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Sample records for inviscid fluids

  1. Inviscid incompressible limits for rotating fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caggio, Matteo; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 163, November (2017), s. 1-18 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier -Stokces system * rotating fluids * incompressible limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X17301815?via%3Dihub

  2. Inviscid incompressible limits of strongly stratified fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Jin, B.J.; Novotný, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, 3-4 (2014), s. 307-329 ISSN 0921-7134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokes system * anelastic approximation * stratified fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2014 http://iospress.metapress.com/content/d71255745tl50125/?p=969b60ae82634854ab8bd25505ce1f71&pi=3

  3. Inviscid incompressible limits for rotating fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caggio, Matteo; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 163, November (2017), s. 1-18 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokces system * rotating fluids * incompressible limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X17301815?via%3Dihub

  4. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid Flow Simulations over a Surface Using a Quasi-simultaneous Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdza, Peter (Inventor); Martins-Rivas, Herve (Inventor); Suzuki, Yoshifumi (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated surface is generated using a quasi-simultaneous technique. The simulation includes a fluid-flow mesh of inviscid and boundary-layer fluid cells. An initial fluid property for an inviscid fluid cell is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. An initial boundary-layer fluid property a boundary-layer fluid cell is determined using the initial fluid property and a viscous fluid simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. An updated boundary-layer fluid property is determined for the boundary-layer fluid cell using the initial fluid property, initial boundary-layer fluid property, and an interaction law. The interaction law approximates the inviscid fluid simulation using a matrix of aerodynamic influence coefficients computed using a two-dimensional surface panel technique and a fluid-property vector. An updated fluid property is determined for the inviscid fluid cell using the updated boundary-layer fluid property.

  5. A counter-rotating vortex pair in inviscid fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibah, Ummu; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2017-12-01

    We study the motion of a counter-rotating vortex pair with the circulations ±Γ move in incompressible fluid. The assumption is made that the core is very thin, that is the core radius σ is much smaller than the vortex radius d such that ɛ = σ/d ≪ 1. With this condition, the method of matched asymptotic expansion is employed. The solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations and the Biot-Savart law, regarding the inner and outer solutions respectively, are constructed in the form of a small parameter. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law near the vortex core provides with the matching condition for an asymptotic expansion for limiting the Navier-Stokes equations for large radius r. The general formula of an anti-parallel vortex pair is established. At leading order O(ɛ0), we apply the special case in inviscid fluid, the Rankine vortex, a circular vortex of uniform vorticity. Furthermore at leading order O(ɛ5) we show the traveling speed of a vortex pair.

  6. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid-Flow Simulations over an Aircraft Surface Using a Fluid-Flow Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using inviscid and viscous simulations. A fluid-flow mesh of fluid cells is obtained. At least one inviscid fluid property for the fluid cells is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. A set of intersecting fluid cells that intersects the aircraft surface are identified. One surface mesh polygon of the surface mesh is identified for each intersecting fluid cell. A boundary-layer prediction point for each identified surface mesh polygon is determined. At least one boundary-layer fluid property for each boundary-layer prediction point is determined using the at least one inviscid fluid property of the corresponding intersecting fluid cell and a boundary-layer simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. At least one updated fluid property for at least one fluid cell is determined using the at least one boundary-layer fluid property and the inviscid fluid simulation.

  7. Selective decay by Casimir dissipation in inviscid fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    The problem of parameterizing the interactions of larger scales and smaller scales in fluid flows is addressed by considering a property of two-dimensional (2D) incompressible turbulence. The property we consider is selective decay, in which a Casimir of the ideal formulation (enstrophy in 2D flows, helicity in three-dimensional flows) decays in time, while the energy stays essentially constant. This paper introduces a mechanism that produces selective decay by enforcing Casimir dissipation in fluid dynamics. This mechanism turns out to be related in certain cases to the numerical method of anticipated vorticity discussed in Sadourny and Basdevant (1981 C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 292 1061–4, 1985 J. Atm. Sci. 42 1353–63). Several examples are given and a general theory of selective decay is developed that uses the Lie–Poisson structure of the ideal theory. A scale-selection operator allows the resulting modifications of the fluid motion equations to be interpreted in several examples as parametrizing the nonlinear, dynamical interactions between disparate scales. The type of modified fluid equation systems derived here may be useful in modelling turbulent geophysical flows where it is computationally prohibitive to rely on the slower, indirect effects of a realistic viscosity, such as in large-scale, coherent, oceanic flows interacting with much smaller eddies. (paper)

  8. Linear stability analysis of parallel shear flows for an inviscid generalized two-dimensional fluid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwayama, T; Sueyoshi, M; Watanabe, T

    2013-01-01

    The linear stability of parallel shear flows for an inviscid generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluid system, the so-called α turbulence system, is studied. This system is characterized by the relation q = −( − Δ) α/2 ψ between the advected scalar q and the stream function ψ. Here, α is a real number not exceeding 3 and q is referred to as the generalized vorticity. In this study, a sufficient condition for linear stability of parallel shear flows is derived using the conservation of wave activity. A stability analysis is then performed for a sheet vortex that violates the stability condition. The instability of a sheet vortex in the 2D Euler system (α = 2) is referred to as a Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability; such an instability for the generalized 2D fluid system is investigated for 0 3−α for 1 < α < 3, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation. In contrast, for 0 < α ⩽ 1, the growth rate is infinite. In other words, a transition of the growth rate of the perturbation occurs at α = 1. A physical model for KH instability in the generalized 2D fluid system, which can explain the transition of the growth rate of the perturbation at α = 1, is proposed. (paper)

  9. Parallel Simulation of HGMS of Weakly Magnetic Nanoparticles in Irrotational Flow of Inviscid Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanok Hournkumnuard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS using a microferromagnetic wire for capturing weakly magnetic nanoparticles in the irrotational flow of inviscid fluid is simulated by using parallel algorithm developed based on openMP. The two-dimensional problem of particle transport under the influences of magnetic force and fluid flow is considered in an annular domain surrounding the wire with inner radius equal to that of the wire and outer radius equal to various multiples of wire radius. The differential equations governing particle transport are solved numerically as an initial and boundary values problem by using the finite-difference method. Concentration distribution of the particles around the wire is investigated and compared with some previously reported results and shows the good agreement between them. The results show the feasibility of accumulating weakly magnetic nanoparticles in specific regions on the wire surface which is useful for applications in biomedical and environmental works. The speedup of parallel simulation ranges from 1.8 to 21 depending on the number of threads and the domain problem size as well as the number of iterations. With the nature of computing in the application and current multicore technology, it is observed that 4–8 threads are sufficient to obtain the optimized speedup.

  10. Inviscid linear stability analysis of two fluid columns of different densities subject to gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathama, Aditya; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the inviscid linear stability of vertical interface between two fluid columns of different densities under the influence of gravity. In this flow arrangement, the two free streams are continuously accelerating, in contrast to the canonical Kelvin-Helmholtz or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities whose base flows are stationary (or weakly time dependent). In these classical cases, the temporal evolution of the interface can be expressed as Fourier or Laplace solutions in time. This is not possible in our case; instead, we employ the initial value problem method to solve the equations analytically. The results, expressed in terms of the well-known parabolic cylinder function, indicate that the instability grows as the exponential of a quadratic function of time. The analysis shows that in this accelerating Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration, the interface is unconditionally unstable at all wave modes, despite the presence of surface tension. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0002382) and the California Institute of Technology.

  11. On Dispersive Effects In Inviscid Fluids And Non-Uniqueness Of Weak Wave Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, Klaus

    This work is devoted to the study of some aspects of the well-posedness theory of evolution differential equations in mathematical physics. In Part I we explore the effects of dispersion in incompressible, inviscid fluids in a variety of settings. In the absence of the strongly regularizing mechanism of viscosity, even in only two spatial dimensions effects such as the rotation of the earth or unidirectional gravitational forces are not understood well. For these we bring to light a mechanism that disperses waves, i.e. we show that in such systems waves or disturbances at different frequencies travel at distinct speeds, often also in different directions. On the one hand, this allows us to improve the well-posedness theory of a wide range of problems. In some scenarios this yields a theory that holds on a very large timespan. On the other hand, it may also resolve questions regarding the qualitative behavior of more complicated systems, where effects other than the dispersion play a dominant role. In Part II we study the well-posedness theory of the so-called wave maps equation, which arises in quantum physics. The corresponding energy conservation law suggests a natural mathematical framework. For this problem, however, we show that in the physically relevant setting this consideration does not provide a satisfactory theory: For a given initial setup, the time evolution is not unique.

  12. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  13. Suitable weak solutions: from compressible viscous to incompressible inviscid fluid flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.; Petzeltová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 356, č. 2 (2013), s. 683-702 ISSN 0025-5831 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : relative entropy * incompressible limit * inviscid limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.201, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00208-012-0862-5

  14. Wave propagation in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic solid bar immersed in an inviscid fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Selvamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave propagation in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic solid bar immersed in an inviscid fluid is discussed within the frame work of linearized three dimensional theory of elasticity. Three displacement potential functions are introduced to uncouple the equations of motion, electric and magnetic induction. The frequency equations that include the interaction between the solid bar and fluid are obtained by the perfect slip boundary conditions using the Bessel functions. The numerical calculations are carried out for the non-dimensional frequency, phase velocity and attenuation coefficient by fixing wave number and are plotted as the dispersion curves. The results reveal that the proposed method is very effective and simple and can be applied to other bar of different cross section by using proper geometric relation.

  15. The inviscid, compressible and rotational, 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids: Solvable models with illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquard, Ph.; Vuffray, M.

    2014-10-01

    The coupling between dilatation and vorticity, two coexisting and fundamental processes in fluid dynamics (Wu et al., 2006, pp. 3, 6) is investigated here, in the simplest cases of inviscid 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids respectively modeled by single vortices confined in compressible, local, inertial and global, rotating, environments. The field equations are established, inductively, starting from the equations of the characteristics solved with an initial Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity fields namely a vorticity free and a divergence free part (Wu et al., 2006, Sects. 2.3.2, 2.3.3) and, deductively, by means of a canonical Hamiltonian Clebsch like formalism (Clebsch, 1857, 1859), implying two pairs of conjugate variables. Two vector valued fields are constants of the motion: the velocity field in the Burgers case and the momentum field per unit mass in the Euler-Coriolis one. Taking advantage of this property, a class of solutions for the mass densities of the fluids is given by the Jacobian of their sum with respect to the actual coordinates. Implementation of the isotropy hypothesis entails a radial dependence of the velocity potentials and of the stream functions associated to the compressible and to the rotational part of the fluids and results in the cancellation of the dilatation-rotational cross terms in the Jacobian. A simple expression is obtained for all the radially symmetric Jacobians occurring in the theory. Representative examples of regular and singular solutions are shown and the competition between dilatation and vorticity is illustrated. Inspired by thermodynamical, mean field theoretical analogies, a genuine variational formula is proposed which yields unique measure solutions for the radially symmetric fluid densities investigated. We stress that this variational formula, unlike the Hopf-Lax formula, enables us to treat systems which are both compressible and rotational. Moreover in the one

  16. Computation of Viscous-Inviscid Interactions (Le Calcul de l’Interaction Fluide Parfait-Fluide Visqueux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    rapport 5 in 6coulement de fluide parfait tictif superpoae Le proc~di Elimine en particulier lea anomalies de couches supercritiques au sens de Crocco- Lees ...amasi sur le rhoix d’un traitemnent pratique de l’interaction rouche limite - onde de char adapt6 am ralcul des profits ou des voilures tranesoniques...sense of Crocco- Lees , even if it is limited to an approximation level of the first order. It also appears desirable 111 12! that the viscous correctionsof

  17. The contact angle in inviscid fluid mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    assumed to start and continue with a uniform pressure over the interface; we will assume the gas to be passive, i.e. it only exerts a constant pressure on the liquid interface. In. §2.1, we write down the equations governing the motion. In §2.2, we first consider planar motions; motions in a cylinder of arbitrary cross-section are ...

  18. Hamiltonian formulation of inviscid flows with free boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.D.I.; Brown, R.; Yang, Y.M.

    1988-01-01

    The formulation of the Hamiltonian structures for inviscid fluid flows with material free surfaces is presented in both the Lagrangian specification, where the fundamental Poisson brackets are canonical, and in the Eulerian specification, where the dynamics is given in noncanonical form. The noncanonical Eulerian brackets are derived explicitly from the canonical Lagrangian brackets. The Eulerian brackets are, with the exception of a single term at each material free surface separating flows in different phases, identical to those for isentropic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid. The dynamics of the free surface is located in the Hamiltonian and in the definition of the Eulerian variables of mass density, rho(x, t), momentum density, M(x,t) [which is rho times the fluid velocity v(x,t)], and the specific entropy, σ(x,t). The boundary conditions for the Eulerian variables and the evolution equations for the free surfaces come from the Euler equations of the flow. This construction provides a unified treatment of inviscid flows with any number of free surfaces

  19. Stabilization of Inviscid Vortex Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protas, Bartosz; Sakajo, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    In this study we investigate the problem of stabilizing inviscid vortex sheets via feedback control. Such models, expressed in terms of the Birkhoff-Rott equation, are often used to describe the Kevin-Helmholtz instability of shear layers and are known to be strongly unstable to small-scale perturbations. First, we consider the linear stability of a straight vortex sheet in the periodic setting with actuation in the form of an array of point vortices or sources located a certain distance away from the sheet. We establish conditions under which this system is controllable and observable. Next, using methods of the linear control theory, we synthesize a feedback control strategy which stabilizes a straight vortex sheet in the linear regime. Given the poor conditioning of the discretized problem, reliable solution of the resulting algebraic Riccati equation requires the use of high-precision arithmetic. Finally, we demonstrate that this control approach also succeeds in the nonlinear regime, provided the magnitude of the initial perturbation is sufficiently small.

  20. Newton solution of inviscid and viscous problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1988-01-01

    The application of Newton iteration to inviscid and viscous airfoil calculations is examined. Spatial discretization is performed using upwind differences with split fluxes. The system of linear equations which arises as a result of linearization in time is solved directly using either a banded matrix solver or a sparse matrix solver. In the latter case, the solver is used in conjunction with the nested dissection strategy, whose implementation for airfoil calculations is discussed. The boundary conditions are also implemented in a fully implicit manner, thus yielding quadratic convergence. Complexities such as the ordering of cell nodes and the use of a far field vortex to correct freestream for a lifting airfoil are addressed. Various methods to accelerate convergence and improve computational efficiency while using Newton iteration are discussed. Results are presented for inviscid, transonic nonlifting and lifting airfoils and also for laminar viscous cases. 17 references

  1. Inviscid incompressible limits on expanding domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Nečasová, Šárka; Sun, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2014), s. 2465-2477 ISSN 0951-7715 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokes system * large domain * inviscid limit * incompressible limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.208, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/0951-7715/27/10/2465/

  2. Development of an inviscid flux scheme for thermochemical nonequilibrium flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles Hugh

    Solutions to the governing equations that model hypersonic aerothermodynamics rely heavily on the mathematical and numerical technology that characterizes Computational Fluid Dynamics. Many areas of significant investigation are relevant to advancing state of the art hypersonic aerothermodynamic engineering and applied research analyses. Due to the relatively high energy achieved by spacecraft during launch, physical models for thermal nonequilibrium and chemical nonequilibrium are necessary to develop adequate numerical reentry simulations. In addition, complex features of the Navier Stokes equations require sophisticated mathematical and numerical techniques in order to develop reasonably accurate simulations in an acceptable amount of time. The objective of this work is to present the development of a new inviscid flux evaluation method. This new method, referred to as the Flux Consistent scheme, is closely related to the Modified Steger-Warming method. The unique characteristics of this new flux scheme involve an original eigenvalue implementation. This original eigenvalue formulation, however, leads to incorrect flux magnitudes which must be corrected in the total flux to provide an accurate representation of the inviscid fluxes. The mathematical technique used to identify flux magnitude errors in the Flux Consistent scheme is also applied to the Modified Steger-Warming flux evaluation method. This assessment leads to the characterization of flux errors in the Modified Steger-Warming scheme which are generated by eigenvalue differences between the left and right cell interface flow states. These Modified Steger-Warming flux errors are shown to vanish for supersonic conditions. Two hypotheses in reference to the Modified Steger-Warming scheme are proposed. The first is that sonic glitch problems occurring in some Steger-Warming simulations are the result of the flux error vanishing at supersonic conditions. The second hypothesis concerning the Steger

  3. An inviscid model for vortex shedding from a deforming body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Ratnesh K.; Eldredge, Jeff D. [University of California, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-09-15

    An inviscid vortex sheet model is developed in order to study the unsteady separated flow past a two-dimensional deforming body which moves with a prescribed motion in an otherwise quiescent fluid. Following Jones (J Fluid Mech 496, 405-441, 2003) the flow is assumed to comprise of a bound vortex sheet attached to the body and two separate vortex sheets originating at the edges. The complex conjugate velocity potential is expressed explicitly in terms of the bound vortex sheet strength and the edge circulations through a boundary integral representation. It is shown that Kelvin's circulation theorem, along with the conditions of continuity of the normal velocity across the body and the boundedness of the velocity field, yields a coupled system of equations for the unknown bound vortex sheet strength and the edge circulations. A general numerical treatment is developed for the singular principal value integrals arising in the solution procedure. The model is validated against the results of Jones (J Fluid Mech 496, 405-441, 2003) for computations involving a rigid flat plate and is subsequently applied to the flapping foil experiments of Heathcote et al. (AIAA J, 42, 2196-2204, 2004) in order to predict the thrust coefficient. The utility of the model in simulating aquatic locomotion is also demonstrated, with vortex shedding suppressed at the leading edge of the swimming body. (orig.)

  4. A Viscous-Inviscid Interaction Model for Rotor Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1994-01-01

    A numerical model for the viscous-inviscid interactive computations ofrotor flows is presented. The basic methodology for deriving the outer inviscid solution is a fully three-dimensional boundary element method.The inner viscous domain, i.e. the boundary layer, is described by the two-dimensiona...

  5. Inviscid Design of Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Nozzles for a Real Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A straightforward procedure has been developed to quickly determine an inviscid design of a hypersonic wind tunnel nozzle when the test crash is both calorically and thermally imperfect. This real gas procedure divides the nozzle into four distinct parts: subsonic, throat to conical, conical, and turning flow regions. The design process is greatly simplified by treating the imperfect gas effects only in the source flow region. This simplification can be justified for a large class of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzle design problems. The final nozzle design is obtained either by doing a classical boundary layer correction or by using this inviscid design as the starting point for a viscous design optimization based on computational fluid dynamics. An example of a real gas nozzle design is used to illustrate the method. The accuracy of the real gas design procedure is shown to compare favorably with an ideal gas design based on computed flow field solutions.

  6. Fluid mechanics a concise introduction to the theory

    CERN Document Server

    Yih, Chia-Shun

    1969-01-01

    Fundamentals ; the basic equations ; general theorems for the flow of an inviscid fluid ; irrotational flows of an inviscid fluid of constant density ; waves in an incompressible ; effects of viscosity ; heat transfer and boundary layers of a gas ; hydrodynamic stability ; turbulence ; basic thermodynamics ; curvilinear coordinates.

  7. A strong viscous–inviscid interaction model for rotating airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    version, a parametric study on rotational effects induced by the Coriolis and centrifugal forces in the boundary-layer equations shows that the effects of rotation are to decrease the growth of the boundary-layer and delay the onset of separation, hence increasing the lift coefficient slightly while...... the viscous and inviscid parts. The inviscid part is modeled by a 2D panel method, and the viscous part is modeled by solving the integral form of the laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations with extension for 3D rotational effects. Laminar-to-turbulent transition is either forced by employing...

  8. Stability of a Bubble Expanding and Translating Through an Inviscid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A bubble expands adiabatically and translates in an incompressible and inviscid liquid. We investigate the number of equilibrium points of the bubble and the nature of stability of the bubble at these points. We find that there is only one equilibrium point and the bubble is stable there.

  9. Stability of a bubble expanding and translating through an inviscid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Department of Mathematics, Delhi University, Delhi 110 007, India. MS received 27 August 2001; revised 2 February 2002. Abstract. A bubble expands adiabatically and translates in an incompressible and inviscid liquid. We investigate the number of equilibrium points of the bubble and the nature of stability of the bubble at ...

  10. An inviscid three-dimensional analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine hot-gas manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, P. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study using an inviscid three-dimensional Lagrangian fluid dynamics code has been conducted as a part of an overall effort to understand the flow behavior in the SSME fuel side hot-gas manifold. The model simulates flow from the high-pressure fuel turbine exit through the transfer ducts, including the effects of swirl, inlet flow symmetry, and presence of straightening vanes and struts; a separate, more-detailed effort is in progress that includes viscosity and turbulence effects. The simplified model presented is divided into two parts, the first includes the 180-degree turnaround duct downstream of the turbine exit and the spherical fuel bowl section, while the second models the three transfer ducts. The two parts of the model are coupled together with the interface conditions being updated through iteration. Results indicate that a transverse pressure differential of 165 psi would be imposed on the turbine exit and that unstable flow separation occurs around the vanes, struts, and within the transfer ducts. The three transfer ducts show a mass flux split of approximately 41, 21, and 38 percent. Results to date are encouraging that certain flow characteristics can be usefuly represented using a relatively coarse grid inviscid code.

  11. Inviscid melt spinning-IMS crystallization of amorphous alumina fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallenberger, F.T. (E.I. Du Pont De Nemours Co., Wilmington, DE (USA)); Dunn, S.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Weston, N.E.

    1990-04-01

    Experimental amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}CaO fibers (<80% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) which had been made by inviscid melt spinning (IMS) of low viscosity melts were found to retain up to 87% of their room temperature tensile strength at 750{degree}C (versus 25% for S-glass). The results suggest that the strength of these fibers is ultimately limited by their crystallization temperatures and that they might tolerate 100-200{degree}C higher temperatures than S-glass in comparable applications (e.g., in fiber reinforced composites). Some fibers were crystallized in a laboratory furnace. The crystalline phases of the resulting fibers were correlated with measured properties. The implications were applied to an analysis of a proposed process for redrawing inviscid melt spun (RIMS) fibers.

  12. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  13. Viscous-Inviscid Coupling Methods for Advanced Marine Propeller Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Greve, Martin; Wöckner-Kluwe, Katja; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa; Rung, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports the development of coupling strategies between an inviscid direct panel method and a viscous RANS method and their application to complex propeller ows. The work is motivated by the prohibitive computational cost associated to unsteady viscous flow simulations using geometrically resolved propellers to analyse the dynamics of ships in seaways. The present effort aims to combine the advantages of the two baseline methods in order to reduce the numerical effort without comprom...

  14. Viscous-Inviscid Methods in Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Bio-Inspired Morphing Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruv, Akash V.

    Flight has been one of the greatest realizations of human imagination, revolutionizing communication and transportation over the years. This has greatly influenced the growth of technology itself, enabling researchers to communicate and share their ideas more effectively, extending the human potential to create more sophisticated systems. While the end product of a sophisticated technology makes our lives easier, its development process presents an array of challenges in itself. In last decade, scientists and engineers have turned towards bio-inspiration to design more efficient and robust aerodynamic systems to enhance the ability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be operated in cluttered environments, where tight maneuverability and controllability are necessary. Effective use of UAVs in domestic airspace will mark the beginning of a new age in communication and transportation. The design of such complex systems necessitates the need for faster and more effective tools to perform preliminary investigations in design, thereby streamlining the design process. This thesis explores the implementation of numerical panel methods for aerodynamic analysis of bio-inspired morphing wings. Numerical panel methods have been one of the earliest forms of computational methods for aerodynamic analysis to be developed. Although the early editions of this method performed only inviscid analysis, the algorithm has matured over the years as a result of contributions made by prominent aerodynamicists. The method discussed in this thesis is influenced by recent advancements in panel methods and incorporates both viscous and inviscid analysis of multi-flap wings. The surface calculation of aerodynamic coefficients makes this method less computationally expensive than traditional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers available, and thus is effective when both speed and accuracy are desired. The morphing wing design, which consists of sequential feather-like flaps installed

  15. Inviscid/Boundary-Layer Aeroheating Approach for Integrated Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    A typical entry vehicle design depends on the synthesis of many essential subsystems, including thermal protection system (TPS), structures, payload, avionics, and propulsion, among others. The ability to incorporate aerothermodynamic considerations and TPS design into the early design phase is crucial, as both are closely coupled to the vehicle's aerodynamics, shape and mass. In the preliminary design stage, reasonably accurate results with rapid turn-representative entry envelope was explored. Initial results suggest that for Mach numbers ranging from 9-20, a few inviscid solutions could reasonably sup- port surface heating predictions at Mach numbers variation of +/-2, altitudes variation of +/-10 to 20 kft, and angle-of-attack variation of +/- 5. Agreement with Navier-Stokes solutions was generally found to be within 10-15% for Mach number and altitude, and 20% for angle of attack. A smaller angle-of-attack increment than the 5 deg around times for parametric studies and quickly evolving configurations are necessary to steer design decisions. This investigation considers the use of an unstructured 3D inviscid code in conjunction with an integral boundary-layer method; the former providing the flow field solution and the latter the surface heating. Sensitivity studies for Mach number, angle of attack, and altitude, examine the feasibility of using this approach to populate a representative entry flight envelope based on a limited set of inviscid solutions. Each inviscid solution is used to generate surface heating over the nearby trajectory space. A subset of a considered in this study is recommended. Results of the angle-of-attack sensitivity studies show that smaller increments may be needed for better heating predictions. The approach is well suited for application to conceptual multidisciplinary design and analysis studies where transient aeroheating environments are critical for vehicle TPS and thermal design. Concurrent prediction of aeroheating

  16. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous flow around the profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel; Prihoda, Jaromir

    2015-05-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox's k-ω model. Calculations are done in GAMM channel computational domain with 10% DCA profile and in turbine cascade computational domain with 8% DCA profile. Numerical methods are based on a finite volume solution and compared with experimental measurements for 8% DCA profile.

  17. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous flow around the profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slouka Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox’s k-ω model. Calculations are done in GAMM channel computational domain with 10% DCA profile and in turbine cascade computational domain with 8% DCA profile. Numerical methods are based on a finite volume solution and compared with experimental measurements for 8% DCA profile.

  18. Spatial-Temporal Instability of an Inviscid Shear Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-fei Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore the transition of absolute instability and convective instability in a compressible inviscid shear layer, through a linear spatial-temporal instability analysis. From linearized governing equations of the shear layer and the ideal-gas equation of state, the dispersion relation for the pressure perturbation was obtained. The eigenvalue problem for the evolution of two-dimensional perturbation was solved by means of shooting method. The zero group velocity is obtained by a saddle point method. The absolute/convective instability characteristics of the flow are determined by the temporal growth rate at the saddle point. The absolute/convective nature of the flow instability has strong dependence on the values of the temperature ratio, the velocity ratio, the oblique angle, and M number. A parametric study indicates that, for a great value of velocity ratio, the inviscid shear layer can transit to absolute instability. The increase of temperature ratio decreases the absolute growth rate when the temperature ratio is large; the effect of temperature ratio is opposite when the temperature ratio is relatively small. The obliquity of the perturbations would cause the increase of the absolute growth rate. The effect of M number is different when the oblique angle is great and small. Besides, the absolute instability boundary is found in the velocity ratio, temperature ratio, and M number space.

  19. Discrete Symmetries Analysis and Exact Solutions of the Inviscid Burgers Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the Lie point symmetries and discrete symmetries of the inviscid Burgers equation. By employing the Lie group method of infinitesimal transformations, symmetry reductions and similarity solutions of the governing equation are given. Based on discrete symmetries analysis, two groups of discrete symmetries are obtained, which lead to new exact solutions of the inviscid Burgers equation.

  20. Shallow water equations: viscous solutions and inviscid limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Perepelitsa, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We establish the inviscid limit of the viscous shallow water equations to the Saint-Venant system. For the viscous equations, the viscosity terms are more degenerate when the shallow water is close to the bottom, in comparison with the classical Navier-Stokes equations for barotropic gases; thus, the analysis in our earlier work for the classical Navier-Stokes equations does not apply directly, which require new estimates to deal with the additional degeneracy. We first introduce a notion of entropy solutions to the viscous shallow water equations and develop an approach to establish the global existence of such solutions and their uniform energy-type estimates with respect to the viscosity coefficient. These uniform estimates yield the existence of measure-valued solutions to the Saint-Venant system generated by the viscous solutions. Based on the uniform energy-type estimates and the features of the Saint-Venant system, we further establish that the entropy dissipation measures of the viscous solutions for weak entropy-entropy flux pairs, generated by compactly supported C 2 test-functions, are confined in a compact set in H -1, which yields that the measure-valued solutions are confined by the Tartar-Murat commutator relation. Then, the reduction theorem established in Chen and Perepelitsa [5] for the measure-valued solutions with unbounded support leads to the convergence of the viscous solutions to a finite-energy entropy solution of the Saint-Venant system with finite-energy initial data, which is relative with respect to the different end-states of the bottom topography of the shallow water at infinity. The analysis also applies to the inviscid limit problem for the Saint-Venant system in the presence of friction.

  1. Relativistic low angular momentum accretion: long time evolution of hydrodynamical inviscid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Patryk; Piróg, Michał; Font, José A.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate relativistic low angular momentum accretion of inviscid perfect fluid onto a Schwarzschild black hole. The simulations are performed with a general-relativistic, high-resolution (second-order), shock-capturing, hydrodynamical numerical code. We use horizon-penetrating Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates to remove inaccuracies in regions of strong gravity near the black hole horizon and show the expected convergence of the code with the Michel solution and stationary Fishbone–Moncrief toroids. We recover, in the framework of relativistic hydrodynamics, the qualitative behavior known from previous Newtonian studies that used a Bondi background flow in a pseudo-relativistic gravitational potential with a latitude-dependent angular momentum at the outer boundary. Our models exhibit characteristic ‘turbulent’ behavior and the attained accretion rates are lower than those of the Bondi–Michel radial flow. For sufficiently low values of the asymptotic sound speed, geometrically thick tori form in the equatorial plane surrounding the black hole horizon while accretion takes place mainly through the poles.

  2. Inviscid flux-splitting algorithms for real gases with non-equilibrium chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun; Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram

    1990-01-01

    Formulations of inviscid flux splitting algorithms for chemical nonequilibrium gases are presented. A chemical system for air dissociation and recombination is described. Numerical results for one-dimensional shock tube and nozzle flows of air in chemical nonequilibrium are examined.

  3. Basic developments in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Basic Developments in Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2 focuses on the developments, approaches, methodologies, reactions, and processes involved in fluid dynamics, including sea motion, wave interactions, and motion of spheres in a viscous fluid.The selection first offers information on inviscid cavity and wake flows and weak-interaction theory of ocean waves. Discussions focus on steady and unsteady cavity flows, radiation balance, theory of weak interactions in random fields, interactions between gravity waves and the atmosphere, and interactions within the ocean. The text then examines low Reynolds

  4. Euler's fluid equations: Optimal control vs optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2009-01-01

    An optimization method used in image-processing (metamorphosis) is found to imply Euler's equations for incompressible flow of an inviscid fluid, without requiring that the Lagrangian particle labels exactly follow the flow lines of the Eulerian velocity vector field. Thus, an optimal control problem and an optimization problem for incompressible ideal fluid flow both yield the same Euler fluid equations, although their Lagrangian parcel dynamics are different. This is a result of the gauge freedom in the definition of the fluid pressure for an incompressible flow, in combination with the symmetry of fluid dynamics under relabeling of their Lagrangian coordinates. Similar ideas are also illustrated for SO(N) rigid body motion.

  5. A quasi-3D viscous-inviscid interaction code: Q3UIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    and inviscid parts. The rotational effects generated by centrifugal and Coriolis forces are introduced in Q3UIC via the streamwise and spanwise integral boundary layer momentum equations. A special inviscid version of the code has been developed to cope with massive separation. To check the ability of the code...

  6. A numerical simulation of the inviscid flow through a counter-rotating propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; Adamczyk, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the time-averaged inviscid flow field through the blade rows of a multiblade row turboprop configuration are presented. The governing equations are outlined along with a discussion of the solution procedure and coding strategy. Numerical results obtained from a simulation of the flow field through a modern high-speed turboprop will be shown.

  7. A numerical simulation of the inviscid flow through a counterrotating propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the time-averaged inviscid flow field through the blade rows of a multiblade row turboprop configuration are presented. The governing equations are outlined along with a discussion of the solution procedure and coding strategy. Numerical results obtained from a simulation of the flow field through a modern high-speed turboprop will be shown.

  8. Dissipative solutions and the incompressible inviscid limits of the compressible magnetohydrodynamic system in unbounded domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.; Sun, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2014), s. 121-143 ISSN 1078-0947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible MHD system * inviscid limit * incompressible limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.826, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=8717

  9. Numerical solution of inviscid transonic flow through 3D axial blade row

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, J.; Fuerst, J.; Halama, J.; Kozel, K. [CTU Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics

    2000-07-01

    Presented paper deals with numerical solution of 3D inviscid transonic flow through axial cascades. Two different finite volume methods are mentioned. Authors show a comparison of both methods using results computed for the stator and the rotor cascades. A role of inlet parameters and body forces in the case of a rotor flow has been also investigated. (orig.)

  10. Effect of external pulsation on kinematics of fluid particles in the field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ananth Pai

    Fluid Mech. 24: 1–20. [3] Batchelor G K 1967 An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [4] P G Saffman 1992 Vortex dynamics. Cambridge: Cambridge. University Press. [5] Romero-Mйndez R, Sen M, Yang K T and McClain R L. 1998 Enhancement of heat transfer in an inviscid-flow ther-.

  11. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and filled with viscous fluids. The frequency equation for each problem is obtained from. Figure 5. (Material 1) Effect of liquid viscosity on dispersion curves (Solid curve ± when bore is filled with castor oil. Dashed curve ± when bore is filled with inviscid liquid.) Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore.

  12. A physical five-equation model for compressible two-fluid flow, and its numerical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kreeft (Jasper); B. Koren (Barry)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractA novel five-equation model for inviscid, non-heat-conducting, compressible two-fluid flow is derived, together with an appropriate numerical method. The model uses flow equations based on conservation laws and exchange laws only. The two fluids exchange momentum and energy, for which

  13. Comparison of the generalized Riemann solver and the gas-kinetic scheme for inviscid compressible flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiequan; Li Qibing; Xu Kun

    2011-01-01

    The generalized Riemann problem (GRP) scheme for the Euler equations and gas-kinetic scheme (GKS) for the Boltzmann equation are two high resolution shock capturing schemes for fluid simulations. The difference is that one is based on the characteristics of the inviscid Euler equations and their wave interactions, and the other is based on the particle transport and collisions. The similarity between them is that both methods can use identical MUSCL-type initial reconstructions around a cell interface, and the spatial slopes on both sides of a cell interface involve in the gas evolution process and the construction of a time-dependent flux function. Although both methods have been applied successfully to the inviscid compressible flow computations, their performances have never been compared. Since both methods use the same initial reconstruction, any difference is solely coming from different underlying mechanism in their flux evaluation. Therefore, such a comparison is important to help us to understand the correspondence between physical modeling and numerical performances. Since GRP is so faithfully solving the inviscid Euler equations, the comparison can be also used to show the validity of solving the Euler equations itself. The numerical comparison shows that the GRP exhibits a slightly better computational efficiency, and has comparable accuracy with GKS for the Euler solutions in 1D case, but the GKS is more robust than GRP. For the 2D high Mach number flow simulations, the GKS is absent from the shock instability and converges to the steady state solutions faster than the GRP. The GRP has carbuncle phenomena, likes a cloud hanging over exact Riemann solvers. The GRP and GKS use different physical processes to describe the flow motion starting from a discontinuity. One is based on the assumption of equilibrium state with infinite number of particle collisions, and the other starts from the non-equilibrium free transport process to evolve into an

  14. Application of an engineering inviscid-boundary layer method to slender three-dimensional vehicle forebodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering inviscid-boundary layer method has been modified for application to slender three-dimensional (3-D) forebodies which are characteristic of transatmospheric vehicles. An improved shock description in the nose region has been added to the inviscid technique which allows the calculation of a wider range of body geometries. The modified engineering method is applied to the perfect gas solution over a slender 3-D configuration at angle of attack. The method predicts surface pressures and laminar heating rates on the windward side of the vehicle that compare favorably with numerical solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. These improvements extend the 3-D capabilities of the engineering method and significantly increase its design applications.

  15. Surface Wave Propagation in a Microstretch Thermoelastic Diffusion Material under an Inviscid Liquid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the propagation of Rayleigh type surface waves in an isotropic microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half space under a layer of inviscid liquid. The secular equation for surface waves in compact form is derived after developing the mathematical model. The dispersion curves giving the phase velocity and attenuation coefficients with wave number are plotted graphically to depict the effect of an imperfect boundary alongwith the relaxation times in a microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half space under a homogeneous inviscid liquid layer for thermally insulated, impermeable boundaries and isothermal, isoconcentrated boundaries, respectively. In addition, normal velocity component is also plotted in the liquid layer. Several cases of interest under different conditions are also deduced and discussed.

  16. Convergence of finite differences schemes for viscous and inviscid conservation laws with rough coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsen, Kenneth Hvistendal; Risebro, Nils Henrik

    2000-09-01

    We consider the initial value problem for degenerate viscous and inviscid scalar conservation laws where the flux function depends on the spatial location through a ''rough'' coefficient function k(x). we show that the Engquist-Osher (and hence all monotone) finite difference approximations converge to the unique entropy solution of the governing equation if, among other demands, k' is in BV, thereby providing alternative (new) existence proofs for entropy solutions of degenerate convection-diffusion equations as well as new convergence results for their finite difference approximations. In the inviscid case, we also provide a rate of convergence. Our convergence proofs are based on deriving a series of a priori estimates and using a general L{sup p} compactness criterion. (author)

  17. Comparison of secondary flows predicted by a viscous code and an inviscid code with experimental data for a turning duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J. R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of the secondary flows computed by the viscous Kreskovsky-Briley-McDonald code and the inviscid Denton code with benchmark experimental data for turning duct is presented. The viscous code is a fully parabolized space-marching Navier-Stokes solver while the inviscid code is a time-marching Euler solver. The experimental data were collected by Taylor, Whitelaw, and Yianneskis with a laser Doppler velocimeter system in a 90 deg turning duct of square cross-section. The agreement between the viscous and inviscid computations was generally very good for the streamwise primary velocity and the radial secondary velocity, except at the walls, where slip conditions were specified for the inviscid code. The agreement between both the computations and the experimental data was not as close, especially at the 60.0 deg and 77.5 deg angular positions within the duct. This disagreement was attributed to incomplete modelling of the vortex development near the suction surface.

  18. Inviscid incompressible limits of the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 3 (2013), s. 605-628 ISSN 0010-3616 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * inviscid limit * incompressible limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.901, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00220-013-1691-4

  19. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slouka Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  20. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  1. Introduction to the concept of added mass in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Dan Tam.

    1977-07-01

    The physical phenomenum which leads to the concept of added mass for an inviscid fluid is recalled. The added-mass tensor for a solid body moving through an unbounded fluid is defined and some of its properties are presented. The Taylor theorem is exposed, which enables some of the tensor components to be analytically derived in particular cases. Added-mass values are provided for bodies of particular shape. Applications of the added-mass concept to different problems are given [fr

  2. A study of displacement-based fluid finite elements for calculating frequencies of fluid and fluid-structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.G.; Bathe, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    The widely-used displacement-based finite element formulation for inviscid, compressible, small displacement fluid motions is examined, with the specific objective of calculating fluid-structure frequencies. It is shown that the formulation can be employed with confidence to predict the static response of fluids. Also the resonant frequencies of fluids in rigid cavities and the frequencies of fluids in flexible boundaries are solved successfully if a penalty on rotations is included in the formulation. However, the reason for writing this paper is that problems involving structures moving through fluids that behave almost incompressibly - such as an ellipse vibrating on a spring in water - could not be solved satisfactorily, for which a general explanation is given. (orig.)

  3. Part I. Inviscid, swirling flows and vortex breakdown. Part II. A numerical investigation of the Lundgren turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buntine, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time-independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters does a solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A open-quotes quasi-cylindricalclose quotes amplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. open-quotes Criticalityclose quotes or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi-cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between open-quotes failureclose quotes of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a open-quotes criticalclose quotes flow state. Lundgren developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k -5/3 behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin ampersand Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the model numerically. The first part considers how the flow description compares with numerical simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations

  4. Development of an Aerodynamic Analysis Method and Database for the SLS Service Module Panel Jettison Event Utilizing Inviscid CFD and MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Michael P.; Hall, Leslie, H.; Eppard, William M.; Purinton, David C.; Campbell, John R.; Blevins, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development, testing, and utilization of an aerodynamic force and moment database for the Space Launch System (SLS) Service Module (SM) panel jettison event. The database is a combination of inviscid Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) data and MATLAB code written to query the data at input values of vehicle/SM panel parameters and return the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of the panels as they are jettisoned from the vehicle. The database encompasses over 5000 CFD simulations with the panels either in the initial stages of separation where they are hinged to the vehicle, in close proximity to the vehicle, or far enough from the vehicle that body interference effects are neglected. A series of viscous CFD check cases were performed to assess the accuracy of the Euler solutions for this class of problem and good agreement was obtained. The ultimate goal of the panel jettison database was to create a tool that could be coupled with any 6-Degree-Of-Freedom (DOF) dynamics model to rapidly predict SM panel separation from the SLS vehicle in a quasi-unsteady manner. Results are presented for panel jettison simulations that utilize the database at various SLS flight conditions. These results compare favorably to an approach that directly couples a 6-DOF model with the Cart3D Euler flow solver and obtains solutions for the panels at exact locations. This paper demonstrates a method of using inviscid CFD simulations coupled with a 6-DOF model that provides adequate fidelity to capture the physics of this complex multiple moving-body panel separation event.

  5. Viscous-inviscid interaction using the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1997-01-01

    adaptive grid is used.The interaction is achieved by iterative updatingof the boundary conditions, through the wall transpiration concept. The Navier-Stokes equationsare discretized on a semi-staggered grid.Space-marching integration is performed starting from the stagnation streamline ontwo independent......A numerical model for the calculation of incompressible viscous flows past airfoils andwings has been developed. The approach is based on a strong viscous-inviscid coupling of aboundary element method with the Navier-Stokesequations in vorticity-streamfunction formulation.A semi-adaptive or fully...

  6. Inviscid limit of stochastic damped 2D Navier–Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessaih, Hakima; Ferrario, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    We consider the inviscid limit of the stochastic damped 2D Navier–Stokes equations. We prove that, when the viscosity vanishes, the stationary solution of the stochastic damped Navier–Stokes equations converges to a stationary solution of the stochastic damped Euler equation and that the rate of dissipation of enstrophy converges to zero. In particular, this limit obeys an enstrophy balance. The rates are computed with respect to a limit measure of the unique invariant measure of the stochastic damped Navier–Stokes equations. (paper)

  7. Surface wave propagation in a swelling porous elastic material under a inviscid liquid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation is to study the surface wave propagationin a swelling porous elastic half space under homogeneous inviscidliquid layer. The frequency equation is derive for both swellingporous (SP and without swelling porous (elastic medium (EL medium. The dispersion curves giving the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient with wave number are plotted graphically to depict the effect of swelling porous half space under a homogeneous inviscid liquid layer. The amplitudes of displacement in both SP and EL medium are obtained and are shown graphically. Some special cases are also deduced from the present investigation.

  8. Enhanced Dissipation, Hypoellipticity, and Anomalous Small Noise Inviscid Limits in Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Jacob; Coti Zelati, Michele

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the decay and instant regularization properties of the evolution semigroups generated by two-dimensional drift-diffusion equations in which the scalar is advected by a shear flow and dissipated by full or partial diffusion. We consider both the space-periodic T^2 setting and the case of a bounded channel T × [0,1] with no-flux boundary conditions. In the infinite Péclet number limit (diffusivity {ν\\to 0}), our work quantifies the enhanced dissipation effect due to the shear. We also obtain hypoelliptic regularization, showing that solutions are instantly Gevrey regular even with only partial diffusion. The proofs rely on localized spectral gap inequalities and ideas from hypocoercivity with an augmented energy functional with weights replaced by pseudo-differential operators (of a rather simple form). As an application, we study small noise inviscid limits of invariant measures of stochastic perturbations of passive scalars, and show that the classical Freidlin scaling between noise and diffusion can be modified. In particular, although statistically stationary solutions blow up in {H^1} in the limit {ν \\to 0}, we show that viscous invariant measures still converge to a unique inviscid measure.

  9. Inviscid instabilities of non-planar transversely sheared flows governed by the generalized Rayleigh pressure equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Transition in boundary layer flow over flat/curved surfaces and at moderate to high freestream disturbances or under the influence of various surface roughness elements often involves inviscid secondary instability. This stage in transition can be pictured as being a parametric resonance-type phenomena where a unstable primary flow saturates to a more-or-less steady-state, susceptible to infinitesimal three-dimensional wave-like instability modes that grow much faster than the primary. In decades of research on boundary layers, experimenters have relied upon an inflection point in the wall normal y and/or spanwise directions z of the primary as a pre-cursor to transition. This assertion, based on Rayleigh's theorem, does not however apply in transversely sheared flows. In this talk, we show that an alternative local criterion for inviscid secondary instability - sharing similarities to the original one-dimensional Rayleigh criterion - exists for a class of non-planar transversely sheared flows at long streamwise wavelength. Our general stability criterion is, remarkably, given by necessity of the surface U y , z possessing at least one saddle point in the plane. We analyze this saddle-point criterion numerically show its relevance to secondary instabilities. M.Z.A. would like to anknowledge financial support from Laminar Flow Control (LFC-UK) Research Program at Imperial College London and would like to thank Professor Philip Hall for motivating his interest in this problem.

  10. A meshless front tracking method for the Euler equations of fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, J.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    A second order front tracking method is developed for solving the Euler equations of inviscid fluid dynamics numerically. Front tracking methods are usually limited to first order accuracy, since they are based on a piecewise constant approximation of the solution. Here the second order convergence

  11. Phase space density representations in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Phase space density representations of inviscid fluid dynamics were recently discussed by Abarbanel and Rouhi. Here it is shown that such representations may be simply derived and interpreted by means of the Liouville equation corresponding to the dynamical system of ordinary differential equations that describes fluid particle trajectories. The Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket for the phase space density then emerge as immediate consequences of the corresponding structure of the dynamics. For barotropic fluids, this approach leads by direct construction to the formulation presented by Abarbanel and Rouhi. Extensions of this formulation to inhomogeneous incompressible fluids and to fluids in which the state equation involves an additional transported scalar variable are constructed by augmenting the single-particle dynamics and phase space to include the relevant additional variable

  12. Existence and uniqueness of entropy solution to initial boundary value problem for the inviscid Burgers equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Changjiang; Duan, Renjun

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the existence and uniqueness of the entropy solution to the initial boundary value problem for the inviscid Burgers equation. To apply the method of vanishing viscosity to study the existence of the entropy solution, we first introduce the initial boundary value problem for the viscous Burgers equation, and as in Evans (1998 Partial Differential Equations (Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society) and Hopf (1950 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 3 201-30), give the formula of the corresponding viscosity solutions by Hopf-Cole transformation. Secondly, we prove the convergence of the viscosity solution sequences and verify that the limiting function is an entropy solution. Finally, we give an example to show how our main result can be applied to solve the initial boundary value problem for the Burgers equation

  13. Survey of numerical methods for compressible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sod, G A

    1977-06-01

    The finite difference methods of Godunov, Hyman, Lax-Wendroff (two-step), MacCormack, Rusanov, the upwind scheme, the hybrid scheme of Harten and Zwas, the antidiffusion method of Boris and Book, and the artificial compression method of Harten are compared with the random choice known as Glimm's method. The methods are used to integrate the one-dimensional equations of gas dynamics for an inviscid fluid. The results are compared and demonstrate that Glimm's method has several advantages. 16 figs., 4 tables.

  14. Numerical simulations of incompressible laminar flows using viscous-inviscid interaction procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, Alexander V.

    The present method is based on Helmholtz velocity decomposition where velocity is written as a sum of irrotational (gradient of a potential) and rotational (correction due to vorticity) components. Substitution of the velocity decomposition into the continuity equation yields an equation for the potential, while substitution into the momentum equations yields equations for the velocity corrections. A continuation approach is used to relate the pressure to the gradient of the potential through a modified Bernoulli's law, which allows the elimination of the pressure variable from the momentum equations. The present work considers steady and unsteady two-dimensional incompressible flows over an infinite cylinder and NACA 0012 airfoil shape. The numerical results are compared against standard methods (stream function-vorticity and SMAC methods) and data available in literature. The results demonstrate that the proposed formulation leads to a good approximation with some possible benefits compared to the available formulations. The method is not restricted to two-dimensional flows and can be used for viscous-inviscid domain decomposition calculations.

  15. The fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Adam K.; Wilson, Helen J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain. Molten chocolate is a mildly shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. Dividing the flow into three main domains—the pumped flow up the centre, the film flow over each dome, and the freely falling curtain flow between the domes—we generate a wide-ranging study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. The central pumped flow is a benchmark to elucidate the effects of shear-thinning. The dome flow can be modelled as a thin-film flow with the leading-order effects being a simple balance of gravity and viscosity. Finally, the curtain flow is analytically intractable but is related to the existing theory of water bells (both inviscid and viscous). In pipe flow, Newtonian fluids exhibit a parabolic velocity profile; shear-thinning makes the profile more blunted. In thin-film flow over the dome, gravitational and viscous effects balance and the dome shape is not important beyond the local slope. We find that the chocolate thins and slows down as it travels down the dome. Finally, in the curtain flow, we predict the shape of the falling sheet for an inviscid fluid, and compare this with the literature to predict the shape for a viscous fluid, having shown that viscous forces are too great to ignore. We also find that the primary effect driving the shape of the curtain (which falls inwards towards the axis of the fountain) is surface tension. We find that the three domains provide excellent introductions to non-Newtonian mechanics, the important mathematical technique of scaling, and how to manipulate existing data to make our own predictions. We also find that the topic generates interest among the public in our engagement work.

  16. The fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Adam K; Wilson, Helen J

    2016-01-01

    We consider the fluid dynamics of the chocolate fountain. Molten chocolate is a mildly shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. Dividing the flow into three main domains—the pumped flow up the centre, the film flow over each dome, and the freely falling curtain flow between the domes—we generate a wide-ranging study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. The central pumped flow is a benchmark to elucidate the effects of shear-thinning. The dome flow can be modelled as a thin-film flow with the leading-order effects being a simple balance of gravity and viscosity. Finally, the curtain flow is analytically intractable but is related to the existing theory of water bells (both inviscid and viscous). In pipe flow, Newtonian fluids exhibit a parabolic velocity profile; shear-thinning makes the profile more blunted. In thin-film flow over the dome, gravitational and viscous effects balance and the dome shape is not important beyond the local slope. We find that the chocolate thins and slows down as it travels down the dome. Finally, in the curtain flow, we predict the shape of the falling sheet for an inviscid fluid, and compare this with the literature to predict the shape for a viscous fluid, having shown that viscous forces are too great to ignore. We also find that the primary effect driving the shape of the curtain (which falls inwards towards the axis of the fountain) is surface tension. We find that the three domains provide excellent introductions to non-Newtonian mechanics, the important mathematical technique of scaling, and how to manipulate existing data to make our own predictions. We also find that the topic generates interest among the public in our engagement work. (paper)

  17. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-01-01

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem. PMID:23729844

  18. Fluid Dynamics And Mass Transfer In Two-Fluid Taylor-Couette Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, G.; Graham, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Taylor-Couette instability of a single liquid phase can be used to enhance mass transfer processes such as filtration and membrane separations. We consider here the possibility of using this instability to enhance interphase transport in a two-fluid systems, with a view toward improved liquid-liquid extractions for biotechnology applications. We investigate the centrifugal instability of a pair of radially stratified immiscible liquids in the annular gap between concentric, corotating cylinders: two-fluid Taylor-Couette flow. Experiments show that a two-layer flow with a well-defined interface and Taylor vortices in each phase can be obtained. The experimental results are in good agreement with predictions of inviscid arguments based on a two-phase extension of Rayleigh's criterion, as well as with detailed linear stability calculations. For a given geometry, the most stable configuration occurs for fluids of roughly (exactly in the inviscid limit) equal dynamic viscosities. A number of preliminary mass transfer experiments have also been performed, in the presence of axial counterflow. The onset of Taylor vortices coincides with a clear decrease in the extent of axial dispersion and an increase in the rate of interphase transport, thus suggesting that this flow geometry may provide an effective means for countercurrent chromatographic separations

  19. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics applied to flows in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M. D.; Diwakar, R.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Jones, E.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of studies conducted by Diwakar et al. (1976) and Griffin et al. (1976), who reported the first computational fluid dynamic results for the two-dimensional flowfield for all four strokes of a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine cycle. An analysis of rectangular and cylindrical three-dimensional engine models is performed. The working fluid is assumed to be inviscid air of constant specific heats. Calculations are carried out of a four-stroke IC engine flowfield wherein detailed finite-rate chemical combustion of a gasoline-air mixture is included. The calculations remain basically inviscid, except that in some instances thermal conduction is included to allow a more realistic model of the localized sparking of the mixture. All the results of the investigation are obtained by means of an explicity time-dependent finite-difference technique, using a high-speed digital computer.

  1. The utilization of parallel processing in solving the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Celestina, Mark L.; Adamczyk, John J.; Misegades, Kent P.; Dawson, Jef M.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is outlined which utilizes parallel processing to solve the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery along with a description of its implementation in a FORTRAN computer code, MSTAGE. A scheme to reduce the central memory requirements of the program is also detailed. Both the multitasking and I/O routines referred to in this paper are specific to the Cray X-MP line of computers and its associated SSD (Solid-state Storage Device). Results are presented for a simulation of a two-stage rocket engine fuel pump turbine.

  2. Utilization of parallel processing in solving the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Celestina, Mark L.; Adamczyk, John J.; Misegades, Kent P.; Dawson, Jef M.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is outlined which utilizes parallel processing to solve the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery along with a description of its implementation in a FORTRAN computer code, MSTAGE. A scheme to reduce the central memory requirements of the program is also detailed. Both the multitasking and I/O routines referred to are specific to the Cray X-MP line of computers and its associated SSD (Solid-State Disk). Results are presented for a simulation of a two-stage rocket engine fuel pump turbine.

  3. Solving the linear inviscid shallow water equations in one dimension, with variable depth, using a recursion formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Walls, R; Martín-Atienza, B; Salinas-Matus, M; Castillo, J

    2017-01-01

    When solving the linear inviscid shallow water equations with variable depth in one dimension using finite differences, a tridiagonal system of equations must be solved. Here we present an approach, which is more efficient than the commonly used numerical method, to solve this tridiagonal system of equations using a recursion formula. We illustrate this approach with an example in which we solve for a rectangular channel to find the resonance modes. Our numerical solution agrees very well with the analytical solution. This new method is easy to use and understand by undergraduate students, so it can be implemented in undergraduate courses such as Numerical Methods, Lineal Algebra or Differential Equations. (paper)

  4. Hydrodynamic 'memory' of binary fluid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnik, M. V.; Ingel, L. Kh.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of hydrostatic adjustment in a two-component fluid system, such as seawater stratified with respect to temperature and salinity. Both linear approximation and nonlinear problem are investigated. It is shown that scenarios of relaxation to a hydrostatically balanced state in binary fluid mixtures may substantially differ from hydrostatic adjustment in fluids that can be stratified only with respect to temperature. In particular, inviscid two-component fluids have 'memory': a horizontally nonuniform disturbance in the initial temperature or salinity distribution does not vanish even at the final stage, transforming into a persistent thermohaline 'trace.' Despite stability of density stratification and convective stability of the fluid system by all known criteria, an initial temperature disturbance may not decay and may even increase in amplitude. Moreover, its sign may change (depending on the relative contributions of temperature and salinity to stable background density stratification). Hydrostatic adjustment may involve development of discontinuous distributions from smooth initial temperature or concentration distributions. These properties of two-component fluids explain, in particular, the occurrence of persistent horizontally or vertically nonuniform temperature and salinity distributions in the ocean, including discontinuous ones

  5. Inviscid incompressible limit under mild stratification: a rigorous derivation of the Euler-Boussinesq system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2014), s. 279-307 ISSN 0095-4616 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Keywords : compressible fluids * Navier-Stokes equations * singular limits Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.591, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00245-014-9243-7

  6. Fluid structure interaction with sloshing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belytschko, T.B.; Liu, W.K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, three different formulations for fluid-structure interaction with sloshing are discussed. When the surface displacements are large, the problems are nonlinear, and Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods and direct time integration are most appropriate. Explicit direct time integration has the disadvantage of a limited time-step whereas implicit method has the disadvantage of nonconvergence and high computational cost. A mixed time method which employs E-mE (explicit-multiple explicit) integration for obtaining the velocity and free surface displacement and I-mI (implicit-multiple implicit) integration for obtaining the pressure is described. An iterative solution procedure is used to enhance the efficiency of the implicit solution procedure as well as to reduce the computer storage. For linear problems, the surface wave effects can be approximated by a perturbation method on the body force term if the surface displacements are small. Furthermore, if the fluid can be idealized as inviscid, incompressible and irrotational, the pressure, velocity, and free surface displacement variables can be eliminated via a velocity potential formulation. (orig.)

  7. Development of a method of analysis and computer program for calculating the inviscid flow about the windward surfaces of space shuttle configurations at large angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslen, S. H.

    1974-01-01

    A general method developed for the analysis of inviscid hypersonic shock layers is discussed for application to the case of the shuttle vehicle at high (65 deg) angle of attack. The associated extensive subsonic flow region caused convergence difficulties whose resolution is discussed. It is required that the solution be smoother than anticipated.

  8. New approach to the solution of large, full matrix equations. [Neumann problem for inviscid incompressble flow past airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. W.; James, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach to the solution of matrix equations resulting from integral equations is presented and applied to the solution of two-dimensional Neumann problems describing the inviscid, incompressible flow past an airfoil. The problem is reformulated in terms of a preselected set of mode functions giving an equivalent matrix equation to be solved for the mode-function expansion coefficients. Because of the inherent smoothness of the original problem, the coefficient problem can be solved approximately without significantly affecting the accuracy of the final solution. Very promising two-dimensional results are obtained and the extension of the method to three-dimensional problems is investigated. On the basis of these results it is shown that the computing time for the matrix solution for a large three-dimensional panel method calculation could be reduced by an order of magnitude compared with that required for a direct solution.

  9. A thin-shock-layer solution for nonequilibrium, inviscid hypersonic flows in earth, Martian, and Venusian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    An approximate inverse solution is presented for the nonequilibrium flow in the inviscid shock layer about a vehicle in hypersonic flight. The method is based upon a thin-shock-layer approximation and has the advantage of being applicable to both subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer. The relative simplicity of the method makes it ideally suited for programming on a digital computer with a significant reduction in storage capacity and computing time required by other more exact methods. Comparison of nonequilibrium solutions for an air mixture obtained by the present method is made with solutions obtained by two other methods. Additional cases are presented for entry of spherical nose cones into representative Venusian and Martian atmospheres. A digital computer program written in FORTRAN language is presented that permits an arbitrary gas mixture to be employed in the solution. The effects of vibration, dissociation, recombination, electronic excitation, and ionization are included in the program.

  10. A viscous-inviscid interactive procedure for rotational flow in cascades of two dimensional airfoils of arbitrary shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interactive calculation procedure is developed for application to flow in cascades of two-dimensional airfoils. This procedure has essentially three components. First, a numerical solution of the Eulers equations which can accommodate an arbitrarily specified cascade geometry of the cascade. A method of grid generation has been used which relics in part on a succession of conformal mappings. Second, a viscous solution for use in boundary layers and wake regions was programmed. Finally, an interactive scheme which takes the form of a source-sink distribution along the blade surface and wake centerline is employed. Results were obtained with this procedure for several cascade flow situations, and some comparisons with experiment are presented.

  11. Statistical solutions of the Navier endash Stokes equations on the phase space of vorticity and the inviscid limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, P.; Wu, J.

    1997-01-01

    Using the methods of Foias [Sem. Math. Univ. Padova 48, 219 endash 343 (1972); 49, 9 endash 123 (1973)] and Vishik endash Fursikov [Mathematical Problems of Statistical Hydromechanics (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1988)], we prove the existence and uniqueness of both spatial and space endash time statistical solutions of the Navier endash Stokes equations on the phase space of vorticity. Here the initial vorticity is in Yudovich space and the initial measure has finite mean enstrophy. We show under further assumptions on the initial vorticity that the statistical solutions of the Navier endash Stokes equations converge weakly and the inviscid limits are the corresponding statistical solutions of the Euler equations. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids under seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamic response of liquid-tank systems, such as reactor vessels, spent-fuel pools and liquid storage tanks have been studied extensively in the last decade (Chang et al. 1988; Ma et al. 1991). However, most of the studies are conducted with the assumption of an inviscid fluid. In recent years, the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids has received increasing attention in high level waste storage tanks containing viscous waste material. This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids in a large 2-D fluid-tank system under seismic excitation. Hydrodynamic responses (i.e. sloshing wave height, fluid pressures, shear stress, etc.) are calculated for a fluid with various viscosities. Four fluid viscosities are considered. They are 1 cp, 120 cp, 1,000 cp and 12,000 cp (1 cp = 1.45 x 10 -7 lb-sec/in 2 ). Note that the liquid sodium of the Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) reactor has a viscosity of 1.38 x 10 -5 lb-sec/in 2 (about 95 cp) at an operational temperature of 900 degree F. Section 2 describes the pertinent features of the mathematical model. In Section 3, the fundamental sloshing phenomena of viscous fluid are examined. Sloshing wave height and shear stress for fluid with different viscosities are compared. The conclusions are given in Section 4

  13. Effective conductivity by fluid analogy for a porous insulator filled with a conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    By combining of identities relating effective conductivity to tortuosity and tortuosity to induced mass, a general formula for the effective (electrical or thermal) conductivity of a porous insulator filled with a conductor is obtained. This formula depends on an induced-mass factor which arises by treating of the conducting material as an inviscid fluid. This induced-mass factor can be estimated with the use of an effective-medium theory. For random arrays of equal spheres, the estimates of conductivity obtained with the use of this fluid analogy are in good agreement with recent exact values derived for periodic arrays of insulating spheres to closest packing

  14. Low-frequency wave propagation in an elastic plate loaded by a two-layer fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Indeitsev, Dmitrij; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    concern is propagation of low-frequency waves in such a coupled waveguide. In the present paper, we assume that an inhomogeneous fluid may be modelled as two homogeneous, inviscid and incompressible layers with slightly different densities. The lighter layer of fresh water lies on top of the heavier layer...... of salty water. The former one produces fluid loading at the plate, whereas the latter one is bounded by the sea bottom. We employ classical asymptotic methods to identify significant regimes of wave motion in the compound three-component waveguide. The roles of parameters involved in the problem...

  15. Fluid/structure interaction in BERDYNE (Level 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.H.

    1988-02-01

    A fluid-structure interaction capability has been developed for Level 4 of the finite element dynamics code BERDYNE, as part of the BERSAFE structural analysis system. This permits analysis of small amplitude free or forced vibration of systems comprising elastic structural components and inviscid volumes of possibly compressible fluid. Free fluid surfaces under the influence of gravity may be present. The formulation chosen uses the rigid walled fluid modes, calculated in a preliminary stage, as a basis for description of the coupled system, providing symmetric system matrices for which efficient solution procedures are available. The inclusion of the fluid modal variables within the system matrices is carried out through the use of the BERDYNE 'substructuring' feature, which allows the inclusion of very general 'super-elements' among the normal structural elements. The program also has a seismic analysis capability, used for the analysis of fluid-structure systems subjected to a specified support acceleration time history. In this case analysis is carried out in terms of relative structural motions, but absolute fluid pressures. Application of the BERDYNE fluid/structure interaction capability to some simple test cases produced results in good agreement with results obtained by analytic or independent numerical techniques. Full instructions on the use of the facility will be included in the BERDYNE Level 4 documentation. Interim documentation for the pre-release version is available from the author. (author)

  16. Finite Element Framework for Computational Fluid Dynamics in FEBio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Shim, Jay J; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2018-02-01

    The mechanics of biological fluids is an important topic in biomechanics, often requiring the use of computational tools to analyze problems with realistic geometries and material properties. This study describes the formulation and implementation of a finite element framework for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in FEBio, a free software designed to meet the computational needs of the biomechanics and biophysics communities. This formulation models nearly incompressible flow with a compressible isothermal formulation that uses a physically realistic value for the fluid bulk modulus. It employs fluid velocity and dilatation as essential variables: The virtual work integral enforces the balance of linear momentum and the kinematic constraint between fluid velocity and dilatation, while fluid density varies with dilatation as prescribed by the axiom of mass balance. Using this approach, equal-order interpolations may be used for both essential variables over each element, contrary to traditional mixed formulations that must explicitly satisfy the inf-sup condition. The formulation accommodates Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscous responses as well as inviscid fluids. The efficiency of numerical solutions is enhanced using Broyden's quasi-Newton method. The results of finite element simulations were verified using well-documented benchmark problems as well as comparisons with other free and commercial codes. These analyses demonstrated that the novel formulation introduced in FEBio could successfully reproduce the results of other codes. The analogy between this CFD formulation and standard finite element formulations for solid mechanics makes it suitable for future extension to fluid-structure interactions (FSIs).

  17. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  18. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  19. Assessment of NASA and RAE viscous-inviscid interaction methods for predicting transonic flow over nozzle afterbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, L. E.; Hodges, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Royal Aircraft Establishment have undertaken a cooperative program to conduct an assessment of their patched viscous-inviscid interaction methods for predicting the transonic flow over nozzle afterbodies. The assessment was made by comparing the predictions of the two methods with experimental pressure distributions and boattail pressure drag for several convergent circular-arc nozzle configurations. Comparisons of the predictions of the two methods with the experimental data showed that both methods provided good predictions of the flow characteristics of nozzles with attached boundary layer flow. The RAE method also provided reasonable predictions of the pressure distributions and drag for the nozzles investigated that had separated boundary layers. The NASA method provided good predictions of the pressure distribution on separated flow nozzles that had relatively thin boundary layers. However, the NASA method was in poor agreement with experiment for separated nozzles with thick boundary layers due primarily to deficiencies in the method used to predict the separation location.

  20. An engineering method for interactive inviscid-boundary layers in three-dimensional hypersonic flows. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering method has been developed that couples an approximate three dimensional inviscid technique with the axisymmetric analog and a set of approximate convective heating equations. The displacement effect on the boundary layer on the outer inviscid flow is calculated and included as a boundary condition in the inviscid technique. This accounts for the viscous interaction present at lower Reynolds numbers. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three dimensional elliptic cones at angle of attack for the laminar hypersonic flow of a perfect gas. The method is applied to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates, pressures, and shock shapes that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes and viscous shock-layer equations. In addition, the inclusion of viscous interaction significantly improves results obtained at lower Reynolds numbers. The new technique represents a major improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  1. Implementation of a Forth-Order Aeroelastic Coupling into a Viscous-Inviscid Flow Solver with Experimental Validation (for One Degree of Freedom)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Sirko; Ramos-García, Néstor; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Technical University of Denmark (DTU)-WInd Energy Team

    2014-11-01

    The viscous-inviscid flow solver Q3UIC for 2D aerodynamics has recently been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The Q3UIC solver takes viscous and unsteady effects into account by coupling an unsteady inviscid panel method with the integral boundary layer equations by means of a strong coupling between the viscous and inviscid parts, and in this respect differs from other classic panel codes e.g. Xfoil. In the current work a Runge-Kutta-Nyström scheme was employed to couple inertial, elastic and aerodynamical forces and moments calculated by Q3UIC for a two-dimensional blade section in the time-domain. Numerical simulations are validated by a three step experimental verification process carried out in the low-turbulence wind tunnel at DTU. First, a comparison against steady experiments for a NACA 64418 profile and a flexible trailing edge flap is presented for different fixed flap angles, and second, the measured aerodynamic characteristics considering prescribed motion of the airfoil with a moving flap are compared to the Q3UIC predictions. Finally, an aeroelastic experiment for one degree of freedom-airfoil pitching- is used to evaluate the accuracy of aeroelastic coupling.

  2. Nonlinear responses of chiral fluids from kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Pu, Shi; Yang, Di-Lun

    2018-01-01

    The second-order nonlinear responses of inviscid chiral fluids near local equilibrium are investigated by applying the chiral kinetic theory (CKT) incorporating side-jump effects. It is shown that the local equilibrium distribution function can be nontrivially introduced in a comoving frame with respect to the fluid velocity when the quantum corrections in collisions are involved. For the study of anomalous transport, contributions from both quantum corrections in anomalous hydrodynamic equations of motion and those from the CKT and Wigner functions are considered under the relaxation-time (RT) approximation, which result in anomalous charge Hall currents propagating along the cross product of the background electric field and the temperature (or chemical-potential) gradient and of the temperature and chemical-potential gradients. On the other hand, the nonlinear quantum correction on the charge density vanishes in the classical RT approximation, which in fact satisfies the matching condition given by the anomalous equation obtained from the CKT.

  3. Mass and momentum conservation for fluid simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Momentum conservation has long been used as a design principle for solid simulation (e.g. collisions between rigid bodies, mass-spring elastic and damping forces, etc.), yet it has not been widely used for fluid simulation. In fact, semi-Lagrangian advection does not conserve momentum, but is still regularly used as a bread and butter method for fluid simulation. In this paper, we propose a modification to the semi-Lagrangian method in order to make it fully conserve momentum. While methods of this type have been proposed earlier in the computational physics literature, they are not necessarily appropriate for coarse grids, large time steps or inviscid flows, all of which are common in graphics applications. In addition, we show that the commonly used vorticity confinement turbulence model can be modified to exactly conserve momentum as well. We provide a number of examples that illustrate the benefits of this new approach, both in conserving fluid momentum and passively advected scalars such as smoke density. In particular, we show that our new method is amenable to efficient smoke simulation with one time step per frame, whereas the traditional non-conservative semi-Lagrangian method experiences serious artifacts when run with these large time steps, especially when object interaction is considered. Copyright © 2011 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  4. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...

  5. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  6. Three-dimensional problems of the hydrodynamic interaction between bodies in a viscous fluid in the vicinity of their contact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrov, A. G.; Kharlamov, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 5 (2013), s. 577-587 ISSN 0015-4628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2066 Grant - others:Development of the Scientific Potential of the Higher Schoo(RU) 2.1.2/3604; Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 11- 01-005355 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : lubrication layer theory * viscous and inviscid fluids * thin layer * vicinity of a contact * three-dimensional problems Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.320, year: 2013

  7. Fluid machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Hyeon; Son, Byeong Jin

    2001-04-01

    This book tells of definition and classification of fluid machinery, energy equation of incompressible fluid, principle of momentum, classification and structure of pump, size, safety of centrifugal pump, theory and operation of contraction pump, reciprocating pump, rotary pump, special pump, using of water power, classification of water turbine, impulse water turbine, reaction water turbine, pump water turbine, liquid movement apparatus, fluid type control machinery and solid and gas type pneumatic machine.

  8. Schroedinger fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  9. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  10. Coupled problems in transient fluid and structural dynamics in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some important problems in coupled fluid-structural dynamics which occur in safety investigations of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). light water reactors and nuclear reprocessing plants are discussed and a classification of solution methods is introduced. A distinction is made between the step by step solution procedure, where available computer codes in fluid and structural dynamics are coupled, and advanced simultaneous solution methods, where the coupling is carried out at the level of the fundamental equations. Results presented include the transient deformation of a two-row pin bundle surrounded by an infinite fluid field, vapour explosions in a fluid container and containment distortions due to bubble collapse in the pressure suppression system of a boiling water reactor. A recently developed simultaneous solution method is presented in detail. Here the fluid dynamics (inviscid, incompressible fluid) is described by a singularity method which reduces the three-dimensional fluid dynamics problems to a two-dimensional formulation. In this way the three-dynamics fluid dynamics as well as the structural (shell) dynamics can be described essentially by common unknowns at the fluid-structural interface. The resulting equations for the coupled fluid-structural dynamics are analogous to to the equations of motion of the structural dynamics alone. (author)

  11. Analysis of a discrete element method and coupling with a compressible fluid flow method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monasse, L.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims at the numerical simulation of compressible fluid/deformable structure interactions. In particular, we have developed a partitioned coupling algorithm between a Finite Volume method for the compressible fluid and a Discrete Element method capable of taking into account fractures in the solid. A survey of existing fictitious domain methods and partitioned algorithms has led to choose an Embedded Boundary method and an explicit coupling scheme. We first showed that the Discrete Element method used for the solid yielded the correct macroscopic behaviour and that the symplectic time-integration scheme ensured the preservation of energy. We then developed an explicit coupling algorithm between a compressible inviscid fluid and an un-deformable solid. Mass, momentum and energy conservation and consistency properties were proved for the coupling scheme. The algorithm was then extended to the coupling with a deformable solid, in the form of a semi implicit scheme. Finally, we applied this method to unsteady inviscid flows around moving structures: comparisons with existing numerical and experimental results demonstrate the excellent accuracy of our method. (author) [fr

  12. Dynamic analysis of multibody system immersed in a fluid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.W.; Liu, L.K.; Levy, S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is concerned primarily with the development and evaluation of an analysis method for the reponse prediction of immersed systems to seismic and other dynamic excitations. For immersed multibody systems, the hydrodynamic interaction causes coupled motion among the solid bodies. Also, under intense external excitations, impact between bodies may occur. The complex character of such systems inhibit the use of conventional analytical solutions in closed form. Therefore, approximate numerical schemes have been devised. For an incompressible, inviscid fluid, the hydrodynamic forces exerted by the fluid on solid bodies are determined to be linearly proportional to the acceleration of the vibrating solid bodies; i.e., the presence of the fluid only affects the inertia of the solid body system. A finite element computer program has been developed for computing this hydrodynamic (or added) mass effect. This program can be used to determine the hydrodynamic mass of a two-dimensional fluid field with solid bodies of arbitrary geometry. Triangular elements and linear pressure interpolation function are used to discretize the fluid region. The component element method is used to determine the dynamic response of the multibody system to externally applied mechanical loading or support excitation. The present analysis method for predicting the dynamic response of submerged multibody system is quite general and pertains to any number of solid bodies. However in this paper, its application is demonstrated only for 4 and 25 body systems. (Auth.)

  13. Dynamics of two coaxial cylindrical shells containing viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, T.T.; Chen, S.S.

    1976-09-01

    This study was motivated by the need to design the thermal shield in reactor internals and other system components to avoid detrimental flow-induced vibrations. The system component is modeled as two coaxial shells separated by a viscous fluid. In the analysis, Flugge's shell equations of motion and linearized Navier-Stokes equation for viscous fluid are employed. First, a traveling-wave type solution is taken for shells and fluid. Then, from the interface conditions between the shells and fluid, the solution for the fluid medium is expressed in terms of shell displacements. Finally, using the shell equations of motion gives the frequency equation, from which the natural frequency, mode shape, and modal damping ratio of coupled modes can be calculated. The analytical results show a fairly good qualitative agreement with the published experimental data. Some important conclusions are as follows: (1) In computing the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uncoupled modes and coupled modes, the fluid may be considered inviscid and incompressible. (2) There exists out-of-phase and in-phase modes. The lowest natural frequency is always associated with the out-of-phase mode. (3) The lowest natural frequency of coupled modes is lower than the uncoupled modes. (4) The fluid viscosity contributes significantly to damping, in particular, the modal damping of the out-of-phase modes isrelatively large for small gaps. (5) If the fluid gap is small, or the fluid viscosity is relatively high, the simulation of the vibration Reynolds number should be included to ensure that modal damping of the model is properly accounted for. With the presented analysis and results, the frequency and damping characteristics can be analyzed and design parameters can be related to frequency and damping

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Aeroservoelastic Analysis with Hyper-X Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.; Bach, C.

    2007-01-01

    A finite element computational fluids dynamics-based aeroservoelastic analysis methodology is presented in this paper, in which both structural and fluids discretization are achieved by the finite element method, and their interaction is modeled by the transpiration boundary condition technique. In the fluids discipline either inviscid or viscous flow may be accounted for, usually employing unstructured grids.Adescription of a novel viscous flow solver employing unstructured grids is given in detail. Provisions are made for digital as well as analog controllers. These new aeroservoelastic analysis techniques are next applied for the solution of a number of example problems including the novel Hyper-X launch vehicle. Experimental and actual flight test data are also compared with analysis results that signify to the efficacy and accuracy of the newly developed solution procedures.

  15. Hydrodynamics of the interaction between bodies in a viscous fluid in the vicinity of their contact at low and high Reynolds numbers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrov, A. G.; Kharlamov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2013), s. 179-191 ISSN 0015-4628 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/2066 Grant - others:Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 11-01-00535; Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 11-01-00857; Target Analytical Program; Development of the Scientific Potential of the Higher School(RU) 2.1.2/3604 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : lubrication layer theory * viscous and inviscid fluids * thin layer * contact vicinity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.320, year: 2013

  16. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  17. Viscous-inviscid interaction with the quasi-simultaneous method for 2D and 3D aerodynamic flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Edith Gerda Maria

    2001-01-01

    Flow phenomena are around us everywhere. One can think of the waves in the sea or the wind playing with the leaves fallen from the trees. Most of these fluid flow situations are described by the so-called Navier-Stokes equations which are based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy.

  18. Fluid Mechanics of Inhalant Siphon Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, A. C.; Crimaldi, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Inhalant siphon and suction flows are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems. From biological flows in filter-feeding benthic bivalves and predation by planktivorous fishes, to engineered flows in water samplers and production of hydrodynamic stimuli for laboratory assays, inhalant siphon flows span much of the laminar range (Reynolds number 0.01 - 2,000) and fundamentally influence many transport and exchange processes. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of inhalant siphon flows with varying Reynolds numbers and geometries have informed design and construction of an index of refraction-matched flow facility (mineral oil, borosilicate glass tubing) in which we are employing particle image velocimetry (PIV) to quantify transient and steady-state flow fields outside and inside the siphon tube. Varying siphon diameter, flow rate, and extraction height allows us to evaluate effects of Reynolds number and siphon geometry on local hydrodynamics. This complementary experimental and numerical modeling investigation of siphon flow hydrodynamics was motivated recently by a colleague whose biologically inspired numerical modeling of inhalant siphons using a boundary condition of constant volumetric outflow (as opposed to the classically assumed uniform inlet velocity profile) revealed nontrivial departures from idealized flows: inviscid potential flows (i.e. point sink) and pipe flows (the classical pipe entry problem), particularly in the low Reynolds number regime. Reduced entrance lengths, larger radial inflows, and modifications to fluid capture zones seen numerically at low Reynolds number are being tested experimentally and may have important implications for both biological and engineered siphons.

  19. Self-propulsion of free solid bodies with internal rotors via localized singular vortex shedding in planar ideal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallapragada, P.; Kelly, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    Diverse mechanisms for animal locomotion in fluids rely on vortex shedding to generate propulsive forces. This is a complex phenomenon that depends essentially on fluid viscosity, but its influence can be modeled in an inviscid setting by introducing localized velocity constraints to systems comprising solid bodies interacting with ideal fluids. In the present paper, we invoke an unsteady version of the Kutta condition from inviscid airfoil theory and a more primitive stagnation condition to model vortex shedding from a geometrically contrasting pair of free planar bodies representing idealizations of swimming animals or robotic vehicles. We demonstrate with simulations that these constraints are sufficient to enable both bodies to propel themselves with very limited actuation. The solitary actuator in each case is a momentum wheel internal to the body, underscoring the symmetry-breaking role played by vortex shedding in converting periodic variations in a generic swimmer's angular momentum to forward locomotion. The velocity constraints are imposed discretely in time, resulting in the shedding of discrete vortices; we observe the roll-up of these vortices into distinctive wake structures observed in viscous models and physical experiments.

  20. Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  1. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  2. Homogenization theory for periodic distributions of elastic cylinders embedded in a viscous fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2012-10-01

    A multiple-scattering theory is applied to study the homogenization of clusters of elastic cylinders distributed in a isotropic lattice and embedded in a viscous fluid. Asymptotic relations are derived and employed to obtain analytical formulas for the effective parameters of homogenized clusters in which the underlying lattice has a low filling fraction. It is concluded that such clusters behave, in the low frequency limit, as an effective elastic medium. Particularly, it is found that the effective dynamical mass density follows the static estimate; i.e., the homogenization procedure does not recover the non-linear behavior obtained for the inviscid case. Moreover, the longitudinal and transversal sound speeds do not show any dependence on fluid viscosity. Numerical simulations performed for clusters made of brass cylinders embedded in glycerin support the reliability of the effective parameters resulting from the homogenization procedure reported here.

  3. Generalized added masses computation for fluid structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeri, L.; Cecconi, S.; Scala, M.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this paper a description of a method to simulate the dynamic effect of a fluid between two structures by means of an added mass and an added stiffness. The method is based on a potential theory which assumes the fluid is inviscid and incompressible (the case of compressibility is discussed); a solution of the corresponding field equation is given as a superposition of elementary conditions (i.e. applicable to elementary boundary conditions). Consequently the pressure and displacements of the fluid on the boundary are given as a function of the series coefficients; the ''work lost'' (i.e. the work done by the pressures on the difference between actual and estimated displacements) is minimized, in this way the expansion coefficients are related to the displacements on the boundaries. Virtual work procedures are then used to compute added masses. The particular case of a free surface (with gravity effects) is discussed, it is shown how the effect can be modelled by means of an added stiffness term. Some examples relative to vibrations in reservoirs are given and discussed. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic analysis of multibody system immersed in a fluid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.W.; Liu, L.K.; Levy, S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is concerned primarily with the development and evaluation of an analysis method for the response prediction of immersed multibody systems to seismic and other dynamic excitations. For immersed multibody systems to seismic and other dynamic excitations. For immersed multibody systems, the hydrodynamic interaction causes coupled motion among the solid bodies. Also, under intense external excitations, impact between bodies may occur. The complex character of such systems inhibit the use of conventional analytical solutions in closed form. Therefore, approximate numerical schemes have been devised. For an incompressible, inviscid fluid, the hydrodynamic forces exerted by the fluid on solid bodies are determined to be linearly proportional to the acceleration of the vibrating solid bodies; i.e., the presence of the fluid only affects the inertia of the solid body system. A finite element computer program has been developed for computing this hydrodynamic (or added) mass effect. This program can be used to determine the hydrodynamic mass of a two-dimensional fluid field with solid bodies of arbitrary geometry. Triangular elements and linear pressure interpolation function are used to discretize the fluid region. The component element method is used to determine the dynamic response of the multibody system to externally applied mechanical loading or support excitation. In the component element method, each structural body is modeled by component elements of conceptual spring-damper type. This method is particularly advantageous for systems having nonlinearities. Direct timewise numerical integration scheme is used to solve the governing dynamic equation of the system. Analytical study is carried out and compared with an experimental result for the forced vibration of 4 simply supported beams in water. Also studied is a case of 25 (5x5) beams within a square fluid-filled container by using two different approaches

  5. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  6. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...... of sound, site and the social, and how the spatial, the visual, and the bodily interact in sonic environments, how they are constructed and how they are entangled in other practices. With the Seismograf special issue Fluid Sounds, we bring this knowledge into the dissemination of audio research itself...

  7. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  8. Analysis of Moving-Coil Actuator Jet Injectors for Viscous Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rhys Matthew James; Ruddy, Bryan P; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    A jet injector is a device that can be used to deliver liquid drugs through the skin using a fluid jet, without the use of a needle. Most jet injectors are designed and used for the delivery of inviscid liquids, and are not optimized for the delivery of viscous drug compounds. To better understand the requirements for delivering viscous drugs, we have developed a mathematical model of the electromechanics of a moving-coil actuated jet injector as it delivers viscous fluids. The model builds upon previous work by incorporating the nonlinear electrical properties of the motor, compliant elements of the mechanical piston and ampoule system, and the effect of viscosity on injector characteristics. The model has been validated by monitoring the movement of the piston tip and measurements of the jet force. The results of the model indicate that the jet speed is diminished with increasing fluid viscosity, but overshoot and ringing in the jet speed is unaffected. However, a stiffer ampoule and piston will allow for a better control of the jet speed profile during an injection, and reduce ringing. We identified that the piston friction coefficient, the compliance of the injector components, and the viscous properties of the fluid are important determinants of performance when jet-injecting viscous fluids. By expanding upon previous jet injector models, this study has provided informative simulations of jet injector characteristics and performance. The model can be used to guide the design of future jet injectors for viscous fluids.

  9. Gyroelastic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  10. Gyroelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch

  11. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  12. Automatic fluid dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  13. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    decades, mainly due to the rapid improvement in computational efficiency, cameras, optics and instrumentation, both computational and experimental techniques have improved significantly, allowing researchers in Fluid Mechanics to build better mechanistic and analytical models for processes involving dynamics of fluids.

  14. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    of renewable energy (e.g., via wind, hydrokinetic generators), creating low-cost healthcare (e.g., via point-of-care medical testing) and improvement of energy efficiency of fluid power systems, depends on improving our understanding of Fluid. Mechanics. Fluids are ubiquitous in both nature and technological applications, ...

  15. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  16. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  17. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  18. Videotapes and Movies on Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Bobbie; Young, Virginia E.

    1996-01-01

    Chapter 17 of Handbook of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machinery: Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics, Volume 11. A list of videorecordings and 16mm motion pictures about Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines.

  19. Fluid free surface effect on the vibration analysis of cylindrical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakis, A.A.; Brusuc, G.; Toorani, M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the effect of free surface motion of the fluid on the dynamic behavior of the thin-walled cylindrical shells. This paper outlines a semi-analytical approach to dynamic analysis of the fluid-filled horizontal cylindrical shell taking into account the free surface motion effect. The aim of the method is to provide a general approach that can be used for both analysis and synthesis of fluid structure interaction problems in the horizontal cylindrical shells where the dynamic interaction of a flexible structure and incompressible and inviscid flow is in focus. The approach is very general and allows for dynamic analysis of both uniform and non-uniform cylindrical shell considering the fluid forces including the sloshing effect exerted on the structure. The hybrid method developed in this work is on the basis of a combination of the classical finite element approach and the thin shell theory to determine the specific displacement functions. Mass and stiffness matrices of the shell are determined by precise analytical integration. A potential function is considered to develop the dynamic pressure due to the fluid. The kinetic and potential energies are evaluated for a range of fluid height to find the influence of the fluid on the dynamic responses of the structure. The influence of the physical and geometrical parameters on the fluid-structure system has been considered in the numerical solutions. When these results are compared with corresponding results available in the literature, both theory and experiment, very good agreement is obtained. (authors)

  20. High order methods for incompressible fluid flow: Application to moving boundary problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoentegaard, Tormod

    2008-04-15

    Fluid flows with moving boundaries are encountered in a large number of real life situations, with two such types being fluid-structure interaction and free-surface flows. Fluid-structure phenomena are for instance apparent in many hydrodynamic applications; wave effects on offshore structures, sloshing and fluid induced vibrations, and aeroelasticity; flutter and dynamic response. Free-surface flows can be considered as a special case of a fluid-fluid interaction where one of the fluids are practically inviscid, such as air. This type of flows arise in many disciplines such as marine hydrodynamics, chemical engineering, material processing, and geophysics. The driving forces for free-surface flows may be of large scale such as gravity or inertial forces, or forces due to surface tension which operate on a much smaller scale. Free-surface flows with surface tension as a driving mechanism include the flow of bubbles and droplets, and the evolution of capillary waves. In this work we consider incompressible fluid flow, which are governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. There are several challenges when simulating moving boundary problems numerically, and these include - Spatial discretization - Temporal discretization - Imposition of boundary conditions - Solution strategy for the linear equations. These are some of the issues which will be addressed in this introduction. We will first formulate the problem in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework, and introduce the weak formulation of the problem. Next, we discuss the spatial and temporal discretization before we move to the imposition of surface tension boundary conditions. In the final section we discuss the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  1. Impact simulation of liquid-filled containers including fluid-structure interaction--Part 1: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Morandin, G.D.; Nadeau, E.

    1993-01-01

    In a number of applications, the hydrodynamic effect of a fluid must be included in the structural evaluation of liquid-filled vessels undergoing transient loading. Prime examples are liquid radioactive waste transportation packages. These packages must demonstrate the ability to withstand severe accidental impact scenarios. A hydrodynamic model of the fluid is developed using a finite element discretization of the momentum equations for a three-dimensional continuum. An inviscid fluid model with an isotropic stress state is considered. A barotropic equation of state, relating volumetric strain to pressure, is used to characterize the fluid behavior. The formulation considers the continuum as a compressible medium only, so that no tension fields are permitted. The numerical technique is incorporated into the existing general-purpose three-dimensional structural computer code H3DMAP. Part 1 of the paper describes the theory and implementation along with comparisons with classical theory. Part 2 describes the experimental validations of the theoretical approach. Excellent correlation between predicted and experimental results is obtained

  2. Grade-two fluids on non-smooth domain driven by multiplicative noise: Existence, uniqueness and regularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafimandimby, Paul André

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of a stochastic PDE with multiplicative noise modeling the motion of viscous and inviscid grade-two fluids on a bounded domain O of R2. We aim to identify the minimal conditions on the boundary smoothness of the domain for the well-posedness and time regularity of the solution. In particular, we found out that the existence of a H1 (O) weak martingale solution holds for any bounded Lipschitz domain O. When O is a convex polygon the solution u lives in the Sobolev space W 2 , r (O) for some r > 2 and rot (u - αΔu) is continuous in L2 (O) with respect to the time variable. Moreover, pathwise uniqueness of solution holds. The existence result is new for the stochastic inviscid model and improves previous results for the viscous one. The time continuity result is new, even for the deterministic case when the domain O is a convex polygon.

  3. Utilizing parallel optimization in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkolaras, Michael

    1998-12-01

    General problems of interest in computational fluid dynamics are investigated by means of optimization. Specifically, in the first part of the dissertation, a method of optimal incremental function approximation is developed for the adaptive solution of differential equations. Various concepts and ideas utilized by numerical techniques employed in computational mechanics and artificial neural networks (e.g. function approximation and error minimization, variational principles and weighted residuals, and adaptive grid optimization) are combined to formulate the proposed method. The basis functions and associated coefficients of a series expansion, representing the solution, are optimally selected by a parallel direct search technique at each step of the algorithm according to appropriate criteria; the solution is built sequentially. In this manner, the proposed method is adaptive in nature, although a grid is neither built nor adapted in the traditional sense using a-posteriori error estimates. Variational principles are utilized for the definition of the objective function to be extremized in the associated optimization problems, ensuring that the problem is well-posed. Complicated data structures and expensive remeshing algorithms and systems solvers are avoided. Computational efficiency is increased by using low-order basis functions and concurrent computing. Numerical results and convergence rates are reported for a range of steady-state problems, including linear and nonlinear differential equations associated with general boundary conditions, and illustrate the potential of the proposed method. Fluid dynamics applications are emphasized. Conclusions are drawn by discussing the method's limitations, advantages, and possible extensions. The second part of the dissertation is concerned with the optimization of the viscous-inviscid-interaction (VII) mechanism in an airfoil flow analysis code. The VII mechanism is based on the concept of a transpiration velocity

  4. FOREWORD Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This section of the Special Issue carries selected articles from the Fluid Mechanics and Fluid. Power Conference held during 12–14 December 2013 at the National Institute of Technology,. Hamirpur (HP). The section includes three review articles and nine original research articles. These were selected on the basis of their ...

  5. Electric fluid pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  6. Hydraulic Brake Fluid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydraulic brake fluid consisting of diethylene glycol , monoethyl ether of diethylene glycol , and castor oil has been improved as described in the patent by adding the fluid tributyl ether of orthophosphoric acid.

  7. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  8. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... mixing it with a violet stain (called a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to ... reveals an abnormal collection of pleural fluid. The Gram stain can help identify the bacteria that might ...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  10. Fluid dynamic transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilhena Reigosa, R. de

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology adopted at NUCLEN for the fluid dynamic analyses for ANGRA 2. The fluid dynamic analysis allows, through computer codes to simulate and quantify the loads resulting from fluid dynamic transients caused by postulated ruptures or operational transients, in the piping of the safety systems and of the important operational systems. (author)

  11. Amniotic fluid water dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beall, M. H.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H. M.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; Ross, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Water arrives in the mammalian gestation from the maternal circulation across the placenta. It then circulates between the fetal water compartments, including the fetal body compartments, the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is created by the flow of fluid from the fetal lung and

  12. Fundamental Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOOK I REVIEW. Fundamental Fluid. Mechanics. Good Text Book Material. V H Arakeri. Fluid Mechanics for Engineers. P N Chatterjee. MacMillan India Limited. Vol. 1, pp. 367. RS.143. Vo1.2, pp.306. RS.130. Fluid Mechanics for Engineers in two vol- umes by P N Chatterjee contains standard material for a first level ...

  13. Numerical investigation of the deformation mechanism of a bubble or a drop rising or falling in another fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Han; Yang Yongming; Hu Yüe; Zhang Huisheng; Zhang Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method for simulating the motion and deformation of an axisymmetric bubble or drop rising or falling in another infinite and initially stationary fluid is developed based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method in the frame of two incompressible and immiscible viscous fluids under the action of gravity, taking into consideration of surface tension effects. A comparison of the numerical results by this method with those by other works indicates the validity of the method. In the frame of inviscid and incompressible fluids without taking into consideration of surface tension effects, the mechanisms of the generation of the liquid jet and the transition from spherical shape to toroidal shape during the bubble or drop deformation, the increase of the ring diameter of the toroidal bubble or drop and the decrease of its cross-section area during its motion, and the effects of the density ratio of the two fluids on the deformation of the bubble or drop are analysed both theoretically and numerically. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  14. Flow of visco-elastic fluid of Rivlin-Ericksen type between two inclined parallel planes in presence of gravity and uniform transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, P.R.; Sadat, Khondokar Anowarus; Kundu, Shyamal Kumar

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the flow of Rivlin-Ericksen visco-elastic fluid between two inclined parallel planes in presence of gravity and uniform transverse magnetic field. It has been assumed that the lower plane is at rest and the upper plane is moving with a transient velocity in the first case, while in the second case it is moving longitudinally with a periodic velocity. In both cases the fluid velocity and flux of fluid have been obtained by variable separation technique. These results are then deduced for the case of visco-elastic Maxwell fluid taking the fluid to be electrically conducting and placed in presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field. Further, when the magnetic field is absent the corresponding results are obtained by passing to the limit as uniform magnetic field tending to zero. Moreover, the titled problem has also been solved in case of inviscid fluid in both cases of hydromagnetic flow and flow in absence of magnetic field. Thus the present problem is focused to a wide range of flow problems of different types of fluid models. (author)

  15. Fluid and particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  16. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  17. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  18. Intravenous fluids: balancing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, Ewout J

    2017-08-01

    The topic of intravenous (IV) fluids may be regarded as "reverse nephrology", because nephrologists usually treat to remove fluids rather than to infuse them. However, because nephrology is deeply rooted in fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance, IV fluids belong in the realm of our specialty. The field of IV fluid therapy is in motion due to the increasing use of balanced crystalloids, partly fueled by the advent of new solutions. This review aims to capture these recent developments by critically evaluating the current evidence base. It will review both indications and complications of IV fluid therapy, including the characteristics of the currently available solutions. It will also cover the use of IV fluids in specific settings such as kidney transplantation and pediatrics. Finally, this review will address the pathogenesis of saline-induced hyperchloremic acidosis, its potential effect on outcomes, and the question if this should lead to a definitive switch to balanced solutions.

  19. Linearized formulation for fluid-structure interaction: Application to the linear dynamic response of a pressurized elastic structure containing a fluid with a free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotté, J.-S.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-05-01

    To control the linear vibrations of structures partially filled with liquids is of prime importance in various industries such as aerospace, naval, civil and nuclear engineering. It is proposed here to investigate a linearized formulation adapted to a rational computation of the vibrations of such coupled systems. Its particularity is to be fully Lagrangian since it considers the fluid displacement field with respect to a static equilibrium configuration as the natural variable describing the fluid motion, as classically done in structural dynamics. As the coupled system considered here is weakly damped in the low frequency domain (low modal density), the analysis of the vibrations of the associated undamped conservative system constitutes the main objective of this paper. One originality of the present formulation is to take into account the effect of the pressurization of the tank on the dynamics of the system, particularly in the case of a compressible liquid. We propose here a new way of deriving the linearized equations of the coupled problem involving a deformable structure and an inner inviscid liquid with a free surface. A review of the classical case considering a heavy incompressible liquid is followed by an application to the new case involving a light compressible liquid. A solution procedure in the frequency domain is proposed and a numerical discretization using the finite element method is discussed. In order to reduce the computational costs, an appropriate reduced order matrix model using modal synthesis approach is also presented.

  20. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  1. Metalworking and machining fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  2. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  3. Plasmas and fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma and fluid physics includes the fields of fusion research and space investigation. This book discusses the most important advances in these areas over the past decade and recommends a stronger commitment to basic research in plasma and fluid physics. The book recommends that plasma and fluid physics be included in physics curriculums because of their increasing importance in energy and defense. The book also lists recent accomplishments in the fields of general plasma physics, fusion plasma confinement and heating, space and astrophysical plasmas, and fluid physics and lists research opportunities in these areas. A funding summary explains how research monies are allocated and suggests ways to improve their effectiveness

  4. The Fluids RAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo

    2016-11-01

    After fifteen years of experience in rap, and ten in fluid mechanics, "I am coming here with high-Reynolds-number stamina; I can beat these rap folks whose flows are... laminar." The rap relates fluid flows to rap flows. The fluid concepts presented in the song have varying complexity and the listeners/viewers will be encouraged to read the explanations on a site dedicated to the rap. The music video will provide an opportunity to share high-quality fluid visualizations with a general audience. This talk will present the rap lyrics, the vision for the video, and the strategy for outreach. Suggestions and comments will be welcomed.

  5. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  6. Sphere based fluid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Systems are described for using multiple closely-packed spheres. In one system for passing fluid, a multiplicity of spheres lie within a container, with all of the spheres having the same outside diameter and with the spheres being closely nested in one another to create multiple interstitial passages of a known size and configuration and smooth walls. The container has an inlet and outlet for passing fluid through the interstitial passages formed between the nested spheres. The small interstitial passages can be used to filter out material, especially biological material such as cells in a fluid, where the cells can be easily destroyed if passed across sharp edges. The outer surface of the spheres can contain a material that absorbs a constitutent in the flowing fluid, such as a particular contamination gas, or can contain a catalyst to chemically react the fluid passing therethrough, the use of multiple small spheres assuring a large area of contact of these surfaces of the spheres with the fluid. In a system for storing and releasing a fluid such as hydrogen as a fuel, the spheres can include a hollow shell containing the fluid to be stored, and located within a compressable container that can be compressed to break the shells and release the stored fluid.

  7. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  8. A numerical model of two-phase flow at the micro-scale using the volume-of-fluid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mosayeb; Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a simple and robust numerical scheme to model two-phase flow in porous media where capillary forces dominate over viscous effects. The volume-of-fluid method is employed to capture the fluid-fluid interface whose dynamics is explicitly described based on a finite volume discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Interfacial forces are calculated directly on reconstructed interface elements such that the total curvature is preserved. The computed interfacial forces are explicitly added to the Navier-Stokes equations using a sharp formulation which effectively eliminates spurious currents. The stability and accuracy of the implemented scheme is validated on several two- and three-dimensional test cases, which indicate the capability of the method to model two-phase flow processes at the micro-scale. In particular we show how the co-current flow of two viscous fluids leads to greatly enhanced flow conductance for the wetting phase in corners of the pore space, compared to a case where the non-wetting phase is an inviscid gas.

  9. Impact simulation of liquid-filled containers including fluid-structure interaction--Part 2: Experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Morandin, G.D.; Nadeau, E.

    1993-01-01

    In a number of applications, the hydrodynamic effect of a fluid must be included in the structural evaluation of liquid-filled vessels undergoing transient loading. Prime examples are liquid radioactive waste transportation packages. These packages must demonstrate the ability to withstand severe accidental impact scenarios. A hydrodynamic model of the fluid is developed using a finite element discretization of the momentum equations for a three-dimensional continuum. An inviscid fluid model with an isotropic stress state is considered. A barotropic equation of state, relating volumetric strain to pressure, is used to characterize the fluid behavior. The formulation considers the continuum as a compressible medium only, so that no tension fields are permitted. The numerical technique is incorporated into the existing general-purpose three-dimensional structural computer code H3DMAP. Part 1 of the paper describes the theory and implementation along with comparisons with classical theory. Part 2 describes the experimental validation of the theoretical approach. Excellent correlation between predicted and experimental results is obtained

  10. Complexity in fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayly, B.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids are basically very simple things. The fluids encountered all the time - air, water, milk, coffee, etc. - are undramatic. One blob of a given fluid looks much like any other, except for such gross properties as volume or mass. Of course, blobs of fluid come in different shapes. However, it's easy to change the shape of a blob of fluid, with the result that we rarely think of the shape of a fluid blob as a defining property. In fact, a blob that starts with one shape can be deformed into almost any other shape, with arbitrarily small input of energy. When one talks about lumps of a solid, in contrast, shape is important. This is because it takes work, i.e., energy, to change the shape of a solid. Making a small deformation from some rest configuration takes a small amount of energy, and a large deformation takes a lot of energy. Sometimes, as in idealized elastic systems, the required energy goes to infinity as the deformation becomes unbounded. Real solids usually break if you deform them enough; all subsequent deformations cost no energy. Basically, a finite deformation requires finite energy. Complexity arises in fluid systems because the shape of a blob of fluid is indeterminate. Nothing prevents an initially simple fluid blob from deforming into the weirdest shape imaginable. It is the absence of any kind of blob-shape constraint that allows complexity to enter fluid science. During these lectures the author briefly describes a few areas in which complexity arises and has to be dealt with. These lectures will be roughly divided as follows: (1) physical and mathematical description of fluids and flows; (2) flow transport and ergodic theory; (3) magnetic dynamos and related problems; (4) flow instabilities; (5) turbulence

  11. Fluid loading responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the peri-operative phase are dependent on physicians and nurses for their fluid intake. Volume status optimization is required to maximize oxygen delivery to vital organs. Unnecessary fluid administration can, however, lead to general and pulmonary

  12. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stationary fluid only normal stress (pressure) is present and tangential stresses are absent. In this article we ... delayed the discovery of the principle by a few centuries! Archimedes formulated his laws on buoyancy ... stress in the study of mechanics of solids and fluids (see Boxl). Just as temperature and density, stress can ...

  13. Applications of fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, G.R.; Garg, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes flexible and practical approach to learning the basics of fluid dynamics. Each chapter is a self-contained work session and includes a fluid dynamics concept, an explanation of the principles involved, an illustration of their application and references on where more detailed discussions can be found

  14. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secr...

  15. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  16. Time Independent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids by explaining flow curves exhibited by plastic, shear-thining, and shear-thickening fluids and Bingham plastic materials. Indicates that the exact mechanism governing shear-thickening behaviors is a problem of further study. (CC)

  17. Relativistic thermodynamics of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-05-01

    The relativistic covariant definition of a statistical equilibrium, applied to a perfect gas, involves a 'temperature four-vector', whose direction is the mean velocity of the fluid, and whose length is the reciprocal temperature. The hypothesis of this 'temperature four-vector' being a relevant variable for the description of the dissipative motions of a simple fluid is discussed. The kinematics is defined by using a vector field and measuring the number of molecules. Such a dissipative fluid is subject to motions involving null entropy generation; the 'temperature four-vector' is then a Killing vector; the equations of motion can be completely integrated. Perfect fluids can be studied by this way and the classical results of Lichnerowicz are obtained. In weakly dissipative motions two viscosity coefficient appear together with the heat conductibility coefficient. Two other coefficients perharps measurable on real fluids. Phase transitions and shock waves are described with using the model [fr

  18. Slip in quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einzel, D.; Parpia, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this review the authors describe theoretical and experimental investigations of general slip phenomena in context with the flow of the quantum liquids 3 He, 4 He and their mixtures at low temperatures. The phenomena of slip is related to a boundary effect. It occurs when sufficiently dilute gases flow along the wall of an experimental cell. A fluid is said to exhibit slip when the fluid velocity at the wall is not equal to the wall's velocity. Such a situation occurs whenever the wall reflects the fluid particles in a specular-like manner, and/or if the fluid is describable in terms of a dilute ordinary gas (classical fluid) or a dilute gas of thermal excitations (quantum fluid). The slip effect in quantum fluids is discussed theoretically on the basis of generalized Landau-Boltzmann transport equations and generalized to apply to a regime of ballistic motion of the quasiparticles in the fluid. The central result is that the transport coefficient of bulk shear viscosity, which typically enters in the Poiseuille flow resistance and the transverse acoustic impedance, has to be replaced by geometry dependent effective viscosity, which depends on the details of the interaction of the fluid particles with the cell walls. The theoretical results are compared with various experimental data obtained in different geometries and for both Bose and Fermi quantum fluids. Good agreement between experiment and theory is found particularly in the case of pure normal and superfluid 3 He, with discrepancies probably arising because of deficiencies in characterization of the experimental surfaces

  19. Shock-wave-like structures induced by an exothermic neutralization reaction in miscible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Mizev, Alexey; Mosheva, Elena; Kostarev, Konstantin

    2017-11-01

    We report shock-wave-like structures that are strikingly different from previously observed fingering instabilities, which occur in a two-layer system of miscible fluids reacting by a second-order reaction A+B→S in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. While the traditional analysis expects the occurrence of a diffusion-controlled convection, we show both experimentally and theoretically that the exothermic neutralization reaction can also trigger a wave with a perfectly planar front and nearly discontinuous change in density across the front. This wave propagates fast compared with the characteristic diffusion times and separates the motionless fluid and the area with anomalously intense convective mixing. We explain its mechanism and introduce a new dimensionless parameter, which allows to predict the appearance of such a pattern in other systems. Moreover, we show that our governing equations, taken in the inviscid limit, are formally analogous to well-known shallow-water equations and adiabatic gas flow equations. Based on this analogy, we define the critical velocity for the onset of the shock wave which is found to be in the perfect agreement with the experiments.

  20. Epi-Two-Dimensional Fluid Flow: A New Topological Paradigm for Dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Z; Morrison, P J

    2017-12-15

    While a variety of fundamental differences are known to separate two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) fluid flows, it is not well understood how they are related. Conventionally, dimensional reduction is justified by an a priori geometrical framework; i.e., 2D flows occur under some geometrical constraint such as shallowness. However, deeper inquiry into 3D flow often finds the presence of local 2D-like structures without such a constraint, where 2D-like behavior may be identified by the integrability of vortex lines or vanishing local helicity. Here we propose a new paradigm of flow structure by introducing an intermediate class, termed epi-two-dimensional flow, and thereby build a topological bridge between 2D and 3D flows. The epi-2D property is local and is preserved in fluid elements obeying ideal (inviscid and barotropic) mechanics; a local epi-2D flow may be regarded as a "particle" carrying a generalized enstrophy as its charge. A finite viscosity may cause "fusion" of two epi-2D particles, generating helicity from their charges giving rise to 3D flow.

  1. Rotation of a rigid satellite with a fluid component: a new light onto Titan's obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Gwenaël; Rambaux, Nicolas; Richard, Andy

    2017-12-01

    We revisit the rotation dynamics of a rigid satellite with either a liquid core or a global subsurface ocean. In both problems, the flow of the fluid component is assumed inviscid. The study of a hollow satellite with a liquid core is based on the Poincaré-Hough model which provides exact equations of motion. We introduce an approximation when the ellipticity of the cavity is low. This simplification allows to model both types of satellite in the same manner. The analysis of their rotation is done in a non-canonical Hamiltonian formalism closely related to Poincaré's "forme nouvelle des équations de la mécanique". In the case of a satellite with a global ocean, we obtain a seven-degree-of-freedom system. Six of them account for the motion of the two rigid components, and the last one is associated with the fluid layer. We apply our model to Titan for which the origin of the obliquity is still a debated question. We show that the observed value is compatible with Titan slightly departing from the hydrostatic equilibrium and being in a Cassini equilibrium state.

  2. Absorption fluids data survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  3. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  4. Materials for ER Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodworth, Robert; Wendt, Eckhard

    Recent improvements in the physical understanding of ER fluids have led to the rational design of new ER materials with improved properties. This paper gives an overview of several recent developments in the formulation of ER fluids, concentrating on new particulate phases for ER dispersions. Examples of homogeneous ER fluids are also discussed. The trend leading to designed ER dispersions is demonstrated by a new class of electrorheological fluids based on non-aqueous polyurethane dispersions. The fluids exhibit an attractive combination of properties: low viscosity, high ER effect, and low conductivity. The dispersed phase consists of a specially developed polyurethane elastomer which solvates and stabilizes metal salts. The polymer network density influences the mobility of the dissolved ions, allowing a surprising degree of control over the ER effect. Properties such as the field strength dependence of the ER-effect, switching response, and conductivity of these fluids correlate directly with changes in the polymer structure. Electrorheological measurements in a couette viscometer (shear-mode) and in a model shock absorber (flow-mode) using a commercial polyurethane-based fluid show that the ER effect is also dependent upon the shearing geometry.

  5. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003428.htm Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection is a test to look at the fluid ...

  6. Fluid movement and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-11-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation, cognitive flexibility, and remote associations. Alternative mechanisms such as enhanced mood and motivation were also examined. These results suggest that creativity can be influenced by certain types of physical movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  8. Synthetic Base Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  9. Pericardial fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to identify organisms that cause infection. Pericardial fluid gram stain is a related topic. How the Test is ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  10. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  11. Modeling Fluid Structure Interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benaroya, Haym

    2000-01-01

    The principal goal of this program is on integrating experiments with analytical modeling to develop physics-based reduced-order analytical models of nonlinear fluid-structure interactions in articulated naval platforms...

  12. Windshield washer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluid is a brightly colored liquid made of methanol, a poisonous alcohol. Sometimes, small amounts of other toxic alcohols, such as ethylene glycol, are added to the mixture. Some young children ...

  13. Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics: A Challenge for Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwick, A.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility that compression as well as rarefaction shocks may form in single phase vapours was envisaged first by Bethe (1942). However calculations based on the Van der Waals equation of state indicated that the latter type of shock is possible only if the specific heat at constant volume cv divided by the universal gas constant R is larger than about 17.5 which he considered too large to be satisfied by real fluids. This conclusion was contested by Thompson (1971) who showed that the type of shock capable of forming in arbitrary fluids is determined by the sign of the thermodynamic quantity to which he referred to as fundamental derivative of gas dynamics. Here v, p, s and c denote the specific volume, the pressure, the entropy and the speed of sound. Thompson and co-workers also showed that the required condition for the existence of rarefaction shocks, that Γ may take on negative values, is indeed satisfied for a number of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon vapours. This finding spawned a burst of theoretical studies elaborating on the unusual and often counterintuitive behaviour of shocks with rarefaction shocks present. These produced both results of theoretical character but also results suggesting the practical importance of Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics in general. The present paper addresses some of the challenges encountered in connection with the theoretical treatment of the associated flow behaviour. Weakly nonlinear acoustic waves of finite amplitude serve as a starting point. Here mixed rather than strictly positive nonlinearity generates a wealth of phenomena not possible in perfect gases. Examples of steady flows where these non-classical effects play a decisive role (and which may be useful also for future experimental work) are quasi one-dimensional nozzle flows and transonic two-dimensional flows past corners. The study of viscous effects concentrates on laminar flows of boundary layer type. Here non-classical phenomena are caused by the

  14. Amniotic fluid inflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna; Grove, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy.......The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy....

  15. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Fullerol ionic fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Fernandes, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    We report for the first time an ionic fluid based on hydroxylated fullerenes (fullerols). The ionic fluid was synthesized by neutralizing the fully protonated fullerol with an amine terminated polyethylene/polypropylene oxide oligomer (Jeffamine®). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding significantly perturbs the thermal transitions and melting/crystallization behavior of the amine. In contrast, both the normalized heat of fusion and crystallization of the amine in the control are similar to those of the neat amine consistent with a physical mixture of the fullerols/amine with minimal interactions. In addition to differences in thermal behavior, the fullerol ionic fluid exhibits a complex viscoelastic behavior intermediate between the neat Jeffamine® (liquid-like) and the control (solid-like). © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes.

  18. statistical fluid theory for associating fluids containing alternating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Statistical associating fluid theory of homonuclear dimerized chain fluids and homonuclear monomer-dimer mixture chain fluids are extended to fluids containing al- ternating heteronuclear chain molecules separately. The proposed models account for the appropriate site-site correlation functions at contact.

  19. Verification of Compressible and Incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes and Residual-based Mesh Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Aniruddha

    Code verifition is the process of ensuring, to the degree possible, that there are no algorithm deficiencies and coding mistakes (bugs) in a scientific computing simulation. In this work, techniques are presented for performing code verifition of boundary conditions commonly used in compressible and incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Using a compressible CFD code, this study assesses the subsonic in flow (isentropic and fixed-mass), subsonic out ow, supersonic out ow, no-slip wall (adiabatic and isothermal), and inviscid slip-wall. The use of simplified curved surfaces is proposed for easier generation of manufactured solutions during the verifition of certain boundary conditions involving many constraints. To perform rigorous code verifition, general grids with mixed cell types at the verified boundary are used. A novel approach is introduced to determine manufactured solutions for boundary condition verifition when the velocity-field is constrained to be divergence-free during the simulation in an incompressible CFD code. Order of accuracy testing using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is employed here for code verifition of the major components of an open-source, multiphase ow code - MFIX. The presence of two-phase governing equations and a modified SIMPLE-based algorithm requiring divergence-free flows makes the selection of manufactured solutions more involved than for single-phase, compressible flows. Code verifition is performed here on 2D and 3D, uniform and stretched meshes for incompressible, steady and unsteady, single-phase and two-phase flows using the two-fluid model of MFIX. In a CFD simulation, truncation error (TE) is the difference between the continuous governing equation and its discrete approximation. Since TE can be shown to be the local source term for the discretization error, TE is proposed as the criterion for determining which regions of the computational mesh should be refined/coarsened. For mesh

  20. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  1. Viscous Flow with Large Fluid-Fluid Interface Displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole; Saasen, Arild

    1998-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) kinematic description has been implemented in a 3D transient finite element program to simulate multiple fluid flows with fluid-fluid interface or surface displacements. The description of fluid interfaces includes variable interfacial tension, and the formulation...... is useful in the simulation of low and intermediate Reynolds number viscous flow. The displacement of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical (concentric and eccentric) annulus and a (vertical and inclined)tube is simulated....

  2. The global existence and large time behavior of smooth compressible fluid in an infinitely expanding ball, III: The 3-D Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huicheng; Zhao, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the works in [35] and [37], where the authors have established the global existence of smooth compressible flows in infinitely expanding balls for inviscid gases and viscid gases, respectively. In this paper, we are concerned with the global existence and large time behavior of compressible Boltzmann gases in an infinitely expanding ball. Such a problem is one of the interesting models in studying the theory of global smooth solutions to multidimensional compressible gases with time dependent boundaries and vacuum states at infinite time. Due to the conservation of mass, the fluid in the expanding ball becomes rarefied and eventually tends to a vacuum state meanwhile there are no appearances of vacuum domains in any part of the expansive ball, which is easily observed in finite time. In the present paper, we will confirm this physical phenomenon for the Boltzmann equation by obtaining the exact lower and upper bound on the macroscopic density function.

  3. Inverse problems, non-roundness and flat pieces of the effective burning velocity from an inviscid quadratic Hamilton-Jacobi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wenjia; Tran, Hung V.; Yu, Yifeng

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of this paper is to understand finer properties of the effective burning velocity from a combustion model introduced by Majda and Souganidis (1994 Nonlinearity 7 1-30). Motivated by results in Bangert (1994 Calculus Variations PDE 2 49-63) and applications in turbulent combustion, we show that when the dimension is two and the flow of the ambient fluid is either weak or very strong, the level set of the effective burning velocity has flat pieces. Due to the lack of an applicable Hopf-type rigidity result, we need to identify the exact location of at least one flat piece. Implications on the effective flame front and other related inverse type problems are also discussed.

  4. Channel flow induced by wall injection of fluid and particles; Ecoulement induit par injection parietale de fluide et de particules dans un conduit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraille, Th.; Casalis, G. [Aerodynamics and Energetics Modeling Dept., 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-12-01

    The Taylor flow is the laminar single phase flow induced by gas injection through porous walls, and is assumed to represent the flow inside solid propellant motors. Such a flow is intrinsically unstable, and the generated instabilities are probably responsible for the thrust oscillations observed in the aforesaid motors. However particles are embedded in the propellants usually used, and are released in the fluid by the lateral walls during the combustion, so that there are two heterogeneous phases in the flow. The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of these particles on stability by comparison with stability results from the single phase studies, in a plane two-dimensional configuration. The particles are supposed to be chemically inert and of a uniform size. In order to carry out a linear stability study for this flow modified by the presence of particles, the mean particle velocity field is first determined, assuming that only the gas exerts forces on the particles. This field is sought in a self similar form, which imposes a limit on the size of the particles. However, the particle mass concentration cannot be obtained in a self similar form, but can only, be described by a partial differential equation. The mean flow characteristics being determined, the spectrum of the discretized linear stability operator shows first that particle addition does not trigger any new 'dangerous' modes compared with the single phase flow case. It also shows that the most amplified mode in the case of the single phase flow remains the most amplified mode in the case of the two phase flow. Moreover, the addition of particles acts continuously upon stability results, behaving linearly with respect to the particle mass concentration when the latter is small. The linear correction to the monophasic mode, as well as the evolution of the modes with weak values of the particle mass concentration at the wall, are shown to be proportional to the ejection velocity of

  5. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  6. Rheology of Active Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintillan, David

    2018-01-01

    An active fluid denotes a viscous suspension of particles, cells, or macromolecules able to convert chemical energy into mechanical work by generating stresses on the microscale. By virtue of this internal energy conversion, these systems display unusual macroscopic rheological signatures, including a curious transition to an apparent superfluid-like state where internal activity exactly compensates viscous dissipation. These behaviors are unlike those of classical complex fluids and result from the coupling of particle configurations with both externally applied flows and internally generated fluid disturbances. Focusing on the well-studied example of a suspension of microswimmers, this review summarizes recent experiments, models, and simulations in this area and highlights the critical role played by the rheological response of these active materials in a multitude of phenomena, from the enhanced transport of passive suspended objects to the emergence of spontaneous flows and collective motion.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Magoules, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Exploring new variations of classical methods as well as recent approaches appearing in the field, Computational Fluid Dynamics demonstrates the extensive use of numerical techniques and mathematical models in fluid mechanics. It presents various numerical methods, including finite volume, finite difference, finite element, spectral, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), mixed-element-volume, and free surface flow.Taking a unified point of view, the book first introduces the basis of finite volume, weighted residual, and spectral approaches. The contributors present the SPH method, a novel ap

  8. On radiative fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straumann, N.

    1976-01-01

    The Thomas calculation of the energy-momentum tensor of radiation quanta, which are nearly in thermal equilibrium with a relativistically moving material medium, is simplified and extended to more general transport equations. It is shown that the fluid (matter plus radiation) behaves, independently of the detailed form of the Boltzmann equation, like a relativistic imperfect fluid (in the formulation of Eckart). General expressions for the coefficients of heat conduction, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity are given. Published formulae for these coefficients in special cases are corrected. (Auth.)

  9. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  10. Stability of horizontal viscous fluid layers in a vertical arbitrary time periodic electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Hardt, Steffen

    2017-12-01

    The stability of a horizontal interface between two viscous fluids, one of which is conducting and the other is dielectric, acted upon by a vertical time-periodic electric field is considered theoretically. The two fluids are bounded by electrodes separated by a finite distance. For an applied ac electric field, the unstable interface deforms in a time periodic manner, owing to the time dependent Maxwell stress, and is characterized by the oscillation frequency which may or may not be the same as the frequency of the ac electric field. The stability curve, which relates the critical voltage, manifested through the Mason number—the ratio of normal electric stress and viscous stress, and the instability wavenumber at the onset of the instability, is obtained by means of the Floquet theory for a general arbitrary time periodic electric field. The limit of vanishing viscosities is shown to be in excellent agreement with the marginal stability curves predicted by means of a Mathieu equation. The influence of finite viscosity and electrode separation is discussed in relation to the ideal case of inviscid fluids. The methodology to obtain the marginal stability curves developed here is applicable to any arbitrary but time periodic signal, as demonstrated for the case of a signal with two different frequencies, and four different frequencies with a dc offset. The mode coupling in the interfacial normal stress leads to appearance of harmonic and subharmonic modes, characterized by the frequency of the oscillating interface at an integral or half-integral multiple of the applied frequency, respectively. This is in contrast to the application of a voltage with a single frequency which always leads to a harmonic mode oscillation of the interface. Whether a harmonic or subharmonic mode is the most unstable one depends on details of the excitation signal.

  11. Fundamental Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    umes by P N Chatterjee contains standard material for a first level course in fluid me- chanics for Civil, Mechanical, Aeronautical and Chemical Engineering students. It is however not suitable for Applied Science students like those majoring in Physics or. Mathematics and is not a good reference book for practising ...

  12. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  13. Incompressible ionized fluid mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 7 (2006), s. 493-509 ISSN 0935-1175 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : chemically reacting fluids * Navier-Stokes * Nernst-Planck * Possion equation s * heat equation s Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2006

  14. Bouncy Fluid Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2012-11-01

    Contrary to intuition, free fluid jets can sometimes ``bounce'' off each other upon collision, due to an entrained air film that keeps them separated. So far, there have only been a few descriptive studies of bouncing jets, since the first recorded observation by Rayleigh more than a century ago. We present a quantitative investigation of non-coalescence in jets of same fluid upon an oblique collision. Using a simple experimental set-up, we carried out a parametric study of the bouncing jets by varying the jet diameter, velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity. Our results reveal a scaling law for the contact time of bouncing jets. We further investigate the transition of colliding jets from non-coalescence to coalescence, which seems to be caused by instability of the fluid interface. A dimensionless parameter, which is a function of the Normal Weber Number, Normal Reynolds Number and the angle of inclination of the jets, quantitatively dictates the transition. Presently at Department of Physics, Danish Technical University, Denmark.

  15. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  16. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  17. Fluids in metamorphic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touret, J.L.R.

    2001-01-01

    Basic principles for the study of fluid inclusions in metamorphic rocks are reviewed and illustrated. A major problem relates to the number of inclusions, possibly formed on a wide range of P-T conditions, having also suffered, in most cases, extensive changes after initial trapping. The

  18. Charged fluids with symmetries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    metric tensor field and generate constants of the motion along null geodesics for massless particles. Conformal symmetries arise in various physical applications. The existence of conformal symmetries in relativistic cosmological models, with restrictions on the matter content and fluid four-velocity, have been extensively ...

  19. Dynamical pattern formation in two-dimensional fluids and Landau pole bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shun; Barré, Julien; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y.

    2014-06-01

    A phenomenological theory is proposed to analyze the asymptotic dynamics of perturbed inviscid Kolmogorov shear flows in two dimensions. The phase diagram provided by the theory is in qualitative agreement with numerical observations, which include three phases depending on the aspect ratio of the domain and the size of the perturbation: a steady shear flow, a stationary dipole, and four traveling vortices. The theory is based on a precise study of the inviscid damping of the linearized equation and on an analysis of nonlinear effects. In particular, we show that the dominant Landau pole controlling the inviscid damping undergoes a bifurcation, which has important consequences on the asymptotic fate of the perturbation.

  20. Editorial Special Issue on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This special issue of Sadhana contains selected papers from two conferences related to fluid mechanics held in India recently, Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power conference at NIT, Hamirpur, and an International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (IUTAM) symposium held at. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for ...

  1. R3 fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper is aimed at getting more insight on three main points concerning large-scale astrophysical systems, namely: (i formulation of tensor virial equations from the standpoint of analytical mechanics; (ii investigation on the role of systematic and random motions with respect to virial equilibrium configurations; (iii determination of extent to which systematic and random motions are equivalent in flattening or elongating the shape of a mass distribution. The tensor virial equations are formulated regardless of the nature of the system and its constituents, by generalizing and extending a procedure used for the scalar virial equations in presence of discrete subunits (Landau and Lifchitz 1966. In particular, the self potential-energy tensor is shown to be symmetric with respect to the exchange of the indices, (Epotpq = (Epotqp. Then the results are extended to continuous mass distributions. The role of systematic and random motions in collisionless, ideal, self-gravitating fluids is analysed in detail including radial and tangential velocity dispersion on the equatorial plane, and the related mean angular velocity, Ω, is conceived as a figure rotation. R3 fluids are defined as ideal, self-gravitating fluids in virial equilibrium, with systematic rotation around a principal axis of inertia, taken to be x3. The related virial equations are written in terms of the moment of inertia tensor, Ipq, the self potential-energy tensor, (Epotpq, and the generalized anisotropy tensor, ζpq (Caimmi and Marmo 2005, Caimmi 2006a. Additional effort is devoted to the investigation of the properties of axisymmetric and triaxial configurations. A unified theory of systematic and random motions is developed for R3 fluids, taking into consideration imaginary rotation (Caimmi 1996b, 2006a, and a number of theorems previously stated for homeoidally striated Jacobi ellipsoids (Caimmi 2006a are extended to the more general case of R3 fluids. The effect of

  2. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  3. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  4. Recording fluid currents by holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflinger, L. O.; Wuerker, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Convection in fluids can be studied with aid of holographic apparatus that reveals three-dimensional motion of liquid. Apparatus eliminates images of fixed particles such as dust on windows and lenses, which might mask behavior of moving fluid particles. Holographic apparatus was developed for experiments on fluid convection cells under zero gravity. Principle is adaptable to study of fluid processes-for example, electrochemical plating and combustion in automotive engines.

  5. Oscillating fluid power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  6. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  7. Fluid dynamics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieutord, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to readers who want to learn fluid dynamics from the beginning. It assumes a basic level of mathematics knowledge that would correspond to that of most second-year undergraduate physics students and examines fluid dynamics from a physicist’s perspective. As such, the examples used primarily come from our environment on Earth and, where possible, from astrophysics. The text is arranged in a progressive and educational format, aimed at leading readers from the simplest basics to more complex matters like turbulence and magnetohydrodynamics. Exercises at the end of each chapter help readers to test their understanding of the subject (solutions are provided at the end of the book), and a special chapter is devoted to introducing selected aspects of mathematics that beginners may not be familiar with, so as to make the book self-contained.

  8. Electrorheologic fluids; Fluidos electroreologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejon G, Leonardo; Lopez G, Francisco; Montoya T, Gerardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Manero B, Octavio [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM.(Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present article has as an objective to offer a review of the research work made in the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) on the study of the electrorheologic fluids whose flow properties can abruptly change in the presence of an electric field when this is induced by a direct current. The electrorheologic fluids have their main application in the manufacture of self-controlling damping systems. [Spanish] El presente articulo tiene por objetivo ofrecer una resena de los trabajos de investigacion realizados en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) sobre el estudio de los fluidos electroreologicos cuyas propiedades de flujo pueden cambiar abruptamente en presencia de un campo electrico cuando este es inducido por una corriente directa. Los fluidos electroreologicos tienen su principal aplicacion en la fabricacion de sistemas de amortiguamiento autocontrolables.

  9. Active chiral fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürthauer, S; Strempel, M; Grill, S W; Jülicher, F

    2012-09-01

    Active processes in biological systems often exhibit chiral asymmetries. Examples are the chirality of cytoskeletal filaments which interact with motor proteins, the chirality of the beat of cilia and flagella as well as the helical trajectories of many biological microswimmers. Here, we derive constitutive material equations for active fluids which account for the effects of active chiral processes. We identify active contributions to the antisymmetric part of the stress as well as active angular momentum fluxes. We discuss four types of elementary chiral motors and their effects on a surrounding fluid. We show that large-scale chiral flows can result from the collective behavior of such motors even in cases where isolated motors do not create a hydrodynamic far field.

  10. Magnetorheological Fluids and Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, John

    2002-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) materials possess mechanical or rheological properties that can be controlled by magnetic fields. MR fluids, perhaps the prototypical MR materials, comprise magnetically soft particles dispersed in polar or nonpolar liquids. The particles in these fluids align to form chains or more complex structures when a magnetic field is applied; these structures resist mechanical deformation, reversibly transforming the fluid into a weak viscoelastic solid. Other MR materials include magnetic powders, in which the magnetic particles are dispersed in air and which also become weak solids in an applied field. MR elastomers, a third class of these materials, contain magnetizable particles dispersed in elastomeric solids. These elastomers are magnetostrictive, possessing substantial field-induced modulus increases and elongations. The fascinating behavior of these materials, together with their many potential uses in the automobile and elsewhere, has motivated considerable scientific and technological progress over the last decade. While magnetic powders have been used in industrial applications for decades, the first components using MR fluids were marketed in the mid-1990s, and the first commercial automotive applications are imminent. In this presentation, I will survey the physical properties of MR materials and sketch our understanding of their origins, paying particular attention to the central role of field-induced interparticle magnetic forces and the nature and dynamics of the resulting microstructure. I will describe some possible automotive applications based on these materials, focusing on the material properties and component performance that is required. Finally, I will identify some of the open scientific and technical issues in this growing field.

  11. Fluid circulation control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  12. Measuring fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

  13. The mixing of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottino, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    What do the eruption of Krakatau, the manufacture of puff pastry and the brightness of stars have in common? Each involves some aspect of mixing. Mixing also plays a critical role in modern technology. Chemical engineers rely on mixing to ensure that substances react properly, to produce polymer blends that exhibit unique properties and to disperse drag-reducing agents in pipelines. Yet in spite of its of its ubiquity in nature and industry, mixing is only imperfectly under-stood. Indeed, investigators cannot even settle on a common terminology: mixing is often referred to as stirring by oceanographers and geophysicists, as blending by polymer engineers and as agitation by process engineers. Regardless of what the process is called, there is little doubt that it is exceedingly complex and is found in a great variety of systems. In constructing a theory of fluid mixing, for example, one has to take into account fluids that can be miscible or partially miscible and reactive or inert, and flows that are slow and orderly or very fast and turbulent. It is therefore not surprising that no single theory can explain all aspect of mixing in fluids and that straightforward computations usually fail to capture all the important details. Still, both physical experiments and computer simulations can provide insight into the mixing process. Over the past several years the authors and his colleague have taken both approaches in an effort to increase understanding of various aspect of the process-particularly of mixing involving slow flows and viscous fluids such as oils

  14. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  15. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which I and my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same ti...

  16. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which land my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same tim...

  17. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  18. Dynamics of radiating fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalas, D.; Weaver, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the role of radiation in the transport of energy and momentum in a combined matter-radiation fluid. The transport equation for a moving radiating fluid is presented in both a fully Eulerian and a fully Lagrangian formulation, along with conservation equations describing the dynamics of the fluid. Special attention is paid to the problem of deriving equations that are mutually consistent in each frame, and between frames, to 0(v/c). A detailed analysis is made to show that in situations of broad interest, terms that are formally of 0(v/c) actually dominate the solution, demonstrating that it is essential (1) to pay scrupulous attention to the question of the frame dependence in formulating the equations, and (2) to solve the equations to 0(v/c) in quite general circumstances. These points are illustrated in the context of the nonequilibrium radiation diffusion limit, and a sketch of how the Lagrangian equations are to be solved is presented

  19. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  20. Fluid transport due to nonlinear fluid-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    1997-01-01

    This work considers nonlinear fluid-structure interaction for a vibrating pipe containing fluid. Transverse pipe vibrations will force the fluid to move relative to the pipe creating unidirectional fluid flow towards the pipe end. The fluid flow induced affects the damping and the stiffness...... of the pipe. The behavior of the system in response to lateral resonant base excitation is analysed numerically and by the use of a perturbation method (multiple scales). Exciting the pipe in the fundamental mode of vibration seems to be most effective for transferring energy from the shaker to the fluid......, whereas higher modes of vibration can be used to transport fluid with pipe vibrations of smaller amplitude. The effect of the nonlinear geometrical terms is analysed and these terms are shown to affect the response for higher modes of vibration. Experimental investigations show good agreement...

  1. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  2. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  3. Hazards of organic working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, S.

    1977-08-01

    We present several brief reviews on working fluids proposed for use in organic Rankine and bi-phase bottoming cycles. There are several general problems with many organic working fluids: flammability, toxicity, and a tendency to leak through seals. Besides, two of the proposed working fluids are to be used at temperatures above the manufacturer's maximum recommended temperature, and one is to be used in a way different from its customary usage. It may, in some cases, be more profitable to first seek alternative working fluids before committing large amounts of time and money to research projects on unsafe working fluids

  4. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  5. Hazards of organic working fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberstein, S

    1977-08-01

    We present several brief reviews on working fluids proposed for use in organic Rankine and bi-phase bottoming cycles. There are several general problems with many organic working fluids: flammability, toxicity, and a tendency to leak through seals. Besides, two of the proposed working fluids are to be used at temperatures above the manufacturer's maximum recommended temperature, and one is to be used in a way different from its customary usage. It may, in some cases, be more profitable to first seek alternative working fluids before committing large amounts of time and money to research projects on unsafe working fluids.

  6. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B., E-mail: mabdalla@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco 2, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, 01156-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Holender, L., E-mail: holender@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil); Santos, M.A., E-mail: masantos@cce.ufes.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Fernando Ferarri S/N, Goiabeiras, 29060-900 Vitória, ES (Brazil); Vancea, I.V., E-mail: ionvancea@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy–momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  7. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  8. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  9. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  10. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  11. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael W.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2017-08-15

    Disclosed herein is a acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow that includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  12. Reliability of fluid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopáček Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the importance of detection reliability, especially in complex fluid systems for demanding production technology. The initial criterion for assessing the reliability is the failure of object (element, which is seen as a random variable and their data (values can be processed using by the mathematical methods of theory probability and statistics. They are defined the basic indicators of reliability and their applications in calculations of serial, parallel and backed-up systems. For illustration, there are calculation examples of indicators of reliability for various elements of the system and for the selected pneumatic circuit.

  13. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  14. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  15. Solitary waves in fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Grimshaw, RHJ

    2007-01-01

    After the initial observation by John Scott Russell of a solitary wave in a canal, his insightful laboratory experiments and the subsequent theoretical work of Boussinesq, Rayleigh and Korteweg and de Vries, interest in solitary waves in fluids lapsed until the mid 1960's with the seminal paper of Zabusky and Kruskal describing the discovery of the soliton. This was followed by the rapid development of the theory of solitons and integrable systems. At the same time came the realization that solitary waves occur naturally in many physical systems, and play a fundamental role in many circumstances. The aim of this text is to describe the role that soliton theory plays in fluids in several contexts. After an historical introduction, the book is divided five chapters covering the basic theory of the Korteweg-de Vries equation, and the subsequent application to free-surface solitary waves in water to internal solitary waves in the coastal ocean and the atmospheric boundary layer, solitary waves in rotating flows, ...

  16. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  17. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluid mechanics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cengel, Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Cengel and Cimbala's Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals and Applications, communicates directly with tomorrow's engineers in a simple yet precise manner. The text covers the basic principles and equations of fluid mechanics in the context of numerous and diverse real-world engineering examples. The text helps students develop an intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics by emphasizing the physics, using figures, numerous photographs and visual aids to reinforce the physics. The highly visual approach enhances the learning of Fluid mechanics by students. This text distinguishes itself from others by the way the material is presented - in a progressive order from simple to more difficult, building each chapter upon foundations laid down in previous chapters. In this way, even the traditionally challenging aspects of fluid mechanics can be learned effectively. McGraw-Hill is also proud to offer ConnectPlus powered by Maple with the third edition of Cengel/Cimbabla, Fluid Mechanics. This innovative and powerful new sy...

  19. Supercritical fluids processing: emerging opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovaly, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    This publication on the emerging opportunities of supercritical fluids processing reveals the latest research findings and development trends in this field. These findings and development trends are highlighted, and the results of applications of technology to the business of supercritical fluids are reported. Applications of supercritical fluids to chemical intermediates, environmental applications, chemical reactions, food and biochemistry processing, and fuels processing are discussed in some detail

  20. Chemokines in tumor proximal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyza, Jaromir

    2017-03-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines produced by leukocytes and other types of cells including tumor cells. Their action is determined by the expression of cognate receptors and subsequent signaling in target cells, followed by the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins and the induction of other responses. In tumors, chemokines produced by neoplastic/stroma cells control the leukocyte infiltrate influencing tumor growth and progression. Tumor cells also express functional chemokine receptors responding to chemokine signals, promoting cell survival, proliferation and metastasis formation. Chemokines may be detected in serum of cancer patients, but due to the paracrine nature of these molecules, more significant concentrations are found in the tumor adjacent, non-vascular fluids, collectively called tumor proximal fluids. This review summarizes the expression of CC and CXC chemokines in these fluids, namely in interstitial fluid, pleural, ascitic, and cyst fluids, but also in urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, cervical secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Most comparative clinical studies reveal increased chemokine levels in high-grade tumor proximal fluids rather than in low-grade tumors and benign conditions, indicating shorter survival periods. The data confirm peritumoral fluid chemokines as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as offer support for chemokines and their receptors as potential targets for antitumor therapy.

  1. The fluid dynamics of climate

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzi, Elisa; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides an overview of the fluid aspects of the climate system, focusing on basic aspects as well as recent research developments. It will bring together contributions from diverse fields of the physical, mathematical and engineering sciences. The volume will be useful to doctorate students, postdocs and researchers working on different aspects of atmospheric, oceanic and environmental fluid dynamics. It will also be of interest to researchers interested in quantitatively understanding how fluid dynamics can be applied to the climate system, and to climate scientists willing to gain a deeper insight into the fluid mechanics underlying climate processes.

  2. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  3. Magnetoviscous model fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, M; Hess, S

    2003-01-01

    We review, apply and compare diverse approaches to the theoretical understanding of the dynamical and rheological behaviour of ferrofluids and magnetorheological (MR) fluids subject to external magnetic and flow fields. Simple models are introduced which are directly solvable by nonequilibrium Brownian or molecular dynamics computer simulation. In particular, the numerical results for ferrofluids quantify the domain of validity of uniaxial alignment of magnetic moments (in and) out of equilibrium. A Fokker-Planck equation for the dynamics of the magnetic moments - corresponding to the Brownian dynamics approach - and its implications are analysed under this approximation. The basic approach considers the effect of external fields on the dynamics of ellipsoid shaped permanent ferromagnetic domains (aggregates), whose size should depend on the strength of flow and magnetic field, the magnetic interaction parameter and concentration (or packing fraction). Results from analytic calculations and from simulation ar...

  4. Fluid Mechanics of Taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Alexis; Bhatia, Nitesh; Carter, Taren; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Saliva plays a key role in digestion, speech and tactile sensation. Lack of saliva, also known as dry mouth syndrome, increases risk of tooth decay and alters sense of taste; nearly 10% of the general population suffer from this syndrome. In this experimental study, we investigate the spreading of water drops on wet and dry tongues of pigs and cows. We find that drops spread faster on a wet tongue than a dry tongue. We rationalize the spreading rate by consideration of the tongue microstructure, such as as papillae, in promoting wicking. By investigating how tongue microstructure affects spreading of fluids, we may begin to how understand taste receptors are activated by eating and drinking.

  5. Spin and Madelung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, G.

    1995-07-01

    Starting from the Pauli current the decomposition of the non-relativistic local velocity has been obtained in two parts (in the ordinary tensorial language): one parallel and the other orthogonal to the impulse. The former is recognized to be the classical part, that is, the center-of-mass (CM) velocity, and the latter the quantum one, that is, the velocity of the motion in the CM frame (namely, the internal spin motion or Zitterbewegung). Inserting this complete, composite expression of the velocity into the kinetic energy term of the classical non-relativistic (i.e. Newtonian) Lagrangian, the author straightforwardly get the appearance of the so called quantum potential associates as it is known, to the Madelung fluid. In such a way, the quantum mechanical behaviour of particles appears to be strictly correlated to the existence of spin and Zitterbewegung

  6. Fluid dynamics and vibration of tube banks in fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukauskas, A.; Ulinskas, R.; Katinas, V.

    1988-01-01

    This work presents results derived in fluid dynamics, hydraulic drag and flow-induced vibrations within transverse and yawed tube banks. The studies encompass banks of smooth, rough and finned tubes at Reynolds numbers from 1 to 2x10/sup 6/. Highlighted in the text are fluid dynamic parameters of tube banks measured at inter-tube spaces and tube surfaces

  7. Dynamic fluid loss characteristics of foam fracturing fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.C.

    1982-09-01

    Dynamic fluid loss measurements were conducted on core samples ranging in permeability between 0.02 to 140 md. These tests were run to measure the effect of several parameters on the foam fluid loss coefficients. The parameters tested were: core permeability, gel concentration in the liquid phase, foam quality, temperature, core length and differential test pressure. The type of foam that is used in most conventional fracturing treatments is a wall building fluid. Although this foam has excellent inherent fluid loss properties, the fluid loss values reported in this paper more closely resemble those of conventional fracturing fluids than reported earlier. These values have been used in the successful design of field fracturing treatments. These data support the mechanism of two phase flow in porous media suggested by Holm. The fluid passing through the cores was rich in liquid phase with composition proportional to the viscosity of the liquid phase. The broad range of fluid loss coefficients for foam calculated in these tests are intermediate in value to those reported in similar tests by Blauer and Kohlhaas, who obtained lower values, and King, who obtained higher values.

  8. Thermophysical properties of supercritical fluids and fluid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengers, J.V.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of the research is to extend the theory of critical phenomena in fluids and fluid mixtures to obtain scientifically based equations that include the crossover from the asymptotic singular behavior of the thermophysical properties close to the critical point to the regular behavior of these properties far away from the critical point

  9. High order ADER schemes for a unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics: Viscous heat-conducting fluids and elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbser, Michael; Peshkov, Ilya; Romenski, Evgeniy; Zanotti, Olindo

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of the unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics recently proposed by Peshkov and Romenski [110], further denoted as HPR model. In that framework, the viscous stresses are computed from the so-called distortion tensor A, which is one of the primary state variables in the proposed first order system. A very important key feature of the HPR model is its ability to describe at the same time the behavior of inviscid and viscous compressible Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids with heat conduction, as well as the behavior of elastic and visco-plastic solids. Actually, the model treats viscous and inviscid fluids as generalized visco-plastic solids. This is achieved via a stiff source term that accounts for strain relaxation in the evolution equations of A. Also heat conduction is included via a first order hyperbolic system for the thermal impulse, from which the heat flux is computed. The governing PDE system is hyperbolic and fully consistent with the first and the second principle of thermodynamics. It is also fundamentally different from first order Maxwell-Cattaneo-type relaxation models based on extended irreversible thermodynamics. The HPR model represents therefore a novel and unified description of continuum mechanics, which applies at the same time to fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. In this paper, the direct connection between the HPR model and the classical hyperbolic-parabolic Navier-Stokes-Fourier theory is established for the first time via a formal asymptotic analysis in the stiff relaxation limit. From a numerical point of view, the governing partial differential equations are very challenging, since they form a large nonlinear hyperbolic PDE system that includes stiff source terms and non-conservative products. We apply the successful family of one-step ADER-WENO finite volume (FV) and ADER discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element schemes to the HPR model in the stiff

  10. Fluid Flow at Branching Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    The flow of fluids at branching junctions plays important kinematic and dynamic roles in most biological and industrial flow systems. The present paper highlights some key issues related to the flow of fluids at these junctions with special emphasis on the biological flow networks particularly blood transportation vasculature.

  11. Intraoperative fluid therapy in neonates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evidence base for the administration of intraoperative fluids in neonates is poor and extrapolated from adults and children. Differences from adults and children in physiology and anatomy of neonates inform our practice. Keywords: fluid ..... compromise lung function and wound healing. The EGL develops early in ...

  12. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  13. Viscoelastic Fluid-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Anita; Rothstein, Jonathan; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    When a flexible object such as an elastic sheet is placed perpendicular to the flow of a Newtonian fluid, the structure can oscillate due to the shedding of separated vortices at high Reynolds numbers. If the same flexible object is placed in non-Newtonian flows, however, the structure's response is still unknown. Unlike Newtonian fluids, the flow of viscoelastic fluids can become unstable at infinitesimal Reynolds numbers due to a purely elastic flow instability. In this talk, we will discuss the fluid-structure interaction between a wormlike micelle solution at high Weissenberg number and a flexible elastic sheet in cross flow. Elastic flow instabilities have been observed for wormlike micelle solutions in a number of flows. Here we will study what happens when elastic flow instabilities occur in the vicinity of a thin flexible polymer sheet. We will show that the time varying fluid forces exerted on the structure can grow large enough to cause a structural motion which can in turn feed back into the flow to modify the flow instability. The static and dynamic responses of the flexible sheet will be presented for a series of flexible sheets oriented at different angles to the flow direction, for varying fluid flow rates, and for varying fluid compositions and properties. In addition, measurements of velocity profiles and flow-induced birefringence will be presented in order to quantify the time variation of the flow field and the state of stress in the fluid.

  14. Fluid simulation for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Bridson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Animating fluids like water, smoke, and fire using physics-based simulation is increasingly important in visual effects, in particular in movies, like The Day After Tomorrow, and in computer games. This book provides a practical introduction to fluid simulation for graphics. The focus is on animating fully three-dimensional incompressible flow, from understanding the math and the algorithms to the actual implementation.

  15. Materials processing using supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting areas of supercritical fluids applications is the processing of novel materials. These new materials are designed to meet specific requirements and to make possible new applications in Pharmaceuticals design, heterogeneous catalysis, micro- and nano-particles with unique structures, special insulating materials, super capacitors and other special technical materials. Two distinct possibilities to apply supercritical fluids in processing of materials: synthesis of materials in supercritical fluid environment and/or further processing of already obtained materials with the help of supercritical fluids. By adjusting synthesis parameters the properties of supercritical fluids can be significantly altered which further results in the materials with different structures. Unique materials can be also obtained by conducting synthesis in quite specific environments like reversed micelles. This paper is mainly devoted to processing of previously synthesized materials which are further processed using supercritical fluids. Several new methods have been developed to produce micro- and nano-particles with the use of supercritical fluids. The following methods: rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS supercritical anti-solvent (SAS, materials synthesis under supercritical conditions and encapsulation and coating using supercritical fluids were recently developed.

  16. Performance Testing of Cutting Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter

    The importance of cutting fluid performance testing has increased with documentation requirements of new cutting fluid formulations based on more sustainable products, as well as cutting with minimum quantity of lubrication and dry cutting. Two sub-problems have to be solved: i) which machining...... tests feature repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity to cutting fluids, and ii) to what extent results of one test ensure relevance to a wider set of machining situations. The present work is aimed at assessing the range of validity of the different testing methods, investigating correlation...... within the whole range of operations, materials, cutting fluids, operating conditions, etc. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping, and with respect to tool life, cutting forces, chip formation and product quality (dimensional accuracy and surface integrity...

  17. Fluid Dynamics of Bottle Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Patrick; Gao, Haijing; Appathurai, Santosh; Basaran, Osman

    2011-11-01

    Filling of bottles is a widely practiced operation in a large number of industries. Well known examples include filling of ``large'' bottles with shampoos and cleaners in the household products and beauty care industries and filling of ``small'' bottles in the pharmaceutical industry. Some bottle filling operations have recently drawn much attention from the fluid mechanics community because of the occurrence of a multitude of complex flow regimes, transitions, and instabilities such as mounding and coiling that occur as a bottle is filled with a fluid. In this talk, we present a primarily computational study of the fluid dynamical challenges that can arise during the rapid filling of bottles. Given the diversity of fluids used in filling applications, we consider four representative classes of fluids that exhibit Newtonian, shear-thinning, viscoelastic, and yield-stress rheologies. The equations governing the dynamics of bottle filling are solved either in their full 3D but axisymmetric form or using the slender-jet approximation.

  18. Fluid simulation with articulated bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwatra, Nipun; Wojtan, Chris; Carlson, Mark; Essa, Irfan; Mucha, Peter J; Turk, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for creating realistic animations of characters that are swimming through fluids. Our approach combines dynamic simulation with data-driven kinematic motions (motion capture data) to produce realistic animation in a fluid. The interaction of the articulated body with the fluid is performed by incorporating joint constraints with rigid animation and by extending a solid/fluid coupling method to handle articulated chains. Our solver takes as input the current state of the simulation and calculates the angular and linear accelerations of the connected bodies needed to match a particular motion sequence for the articulated body. These accelerations are used to estimate the forces and torques that are then applied to each joint. Based on this approach, we demonstrate simulated swimming results for a variety of different strokes, including crawl, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. The ability to have articulated bodies interact with fluids also allows us to generate simulations of simple water creatures that are driven by simple controllers.

  19. Revisiting the Landau fluid closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced fluid models that are much closer to the full kinetic description than the usual magnetohydrodynamic description are a very useful tool for studying astrophysical plasmas and for interpreting solar wind observational data. The development of advanced fluid models that contain certain kinetic effects is complicated and has attracted much attention over the past years. Here we focus on fluid models that incorporate the simplest possible forms of Landau damping, derived from linear kinetic theory expanded about a leading-order (gyrotropic) bi-Maxwellian distribution function f_0, under the approximation that the perturbed distribution function f_1 is gyrotropic as well. Specifically, we focus on various Pade approximants to the usual plasma response function (and to the plasma dispersion function) and examine possibilities that lead to a closure of the linear kinetic hierarchy of fluid moments. We present re-examination of the simplest Landau fluid closures.

  20. Heating production fluids in a wellbore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, Yamila; Jankowski, Todd A.

    2016-07-12

    A method for heating a production fluid in a wellbore. The method can include heating, using a packer fluid, a working fluid flowing through a first medium disposed in a first section of the wellbore, where the first medium transfers heat from the packer fluid to the working fluid. The method can also include circulating the working fluid into a second section of the wellbore through a second medium, where the second medium transfers heat from the working fluid to the production fluid. The method can further include returning the working fluid to the first section of the wellbore through the first medium.

  1. Computation of Viscous-Inviscid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    oO la darivfie de S, augmeute- fortement jusqu’l devenir infinie. Or il eat dana ce cas bien fitabli qu’il slagit d’un pro- blame lig A L£utilisation...extiriaurea, ella se aimplifie pour devenir en =9 n’~tpaa Equivalent A un calcul de couche litnite pour lequel on ae donne lea Epaiaaeura S.Let 91 Dana

  2. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Zachary A; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S; Mecca, Jodi M; Tucker, Christopher J; Squires, Todd M

    2014-03-11

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 10(3)-10(4) times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants.

  3. General stability criterion for inviscid parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Liang

    2007-01-01

    Arnol'd's second stability theorem is approached from an elementary point of view. First, a sufficient criterion for stability is found analytically as either -μ 1 s ) s ) in the flow, where U s is the velocity at the inflection point, and μ 1 is the eigenvalue of Poincare's problem. Second, this criterion is generalized to barotropic geophysical flows in the β plane. And the connections between present criteria and Arnol'd's nonlinear criteria are also discussed. The proofs are completely elementary and so could be used to teach undergraduate students

  4. Tracing Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

    2004-03-01

    Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

  5. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  6. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  7. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-24

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  8. Noncommutative geometry and fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Praloy; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we have developed a Non-Commutative (NC) generalization of perfect fluid model from first principles, in a Hamiltonian framework. The noncommutativity is introduced at the Lagrangian (particle) coordinate space brackets and the induced NC fluid bracket algebra for the Eulerian (fluid) field variables is derived. Together with a Hamiltonian this NC algebra generates the generalized fluid dynamics that satisfies exact local conservation laws for mass and energy, thereby maintaining mass and energy conservation. However, nontrivial NC correction terms appear in the charge and energy fluxes. Other non-relativistic spacetime symmetries of the NC fluid are also discussed in detail. This constitutes the study of kinematics and dynamics of NC fluid. In the second part we construct an extension of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model based on the NC fluid dynamics presented here. We outline the way in which NC effects generate cosmological perturbations bringing about anisotropy and inhomogeneity in the model. We also derive a NC extended Friedmann equation. (orig.)

  9. Fluid Dynamics with Cryogenic Fluid Transfer in Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During chilldown of cryogenic fluid tanks and lines, the interface between the liquid and vapor rapidly changes. Understanding these rapid changes is key...

  10. Boundary effect in electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, X L; Yang, F; Xuan, S H; Zong, L H; Zhu, W; Jiang, W Q

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the boundary friction coefficient on the rheological properties of the electrorheological (ER) fluids in quasistatic and dynamic states is investigated by computer simulation. The relation between the shear stress and the boundary friction coefficient in quasistatic and dynamic states is discussed qualitatively and quantitatively, and the trend matches the previously reported experimental results well. The flow curves of ER fluids, under different friction coefficients, are calculated, and it is found that the friction coefficient affects the flow curves. In two dimensions, the transitions in structure corresponding to the shear stress variations are presented to understand the mechanism of ER fluids.

  11. Quantum field theory of fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2015-02-20

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around noninteracting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is "freer", in the sense that the noninteracting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree and loop level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behavior is radically different from both classical fluids and quantum fields.

  12. Fluid intelligence: A brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    The concept of fluid and crystallized intelligence was introduced to the psychological community approximately 75 years ago by Raymond B. Cattell, and it continues to be an area of active research and controversy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the origin of the concept, early efforts to define intelligence and uses of intelligence tests to address pressing social issues, and the ongoing controversies associated with fluid intelligence and the structure of intelligence. The putative neuropsychological underpinnings and neurological substrates of fluid intelligence are discussed.

  13. Molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Lloyd L

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Nonideal Fluids serves as an introductory presentation for engineers to the concepts and principles behind and the advances in molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids. The book covers related topics such as the laws of thermodynamics; entropy; its ensembles; the different properties of the ideal gas; and the structure of liquids. Also covered in the book are topics such as integral equation theories; theories for polar fluids; solution thermodynamics; and molecular dynamics. The text is recommended for engineers who would like to be familiarized with the concept

  14. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  15. Advances in Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T

    2010-01-01

    Environmental fluid mechanics (EFM) is the scientific study of transport, dispersion and transformation processes in natural fluid flows on our planet Earth, from the microscale to the planetary scale. This book brings together scientists and engineers working in research institutions, universities and academia, who engage in the study of theoretical, modeling, measuring and software aspects in environmental fluid mechanics. It provides a forum for the participants, and exchanges new ideas and expertise through the presentations of up-to-date and recent overall achievements in this field.

  16. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  17. Fluid Mechanics Can Be Fun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    A humanistic approach to teaching fluid mechanics is described which minimizes lecturing, increases professor-student interaction, uses group and individual problem solving sessions, and allows for student response. (BB)

  18. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  19. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  20. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  1. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  2. Closed Loop Fluid Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    loop fluid delivery system (CLFDS) will integrate a vital signs monitor ( VSM ) and high speed infusion pump (Pump) to respond quickly to drops in...Interface (GUI) shows VSM data, allows the user to select from several injury types (head, uncontrolled hemorrhage, controlled hemorrhage, and three total...the bedrock for future Closed Loop Fluid System Pre-Market Approval application(s) to FDA. 6. Major Issues Clinical study testing revealed a

  3. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C–O–H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds ...

  4. Nuclear fluid dynamics and TDHF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    In some previous reports a modified TDHF (Time Dependent Hartree-Fock) equation including a collision term was introduced. The collisions were included in the relaxation-time approximation familiar in classical transport theory. In plasma-physics it is often referred to as the Krook-model. The author explores the approximate nature of, and the possible computational advantage of revamping the modified TDHF-equation into fluid-equations, by truncating the moment-expansion of the Wigner-function. In the fluid-equations that are derived the mean field and the relaxation time are both maintained explicitly. The pressure tensor is allowed to be anisotropic, i.e., the fluid is viscous. Only in the limit of a very short relaxation time (approximately 10 -23 s) may the isotropic (non-viscous) approximation be acceptable. The fluid-equations are tested by comparing computed results with those obtained with the modified TDHF. It is concluded that the fluid-equations are a viable alternative. Some differences can be attributed to the neglect of the higher moments of the momentum-distribution in the fluid-equations. Others are due to other approximations necessary in the truncation. (Auth.)

  5. Fluid element in SAP IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, C.; Akkas, N.

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies a fluid element is incorporated in the widely used general purpose finite element program SAPIV. This type of problem is of interest in the design of nuclear components involving geometric complexities and nonlinearities. The elasticity matrix of a general-purpose finite element program is modified in such a way that it becomes possible to idealize fluid as a structural finite element with zero shear modulus and a given bulk modules. Using the modified version of SAPIV, several solid-fluid interactions problems are solved. The numerical solutions are compared with the available analytical solutions. They are shown to be in reasonable aggrement. It is also shown that by solving an exterior-fluid interaction problem, the pressure wave propagation in the acoustic medium can be solved with the same approach. In this study, two of the problem not studied in the previous work will be presented. These problems are namely the effects of the link elements used at solid-fluid interfaces and of the concentrated loads on the response of the fluid medium. Truss elements are used as the link elements. After these investigations, it is decided that general purpose finite element programs with slight modifications can be used in the safety analysis of nuclear reactor plants. By this procedure it is possible to handle two-dimensional plane strain and tridimensional axisymmetric problems of this type. (orig.)

  6. Thermophysical properties of supercritical fluids and fluid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengers, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    This research is concerned with the development of a quantitative scientific description of the thermodynamic and transport properties of supercritical and subcritical fluids and fluid mixtures. It is known that the thermophysical properties of fluids and fluid mixtures asymptotically close to the critical point satisfy scaling laws with universal critical exponents and universal scaling functions. However, the range of validity of these asymptotic scaling laws is quite small. As a consequence, the impact of the modern theory of critical phenomena on chemical engineering has been limited. On the other hand, an a priori estimate of the range of temperatures and densities, where critical fluctuations become significant, can be made on the basis of the so-called Ginzburg criterion. A recent analysis of this criterion suggests that this range is actually quite large and for a fluid like carbon dioxide can easily extend to 100 degrees or so above the critical temperature. Hence, the use of traditional engineering equations like cubic equations is not scientifically justified in a very wide range of temperatures and densities around the critical point. We have therefore embarked on a scientific approach to deal with the global effects of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties of fluids and fluid mixtures. For this purpose it is not sufficient to consider the asymptotic critical fluctuations but we need to deal also with the nonasymptotic critical fluctuations. The goal is to develop scientifically based questions that account for the crossover of the thermophysical properties from their asymptotic singular behavior in the near vicinity of the critical point to their regular behavior very far away from the critical point

  7. Fluid Mechanics An Introduction to the Theory of Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Durst, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science needed to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into all aspects of fluid mechanics covering all relevant subfields.

  8. 14 CFR 25.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 25.1185 Section 25.1185... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1185 Flammable fluids. (a... system containing flammable fluids or gases may be in a designated fire zone unless the fluid contained...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.41 - Metalworking fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metalworking fluids. 2902.41 Section 2902.41... Items § 2902.41 Metalworking fluids. (a) Definition. (1) Fluids that are designed to provide cooling... operations such as cutting, drilling, grinding, machining, and tapping. (2) Metalworking fluids for which...

  10. 14 CFR 125.153 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 125.153 Section 125.153....153 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in designated fire zones, except where the fluid contained, the design of...

  11. Yang-Mills Magneto-Fluid Unification

    OpenAIRE

    Bambah, Bindu A.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Mukku, Chandrasekher

    2006-01-01

    We generalize the hybrid magneto-fluid model of a charged fluid interacting with an electromagnetic field to the dynamics of a relativistic hot fluid interacting with a non-Abelian field. The fluid itself is endowed with a non-Abelian charge and the consequences of this generalization are worked out. Applications of this formalism to the Quark Gluon Plasma are suggested.

  12. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  13. Combustion, Complex Fluids, and Fluid Physics Experiments on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian; Urban, David

    2012-01-01

    From the very first days of human spaceflight, NASA has been conducting experiments in space to understand the effect of weightlessness on physical and chemically reacting systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio has been at the forefront of this research looking at both fundamental studies in microgravity as well as experiments targeted at reducing the risks to long duration human missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond. In the current International Space Station (ISS) era, we now have an orbiting laboratory that provides the highly desired condition of long-duration microgravity. This allows continuous and interactive research similar to Earth-based laboratories. Because of these capabilities, the ISS is an indispensible laboratory for low gravity research. NASA GRC has been actively involved in developing and operating facilities and experiments on the ISS since the beginning of a permanent human presence on November 2, 2000. As the lead Center both Combustion, Fluid Physics, and Acceleration Measurement GRC has led the successful implementation of an Acceleration Measurement systems, the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) as well as the continued use of other facilities on the ISS. These facilities have supported combustion experiments in fundamental droplet combustion fire detection fire extinguishment soot phenomena flame liftoff and stability and material flammability. The fluids experiments have studied capillary flow magneto-rheological fluids colloidal systems extensional rheology pool and nucleate boiling phenomena. In this paper, we provide an overview of the experiments conducted on the ISS over the past 12 years. We also provide a look to the future development. Experiments presented in combustion include areas such as droplet combustion, gaseous diffusion flames, solid fuels, premixed flame studies, fire safety, and super critical oxidation processes. In fluid physics, experiments are discussed in

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis in hydrocele fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, G; Mohanty, S; Pani, S P; Panda, S K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis in hydrocele fluid. METHODS: 90 male patients with hydrocele of tunica vaginalis from an endemic area for bancroftian filariasis were investigated for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis in their hydrocele fluids. C trachomatis antigen detection tests-a direct immunofluorescence assay and an enzyme immunoassay along with polymerase chain reaction assay for amplification of a 517 bp fragment of C trachomatis endogenous plasmid-were used in this study. The patients were also tested for the presence of microfilaria in their hydrocele fluids and night blood. Histopathological examination was carried out to detect adult filarial worm in tunica vaginalis testes. RESULTS: Eight (8.88%) patients had chlamydia antigen in the hydrocele fluids; C trachomatis plasmid sequences could be amplified from five of these. Seven (7.77%) patients had microfilaria in the hydrocele fluids, three of them having adult worm in tunica vaginalis. CONCLUSION: C trachomatis infection might be associated with hydrocele in some of these patients. PMID:9582470

  15. Ultrasonic techniques for fluids characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Povey, Malcolm J W

    1997-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of ultrasonic techniques for the characterization of fluids. Focusing on ultrasonic velocimetry, the author covers the basic topics and techniques necessaryfor successful ultrasound measurements on emulsions, dispersions, multiphase media, and viscoelastic/viscoplastic materials. Advanced techniques such as scattering, particle sizing, and automation are also presented. As a handbook for industrial and scientific use, Ultrasonic Techniques for Fluids Characterization is an indispensable guide to chemists and chemical engineers using ultrasound for research or process monitoring in the chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotechnology,and fuels industries. Key Features * Appeals to anyone using ultrasound to study fluids * Provides the first detailed description of the ultrasound profiling technique for dispersions * Describes new techniques for measuring phase transitions and nucleation, such as water/ice and oil/fat * Presents the l...

  16. Coulombic Fluids Bulk and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Freyland, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this book the bulk and interfacial physico-chemical characteristics of various fluid systems dominated by Coulomb interactions are treated which includes molten salts, ionic liquids as well as metal-molten salt mixtures and expanded fluid metals. Of particular interest is the comparison of the different systems. Topics in the bulk phase concern the microscopic structure, the phase behaviour and critical phenomena, and the metal-nonmetal transition. Interfacial phenomena include wetting transitions, electrowetting, surface freezing, and the electrified ionic liquid/ electrode interface. With regard to the latter 2D and 3D electrochemical phase formation of metals and semi-conductors on the nanometer scale is described for a number of selected examples. The basic concepts and various experimental methods are introduced making the book suitable for both graduate students and researchers interested in Coulombic fluids.

  17. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  18. Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Hultquist, Jeff; Bryson, Steve; Kenwright, David; Lane, David; Walatka, Pamela; Clucas, Jean; Watson, Velvin; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Scientific visualization serves the dual purpose of exploration and exposition of the results of numerical simulations of fluid flow. Along with the basic visualization process which transforms source data into images, there are four additional components to a complete visualization system: Source Data Processing, User Interface and Control, Presentation, and Information Management. The requirements imposed by the desired mode of operation (i.e. real-time, interactive, or batch) and the source data have their effect on each of these visualization system components. The special requirements imposed by the wide variety and size of the source data provided by the numerical simulation of fluid flow presents an enormous challenge to the visualization system designer. We describe the visualization system components including specific visualization techniques and how the mode of operation and source data requirements effect the construction of computational fluid dynamics visualization systems.

  19. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  20. Nonlinear rheology of complex fluid-fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Fischer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid–fluid interfaces stabilized by proteins, protein aggregates, polymers, or colloidal particles, tend to have a complex microstructure. Their response to an applied deformation is often highly nonlinear, even at small deformation (rates). The nonlinearity of the response is a result of changes

  1. Editorial Special Issue on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore. Fluid mechanics touches almost all aspects of the natural and engineering ... lence which distorts electromagnetic waves; an earth scientist may simulate convection in the earth's mantle to understand plate tectonics or convection in the atmosphere to ...

  2. Sideload vanes for fluid pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Scott R. (Inventor); Dills, Michael H. (Inventor); Rodriguez, Jose L. (Inventor); Tepool, John Eric (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A fluid pump assembly includes a rotatable component that can be rotated about an axis and a static vane assembly located adjacent to the rotatable component. The static vane assembly includes a circumferential surface axially spaced from the rotatable component, and one or more vanes extending from the circumferential surface toward the rotatable component. The one or more vanes are configured to produce a radial load on the rotatable component when the rotatable component is rotating about the axis and a fluid is present between the static vane assembly and the rotatable component.

  3. Wellbottom fluid implosion treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, Emmet F.

    2001-01-01

    A system for inducing implosion shock forces on perforation traversing earth formations with fluid pressure where an implosion tool is selected relative to a shut in well pressure and a tubing pressure to have a large and small area piston relationship in a well tool so that at a predetermined tubing pressure the pistons move a sufficient distance to open an implosion valve which permits a sudden release of well fluid pressure into the tubing string and produces an implosion force on the perforations. A pressure gauge on the well tool records tubing pressure and well pressure as a function of time.

  4. Fluid mechanics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Spurk, Joseph H

    1997-01-01

    his collection of over 200 detailed worked exercises adds to and complements the textbook Fluid Mechanics by the same author, and illustrates the teaching material through examples. In the exercises the fundamental concepts of Fluid Mechanics are applied to obtaining the solution of diverse concrete problems, and in doing this the student's skill in the mathematical modeling of practical problems is developed. In addition, 30 challenging questions without detailed solutions have been included, and while lecturers will find these questions suitable for examinations and tests, the student himself can use them to check his understanding of the subject.

  5. Analysis of giant electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2013-07-15

    The yield stress dependence on electric field strength for giant electrorheological (GER) fluids over the full range of electric fields was examined using Seo's scaling function which incorporated both the polarization and the conductivity models. If a proper scaling was applied to the yield stress data to collapse them onto a single curve, the Seo's scaling function could correctly fit the yield stress behavior of GER suspensions, even at very high electric field strengths. The model predictions were also compared with recently proposed Choi et al.'s model to allow a consideration of the universal framework of ER fluids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluid systems for RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2005-01-01

    The optical properties of the radiator media are of prime importance in Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. The main requirements for the radiator fluid are a stable refractive index and a photon absorption as low as possible. We will in this note cover some of the cleaning procedures which are required together with distillation and similar separation procedures. Thin film membranes have been introduced during the last decade. They have proven particularly interesting in separating air from some Cherenkov fluids. We will also discuss the use of molecular sieves.

  7. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  8. Piezooptic behavior of certain fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of pressure--volume data for certain optical fluids, which characterizes them by two parameters: their bulk moduli and the pressure derivative of their bulk moduli, both evaluated at zero pressure. We then relate their refractive-index changes to density and pressure using this analysis and the Lorentz-Lorenz equation with a density-dependent polarizability. An example of the use of such fluids in a fiber-optic pressure gauge being developed at Sandia is also discussed

  9. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a Berty'' autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  10. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a ``Berty`` autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  11. Rheology and non-Newtonian fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Irgens, Fridtjov

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a brief but thorough introduction to the fascinating subject of non-Newtonian fluids, their behavior and mechanical properties. After a brief introduction of what characterizes non-Newtonian fluids in Chapter 1 some phenomena characteristic of non-Newtonian fluids are presented in Chapter 2. The basic equations in fluid mechanics are discussed in Chapter 3. Deformation kinematics, the kinematics of shear flows, viscometric flows, and extensional flows are the topics in Chapter 4. Material functions characterizing the behavior of fluids in special flows are defined in Chapter 5. Generalized Newtonian fluids are the most common types of non-Newtonian fluids and are the subject in Chapter 6. Some linearly viscoelastic fluid models are presented in Chapter 7. In Chapter 8 the concept of tensors is utilized and advanced fluid models are introduced. The book is concluded with a variety of 26 problems. Solutions to the problems are ready for instructors.

  12. Somatomedin activity in synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, C L; Burwell, R G; Buttery, P J; Walker, G; Woodward, P M

    1977-01-01

    Abnormalities of synovial fluid, as a lubricant and nutrient, may have relevance to the causation of certain articular diseases. The somatomedin activity in normal synovial fluid obtained from the knee joint of the ox has been studied and compared with the activity in serum from the same animal. The porcine costal cartilage bioassay of Van den Brande and Du Caju (1974) has been used with the isotopes 35S-sulphate and 3H-thymidine. The mean potency ratio of ox synovial fluid in terms of ox serum for 35S-sulphate incorporation was 0-28 (range 0-19-0-47) and for 3H-thymidine incorporation 0-35 (range 0-21-0-63). A significant correlation was found between the somatomedin activity (as measured by 35S-sulphate incorporation) and the total protein and albumin concentrations in the ox synovial fluids and the ox sera, but there was no significant relationship between the somatomedin potency ratios and the globulin concentrations. The possible relevance of these findings to injury and disease in synovial joint is discussed. PMID:843111

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  14. Protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja H

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) perfuses the brain and spinal cord. CSF contains proteins and peptides important for brain physiology and potentially also relevant for brain pathology. Hence, CSF is the perfect source to search for new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of neurological diseases as well...

  15. Free Falling in Stratified Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Try; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Leaves falling in air and discs falling in water are examples of unsteady descents due to complex interaction between gravitational and aerodynamic forces. Understanding these descent modes is relevant to many branches of engineering and science such as estimating the behavior of re-entry space vehicles to studying biomechanics of seed dispersion. For regularly shaped objects falling in homogenous fluids, the motion is relatively well understood. However, less is known about how density stratification of the fluid medium affects the falling behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate the descent of discs in both pure water and in stable linearly stratified fluids for Froude numbers Fr 1 and Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 -2000. We found that stable stratification (1) enhances the radial dispersion of the disc at landing, (2) increases the descent time, (3) decreases the inclination (or nutation) angle, and (4) decreases the fluttering amplitude while falling. We conclude by commenting on how the corresponding information can be used as a predictive model for objects free falling in stratified fluids.

  16. The Challenge of Fluid Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. The Challenge of Fluid Flow - The Diversity of Flow Phenomena. Roddam Narasimha. General Article Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 67-79. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. The Challenge of Fluid Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 9. The Challenge of Fluid Flow - What One Can and Cannot Do. Roddam Narasimha. General Article Volume 10 Issue 9 September 2005 pp 6-22. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Observing magnetic objects in fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Tijmen Antoon Geert

    2018-01-01

    This thesis describes two topics dealing with objects moving through fluids. The first project considers centimetre-sized magnetic particles submerged in a turbulent water flow. We have studied how these particles interact with each other and self-assemble into clusters. By investigating their

  19. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 1. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming - Lift-based Propulsion. Jaywant H Arakeri. General Article Volume 14 Issue 1 January 2009 pp 32-46. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Mixed Fluid Conditions: Capillary Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-07-06

    Mixed fluid phenomena in porous media have profound implications on soil-atmosphere interaction, energy geotechnology, environmental engineering and infrastructure design. Surface tension varies with pressure, temperature, solute concentration, and surfactant concentration; on the other hand, the contact angle responds to interfacial tensions, surface topography, invasion velocity, and chemical interactions. Interfaces are not isolated but interact through the fluid pressure and respond to external fields. Jumps, snap-offs and percolating wetting liquids along edges and crevices are ubiquitous in real, non-cylindrical porous networks. Pore- and macroscale instabilities together with pore structure variability-and-correlation favor fluid trapping and hinder recovery efficiency. The saturation-pressure characteristic curve is affected by the saturation-history, flow-rate, the mechanical response of the porous medium, and time-dependent reactive and diffusive processes; in addition, there are salient differences between unsaturation by internal gas nucleation and gas invasion. Capillary forces add to other skeletal forces in the porous medium and can generate open-mode discontinuities when the capillary entry pressure is high relative to the effective stress. Time emerges as an important variable in mixed-fluid conditions and common quasi-static analyses may fail to capture the system response.

  2. Fluid Mechanics in Sommerfeld's School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sommerfeld's affiliation with fluid mechanics started when he began his career as an assistant of the mathematician Felix Klein at Göttingen. He always regarded fluid mechanics as a particular challenge. In 1904, he published a theory of hydrodynamic lubrication. Four years later, he conceived an approach for the analysis of flow instability (the Orr-Sommerfeld approach) as an attempt to account for the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The onset of turbulence also became a major challenge for some of his pupils, in particular Ludwig Hopf and Fritz Noether. Both contributed considerably to elaborate the Orr-Sommerfeld theory. Heisenberg's doctoral work was another attempt in this quest. When Sommerfeld published his lectures on theoretical physics during World War II, he dedicated one of the six volumes to the mechanics of continuous media. With chapters on boundary layer theory and turbulence, it exceeded the scope of contemporary theoretical physics—revealing Sommerfeld's persistent appreciation of fluid mechanics. He resorted to Prandtl's Göttingen school of fluid mechanics in order to stay abreast of the rapid development of these specialties.

  3. Supercritical fluids in chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, A.; Charton, F.

    2011-01-01

    When the pressure and temperature of a fluid are simultaneously higher than their critical point values, the fluid is said to be supercritical. Supercritical fluids have unique physico-chemical properties, in particular they have specific gravity close to that of liquids and viscosity close to that of gases. Carbon dioxide CO 2 (P c = 73.8 bars, T c = 31 C. degrees) is the most widely used compound in supercritical processes. In the nuclear field, chemistry inspired by liquid phase extraction has been developed for the supercritical CO 2 used as a diluent in association with extractant systems such as organo-phosphorus compounds or β-dike-tones. The Japanese Super-DIREX (Supercritical fluid Direct Extraction) process exploits the supercritical CO 2 - tri-n-butyl phosphate - nitric acid chemical system to extract actinides from spent fuel. In the United States, the same chemical system is utilized in an industrial facility to recover enriched uranium from incineration ash. Supercritical water H 2 O (P c = 221 bars, T c = 374 C. degrees) exhibits solvation properties close to those of organic solvents and can solubilise organic compounds that are insoluble in liquid water. In the nuclear field, CEA is studying oxidation in supercritical water, also called hydrothermal oxidation, for the mineralization of contaminated organic solvents. (A.C.)

  4. Fluid involvement in normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2000-04-01

    Evidence of fluid interaction with normal faults comes from their varied role as flow barriers or conduits in hydrocarbon basins and as hosting structures for hydrothermal mineralisation, and from fault-rock assemblages in exhumed footwalls of steep active normal faults and metamorphic core complexes. These last suggest involvement of predominantly aqueous fluids over a broad depth range, with implications for fault shear resistance and the mechanics of normal fault reactivation. A general downwards progression in fault rock assemblages (high-level breccia-gouge (often clay-rich) → cataclasites → phyllonites → mylonite → mylonitic gneiss with the onset of greenschist phyllonites occurring near the base of the seismogenic crust) is inferred for normal fault zones developed in quartzo-feldspathic continental crust. Fluid inclusion studies in hydrothermal veining from some footwall assemblages suggest a transition from hydrostatic to suprahydrostatic fluid pressures over the depth range 3-5 km, with some evidence for near-lithostatic to hydrostatic pressure cycling towards the base of the seismogenic zone in the phyllonitic assemblages. Development of fault-fracture meshes through mixed-mode brittle failure in rock-masses with strong competence layering is promoted by low effective stress in the absence of thoroughgoing cohesionless faults that are favourably oriented for reactivation. Meshes may develop around normal faults in the near-surface under hydrostatic fluid pressures to depths determined by rock tensile strength, and at greater depths in overpressured portions of normal fault zones and at stress heterogeneities, especially dilational jogs. Overpressures localised within developing normal fault zones also determine the extent to which they may reutilise existing discontinuities (for example, low-angle thrust faults). Brittle failure mode plots demonstrate that reactivation of existing low-angle faults under vertical σ1 trajectories is only likely if

  5. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  6. Instrumentation, measurements, and experiments in fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, E

    2007-01-01

    NEED AND OBJECTIVE OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDY Some Fluid Mechanics MeasurementsMeasurement SystemsSome of the Important Quantities Associated with FluidFlow MeasurementsFUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICSProperties of FluidsThermodynamic PropertiesSurface TensionAnalysis of Fluid FlowBasic and Subsidiary Laws for Continuous MediaKinematics of Fluid FlowStreamlinesPotential FlowViscous FlowsGas DynamicsWIND TUNNELSLow-Speed Wind TunnelsPower Losses in a Wind TunnelHigh-Speed Wind TunnelsHypersonic TunnelsInstrume

  7. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, M. J.; Chang, H.-C.; Leighton, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the major results of the grant "Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows." These include: 1) the demonstration that atomization in liquid/liquid shear flow is driven by a viscous shear instability that triggers the formation of a long thin sheet; 2) discovery of a new mode of interfacial instability for oscillatory two-layer systems whereby a mode that originates within the less viscous liquid phase causes interfacial deformation as the oscillation proceeds; 3) the demonstration that rivulet formation from gravity front occurs because the local front shape specified by gravity and surface tension changes from a nose to a wedge geometry, thus triggering a large increase in viscous resistance; and 4) extension of the studies on nonlinear wave evolution on falling films and in stratified flow, particularly the evolution towards large-amplitude solitary waves that tend to generate drops.

  8. Fluid-fluid interfacial mobility from random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Paul L.; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2017-12-01

    Dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics is used to perform the first calculation of fluid-fluid interfacial mobilities. The mobility is calculated from one-dimensional random walks of the interface by relating the diffusion coefficient to the interfacial mobility. Three different calculation methods are employed: one using the interfacial position variance as a function of time, one using the mean-squared interfacial displacement, and one using the time-autocorrelation of the interfacial velocity. The mobility is calculated for two liquid-liquid interfaces and one liquid-vapor interface to examine the robustness of the methods. Excellent agreement between the three calculation methods is shown for all the three interfaces, indicating that any of them could be used to calculate the interfacial mobility.

  9. Fundamental Issues of Nano-fluid Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Wesley C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will elucidate some of the behaviors of nano-fluids other than the abnormal conductivity enhancement, which are of importance to the experimental and engineering use of nano-fluids. Nano-fluid is the common name of any sol colloid involving nano-scale (less than 100 nm) sized particles dispersed within a base fluid. It has been shown previously that the dispersion of nano-particulate metallic oxides into water can increase thermal conductivity up to 30-40% over that of the base fluid and anomalously more than the mere weighed average of the colloid. There is a great potential for the use of nano-fluids as a way to enhance fluid/thermal energy transfer systems. Due to the recentness of nano-fluid science, there are still many issues which have not been fully investigated. This paper should act as a primer for the basic understanding of nano-fluid behavior. Particle size and colloid stability are of key importance to the functionality of nano-fluids. The pH and concentration/loading of nano-fluids can alter the size of the nano-particles and also the stability of the fluids. It will be shown through experiment and colloid theory the importance of these parameters. Furthermore, most of the existing literature uses volume percentage as the measure of particle loading, which can often be misleading. There will be discussion of this and other misleading ideas in nano-fluid science. (author)

  10. On the efficiency of a fluid-fluid centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apazidis, N.

    1984-05-01

    Efficiency of a separation process of two immiscible incompressible fluids of different densities occuring under the influence of a combined centrifugal and gravitational force field is investigated. The analysis is based on the set of equations for a rotating two-phase flow of a mixture as presented by Greenspan (1983). The geometry of the separation process is considered and the total flow of the separated phases evaluated. (author)

  11. High order ADER schemes for a unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics: Viscous heat-conducting fluids and elastic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Peshkov, Ilya; Romenski, Evgeniy; Zanotti, Olindo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • High order schemes for a unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics. • The mathematical model applies simultaneously to fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. • Viscous fluids are treated in the frame of hyper-elasticity as generalized visco-plastic solids. • Formal asymptotic analysis reveals the connection with the Navier–Stokes equations. • The distortion tensor A in the model appears to be well-suited for flow visualization. - Abstract: This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of the unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics recently proposed by Peshkov and Romenski [110], further denoted as HPR model. In that framework, the viscous stresses are computed from the so-called distortion tensor A, which is one of the primary state variables in the proposed first order system. A very important key feature of the HPR model is its ability to describe at the same time the behavior of inviscid and viscous compressible Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids with heat conduction, as well as the behavior of elastic and visco-plastic solids. Actually, the model treats viscous and inviscid fluids as generalized visco-plastic solids. This is achieved via a stiff source term that accounts for strain relaxation in the evolution equations of A. Also heat conduction is included via a first order hyperbolic system for the thermal impulse, from which the heat flux is computed. The governing PDE system is hyperbolic and fully consistent with the first and the second principle of thermodynamics. It is also fundamentally different from first order Maxwell–Cattaneo-type relaxation models based on extended irreversible thermodynamics. The HPR model represents therefore a novel and unified description of continuum mechanics, which applies at the same time to fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. In this paper, the direct connection between the HPR model and the classical hyperbolic–parabolic Navier

  12. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  13. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-01-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild's 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star--a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density--the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres

  14. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  15. CEE3500 - Fluid Mechanics, Spring 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Urroz, Gilberto E.

    2006-01-01

    Explores fluid properties, hydrostatics, fluid dynamics, similitude, energy and momentum principles, closed conduit flow, open channel flow, and flow measurement. Includes laboratory exercises in flow measurement, open channel flow, pipe friction, physical modeling, and data collection.

  16. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  17. Gel Evolution in Oil Based Drilling Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvold, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Drilling fluids make up an essential part of the drilling operation. Successful drilling operations rely on adequate drilling fluid quality. With the development of new drilling techniques such as long deviated sections and drilling in ultra-deep waters, the standard of required performance of the drilling fluids continue to increase. Narrow pressure margins and low tolerance for barite sag requires accurate prediction of the gel evolution in drilling fluids. Increased knowledge of how dri...

  18. Enhanced active swimming in viscoelastic fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Emily E; Lauga, Eric Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms often self propel in fluids with complex rheology. While past theoretical work indicates that fluid viscoelasticity should hinder their locomotion, recent experiments on waving swimmers suggest a possible non-Newtonian enhancement of locomotion. We suggest a physical mechanism, based on fluid-structure interaction, leading to swimming in a viscoelastic fluid at a higher speed than in a Newtonian one. Using Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model, we solve for the...

  19. Body fluids and salt metabolism - Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettinelli Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a high frequency of diarrhea and vomiting in childhood. As a consequence the focus of the present review is to recognize the different body fluid compartments, to clinically assess the degree of dehydration, to know how the equilibrium between extracellular fluid and intracellular fluid is maintained, to calculate the effective blood osmolality and discuss both parenteral fluid maintenance and replacement.

  20. Cosmological model with macroscopic spin fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Szydlowski, Marek; Krawiec, Adam

    2003-01-01

    We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model with some exotic perfect fluid with spin known as the Weyssenhoff fluid. The possibility that the dark energy may be described in part by the Weyssenhoff fluid is discussed. The observational constraint coming from supernovae type Ia observations is established. This result indicates that, whereas the cosmological constant is still needed to explain current observations, the model with spin fluid is admissible. For high redshifts $z ...

  1. Fluid Annotations in a Open World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zellweger, Polle Trescott; Bouvin, Niels Olof; Jehøj, Henning

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Documents use animated typographical changes to provide a novel and appealing user experience for hypertext browsing and for viewing document annotations in context. This paper describes an effort to broaden the utility of Fluid Documents by using the open hypermedia Arakne Environment...... to layer fluid annotations and links on top of abitrary HTML pages on the World Wide Web. Changes to both Fluid Documents and Arakne are required....

  2. Flow of Jeffrey Fluid through Narrow Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Nallapu, Santhosh; Radhakrishnamacharya, G.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with a two-fluid model for the flow of Jeffrey fluid in tubes of small diameters. It is assumed that the core region consists of Jeffrey fluid and Newtonian fluid in the peripheral region. Analytical expressions for velocity, effective viscosity, core hematocrit and mean hematocrit have been derived. The effects of various parameters, namely, Jeffrey parameter ({\\lambda}1), tube hematocrit (H0) and tube radius (a) on effective viscosity, core hematocrit and mean hemato...

  3. Advanced working fluids: Thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Gering, Kevin L.

    1990-10-01

    Electrolytes are used as working fluids in gas fired heat pump chiller engine cycles. To find out which molecular parameters of the electrolytes impact on cycle performance, a molecular theory is developed for calculating solution properties, enthalpies, vapor-liquid equilibria, and engine cycle performance. Aqueous and ammoniac single and mixed salt solutions in single and multisolvent systems are investigated. An accurate correlation is developed to evaluate properties for concentrated electrolyte solutions. Sensitivity analysis is used to determine the impact of molecular parameters on the thermodynamic properties and cycle performance. The preferred electrolytes are of 1-1 valence type, small ion size, high molecular weight, and in strongly colligative cosolvent. The operating windows are determined for a number of absorption fluids of industrial importance.

  4. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Phys. Fluids 25, 1949–1952) contains an infinite sum of modified Bessel functions. Using the approach by Okulov (Okulov, V. L. 1995 Russ. J. Eng. Thermophys. 5, 63–75) we obtain a closed-form approximation which is considerably easier to analyse. Critical points of the stream function can be found from...... function for the topology of the streamline pattern in incompressible flows. On this basis, we perform a comprehensive study of the topology of the flow field generated by a helical vortex filament in an ideal fluid. The classical expression for the stream function obtained by Hardin (Hardin, J. C. 1982...... the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. By including the self-induced velocity on the vortex filament by a localised induction approximation, the stream function is slightly modified...

  5. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboureur, Laurent; Ollero, Mario; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC). It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering) or highly specific (mass spectrometry) detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides) defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium. PMID:26090714

  6. Sensors for Fluid Leak Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Martinsanz, Gonzalo Pajares

    2015-01-01

    Fluid leak detection represents a problem that has attracted the interest of researchers, but not exclusively because in industries and services leaks are frequently common. Indeed, in water or gas supplies, chemical or thermal plants, sea-lines or cooling/heating systems leakage rates can cause important economic losses and sometimes, what it is more relevant, environmental pollution with human, animal or plant lives at risk. This last issue has led to increased national and international re...

  7. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  8. Fluid mechanics of environmental interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid Mechanics of Environmental Interfaces describes the concept of the environmental interface, defined as a surface between two either abiotic or biotic systems. These are in relative motion and exchange mass, heat and momentum through biophysical and/or chemical processes. These processes are fluctuating temporally and spatially.The book will be of interest to graduate students, PhD students as well as researchers in environmental sciences, civil engineering and environmental engineering, (geo)physics and applied mathematics.

  9. Simulation of cerebrospinal fluid transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, Jakub; Štěpáník, Z.; Kaczmarská, A.; Maršík, František; Brož, Z.; Otáhal, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, 11-12 (2007), s. 802-809 ISSN 0965-9978 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 112/2005; GA UK(CZ) 114/2005; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0958 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid * pulsation * mathematical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2007

  10. Birch's Law for fluid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaner, J.W.; Hixson, R.S.; Winkler, M.A.; Boness, D.A.; Brown, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    By comparing acoustic velocities in fluid metals over a very wide range of densities we have established Birch's Law as an approximate representation over the entire liquid range. For a given liquid metal the acoustic velocity is close to linear in density, with a slope determined by the atomic weight. The measurements include isobaric expansion to less than half normal density, ultrasonics on molten metals at 1 atmosphere, and shock melted metals to greater than twice normal density

  11. 14 CFR 27.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 27.1185 Section 27.1185... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 27.1185 Flammable fluids. (a..., other than a fuel tank, that is part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases must be isolated...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 29.1185 Section 29.1185... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 29.1185 Flammable fluids. (a) No tank or reservoir that is part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be in a...

  13. 14 CFR 121.255 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 121.255 Section 121.255..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.255 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in...

  14. Transient flows of a Burgers' fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.

    2005-12-01

    An analysis is performed to develop the analytical solutions for some unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows of a Burgers' fluid between two plates. A uniform magnetic field is applied transversely to the fluid motion. The exact solutions are given for three problems. Results for the velocity fields are discussed and compared with the flows of Oldroyd-B, Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian fluids. (author)

  15. Optimal composition of fluid-replacement beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a review of the fundamental aspects of body fluid balance and the physiological consequences of water imbalances, as well as discuss considerations for the optimal composition of a fluid replacement beverage across a broad range of applications. Early pioneering research involving fluid replacement in persons suffering from diarrheal disease and in military, occupational, and athlete populations incurring exercise- and/or heat-induced sweat losses has provided much of the insight regarding basic principles on beverage palatability, voluntary fluid intake, fluid absorption, and fluid retention. We review this work and also discuss more recent advances in the understanding of fluid replacement as it applies to various populations (military, athletes, occupational, men, women, children, and older adults) and situations (pathophysiological factors, spaceflight, bed rest, long plane flights, heat stress, altitude/cold exposure, and recreational exercise). We discuss how beverage carbohydrate and electrolytes impact fluid replacement. We also discuss nutrients and compounds that are often included in fluid-replacement beverages to augment physiological functions unrelated to hydration, such as the provision of energy. The optimal composition of a fluid-replacement beverage depends upon the source of the fluid loss, whether from sweat, urine, respiration, or diarrhea/vomiting. It is also apparent that the optimal fluid-replacement beverage is one that is customized according to specific physiological needs, environmental conditions, desired benefits, and individual characteristics and taste preferences.

  16. Lennard-Jones fluids in a nanochannel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartkamp, Remco; Luding, Stefan; Nuernberg Messe GmbH,

    2010-01-01

    During the past few decades molecular dynamics has been a widely applied tool to simulate fluid confined in micro/nano geometries. What makes interfacial fluids fundamentally different from the bulk fluid is the fact that their density varies considerably over microscopic distances. A class of such

  17. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium | Tumram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to test previously developed regression formulae for estimating death interval based on synovial fluid potassium and to assess its reliability in estimating death interval. Synovial fluid potassium was measured on a sample of 308 individuals. Death interval was regressed on synovial fluid ...

  18. Self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A sealed self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly is described for circulating fluid in the form of a gas coolant in a nuclear reactor, the power for the circulator being provided by a shaft located within the primary containment vessel. In such a system the reactor coolant is isolated from the fluid region at the far end of the drive shaft. (U.K.)

  19. Fluid Power/Basic Hydraulics. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbery, Richard

    This guide is designed to assist industrial vocational instructors in teaching a course on fluid power and basic hydraulics. Covered in the unit on the basics of fluid power and hydraulics are the following topics: the fundamentals of fluid power and hydraulics, basic hydraulic circuits, and servicing a hydraulic jack. The second unit, consisting…

  20. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nilesh Keshav Tumram

    2014-03-28

    Mar 28, 2014 ... tion of various body fluids immediately after death.2 Several investigators have tried to find the relation between death interval and postmortem biochemical changes in various body fluids such as blood, serum, cerebrospinal, vitreous, and syno- vial fluid.3 Various studies conducted till now have well estab-.

  1. Markov-modulated and feedback fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    1998-01-01

    In the last twenty years the field of Markov-modulated fluid queues has received considerable attention. In these models a fluid reservoir receives and/or releases fluid at rates which depend on the actual state of a background Markov chain. In the first chapter of this thesis we give a short

  2. Method of drilling with magnetorheological fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitha, P.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A method of drilling a bore hole into a stratum, wherein via the drill hole drilling fluid is introduced and fed to the drill head. In order to avoid dilution or leak-off of the drilling fluid the same is in accordance with the invention a magnetorheological drilling fluid, and when an undesirable

  3. Consistency argued students of fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viyanti; Cari; Suparmi; Winarti; Slamet Budiarti, Indah; Handika, Jeffry; Widyastuti, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving for physics concepts through consistency arguments can improve thinking skills of students and it is an important thing in science. The study aims to assess the consistency of the material Fluid student argmentation. The population of this study are College students PGRI Madiun, UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta and Lampung University. Samples using cluster random sampling, 145 samples obtained by the number of students. The study used a descriptive survey method. Data obtained through multiple-choice test and interview reasoned. Problem fluid modified from [9] and [1]. The results of the study gained an average consistency argmentation for the right consistency, consistency is wrong, and inconsistent respectively 4.85%; 29.93%; and 65.23%. Data from the study have an impact on the lack of understanding of the fluid material which is ideally in full consistency argued affect the expansion of understanding of the concept. The results of the study as a reference in making improvements in future studies is to obtain a positive change in the consistency of argumentations.

  4. Pleural fluid exchange in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashenko, Gregg J; Robichaux, Amy; Lee, Y C Gary; Sanders, Jonathan R; Roselli, Robert J; Light, Richard W

    2007-07-01

    The study was designed to better characterize pleural fluid absorption in rabbits with the following two objectives: to determine the relative absorption of saline versus high-protein solutions, and to identify the relative rates of absorption of dextran molecules of varying sizes. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits received a 12-mL intrapleural injection of saline solution and a 10% protein solution on opposite sides, each solution containing dextran molecules with varying MWs. At sacrifice at 1, 4, 8, 18 and 24 h, the volume of pleural fluid and the concentrations of the dextran molecules were determined. Saline was absorbed faster than the high-protein fluid (P higher than those in the protein solution at all times after injection (P = 0.005; P higher-MW dextrans were cleared more slowly than the lower-MW dextrans in a continuously graded manner. Saline was absorbed faster than a solution with a high protein content. There was a continuous spectrum in the rate of absorption of the dextran molecules, with the larger molecules being absorbed more slowly.

  5. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental equations of fluid mechanics are specific expressions of the principles of motion which are ascribed to Isaac Newton. Thus, the equations which form the framework of applied fluid mechanics or hydraulics are, in addition to the equation of continuity, the Newtonian equations of energy and momentum. These basic relationships are also the foundations of river hydraulics. The fundamental equations are developed in this report with sufficient rigor to support critical examinations of their applicability to most problems met by hydraulic engineers of the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. Physical concepts are emphasized, and mathematical procedures are the simplest consistent with the specific requirements of the derivations. In lieu of numerical examples, analogies, and alternative procedures, this treatment stresses a brief methodical exposition of the essential principles. An important objective of this report is to prepare the user to read the literature of the science. Thus, it begins With a basic vocabulary of technical symbols, terms, and concepts. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the language of modern fluid mechanics as it pertains to hydraulic engineering. The basic differential and integral equations of simple fluid motion are derived, and these equations are, in turn, used to describe the essential characteristics of hydrostatics and piezometry. The one-dimensional equations of continuity and motion are defined and are used to derive the general discharge equation. The flow net is described as a means of demonstrating significant characteristics of two-dimensional irrotational flow patterns. A typical flow net is examined in detail. The influence of fluid viscosity is described as an obstacle to the derivation of general, integral equations of motion. It is observed that the part played by viscosity is one which is usually dependent on experimental evaluation. It follows that the dimensionless ratios known as

  6. Computer simulation of evolution and interaction dynamics of the vortex structures in fluids including atmosphere and hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belashov, Vasily

    We study numerically the interaction of the vortex structures in the continuum, and, specifically, in fluids and plasmas in two-dimensional approximation, when the Euler-type equations are applicable, namely: begin{center} e_{i}d_{t}x_{i}=d_{y}_{i}H/B, e_{i}d_{t}y_{i}=-d_{x}_{i}H/B, d_{m}=d/dm; d_{t}rho+vnablarho=0, v= - [z, nablapsi]/B; Deltapsi - f = - phi where e_{i} is the strength (circulation) of discrete vortex or the charge per unit length of the filaments, phi is a z-component of vorticity zeta or charge density rho, and psi is a stream function or potential for the two-dimensional flow of inviscid fluid and guiding-centre plasma, respectively, and H is a Hamiltonian. Note, that in the continuum (fluid) model B=1 in the Hamiltonian eqs. Function f=0 for the continuum or quasi-particles (filaments) with Coulomb interaction models, and f=k(2) psi for a screened Coulomb interaction model. We consider here only case f=0, and generalization of our approximation for f=k(2) psi is rather trivial. For numerical simulation we used the contour dynamics method, to some extent modified. We fulfilled a number of the series of numerical simulations for study of two-vortex inter-action, the interaction in the N-vortex systems, including interaction between the vortex structures and the dust particles, and also interaction of two three-dimensional plane-rotating vortex structures within the framework of many-layer model of medium, in dependence on some parameters: initial distance between vortices, value and sign of their vorticities, and spatial configuration of the vortex system. The results obtained showed that for all cases in dependence on initial conditions two regimes of the interaction can be observed, namely: weak interaction with quasi-stationary evolution and active interaction with the "phase intermixing", when the evolution can lead to formation of complex forms of vorticity regions. The theoretical explanation of the effects, which we observed, is given on

  7. In vitro comparison of output fluid temperatures for room temperature and prewarmed fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, N; Towle Millard, H A; Lee, R A; Weng, H Y

    2014-08-01

    To determine if prewarmed intravenous fluids produce superior fluid output temperatures compared with room temperature fluids at common anaesthetic fluid rates for small animal patients. A prospective, randomised, in vitro fluid line test-vein study was performed. Nine flow rates were analysed (10, 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, 260 and 300 mL/hour) for room temperature fluids (21°C) and for five prewarmed fluids (40, 45, 50, 55 and 60°C). For each flow rate tested, room temperature fluids never exceeded 25°C at any time point for each trial (range 18 to 25°C). For each flow rate tested, prewarmed fluids never exceeded 25 · 5°C at any time point for each trial (range 18 to 25 · 5°C). The mean output fluid temperature of prewarmed fluids was significantly warmer than room temperature fluids only at 300 mL/hour for 40°C (P = 0 · 0012), 45°C (P = 0 · 004), 50°C (P = 0 · 0002), 55°C (P = 0 · 0001) and 60°C (P fluids (up to 60°C) compared with room temperature intravenous fluids at common anaesthetic fluid rates for small animals. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Leg fluid accumulation during prolonged sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, Daniel; Rubianto, Jonathan; Popovic, Milos; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-08-01

    The accumulation of fluid in the legs due to sedentariness can be a health risk in extreme cases. Negative health impacts associated with leg fluid accumulation include leg edema and risk of blood clots. Furthermore, fluid accumulating in the legs is accompanied by fluid shift into the upper body which is also associated with health risks such as: increased blood pressure when lying down, respiratory problems in people with heart failure, and increased sleep apnea. Understanding the pattern by which fluid accumulates in the legs can aid in the development of devices for reducing leg fluid accumulation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the time course of fluid accumulation over a two-and-half-hour seated period. Non-obese participants with sleep apnea and no other co-morbidities were included in the sample as part of a larger study. Leg fluid was measured continuously using a method of bioelectrical impedance. Participants were first asked to lie supine for 30 minutes as a washout, and then sat with their legs still for two and a half hours. The main finding of this study is that the pattern of leg fluid accumulation differed in the first 45 minutes compared to the latter 105 minutes. In the first 45 minutes, fluid accumulated according to first order exponential function. In the latter period, fluid accumulated according to a linear function. The initial exponential accumulation is likely due to the large increase in capillary pressure caused by rapid blood flow into the legs due to gravity, leading to substantial filtration of blood plasma into the tissue spaces. The latter linear portion likely represents continued slow filtration of fluid out of the vasculature and into the tissue spaces. This is the first study to show that fluid accumulation in the legs is a combination of an exponential and linear functions. The linear increase identifies that there is no foreseeable point in which leg fluid stops accumulating while sitting for prolonged periods.

  9. Pore fluid pressure and the seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. E.; Zhu, W.; Hirth, G.; Belzer, B.

    2017-12-01

    In the brittle crust, the critical shear stress required for fault slip decreases with increasing pore fluid pressures according to the effective stress criterion. As a result, higher pore fluid pressures are thought to promote fault slip and seismogenesis, consistent with observations that increasing fluid pressure as a result of wastewater injection is correlated with increased seismicity. On the other hand, elevated pore fluid pressure is also proposed to promote slow stable failure rather than seismicity along some fault zones, including during slow slip in subduction zones. Here we review recent experimental evidence for the roles that pore fluid pressure and the effective stress play in controlling fault slip behavior. Using two sets of experiments on serpentine fault gouge, we show that increasing fluid pressure does decrease the shear stress for reactivation under brittle conditions. However, under semi-brittle conditions as expected near the base of the seismogenic zone, high pore fluid pressures are much less effective at reducing the shear stress of reactivation even though deformation is localized and frictional. We use an additional study on serpentinite to show that cohesive fault rocks, potentially the product of healing and cementation, experience an increase in fracture energy during faulting as fluid pressures approach lithostatic, which can lead to more stable failure. Structural observations show that the increased fracture energy is associated with a greater intensity of transgranular fracturing and delocalization of deformation. Experiments on several lithologies indicate that the stabilizing effect of fluid pressure occurs independent of rock composition and hydraulic properties. Thus, high pore fluid pressures have the potential to either enhance seismicity or promote stable faulting depending on pressure, temperature, and fluid pressure conditions. Together, the results of these studies indicate that pore fluid pressure promotes

  10. Scintigraphy of the cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touya, E.; Perillo, W.; Paez, A.; Osorio, A.; Ferrando, R.; Lago, G.; Garcia Guelfi, A.; Ferrari, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eight years of experience in scintigraphy of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with 113 Insup(m)-colloid is reported. Two hundred cases are discussed. On the basis of the clinical diagnosis, the cases are divided into five groups: (1) spinal cord compression; (2) hydrocephalus of the adult and child; (3) control of extracranial CSF shunts; (4) CSF fistula; and (5) brain tumour. It is concluded that the radiopharmaceutical used has no limitations except in the study of the hydrocephalus of the adult. For those services remote from the production centres, it is a convenient option for CSF scintigraphy. (author)

  11. Ferroelectric Fluid Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An active valve is controlled and driven by external electrical actuation of a ferroelectric actuator to provide for improved passage of the fluid during certain time periods and to provide positive closure of the valve during other time periods. The valve provides improved passage in the direction of flow and positive closure in the direction against the flow. The actuator is a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature, said dome shaped actuator having a rim and an apex. and a dome height measured from a plane through said rim said apex that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and an outside surface of said dome shaped actuator.

  12. Scattering methods in complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Summarising recent research on the physics of complex liquids, this in-depth analysis examines the topic of complex liquids from a modern perspective, addressing experimental, computational and theoretical aspects of the field. Selecting only the most interesting contemporary developments in this rich field of research, the authors present multiple examples including aggregation, gel formation and glass transition, in systems undergoing percolation, at criticality, or in supercooled states. Connecting experiments and simulation with key theoretical principles, and covering numerous systems including micelles, micro-emulsions, biological systems, and cement pastes, this unique text is an invaluable resource for graduate students and researchers looking to explore and understand the expanding field of complex fluids.

  13. Fundamental fluid mechanics and magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hosking, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended to enable postgraduate research students to enhance their understanding and expertise in Fluid Mechanics and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), subjects no longer treated in isolation. The exercises throughout the book often serve to provide additional and quite significant knowledge or to develop selected mathematical skills, and may also fill in certain details or enhance readers’ understanding of essential concepts. A previous background or some preliminary reading in either of the two core subjects would be advantageous, and prior knowledge of multivariate calculus and differential equations is expected.

  14. Black holes from fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Subhaneil

    2009-12-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence in a regime where the field theory is well described by fluid mechanics to study large black holes in asymptotically locally anti de Sitter spaces. In particular, we use the fluid description to study the thermodynamics of the black holes and the existence of exotic horizon topologies in higher dimensions. First we test this method by comparing large rotating black holes in global AdSD spaces to stationary solutions of the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations on SD-2. Reading off the equation of state of this fluid from the thermodynamics of non-rotating black holes, we proceed to construct the nonlinear spinning solutions of fluid mechanics that are dual to rotating black holes. In all known examples, the thermodynamics and the local stress tensor of our solutions are in precise agreement with the thermodynamics and boundary stress tensor of the spinning black holes. Our results yield predictions for the thermodynamics of all large black holes in all theories of gravity on AdS spaces, for example, IIB string theory on AdS5 x S 5 and M theory on AdS4 x S7 and AdS7 x S 4. We then construct solutions to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations that describe the long wavelength collective dynamics of the deconfined plasma phase of N = 4 Yang Mills theory compactified down to d = 3 on a Scherk-Schwarz circle. Our solutions are stationary, axially symmetric spinning balls and rings of plasma. These solutions, which are dual to (yet to be constructed) rotating black holes and black rings in Scherk-Schwarz compactified AdS 5, and have properties that are qualitatively similar to those of black holes and black rings in flat five dimensional gravity. We also study the stability of these solutions to small fluctuations, which provides an indirect method for studying Gregory-Laflamme instabilities. We also extend the construction to higher dimensions, allowing one to study the existence of new black hole topologies and their phase diagram.

  15. Complex fluids modeling and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Saramito, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the modeling of complex fluids, including many common substances, such as toothpaste, hair gel, mayonnaise, liquid foam, cement and blood, which cannot be described by Navier-Stokes equations. It also offers an up-to-date mathematical and numerical analysis of the corresponding equations, as well as several practical numerical algorithms and software solutions for the approximation of the solutions. It discusses industrial (molten plastics, forming process), geophysical (mud flows, volcanic lava, glaciers and snow avalanches), and biological (blood flows, tissues) modeling applications. This book is a valuable resource for undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics, mechanical engineering and physics.

  16. ICFD - Interdisciplinary Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankey, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Interdisciplinary Computational Fluid Dynamics is that field in which the Navier-Stokes equations are coupled to another set of equations for the solution of interaction problems. Although it is currently possible to apply numerical algorithms and grid generation methods to such problems, together with the conservation form for governing equations and arrangements of field data which exploit vector processor hardwares, novel technology is called for in the modeling of complex interface boundary conditions and the incorporation of constitutive relationships for state variables and transport processes. It is also necessary to model such subgrid scale phenomena as turbulence, evaporation, atomization, devolatization, nucleation, chemical reactions, surface tension, and surface roughness. 33 references

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD....... The guidebook is also written for people working with CFD which have to be more aware of how this numerical method is applied in the area of ventilation. The guidebook has, for example, chapters that are very important for CFD quality control in general and for the quality control of ventilation related...

  18. Fluid mechanics. 5. enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalide, W.

    1980-01-01

    Originally written for students in the field of engineering, this book may also be of use in the engineering practice. The subject is presented with a view to practice. Fundamental theorems of fluid mechanics are presented without going too much into theory. The chapter on supersonic flow has been extended in the fifth edition as this is a field of great importance in engineering. The new chapter on gas dynamics takes account of these processes in turbine and compressure construction and aeronautical engineering. There is an appendix with material data, characteristic values, flow resistance coefficients, diagrams and two tables with rated pressure loss values for pipeline flow. (orig./GL)

  19. Experimental Approach to Teaching Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Catalina

    2015-11-01

    For the last 15 years we have promoted experimental work even in the theoretical courses. Fluids appear in the Physics curriculum of the National University of Mexico in two courses: Collective Phenomena in their sophomore year and Continuum Mechanics in their senior year. In both, students are asked for a final project. Surprisingly, at least 85% choose an experimental subject even though this means working extra hours every week. Some of the experiments were shown in this congress two years ago. This time we present some new results and the methodology we use in the classroom. I acknowledge support from the Physics Department, Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM.

  20. Sensors for Fluid Leak Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Pajares Martinsanz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluid leak detection represents a problem that has attracted the interest of researchers, but not exclusively because in industries and services leaks are frequently common. Indeed, in water or gas supplies, chemical or thermal plants, sea-lines or cooling/heating systems leakage rates can cause important economic losses and sometimes, what it is more relevant, environmental pollution with human, animal or plant lives at risk. This last issue has led to increased national and international regulations with different degrees of severity regarding environmental conservation.[...

  1. Fluid discrimination based on rock physics templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir fluid discrimination is an indispensable part of seismic exploration. Reliable fluid discrimination helps to decrease the risk of exploration and to increase the success ratio of drilling. There are many kinds of fluid indicators that are used in fluid discriminations, most of which are single indicators. But single indicators do not always work well under complicated reservoir conditions. Therefore, combined fluid indicators are needed to increase accuracies of discriminations. In this paper, we have proposed an alternative strategy for the combination of fluid indicators. An alternative fluid indicator, the rock physics template-based indicator (RPTI) has been derived to combine the advantages of two single indicators. The RPTI is more sensitive to the contents of fluid than traditional indicators. The combination is implemented based on the characteristic of the fluid trend in the rock physics template, which means few subjective factors are involved. We also propose an inversion method to assure the accuracy of the RPTI input data. The RPTI profile is an intuitionistic interpretation of fluid content. Real data tests demonstrate the applicability and validity. (paper)

  2. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  3. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won; Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  4. Semiclassical statistical mechanics of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Y.; Sinha, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of calculating the equilibrium properties of fluids in the semiclassical limit when the quantum effects are small is studied. Particle distribution functions and thermodynamic quantities are defined in terms of the Slater sum and methods for evaluating the Slater sum are discussed. It is shown that the expansion method employing the usual Wigner-Kirkwood or Hemmer-Jancovici series is not suitable to treat the properties of the condensed state. Using the grand canonical ensemble and functional differentiation technique we develop cluster expansion series of the Helmholtz free energy and pair correlation functions. Using topological reduction we transform these series to more compact form involving a renormalized potential or a renormalized Mayer function. Then the convergence of the two series is improved by an optimal choice of the renormalized potential or the Mayer function. Integral equation theories are derived and used to devise perturbation methods. An application of these methods to the calculation of the virial coefficients, thermodynamic properties and the pair correlation function for model fluids is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Amniotic fluid embolism mortality rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the mortality rate of amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) using population-based studies and case series. A literature search was conducted using the two key words: 'amniotic fluid embolism (AFE)' AND 'mortality rate'. Thirteen population-based studies were evaluated, as well as 36 case series including at least two patients. The mortality rate from population-based studies varied from 11% to 44%. When nine population-based studies with over 17 000 000 live births were aggregated, the maternal mortality rate was 20.4%. In contrast, the mortality rate of AFE in case series varies from 0% to 100% with numerous rates in between. The AFE mortality rate in population-based studies varied from 11% to 44% with the best available evidence supporting an overall mortality rate of 20.4%. Data from case series should no longer be used as a basis for describing the lethality of AFE. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Synovial fluid over the centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the most meaningful historical topics on the study of synovial fluid, by starting from the Greco- Roman Medicine, up to Paracelsus (1493-1541, who introduced the term “synovia” to name the intra-articular humour. Afterwards, some till now unreported historical sources are recorded, e.g., a short text by the Italian XVIII century physician Giambattista Contoli (“Breve Instruzione sopre il Glutine, ò Colla…, 1699”. Then, in keeping with some recent researches, a brief history of arthrocentesis is outlined, by considering the first procedures, which should have been performed in Mexico, during the precolonial period. Moreover, the first chemical analysis of synovial fluid, as carried out by the French chemist Jean-Louis Margueron (1792, and the first modern study on the synovial membrane by Marie-François-Xavier Bichat (1800 are explained. Finally, some XIX century investigations concerning the synovial pharmacodynamics, in particular an Italian one based on the elimination of certain chemical substances through the synovial membrane, are discussed.

  7. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  8. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  9. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  10. Parallel plasma fluid turbulence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Drake, J.B.; Lynch, V.E.; Newman, D.E.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of plasma turbulence and transport is a complex problem of critical importance for fusion-relevant plasmas. To this day, the fluid treatment of plasma dynamics is the best approach to realistic physics at the high resolution required for certain experimentally relevant calculations. Core and edge turbulence in a magnetic fusion device have been modeled using state-of-the-art, nonlinear, three-dimensional, initial-value fluid and gyrofluid codes. Parallel implementation of these models on diverse platforms--vector parallel (National Energy Research Supercomputer Center's CRAY Y-MP C90), massively parallel (Intel Paragon XP/S 35), and serial parallel (clusters of high-performance workstations using the Parallel Virtual Machine protocol)--offers a variety of paths to high resolution and significant improvements in real-time efficiency, each with its own advantages. The largest and most efficient calculations have been performed at the 200 Mword memory limit on the C90 in dedicated mode, where an overlap of 12 to 13 out of a maximum of 16 processors has been achieved with a gyrofluid model of core fluctuations. The richness of the physics captured by these calculations is commensurate with the increased resolution and efficiency and is limited only by the ingenuity brought to the analysis of the massive amounts of data generated

  11. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  12. Arachnoid cysts do not contain cerebrospinal fluid: A comparative chemical analysis of arachnoid cyst fluid and cerebrospinal fluid in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaland Øystein A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arachnoid cyst (AC fluid has not previously been compared with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the same patient. ACs are commonly referred to as containing "CSF-like fluid". The objective of this study was to characterize AC fluid by clinical chemistry and to compare AC fluid to CSF drawn from the same patient. Such comparative analysis can shed further light on the mechanisms for filling and sustaining of ACs. Methods Cyst fluid from 15 adult patients with unilateral temporal AC (9 female, 6 male, age 22-77y was compared with CSF from the same patients by clinical chemical analysis. Results AC fluid and CSF had the same osmolarity. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium or glucose. We found significant elevated concentration of phosphate in AC fluid (0.39 versus 0.35 mmol/L in CSF; p = 0.02, and significantly reduced concentrations of total protein (0.30 versus 0.41 g/L; p = 0.004, of ferritin (7.8 versus 25.5 ug/L; p = 0.001 and of lactate dehydrogenase (17.9 versus 35.6 U/L; p = 0.002 in AC fluid relative to CSF. Conclusions AC fluid is not identical to CSF. The differential composition of AC fluid relative to CSF supports secretion or active transport as the mechanism underlying cyst filling. Oncotic pressure gradients or slit-valves as mechanisms for generating fluid in temporal ACs are not supported by these results.

  13. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, in CO2 streams can lead to potential capital and energy savings. However, predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and impurities into geological formations requires the understanding of the phase equilibrium and fluid-fluid interactions. To meet this need, we developed a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) for the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system at 373.15 concentration of NaCl up to 6 mol/kgH2O. The EoS allows us to predict equilibrium composition in both liquid and vapor phases, fugacity coefficients of components, and phase densities. Predictions show that inclusion of H2S in CO2 streams may lead to two-phase flow in pipelines. For H2S-CO2 mixtures at a given temperature the bubble and dew pressures decrease with increasing H2S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. Furthermore, the EoS can be incorporated into reservoir simulators so that the dynamic development of mixed fluid plumes in the reservoir can be simulated. Accurate modeling of fluid-mineral interactions must confront unresolved uncertainties of silicate dissolution - precipitation reaction kinetics. Most prominent among these uncertainties is the well-known lab-field apparent discrepancy in dissolution rates. Although reactive transport models that simulate the interactions between reservoir rocks and brine, and their attendant effects on porosity and permeability changes, have proliferated, whether these results have acceptable uncertainties are unknown. We have conducted a series of batch experiments at elevated temperatures and numerical simulations of coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions. The results show that taking into account of reaction coupling is able

  14. Carbon Dioxide: The Other Planetary Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, S.; Gamez, D.; Shock, E.

    2016-12-01

    Cometary and interstellar ices have carbon dioxide to water mole ratios of up to 0.3. When melted, such high levels of carbon dioxide cannot all be dissolved in the aqueous phase and instead partition into a CO2-rich (carbonic) fluid. This implies that during the accretion and formation of planetary systems carbonic fluids are not only possible, but common. In fact, they make up the atmosphere of Venus, are found bubbling out of Champagne Vent in the Pacific Ocean, and are documented by metamorphic fluid inclusions. Examination of phase diagrams reveals the conditions where carbonic fluids will exist or predominate. Carbonic fluids are predicted to exist in Earth's subduction zones and under the ice of small ocean worlds. CO2 had previously been shown to completely dissolve into NH­­3­-H­­2O oceans on small icy bodies by forming ammonium carbonate, but the newer measurements of CO2­ abundances indicate that not all of the CO2 can partition into the aqueous fluid as ammonium carbonate. The remaining CO2 would necessarily form a separate carbonic fluid making it likely that liquid CO2 would be a major oceanic component on some small icy bodies. The enhanced solubility of nonpolar and slightly polar organic compounds in carbonic fluids relative to aqueous fluids means that generation, transport, and deposition processes can be greatly enhanced in those cases where carbonic fluids occur. As an example, the solubility of benzoic acid, a polar compound, is about an order of magnitude greater in carbonic than in aqueous fluids, which is surprising given that water is a polar solvent and carbon dioxide is a nonpolar solvent. Anthracene, a nonpolar compound, has an even greater solubility difference between carbonic and aqueous fluids at approximately four orders of magnitude. Highly polar compounds, including most of the building blocks of life, are more soluble in aqueous fluids than in carbonic fluids. The solubility difference of organic molecules in carbonic

  15. Knotted solutions, from electromagnetism to fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel W. F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Nastase, Horatiu; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Knotted solutions to electromagnetism and fluid dynamics are investigated, based on relations we find between the two subjects. We can write fluid dynamics in electromagnetism language, but only on an initial surface, or for linear perturbations, and we use this map to find knotted fluid solutions, as well as new electromagnetic solutions. We find that knotted solutions of Maxwell electromagnetism are also solutions of more general nonlinear theories, like Born-Infeld, and including ones which contain quantum corrections from couplings with other modes, like Euler-Heisenberg and string theory DBI. Null configurations in electromagnetism can be described as a null pressureless fluid, and from this map we can find null fluid knotted solutions. A type of nonrelativistic reduction of the relativistic fluid equations is described, which allows us to find also solutions of the (nonrelativistic) Euler’s equations.

  16. 'Liberal' vs. 'restrictive' perioperative fluid therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Secher, N H; Kehlet, H

    2009-01-01

    clinical trials and cited studies, comparing two different fixed fluid volumes on post-operative clinical outcome in major surgery. Studies were assessed for the type of surgery, primary and secondary outcome endpoints, the type and volume of administered fluid and the definition of the perioperative...... period. Also, information regarding perioperative care and type of anaesthesia was assessed. RESULTS: In the seven randomized studies identified, the range of the liberal intraoperative fluid regimen was from 2750 to 5388 ml compared with 998 to 2740 ml for the restrictive fluid regimen. The period...... for fluid therapy and outcome endpoints were inconsistently defined and only two studies reported perioperative care principles and discharge criteria. Three studies found an improved outcome (morbidity/hospital stay) with a restrictive fluid regimen whereas two studies found no difference and two studies...

  17. Performance Comparison and Selection of Transformer Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Yang; Liu Shi Jia

    2016-01-01

    Transformer fluid directly affects the working state of the components and the cooling efficiency of transformer. There are three kinds of transformer fluid used for electric locomotive, EMU and suburban rail vehicles: mineral oil, silicone liquid and synthetic ester based insulating oil. In this paper, the three kinds of oil are compared from the fire safety, environmental protection, reliability and low maintenance. It provides a strong basis for the selection of transformer fluid. By compr...

  18. A Magnetorheological Fluid Damper for Rotor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Forte, P.; Paternò, M.; Rustighi, E.

    2004-01-01

    Even though we are still far from industrial applications, in the last decade there has been increasing attention directed toward the employment of electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) fluids in active bearings and active squeeze film dampers in rotordynamics. MR fluids react to magnetic fields undergoing reversible changes in their mechanical characteristics, viscosity, and stiffness in particular. In previous literature, some applications of ER fluids in rotor squeeze film da...

  19. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2017-05-09

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  20. 4-H NFPA Fluid Power Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnett, Erika D

    2016-01-01

    The 4-H NFPA Fluid Power Challenge partnered Purdue Polytechnic Institute and Indiana 4-H with the National Fluid Power Association and Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power to provide teams of Indiana youth in 6-8th grades with opportunity to learn about hydraulics, engineering design, and other STEM skills. This created an opportunity to give youth a learning experience with STEM through hands-on, experiential learning activities. Youth experienced a one day workshop in which they wo...

  1. Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Talalay, P.G.; Gundestrup, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on the data published in research report of P. G. Talalay and N. S. Gundestrup; Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling : A review. Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, 1999,120p. In the practice of deep ice core drilling only three types of bore-hole fluids have been used : 1) petroleum oil products (fuels or solvents) containing densifier, 2) aqueous ethylene glycol or ethanol solutions, 3) n-butyl acetate. The main parameters of drilling fluids are 1) density and fluid top...

  2. Introduction to thermo-fluids systems design

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia McDonald, André

    2012-01-01

    A fully comprehensive guide to thermal systems design covering fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, heat transfer and thermodynamic power cycles Bridging the gap between the fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and thermodynamics, and the practical design of thermo-fluids components and systems, this textbook focuses on the design of internal fluid flow systems, coiled heat exchangers and performance analysis of power plant systems. The topics are arranged so that each builds upon the previous chapter to convey to the reader that topics are not stand-alone i

  3. Effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, P.R.; Duke, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on drilling fluids, also called drilling muds, which are essential to drilling processes in the exploration and production of oil and gas from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). These fluids are usually discharged from drilling platforms into surrounding waters of the OCS and are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a program carried out by the EPA Environmental research Laboratory at Gulf Breeze, Florida, diverse marine species as well as microbiotic and macrobiotic communities were studied. Drilling fluids were toxic to marine organisms in certain concentrations and exposure regimes. Furthermore, the fluids adversely affected the benthos physically by burying them or by altering the substrates. Toxicity of the drilling-fluid components, used drilling fluids from active Gulf of Mexico sites, and laboratory-prepared drilling fluids varied considerably. for example 96-h LC 50 s were from 25 μ liter -1 to > 1500 μl liter -1 for clams, larval lobsters, mysids, and grass shrimp. In most instances, mortality was significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the diesel-oil content of the fluids collected from the Gulf of Mexico. Data and model simulations suggest a rapid dilution of drilling fluids released into OCS waters, resulting in concentrations below the acute-effect concentration for the water column organisms tested

  4. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  5. Fluid Regulation for Life and Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Allyn

    Fluid regulation for life and performance is examined in this chapter. First, however, the nature and function of water in human physiology as it pertains to maintaining fluid balance on a daily basis must be examined. The relation of water to human performance is also examined as the body's requirement for this fluid before, during, and after exercise is explored. In addition, other fluid sources, such as carbohydrate drinks, are examined for their efficacy, including specifically formulated beverages marketed for use during exercise. Finally, recommendations for application in the athletic environment are given.

  6. Fundamental trends in fluid-structure interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, Giovanni P

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of a fluid with a solid body is a widespread phenomenon in nature, occurring at different scales and different applied disciplines. Interestingly enough, even though the mathematical theory of the motion of bodies in a liquid is one of the oldest and most classical problems in fluid mechanics, mathematicians have, only very recently, become interested in a systematic study of the basic problems related to fluid-structure interaction, from both analytical and numerical viewpoints. ""Fundamental Trends in Fluid-Structure Interaction"" is a unique collection of important papers wr

  7. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  8. Connection Between Thermodynamics and Dynamics of Simple Fluids in Pores: Impact of Fluid-Fluid Interaction Range and Fluid-Solid Interaction Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-08-03

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate how the range of fluid-fluid (adsorbate-adsorbate) interactions and the strength of fluid-solid (adsorbate-adsorbent) interactions impact the strong connection between distinct adsorptive regimes and distinct self-diffusivity regimes reported in [Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Langmuir 2013 , 29 , 14527-14535]. Although increasing the fluid-fluid interaction range changes both the thermodynamics and the dynamic properties of adsorbed fluids, the previously reported connection between adsorptive filling regimes and self-diffusivity regimes remains. Increasing the fluid-fluid interaction range leads to enhanced layering and decreased self-diffusivity in the multilayer-formation regime but has little effect on the properties within film-formation and pore-filling regimes. We also find that weakly attractive adsorbents, which do not display distinct multilayer formation, are hard-sphere-like at super- and subcritical temperatures. In this case, the self-diffusivity of the confined and bulk fluid has a nearly identical scaling-relationship with effective density.

  9. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart–lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid esuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately.

  10. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  11. Mechanics of solids and fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatise on the mechanics of solids and fluids, with a significant application to structural mechanics. In reading through the text, I can not help being impressed with Dr. Ziegler's command of both historical and contemporary developments of theoretical and applied mechanics. The book is a unique volume which contains information not easily found throughout the related literature. The book opens with a fundamental consideration of the kinematics of particle motion, followed by those of rigid body and deformable medium .In the latter case, both small and finite deformation have been presented concisely, paving the way for the constitutive description given later in the book. In both chapters one and two, the author has provided sufficient applications of the theoretical principles introduced. Such a connection between theory and appication is a common theme throughout every chapter, and is quite an attractive feature of the book

  12. A viable dark fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhateeb, Esraa

    2018-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model based on a generalization of the equation of state proposed by Nojiri and Odintsov (2004) and Štefančić (2005, 2006). We argue that this model works as a dark fluid model which can interpolate between dust equation of state and the dark energy equation of state. We show how the asymptotic behavior of the equation of state constrained the parameters of the model. The causality condition for the model is also studied to constrain the parameters and the fixed points are tested to determine different solution classes. Observations of Hubble diagram of SNe Ia supernovae are used to further constrain the model. We present an exact solution of the model and calculate the luminosity distance and the energy density evolution. We also calculate the deceleration parameter to test the state of the universe expansion.

  13. A primer on quantum fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Barenghi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this primer is to cover the essential theoretical information, quickly and concisely, in order to enable senior undergraduate and beginning graduate students to tackle projects in topical research areas of quantum fluids, for example, solitons, vortices and collective modes. The selection of the material, both regarding the content and level of presentation, draws on the authors analysis of the success of relevant research projects with newcomers to the field, as well as of the students feedback from many taught and self-study courses on the subject matter. Starting with a brief historical overview, this text covers particle statistics, weakly interacting condensates and their dynamics and finally superfluid helium and quantum turbulence. At the end of each chapter (apart from the first) there will be some exercises. Detailed solutions can be made available to instructors upon request to the authors. .

  14. Fluid Mechanics Optimising Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a new ``green'' approach in the synthesis of organic chemicals with many industrial applications in biodiesel generation, cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The VFD is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate with a jet feeding drops of liquid reactants to the base of the tube. The aim of this project is to explain the fluid mechanics of the VFD that influence the rate of reactions. The reaction rate is intimately related to the intense shearing that promotes collision between reactant molecules. In the VFD, the highest shears are found at the bottom of the tube in the Rayleigh and the Ekman layer and at the walls in the Stewardson layers. As a step towards optimising the performance of the VFD we present experiments conducted in order to establish the minimum drop volume and maximum rotation rate for maximum axisymmetric spreading without fingering instability. PhD candidate, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

  15. Relativistic thermodynamics of Fluids. l

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havas, P.; Swenson, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    In 1953, Stueckelberg and Wanders derived the basic laws of relativistic linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemically reacting fluids from the relativistic local conservation laws for energy-momentum and the local laws of production of substances and of nonnegative entropy production by the requirement that the corresponding currents (assumed to depend linearly on the derivatives of the state variables) should not be independent. Generalizing their method, we determine the most general allowed form of the energy-momentum tensor T/sup alphabeta/ and of the corresponding rate of entropy production under the same restriction on the currents. The problem of expressing this rate in terms of thermodynamic forces and fluxes is discussed in detail; it is shown that the number of independent forces is not uniquely determined by the theory, and seven possibilities are explored. A number of possible new cross effects are found, all of which persist in the Newtonian (low-velocity) limit. The treatment of chemical reactions is incorporated into the formalism in a consistent manner, resulting in a derivation of the law for rate of production, and in relating this law to transport processes differently than suggested previously. The Newtonian limit is discussed in detail to establish the physical interpretation of the various terms of T/sup alphabeta/. In this limit, the interpretation hinges on that of the velocity field characterizing the fluid. If it is identified with the average matter velocity following from a consideration of the number densities, the usual local conservation laws of Newtonian nonequilibrium thermodynamics are obtained, including that of mass. However, a slightly different identification allows conversion of mass into energy even in this limit, and thus a macroscopic treatment of nuclear or elementary particle reactions. The relation of our results to previous work is discussed in some detail

  16. Fluid replacement during marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, Tim

    2003-09-01

    During endurance exercise, about 75% of the energy produced from metabolism is in the form of heat, which cannot accumulate. The remaining 25% of energy available can be used for movement. As running pace increases, the rate of heat production increases. Also, the larger one's body mass, the greater the heat production at a particular pace. Sweat evaporation provides the primary cooling mechanism for the body, and for this reason athletes are encouraged to drink fluids to ensure continued fluid availability for evaporation and circulatory flow to the tissues. Elite level runners could be in danger of heat illness if they race too quickly in hot/humid conditions and may collapse at the end of their event. Most marathon races are scheduled at cooler times of the year or day, however, so that heat loss to the environment is adequate. Typically, this postrace collapse is due simply to postural hypotension from decreased skeletal muscle massage of the venous return circulation to the heart on stopping. Elite athletes manage adequate hydration by ingesting about 200-800 mL/hour, and such collapse is rare. Athletes "back in the pack" are moving at a much slower pace, however, with heat accumulation unlikely and drinking much easier to manage. They are often urged to drink "as much as tolerable," ostensibly to prevent dehydration from their hours out on the race course. Excessive drinking among these participants can lead to hyponatremia severe enough to cause fatalities. A more reasonable approach is to urge these participants not to drink as much as possible but to drink ad libitum (according to the dictates of thirst) no more than 400-800 mL/hour.

  17. Fluid-structure thermal coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, J. [Adtech, N3S, Tokyo (Japan); Gasser, D. [Simulog, N3S, Estet, Simail, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yvelyne (France)

    1997-12-31

    On many occasions thermal exchange takes place between a structure and a fluid flowing in its neighbourhood. Such phenomena can be very complex, and numerical simulation is then an interesting means to understand them better. In that context, SIMULOG simulated the air flow around a radiator using the coupled numerical codes N3S and SYRTHES, which are developed at EDF/LNH. While N3S computes the air flow and thermal convection around the radiator`s fins, SYRTHES computes heat conduction in the radiator. The N3S-SYRTHES coupling process takes into account the heat transfer at the fluid/solid interface. Two computations were performed, corresponding to air flow rates values between the fins of 0.0518 m{sup 3}/s and 0.0865 m{sup 3}/s, and a radiator temperature of 40 deg C, the air flows along the Z axis from the bottom to the top of the radiator. A rise in temperature, along the Z axis, takes place in the air and in the radiator. The maximum temperature reached inside the radiator is 55 deg C for the lowest flow and 51 deg C for the highest one. The average decrease of the air and radiator temperature is about 5 deg C when the flow rate raises from 0.0518 m{sup 3}/s to 0.0865 m{sup 3}/s. Such a simulation gives important information for the conception and the performance evaluation of this process where the main objective is to control the maximum temperature. (authors)

  18. A Biocompatible Synthetic Lung Fluid Based on Human Respiratory Tract Lining Fluid Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Abhinav; Terakosolphan, Wachirun; Hassoun, Mireille; Vandera, Kalliopi-Kelli; Novicky, Astrid; Harvey, Richard; Royall, Paul G.; Bicer, Elif Melis; Eriksson, Jonny; Edwards, Katarina; Valkenborg, Dirk; Nelissen, Inge; Hassall, Dave; Mudway, Ian S.; Forbes, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise a biorelevant simulated lung fluid (SLF) based on the composition of human respiratory tract lining fluid. SLF was compared to other media which have been utilized as lung fluid simulants in terms of fluid structure, biocompatibility and performance in inhalation biopharmaceutical assays. Methods: The structure of SLF was investigated using cryo-transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and Langmuir isotherms. Biocompatibility with A549 alveola...

  19. Differentiating benign from malignant bone tumors using fluid-fluid level features on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hong; Cui, Jian Ling; Cui, Sheng Jie; Sun, Ying Cal; Cui, Feng Zhen [Dept. of Radiology, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei Province Biomechanical Key Laborary of Orthopedics, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-12-15

    To analyze different fluid-fluid level features between benign and malignant bone tumors on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was approved by the hospital ethics committee. We retrospectively analyzed 47 patients diagnosed with benign (n = 29) or malignant (n = 18) bone tumors demonstrated by biopsy/surgical resection and who showed the intratumoral fluid-fluid level on pre-surgical MRI. The maximum length of the largest fluid-fluid level and the ratio of the maximum length of the largest fluid-fluid level to the maximum length of a bone tumor in the sagittal plane were investigated for use in distinguishing benign from malignant tumors using the Mann-Whitney U-test and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Fluid-fluid level was categorized by quantity (multiple vs. single fluid-fluid level) and by T1-weighted image signal pattern (high/low, low/high, and undifferentiated), and the findings were compared between the benign and malignant groups using the chi2 test. The ratio of the maximum length of the largest fluid-fluid level to the maximum length of bone tumors in the sagittal plane that allowed statistically significant differentiation between benign and malignant bone tumors had an area under the ROC curve of 0.758 (95% confidence interval, 0.616-0.899). A cutoff value of 41.5% (higher value suggests a benign tumor) had sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 83%. The ratio of the maximum length of the largest fluid-fluid level to the maximum length of a bone tumor in the sagittal plane may be useful to differentiate benign from malignant bone tumors.

  20. Intravenous fluids in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Strait, Kelly M; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Shu-Xia; Mody, Purav; Partovian, Chohreh; Coca, Steven G; Kim, Nancy; Horwitz, Leora I; Testani, Jeffrey M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to determine the use of intravenous fluids in the early care of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF) who are treated with loop diuretics. Intravenous fluids are routinely provided to many hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with HF to 346 hospitals from 2009 to 2010. We assessed the use of intravenous fluids during the first 2 days of hospitalization. We determined the frequency of adverse in-hospital outcomes. We assessed variation in the use of intravenous fluids across hospitals and patient groups. Among 131,430 hospitalizations for HF, 13,806 (11%) were in patients treated with intravenous fluids during the first 2 days. The median volume of administered fluid was 1,000 ml (interquartile range: 1,000 to 2,000 ml), and the most commonly used fluids were normal saline (80%) and half-normal saline (12%). Demographic characteristics and comorbidities were similar in hospitalizations in which patients did and did not receive fluids. Patients who were treated with intravenous fluids had higher rates of subsequent critical care admission (5.7% vs. 3.8%; p fluid treatment varied widely across hospitals (range: 0% to 71%; median: 12.5%). Many patients who are hospitalized with HF and receive diuretics also receive intravenous fluids during their early inpatient care, and the proportion varies among hospitals. Such practice is associated with worse outcomes and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluid-to-fluid scaling of heat transfer phenomena with supercritical pressure fluids: Results from RANS analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucciarelli, A.; Ambrosini, W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A methodology for fluid-to-fluid scaling of heat transfer to supercritical fluids is proposed. • The methodology is based on a dimensionless formulation. • A first assessment of the methodology is obtained on the basis of RANS calculations. - Abstract: A methodology for fluid-to-fluid scaling of predicted heat transfer phenomena with supercritical pressure fluids is being developed with the aid of RANS calculations. The proposed approach rephrases and further develops a previous attempt, whose preliminary validation was limited by the considerable inaccuracy of the adopted turbulence models when applied to deteriorated heat transfer. A recent improvement in the accuracy of heat transfer predictions allowed this further step, also based on the broader experience gained in the mean time in the prediction of experimental data. Four representative experimental data cases related to water and CO 2 , for which reasonably accurate results have been obtained by RANS turbulence equations, are addressed by changing the working fluid and imposing an approximate invariance of the dimensionless trends of fluid enthalpy at the wall and in bulk. Intrinsic differences in the thermal behaviour of the considered fluids (e.g., in the Prandtl number) are reflected in corresponding changes in the value of a single dimensionless parameter, following an indication coming from simple theoretical considerations. Results of RANS models for different fluids are used as a preliminary support to the validity of the approach, showing an interesting persistence of heat transfer behaviour in dimensionless form in the four addressed cases. The present uncertainties in the proposed methodology are mainly a consequence of the limited accuracy of the adopted simulation models. The obtained indications can be used in planning experimental or better resolved computational analyses (LES, DNS) which may better clarify the promising features of this approach.

  2. Two-fluid model for the simultaneous flow of colloids and fluids in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    To describe the velocities of particles such as ions, protein molecules and colloids dispersed or dissolved in a fluid, it is important to also describe the forces acting on the fluid, including pressure gradients and friction of the fluid with the particles and with the porous media through which

  3. Relativistic elasticity of stationary fluid branes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armas, J.; Obers, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid mechanics can be formulated on dynamical surfaces of arbitrary codimension embedded in a background space-time. This has been the main object of study of the blackfold approach in which the emphasis has primarily been on stationary fluid configurations. Motivated by this approach we show un...

  4. PRESSURE ANALYSIS AND FLUID CONTACT PREDICTION FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As pressure data was not acquired in the water leg of the reservoir, pressure gradient analysis was done with the field-wide hydrostatic profile for contact and fluid prediction. Also, an evaluation of the possibility of having an oil rim within the region of fluid-type uncertainty was carried out. The predicted results revealed that ...

  5. Rotating Polygons on a Fluid Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Tomas; Jansson, Thomas; Haspang, Martin

    The free surface of a rotating fluid will, due to the centrifugal force, be pressed radially outward. If the fluid rotates as a rigid body in a cylindrical container the surface will assume a parabolic shape. If, however, the flow is driven by rotating the bottom plate, the axial symmetry can break...

  6. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann scheme for relativistic fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza, M.; Boghosian, B.; Herrmann, H. J.; Succi, S.

    2009-01-01

    A Lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically verified through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shock-wave propagation in viscous quark-gluon plasmas. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the main advantages of Lattice Boltzmann methods to the relativistic context, which seems particularly useful for the simulation of relativistic fluids in complicated geometries.

  8. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  9. Black holes as lumps of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarelli, Marco M.; Dias, Oscar J.C.; Emparan, Roberto; Klemm, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The old suggestive observation that black holes often resemble lumps of fluid has recently been taken beyond the level of an analogy to a precise duality. We investigate aspects of this duality, and in particular clarify the relation between area minimization of the fluid vs. area maximization of the black hole horizon, and the connection between surface tension and curvature of the fluid, and surface gravity of the black hole. We also argue that the Rayleigh-Plateau instability in a fluid tube is the holographic dual of the Gregory-Laflamme instability of a black string. Associated with this fluid instability there is a rich variety of phases of fluid solutions that we study in detail, including in particular the effects of rotation. We compare them against the known results for asymptotically flat black holes finding remarkable agreement. Furthermore, we use our fluid results to discuss the unknown features of the gravitational system. Finally, we make some observations that suggest that asymptotically flat black holes may admit a fluid description in the limit of large number of dimensions.

  10. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…

  11. Core-shell particles at fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchcic, C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of particles as stabilizers for foams and emulsions. Applying hard particles for stabilization of fluid interface is referred to as Pickering stabilization. By using hard particles instead of surfactants and polymers, fluid interfaces can be effectively

  12. MRI of subdural fluid collections in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Takagi, Takuji; Nagai, Hajime; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of subdural fluid collectioin in infants were examined by MRI (0.5 Tesla). The findings of MRI were classified into 3 groups as follows: Group I: Blood component is observed in the entire subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group II: Blood component is observed in a part of the subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group III: Subdural fluid consists of pure CSF (12 cases, 60 %). In general, operative treatment should be considered for cases which have blood components in the subdural space and/or symptoms and signs of increased ICP. In group I, operation was performed on 2 cases (50 %). In group II, subdural fluid collections were associated with dilated subarachnoid spaces and 2 cases were operated on in this group (50 %). In group III, only one case was operated on (8.3 %) and subdural fluid collections disappeared spontaneously in 4 cases of this group. The precise anatomical location of subdural fluid collections could not be decided in several cases even by MRI. The cases which had blood components, tended to demonstrate membranes frequently on MRI. However, the existence of blood components did not affect the DQ S significantly. The prognosis of subdural fluid collection is supposedly related to the degree of preexistent brain damage. (author)

  13. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  14. Supercritical fluids technology. Pt. 1 General topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    Supercritical fluids technology is among the emerging 'clean' technologies, that allows the minimization in the use of chemical and thermic treatments and products irradiation, diminishing the quantity of liquid wastes to be treated. In this first article phase equilibria thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of transport phenomena are reviewed [it

  15. Introducing fluid dynamics using dimensional analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of fluid dynamics can be introduced using dimensional analysis, combined with some basic physical principles. This approach is concise and allows exploration of both the laminar and turbulent limits—including important phenomena that are not normally dealt with when fluid dynamics...

  16. Joint distributions for interacting fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Dirk; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    Motivated by recent traffic control models in ATM systems, we analyse three closely related systems of fluid queues, each consisting of two consecutive reservoirs, in which the first reservoir is fed by a two-state (on and off) Markov source. The first system is an ordinary two-node fluid tandem

  17. Fluid composition analysis device and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates in particular to a device for determining one or more fluid properties of a fluid. The device preferably comprises a flow distributor comprising a cavity, an inlet to the cavity, one or more outlets from the cavity, and one or more flow deflecting elements present in the cav...

  18. Byzantine Parthenogenesis as Hierotopy of Fluid Brilliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    Images Borne on Dewy Lightning Byzantine παρθένογένεσις as Hierotopy of Fluid Brilliance......Images Borne on Dewy Lightning Byzantine παρθένογένεσις as Hierotopy of Fluid Brilliance...

  19. Scale interactions in compressible rotating fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 6 (2014), s. 1703-1725 ISSN 0373-3114 Keywords : compressible fluid * rotating fluid * singular limit Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10231-013-0353-7

  20. Rindler fluid with weak momentum relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimphun, Sunly; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Park, Chanyong; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2018-01-01

    We realize the weak momentum relaxation in Rindler fluid, which lives on the time-like cutoff surface in an accelerating frame of flat spacetime. The translational invariance is broken by massless scalar fields with weak strength. Both of the Ward identity and the momentum relaxation rate of Rindler fluid are obtained, with higher order correction in terms of the strength of momentum relaxation. The Rindler fluid with momentum relaxation could also be approached through the near horizon limit of cutoff AdS fluid with momentum relaxation, which lives on a finite time-like cutoff surface in Anti-de Sitter(AdS) spacetime, and further could be connected with the holographic conformal fluid living on AdS boundary at infinity. Thus, in the holographic Wilson renormalization group flow of the fluid/gravity correspondence with momentum relaxation, the Rindler fluid can be considered as the Infrared Radiation(IR) fixed point, and the holographic conformal fluid plays the role of the ultraviolet(UV) fixed point.

  1. Thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program subroutine FLUID calculates thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in liquid, gas, or two-phase (liquid/gas) conditions. Program determines thermodynamic state from assigned values for temperature and density, pressure and density, temperature and pressure, pressure and entropy, or pressure and enthalpy.

  2. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balankin, Alexander S., E-mail: abalankin@ipn.mx [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Mena, Baltasar [Laboratorio de Ingeniería y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Sisal, Yucatán, 97355 (Mexico); Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2017-02-12

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived. - Highlights: • Equations of Stokes flow of Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. • Pressure distribution in the Newtonian fractal fluid is derived. • Velocity distribution in Poiseuille flow of fractal fluid is found. • Velocity distribution in a steady Couette flow is established.

  3. Fast fluid registration of medical images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus

    1996-01-01

    This paper offers a new fast algorithm for non-rigid viscous fluid registration of medical images that is at least an order of magnitude faster than the previous method by (Christensen et al., 1994). The core algorithm in the fluid registration method is based on a linear elastic deformation...

  4. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  5. Bifurcated SEN with Fluid Flow Conditioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rivera-Perez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the performance of a novel design for a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle (SEN used for the continuous casting of steel slabs. The proposed design incorporates fluid flow conditioners attached on SEN external wall. The fluid flow conditioners impose a pseudosymmetric pattern in the upper zone of the mold by inhibiting the fluid exchange between the zones created by conditioners. The performance of the SEN with fluid flow conditioners is analyzed through numerical simulations using the CFD technique. Numerical results were validated by means of physical simulations conducted on a scaled cold water model. Numerical and physical simulations confirmed that the performance of the proposed SEN is superior to a traditional one. Fluid flow conditioners reduce the liquid free surface fluctuations and minimize the occurrence of vortexes at the free surface.

  6. Fluid structure interaction in tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Jedrzejewski, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    A lot of industrial components contain tube bundles immersed in a fluid. The mechanical analysis of such systems requires the study of the fluid structure interaction in the tube bundle. Simplified methods, based on homogenization methods, have been developed to analyse such phenomenon and have been validated through experimental results. Generally, these methods consider only the fluid motion in a plan normal to the bundle axis. This paper will analyse, in a first part, the fluid structure interaction in a tube bundle through a 2D finite element model representing the bundle cross section. The influence of various parameters like the bundle size, and the bundle confinement will be studied. These results will be then compared with results from homogenization methods. Finally, the influence of the 3D fluid motion will be investigated, in using simplified methods. (authors). 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  7. FORMATE-BASED FLUIDS: FORMULATION AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Formate-based fluids has been successfully used in over hunders HPHT well operations since they introduced in field practice. They have many advantages when compared with conventional HPHT drilling and completion fluids such as: minimal formation damage, maintenance of additve properties at high temperatures, reduced hydraulic flow resistance, low potential for differential sticking, naturally lubricating, very low corrosion rates, biodegradable and pose little risk to the environment etc. Formate-based fluids can be applied during deep slim hole drilling, shale drilling, reservoir drilling, salt and gas hydrate formations drilling. The laboratory research was carried out to evaluate the rheological behavior of formate-based fluids as a function of temperature. Formate-based fluids were formulated using potassium formate brine, xanthan polymer, PAC, starch and calcium carbonate. Experimental results show that potassium formate improves the thermal stability of polymers.

  8. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  9. Bubble dynamics equations in Newton fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J

    2008-01-01

    For the high-speed flow of Newton fluid, bubble is produced and expanded when it moves toward the surface of fluid. Bubble dynamics is a very important research field to understand the intrinsic feature of bubble production and motion. This research formulates the bubble expansion by expansion-local rotation transformation, which can be calculated by the measured velocity field. Then, the related dynamic equations are established to describe the interaction between the fluid and the bubble. The research shows that the bubble production condition can be expressed by critical vortex value and fluid pressure; and the bubble expansion rate can be obtained by solving the non-linear dynamic equation of bubble motion. The results may help the related research as it shows a special kind of fluid motion in theoretic sense. As an application example, the nanofiber radium-voltage relation and threshold voltage-surface tension relation in electrospinning process are discussed

  10. Single-particle Schroedinger fluid. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a single quantal particle moving in a time-dependent external potential well is formulated specifically to emphasize and develop the fluid dynamical aspects of the matter flow. This idealized problem, the single-particle Schroedinger fluid, is shown to exhibit already a remarkably rich variety of fluid dynamical features, including compressible flow and line vortices. It provides also a sufficient framework to encompass simultaneously various simplified fluidic models for nuclei which have earlier been postulated on an ad hoc basis, and to illuminate their underlying restrictions. Explicit solutions of the single-particle Schroedinger fluid problem are studied in the adiabatic limit for their mathematical and physical implications (especially regarding the collective kinetic energy). The basic generalizations for extension of the treatment to the many-body Schroedinger fluid are set forth

  11. CT evaluation of the intraperitoneal fluid distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, J.; Rzymski, K.; Czarnecki, R.

    1982-07-01

    The intraperitoneal distribution of fluid and its detectability with a CT scanning were investigated in 13 patients during infusion of dialysate for peritoneal dialysis. An ascending pattern of spread i.e. from the lesser pelvis through the inframesocolic compartment to the supramesocolic compartment prevailed. Accumulation of fluid in the perihepatic space and in Morison's pouch as a function of fluid volume is at best approximated by a parabolic curve. Fifty to two hundred fifty ml. of fluid were detectable with a CT scanning in supine position in the majority of cases within the perihepatic space and Morison's pouch. The lowest amount of fluid detectable in the peritoneal cavity - 25 ml. was found between the anterior abdominal wall and bowel loops in right decubitus.

  12. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumley, J.L.; Van Dyke, M.; Reed, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in theoretical, experimental, and computational fluid mechanics are discussed in a collection of annual review essays. Topics addressed include Lagrangian ocean studies, drag reduction in nature, the hydraulics of rotating strait and sill flow, analytical methods for the development of Reynolds-stress closures in turbulence, and exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Consideration is given to the theory of hurricanes, flow phenomena in CVD of thin films, particle-imaging techniques for experimental fluid mechanics, symmetry and symmetry-breaking bifurcations in fluid dynamics, turbulent mixing in stratified fluids, numerical simulation of transition in wall-bounded shear flows, fractals and multifractals in fluid turbulence, and coherent motions in the turbulent boundary layer

  13. Tribodynamic Modeling of Digital Fluid Power Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per

    In fluid power engineering, efficiency and reliability optimization have become a major objective. The interest in using fluid power transmission in wind and wave energy applications are producing requirements concerning efficiency and reliability in order to compete with other transmission systems...... design methods and tools are important to the development of digital fluid power machines. The work presented in this dissertation is part of a research program focusing on the development of digital fluid power MW-motors for use in hydraulic drive train in wind turbines. As part of this development....... In fluid power motoring and pumping units, a significant problem is that loss mechanisms do not scale down with diminishing power throughput. Although machines can reach peak efficiencies above 95%, the actual efficiency during operation, which includes part-load situations, is much lower. The invention...

  14. Phase behavior of patchy spheroidal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpency, T N; Gunton, J D; Rickman, J M

    2016-12-07

    We employ Gibbs-ensemble Monte Carlo computer simulation to assess the impact of shape anisotropy and particle interaction anisotropy on the phase behavior of a colloidal (or, by extension, protein) fluid comprising patchy ellipsoidal particles, with an emphasis on critical behavior. More specifically, we obtain the fluid-fluid equilibrium phase diagram of hard prolate ellipsoids having Kern-Frenkel surface patches under a variety of conditions and study the critical behavior of these fluids as a function of particle shape parameters. It is found that the dependence of the critical temperature on aspect ratio for particles having the same volume can be described approximately in terms of patch solid angles. In addition, ordering in the fluid that is associated with particle elongation is also found to be an important factor in dictating phase behavior.

  15. Viscoelastic gravel-pack carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmer, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a fluid to flow adequately into the formation during gravel-pack treatments is critical to achieving a good pack. Recent studies have indicated ''fish-eyes'' and/or ''microgels'' present in many polymer gelled carrier fluids will plug pore throats, leading to impaired leakoff and causing formation damage. Intensive manipulation of the polymer gelled fluid using shear and filter devices will help remove the particles, but it adds to the cost of the treatment in terms of equipment and manpower. Excessive shear will degrade the polymer leading to poor gravel suspension, while too little shear will cause filtration problems. A gelled carried fluid using a viscoelastic surfactant system has been found to leak off very efficiently to the formation, and cause no formation damage, without the use of shear/filter devices. Viscoelastic surfactant-base gelled fluids develop viscosity because of the association of surfactant moloecules into large rod-shaped aggregates. There is no hydration of polymer involved, so fish-eyes and microgels will not be formed in the viscoelastic fluid. A surfactant-base system having a yield point allows the gravel carrying properties to be much better than fluids gelled with conventional polymer systems (hydroxyethylcellulose [HEC]). For example, a gravel carried fluid gelled with 80 lb HEC/1,000 gal has a viscosity of about 400 cp at 170 sec/sup -1/; a viscoelastic surfactant-base system having only one-half the viscosity still flows into cores about four times more efficiently than the HEC-base fluid. The rheology, leakoff, formation damage and mixing properties of a viscoelastic, surfactant-base, gravel-pack carrier fluid are discussed

  16. Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Venstermans, C.; Gielen, J.; Parizel, P.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, F.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Duffel/Mechelen (Belgium); Vogel, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Schepper, A.M.A. de [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors. Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels. Extension (single, multiple and proportion of the lesion occupied by fluid-fluid levels) and signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging of fluid-fluid levels were determined. In all patients, pathologic correlation was available. Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), ''brown tumor'' (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases). Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma ''not otherwise specified'' (2 cases). In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively. Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can

  17. Rigid Body Sampling and Individual Time Stepping for Rigid-Fluid Coupling of Fluid Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an efficient and simple rigid-fluid coupling scheme with scientific programming algorithms for particle-based fluid simulation and three-dimensional visualization. Our approach samples the surface of rigid bodies with boundary particles that interact with fluids. It contains two procedures, that is, surface sampling and sampling relaxation, which insures uniform distribution of particles with less iterations. Furthermore, we present a rigid-fluid coupling scheme integrating individual time stepping to rigid-fluid coupling, which gains an obvious speedup compared to previous method. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  18. Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P. van; Venstermans, C.; Gielen, J.; Parizel, P.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Vogel, J.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L.; Schepper, A.M.A. de

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors. Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels. Extension (single, multiple and proportion of the lesion occupied by fluid-fluid levels) and signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging of fluid-fluid levels were determined. In all patients, pathologic correlation was available. Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), ''brown tumor'' (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases). Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma ''not otherwise specified'' (2 cases). In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively. Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can occur in a wide range of bone and soft

  19. Heat exchanger with intermediate evaporating and condensing fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraas, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    A shell and tube-type heat exchanger, such as a liquid sodium-operated steam generator for use in nuclear reactors, comprises a shell containing a primary fluid tube bundle, a secondary fluid tube bundle at higher elevation, and an intermediate fluid vaporizing at the surface of the primary fluid tubes and condensing at the surface of the secondary fluid tubes

  20. Heat exchanger with intermediate evaporating and condensing fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Arthur P.

    1978-01-01

    A shell and tube-type heat exchanger, such as a liquid sodium-operated steam generator for use in nuclear reactors, comprises a shell containing a primary fluid tube bundle, a secondary fluid tube bundle at higher elevation, and an intermediate fluid vaporizing at the surface of the primary fluid tubes and condensing at the surface of the secondary fluid tubes.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid and ependymal neurophysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A G; Zimmerman, E A

    1973-05-01

    Neurophysins are "carrier proteins" associated with vasopressin and oxytocin in the neurohypophyseal system. The release of these hormone associated proteins may serve as an indicator of posterior pituitary function. This report describes the measurement of neurophysin in human and monkey plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by radioimmunoassay. Tissue neurophysin is also localized in monkey brain by the immunoperoxidase technique. CSF from 68 patients and five monkeys had easily measurable neurophysin in every sample. The concentration of neurophysin in CSF and in plasma of man is 5.4+/-0.30 ng/ml (mean and SEM) and 0.69+/-0.04, respectively. The two means were significantly different (P dogs did not enter CSF. Using the immunoperoxidase technique, we found neurophysin not only in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, their tracts, and the posterior pituitary, but also in the specialized ependymal tanycytes of the infundibular recess of the third ventricle and in the external layer of the median eminence where capillaries drain into hypophyseal portal vessels. Neurophysin may pass from CSF to portal vessels via tanycytes in a manner similar to that postulated for releasing factors.

  2. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesseling, P.

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state- of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and how to overcome it by means of slope-limited schemes is discussed. An introduction is given to efficient iterative solution methods, using Krylov subspace and multigrid acceleration. Many pointers are given to recent literature, to help the reader to quickly reach the current research frontier. (orig.)

  3. Fluid mechanics of environmental interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Preface Preface of the first editionBiographies of the authors Part one - Preliminaries1. Environmental fluid mechanics: Current issues and future outlook B. Cushman-Roisin, C. Gualtieri & D.T. MihailovicPart two - Processes at atmospheric interfaces2. Point source atmospheric diffusionB. Rajkovic, I. Arsenic & Z. Grsic3. Air-sea interaction V. Djurdjevic & B. Rajkovic4. Modelling of flux exchanges between heterogeneous surfaces and atmosphere D.T. Mihailovic & D. Kapor5. Desert dust uptake-transport and deposition mechanisms - impacts of dust on radiation, clouds and precipitation G. Kallos, P. Katsafados & C. SpyrouPart three - Processes at water interfaces6. Gas-transfer at unsheared free-surfaces C. Gualtieri & G. Pulci Doria7. Advective diffusion of air bubbles in turbulent water flows H. Chanson8. Exchanges at the bed sediments-water column interface F.A. Bombardelli & P.A. Moreno9. Surface water and streambed sediment interaction: The hyporheic exchange D. Tonina10. Environm...

  4. Stability of fluid motions I

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Daniel D

    1976-01-01

    The study of stability aims at understanding the abrupt changes which are observed in fluid motions as the external parameters are varied. It is a demanding study, far from full grown"whose most interesting conclusions are recent. I have written a detailed account of those parts of the recent theory which I regard as established. Acknowledgements I started writing this book in 1967 at the invitation of Clifford Truesdell. It was to be a short work on the energy theory of stability and if I had stuck to that I would have finished the writing many years ago. The theory of stability has developed so rapidly since 1967 that the book I might then have written would now have a much too limited scope. I am grateful to Truesdell, not so much for the invitation to spend endless hours of writing and erasing, but for the generous way he has supported my efforts and encouraged me to higher standards of good work. I have tried to follow Truesdell's advice to write this work in a clear and uncomplicated style. This is not ...

  5. Protein-stabilized magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soenen, S.J.H. [Interdisciplinary Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven-Campus Kortrijk, University Campus, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Hodenius, M.; Schmitz-Rode, T. [Helmholtz Institute, Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); De Cuyper, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven-Campus Kortrijk, University Campus, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Marcel.DeCuyper@KULeuven-Kortrijk.be

    2008-03-15

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and egg yolk phosvitin on magnetic fluid particles was investigated. Incubation mixtures were prepared by mixing an alkaline suspension of tetramethylammonium-coated magnetite cores with protein solutions at various protein/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, followed by dialysis against a 5 mM TES buffer (pH 7.0), after which separation of bound and non-bound protein by high-gradient magnetophoresis was executed. Both the kinetic profiles as well as the isotherms of adsorption strongly differed for both proteins. In case of the spherical BSA, initially, abundant adsorption occurred, then it decreased and-at high protein concentrations-it slowly raised again. In contrast, with the highly phosphorylated phosvitin, binding slowly started and the extent of protein adsorption remained unchanged both as a function of time and phosvitin concentration. Competition binding studies, using binary protein mixtures composed of equal weight amounts of BSA and phosvitin, showed that binding of the latter protein is 'unrealistically' high. Based on the geometry of the two proteins, putative pictures on their orientation on the particle's surface in the various experimental conditions were deduced.

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction of hops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN ZEKOVIC

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cultivars of hop were extracted by the method of supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (SFE–CO2 as extractant. The extraction (50 g of hop sample using a CO2 flow rate of 97.725 L/h was done in the two steps: 1. extraction at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (sample of series A was obtained and, after that, the same sample of hop was extracted in the second step: 2. extraction at 300 bar and 40 °C for 2.5 h (sample of series B was obtained. The Magnum cultivar was chosen for the investigation of the extraction kinetics. For the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the obtained hop extracts, the GC-MS method was used. Two of four themost common compounds of hop aroma (a-humulene and b-caryophyllene were detected in samples of series A. In addition, isomerized a-acids and a high content of b-acids were detected. The a-acids content in the samples of series B was the highest in the extract of the Magnum cultivar (it is a bitter variety of hop. The low contents of a-acids in all the other hop samples resulted in extracts with low a-acids content, i.e., that contents were under the prescribed a-acids content.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid circulation and hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Ville; Vanninen, Ritva; Rauramaa, Tuomas

    2017-01-01

    Hydrocephalus (HC) is classically defined as dynamic imbalance between the production and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leading to enlarged ventricles. Potential causative factors include various brain disorders like tumors causing obstruction of CSF flow within the ventricular system or the subarachnoid space. Classification of HC is based on the site of CSF flow obstruction guiding optimal treatment, with endoscopic third ventriculostomy in intraventricular obstruction and CSF shunt in communicating HC. Another clinically relevant classification is acute and chronic; the most frequent chronic form is idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). The reported incidence of HC varies according to the study population and classification used. The incidence of congenital HC is approximately 0.4-0.6/1,000 newborns and the annual incidence of iNPH varies from 0.5/100,000 to 5.5/100,000. Radiologically, ventricular dilatation may be nonspecific, and differentiation of iNPH from other neurodegenerative diseases may be ambiguous. There are no known specific microscopic findings of HC but a systematic neuropathologic examination is needed to detect comorbid diseases and possible etiologic factors of HC. Depending on the etiology of HC, there are several nonspecific signs potentially to be seen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluid dynamics of Ribbed Annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, G. E.; Pink, R. J.; Condie, K. G.; McEligot, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Typical advanced gas-cooled reactor designs use periodic spacer ribs to center rods in circular cooling channels, e.g., as for control rods (General Atomics and others) and fuel rods (HTTR). In contrast to classical studies of axisymmetric annuli, the flow becomes three-dimensional but is typically periodic in the circumferential direction and - in some cases - in the streamwise direction. Fundamental measurements have been obtained for two idealizations of these complex geometries: an annulus with three ribs circumferentially and one with four. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was employed with INEEL's unique Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) flow facility to determine the velocity and turbulence fields. The initial experiment was aimed at obtaining benchmark data to test the capabilities of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes to handle ribbed annular geometries without the complications of turbulent transport. The Reynolds number was about 1120. These conditions correspond to some stages during a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) event. Power spectral densities were obtained to determine the eddy shedding frequency downstream of the ribs. For the second experiment LDV measurements were obtained in another ribbed-annular model at a higher flow rate. For this nominally turbulent flow, evidence of laminarization appears in the flow converging to pass between ribs. The measurements indicated flow details which could be useful for assessment of CFD codes

  9. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D Graham; Nowell, Geoff M; Ottley, Chris J

    2015-08-20

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle.

  10. Working fluid selection for organic Rankine cycles - Impact of uncertainty of fluid properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    of processmodels and constraints 2) selection of property models, i.e. Penge Robinson equation of state 3)screening of 1965 possible working fluid candidates including identification of optimal process parametersbased on Monte Carlo sampling 4) propagating uncertainty of fluid parameters to the ORC netpower output......This study presents a generic methodology to select working fluids for ORC (Organic Rankine Cycles)taking into account property uncertainties of the working fluids. A Monte Carlo procedure is described as a tool to propagate the influence of the input uncertainty of the fluid parameters on the ORC....... The net power outputs of all the feasible working fluids were ranked including their uncertainties. The method could propagate and quantify the input property uncertainty of the fluidproperty parameters to the ORC model, giving an additional dimension to the fluid selection process. In the given analysis...

  11. Dynamic simulation of wavy-stratified two-phase flow with the one-dimensional two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullmer, William D.

    conditions. This appears to result in non-convergence when particular solutions at a specific time are compared using different numerical discretizations. However, it is shown that the chaotic solutions exhibit an invariant spectrum in wavenumber space that can be used to assess the convergence of solutions. This concept is applied to a Kelvin-Helmholtz experiment of kerosene and liquid water in a tilted channel whereby many slightly different simulations are run and averaged to determine the mean behavior. Comparisons to experimental data are favorable; especially considering the limitations of applying a one-dimensional model to a dynamic simulation of wavy channel flow. When the analysis is extended to consider air-water flows, several additional challenges are encountered related to the long-wavelength inviscid Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which is the instability inherent to the one-dimensional two-fluid model. The transition from stratified to wavy flow is significantly over-predicted, i.e., requires a larger velocity to become unstable than observed experimentally. The wave sheltering model of Brauner and Maron (1993) is included in the interfacial shear model and calibrated for flow in a rectangular channel. However, when the unstable flow regime is simulated a wavy flow pattern does not develop as in the liquid-liquid case. Due to the near absence of inertia in the lighter gas phase, viscosity and surface tension are unable to bound the growth of disturbances within the physical limitations of the channel geometry. Transitions to regions of single phase flow result, indicating a slug flow pattern where wavy flow should exist. A novel approach is taken where the instability mechanism, here the sheltering force, is adjusted based on local geometric conditions, namely the void fraction gradient. Comparison to data shows promising results, although a large degree of uncertainty in such an approach remains due to a lack of local experimental data.

  12. Characterization and differentiation of body fluids, putrefaction fluid, and blood using Hounsfield unit in postmortem CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Jackowski, Christian; Buetikofer, Yanik; Kara, Levent

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ranges of Hounsfield unit (HU) found in body fluids, putrefaction fluids, and blood on postmortem CT and how these ranges are affected by postmortem interval, temperatures, and CT beam energy. Body fluids, putrefaction fluids, and blood from a total of 53 corpses were analyzed to determine the ranges of HU values from postmortem CT images that were taken prior to autopsy. The fluids measured in CT images were obtained at autopsy and examined in terms of macroscopic and microscopic appearances. Body fluids and blood were also collected in plastic bottles, which were subjected to CT scans at different beam energies (80-130 kV) and at various fluid temperatures (4 to 40 °C). At a postmortem interval of 1 to 4 days, the ranges of HU values of the serous fluids (13-38 HU) and the nonsedimented blood (40-88 HU) did not overlap. In the sedimented blood, the upper serum layer exhibited HU value ranges that overlapped with those of the serous fluids. The putrefaction fluids exhibited a range of HU values between 80 and -130 HU. Elevated HU values were observed in fluids with accretive cell impurities. HU values decreased slightly with increasing temperature and CT beam energy. We concluded that serous fluids and blood in fresh corpses can be characterized and differentiated from each other based on HU value ranges. In contrast, body fluids in decomposed corpses cannot be differentiated by their HU value ranges. Different beam energies and corpse temperatures had only minor influences on HU value ranges and therefore should not be obstacles to the differentiation and characterization of body fluids and blood.

  13. XXII Fluid Mechanics Conference (KKMP2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers that have been presented at XXII Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXII FMC) held in Słok near Bełchatów in Poland during llth-14th September of 2016. The Conference is organized by Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Polish Academy of Sciences - Committee of Mechanics and Foun-dation for Development of Wroclaw University of Science and Technology. Let us recall some historical facts: Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, which makes a total of forty-two years. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. We have already met in Bełchatów 10 years ago (XVII KKMP). It was a successful meeting. Since then the National Conference on Fluid Mechanics has changed title and has started to be named Fluid Mechanics Conference in the hopes that it will attract more participants from other countries. English became the Conference's first language and we started to invite world leading scientists - working in the field of fluid mechanics. At the 2006 conference we hosted for the first time prof. Keith Moffatt from the Cambridge University. In this year prof. Moffatt once again promised us to arrive to Bełchatów. The whole fluid mechanics community celebrates 9 2 anniversary of his birthday. So let us also wish happy anniversary to prof. Moffatt. In the mean time we had to pay last respects to our collages. Prof. Prosnak who is regarded as a founder of the Notational Conference on Fluid Mechanics and is well known through his books. Prof. Puzyrewski who was present at all conferences so far. He was providing via his discussions a special value to these conferences, and our colleague prof. Konrad Bajer who was intended to be the organizer and host of the present conference. Short memories to them will be given during the opening ceremony. Conference topics include, but are not limited

  14. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  15. Endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kljajić, Vladimir; Vuleković, Petar; Vlaški, Ljiljana; Savović, Slobodan; Dragičević, Danijela; Papić, Vladimir

    Nasal liquorrhea indicates a cerebrospinal fluid fistula, an open communication between the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid and the nasal cavity. It can be traumatic and spontaneous. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula using fluorescein. This retrospective study included 30 patients of both sexes, with a mean age of 48.7 years, treated in the period from 2007 to 2015. All patients underwent lumbar administration of 5% sodium fluorescein solution preoperatively. Fistula was closed using three-layer graft and fibrin glue. Cerebrospinal fluid fistulas were commonly located in the ethmoid (37%) and sphenoid sinus (33%). Most patients presented with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (2/3 of patients). The reported success rate for the first repair attempt was 97%. Complications occurred in three patients: one patient presented with acute hydrocephalus, one with reversible encephalopathy syndrome on the fifth postoperative day with bilateral loss of vision, and one patient was diagnosed with hydrocephalus two years after the repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Endoscopic diagnosis and repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas using fluorescein intrathecally has high success rate and low complication rate. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-04-08

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler-Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations.

  17. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  18. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler–Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations. PMID:27547083

  19. Magnelok technology: a complement to magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J. David

    2004-07-01

    Magnetorheological or MR fluids have been successfully used to enable highly effective semi-active control systems in automobile primary suspensions to control unwanted motions in civil engineering structures and to provide force-feedback in steer-by-wire systems. A key to the successful use of MR fluids is an appreciation and understanding of the balance and trade-off between the magnetically controlled on-state force and the ever-present off-state viscous force. In all MR fluid applications, one must deal with the fact that MR fluids never fully decouple or go to zero force in their off-state. Magnelok devices are a magnetically controlled compliment to traditional MR fluid devices that have been developed to enable a true force decoupling in the off-state. Magnelok devices may be embodied as linear or rotary dampers, brakes, lockable struts or position holding devices. They are particularly suitable for lock/un-lock applications. Unlike MR fluid devices they contain no fluid yet they do provide a variable level of friction damping that is controlled by the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. Magnelok devices are low cost as they easily accommodate relatively loose mechanical tolerances and require no seals or accumulator. A variety of controllable Magnelok devices and applications are described.

  20. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.