following each face-to-face evaluation of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Over a one-month period in 2007, a total of 2,624 adults were evaluated. Logistic hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze the relationship between demographic, clinical, and service-related variables and outcomes of the emergency evaluations. Several factors predicted 84% of the actions taken to initiate involuntary commitment. These included unavailability of alternatives to hospitalization, such as temporary housing or residential crisis stabilization; evaluation of the client in a hospital emergency room or police station or while in police custody; current enrollment in treatment; and clinical factors related to the commitment criteria, including risk of self-harm or harm to others, acuity and severity of the crisis, and current drug abuse or dependence. A lack of intensive community-based treatment and support in lieu of hospitalization accounted for a significant portion of variance in actions to initiate involuntary commitment. Comprehensive community services and supports for individuals experiencing mental health crises may reduce the rate of involuntary hospitalization. There is a need to enrich intensive community mental health services and supports and to evaluate the impact of these enhancements on the frequency of involuntary mental health interventions.

  15. Ways of sampling voluntary and involuntary autobiographical memories in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anne S; Johannessen, Kim B; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive psychologists have often equaled retrieval of personal events with voluntary recall from autobiographical memory, but more recent research shows that autobiographical memories often come to mind involuntarily-that is, with no retrieval effort. Voluntary memories have been studied in numerous laboratory experiments in response to word-prompts, whereas involuntary memories primarily have been examined in an everyday living context, using a structured diary procedure. However, it remains unclear how voluntary memories sampled in the laboratory map onto self-prompted voluntary memories in daily life. Here, we used a structured diary procedure to compare different types of voluntary autobiographical memories to their involuntary counterparts. The results replicated previous findings with regard to differences between word-prompted voluntary and involuntary memories, whereas there were fewer differences between self-prompted voluntary and involuntary memories. The findings raise the question as to what is the best way of sampling voluntary memories and the best comparison for involuntary memories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychiatric patients' views on why their involuntary hospitalisation was right or wrong: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsakou, Christina; Rose, Diana; Amos, Tim; Bowers, Len; McCabe, Rosemarie; Oliver, Danielle; Wykes, Til; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    To explore involuntary patients' retrospective views on why their hospitalisation was right or wrong. Involuntary patients were recruited from 22 hospitals in England and interviewed in-depth. The study drew on grounded theory and thematic analysis. Most of the patients felt mentally unwell before admission and out of control during their treatment. Despite these common experiences, three groups of patients with distinct views on their involuntary hospitalisation were identified: those who believed that it was right, those who thought it was wrong and those with ambivalent views. Those with retrospectively positive views believed that hospitalisation ensured that they received treatment, averted further harm and offered them the opportunity to recover in a safe place. They felt that coercion was necessary, as they could not recognise that they needed help when acutely unwell. Those who believed that involuntary admission was wrong thought that their problems could have been managed through less coercive interventions, and experienced hospitalisation as an unjust infringement of their autonomy, posing a permanent threat to their independence. Patients with ambivalent views believed that they needed acute treatment and that hospitalisation averted further harm. Nonetheless, they thought that their problems might have been managed through less coercive community interventions or a shorter voluntary hospitalisation. The study illustrates why some patients view their involuntary hospitalisation positively, whereas others believe it was wrong. This knowledge could inform the development of interventions to improve patients' views and treatment experiences.

  17. Trauma-related versus positive involuntary thoughts with and without meta-awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Deanne M; Strange, Deryn; Lindsay, D Stephen; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2016-11-01

    In earlier work, we asked subjects to report involuntary thoughts relating to a trauma film and also probed subjects periodically. Subjects often reported involuntary thoughts in response to probes, suggesting they lacked meta-awareness of those thoughts. But it is possible that some or all probe-detected thoughts were continuations of thoughts subjects had spontaneously reported, leading us to overestimate involuntary thoughts lacking meta-awareness. It is also unclear whether failures in meta-awareness occur for other emotional events. We exposed subjects to a negative or positive film. Subsequently, they reported involuntary film-related thoughts and responded to probes that distinguished new from continuing thoughts. Many (54%) but not all probe-caught thoughts were thought continuations. This result supports our earlier finding that people can lack meta-awareness for trauma-related thoughts, but suggests caution in how meta-awareness is assessed. We also found that self-caught negative and positive involuntary thoughts occurred at a similar frequency, with different characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, S A; Hansen, B F

    1988-01-01

    The extent to which muscle glycogen concentrations can be increased during exposure to maximal insulin concentrations and abundant glucose was investigated in the isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Perfusion for 7 h in the presence of 20,000 microU/ml insulin and 11-13 mM glucose...... increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased (mean +/- SE) from 34.9 +/- 1.2 mumol.g-1.h-1 at 0 h to 7.5 +/- 0.7 after 7 h of perfusion. During...... the perfusion muscle glycogen synthase activity decreased and free intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate increased indicating that glucose disposal was impaired. However, glucose transport as measured by the uptake of 3-O-[14C]methyl-D-glucose was also markedly decreased after 5 and 7 h of perfusion...

  19. Coexistence of potentiation and fatigue in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Rassier

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Twitch potentiation and fatigue in skeletal muscle are two conditions in which force production is affected by the stimulation history. Twitch potentiation is the increase in the twitch active force observed after a tetanic contraction or during and following low-frequency stimulation. There is evidence that the mechanism responsible for potentiation is phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains of myosin, a Ca2+-dependent process. Fatigue is the force decrease observed after a period of repeated muscle stimulation. Fatigue has also been associated with a Ca2+-related mechanism: decreased peak Ca2+ concentration in the myoplasm is observed during fatigue. This decrease is probably due to an inhibition of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although potentiation and fatigue have opposing effects on force production in skeletal muscle, these two presumed mechanisms can coexist. When peak myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration is depressed, but myosin light chains are relatively phosphorylated, the force response can be attenuated, not different, or enhanced, relative to previous values. In circumstances where there is interaction between potentiation and fatigue, care must be taken in interpreting the contractile responses.

  20. The Emotional Response to Everyday Involuntary and Voluntary Memories in Dysphoria and Non-Dysphoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Palacio Gonzalez, Adriana; Watson, Lynn; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Retrieving personal memories may cause emotional reactions and thus a need for emotion regulation. Past research indicates that involuntary memories have a greater effect on mood that the voluntary counterparts. However, different dimensions of the emotional response (i.e., intensity and regulation......) upon retrieval of both involuntary and voluntary personal memories have not been thoroughly examined. We examined individuals’ emotional intensity and regulation of everyday involuntary and voluntary memories during dysphoria and non-depression. Twenty dysphoric individuals and 23 non......-depressed individuals completed a structured memory diary where the intensity of fear, sadness, happiness, and anger, as well as the employment of emotion regulation strategies (brooding, memory suppression, emotional suppression, and reflection) was recorded upon the retrieval of everyday autobiographical memories...

  1. The influence of inspiratory muscle work history and specific inspiratory muscle training upon human limb muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Alison K; Lomax, Michelle

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of the work history of the inspiratory muscles upon the fatigue characteristics of the plantar flexors (PF). We hypothesized that under conditions where the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex has been elicited, PF fatigue would be hastened due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Eight volunteers undertook seven test conditions, two of which followed 4 week of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The inspiratory metaboreflex was induced by inspiring against a calibrated flow resistor. We measured torque and EMG during isometric PF exercise at 85% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Supramaximal twitches were superimposed upon MVC efforts at 1 min intervals (MVC(TI)); twitch interpolation assessed the level of central activation. PF was terminated (T(lim)) when MVC(TI) was <50% of baseline MVC. PF T(lim) was significantly shorter than control (9.93 +/- 1.95 min) in the presence of a leg cuff inflated to 140 mmHg (4.89 +/- 1.78 min; P = 0.006), as well as when PF was preceded immediately by fatiguing inspiratory muscle work (6.28 +/- 2.24 min; P = 0.009). Resting the inspiratory muscles for 30 min restored the PF T(lim) to control. After 4 weeks, IMT, inspiratory muscle work at the same absolute intensity did not influence PF T(lim), but T(lim) was significantly shorter at the same relative intensity. The data are the first to provide evidence that the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex accelerates the rate of calf fatigue during PF, and that IMT attenuates this effect.

  2. Long-term effects of involuntary hospitalization on medication adherence, treatment engagement and perception of coercion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Susanne; Pfiffner, Carmen; Weiser, Prisca; Längle, Gerhard; Croissant, Daniela; Schepp, Wiltrud; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas; Eschweiler, Gerhard; Steinert, Tilman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the long-term influence of involuntary hospitalization on medication adherence, engagement in out-patient treatment and perceived coercion to treatment participation. In a naturalistic observational multi-centre study, 290 voluntarily and 84 involuntarily hospitalized patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder had been followed up over a period of 2 years with half-yearly assessments. Assessments included self-rated medication adherence, externally judged medication adherence by blood levels, engagement in treatment and perceived coercion. The statistical analyses were based on multilevel hierarchical modelling of longitudinal data. Level and development of the outcome was controlled for involuntariness, for sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Involuntariness of the index-hospitalization did not have an effect on the development of treatment engagement or medication adherence judged by blood levels in the course of the follow-up period when the models were controlled for sociodemographic variables and clinical history. It was associated, though, with a continuously lower self-rated medication adherence. Moreover, former involuntarily hospitalized patients more often felt coerced in several treatment aspects at the follow-up assessments. Yet, there was no difference between the voluntary and involuntary group with regard to the development of the levels of adherence or coercion experiences over time. Involuntary hospitalization does not seem to impair future treatment engagement in patients with schizophrenia, but formerly involuntarily hospitalized patients continue to be more sensitive to subjective or real coercion in their treatment and more vulnerable to medication non-adherence. Hereby, their risk of future involuntary hospitalization might be increased.

  3. Coming to Terms With Permanent Involuntary Childlessness: A Phenomenological Analysis of Bulletin Board Postings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaira H. Malik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the role that online support communities play in the lives of women faced with permanent involuntary childlessness. To understand the experiences of these women, this study conducted a thematic analysis of messages downloaded from an online community for permanent involuntary childlessness. Four central themes were identified: Feeling like an “outsider”, A whole lifetime of loss, Coming to terms with childlessness and Finding a safe haven online. These findings show that the online community appeared to empower women to move on with their lives and discover a new sense of self-worth and identity beyond that of motherhood.

  4. A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opjordsmoen, S; Friis, S; Melle, I

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission. METHOD: We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary...

  5. Desmin Cytoskeleton Linked to Muscle Mitochondrial Distribution and Respiratory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Derek J.; Mavroidis, Manolis; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies have previously suggested potential association of intermediate filaments (IFs) with mitochondria. Thus, we have investigated mitochondrial distribution and function in muscle lacking the IF protein desmin. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle tissue sections, as well as histochemical staining for the mitochondrial marker enzymes cytochrome C oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase, demonstrate abnormal accumulation of subsarcolemmal clumps of mitochondria in predominantly slow twitch skeletal muscle of desmin-null mice. Ultrastructural observation of desmin-null cardiac muscle demonstrates in addition to clumping, extensive mitochondrial proliferation in a significant fraction of the myocytes, particularly after work overload. These alterations are frequently associated with swelling and degeneration of the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial abnormalities can be detected very early, before other structural defects become obvious. To investigate related changes in mitochondrial function, we have analyzed ADP-stimulated respiration of isolated muscle mitochondria, and ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in situ using saponin skinned muscle fibers. The in vitro maximal rates of respiration in isolated cardiac mitochondria from desmin-null and wild-type mice were similar. However, mitochondrial respiration in situ is significantly altered in desmin-null muscle. Both the maximal rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption and the dissociation constant (K m) for ADP are significantly reduced in desmin-null cardiac and soleus muscle compared with controls. Respiratory parameters for desmin-null fast twitch gastrocnemius muscle were unaffected. Additionally, respiratory measurements in the presence of creatine indicate that coupling of creatine kinase and the adenine translocator is lost in desmin-null soleus muscle. This coupling is unaffected in cardiac muscle from desmin-null animals. All of these studies indicate that desmin IFs play a significant

  6. Muscle ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Rushkevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease. This pathology is characterized by the involvement of central and peripheral motor neurons in the pathological process. One  f the specific symptoms of ALS is fasciculations - involuntary muscle contractions that may occasionally precede the development of muscle weakness and atrophies. This paper summarizes the accumulated practical experience in using muscle ultrasound study in the diagnosis of fasciculations and their prevalence as an early sign of anterior corneal lesion in ALS.

  7. The effect of unloading and reloading on the extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle: changes in muscle strength and motor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TES Takala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During three weeks of hindlimb suspension muscle mass decreased 36%(p<0.05 in Soleus (Sol muscle, 17%(p<0.05 in Gastrocnemius (GM and had tendences to decrease in plantaris (Pla (15% and in extensor digitorum longus (EDL (8% muscles. Hindlimb grip strength decreased gradually during three weeks of unloading. Specific mRNA level for type I collagen decreased during three weeks of unloading in Sol muscle by 28%(p<0.05 and in GM muscle by 34%(p<0.05. mRNA level for type III collagen decreased in Sol by 22%(p<0.05 and in GM by 51%(p<0.001. Non-fibrillar type IV collagen mRNA level decreased in both above-described muscles about 25%(p<0.05. Lysyl oxidase (LO mRNA level decreased by 46%(p<0.05 during three weeks of unloading only in Sol muscle. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 mRNA level increased during reloading period in Sol and GM muscles subsequently 28%(p<0.05 and 49%(p<0.001. During unloading the activity of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in slow-twitch (ST and fast-twitch (FT muscles changed in different directions: during first week of suspension, their expression decreased in Sol muscle by 31%(p<0.05 and increased in Pla and GM muscle subsequently by 24%(p<0.05 and 31%(p<0.001. The pretranslational level of changes in fibrillar and non-fibrillar collagen, MMP-2, LO, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 -are shown for first time together with changes in muscle strength and motor activity during unloading and reloading

  8. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G. (Free Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1987-08-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was <30%. Straight lines were used to fit the relation between heat production and force. Hypothyroidism significantly decreases tension-independent heat during contraction of EDL and soleus muscle. Because the tension-independent heat is considered to be related to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake activity and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state.

  9. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  10. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  11. Mending new communities after involuntary resettlement in the Philippines and Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quetulio-Navarra, M.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement of poor families contribute to the worsening of their poverty situation yet involuntary resettlement still takes place. According to the latest Report of the Indonesian Centre on Housing Rights and Eviction, more than 12,000 people were reportedly evicted in August 2008 to give way

  12. The involuntary nature of music-evoked autobiographical memories in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Fasotti, L.; Allain, P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to examine the involuntary nature of music-evoked autobiographical memories. For this purpose, young adults, older adults, and patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were asked to remember autobiographical events in two

  13. Individual differences in recognising involuntary autobiographical memories: impact on the reporting of abstract cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, John H; Bernas, Ronan S; Clevinger, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This study examined individual differences in the ability to recognise involuntary autobiographical memories. We hypothesised that individuals may not always recognise involuntary memories which are cued by abstract experiences (e.g., thoughts or language), while they are better able to recognise those which are cued by concrete sensory/perpetual experiences. We hypothesised that individuals without formal training in psychology would be more prone to these recognition failures than individuals with training in psychology. We tested the hypothesis by comparing the results of general first-year undergraduate students, graduate students in psychology and graduates students in other disciplines after each had participated in a two-week diary study of their naturally occurring involuntary memories. The results showed undergraduate participants and non-psychology graduate participants reporting fewer involuntary memories being triggered by abstract cues than the graduate psychology participants, while the groups did not differ in the report of memories triggered by sensory/perpetual cues. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. Local Geographical Distribution of Acute Involuntary Psychiatric Admissions in Subdistricts In and Around Utrecht, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Arjan W; van Ommeren, Omar W H R; van Buuren, Melissa L; Laan, Wijnand; Smeets, Hugo M; Engelhard, Iris M

    BACKGROUND: Acute involuntary psychiatric admissions (AIPA) tend to be applied more often in urban areas. OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to describe AIPA prevalence differences between the subdistricts in an urban area, and to identify which district characteristics are associated with a higher

  15. 26 CFR 1.1033(a)-1 - Involuntary conversions; nonrecognition of gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1033(a)-1... section 1033 to involuntary conversions of a principal residence with respect to which an election has been made under section 121 (relating to gain from sale or exchange of residence of individual who has...

  16. Why Am I Remembering This Now? Predicting the Occurrence of Involuntary (Spontaneous) Episodic Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Staugaard, Soren Rislov; Sorensen, Louise Maria Torp

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary episodic memories are memories of events that come to mind spontaneously, that is, with no preceding retrieval attempts. They are common in daily life and observed in a range of clinical disorders in the form of negative, intrusive recollections or flashbacks. However, little is known about their underlying mechanisms. Here we report a…

  17. A Reading "Din in the Head": Evidence of Involuntary Mental Rehearsal in Second Language Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Jeff; Rodrigo, Victoria

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the phenomenon of involuntary mental rehearsal of language as an indicator of second language (L2) acquisition among acquirers. This study provides evidence for an L2 "Din in the head" after reading from a survey of two classes of intermediate Spanish students: a reading-only group and a reading-and-conversation group. (11 references)…

  18. Re-Creation in the Age of Wisdom : Involuntary Job Transition in Women over 50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyon-Dugin, Frances E.

    2017-01-01

    Re-Creation in the Age of Wisdom: Involuntary Job Transition in Women over 50 Frances Elizabeth Lyon-Dugin A large share of our time with each other is centered around employment or ‘work’, however we define it. A time of transition between jobs, especially when a job is lost through no choice of

  19. Involuntary Mental Time Travel and Its Effect on Prospective Teachers' Situational Intrinsic Motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay

    2010-01-01

    Recent cognitive psychological research has argued that involuntary mental time travel is an important individual difference variable that has the potential to affect an individual's motivation. However, this issue has not been empirically investigated in educational settings such as teacher education. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the…

  20. The importance of safety, agency and control during involuntary mental health admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyder, Marianne; Bland, Robert; Crompton, David

    2016-08-01

    Constructs such as personal recovery, patient engagement and consumer involvement are central in mental health care delivery. These approaches emphasise the importance of empowerment and choice. Under some circumstances Involuntary Treatment Orders (ITO) allow a person to be treated for a mental illness without their consent. This study explores the tensions between the principles of empowerment and control and involuntary treatment. Twenty-five involuntary inpatients of a major teaching hospital were interviewed about their experiences of being placed under an ITO. The interviews were analysed thematically. Being able to have some sense of agency and re-asserting personal control are critical components of an involuntary mental health admission. Participants wanted information about their treatment, the ITO process and their environment. They also spoke about the importance of a space where they felt safe from themselves and others to make sense of the experience. This study suggests that for coercive treatment to aid, rather than disrupt recovery, treatment services need to focus on: the provision of rights; the creation of a sense of safety; establishing supportive relationships; carrying hope and finding ways to foster a strong sense of agency and empowerment.

  1. [Factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okido, Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Pina, Juliana Coelho; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2016-02-01

    To identify the factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions of technology-dependent children, in the municipality of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study, with a quantitative approach. After an active search, 124 children who qualified under the inclusion criteria, that is to say, children from birth to age 12, were identified. Data was collected in home visits to mothers or the people responsible for the children, through the application of a questionnaire. Analysis of the data followed the assumptions of the Generalized Linear Models technique. 102 technology-dependent children aged between 6 months and 12 years participated in the study, of whom 57% were male. The average number of involuntary hospital admissions in the previous year among the children studied was 0.71 (±1.29). In the final model the following variables were significantly associated with the outcome: age (OR=0.991; CI95%=0.985-0.997), and the number of devices (OR=0.387; CI95%=0.219-0.684), which were characterized as factors of protection and quantity of medications (OR=1.532; CI95%=1.297-1.810), representing a risk factor for involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children. The results constitute input data for consideration of the process of care for technology-dependent children by supplying an explanatory model for involuntary hospital admissions for this client group.

  2. The Short-Term Impact of Involuntary Migration in China's Three Gorges: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sean-Shong; Cao, Yue; Xi, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the short-term impact of involuntary migration resulting from China's Three Gorges Dam project on the 1.3 million persons being displaced. We focus on the social, economic, and mental and physical health impact using three sets of indicators. Using a prospective research design, we gathered information about…

  3. Reflections on involuntary treatment in the prevention of fatal anorexia nervosa: A review of five cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Janni Schmidt; Brixen, Kim; Andries, Alin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Involuntary treatment in the prevention of fatal anorexia nervosa (AN) is still controversial. METHOD: Five fatal cases of AN were identified out of 1,160 patients who attended a specialized eating disorder unit between 1994 and 2006. Information on inpatient, ambulatory, and emergency...

  4. Involuntary psychiatric hospitalisation, stigma stress and recovery: a 2-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z; Lay, B; Oexle, N; Drack, T; Bleiker, M; Lengler, S; Blank, C; Müller, M; Mayer, B; Rössler, W; Rüsch, N

    2018-01-31

    Compulsory admission can be experienced as devaluing and stigmatising by people with mental illness. Emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalisation and stigma-related stress may affect recovery, but longitudinal data are lacking. We, therefore, examined the impact of stigma-related emotional reactions and stigma stress on recovery over a 2-year period. Shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalisation, stigma stress, self-stigma and empowerment, as well as recovery were assessed among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalisation. More shame, self-contempt and stigma stress at baseline were correlated with increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment after 1 year. More stigma stress at baseline was associated with poor recovery after 2 years. In a longitudinal path analysis more stigma stress at baseline predicted poorer recovery after 2 years, mediated by decreased empowerment after 1 year, controlling for age, gender, symptoms and recovery at baseline. Stigma stress may have a lasting detrimental effect on recovery among people with mental illness and a history of involuntary hospitalisation. Anti-stigma interventions that reduce stigma stress and programs that enhance empowerment could improve recovery. Future research should test the effect of such interventions on recovery.

  5. Sarcolipin overexpression improves muscle energetics and reduces fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopariwala, Danesh H.; Pant, Meghna; Shaikh, Sana A.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie; Pan, Zui

    2015-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a regulator of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase in skeletal muscle. Recent studies using SLN-null mice have identified SLN as a key player in muscle thermogenesis and metabolism. In this study, we exploited a SLN overexpression (SlnOE) mouse model to determine whether increased SLN level affected muscle contractile properties, exercise capacity/fatigue, and metabolic rate in whole animals and isolated muscle. We found that SlnOE mice are more resistant to fatigue and can run significantly longer distances than wild-type (WT). Studies with isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles showed that SlnOE EDL produced higher twitch force than WT. The force-frequency curves were not different between WT and SlnOE EDLs, but at lower frequencies the pyruvate-induced potentiation of force was significantly higher in SlnOE EDL. SLN overexpression did not alter the twitch and force-frequency curve in isolated soleus muscle. However, during a 10-min fatigue protocol, both EDL and soleus from SlnOE mice fatigued significantly less than WT muscles. Interestingly, SlnOE muscles showed higher carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 protein expression, which could enhance fatty acid metabolism. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase expression was higher in SlnOE EDL, suggesting increased glycolytic capacity. We also found an increase in store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in isolated flexor digitorum brevis fibers of SlnOE compared with WT mice. These data allow us to conclude that increased SLN expression improves skeletal muscle performance during prolonged muscle activity by increasing SOCE and muscle energetics. PMID:25701006

  6. [Involuntary treatment of mental patients in the community: legal and ethical dilemmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrossili, M

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the measure of involuntary treatment of mental patients in the community, not only with regard to human rights and more specifically those of persons with mental disorders, but also with regard to ethics and deontology in mental healthcare delivery service. In this light, the important role of informed consent in psychiatry with regard to the psychiatric act is examined. Informed consent of mental patients in treatment when they are in need of voluntary or involuntary hospitalization is further examined, while emphasis is being put on the case of involuntary treatment. The Convention for Human Rights and Biomedicine (Convention of Οviedo), the European Convention of Human Rights, other documents of International Organizations (UN) and specialized national legislation (A. 2071/1992, Chapter vi, Greek law) constitute basic reference and interpretation points. The examination of consent and the demarcation of the exceptions are important issues that need to be approached. More particularly, our interest lies with the article 7 of the Convention for Human Rights and Biomedicine, which specifically refers to the protection of person who suffers from a mental disorder. The opinion that informed consent in psychiatric treatment and involuntary treatment are concepts and processes which are distinct but not always mutually exclusive is enhanced. In any case, involuntary treatment causes major dilemmas as far as informed consent in the psychiatric act is concerned, as it raises issues that affect the autonomy of the person. Today, however, there are many factors which influence public politics towards the adoption of the measure of involuntary treatment within the community. How is it that this paradoxical link is legitimized and justified: involuntary treatment and community? The enactment of the above mentioned measure in many European and North American countries has created new paths in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. Nonetheless, it

  7. Differentiation and fiber type-specific activity of a muscle creatine kinase intronic enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Phillip WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of genes, including muscle creatine kinase (MCK, are differentially expressed in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers, but the fiber type-specific regulatory mechanisms are not well understood. Results Modulatory region 1 (MR1 is a 1-kb regulatory region within MCK intron 1 that is highly active in terminally differentiating skeletal myocytes in vitro. A MCK small intronic enhancer (MCK-SIE containing a paired E-box/myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 regulatory motif resides within MR1. The SIE's transcriptional activity equals that of the extensively characterized 206-bp MCK 5'-enhancer, but the MCK-SIE is flanked by regions that can repress its activity via the individual and combined effects of about 15 different but highly conserved 9- to 24-bp sequences. ChIP and ChIP-Seq analyses indicate that the SIE and the MCK 5'-enhancer are occupied by MyoD, myogenin and MEF2. Many other E-boxes located within or immediately adjacent to intron 1 are not occupied by MyoD or myogenin. Transgenic analysis of a 6.5-kb MCK genomic fragment containing the 5'-enhancer and proximal promoter plus the 3.2-kb intron 1, with and without MR1, indicates that MR1 is critical for MCK expression in slow- and intermediate-twitch muscle fibers (types I and IIa, respectively, but is not required for expression in fast-twitch muscle fibers (types IIb and IId. Conclusions In this study, we discovered that MR1 is critical for MCK expression in slow- and intermediate-twitch muscle fibers and that MR1's positive transcriptional activity depends on a paired E-box MEF2 site motif within a SIE. This is the first study to delineate the DNA controls for MCK expression in different skeletal muscle fiber types.

  8. Serum levo-carnitine levels and skeletal muscle functions in type 2 diabetes mellitus in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleem, S.B.; Hussain, M.M.; Farooq, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study serum levo-carnitine (l-carnitine) levels and isometric contraction, force frequency relationship and fatigue of rodent skeletal muscles in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Physiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups; group I (control), fed on normal diet ad libitum and Group II (diabetic), fed on high fat diet and administered streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). At 21st day, plasma glucose and TG/HDL ratio were measured to confirm the development of T2DM in group II. At 28th day, blood was drawn by intracardiac puncture to estimate serum levo-carnitine levels. Contractile functions of skeletal muscles were assessed by using iWorx AHK/214 physiological data acquisition unit. Simple muscle twitches, maximum isometric twitch tension (MITT), time-to-peak twitch tension (TPTT) and time-to-relax to 50% of the peak twitch tension (1/2RT) of extensor digitorum muscles were recorded. Muscles were stimulated at higher frequencies to determine maximum fused tetanic tension (MFTT), maximum fused tetanic tension after fatigue protocol (TTFP) and recovery from fatigue (RF). Results: Serum levo-carnitine level decreased significantly in the diabetic group. Both groups had similar MITT, TPTT and 1/2RT but decline in MFTT, TTFP and RF was significant in the diabetic rats. Conclusion: T2DM adversely affected serum levo-carnitine levels and the contractile functions of rodent skeletal muscle at high frequency stimulation. (author)

  9. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stroke rehabilitation with different exercise paradigms has been investigated, but which one is more effective in facilitating motor recovery and up-regulating brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF after brain ischemia would be interesting to clinicians and patients. Voluntary exercise, forced exercise, and involuntary muscle movement caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and seventeen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into four groups: Control (Con, Voluntary exercise of wheel running (V-Ex, Forced exercise of treadmill running (F-Ex, and Involuntary exercise of FES (I-Ex with implanted electrodes placed in two hind limb muscles on the affected side to mimic gait-like walking pattern during stimulation. Ischemic stroke was induced in all rats with the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion model and fifty-seven rats had motor deficits after stroke. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, rats were arranged to their intervention programs. De Ryck's behavioral test was conducted daily during the 7-day intervention as an evaluation tool of motor recovery. Serum corticosterone concentration and BDNF levels in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex were measured after the rats were sacrificed. V-Ex had significantly better motor recovery in the behavioral test. V-Ex also had significantly higher hippocampal BDNF concentration than F-Ex and Con. F-Ex had significantly higher serum corticosterone level than other groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Voluntary exercise is the most effective intervention in upregulating the hippocampal BDNF level, and facilitating motor recovery. Rats that exercised voluntarily also showed less

  10. A Case of Painful Hemimasticatory Spasm with Masseter Muscle Hypertrophy Responsive to Botulinum Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyuck Kim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemimasticatory spasm (HMS is a rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contractions of the unilateral jaw-closing muscles. HMS has been frequently described in association with facial hemiatrophy or localized scleroderma. A 42-year-old female presented with involuntary paroxysmal spasms of the left face, of 6 months duration. Her lower face on the left was markedly hypertrophied without skin lesions. An electrophysiological study indicated that the masseter reflexes and masseteric silent period were attenuated on the affected side. Surface electromyography demonstrated irregular bursts of motor unit potentials at high frequencies up to 200 Hz. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed marked hypertrophy of the left masseter muscle. Biopsy of the hypertrophied masseter muscle was normal. Repeated local injections of botulinum toxin noticeably reduced the size of the hypertrophied muscle as well as improved the patient’s symptoms.

  11. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  12. Qualitative exploration of stakeholders' perspectives of involuntary admission under the Mental Health Act 2001 in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Siobhán; Casey, Dympna; Cooney, Adeline; Higgins, Agnes; McGuinness, David; Bainbridge, Emma; Keys, Mary; Georgieva, Irina; Brosnan, Liz; Beecher, Claire; Hallahan, Brian; McDonald, Colm; Murphy, Kathy

    2017-12-01

    There is international interest in, and continued concern about, the potential long-term impact of involuntary admission to psychiatric institutions, and the effect this coercive action has on a person's well-being and human rights. Involuntary detention in hospital remains a controversial process that involves stakeholders with competing concerns and who often describe negative experiences of the process, which can have long-lasting effects on the therapeutic relationship with service users. The aim of the present study was to explore the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the involuntary admission and detention of people under the Mental Health Act 2001 in Ireland. Focus groups were used to collect data. Stakeholders interviewed were service users, relatives, general practitioners, psychiatrists, mental health nurses, solicitors, tribunal members, and police. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Three key categories emerged: (i) getting help; (ii) detention under the Act; and (iii) experiences of the tribunal process. This research highlights gaps in information and uncertainty about the involuntary admission process for stakeholders, but particularly for service users who are most affected by inadequate processes and supports. Mental health law has traditionally focussed on narrower areas of detention and treatment, but human rights law requires a greater refocussing on supporting service users to ensure a truly voluntary approach to care. The recent human rights treaty, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, is to guarantee a broad range of fundamental rights, such as liberty and integrity, which can be affected by coercive processes of involuntary admission and treatment. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Effect of Taurine Supplementation on the Alterations in Amino Acid Content in Skeletal Muscle with Exercise in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikura, Keisuke; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ra, Song-Gyu; Endo, Shoji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Miyakawa, Shumpei; Ohmori, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Taurine included abundantly in skeletal muscle, particularly in the slow-twitch fibers, enhances exercise performance. However, the exact mechanisms for this effect have been unclear. The present study investigated the influence of taurine supplementation on amino acids profile in skeletal muscles as one of mechanisms in the enhancement of exercise performance induced by taurine. In the rats that received taurine solution, amino acids concentrations were comprehensively quantified in two port...

  14. The neuromechanical functional contractile properties of the thigh muscles measured using tensiomyography in male athletes and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toskić Lazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary neuromechanical muscle contractile properties, especially of the extensor muscles and knee joint flexors as the largest muscle groups of the caudal part of the body, play an important role in both everyday movement and sport. Based on these data we can obtain important information on the functional properties of muscles. The basic means of evaluation of the functional involuntary neuromechanical muscles contractile properties is the non-invasive tensiomyographic method (TMG. The aim of this study was to determine the differences between the involuntary neuromechanical contractile properties of the thigh muscles measured using the TMG method on a sample of male athletes and non-athletes. The sample of participants was made up of 17 athletes and 10 non-athletes. By applying the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and the t-test, we achieved results which indicate that of the overall 30 variables, a difference was determined among 13 of them. Most of the differences were determined for the extensor muscles of the right knee, especially of the rectus femoris muscle. It was also shown that in addition to the main knee joint extensor muscle (rectus femoris the main knee joint flexor muscle (biceps femoris also takes part in the definition of the difference between athletes and non-athletes. The results have shown that the following variables: contraction time (Tc and delay contraction time (Td are the functional parameters for which the highest difference between athletes and non-athletes were determined (from t = -2.284, p < 0.05 for the vastus lateralis of the right leg to t = -4.018, p < 0.01 for the rectus femoris of the left leg. These results have shown that it is possible to determine the differences in the functional involuntary neuromechanical contractile properties of the thigh muscles among trained and untrained individuals using the tensiomyographic method, but at the same time indicated that these differences were very

  15. Simulation of the reversal of neuromuscular block by sequestration of the free molecules of the muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigrovic, Vladimir; Bhatt, Shashi B; Amann, Anton

    2007-12-01

    The study examined in simulations the interaction between a muscle relaxant and an antagonist that binds the free molecules of the relaxant, as experimentally demonstrated for rocuronium and sugammadex. The hypothetical muscle relaxant D and the hypothetical antagonist X were assigned pharmacokinetic properties to define the time course of their concentrations in plasma, and pharmacodynamic properties to define binding of D to either X or the receptors at the motor end plates. D, X, and their complex DX were postulated to diffuse between plasma and the effect compartment. The first and the fourth twitch elicited in sequential trains of four stimuli were evaluated in a model of neuromuscular transmission. The rates of reactions were formulated as differential equations and the equations solved numerically. If the affinity of D for X is comparable to that of D for the postsynaptic receptors, doses of X two to four times larger than the dose of D produce a fast and a complete recovery of the twitches. Smaller doses of X or lower affinities of D for X accomplish a slower and only partial recovery. Additionally, the complete restoration of twitch strength within 2 min after the injection of X requires that X and DX diffuse into the effect compartment. The simulations reveal the physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of an antagonist that restores twitch strength by sequestering the free molecules of the muscle relaxant.

  16. Muscle glucose metabolism following exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1982-01-01

    Muscle glycogen stores are depleted during exercise and are rapidly repleted during the recovery period. To investigate the mechanism for this phenomenon, untrained male rats were run for 45 min on a motor-driven treadmill and the ability of their muscles to utilize glucose was then assessed during...... in glucose utilization enhanced by prior exercise appeared to be glucose transport across the cell membrane, as in neither control nor exercised rats did free glucose accumulate in the muscle cell. Following exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate the release of lactate into the perfusate was unaltered......; however its ability to stimulate the incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen in certain muscles was enhanced. Thus at a concentration of 75 muU/ml insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis eightfold more in the fast-twitch red fibers of the red gastrocnemius than it did in the same muscle...

  17. Catalase overexpression does not impair extensor digitorum longus muscle function in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2007-12-01

    Catalase is a major antioxidant enzyme. Increasing catalase expression represents a promising avenue to improve muscle function in certain physiological conditions and in some muscle diseases. We hypothesized that catalase overexpression should not impair normal muscle contraction. We delivered a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged human catalase gene to normal mouse muscle by an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Western blot and immunostaining revealed efficient expression of HA-tagged catalase. Enzymatic assay demonstrated an approximately threefold increase in catalase activity in AAV-infected muscles. Catalase overexpression impaired neither twitch nor tetanic tension in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Furthermore, EDL fatigue response was not altered. Taken together, we have developed a novel AAV vector to enhance catalase expression. Lack of apparent toxicity in normal muscle strongly supports further exploration of this vector to reduce oxidative stress-induced muscle damage.

  18. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P < 0.01) twitch and tetanus contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P < 0.05) specific force. SOL and EDL of age-matched but not younger BEH mice showed greater exercise-induced CK efflux compared with BEH+/+ mice. In summary, myostatin dysfunction leads to impairment in muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  19. Intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse skeletal muscle in response to single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, resulting from single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise. At 1, 4, and 24 h after single-dose treatment with clenbuterol or after acute running exercise, the soleus and TA muscles were isolated and subjected to analysis. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise in the soleus muscle but not in the TA muscle. Although there was no change in the phosphorylation of Akt after acute exercise in either muscle, phosphorylation of Akt in the soleus muscle increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment, whereas that in the TA muscle remained unchanged. These results suggest that p38 MAPK and Akt pathways play a functional role in the adaptation to clenbuterol treatment and exercise, particularly in slow-twitch muscles.

  20. The Expression of MMP-2 Following Immobilization and High-Intensity Running in Plantaris Muscle Fiber in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-week, high-intensity running and a 2-week immobilization on muscle fiber type composition of the plantaris muscle from 18 female, 6-month-old Wistar rats (running, n = 6; immobilization, n = 6; sedentary control, n = 6 was bio- and histochemically investigated. The high-intensity treadmill running began with 20 min (32 m/min, 0% gradient, 75% VO2 max, up to 50 min/day. Right hind limbs were immobilized by an external fixation procedure for 13 days. Muscle mass of the plantaris muscle in the immobilized groups was reduced by 16% in comparison with the sedentary control group. High-intensity running and immobilization increased both mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP-2 in plantaris. Running and immobilization decreased the percentages of transverse sectional area of fast-twitch glycolytic (FG type IIb fibers, running increased relative cross-sectional area of fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG type IIa muscle fibers, whereas immobilization increased relative cross-sectional area of slow-twitch oxidative (SO muscle fibers (type I. Our results suggest that both high-intensity running and immobilization are enough to induce overwhelming changes in plantaris.

  1. Lesions of rat skeletal muscle after local block of acetylcholinesterase and neuromuscular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mense, S; Simons, D G; Hoheisel, U; Quenzer, B

    2003-06-01

    In skeletal muscle, a local increase of acetylcholine (ACh) in a few end plates has been hypothesized to cause the formation of contraction knots that can be found in myofascial trigger points. To test this hypothesis in rats, small amounts of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor [diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP)] were injected into the proximal half of the gastrocnemius muscle, and the muscle nerve was electrically stimulated for 30-60 min for induction of muscle twitches. The distal half of the muscle, which performed the same contractions, served as a control to assess the effects of the twitches without DFP. Sections of the muscle were evaluated for morphological changes in relation to the location of blocked end plates. Compared with the distal half of the muscle, the DFP-injected proximal half exhibited significantly higher numbers of abnormally contracted fibers (local contractures), torn fibers, and longitudinal stripes. DFP-injected animals in which the muscle nerve was not stimulated and that were allowed to survive for 24 h exhibited the same lesions but in smaller numbers. The data indicate that an increased concentration of ACh in a few end plates causes damage to muscle fibers. The results support the assumption that a dysfunctional end plate exhibiting increased release of ACh may be the starting point for regional abnormal contractions, which are thought to be essential for the formation of myofascial trigger points.

  2. Aspects of respiratory muscle fatigue in a mountain ultramarathon race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Thomas U; Marty, Julia; Kerherve, Hugo; Millet, Guillaume Y; Verges, Samuel; Spengler, Christina M

    2015-03-01

    Ultramarathon running offers a unique possibility to investigate the mechanisms contributing to the limitation of endurance performance. Investigations of locomotor muscle fatigue show that central fatigue is a major contributor to the loss of strength in the lower limbs after an ultramarathon. In addition, respiratory muscle fatigue is known to limit exercise performance, but only limited data are available on changes in respiratory muscle function after ultramarathon running and it is not known whether the observed impairment is caused by peripheral and/or central fatigue. In 22 experienced ultra-trail runners, we assessed respiratory muscle strength, i.e., maximal voluntary inspiratory and expiratory pressures, mouth twitch pressure (n = 16), and voluntary activation (n = 16) using cervical magnetic stimulation, lung function, and maximal voluntary ventilation before and after a 110-km mountain ultramarathon with 5862 m of positive elevation gain. Both maximal voluntary inspiratory (-16% ± 13%) and expiratory pressures (-21% ± 14%) were significantly reduced after the race. Fatigue of inspiratory muscles likely resulted from substantial peripheral fatigue (reduction in mouth twitch pressure, -19% ± 15%; P fatigue. Forced vital capacity remained unchanged, whereas forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak inspiratory and expiratory flow rates, and maximal voluntary ventilation were significantly reduced (P muscle strength for inspiratory muscles shown to result from significant peripheral muscle fatigue with only little contribution of central fatigue. This is in contrast to findings in locomotor muscles. Whether this difference between muscle groups results from inherent neuromuscular differences, their specific pattern of loading or other reasons remain to be clarified.

  3. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  4. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was 2+ cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca 2+ cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported 45 Ca 2+ -uptake activity and 45 Ca 2+ -loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state

  5. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Effect of formoterol, a long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, on muscle strength and power output, metabolism and fatigue during maximal sprinting in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders; Hostrup, Morten; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    L min(-1) kg(-1)) performed a 30-s cycle ergometer sprint after inhalation of either 54 µg formoterol (FOR) or placebo (PLA). Before and after the sprint, muscle biopsies were collected from vastus lateralis and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and contractile properties of quadriceps were measured......, and the decrease in ATP content was lower (PMVC and peak twitch force were higher (P

  7. Respiratory muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Schlager, Daniel; Walker, David J; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Windisch, Wolfram; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases limit daily activities, impair quality of life and result in (exertional) dyspnoea. This has mainly been attributed to a decline in lung function and impaired gas exchange. However, the contribution of respiratory muscle dysfunction to these limitations remains to be conclusively investigated. Interstitial lung disease patients and matched controls performed body plethysmography, a standardised 6-min walk test, volitional tests (respiratory drive (P0.1), global maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure (PImax), sniff nasal pressure (SnPna) and inspiratory muscle load) and nonvolitional tests on respiratory muscle function and strength (twitch mouth and transdiaphragmatic pressure during bilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (TwPmo and TwPdi)). 25 patients and 24 controls were included in the study. PImax and SnPna remained unaltered (both p>0.05), whereas P0.1 and the load on the inspiratory muscles were higher (both prespiratory muscle strength remains preserved. Central respiratory drive and the load imposed on the inspiratory muscles are increased. Whether impaired respiratory muscle function impacts morbidity and mortality in interstitial lung disease patients needs to be investigated in future studies.

  8. Torque decrease during submaximal evoked contractions of the quadriceps muscle is linked not only to muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowski, Boris; Lepers, Romuald; Martin, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the neuromuscular mechanisms involved in the torque decrease induced by submaximal electromyostimulation (EMS) of the quadriceps muscle. It was hypothesized that torque decrease after EMS would reflect the fatigability of the activated motor units (MUs), but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited as a result of changes in axonal excitability threshold. Two experiments were performed on 20 men to analyze 1) the supramaximal twitch superimposed and evoked at rest during EMS (Experiment 1, n = 9) and 2) the twitch response and torque-frequency relation of the MUs activated by EMS (Experiment 2, n = 11). Torque loss was assessed by 15 EMS-evoked contractions (50 Hz; 6 s on/6 s off), elicited at a constant intensity that evoked 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The same stimulation intensity delivered over the muscles was used to induce the torque-frequency relation and the single electrical pulse evoked after each EMS contraction (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, supramaximal twitch was induced by femoral nerve stimulation. Torque decreased by ~60% during EMS-evoked contractions and by only ~18% during MVCs. This was accompanied by a rightward shift of the torque-frequency relation of MUs activated and an increase of the ratio between the superimposed and posttetanic maximal twitch evoked during EMS contraction. These findings suggest that the torque decrease observed during submaximal EMS-evoked contractions involved muscular mechanisms but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited due to changes in axonal excitability. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Expression of Dihydropyridine and Ryanodine Receptors in Type IIA Fibers of Rat Skeletal Muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, Katja; Mänttäri, Satu; Järvilehto, Matti

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a significant (p=0.01) correlation between DHP as well as Ry receptor density and the expression of MHC IIa (correlation factor r=0.674 and r=0.645, respectively) in one slow-twitch, postural muscle (m. soleus), one mixed, fast-twitch muscle (m. gastrocnemius) and two fast-twitch muscles (m. rectus femoris, m. extensor digitorum longus). The highest DHP and Ry receptor density was found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (0.058±0.0060 and 0.057±0.0158 ODu, respectively). As expected, the highest relative percentage of MHC IIa was also found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (70.0±7.77%). Furthermore, histochemical experiments revealed that the IIA fibers stained most strongly for the fluorophore-conjugated receptor blockers. Our data clearly suggest that the expression of DHPRs and RyRs follows a fiber type-specific pattern, indicating an important role for these proteins in the maintenance of an effective Ca 2+ cycle in the fast contracting fiber type IIA

  10. Heterogeneous effects of calorie restriction on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling of individual rat skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sharma

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR (consuming ~60% of ad libitum, AL, intake improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (~140 µU/ml in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [(14C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG, phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160 kDa, AS160, abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (P<0.05 concomitant with significantly (P<0.05 elevated 2-DG uptake in 3 of the 4 fast-twitch muscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (P<0.05 increases in phosphorylation of both Akt and AS160. Among the 3 muscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (P<0.05 CR-related increases in Akt and AS160 phosphorylation. The current data revealed that CR leads to greater whole body glucose disposal in part attributable to elevated in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by fast-twitch muscles. The

  11. [Muscle cramps--differential diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    Calf cramps are sudden, involuntary, painful contractions of part of or the entire calf muscle that are visible, persist for seconds to minutes and then spontaneously resolve. They can occur with no identifiable cause, and are then referred to as common calf cramps. They may also be symptoms associated with diseases of the peripheral and central nervous system and muscle diseases. They also occur in association with metabolic disorders. In such cases the cramps are more extensive, intense and persist for longer. Cramp-fasciculation-myalgia syndrome additionally involves paresthesias and other signs of hyperexcitability of peripheral nerves. The recommended treatment for patients with frequent calf cramps causing significant impairment of well-being is oral administration of quinidine and/or botulinum toxin treatment of the calf muscles. During pregnancy both products are contraindicated, while probatory administration of magnesium is indicated.

  12. Electrically and hybrid-induced muscle activations: effects of muscle size and fiber type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Stratton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB and vastus lateralis (VL was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations. Surface electromyography (sEMG and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1 compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC force, and 2 compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG.

  13. Task-dependent inhomogeneous muscle activities within the bi-articular human rectus femoris muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naokazu Miyamoto

    Full Text Available The motor nerve of the bi-articular rectus femoris muscle is generally split from the femoral nerve trunk into two sub-branches just before it reaches the distal and proximal regions of the muscle. In this study, we examined whether the regional difference in muscle activities exists within the human rectus femoris muscle during maximal voluntary isometric contractions of knee extension and hip flexion. Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from the distal, middle, and proximal regions. In addition, twitch responses were evoked by stimulating the femoral nerve with supramaximal intensity. The root mean square value of electromyographic amplitude during each voluntary task was normalized to the maximal compound muscle action potential amplitude (M-wave for each region. The electromyographic amplitudes were significantly smaller during hip flexion than during knee extension task for all regions. There was no significant difference in the normalized electromyographic amplitude during knee extension among regions within the rectus femoris muscle, whereas those were significantly smaller in the distal than in the middle and proximal regions during hip flexion task. These results indicate that the bi-articular rectus femoris muscle is differentially controlled along the longitudinal direction and that in particular the distal region of the muscle cannot be fully activated during hip flexion.

  14. Overexpression of TEAD-1 in transgenic mouse striated muscles produces a slower skeletal muscle contractile phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsika, Richard W; Schramm, Christine; Simmer, Gretchen; Fitzsimons, Daniel P; Moss, Richard L; Ji, Juan

    2008-12-26

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors serve important functional roles during embryonic development and in striated muscle gene expression. Our previous work has implicated a role for TEAD-1 in the fast-to-slow fiber-type transition in response to mechanical overload. To investigate whether TEAD-1 is a modulator of slow muscle gene expression in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged TEAD-1 under the control of the muscle creatine kinase promoter. We show that striated muscle-restricted HA-TEAD-1 expression induced a transition toward a slow muscle contractile protein phenotype, slower shortening velocity (Vmax), and longer contraction and relaxation times in adult fast twitch extensor digitalis longus muscle. Notably, HA-TEAD-1 overexpression resulted in an unexpected activation of GSK-3alpha/beta and decreased nuclear beta-catenin and NFATc1/c3 protein. These effects could be reversed in vivo by mechanical overload, which decreased muscle creatine kinase-driven TEAD-1 transgene expression, and in cultured satellite cells by TEAD-1-specific small interfering RNA. These novel in vivo data support a role for TEAD-1 in modulating slow muscle gene expression.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy with myofeedback for women with stress urinary incontinence : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kruif, Yvette P.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Involuntary urine loss can be a major social and hygienic problem for women suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A frequently applied treatment method for these women is pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy (PFE), either with or without EMG-biofeedback (myofeedback). This paper attempts

  16. Long-term consequences of youth volunteering: Voluntary versus involuntary service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Morgül, Kerem

    2017-09-01

    Despite the renewed interest in youth volunteering in recent years, there remain major gaps in our knowledge of its consequences. Drawing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examine the long-term effects of youth volunteering on the civic and personal aspects of volunteers' lives. Our results suggest that youth volunteering has a positive return on adult volunteering only when it is voluntary, and that net of contextual factors neither voluntary nor involuntary youth service has a significant effect on adult voting. Regarding personal outcomes, our findings indicate that the psychological benefits of youth volunteering accrue only to voluntary participants, whereas both voluntary and involuntary youth service are positively associated with educational attainment and earnings in young adulthood. Taken together, these results lend support to the case for youth volunteer programs, though the civic benefits of these programs appear to be less dramatic than generally suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Involuntary detention and treatment of the mentally ill: China's 2012 Mental Health Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    The long-awaited Mental Health Law of China was passed on 26 October 2012 and took effect on 1 May 2013. Being the first national legislation on mental health, it establishes a basic legal framework to regulate mental health practice and recognizes the fundamental rights of persons with mental disorders. This article focuses on the system of involuntary detention and treatment of the mentally ill under the new law, which is expected to prevent the so-called "Being misidentified as mentally disordered" cases in China. A systematic examination of the new system demonstrates that the Mental Health Law of China implicitly holds two problematic assumptions and does not provide adequate protection of the fundamental rights of the involuntary patients. Administrative enactments and further national legislative efforts are needed to remedy these flaws in the new law. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The involuntary nature of music-evoked autobiographical memories in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Fasotti, Luciano; Allain, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this paper was to examine the involuntary nature of music-evoked autobiographical memories. For this purpose, young adults, older adults, and patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) were asked to remember autobiographical events in two conditions: after being exposed to their own chosen music, and in silence. Compared to memories evoked in silence, memories evoked in the "Music" condition were found to be more specific, accompanied by more emotional content and impact on mood, and retrieved faster. In addition, these memories engaged less executive processes. Thus, with all these characteristics and the fact that they are activated by a perceptual cue (i.e., music), music-evoked autobiographic memories have all the features to be considered as involuntary memories. Our paper reveals several characteristics of music-evoked autobiographical memories in AD patients and offers a theoretical background for this phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrophysiological, histochemical, and hormonal adaptation of rat muscle after prolonged hindlimb suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Kyparos, Antonios; Albani, Maria; Frossinis, Athanasios; Papadelis, Christos L; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Vivas, Ana; Guiba-Tziampiri, Olympia

    2004-05-01

    The perspective of long-duration flights for future exploration, imply more research in the field of human adaptation. Previous studies in rat muscles hindlimb suspension (HLS), indicated muscle atrophy and a change of fibre composition from slow-to-fast twitch types. However, the contractile responses to long-term unloading is still unclear. Fifteen adult Wistar rats were studied in 45 and 70 days of muscle unweighting and soleus (SOL) muscle as well as extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were prepared for electrophysiological recordings (single, twitch, tetanic contraction and fatigue) and histochemical stainings. The loss of muscle mass observed was greater in the soleus muscle. The analysis of electrophysiological properties of both EDL and SOL showed significant main effects of group, of number of unweighting days and fatigue properties. Single contraction for soleus muscle remained unchanged but there was statistically significant difference for tetanic contraction and fatigue. Fatigue index showed a decrease for the control rats, but increase for the HLS rats. According to the histochemical findings there was a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism during HLS. The data suggested that muscles atrophied, but they presented an adaptation pattern, while their endurance in fatigue was decreased. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatty acid binding protein 3 is associated with skeletal muscle strength in polymyositis and dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Hang; Peng, Qinglin; Jiang, Wei; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Guochun

    2017-02-01

    To determine serum levels and histopathological characteristics of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) in patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM), and to evaluate the correlation between the FABP3 and muscle strength. The study population included 24 subjects with PM/DM, 12 subjects with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hyper-creatine kinase-emia (AMSH), and 10 healthy control subjects. Muscle strength was measured by using the Manual Muscle Test (MMT8). Serum CK, myoglobin and FABP3 levels were tested. Correlations between variables were studied by using Spearman's rank and partial correlation analysis methods. Immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent stainings of FABP3 were performed to investigate its distribution in skeletal muscle. PM/DM patients had significantly higher (P 0.05), -0.228 (P > 0.05) and -0.927 (P < 0.001), respectively. Immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent staining showed that FABP3 expression increased in the skeletal muscle of PM/DM patients and was mainly distributed in slow twitch muscle fibers. Serum levels of FABP3 in PM/DM patients were significantly increased and were mainly distributed in slow twitch muscle fibers, displaying a closer association with muscle weakness than did serum levels of CK and myoglobin. FABP3 is likely to be a useful serum biomarker in PM/DM patients. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Calcium-Enhanced Twitching Motility in Xylella fastidiosa Is Linked to a Single PilY1 Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F; Parker, Jennifer K; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is restricted to the xylem vessel environment, where mineral nutrients are transported through the plant host; therefore, changes in the concentrations of these elements likely impact the growth and virulence of this bacterium. Twitching motility, dependent on type IV pili (TFP), is required for movement against the transpiration stream that results in basipetal colonization. We previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca) increases the motility of X. fastidiosa, although the mechanism was unknown. PilY1 is a TFP structural protein recently shown to bind Ca and to regulate twitching and adhesion in bacterial pathogens of humans. Sequence analysis identified three pilY1 homologs in X. fastidiosa (PD0023, PD0502, and PD1611), one of which (PD1611) contains a Ca-binding motif. Separate deletions of PD0023 and PD1611 resulted in mutants that still showed twitching motility and were not impaired in attachment or biofilm formation. However, the response of increased twitching at higher Ca concentrations was lost in the pilY1-1611 mutant. Ca does not modulate the expression of any of the X. fastidiosa PilY1 homologs, although it increases the expression of the retraction ATPase pilT during active movement. The evidence presented here suggests functional differences between the PilY1 homologs, which may provide X. fastidiosa with an adaptive advantage in environments with high Ca concentrations, such as xylem sap. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Potential benefits of taurine in the prevention of skeletal muscle impairment induced by disuse in the hindlimb-unloaded rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Gramegna, Gianluca; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Basco, Davide; Svelto, Maria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2012-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) in rats induces severe atrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in postural slow-twitch muscles, as occurs in human disuse conditions, such as spaceflight or bed rest. In rats, a reduction of soleus muscle weight and a decrease of cross-sectional area (CSA) were observed as signs of atrophy. An increased expression of the fast-isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed the phenotype transition. In parallel the resting cytosolic calcium concentration (restCa) was decreased and the resting chloride conductance (gCl), which regulates muscle excitability, was increased toward the values of the fast-twitch muscles. Here, we investigated the possible role of taurine, which is known to modulate calcium homeostasis and gCl, in the restoration of muscle impairment due to 14-days-HU. We found elevated taurine content and higher expression of the taurine transporter TauT in the soleus muscle as compared to the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of control rats. Taurine level was reduced in the HU soleus muscle, although, TauT expression was not modified. Taurine oral supplementation (5 g/kg) fully prevented this loss, and preserved resting gCl and restCa together with the slow MHC phenotype. Taurine supplementation did not prevent the HU-induced drop of muscle weight or fiber CSA, but it restored the expression of MURF-1, an atrophy-related gene, suggesting a possible early protective effect of taurine. In conclusion, taurine prevented the HU-induced phenotypic transition of soleus muscle and might attenuate the atrophic process. These findings argue for the beneficial use of taurine in the treatment of disuse-induced muscle dysfunction.

  3. A panel data analysis of the effects of voluntary and involuntary separations on unit performance in

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Simón

    2012-01-01

    We studied the relationship between collective involuntary and voluntary turnover over unit-level performance. Our unique dataset, consisting of panel data with 24-month observations for 232 stores of a large Spanish fashion retail company, enabled us to compare different time lags between the moment of departures and the performance measures using fixed effects regressions. Such analyses revealed that both types of turnover had different consequences. Voluntary turnover was unrelated to stor...

  4. The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R.; Sankarpandi, Sathish K.; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previousl...

  5. Factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children

    OpenAIRE

    Okido,Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Pina,Juliana Coelho; Lima,Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions of technology-dependent children, in the municipality of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil. METHOD A cross-sectional study, with a quantitative approach. After an active search, 124 children who qualified under the inclusion criteria, that is to say, children from birth to age 12, were identified. Data was collected in home visits to mothers or the people responsible for the children, through th...

  6. Tendon displacements during voluntary and involuntary finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nathalie; Gijsbertse, Kaj; Selles, Ruud W; de Korte, Chris L; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Stegeman, Dick F; Maas, Huub

    2018-01-23

    In the human hand, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. One potential cause for this is mechanical connections between the tendons and muscle bellies corresponding to the different fingers. The aim of this study was to determine the tendon displacement of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) of both the instructed and the neighboring, non-instructed fingers during single finger flexion movements. In nine healthy subjects (age 22-29 years), instructed and non-instructed FDS finger tendon displacement of the index, middle and ring finger was measured using 2D ultrasound analyzed with speckle tracking software in two conditions: active flexion of all finger joints with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed fingers were restricted. Our results of the free movement protocol showed an average tendon displacement of 27 mm for index finger flexion, 21 mm for middle finger flexion and 17 mm for ring finger flexion. Displacements of the non-instructed finger tendons (≈12 mm) were higher than expected based of the amount of non-instructed finger movement. In the restricted protocol, we found that, despite minimal joint movements, substantial non-instructed finger tendon displacement (≈9 mm) was still observed, which was interpreted as a result of tendon strain. When this strain component was subtracted from the tendon displacement of the non-instructed fingers during the free movement condition, the relationship between finger movement and tendon displacement of the instructed and non-instructed finger became comparable. Thus, when studying non-instructed finger tendon displacement it is important to take tendon strain into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, T; Stallknecht, B M; Pedersen, O

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an incre......The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers...

  8. Single muscle fiber gene expression with run taper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Murach

    Full Text Available This study evaluated gene expression changes in gastrocnemius slow-twitch myosin heavy chain I (MHC I and fast-twitch (MHC IIa muscle fibers of collegiate cross-country runners (n = 6, 20±1 y, VO₂max = 70±1 ml•kg-1•min-1 during two distinct training phases. In a controlled environment, runners performed identical 8 kilometer runs (30:18±0:30 min:s, 89±1% HRmax while in heavy training (∼72 km/wk and following a 3 wk taper. Training volume during the taper leading into peak competition was reduced ∼50% which resulted in improved race times and greater cross-section and improved function of MHC IIa fibers. Single muscle fibers were isolated from pre and 4 hour post run biopsies in heavily trained and tapered states to examine the dynamic acute exercise response of the growth-related genes Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (FN14, Myostatin (MSTN, Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72, Muscle ring-finger protein-1 (MURF1, Myogenic factor 6 (MRF4, and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 via qPCR. FN14 increased 4.3-fold in MHC IIa fibers with exercise in the tapered state (P<0.05. MSTN was suppressed with exercise in both fiber types and training states (P<0.05 while MURF1 and HSP72 responded to running in MHC IIa and I fibers, respectively, regardless of training state (P<0.05. Robust induction of FN14 (previously shown to strongly correlate with hypertrophy and greater overall transcriptional flexibility with exercise in the tapered state provides an initial molecular basis for fast-twitch muscle fiber performance gains previously observed after taper in competitive endurance athletes.

  9. The impact of a change in commitment procedures on the character of involuntary psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, R M; Briggs, R P; Ratner, C H

    1984-04-01

    The statutory requirements for involuntary civil psychiatric confinement have become increasingly restrictive. In the jurisdiction under investigation, patients were originally admitted under an Order to Apprehend (OTA) procedure simply on the petition of two affiants who indicated the patient was in need of care. A newly elected judge instituted changes requiring affiants to claim the subject was "dangerous" to self or others and asking for a clinical assessment and recommendation before signing the petitioned request for involuntary confinement. It might be expected that the more restrictive procedures would have produced a population of more assaultive patients. A study of petitions signed under in the earlier (N = 133) and later, more restrictive (N = 218) procedures indicated that the proportion of assaultive or dangerous patients was virtually identical. Further investigation, using hospital data an OTA patients from this area in both time periods, suggested that while patients were not more assaultive, they appeared to be more seriously ill or psychiatrically impaired. Apparently, movement to a dangerousness standard that allows clinical discretion in interpreting its presence may result in involuntary commitments for more seriously ill, although not necessarily more assaultive, patients.

  10. Involuntary and voluntary recall of musical memories: A comparison of temporal accuracy and emotional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Bashir, Zaariyah; Farrugia, Nicolas; Stewart, Lauren

    2018-01-29

    Comparisons between involuntarily and voluntarily retrieved autobiographical memories have revealed similarities in encoding and maintenance, with differences in terms of specificity and emotional responses. Our study extended this research area into the domain of musical memory, which afforded a unique opportunity to compare the same memory as accessed both involuntarily and voluntarily. Specifically, we compared instances of involuntary musical imagery (INMI, or "earworms")-the spontaneous mental recall and repetition of a tune-to deliberate recall of the same tune as voluntary musical imagery (VMI) in terms of recall accuracy and emotional responses. Twenty participants completed two 3-day tasks. In an INMI task, participants recorded information about INMI episodes as they occurred; in a VMI task, participants were prompted via text message to deliberately imagine each tune they had previously experienced as INMI. In both tasks, tempi of the imagined tunes were recorded by tapping to the musical beat while wearing an accelerometer and additional information (e.g., tune name, emotion ratings) was logged in a diary. Overall, INMI and VMI tempo measurements for the same tune were strongly correlated. Tempo recall for tunes that have definitive, recorded versions was relatively accurate, and tunes that were retrieved deliberately (VMI) were not recalled more accurately in terms of tempo than spontaneous and involuntary instances of imagined music (INMI). Some evidence that INMI elicited stronger emotional responses than VMI was also revealed. These results demonstrate several parallels to previous literature on involuntary memories and add new insights on the phenomenology of INMI.

  11. Resources and adaptation following involuntary resettlement in the Bytom-Karb community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietkiewicz Igor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that involuntary displacement often creates various threats for the community and individuals. To reduce these risks, Environmental and Social Impact Assessment, Health Impact Assessment, and Social Assessment are recommended. Whereas assessments focus mostly on the community level and studies describe cases of large population displacements, there is a lack of empirical evidence about how individuals cope with involuntary displacement and what factors contribute or hinder their successful adaptation in the target location. This study uses semi-structured interviews with 21 people about their experience of resettlement due to a mine collapse in Bytom, Poland, that led to involuntary displacement of 560 people. Data was analyzed according to the constructivist grounded theory principles. Results show that this case illustrates a mixture of post-disaster and development-induced displacement. Various factors and resources that affected coping strategies were analyzed, including: material and legal status, health and age, communication skills, and relocation experience. Our findings suggest that, when circumstances allow, an individual resources assessment should also be conducted to counteract impoverishment and further marginalization of the disprivileged and vulnerable individuals.

  12. Nutrition and involuntary weight loss: a pilot study of an educational intervention for nursing home surveyors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joan C; Finucane, Thomas E; Christmas, Colleen; Vaughan, William; Schwartz, Jack; Leff, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    To describe the knowledge and attitudes of nursing home (NH) surveyors before and after a brief educational intervention related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss in nursing home residents. A questionnaire covering knowledge and attitudes about nutrition was given 1 month before and 6 months after a targeted educational intervention. State of Maryland nursing home surveyors. A 24-item questionnaire of NH surveyor knowledge (11 items) and attitudes (13 items) regarding issues related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss in NH residents. Overall surveyors' knowledge scores increased from 68% (SD, 17%) pre-intervention to 76% (SD, 18%) post-intervention (P = .11). Knowledge related to the lack of the effect of tube feeding on survival in NH residents with end-stage dementia was the only knowledge item that improved significantly with the intervention (39% correct pre-intervention and 68% correct post-intervention, P = .04). There were no changes in attitudes toward the diagnosis or treatment of nutrition after the intervention. Overall, NH surveyor knowledge related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss varied widely across topic areas. Neither knowledge nor attitudes were substantially affected by a brief educational intervention. Development of effective educational interventions for NH surveyors should be a priority for stakeholders in NH care.

  13. Spatially explicit, nano-mechanical models of the muscle half-sarcomere: Implications for biomechanical tuning in atrophy and fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Aya; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.; Macpherson, J. Michael; Xu, Xiangrong; Wang, Qi; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut biomechanical performance depends on a wide variety of factors. Results from computational modelling suggest that muscle function—a key component of performance—could be modulated by compliance of the contractile filaments in muscle, especially when force is low such as transient Ca activation in a twitch, reduced activation in muscle fatigue encountered during EVA, or perhaps atrophy during prolonged space flight. We used Monte-Carlo models to investigate the hypotheses that myofilament compliance influences muscle function during a twitch, and also modulates the effects of cooperative interactions between contractile proteins on force generation. Peak twitch force and the kinetics of force decay were both decreased, while tension cost was increased, when myofilament compliance was increased relative to physiological values. Both the apparent Ca sensitivity and cooperativity of activation of steady-state isometric force were altered by myofilament compliance even when there were no explicit interactions included between binding sites. The effects of cooperative interactions between adjacent regulatory units were found to be greater than either the effect of myofilament compliance on apparent cooperativity of activation or that due to myosin cross-bridge-induced cooperativity. These results indicate that muscle function may be "tuned" at the molecular level, particularly under conditions of reduced Ca activation.

  14. Reduced Phrenic Motoneuron Recruitment during Sustained Inspiratory Threshold Loading Compared to Single-Breath Loading: A Twitch Interpolation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raux, Mathieu; Demoule, Alexandre; Redolfi, Stefania; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In humans, inspiratory constraints engage cortical networks involving the supplementary motor area. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) shows that the spread and intensity of the corresponding respiratory-related cortical activation dramatically decrease when a discrete load becomes sustained. This has been interpreted as reflecting motor cortical reorganization and automatisation, but could proceed from sensory and/or affective habituation. To corroborate the existence of motor reorganization between single-breath and sustained inspiratory loading (namely changes in motor neurones recruitment), we conducted a diaphragm twitch interpolation study based on the hypothesis that motor reorganization should result in changes in the twitch interpolation slope. Fourteen healthy subjects (age: 21-40 years) were studied. Bilateral phrenic stimulation was delivered at rest, upon prepared and targeted voluntary inspiratory efforts ("vol"), upon unprepared inspiratory efforts against a single-breath inspiratory threshold load ("single-breath"), and upon sustained inspiratory efforts against the same type of load ("continuous"). The slope of the relationship between diaphragm twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure and the underlying transdiaphragmatic pressure was -1.1 ± 0.2 during "vol," -1.5 ± 0.7 during "single-breath," and -0.6 ± 0.4 during "continuous" (all slopes expressed in percent of baseline.percent of baseline -1 ) all comparisons significant at the 5% level. The contribution of the diaphragm to inspiration, as assessed by the gastric pressure to transdiaphragmatic pressure ratio, was 31 ± 17% during "vol," 22 ± 16% during "single-breath" ( p = 0.13), and 19 ± 9% during "continuous" ( p = 0.0015 vs. "vol"). This study shows that the relationship between the amplitude of the transdiaphragmatic pressure produced by a diaphragm twitch and its counterpart produced by the underlying diaphragm contraction is not unequivocal. If twitch interpolation is

  15. Reduced phrenic motoneuron recruitment during sustained inspiratory threshold loading compared to single-breath loading: a twitch interpolation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Raux

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans, inspiratory constraints engage cortical networks involving the supplementary motor area. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI shows that the spread and intensity of the corresponding respiratory-related cortical activation dramatically decrease when a discrete load becomes sustained. This has been interpreted as reflecting motor cortical reorganisation and automatisation, but could proceed from sensory and/or affective habituation. To corroborate the existence of motor reorganisation between single-breath and sustained inspiratory loading (namely changes in motor neurones recruitment, we conducted a diaphragm twitch interpolation study based on the hypothesis that motor reorganisation should result in changes in the twitch interpolation slope. Fourteen healthy subjects (age: 21 – 40 years were studied. Bilateral phrenic stimulation was delivered at rest, upon prepared and targeted voluntary inspiratory efforts (vol, upon unprepared inspiratory efforts against a single-breath inspiratory threshold load (single-breath, and upon sustained inspiratory efforts against the same type of load (continuous. The slope of the relationship between diaphragm twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure and the underlying transdiaphragmatic pressure was –1.1 ± 0.2 during vol, –1.5 ± 0.7 during single-breath, and -0.6 ± 0.4 during continuous (all slopes expressed in percent of baseline.percent of baseline-1 all comparisons significant at the 5% level. The contribution of the diaphragm to inspiration, as assessed by the gastric pressure to transdiaphragmatic pressure ratio, was 31 ± 17 % during vol, 22 ± 16 % during single-breath (p=0.13, and 19 ± 9 % during continuous (p = 0.0015 vs. vol. This study shows that the relationship between the amplitude of the transdiaphragmatic pressure produced by a diaphragm twitch and its counterpart produced by the underlying diaphragm contraction is not unequivocal. If twitch interpolation is interpreted as

  16. Suppressive effect of mitragynine on the 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced head-twitch response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Takayama, H; Sakai, S; Aimi, N; Watanabe, H

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mitragynine, a major alkaloid isolated from the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth (Rubiaceae), on the 5-HT2A receptor-mediated head-twitch response in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of mitragynine (5-30 mg/kg), as well as intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin, inhibited the 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT: 16 mg/kg, IP)-induced head-twitch response in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, mitragynine affected neither head-weaving caused by 5-MeO-DMT, nor drug-free spontaneous motor activity. Pretreatment of mice with reserpine (5 mg/kg, IP), p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA, 300 mg/kg x 3 times, IP), or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 50 micrograms/mouse, ICV) plus nomifensine (5 mg/kg, IP) did not change the suppressant effect of mitragynine on the head-twitch response caused by 5-MeO-DMT. On the other hand, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine (0.5 mg/kg, IP), and idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg, IP), significantly attenuated the suppressant effect of mitragynine. Lesion of central noradrenergic systems by 6-OHDA plus nomifensine did not alter the effect of idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) on mitragynine-induced suppression of the head-twitch response. These results indicate that stimulation of postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor, blockade of 5-HT2A receptors, or both, are involved in suppression of 5-HT2A receptor-mediated head-twitch response by mitragynine.

  17. Train-of-four recovery precedes twitch recovery during reversal with sugammadex in pediatric patients: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Carlos, Ricardo; Luis Abramides Torres, Marcelo; de Boer, Hans Donald

    2018-04-01

    After reversal of a rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex, the recovery of train-of-four ratio to 0.9 is faster than recovery of first twitch of the train-of-four to 90% in adults. These findings after reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex have not yet been investigated in pediatric patients. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to investigate the relationship of the recovery of first twitch of the train-of-four height and train-of-four ratio after reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in pediatric patients. Patients ASA I-III, aged 2-11 years, and who underwent abdominal and/or perineal surgery were included in the analysis. After extracting the necessary data from the hospital database, the patients were divided into 2 groups based on the dose of sugammadex received: group A: 2 mg.kg -1 for reversal of moderate neuromuscular blockade and group B: 4 mg.kg -1 for reversal of deep neuromuscular blockade. The relationship of the recovery of first twitch of the train-of-four height and train-of-four ratio in these 2 groups were analyzed. Data from 43 pediatric patients aged 2-11 years could be analyzed. The first twitch of the train-of-four height at the recovery of train-of-four ratio to 0.9 in group B was statistically significantly lower compared with group A. This height 3 and 5 minutes after the train-of-four ratio reached 0.9 showed no statistically significant differences between groups. The results were in line with the results found in adults and showed that the train-of-four ratio recovered to 0.9 was faster than first twitch of the train-of-four height recovered to the same level. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Anchoring the "floating arm": Use of proprioceptive and mirror visual feedback from one arm to control involuntary displacement of the other arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, C; Guerraz, M

    2015-12-03

    Arm movement control takes advantage of multiple inputs, including those originating from the contralateral arm. In the mirror paradigm, it has been suggested that control of the unseen arm, hidden by the mirror, is facilitated by the reflection of the other, moving arm. Although proprioceptive feedback originating from the moving arm, (the image of which is reflected in the mirror), is always coupled with visual feedback in the mirror paradigm, the former has received little attention. We recently showed that the involuntary arm movement following a sustained, isometric contraction, known as the "floating arm" or "Kohnstamm phenomenon", was adjusted to the passive-motorized displacement of the other arm. However, provision of mirror feedback, that is, the reflection in the mirror of the passively moved arm, did not add to this coupling effect. Therefore, the interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm may to a large extent have a proprioceptive origin rather than a visual origin. The objective of the present study was to decouple mirror feedback and proprioceptive feedback from the reflected, moving arm and evaluate their respective contributions to interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm. First (in Experiment 1, under eyes-closed conditions), we found that masking the proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm (by co-vibrating the antagonistic biceps and triceps muscles) suppressed the interlimb coupling between involuntary displacement of one arm and passive displacement of the other. Next (in Experiment 2), we masked proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm and specifically evaluated mirror feedback. We found that interlimb coupling through mirror feedback (though significant) was weaker than interlimb coupling through proprioceptive feedback. Overall, the present results show that in the mirror paradigm, proprioceptive feedback is stronger and more consistent than visual-mirror feedback in terms of the impact on interlimb coupling

  19. BDNF-Induced Potentiation of Spontaneous Twitching in Innervated Myocytes Requires Calcium Release From Intracellular Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLEIMAN, ROBIN J.; TIAN, NING; KRIZAJ, DAVID; HWANG, THOMAS N.; COPENHAGEN, DAVID R.; REICHARDT, LOUIS F.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can potentiate synaptic release at newly developed frog neuromuscular junctions. Although this potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+ and reflects changes in acetylcholine release, little is known about the intracellular transduction or calcium signaling pathways. We have developed a video assay for neurotrophin-induced potentiation of myocyte twitching as a measure of potentiation of synaptic activity. We use this assay to show that BDNF-induced synaptic potentiation is not blocked by cadmium, indicating that Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is not required. TrkB autophosphorylation is not blocked in Ca2+-free conditions, indicating that TrkB activity is not Ca2+ dependent. Additionally, an inhibitor of phospholipase C interferes with BDNF-induced potentiation. These results suggest that activation of the TrkB receptor activates phospholipase C to initiate intracellular Ca2+ release from stores which subsequently potentiates transmitter release. PMID:10899220

  20. Enhanced contractility with 2-deoxy-ATP and EMD 57033 is correlated with reduced myofibril structure and twitch power in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Anthony G; Rodriguez, Marita L; Han, Sangyoon J; Sniadecki, Nathan J; Regnier, Michael

    2013-11-01

    As cardiomyocytes mature, their sarcomeres and Z-band widths increase in length in order for their myofibrils to produce stronger twitch forces during a contraction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tensional homeostasis is affected by altering myofibril forces. To assess this hypothesis, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were cultured on arrays of microposts to measure cellular contractility. An optical line scanning technique was used to measure the deflections in the microposts with high temporal resolution, enabling the analysis of twitch force, twitch velocity, and twitch power. Myofibril force production was elevated by vector-mediated overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase (RR) to increase cellular dATP content or by adding the inotropic agent EMD 57033 (EMD). We found that RR and EMD treatment did not affect cardiomyocyte twitch force, but it did lead to reduced twitch velocity and twitch power. Immunofluorescent analysis of α-actinin revealed that RR-over-expressing cardiomyocytes and EMD-treated cardiomyocytes had lower spread area, sarcomere length, and Z-band width as compared to control cells. These results indicate a correlation between myofibril structure and cardiac power. This correlation was confirmed by exposing the cells to the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin, and then subsequently washing it out. After wash-out, cardiomyocytes exhibited a reduction in twitch force, velocity, and power due to shorter sarcomere length and Z-band widths. Our results suggest that cardiac myofibril structure is regulated by tensional homeostasis. If myofibril-generated forces in cardiomyocytes are elevated, a state of tensional homeostasis is maintained by producing sufficient twitch forces with a lower degree myofibril structure.

  1. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.M. [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F. [1864 Stadium Road, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Judge, A.R., E-mail: arjudge@phhp.ufl.edu [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  2. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F.; Judge, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  3. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  4. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  5. A Novel Noninvasive Method for Measuring Fatigability of the Quadriceps Muscle in Noncooperating Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper B. Poulsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Critical illness is associated with muscle weakness leading to long-term functional limitations. Objectives. To assess the reliability of a novel method for evaluating fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects. Methods. On two occasions, separated by seven days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values and the slope of the regression line of peak torque values were primary outcome measures. For twitch contractions, maximum peak torque and rise time were calculated. Relative (intraclass correlation, ICC3.1 and absolute (standard error of measurement, SEM reliability were assessed and minimum detectable change was calculated using a 95% confidence interval (MDC95%. Results. The Fatigue Index (ICC3.1, 0.84; MDC95%, 0.12 and the slope of the regression line (ICC3.1, 0.99; MDC95%, 0.03 showed substantial relative and absolute reliability during the first 15 and 30 contractions, respectively. Conclusion. This method for assessing fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions.

  6. Impacts of the Callipyge mutation on ovine plasma metabolites and muscle fibre type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available The ovine Callipyge mutation causes postnatal muscle hypertrophy localized to the pelvic limbs and torso, as well as body leanness. The mechanism underpinning enhanced muscle mass is unclear, as is the systemic impact of the mutation. Using muscle fibre typing immunohistochemistry, we confirmed muscle specific effects and demonstrated that affected muscles had greater prevalence and hypertrophy of type 2X fast twitch glycolytic fibres and decreased representation of types 1, 2C, 2A and/or 2AX fibres. To investigate potential systemic effects of the mutation, proton NMR spectra of plasma taken from lambs at 8 and 12 weeks of age were measured. Multivariate statistical analysis of plasma metabolite profiles demonstrated effects of development and genotype but not gender. Plasma from Callipyge lambs at 12 weeks of age, but not 8 weeks, was characterized by a metabolic profile consistent with contributions from the affected hypertrophic fast twitch glycolytic muscle fibres. Microarray analysis of the perirenal adipose tissue depot did not reveal a transcriptional effect of the mutation in this tissue. We conclude that there is an indirect systemic effect of the Callipyge mutation in skeletal muscle in the form of changes of blood metabolites, which may contribute to secondary phenotypes such as body leanness.

  7. alpha2-Adrenoceptor antagonists reverse the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist suppression of head-twitch behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Thongpraditchote, S; Murakami, Y; Watanabe, H

    1997-03-01

    The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, as well as 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, reportedly suppress 5-HT2 receptor-mediated head-twitch behavior. We investigated the effect of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists on the suppressive action of 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in mice pretreated with the noradrenaline toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). In normal mice, idazoxan (0.08-0.2 mg/kg, IP) or yohimbine (0.2-2.0 mg/kg, IP), both alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, had no effect on the head-twitch response caused by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT; 16 mg/kg, IP), but idazoxan significantly enhanced the response at 0.5 mg/kg. On the other hand, these alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, at doses that had no effect on the basal number of head-twitches (idazoxan 0.2 mg/kg and yohimbine 0.5 mg/kg), significantly attenuated not only the suppressive effect of clonidine (0.01 mg/kg, IP) on head-twitch response but also that of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, IP). Moreover, idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) also significantly reversed the inhibition by 0.01 mg/kg (IP) ketanserin, a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with 6-OHDA plus nomifensine but not with p-CPA significantly attenuated the effect of idazoxan (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) on the ritanserin inhibition of the head-twitch response. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, dose-dependently suppressed the response, and the effect of prazosin (1.25 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated by 0.5 mg/kg idazoxan. These results indicate that endogenous noradrenaline is involved in the apparent antagonistic interaction between selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in the head-twitch response, and suggest that noradrenaline stimulation of alpha1-adrenoceptors may be involved in this apparent antagonism.

  8. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P; Woodall, Meryl C; Luongo, Timothy S; Grisanti, Laurel A; Tilley, Douglas G; Elrod, John W; Koch, Walter J

    2016-10-14

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl ) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β 2 AR-induced hypertrophy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P.; Woodall, Meryl C.; Luongo, Timothy S.; Grisanti, Laurel A.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Elrod, John W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β2AR-induced hypertrophy. PMID:27566547

  10. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  11. Heart size and mean muscle fibre cross-sectional area related to birth weight in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. RUUSUNEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the aims in domestic pig breeding has been to increase the size of litters resulting in variation in birth weight of piglets. Pig breeding has also resulted in increased body muscle mass. Muscles with the same size can consist either of large number of thin muscle fibres or small number of thick muscle fibres. Larger body muscle content means that in living animal the heart must pump blood to larger muscle mass than earlier. Our interest in this study was to investigate the relationship between the pig’s birth weight and (i growth performance and carcass composition, (ii the size of organs, and (iii the mean muscle fibre cross-sectional area at slaughter. The study consisted of twenty pigs slaughtered at the age of 165±2 days. The day after the slaughter, the carcass composition was determined by dissecting the chilled carcass into lean, fat, bones, and skin and organs were weighed. The average cross sectional area of muscle fibres was determined from three fast-twitch muscles longissimus dorsi, semimembranosus, gluteus superficialis, and two slow-twitch muscles infraspinatus and masseter. The birth weight of pigs ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 kg. We found no clear relationships between the birth weight and the pig’s growth performance from birth to slaughter. When the birth weight increased the heart weight at slaughter increased as well (P < 0.01. The heart weight was higher in those pigs with high carcass weight (P < 0.05 and with the high weight of total muscle mass in the carcass (P < 0.001. The cross sectional area of muscle fibres in M. longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05, M. semimembranosus (P < 0.10, and M. gluteus superficialis (P < 0.05 was larger in those pigs with low birth weight compared to those found in pigs with high birth weight.;

  12. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-07-15

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2-3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4% versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ± s.d.; P torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9% versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P = 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7% versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P = 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2% versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P = 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb.

  13. American football and other sports injuries may cause migraine/persistent pain decades later and can be treated successfully with electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ETOIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J; McNally, S; Bruyninckx, F; Neuhauser, D

    2017-04-01

    Autonomous twitch elicitation at myofascial trigger points from spondylotic radiculopathies-induced denervation supersensitivity can provide favourable pain relief using electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ETOIMS). To provide objective evidence that ETOIMS is safe and efficacious in migraine and persistent pain management due to decades-old injuries to head and spine from paediatric American football. An 83-year-old mildly hypertensive patient with 25-year history of refractory migraine and persistent pain self-selected to regularly receive fee-for-service ETOIMS 2/week over 20 months. He had 180 sessions of ETOIMS. Pain levels, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate/pulse were recorded before and immediately after each treatment alongside highest level of clinically elicitable twitch forces/session, session duration and intervals between treatments. Twitch force grades recorded were from 1 to 5, grade 5 twitch force being strongest. Initially, there was hypersensitivity to electrical stimulation with low stimulus parameters (500 µs pulse-width, 30 mA stimulus intensity, frequency 1.3 Hz). This resolved with gradual stimulus increments as tolerated during successive treatments. By treatment 27, autonomous twitches were noted. Spearman's correlation coefficients showed that pain levels are negatively related to twitch force, number of treatments, treatment session duration and directly related to BP and heart rate/pulse. Treatment numbers and session durations directly influence twitch force. At end of study, headaches and quality of life improved, hypertension resolved and antihypertensive medication had been discontinued. Using statistical process control methodology in an individual patient, we showed long-term safety and effectiveness of ETOIMS in simultaneous diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of migraine and persistent pain in real time obviating necessity for randomised controlled studies.

  14. Does retrieval intentionality really matter? Similarities and differences between involuntary memories and directly and generatively retrieved voluntary memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Staugaard, Søren Risløv

    2016-08-01

    Theories of autobiographical memory distinguish between involuntary and voluntary retrieval as a consequence of conscious intention (i.e., wanting to remember). Another distinction can be made between direct and generative retrieval, which reflects the effort involved (i.e., trying to remember). However, it is unclear how intention and effort interacts. For example, involuntary memories and directly retrieved memories have been used interchangeably in the literature to refer to the same phenomenon of effortless, non-strategic retrieval. More recent theoretical advances suggest that they are separate types of retrieval, one unintentional (involuntary), another intentional and effortless (direct voluntary retrieval), and a third intentional and effortful (generative voluntary retrieval). Whether this also entails differing phenomenological characteristics, such as vividness, rehearsal, or emotional valence, has not been previously investigated. In the current study, participants reported memories in an experimental paradigm designed to elicit voluntary and involuntary memories and rated them on a number of characteristics. If intention affects the retrieval process, then we should expect differences between the characteristics of involuntary and directly retrieved memories. The results imply that retrieval intention seems to differentiate how a memory appears in a person's mind. Furthermore, we argue that these differences in part could result from differences in encoding and consolidation. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Pbx and Prdm1a transcription factors differentially regulate subsets of the fast skeletal muscle program in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhen Yao

    2013-04-01

    The basic helix–loop–helix factor Myod initiates skeletal muscle differentiation by directly and sequentially activating sets of muscle differentiation genes, including those encoding muscle contractile proteins. We hypothesize that Pbx homeodomain proteins direct Myod to a subset of its transcriptional targets, in particular fast-twitch muscle differentiation genes, thereby regulating the competence of muscle precursor cells to differentiate. We have previously shown that Pbx proteins bind with Myod on the promoter of the zebrafish fast muscle gene mylpfa and that Pbx proteins are required for Myod to activate mylpfa expression and the fast-twitch muscle-specific differentiation program in zebrafish embryos. Here we have investigated the interactions of Pbx with another muscle fiber-type regulator, Prdm1a, a SET-domain DNA-binding factor that directly represses mylpfa expression and fast muscle differentiation. The prdm1a mutant phenotype, early and increased fast muscle differentiation, is the opposite of the Pbx-null phenotype, delayed and reduced fast muscle differentiation. To determine whether Pbx and Prdm1a have opposing activities on a common set of genes, we used RNA-seq analysis to globally assess gene expression in zebrafish embryos with single- and double-losses-of-function for Pbx and Prdm1a. We find that the levels of expression of certain fast muscle genes are increased or approximately wild type in pbx2/4-MO;prdm1a−/− embryos, suggesting that Pbx activity normally counters the repressive action of Prdm1a for a subset of the fast muscle program. However, other fast muscle genes require Pbx but are not regulated by Prdm1a. Thus, our findings reveal that subsets of the fast muscle program are differentially regulated by Pbx and Prdm1a. Our findings provide an example of how Pbx homeodomain proteins act in a balance with other transcription factors to regulate subsets of a cellular differentiation program.

  16. How shortcomings in the mental health system affect the use of involuntary community treatment orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Edwina M; Robertson, Michael D; Boyce, Philip; Carney, Terry; Rosen, Alan; Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; O'Connor, Nick; Ryan, Christopher J; Kerridge, Ian H

    2017-07-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to examine stakeholder perspectives on how the operation of the mental health system affects the use of involuntary community treatment orders (CTOs). Methods A qualitative study was performed, consisting of semi-structured interviews about CTO experiences with 38 purposively selected participants in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Participants included mental health consumers (n=5), carers (n=6), clinicians (n=15) and members of the Mental Health Review Tribunal of NSW (n=12). Data were analysed using established qualitative methodologies. Results Analysis of participant accounts about CTOs and their role within the mental health system identified two key themes, namely that: (1) CTOs are used to increase access to services; and (2) CTOs cannot remedy non-existent or inadequate services. Conclusion The findings of the present study indicate that deficiencies in health service structures and resourcing are a significant factor in CTO use. This raises questions about policy accountability for mental health services (both voluntary and involuntary), as well as about the usefulness of CTOs, justifications for CTO use and the legal criteria regulating CTO implementation. What is known about this topic? Following the deinstitutionalisation of psychiatric services over recent decades, community settings are increasingly the focus for the delivery of mental health services to people living with severe and persistent mental illnesses. The rates of use of involuntary treatment in Australian community settings (under CTOs) vary between state and territory jurisdictions and are high by world standards; however, the reasons for variation in rates of CTO use are not well understood. What does this paper add? This paper provides an empirical basis for a link between the politics of mental health and the uptake and usefulness of CTOs. What are the implications for practitioners? This paper makes explicit the real-world demands on the

  17. Involuntary outpatient treatment (iot) for severe mental patients: current situation in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete-Nicolás, Carlos; Hernández-Viadel, Miguel; Bellido-Rodríguez, Carmen; Lera-Calatayud, Guillem; Asensio-Pascual, Pedro; Pérez-Prieto, Juan F; Calabuig-Crespo, Roman; Leal-Cercós, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Involuntary Outpatient Treatment (IOT) expects to improve treatment compliance and, therefore, prevent the impairment of patients with severe mental illness, as well as the risk for them and others. Besides IOT introduction defenders and opponent's states, scientific literature offers contradictory results. Legislative changes have been taken in the vast majority of our neighbouring countries in order to regulate IOT application. There is no legal regulation in Spain; however, OIT application is possible in certain Spanish cities. This article reviews IOT in Spain and surrounding countries.

  18. Destiny, Miracle Healers and Magical Intervention: Vernacular Beliefs on Involuntary Childlessness in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reet Hiiemäe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the dynamics of contemporary beliefs related to involuntary childlessness. Firstly, the methodological issues of collecting source material on delicate matters and the advantages of anonymous and narrative presentation modes in certain contexts will be discussed. Secondly, conclusions drawn from the collected material, i.e. the temporary and changeable nature of those beliefs, their relations with the mass media, the social and the individual aspects and the motifs of guilt and supernatural punishment in the context of identity issues will be presented, concluding that such belief-based models of explanation and help-seeking eventually function as a mental self-defence mechanism.

  19. Skeletal muscle, but not cardiovascular function, is altered in a mouse model of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wacker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL- fast-twitch muscle, soleus (SOL- slow-twitch muscle, heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2a or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In

  20. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Pascal; Douillard, Aymerick; Galbes, Olivier; Ramonatxo, Christelle; Py, Guillaume; Candau, Robin; Lacampagne, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle), as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls) for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  1. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sirvent

    Full Text Available Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle, as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  2. Does retrieval intentionality really matter? Similarities and differences between involuntary memories and directly and generatively retrieved voluntary memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Staugaard, Søren Risløv

    2016-01-01

    Theories of autobiographical memory distinguish between involuntary and voluntary retrieval as a consequence of conscious intention (i.e., wanting to remember). Another distinction can be made between direct and generative retrieval, which reflects the effort involved (i.e., trying to remember......). However, it is unclear how intention and effort interacts. For example, involuntary memories and directly retrieved memories have been used interchangeably in the literature to refer to the same phenomenon of effortless, nonstrategic retrieval. More recent theoretical advances suggest...... that they are separate types of retrieval, one unintentional (involuntary), another intentional and effortless (direct voluntary retrieval), and a third intentional and effortful (generative voluntary retrieval). Whether this also entails differing phenomenological characteristics, such as vividness, rehearsal...

  3. Control of skeletal muscle mitochondria respiration by adenine nucleotides: differential effect of ADP and ATP according to muscle contractile type in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, N; Lefaucheur, L; Fillaut, M; Vincent, A; Herpin, P

    2005-02-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibits considerable variation in mitochondrial content among fiber types, but it is less clear whether mitochondria from different fiber types also present specific functional and regulatory properties. The present experiment was undertaken on ten 170-day-old pigs to compare functional properties and control of respiration by adenine nucleotides in mitochondria isolated from predominantly slow-twitch (Rhomboideus (RM)) and fast-twitch (Longissimus (LM)) muscles. Mitochondrial ATP synthesis, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ADP-stimulated respiration with either complex I or II substrates were significantly higher (25-30%, Prespiration. Based on mitochondrial enzyme activities (cytochrome c oxidase [COX], F0F1-ATPase, mitochondrial creatine kinase [mi-CK]), the higher ADP-stimulated respiration rate of RM mitochondria appeared mainly related to a higher maximal oxidative capacity, without any difference in the maximal phosphorylation potential. Mitochondrial K(m) for ADP was similar in RM (4.4+/-0.9 microM) and LM (5.9+/-1.2 microM) muscles (P>0.05) but the inhibitory effect of ATP was more marked in LM (Prespiration by ATP differs according to muscle contractile type and that absolute muscle oxidative capacity not only relies on mitochondrial density but also on mitochondrial functioning per se.

  4. A Ca2+-calmodulin-eEF2K-eEF2 signalling cascade, but not AMPK, contributes to the suppression of skeletal muscle protein synthesis during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Alsted, Thomas Junker; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis rate decreases during contractions but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. It was hypothesised that there would be a coordinated regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1......) phosphorylation by signalling cascades downstream of rises in intracellular [Ca(2+)] and decreased energy charge via AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) in contracting skeletal muscle. When fast-twitch skeletal muscles were contracted ex vivo using different protocols, the suppression of protein synthesis...... correlated more closely with changes in eEF2 rather than 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Using a combination of Ca(2+) release agents and ATPase inhibitors it was shown that the 60-70% suppression of fast-twitch skeletal muscle protein synthesis during contraction was equally distributed between Ca(2+) and energy...

  5. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeß Katrin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine kinase (CK links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1 CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2 the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL. Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  6. Heterogeneous effects of calorie restriction on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling of individual rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Sequea, Donel A; Castorena, Carlos M; Arias, Edward B; Qi, Nathan R; Cartee, Gregory D

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) (consuming ~60% of ad libitum, AL, intake) improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (~140 µU/ml) in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG), phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160 kDa, AS160), abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages) were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris) and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus) muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (Pmuscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior), without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (Pmuscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (Pmuscles. The results also demonstrated that CR does not uniformly enhance either insulin signaling or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in all muscles in vivo.

  7. Heterogeneous Effects of Calorie Restriction on In Vivo Glucose Uptake and Insulin Signaling of Individual Rat Skeletal Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Sequea, Donel A.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Arias, Edward B.; Qi, Nathan R.; Cartee, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) (consuming ∼60% of ad libitum, AL, intake) improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old) Fischer 344xBrown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (∼140 µU/ml) in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [14C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG), phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160kDa, AS160), abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages) were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris) and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus) muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (Pmuscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior), without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (Pmuscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (Pmuscles. The results also demonstrated that CR does not uniformly enhance either insulin signaling or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in all muscles in vivo. PMID:23755179

  8. Involuntary autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noerreslet, Mikkel; Jemec, Gregor B. E.; Traulsen, Janine M

    2009-01-01

    Consumerism is a major force in western health care. It defines the process in which patients should or do play a more active and central role in making informed choices about health and illness. The talk of patients as consumers is closely linked, and is especially pertinent for patients managing......', by being active, critical, informed etc., in fact prefer to consult a patient-centred medical expert (a dermatologist) with good communication skills, who is able to inform, advise and support on issues of managing atopic dermatitis. These people are not seeking more independence but rather a partnership...

  9. EFFECTS OF VERAPAMIL ON CHICKEN BIVENTER - CERVICIS MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Farokhy

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available - Verapamil produces a sustained contraction in isolated biventer-cervicis muscle of chickens between 2-8 days old. From cumulative dose-response curves, ED50 of was calculated for this effect of verapamil. when isolated chicken biventer-cervicis muscle was electrically stimulated, verapamil had no effect on twitch contractures but increased the base line tone of the muscle. Glycerol treatment of the muscle reduced the responses to acetylcholine and KCl but had little effect on contracture produced by verapamil, and no effect on contracture produced by caffeine. Incubation of the muscles with calcium-free Krcbs solution omitted the responses of the muscle to acetylcholine and reduced the response to caffeine. Again, the responses to caffeine and verapamil were less affected compared to KCL. Addition of ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA (2.5 mM abolished the responses of muscle to all compounds. It was concluded that verapamil produces contracture of the muscle by release of calcium from intracellular stores.

  10. Involuntary human hand movements due to FM radio waves in a moving van.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, P; Savinainen, A; Hänninen, Osmo; Myllylä, R

    2011-06-01

    Finland TRACT Involuntary movements of hands in a moving van on a public road were studied to clarify the possible role of frequency modulated radio waves on driving. The signals were measured in a direct 2 km test segment of an international road during repeated drives to both directions. Test subjects (n=4) had an ability to sense radio frequency field intensity variations of the environment. They were sitting in a minivan with arm movement detectors in their hands. A potentiometer was used to register the hand movements to a computer which simultaneously collected data on the amplitude of the RF signal of the local FM tower 30 km distance at a frequency of about 100 MHz. Involuntary hand movements of the test subjects correlated with electromagnetic field, i.e. FM radio wave intensity measured. They reacted also on the place of a geomagnetic anomaly crossing the road, which was found on the basis of these recordings and confirmed by the public geological maps of the area.In conclusion, RF irradiation seems to affect the human hand reflexes of sensitive persons in a moving van along a normal public road which may have significance in traffic safety.

  11. [Intercultural adaptation of the AIMS in German language: A scale for abnormal involuntary movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, C; Rizos, A; Emmans, D; Jost, W H

    2016-04-01

    Dyskinesias are abnormal involuntary movements and occur across many movement disorders. In Parkinson's disease dyskinesias can be troublesome and are a determinant of the quality of life throughout the course of the disease. Assessment and rating of dyskinesias is thus important for clinical assessment of patients, as well as for academic studies and clinical trials. The abnormal involuntary movement scale (AIMS) is an English language standardised, reliable and validated scale to evaluate dyskinesias. In this article we present a linguistically validated German version of AIMS. The intercultural adaptation of the German translation was performed following an internationally accepted procedure. Firstly, two neurologists independently translated the original into German. Taking both versions into account, a consensus version was agreed on by both translators and was tested on 10 patients. This preliminary German version was then independently translated back into the original language by two different neurologists, and again, a consensus version was agreed on. All translators then compared this English version to the original. Subsequently, the German version was linguistically modified until it resulted in a final German version, which was agreed on by all translators, deemed linguistically acceptable, and the translation back into English was considered to be as unambiguous as possible. This final German version of AIMS was applied to 50 patients in two different hospitals for diagnostic purposes and tested for feasibility and comprehension. In this paper, we present an intercultural adaptation of a linguistically validated German version of AIMS.

  12. From Nose to Memory: The Involuntary Nature of Odor-evoked Autobiographical Memories in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Gandolphe, Marie Charlotte; Gallouj, Karim; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Antoine, Pascal

    2017-12-25

    Research suggests that odors may serve as a potent cue for autobiographical retrieval. We tested this hypothesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and investigated whether odor-evoked autobiographical memory is an involuntary process that shares similarities with music-evoked autobiographical memory. Participants with mild AD and controls were asked to retrieve 2 personal memories after odor exposure, after music exposure, and in an odor-and music-free condition. AD participants showed better specificity, emotional experience, mental time travel, and retrieval time after odor and music exposure than in the control condition. Similar beneficial effects of odor and music exposure were observed for autobiographical characteristics (i.e., specificity, emotional experience, and mental time travel), except for retrieval time which was more improved after odor than after music exposure. Interestingly, regression analyses suggested executive involvement in memories evoked in the control condition but not in those evoked after music or odor exposure. These findings suggest the involuntary nature of odor-evoked autobiographical memory in AD. They also suggest that olfactory cuing could serve as a useful and ecologically valid tool to stimulate autobiographical memory, at least in the mild stage of the disease. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Ironic effects as reflexive responses: Evidence from word frequency effects on involuntary subvocalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangal, Sabrina; Merrick, Christina; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2015-07-01

    In ironic processing, one is more likely to think about something (e.g., white bears) when instructed to not think about that thing. To further investigate this phenomenon involving cognitive control, in the Reflexive Imagery Task (RIT), participants are instructed to not subvocalize the names of visual objects. On the majority of the trials, participants fail to suppress such subvocalizations. This finding supports theorizing that conscious thoughts can be triggered by external stimuli in a manner that is nontrivial, involuntary, and, importantly, reflex-like. These conclusions challenge intuitions that consciousness is unpredictable, whimsical, and somewhat insulated from external control. Perhaps these thoughts arise, not in a reflex-like manner, but from experimental demand or other high-level, strategic processes. This prevalent criticism would be inconsistent with the observation that the RIT effect is influenced by a stimulus parameter such as word frequency. Regarding demand characteristics, such an artifact would require participants to have a theory regarding how word frequency should influence responses. We introduce evidence that stimuli associated with high frequency names are more likely to yield involuntary subvocalizations than stimuli associated with low frequency names. These theoretically-relevant data suggest that ironic effects in paradigms such as the RIT resemble reflex-like processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R; Sankarpandi, Sathish K; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previously possible, concerning (1) the precision of memory representations within INMI and (2) the interactions between INMI and concurrent affective state. Over the course of 4 days, INMI tempo was measured by asking participants to tap to the beat of their INMI with a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants documented additional details regarding their INMI in a diary. Overall, the tempo of music within INMI was recalled from long-term memory in a highly veridical form, although with a regression to the mean for recalled tempo that parallels previous findings on voluntary musical imagery. A significant positive relationship was found between INMI tempo and subjective arousal, suggesting that INMI interacts with concurrent mood in a similar manner to perceived music. The results suggest several parallels between INMI and voluntary imagery, music perceptual processes, and other types of involuntary memories.

  15. Building Alliances with (In)Voluntary Clients: A Study Focused on Therapists' Observable Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero, Luciana; Cunha, Diana; da Silva, José Tomás; Escudero, Valentín; Relvas, Ana Paula

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to compare therapists' observable behaviors to promote alliances with involuntary and voluntary clients during brief family therapy. The therapists' contributions to fostering alliances were rated in sessions 1 and 4 using videotapes of 29 families who were observed in brief therapy. Using the System for Observing Family Therapy Alliances, trained raters searched for specific therapist behaviors that contributed to or detracted from the four alliance dimensions: engagement in the therapeutic process, an emotional connection with the therapist, safety within the therapeutic system, and a shared sense of purpose within the family. The results showed that when working with involuntary clients, therapists presented more behaviors to foster the clients' engagement and to promote a shared sense of purpose within the family. However, in the fourth session, the therapists in both groups contributed to the alliance in similar ways. The results are discussed in terms of (a) the therapists' alliance-building behaviors, (b) the specificities of each client group, and (c) the implications for clinical practice, training, and research. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  16. Neurological signs and involuntary movements in schizophrenia: intrinsic to and informative on systems pathobiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitty, Peter F

    2012-02-01

    While it has long been considered whether the pathobiology of schizophrenia extends beyond its defining symptoms to involve diverse domains of abnormality, in the manner of a systemic disease, studies of neuromotor dysfunction have been confounded by treatment with antipsychotic drugs. This challenge has been illuminated by a new generation of studies on first-episode schizophrenia before initiation of antipsychotic treatment and by opportunities in developing countries to study chronically ill patients who have remained antipsychotic naive due to limitations in provision of psychiatric care. Building from studies in antipsychotic-naive patients, this article reviews 2 domains of neuromotor dysfunction in schizophrenia: neurological signs and involuntary movements. The presence and characteristics of neurological signs in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia and implicate disruption to neuronal circuits linking the basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. The presence and characteristics of involuntary movements in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate an intrinsic feature of the disease process and implicate dysfunction in cortical-basal ganglia-cortical circuitry. These neuromotor disorders of schizophrenia join other markers of subtle but pervasive cerebral and extracerebral, systemic dysfunction, and complement current concepts of schizophrenia as a disorder of developmentally determined cortical-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical\\/cerebellar network disconnectivity.

  17. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  18. Metabotropic Glutamate2 Receptors Play a Key Role in Modulating Head Twitches Induced by a Serotonergic Hallucinogen in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Benvenga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that glutamate can modulate the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A receptor activation through stimulation of metabotropic glutamate2/3 (mGlu2/3 receptors in the prefrontal cortex. Here we show that constitutive deletion of the mGlu2 gene profoundly attenuates an effect of 5-HT2A receptor activation using the mouse head twitch response (HTR. MGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor knockout (KO as well as age-matched ICR (CD-1 wild type (WT mice were administered (±1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-2-aminopropane (DOI and observed for head twitch activity. DOI failed to produce significant head twitches in mGlu2 receptor KO mice at a dose 10-fold higher than the peak effective dose in WT or mGlu3 receptor KO mice. In addition, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268, and the mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM CBiPES, potently blocked the HTR to DOI in WT and mGlu3 receptor KO mice. Conversely, the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495 (10 mg/kg increased the HTR produced by DOI (3 mg/kg in mGlu3 receptor KO mice. Finally, the mGlu2 receptor potentiator CBiPES was able to attenuate the increase in the HTR produced by LY341495 in mGlu3 receptor KO mice. Taken together, all of these results are consistent with the hypothesis that that DOI-induced head twitches are modulated by mGlu2 receptor activation. These results also are in keeping with a critical autoreceptor function for mGlu2 receptors in the prefrontal cortex with differential effects of acute vs. chronic perturbation (e.g., constitutive mGlu2 receptor KO mice. The robust attenuation of DOI-induced head twitches in the mGlu2 receptor KO mice appears to reflect the critical role of glutamate in ongoing regulation of 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex. Future experiments with inducible knockouts for the mGlu2 receptor and/or selective mGlu3 receptor agonists/PAMs/antagonists could provide an important tools in understanding glutamatergic modulation of

  19. Neuromuscular organization of avian flight muscle: architecture of single muscle fibres in muscle units of the pectoralis (pars thoracicus) of pigeon (Columba livia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The M. pectoralis (pars thoracicus) of pigeons (Columba livia) is comprised of short muscle fibres that do not extend from muscle origin to insertion but overlap 'in-series'. Individual pectoralis motor units are limited in territory to a portion of muscle length and are comprised of either fast twitch, oxidative and glycolytic fibres (FOG) or fast twitch and glycolytic fibres (FG). FOG fibres make up 88 to 90% of the total muscle population and have a mean diameter one-half of that of the relatively large FG fibres. Here we report on the organization of individual fibres identified in six muscle units depleted of glycogen, three comprised of FOG fibres and three comprised of FG fibres. For each motor unit, fibre counts revealed unequal numbers of depleted fibres in different unit cross-sections. We traced individual fibres in one unit comprised of FOG fibres and a second comprised of FG fibres. Six fibres from a FOG unit (total length 15.45 mm) ranged from 10.11 to 11.82 mm in length and averaged (± s.d.) 10.74 ± 0.79 mm. All originated bluntly (en mass) from a fascicle near the proximal end of the muscle unit and all terminated intramuscularly. Five of these ended in a taper and one ended bluntly. Fibres coursed on average for 70% of the muscle unit length. Six fibres from a FG unit (total length 34.76 mm) ranged from 8.97 to 18.38 mm in length and averaged 15.32 ± 3.75 mm. All originated bluntly and terminated intramuscularly; one of these ended in a taper and five ended bluntly. Fibres coursed on average for 44% of the muscle unit length. Because fibres of individual muscle units do not extend the whole muscle unit territory, the effective cross-sectional area changes along the motor unit length. These non-uniformities in the distribution of fibres within a muscle unit emphasize that the functional interactions within and between motor units are complex.

  20. Motor Unit Changes Seen With Skeletal Muscle Sarcopenia in Oldest Old Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A.; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Kuzon, William M.; Faulkner, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia leads to many changes in skeletal muscle that contribute to atrophy, force deficits, and subsequent frailty. The purpose of this study was to characterize motor unit remodeling related to sarcopenia seen in extreme old age. Whole extensor digitorum longus muscle and motor unit contractile properties were measured in 19 adult (11–13 months) and 12 oldest old (36–37 months) Brown-Norway rats. Compared with adults, oldest old rats had significantly fewer motor units per muscle, smaller muscle cross-sectional area, and lower muscle specific force. However, mean motor unit force generation was similar between the two groups due to an increase in innervation ratio by the oldest old rats. These findings suggest that even in extreme old age both fast- and slow-twitch motor units maintain the ability to undergo motor unit remodeling that offsets some effects of sarcopenia. PMID:24077596

  1. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, T; Stallknecht, B M; Pedersen, O

    1990-01-01

    exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training...... session