WorldWideScience

Sample records for investigator chief transport

  1. An Investigation of Chief Administrator Turnover in International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John

    2011-01-01

    This article explores chief administrator turnover in international schools. Quantitative and qualitative data from the 83 chief administrators who participated in the study suggests that the average tenure of an international school chief administrator is 3.7 years and that the main reason chief administrators leave international schools is…

  2. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  3. Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a representation overlay of Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts (areas of responsibility). The Vermont Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts layer is part...

  4. CHIEF 2004 Users Manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benthien, G. W; Barach, D; Hobbs, S. L

    2004-01-01

    .... The program was tested on machines running Windows 95/98 , Windows NT, and COMPACT UNIX. The CHIEF program was originally developed in the 1960s to compute the acoustic radiation from an arbitrary shaped radiating body...

  5. Coleadership Among Chief Residents: Exploration of Experiences Across Specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeffrey E

    2015-06-01

    Many departments have multiple chief residents. How these coleaders relate to each other could affect their performance, the residency program, and the department. This article reports on how co-chiefs work together during the chief year, and what may allow them to be more effective coleaders. A phenomenological research design was used to investigate experiences of outgoing chief residents from 13 specialties at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics over a 2-year period from 2012 through 2013. Thematic analysis of semistructured interviews was conducted to investigate commonalities and recommendations. Face-to-face interviews with 19 chief residents from 13 different specialties identified experiences that helped co-chiefs work effectively with each other in orienting new co-chiefs, setting goals and expectations, making decisions, managing interpersonal conflict, leadership styles, communicating, working with program directors, and providing evaluations and feedback. Although the interviewed chief residents received guidance on how to be an effective chief resident, none had been given advice on how to effectively work with a co-chief, and 26% (5 of 19) of the respondents reported having an ineffective working relationship with their co-chief. Chief residents often colead in carrying out their multiple functions. To successfully function in a multichief environment, chief residents may benefit from a formal co-orientation in which they discuss goals and expectations, agree on a decision-making process, understand each other's leadership style, and receive feedback on their efficacy as leaders.

  6. Coleadership Among Chief Residents: Exploration of Experiences Across Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many departments have multiple chief residents. How these coleaders relate to each other could affect their performance, the residency program, and the department. Objective This article reports on how co-chiefs work together during the chief year, and what may allow them to be more effective coleaders. Methods A phenomenological research design was used to investigate experiences of outgoing chief residents from 13 specialties at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics over a 2-year period from 2012 through 2013. Thematic analysis of semistructured interviews was conducted to investigate commonalities and recommendations. Results Face-to-face interviews with 19 chief residents from 13 different specialties identified experiences that helped co-chiefs work effectively with each other in orienting new co-chiefs, setting goals and expectations, making decisions, managing interpersonal conflict, leadership styles, communicating, working with program directors, and providing evaluations and feedback. Although the interviewed chief residents received guidance on how to be an effective chief resident, none had been given advice on how to effectively work with a co-chief, and 26% (5 of 19) of the respondents reported having an ineffective working relationship with their co-chief. Conclusions Chief residents often colead in carrying out their multiple functions. To successfully function in a multichief environment, chief residents may benefit from a formal co-orientation in which they discuss goals and expectations, agree on a decision-making process, understand each other's leadership style, and receive feedback on their efficacy as leaders. PMID:26221435

  7. Investigation of RFID Based Sensors for Sustainable Transportation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    Through support of a University Transportation Research Center Faculty Development Minigrant an investigation was made into the use of RFID based sensing technologies for transportation purposes. Transportation applications would potentially include ...

  8. Investigation of timber harvesting operations using chainsaw considering productivity and residual stand damage: The case of Bahçe Forest Enterprise Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neşe Gülci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Timber harvesting activities are often performed in difficult conditions caused by the mountainous terrain conditions in Turkey. One of the most difficult and dangerous stages of the timber harvesting activities are felling, delimbing, and bucking stages. In some of the European countries with intensive forestry activities, felling, delimbing and bucking stages of timber harvesting are performed with harvesting machines (i.e. harvester, feller-buncher while these processes are mostly performed with chainsaw in Turkey. The chainsaw operations which are not properly planned and implemented may results in considerable amount of time and productivity losses and environmental damages. At the same time, the risk of work accidents increases during the felling activities. Thus, it is very important to investigate productivity and residual stand damage of chainsaw operations. In this study, harvesting activities using chainsaw were evaluated in terms of productivity and environmental aspects. The field studies were conducted in Brutian Pine stands within Bahçe Forest Enterprise Chief of Osmaniye Forest Enterprise Directorate, located in Adana Forest Regional Directorate. Average productivity and timber volume were calculated as 4.06 m3/hr and 0.30 m3, respectively, and productivity increased as the amount of timber production increased. The results indicated that total number of injured trees as a result of felling operation was 43 in which 13 injuries were on live wood while 30 injuries were on tree barks. It was found that sapwood and bark injuries occurred at the top of the trees during felling activities due to tree hang ups.

  9. Understanding the Influence Career Paths Have on Community and Technical College Chief Business Officers' Satisfaction with Their Position: A Mixed Method Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Carter L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to understand whether a community or technical college chief business officer's career line influenced the lived experience of job satisfaction. This mixed method study was conducted in a two-phase approach using the Explanatory Design: Participant Selection Model variant. An initial quantitative survey was conducted from…

  10. Narrator-in-Chief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herron, Mark A.

    The dissertation Narrator-in-Chief: The Narrative Rhetoric of Barack Obama seeks to show how the concept of “narrative” can be used in rhetorical criticism of presidential speeches, particularly when considering the speeches and the biographical text, Dreams from My Father (1995), of Barack Obama...

  11. Investigation of the transportation requirements for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, R.E.; Davis, D.K.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents a general investigation of the transport requirements associated with the construction and operation of conceptual fusion reactors. Projections of amounts of construction and operating materials requiring transportation are presented for several proposed designs. The material to be shipped is described along with the shipping containers that might be used, the transport modes and the expected impact of transporting these materials. Transportation of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials will be required. Most of these materials are routinely shipped by the transportation industry. Transportation requirements of a representative fusion reactor are also compared with Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) requirements

  12. Investigating transport pathways in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffa, Annalisa; Haza, Angelique; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Molcard, Anne; Taillandier, Vincent; Schroeder, Katrin; Chang, Yeon; Poulain, P.-M.

    2013-01-01

    The ocean is a very complex medium with scales of motion that range from thousands of kilometers to the dissipation scales. Transport by ocean currents plays an important role in many practical applications ranging from climatic problems to coastal management and accident mitigation at sea. Understanding transport is challenging because of the chaotic nature of particle motion. In the last decade, new methods have been put forth to improve our understanding of transport. Powerful tools are provided by dynamical system theory, that allow the identification of the barriers to transport and their time variability for a given flow. A shortcoming of this approach, though, is that it is based on the assumption that the velocity field is known with good accuracy, which is not always the case in practical applications. Improving model performance in terms of transport can be addressed using another important methodology that has been recently developed, namely the assimilation of Lagrangian data provided by floating buoys. The two methodologies are technically different but in many ways complementary. In this paper, we review examples of applications of both methodologies performed by the authors in the last few years, considering flows at different scales and in various ocean basins. The results are among the very first examples of applications of the methodologies to the real ocean including testing with Lagrangian in-situ data. The results are discussed in the general framework of the extended fields related to these methodologies, pointing out to open questions and potential for improvements, with an outlook toward future strategies.

  13. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  14. 49 CFR 604.49 - Administrator's discretionary review of the Chief Counsel's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrator's discretionary review of the Chief Counsel's decision. 604.49 Section 604.49 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Administrator and Final Agency Orders § 604.49 Administrator's discretionary review of the Chief Counsel's...

  15. Investigation on aerosol transport in containment cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parozzi, F.; Chatzidakis, S.; Housiadas, C.; Gelain, T.; Nahas, G.; Plumecocq, W.; Vendel, J.; Herranz, L.E.; Hinis, E.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Malgarida, E.

    2005-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions, the containment leak-tightness could be threatened by energetic phenomena that could yield a release to the environment of nuclear aerosols through penetrating concrete cracks. As few data are presently available to quantify this aerosol leakage, a specific action was launched in the framework of the Santar Project of the European 6 th Framework Programme. In this context, both theoretical and experimental investigations have been managed to develop a model that can readily be applied within a code like Aster (Accident Source Term Evaluation Code). Particle diffusion, settling, turbulent deposition, diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis have been considered as deposition mechanisms inside the crack path. They have been encapsulated in numerical models set up to reproduce experiments with small tubes and capillaries and simulate the plug formation. Then, an original lagrangian approach has been used to evaluate the crack retention under typical PWR accident conditions, comparing its predictions with those given by the eulerian approach implemented in the ECART code. On the experimental side, the paper illustrates an aerosol production and measurement system developed to validate aerosol deposition models into cracks and the results that can be obtained: a series of tests were performed with monodispersed fluorescein aerosols injected into a cracked concrete sample. A key result that should be further explored refers to the high enhancement of aerosol retention that could be due to steam condensation. Recommendations concerning future experimentation are also given in the paper. (author)

  16. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed on board the following...

  17. Radiotracer investigations for sediment transport in ports of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Goswami, Sunil; Singh, Gursharan

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of mixing and transport of sediments in coastal region is of vital importance for evaluating suitability of dumping site for dredged sediments produced during maintenance of shipping channels, expansion of existing projects and construction of new projects. Gamma-emitting radiotracers are commonly used for investigation of movement of sediments on seabed using Scandium-46 (scandium glass powder) as radiotracer. The radiotracer is injected on seabed at a desired location and its movement followed over a period of time using waterproof NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. The recorded data is analyzed to obtain transport parameters and utilized for assessing the suitability of the dumping sites and optimization of the dredging operations. About 70 large-scale investigations have been carried out in different ports in India leading to significant economical benefits to the Ports. Present paper discusses various aspects of the radiotracer technique for sediment transport, methodology of data analysis and a specific case study. (author)

  18. Chief officer misconduct in policing: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Hales, Gavin; May, Tiggey; Belur, J.; Hough, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Key findings\\ud This study has examined cases of alleged misconduct involving chief police officers and staff.\\ud The aim was to describe the nature of cases that have come to light, examine the perceived\\ud pathways that led to misconduct, and suggest ways of mitigating the risks of misconduct. The\\ud study is based on interviews with key stakeholders and with investigating officers in chief\\ud officer misconduct cases since April 2008. These cases involved only a small minority of chief\\ud ...

  19. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  20. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He + and mixed p, H 2+ , H 3+ beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was designed to perform

  1. Thermodynamics of transport through the ammonium transporter Amt-1 investigated with free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, R Thomas; Andrade, Susana L A; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2012-08-16

    Amt-1 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfAmt-1) belongs to the Amt/Rh family of ammonium/ammonia transporting membrane proteins. The transport mode and the precise microscopic permeation mechanism utilized by these proteins are intensely debated. Open questions concern the identity of the transported substrate (ammonia and/or ammonium) and whether the transport is passive or active. To address these questions, we studied the overall thermodynamics of the different transport modes as a function of the environmental conditions. Then, we investigated the thermodynamics of the underlying microscopic transport mechanisms with free energy calculations within a continuum electrostatics model. The formalism developed for this purpose is of general utility in the calculation of binding free energies for ligands with multiple protonation forms or other binding forms. The results of our calculations are compared to the available experimental and theoretical data on Amt/Rh proteins and discussed in light of the current knowledge on the physiological conditions experienced by microorganisms and plants. We found that microscopic models of electroneutral and electrogenic transport modes are in principle thermodynamically viable. However, only the electrogenic variants have a net thermodynamic driving force under the physiological conditions experienced by microorganisms and plants. Thus, the transport mechanism of AfAmt-1 is most likely electrogenic.

  2. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  3. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities... certificate or an airline transport pilot certificate, and, except for a chief instructor for a course of... instructor for a ground school course, a person must have 1 year of experience as a ground school instructor...

  4. Investigation of electron beam transport in a helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y.U.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Lossless transport of electrons through the undulator is essential for CW operation of the FELs driven by recirculating electrostatic accelerators. We calculate the transport ratio of an electron beam in a helical undulator by using a 3-D simulation code and compare the results with the experimental results. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The 3-D distribution of the magnetic field of a practical permanent-magnet helical undulator is measured and is used in the calculations. The major parameters of the undutlator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, number of periods in adiabatic region = 3.5, magnetic field strength = 1.3 kG. The transport ratio is very sensitive to the injection condition of the electron beam such as the emittance, the diameter, the divergence, etc.. The injection motion is varied in the experiments by changing the e-gun voltage or the field strength of the focusing magnet located at the entrance of the undulator. It is confirmed experimentally and with simulations that most of the beam loss occurs at the adiabatic region of the undulator regardless of the length of the adiabatic region The effect of axial guiding magnetic field on the beam finish is investigated. According to the simulations, the increase of the strength of axial magnetic field from 0 to 1 kG results in the increase of the transport ratio from 15 % to 95%.

  5. Documents of the Ad Hoc Comitee on investigation of crimes of bolsheviks under Commander-in-Chief of Armed forces of the South of Russia as a source for the history of Russian Orthodox Church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Biryukova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides analysis of reliability and value of documents accumulated by the Ad Hoc Committee on Investigation of Crimes of Bolsheviks under the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces in the South of Russia. This analysis includes the study of documents of the Committee as a source for the Church history in the South of Russia, the study of periodicals and memoirs as well the study of the history of the original owner of the documents mentioned above. The Committee on Investigation of Crimes of Bolsheviks was founded on December 31, 1918 with the purpose of forming public opinion about the true nature of Bolsheviks’ power and the purpose of justifying the mission of the White. The aim of the Committee was of course not to carry out investigation in the fi rst hand, but to record crimes of Bolsheviks and then to inform the public, i.e. to use them as means of propaganda. However, this does not depreciate their value and validity because the work was conducted by the best professional experts in the fi eld of forensic medicine and law who strictly followed guidelines of the judicial proceedings, legal norms and principles. In addition, the work was done in the presence of foreign observers. The Committee was interested in obtaining true and authentic information since fabricated evidence would have lost its value. Investigation of the persecution of the Church in the Southern part of Russia was one of the Committee’s focal points. Materials which were collected by the Committee on the Area of Don Army and brought out with the help of the separate Don Branch Committee as a result of cooperation with diocesan bodies and local judicial departments are of special value.

  6. Research on the actual condition on the licensed chief engineers of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A research on the actual condition on the licensed chief engineers of radiation was performed on October, 1975. Question cards were sent to 2915 facilities in Japan, and answers came back from 2850 facilities. Answers report the size of each facility, number of employee, number of chief engineers in charge, age of chief engineers, appointment authority, responsibility, improvement of working condition of chief engineer, and assistant officer for chief engineer. The number of worker is 62,456 in 2,769 facilities. The number of chief engineer in charge is 3,286 containing 579 doctor and/or dentist. The age of chief in 80 percent facilities is above 31. System of management of radiation safety was also investigated. (Kato, T.)

  7. Numerical investigation of nanoparticles transport in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-07-13

    In this work the problem related to the transport of nanoparticles in anisotropic porous media is investigated numerically using the multipoint flux approximation. Anisotropy of porous media properties are an essential feature that exist almost everywhere in subsurface formations. In anisotropic media, the flux and the pressure gradient vectors are no longer collinear and therefore interesting patterns emerge. The transport of nanoparticles in subsurface formations is affected by several complex processes including surface charges, heterogeneity of nanoparticles and soil grain collectors, interfacial dynamics of double-layer and many others. We use the framework of the theory of filtration in this investigation. Processes like particles deposition, entrapment, as well as detachment are accounted for. From the numerical methods point of view, traditional two-point flux finite difference approximation cannot handle anisotropy of media properties. Therefore, in this work we use the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA). In this technique, the flux components are affected by more neighboring points as opposed to the mere two points that are usually used in traditional finite volume methods. We also use the experimenting pressure field approach which automatically constructs the global system of equations by solving multitude of local problems. This approach facilitates to a large extent the construction of the global system. A set of numerical examples is considered involving two-dimensional rectangular domain. A source of nanoparticles is inserted in the middle of the anisotropic layer. We investigate the effects of both anisotropy angle and anisotropy ratio on the transport of nanoparticles in saturated porous media. It is found that the concentration plume and porosity contours follow closely the principal direction of anisotropy of permeability of the central domain.

  8. Investigation of anisotropic thermal transport in cross-linked polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simavilla, David Nieto

    Thermal transport in lightly cross-linked polyisoprene and polybutadine subjected to uniaxial elongation is investigated experimentally. We employ two experimental techniques to assess the effect that deformation has on this class of materials. The first technique, which is based on Forced Rayleigh Scattering (FRS), allows us to measure the two independent components of the thermal diffusivity tensor as a function of deformation. These measurements along with independent measurements of the tensile stress and birefringence are used to evaluate the stress-thermal and stress-optic rules. The stress-thermal rule is found to be valid for the entire range of elongations applied. In contrast, the stress-optic rule fails for moderate to large stretch ratios. This suggests that the degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity depends on both orientation and tension in polymer chain segments. The second technique, which is based on infrared thermography (IRT), allows us to measure anisotropy in thermal conductivity and strain induced changes in heat capacity. We validate this method measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity by comparing them with those obtained using FRS. We find excellent agreement between the two techniques. Uncertainty in the infrared thermography method measurements is estimated to be about 2-5 %. The accuracy of the method and its potential application to non-transparent materials makes it a good alternative to extend current research on anisotropic thermal transport in polymeric materials. A second IRT application allows us to investigate the dependence of heat capacity on deformation. We find that heat capacity increases with stretch ratio in polyisoprene specimens under uniaxial extension. The deviation from the equilibrium value of heat capacity is consistent with an independent set of experiments comparing anisotropy in thermal diffusivity and conductivity employing FRS and IRT techniques. We identify finite extensibility and strain

  9. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew

    2007-09-01

    some experiments. Using the experimental data as a guide, a modelling investigation has been carried out. The objectives of the modelling investigation were: To develop a geochemical model of the transport of iron into bentonite based on the clear experimental evidence of the penetration of iron into bentonite. To improve our understanding of the desaturation of the bentonite as water is consumed during the corrosion process and the resultant gas(es) escapes. The production of iron from the corroding source was modelled using a rate of gas evolution that had been fitted. It was shown that ion exchange and surface complexation processes do not provide sufficient sorption to predict the high amount of iron observed in the solid phase. Therefore alternative processes, such as iron-containing mineral formation or mineral transformations, were also suggested to account for the amount of iron observed within the bentonite phase. Magnetite was identified as the most thermodynamically stable solubility limiting phase under the experimental conditions. A one-dimensional transport model was constructed to include all relevant processes. The simulations considered the diffusive transport of Fe 2+ ions away from a corroding source, using the rate of gas evolution resulting from the corrosion process. Ion exchange and surface complexation processes were allowed within the bentonite which would provide sorption of iron onto and within the bentonite solid. The pH was buffered by allowing protonation and deprotonation of the surface sites of the bentonite solid. In addition, saturation of iron-containing minerals was permitted. The base case model suggests that about 4.4 wt % of iron could form in the bentonite if the formation of magnetite was allowed. However, the maximum theoretical amount of iron available from the source term is limited to 4.5 wt % of iron by the cumulative gas evolution rate, which is lower than the observed amount of iron in the bulk bentonite (6.6 wt %). A

  10. Investigating anomalous transport of electrolytes in charged porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjøde Bolet, Asger Johannes; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Surface charge is know to play an important role in microfluidics devices when dealing with electrolytes and their transport properties. Similarly, surface charge could play a role for transport in porous rock with submicron pore sizes. Estimates of the streaming potentials and electro osmotic are mostly considered in simple geometries both using analytic and numerical tools, however it is unclear at present how realistic complex geometries will modify the dynamics. Our work have focused on doing numerical studies of the full three-dimensional Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck problem for electrolyte transport in porous rock. As the numerical implementation, we have used a finite element solver made using the FEniCS project code base, which can both solve for a steady state configuration and the full transient. In the presentation, we will show our results on anomalous transport due to electro kinetic effects such as the streaming potential or the electro osmotic effect.

  11. Investigations on ruthenium transport in highly oxidising conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.; Backman, U.; Jokiniemi, J.; Lipponen, M.; Zilliacus, R.; Kissane, M.; Nagy, I.; Kunstar, M.; Ver, N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results from ruthenium release, transport and speciation experiments obtained in recent European studies. Experiments have shown that ruthenium may be released from the fuel already at a relatively moderate temperature, if the cladding is breached and if the flow contains oxygen. Furthermore, a significant fraction of released ruthenium is expected to be transported in the primary circuit in gaseous form. This work helps to resolve a severe accident safety issue related to fission product release in highly oxidising environment, which was indicated in the EURSAFE phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) [1]. Ultimately the goal of the ongoing projects is to improve modelling of ruthenium transport phenomena in severe accident codes such as ASTEC/Sophaeros. (author)

  12. Electrical transport and EPR investigations: A comparative study for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 35; Issue 5. Electrical transport and EPR ... The charge carriers show a change over from 3D VRH to quasi 1D VRH hopping process for multivalent ions at higher doping levels whereas 1D VRH has been followed by monovalent ion for full doping range. These studies ...

  13. Research chief wants to make science matter

    CERN Multimedia

    König, R

    1999-01-01

    The new research chief of the European Union, Phillippe Busquin wants to move science into the heart of EU decision-taking. He would like to make European research more 'cohesive, focused, mobile and multilateral' (2 pages).

  14. Chief Knowledge Officers? Perceptions, Pitfalls, & Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mary; Jones, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Argues that few librarians possess the needed competencies to fill the role of "chief knowledge officer" or "knowledge executive." Outlines executive competencies required: communications, leadership, experience, financial management, customer focus, entrepreneurial insight, and information technology grounding; examines gaps…

  15. Investigations of Atomic Transport Induced by Heavy Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Thomas Clyde

    The mechanisms of atomic transport induced by ion irradiation generally fall into the categories of anisotropic or isotropic processes. Typical examples of these are recoil implantation and cascade mixing, respectively. We have measured the interaction of these processes in the mixing of Ti/SiO(,2)/Si, Cr/SiO(,2)/Si and Ni/SiO(,2)/Si multi-layers irradiated with Xe at fluences of 0.01 - 10 x 10('15)cm('-2). The fluence dependence of net metal transport into the underlying layers was measured with different thicknesses of SiO(,2) and different sample temperatures during irradiation (-196 to 500C). There is a linear dependence at low fluences. At high fluences, a square-root behavior predominates. For thin SiO(,2) layers (primary recoils is quite pronounced since the gross mixing is small. A significant correlation exists between the mixing and the energy deposited through elastic collisions F(,D ). Several models are examined in an attempt to describe the transport process in Ni/SiO(,2). It is likely that injection of Ni by secondary recoil implantation is primarily responsible for getting Ni into the SiO(,2). Secondary recoil injection is thought to scale with F(,D). Trends in the mixing rates indicate that the dominant mechanism for Ti and Cr could be the same as for Ni. The processes of atomic transport and phase formation clearly fail to be separable at higher temperatures. A positive correlation with chemical reactivity emerges at higher irradiation temperatures. The temperature at which rapid mixing occurs is not much below that for spontaneous thermal reaction. Less Ni is retained in the SiO(,2) at high irradiation temperatures. Ni incorporated in the SiO(,2) by low temperature irradiation is not expelled during a consecutive high temperature irradiation. The Ni remains trapped within larger clusters during a sequential 500C irradiation. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  16. Chief Constable's annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the UKAEA constabulary, its personnel, administration and training, are all covered in this report. The crimes recorded at the UKAEA and BNFL sites are analysed. Traffic problems, transport and communications are covered. Miscellaneous police functions (eg lost property), the constabulary social activities and visitors to nuclear establishments are mentioned. The report ends with a policy statement on the aims and objectives of the constabulary. The report covers 1986. (U.K.)

  17. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff aids and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator. The Chief of Staff advises the...

  18. Comparative investigation of electronic transport across three-dimensional nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Zhang, X.-G.; Fry, J. N.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    We show the thickness-dependent transition from metallic conduction to tunneling in three-dimensional (3D) Ag/Si/Ag nanojunctions through layer-by-layer electronic structure and quantum transport calculations. The transmission coefficients are calculated quantum mechanically within the framework of density functional theory in conjunction with nonequilibrium Green's function techniques. Thin junctions show nearly metallic character with no energy gap opening in Si layers due to the metal-induced interface states, and the transmission is independent of the stacking order of Si layers. An energy gap reemerges for Si layers deeply buried within thick junction, and the decay rate of transmission in this insulating region depends on the stacking order. Complex band analysis indicates that the decay of transmission is not determined by a single exponential constant but also depends on the available number of evanescent states. Calculating the electric resistance from the transmission coefficient requires a 3D generalization of the Landauer formula, which is not unique. We examine two approaches, the Landauer-Büttiker formula, with and without subtraction of the Sharvin resistance, and a semiclassical Boltzmann equation with boundary conditions defined by the transmission coefficients at the junction. We identify an empirical upper limit of ˜0.05 per channel in the transmission coefficient, below which the Landauer-Büttiker formula without the Sharvin resistance correction remains a good approximation. In the high transmission limit, the Landauer-Büttiker formula with Sharvin correction and the semiclassical Boltzmann method reach fair agreement.

  19. Investigating hydraulic transport and disposal of coal ash at the Gacko thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, D.; Grbovic, M.; Petrovic, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses ash transport difficulties at the Gacko thermal power station. Designed dumper transport failed due to violent thermal reactions in water-sprayed ash during transport. An system was designed by the Institute for Ore Processing of Belgrade. Large-scale investigation of ash properties and slurry consolidation were conducted prior to hydraulic transport testing. A semi-industrial hydraulic transport was built and tested for ash disposal. It was found that Gacko power station ash may be safely transported by pipeline and disposed in layers 10 cm thick without danger of operation breaks due to ash caking within the pipeline. A sketch of the hydraulic transport system is presented. 4 refs.

  20. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bazylak, A.; Berejnov, V.; Markicevic, B.; Sinton, D.; Djilali, N.

    2008-01-01

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in cont...

  1. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  2. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction......The project is a basic study on the expected thermal behaviour of gravel storage initiated as a part of a research and demonstration gravel storage for seasonal heat storage.The goal of the investigation is to determine the heat transfer between heat pipes and sand-gravel storage media by carrying...

  3. Waiver Given for New York Schools Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a promise to name a chief academic officer as second in charge of the New York City schools which paved the way for Cathleen P. Black to succeed Joel I. Klein as the district's next chancellor. The compromise plan, announced amid intensifying debate over her selection by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, won a state waiver…

  4. Chief Editor's column/Science Smiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 4. Chief Editor's column / Science Smiles. R K Laxman. Science Smiles Volume 1 Issue 4 April 1996 pp 4-4. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/04/0004-0004. Author Affiliations.

  5. Chief Business Officers' Functions: Responsibilities and Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, Richard A.; Vogler, Daniel E.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a survey of 177 chief business officers of public community colleges regarding their responsibilities and the importance they assigned to various role functions. Highlights findings concerning the perceived importance of fiscal/financial duties; endowments as a job function; role in shared planning; and personal attention given to…

  6. The Chief Financial Officer and Government Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasher, William F.; Grigsby, Gwen; Sullivan, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Examines the work of the college or university chief financial officer (CFO) in government relations, focusing on the CFO's responsibilities, methods of working with state legislatures, pitfalls in legislative relations, and special problems faced by institutions in capital cities. (Author/MSE)

  7. Chief, Project Management Office | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    o maintain project management processes and tools including the Portfolio Project Management Framework. • As required, the Chief, Project Management Office manages project teams and working groups by identifying requirements, chairing meetings, setting objectives and goals and timetable; monitoring and evaluating ...

  8. How does fiction reading influence empathy? An experimental investigation on the role of emotional transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Veltkamp, M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced

  9. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The emerging operational role of the “Chief Clinical Informatics Officer” (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). Background The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. Discussion An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. Conclusion A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science. PMID:27081413

  10. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    cohesion force (3.32 mN/m). These measurements prove the importance of natural surfactants in crude oil for particle dispersion. An experimental methodology was provided to determine the effectiveness of asphaltenes as a dispersant. Even though hydrate deposition was inferred from the flowloop tests, it could not be verified from these measurements. Custom-made experimental set-ups (a recirculation liquid system, a rocking cell and a lab-scale mini-loop) were used to isolate the hydrate deposi- tion investigation. Besides water, mineral oil 70T and King Ranch condensate were used in combination with water for the deposition investigation. One of the most important deliverables of this thesis was the construction of a lab-scale flowloop that provides insight on deposition phenomenon in multiphase flow, representing the only set-up, reported in the literature, suitable for this investigation. The miniloop can handle gas-liquid flow (maximum flow rates of 10 Nm3/m for gas and 22 GPM for liquid) through a 10 ft. long straight section (2 in. standard tubing). The testing section (30 in. long) was designed to observe hydrate deposition on the wall. Three mechanisms of hydrate deposition were identified: film growth, particles adhering and particle bedding. The maximum water conversions were: 27.5 ml in the rocking cell, 2400 ml in the miniloop with 100 % WC and 250 ml in the miniloop for dispersed water in mineral oil 70T. The measured DP across to the testing section ranged from 0 to 8 in. H2O. Deposits were obtained for different flow regimes, including 100 % LL, stratified, stratified- wavy and slug flow. The maximum deposit thickness was 1.5 in., obtained in the gas flowing section. When deposits form from particle cohesion, they were easy to slough. From all the experimental worked in this thesis, hydrates accumulated depending on the degrees of subcooling of the bulk fluid, film growth (between 3 to 5 F), deposition from a combination of film growth and particle cohesion

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of the coupling of turbulence and sediment transport over dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.; Leary, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal coupling of sediment transport over dunes using a turbulence- and particle-resolving numerical model and high-speed video in a laboratory flume. The model utilizes the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for the fluid turbulence and a Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation for the sediment. Previous experiments assessing the effects of flow separation on downstream fluid turbulent structures and bedload transport suggest that localized, intermittent, high-magnitude transport events, called permeable splat events, play an important role in both downstream and cross-stream transport near flow reattachment. The flume was lined with 17 concrete ripples that had a 2 cm high crest and were 30 cm long. A high-speed camera observed sediment transport along the entirety of the bedform at 250 Hz. Downstream and vertical fluid velocity was observed at 1mm and 3 mm above the bed using Laser Doppler Velocitmetry (LDV) at 15 distances along bedform profile. As observed in our previous backward-facing step experiments and simulations, mean downstream fluid velocity increases nonlinearly with increasing distance along the ripple. Observed sediment transport, however, increases linearly with increasing distance along the ripple with an exception at the crest of the bedform, where both mean downstream fluid velocity and sediment transport decrease significantly. Previous experiments assessing only the effect of flow separation showed that calculating sediment transport as a function of boundary shear stress using a Meyer-Peter Müller type equation, produced a zone of underestimated transport near flow reattachment. Results reported here show that calculating sediment transport in this way underestimates observed sediment transport along the entire profile of the bedform, not just near flow reattachment. Preliminary sediment transport time-series data show a zone of high-magnitude cross-stream transport near flow reattachment, suggesting that permeable

  12. Wearable Sensors in Transportation - Exploratory Advanced Research Program Initial Stage Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes an initial stage investigation into wearable sensors for transportation research : applications. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has observed significant activity in this area and : seeks to obtain an understanding of...

  13. How does fiction reading influence empathy? An experimental investigation on the role of emotional transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P Matthijs; Veltkamp, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced over a period of one week for people who read a fictional story, but only when they were emotionally transported into the story. No transportation led to lower empathy in both studies, while study 1 showed that high transportation led to higher empathy among fiction readers. These effects were not found for people in the control condition where people read non-fiction. The study showed that fiction influences empathy of the reader, but only under the condition of low or high emotional transportation into the story.

  14. How Does Fiction Reading Influence Empathy? An Experimental Investigation on the Role of Emotional Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Veltkamp, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced over a period of one week for people who read a fictional story, but only when they were emotionally transported into the story. No transportation led to lower empathy in both studies, while study 1 showed that high transportation led to higher empathy among fiction readers. These effects were not found for people in the control condition where people read non-fiction. The study showed that fiction influences empathy of the reader, but only under the condition of low or high emotional transportation into the story. PMID:23383160

  15. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and...

  16. COPTEM: A Model to Investigate the Factors Driving Crude Oil Pipeline Transportation Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette-Levy, Nicolas; Zhong, Margaret; MacLean, Heather; Bergerson, Joule

    2018-01-02

    Previous transportation fuel life cycle assessment studies have not fully accounted for the full variability in the crude oil transport stage, for example, transporting a light crude through a high-diameter pipeline, vs transporting a heavy crude through a small-diameter pipeline. We develop a first-principles, fluid mechanics-based crude oil pipeline transportation emissions model (COPTEM) that calculates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with pipeline transport as a function of crude oil parameters, pipeline dimensions, and external factors. Additionally, we estimate the emissions associated with the full life cycle of pipeline construction, maintenance, and disposal. This model is applied to an inventory of 62 major Canadian and U.S. pipelines (capacity greater than 100 000 barrels/day) to estimate the variability of GHG emissions associated with pipeline transportation. We demonstrate that pipeline GHG emissions intensities range from 0.23 to 20.3 g CO 2 e/(bbl·km), exhibiting considerably greater variability than data reported in other studies. A sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the linear velocity of crude transport and pipeline diameter are the most impactful parameters driving this variability. To illustrate one example of how COPTEM can be used, we develop an energy efficiency gap analysis to investigate the possibilities for more efficient pipeline transport of crude oil.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix to Part 800 - Request to the Secretary of the Department of Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft Accidents Appendix to Part 800 Transportation Other Regulations... the Department of Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft Accidents (a) Acting pursuant to the... Safety Board Act of 1974, and as set forth below to investigate the facts, conditions, and circumstances...

  19. Colloid transport, retention, and remobilization during two-phase flow: Micro-model investigation and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this study the transport of colloids in a two-phase fluid system is investigated. In particular, the effects on the interface of two immiscible fluids in steady-state and transient circumstances in a micro-porous network are investigated. The experimental setup is designed consisting of micro

  20. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties in...

  1. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU) an applicant must: (a...

  2. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief Engineer (OSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief Engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.553 Chief Engineer (OSV). (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, to qualify for an endorsement as Chief engineer (OSV...

  3. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40... INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. The chief engineer is required to report any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  4. History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff: The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the War in Vietnam, 1971-1973

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webb, Willard J; Poole, Walter S

    2007-01-01

    The series of five volumes titled "The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the War in Vietnam" covers the activities of the Joint Chiefs of Staff with regard to Vietnam from 1945 to the final withdrawal of U.S...

  5. Antarctic circumpolar transport and the southern mode: a model investigation of interannual to decadal timescales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Hughes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that, at periods shorter than a year, variations in Antarctic circumpolar transport are reflected in a barotropic mode, known as the southern mode, in which sea level and bottom pressure varies coherently around Antarctica. Here, we use two multidecadal ocean model runs to investigate the behaviour of the southern mode at timescales on which density changes become important, leading to a baroclinic component to the adjustment. We find that the concept of a southern mode in bottom pressure remains valid, and remains a direct measure of the circumpolar transport, with changes at the northern boundary playing only a small role even on decadal timescales. However, at periods longer than about 5 years, density changes start to play a role, leading to a surface intensification of the vertical profile of the transport. We also find that barotropic currents on the continental slope account for a significant fraction of the variability, and produce surface intensification in the meridional-integral flow. Circumpolar sea level and transport are related at all investigated timescales. However, the role of density variations results in a ratio of sea level change to transport which becomes larger at longer timescales. This means that any long-term transport monitoring strategy based on present measurement systems must involve multiplying the observed quantity by a factor which depends on frequency.

  6. Transport processes investigation: A necessary first step in site scale characterization plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepke, C.; Glass, R.J.; Brainard, J.; Mann, M.; Kriel, K.; Holt, R.; Schwing, J.

    1995-01-01

    We propose an approach, which we call the Transport Processes Investigation or TPI, to identify and verify site-scale transport processes and their controls. The TPI aids in the formulation of an accurate conceptual model of flow and transport, an essential first step in the development of a cost effective site characterization strategy. The TPI is demonstrated in the highly complex vadose zone of glacial tills that underlie the Fernald Environmental Remediation Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. As a result of the TPI, we identify and verify the pertinent flow processes and their controls, such as extensive macropore and fracture flow through layered clays, which must be included in an accurate conceptual model of site-scale contaminant transport. We are able to conclude that the classical modeling and sampling methods employed in some site characterization programs will be insufficient to characterize contaminant concentrations or distributions at contaminated or hazardous waste facilities sited in such media

  7. Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Wenbin [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-08-29

    This report documents the work performed by General Motors (GM) under the Cooperative agreement No. DE-EE0000470, “Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance,” in collaboration with the Penn State University (PSU), University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and University of Rochester (UR) via subcontracts. The overall objectives of the project are to investigate and synthesize fundamental understanding of transport phenomena at both the macro- and micro-scales for the development of a down-the-channel model that accounts for all transport domains in a broad operating space. GM as a prime contractor focused on cell level experiments and modeling, and the Universities as subcontractors worked toward fundamental understanding of each component and associated interface.

  8. Investigation of two-phase transport phenomena in microchannels using a microfabricated experimental structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Fumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States)]. E-mail: fuminmems@gmail.com; Steinbrenner, Julie E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Hidrovo, Carlos H. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Kramer, Theresa A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Lee, Eon Soo [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Vigneron, Sebastien [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Cheng, Ching-Hsiang [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Eaton, John K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Room 224, Building 530, Stanford, CA 94305-3030 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Microchannels (0.05-1 mm) improve gas routing in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, but add to the complexities of water management. This work microfabricates experimental structures with distributed water injection as well as with heating and temperature sensing capabilities to study water formation and transport. The samples feature optical access to allow visualization and distributed thermometry for investigation of two-phase flow transport phenomena in the microchannels. The temperature evolution along the channel is observed that the temperature downstream of the distributed water injection decreases as the pressure drop increases. As the water injection rate is lower than 200 {mu}l/min, there exists a turning point where temperature increases as the pressure drop increases further. These micromachined structures with integrated temperature sensors and heaters are key to the experimental investigation as well as visualization of two-phase flow and water transport phenomena in microchannels for fuel cell applications.

  9. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P general surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves. PMID:23864049

  10. A reactive transport investigation of a seawater intrusion experiment in a shallow aquifer, Skansehage Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming Damgaard; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Kipp, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigations on seawater intrusion have mainly focused on either the physical density flow system with transport of a single non-reactive species or focused on the geochemical aspects neglecting density effects. This study focuses on both the geochemical and physical aspects of seawate...

  11. A reactive transport investigation of a seawater intrusion experiment in a shallow aquifer, Skansehage Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming Damgaard; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Kipp, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigations on seawater intrusion have mainly focused on either the physical density flow system with transport of a single non-reactive species or focused on the geochemical aspects neglecting density effects. This study focuses on both the geochemical and physical aspects of seawater...

  12. Geological and hydrological investigation and mass transport study in a fractured system at the Kamaishi Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masahiro; Sawada, Atsushi; Senba, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Tadakazu; Shimo, Michito; Yamamoto, Hajime; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Doe, T.W.; Cladouhos, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrologic investigations demonstrate clearly that variable connectivity of fracture networks can lead to compartmentalised flow systems. These compartments may be significant for understanding flow and transport in a repository site. The experiment shows that complex geometries of fracture networks can be deduced by simple, but careful monitoring of drilling and testing operations. Inadequate isolation of conducting features during experiment area development may short-circuit the flow system and make geometric assessment difficult or impossible. Once conducting features are identified, tracer tests can successfully provide information on transport properties. (author)

  13. Investigations into the binding of 125I-calmodulin to CA++ transport ATPase of human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterk, V.

    1983-01-01

    The study described was carried out in order to investigate the binding of 125 I-calmodulin to Ca ++ transport ATPase using different Ca ++ concentrations and temperatures. The data obtained from these experiments were subsequently analysed in such as a way as to yield meaningful information relating to the mechanisms underlying the attachment of calmodulin to Ca ++ transport ATPase, the % proportion of membrane protein that was attributable to the enzyme as well as the number of calmodulin receptor sites on the individual erythrocytes, etc. Comparisons with data from the relevant literature permitted conclusions to be drawn concerning the mode of Ca ++ transport at the level of the erythrocytes. A new methodology and processing technique had to be developed prior to the beginning of the experiments. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Chief Inspector's guidance to inspectors: combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Note is issued by the Chief Inspector of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP) as one of a series providing guidance for processes prescribed for integrated pollution control in Regulations made under Section 2 of the United Kingdom Environmental Protection Act 1990. It covers the burning of solid fuel manufactured from or comprised of tyres, tyre rubber or similar rubber waste primarily for the purpose of producing energy, in an appliance with a net rated thermal input of 3 megawatts or more. The note includes: a list of prescribed substances most likely to be present in releases to the environment by the processes considered; release limits for release to air, water and land; an outline of techniques for pollution abatement; monitoring requirements. (Author)

  15. Extension of Applicability of integral neutron transport theory in reactor cell and core investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Bosevski, T.; Kocic, A.; Altiparmakov, D.

    1980-01-01

    A Space-Point Energy-Group integral transport theory method (SPEG) is developed and applied to the local and global calculations of the Yugoslav RA reactor. Compared to other integral transport theory methods, the SPEG distinguishes by (1) the arbitrary order of the polynomial, (2) the effective determination of integral parameters through point flux values, (3) the use of neutron balance condition. as a posterior measure of the accuracy of the calculation and (4) the elimination of the subdivisions- into zones, in realistic cases. In addition, different direct (collision probability) and indirect (Monte Carlo) approaches to integral transport theory have been investigated and Some effective acceleration procedures introduced. The study was performed on three test problems in plane and cylindrical geometry, as well as on the nine-region cell of the RA reactor. In particular, the limitations of the integral transport theory including its non-applicability to optically large material regions and to global reactor calculations were examined. The proposed strictly multipoint approach, avoiding the subdivision into zones and groups, seems to provide a good starting point to overcome these limitations of the integral transport theory. (author)

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Colloid-facilitated Plutonium Reactive Transport in Fractured Tuffaceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z.; Wolfsberg, A. V.; Zhu, L.; Reimus, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    Colloids have the potential to enhance mobility of strongly sorbing radionuclide contaminants in fractured rocks at underground nuclear test sites. This study presents an experimental and numerical investigation of colloid-facilitated plutonium reactive transport in fractured porous media for identifying plutonium sorption/filtration processes. The transport parameters for dispersion, diffusion, sorption, and filtration are estimated with inverse modeling for minimizing the least squares objective function of multicomponent concentration data from multiple transport experiments with the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM). Capitalizing on an unplanned experimental artifact that led to colloid formation and migration, we adopt a stepwise strategy to first interpret the data from each experiment separately and then to incorporate multiple experiments simultaneously to identify a suite of plutonium-colloid transport processes. Nonequilibrium or kinetic attachment and detachment of plutonium-colloid in fractures was clearly demonstrated and captured in the inverted modeling parameters along with estimates of the source plutonium fraction that formed plutonium-colloids. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding the transport mechanisms and environmental impacts of plutonium in fractured formations and groundwater aquifers.

  17. Numerical and experimental investigations for insulation particle transport phenomena in water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krepper, Eckhard [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf e.V., (FZD), Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: E.Krepper@fzd.de; Glover, Gregory Cartland; Grahn, Alexander; Weiss, Frank-Peter [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf e.V., (FZD), Institute of Safety Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Alt, Soeren; Hampel, Rainer; Kaestner, Wolfgang; Kratzsch, Alexander; Seeliger, Andre [University of Applied Science Zittau/Goerlitz, Theodor Koerner Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The investigation of insulation debris generation, transport and sedimentation becomes more important with regard to reactor safety research for pressurized and boiling water reactors, when considering the long-term behaviour of emergency core coolant systems during all types of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The insulation debris released near the break during a LOCA incident consists of a mixture of a disparate particle population that varies with size, shape, consistency and other properties. Some fractions of the released insulation debris can be transported into the reactor sump, where it may perturb or impinge on the emergency core cooling systems. Open questions of generic interest are for example the particle load on strainers and corresponding pressure-drop, the sedimentation of the insulation debris in a water pool, its possible re-suspension and transport in the sump water flow. A joint research project on such questions is being performed in cooperation with the University of Applied Science Zittau/Goerlitz and the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The project deals with the experimental investigation and the development of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models for the description of particle transport phenomena in coolant flow. While the experiments are performed at the University Zittau/Goerlitz, the theoretical work is concentrated at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In the present paper, the basic concepts for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling are described and experimental results are presented. Further experiments are designed and feasibility studies were performed.

  18. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    editor signals change and in turn this induces in some people expectation, hope of improvement and maybe radical revolution. Others cower and hope for stability, continuation of the same and as little outward sign of change as possible. So I should like to signal that I hope to satisfy both camps. The Editor-in-Chief is primarily a guardian of the journal and should change nothing that does not need changing. Maintaining a standard at the same level is a valuable achievement in itself. This is no different from taking on any other leadership role such as in a team or department. One has to lead by consensus and with respect for the position. Conversely there are things I would like to see improved (otherwise I should not have been hired) and I commit to attempting these but in a spirit of cooperation with the Board, the publisher (IOP), IPEM and the readership. Any other approach would be doomed anyway. So, what would I like to see changed? Dare I say anything too strongly upfront? Like Alun six years ago I would like there to be more debate via correspondence but this depends on the readers to do more writing along these lines. Personally I feel PMB, like many journals, has developed to the point where most readers sadly can understand only a small fraction of its contents. I have talked to older readers who said they regularly used to read all or half of the journal. Now many of us can manage only the papers in our specialty. Yet this is somewhat inevitable as medical physics has progressed from a fledgling science to the vast activity it is today, topics have become deeply complicated and we cannot and should not reverse the clock. To address this, I would like to see authors provide some form of `intelligible lay-scientific summary' of their paper as a condition of its publication. I think readers would then enjoy reading all, not just some, of these and maybe become attracted to other areas than the ones in which they currently work. I would like to see the

  19. The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the War in Vietnam, 1960-1968. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    porters, laborers , troops, and guides, whose mission was to construct and protect the trails, transport supplies for the southern Communist forces...to President Diem and "request the departure of both Nhus," a reforma - tion of the government, and conciliatory action toward the Buddhists...Staff and National Policy, 1957-1960, vol. 7 (Washington: Office of Joint History, Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2000 ), p. 4

  20. Impact of high speed civil transports on stratospheric ozone. A 2-D model investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This study investigates the effect on stratospheric ozone from a fleet of proposed High Speed Civil Transports (HSCTs). The new LLNL 2-D operator-split chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere is used for this HSCT investigation. This model is integrated in a diurnal manner, using an implicit numerical solver. Therefore, rate coefficients are not modified by any sort of diurnal average factor. This model also does not make any assumptions on lumping of chemical species into families. Comparisons to previous model-derived HSCT assessment of ozone change are made, both to the previous LLNL 2-D model and to other models from the international assessment modeling community. The sensitivity to the NO{sub x} emission index and sulfate surface area density is also explored. (author) 7 refs.

  1. Investigation of Beam Emittance and Beam Transport Line Optics on Polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Andrew [Northern Illinois U.; Syphers, Michael [Fermilab

    2017-10-06

    Effects of beam emittance, energy spread, optical parameters and magnet misalignment on beam polarization through particle transport systems are investigated. Particular emphasis will be placed on the beam lines being used at Fermilab for the development of the muon beam for the Muon g-2 experiment, including comparisons with the natural polarization resulting from pion decay, and comments on the development of systematic correlations among phase space variables.

  2. Investigation of sediment transport and optimization of dredging operations in Indian ports using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    India has a long coastline of about 7,515 km and there are twelve major ports situated on the coastline. Out of them, six are situated on the West Coast whereas other six are situated on the East Coast. In addition to this, there are more than 140 minor ports and other marine establishments situated along the coastline. Each port and marine project has a navigation channel and depth of this navigation channel needs to be maintained to a level of at least 12-15 meters for smooth sailing of ships. Sediments continuously move along the coast due to alongshore currents generated by the waves and tides; and get deposited in navigation channels. For maintaining the required depth of the channels, the dredging operation is carried out. throughout the year or as and when required. Development of a new port or harbour also involves huge capital dredging. The dredged sediments generated during maintenance or capital dredging needs to be dumped at a suitable location, so that it does not find its way back to the channel and obstruct sailing of ships. Moreover the selected site should be such that the turn around time of the dredger is kept minimum to economize the dredging operation. In order to meet the above requirements, the knowledge of transport parameters such as the general direction of movement, extent of lateral and longitudinal movement, transport velocity, transport thickness and bed load movement rate is required. Radiotracer techniques are commonly used to investigate sediment transport on seabed and evaluate the suitability of the proposed dumping sites. Scandium-46 (half-life: 84 days, Gamma energies: 0.89 MeV (100%), 1.12 MeV (100%)) in the form of scandium glass powder is the most suitable radiotracer for tracing sediments on seabed. The activity used in an investigation ranges from 75-300 GBq (2-8 Ci). The suitably prepared particulate radiotracer is injected on seabed at the proposed site using a specially designed injection system and its movement is

  3. The Impact of a Chief Planning Officer on the Administrative Environment for Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Peter J.; Peterson, Marvin W.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a national survey of college administrators' (n=3,333) views of planning, this study investigated the relationship between having a chief planning officer to coordinate planning functions and perceptions of and attitudes toward campus planning. Results suggest the presence of a planner increased perceptions of more rational and…

  4. Female College Presidents: Characteristics to Become and Remain Chief Executive Officer of a College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Arlette

    2012-01-01

    Through an ethnographic approach, the perceptions of female college presidents from the northeastern region of the United States regarding leadership styles and the characteristics to become and remain the chief executive officer of a college were investigated. Six presidents from various types of four-year colleges were interviewed. Themes,…

  5. Investigation of Electromagnetic Field Threat to Fuel Tank Wiring of a Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Beck, Fred B.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators have questioned whether an electrical discharge in the Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) may have initiated the TWA-800 center wing tank explosion. Because the FQIS was designed to be incapable of producing such a discharge on its own, attention has been directed to mechanisms of outside electromagnetic influence. To support the investigation, the NASA Langley Research Center was tasked to study the potential for radiated electromagnetic fields from external radio frequency (RF) transmitters and passenger carried portable electronic devices (PEDs) to excite the FQIS enough to cause arcing, sparking or excessive heating within the fuel tank.

  6. Fundamental investigation of the transport properties of superacids in aqueous and non-aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Sophia

    In the quest to develop more efficient energy providers one of the main focus of research has been on the improvement of ion transport. In lithium battery research this has led to the incorporation of various lithium salts, ceramics and plasticizers into the poly(ethylene)oxide (PEO) matrix, the polymer most used In Proton Conduction Membrane (PCM) fuel cell research this has led to the development of new membranes, which are designed with to replicate Nafion's ((c)DuPont) proton transport but also improve upon its deficiency of transporting intact fuel molecules and its dependence upon the presence of solvating water molecules. To better understand the process of ion transport, NMR was used to investigate dynamic properties such as D (self-diffusion coefficient) and T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time) of various proton and lithium ion-conducting systems. Ionic conductivity and viscosity measurements were also performed. The systems studied includes aqueous superacid solutions (trifluoromethanesulfonic (TFSA), para-toluenesulfonic (PTSA) and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI)); nano-porous (NP-) PCM's incorporating various ceramics and 3M fuel/2M H2SO4 solutions; and P(EO)20LiBETI (LiN(SO 2CF2CF3)2 composite incorporating SiO 2 ceramic nano particles. The objective of the study of the superacid solutions was to determine the effect of concentration on the transport. It was found that beyond the ionic conductivity maximum, fluctuations in both D and T1 supports the existence of local ordering in the ionic network, caused by the reduced solvent dielectric coefficient and increasing viscosity. Of the three superacids TFSA was the most conductive and most affected by reduced solvent concentration. For the P(EO)20LiBETI composite the aim was to determine the effect of the ceramic on the ion transport of the composite in a solvent free environment. Results show that the ceramic causes only modest increase in the lithium transport below 90°C. The objective in the

  7. Do Transport Infrastructures Promote the Foreign Direct Investments Attractiveness? Empirical Investigation from Four North African Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Saidi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship among foreign direct investments and economic growth is a very controversial issue that has given rise to an abundant literature. Numerous research studies examine the bidirectional causal relationship and investigate the major determinants of these investments. In the same order of ideas, this article gives an empirical study from four North African countries to evaluate the role of transport infrastructures to improve the territorial attractiveness for the foreign direct investment. The present paper starts by a theoretical study explaining the role of transport as a major determinant of FDI. In a second section, we represent the empirical study. By using an econometric model with panel data, we found that traditional determinants of FDI have the most significant influence on the international investors’ decision. However, the same findings verify a positive impact of transport and consider it as a new important factor with strategic issues that cannot be avoided. The empirical validation from the four countries leads to verify that it is necessary to adopt development strategies that take into account the transport infrastructures and logistics function

  8. Experimental and gyrokinetic investigation of core impurity transport in Alcator C-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, N.; Greenwald, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Puetterich, T.

    2010-11-01

    A new multiple pulse laser blow-off system coupled with an upgraded high resolution x-ray spectrometer with spatial resolution allow for the most detailed studies of impurity transport on Alcator C-mod to date. Trace impurity injections created by the laser blow-off technique were introduced into plasmas with a wide range of parameters and time evolving profiles of He-like calcium were measured. The unique measurement of a single charge state profile and line integrated emission measurements from spectroscopic diagnostics were compared with the simulated emission from the impurity transport code STRAHL. A nonlinear least squares fitting routine was coupled with STRAHL, allowing for core impurity transport coefficients with errors to be determined. With this method, experimental data from trace calcium injections were analyzed and radially dependent, core values (< r/a ˜.6) of the diffusive and convective components of the impurity flux were obtained. The STRAHL results are compared with linear and global, nonlinear simulations from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Results of this comparison and an investigation of the underlying physics associated with turbulent impurity transport will be presented.

  9. Reforming the road freight transportation system using systems thinking: An investigation of Coronial inquests in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, Sharon; Goode, Natassia; Salmon, Paul; Stevenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Road freight transport is considered to be one of the most dangerous industries in Australia, accounting for over 30% of all work fatalities. Whilst system reform (i.e., change to policy and practice) is needed, it is not clear what this reform should be, or what approaches should be used to drive it. This article argues that road freight transportation reform should be underpinned by a systems thinking approach. Efforts to understand crash causation should be focused beyond the driver and identify contributing factors at other levels with the road freight system. Accordingly, we present the findings from a study that examined whether Australian Coronial investigations into road freight crashes reflect support appropriate system reform. Content analysis was used to identify the contributing factors and interrelations implicated in the road freight crashes described in publicly available Australian Coroner's inquest reports from the last 10 years (2004-2014; n=21). The results found evidence to suggest that the Coronial inquests provide some understanding of the complex system of factors influencing road freight transportation crashes in Australia. However, there was a lack of evidence to suggest an understanding of system-based reform based on the identification of reductionist-focused recommendations. It is concluded that researchers and practitioners (ie., government and industry) need to work together to develop prevention efforts focused on system reforms. Systems thinking based data collection and analysis frameworks are urgently required to help develop this understanding in road freight transportation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A dispersion model of transport media in radiotracer investigations on selected chemical installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iller, E.

    1999-01-01

    Tracer investigations of media transport through chemical reactors play a significant role in the chemical technology. They provide the basis for the determination of some important process parameters, such as flow character of the transported medium, degree of utilisation of the reactor volume during chemical transitions of substrates or even indicate possible mechanisms of chemical reactions. Determination of the medium flow characteristics is closely connected with the mathematical description of the process - a mathematical model of transport. The method of assessment of radiotracers suitability for the investigation of distillation processes presented in this paper allows to determine, in a simple manner, the parameters of distillation characteristics of the radionuclides, the average distillation temperature, the range of distillation temperatures, a suitable radiochemical purity. These parameters precisely determine the behavior of tracers to be expected in a wide range of variable conditions of the distillation process. Applications of tracer tested in such a manner to the investigations of dynamics of media in the industrial rectification columns has resulted in obtaining a dependable evaluation of the performance of these columns in a wide range of changes of their operational parameters. Particular attention has been paid to dynamics of the liquid [phase on the column plate. A dispersion model of liquid flow with hold-up zones has been proposed for the description of the liquid phase transport in the plate - overall assembly.The model consists of a number of flow and stagnant zones, with mass transfer between them. Another example of practical application of results from radiotracer investigation is an analysis of of phase dynamics in the installations designed for the process of liquefaction of Polish coals by means of their catalytic hydrogenation. For the analysis of phase transport in a reaction vessel various mathematical models were applied with

  11. Cellular water distribution, transport, and its investigation methods for plant-based food material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Imran H; Karim, M A

    2017-09-01

    Heterogeneous and hygroscopic characteristics of plant-based food material make it complex in structure, and therefore water distribution in its different cellular environments is very complex. There are three different cellular environments, namely the intercellular environment, the intracellular environment, and the cell wall environment inside the food structure. According to the bonding strength, intracellular water is defined as loosely bound water, cell wall water is categorized as strongly bound water, and intercellular water is known as free water (FW). During food drying, optimization of the heat and mass transfer process is crucial for the energy efficiency of the process and the quality of the product. For optimizing heat and mass transfer during food processing, understanding these three types of waters (strongly bound, loosely bound, and free water) in plant-based food material is essential. However, there are few studies that investigate cellular level water distribution and transport. As there is no direct method for determining the cellular level water distributions, various indirect methods have been applied to investigate the cellular level water distribution, and there is, as yet, no consensus on the appropriate method for measuring cellular level water in plant-based food material. Therefore, the main aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review on the available methods to investigate the cellular level water, the characteristics of water at different cellular levels and its transport mechanism during drying. The effect of bound water transport on quality of food product is also discussed. This review article presents a comparative study of different methods that can be applied to investigate cellular water such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dilatometry. The article closes with a discussion of current challenges to investigating cellular water

  12. The changing role of the health care chief information officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G M

    2000-09-01

    Information is the lifeblood of the health care organization. In the past, chief information officers were responsible for nothing else but assuring a constant flow of information. Today, they are being asked to do a great deal more. From E-business to E-health strategy, the chief information officer is the focal point of an organization's ability to leverage new technology.

  13. 78 FR 50052 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental... Agenda: The Board will advise the Chief of Engineers on environmental policy, identification and... Engineers to receive the views of his Environmental Advisory Board. However, any member of the public...

  14. 76 FR 81485 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental... Engineers Environmental Advisory Board (EAB). Date: January 19, 2012. Time: 9 a.m. through 12 p.m. Location... (202) 512-6000. Agenda: The Board will advise the Chief of Engineers on environmental policy...

  15. 75 FR 63449 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DoD. ACTION: Notice of open... advises the Chief of Engineers by providing expert and independent advice on environmental issues facing...

  16. Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Hassan; Fabiano, Simone; Kemerink, Martijn

    2017-02-01

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

  17. Analytical and experimental investigations of the passive heat transport in HTRs under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.; Barthels, H.; Jahn, W.; Cleveland, J.C.; Ishihara, M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic accident analyses have been performed with computer simulation models to investigate core heatup sequences, sensitivity analyses, power variations, anticipated transients without scram, and core displacement considerations for probabilistic safety analyses (PSA) of small gas-cooled high-temperature reactors (e.g. HTR-Module). In worst case considerations where not only a loss of the active heat removal system is assumed but also a loss of the vessel cooling system, the heat would be transported into the surrounding concrete structure. In such a case the concrete would act as a natural long-term intermediate heat storage dissipating the heat through the concrete surface. Large scale and reactor safety experiments have been performed to investigate passive heat transport mechanisms -- which can cooldown a HIR core during severe accident conditions -- for validation basis of computer simulation codes used for accident analyses. In general, the comparisons of experimental and analytical results with computer calculations of the heat transport codes are in good agreement

  18. Experimental investigation of turbulent transport at the edge of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorczak, N.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript is devoted to the experimental investigation of particle transport in the edge region of the tokamak Tore Supra. The first part introduces the motivations linked to energy production, the principle of a magnetic confinement and the elements of physics essential to describe the dynamic of the plasma at the edge region. From data collected by a set of Langmuir probes and a fast visible imaging camera, we demonstrate that the particle transport is dominated by the convection of plasma filaments, structures elongated along magnetic field lines. They present a finite wave number, responsible for the high enhancement of the particle flux at the low field side of the tokamak. This leads to the generation of strong parallel flows, and the strong constraint of filament geometry by the magnetic shear. (author)

  19. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms.

  20. In vitro investigation of intestinal transport mechanism of silicon, supplied as orthosilicic acid-vanillin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergent, Thérèse; Croizet, Karine; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2017-02-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most abundant trace elements in the body. Although pharmacokinetics data described its absorption from the diet and its body excretion, the mechanisms involved in the uptake and transport of Si across the gut wall have not been established. Caco-2 cells were used as a well-accepted in vitro model of the human intestinal epithelium to investigate the transport, across the intestinal barrier in both the absorption and excretion directions, of Si supplied as orthosilicic acid stabilized by vanillin complex (OSA-VC). The transport of this species was found proportional to the initial concentration and to the duration of incubation, with absorption and excretion mean rates similar to those of Lucifer yellow, a marker of paracellular diffusion, and increasing in the presence of EGTA, a chelator of divalents cations including calcium. A cellular accumulation of Si, polarized from the apical side of cells, was furthermore detected. These results provide evidence that Si, ingested as a food supplement containing OSA-VC, crosses the intestinal mucosa by passive diffusion via the paracellular pathway through the intercellular tight junctions and accumulates intracellularly, probably by an uptake mechanism of facilitated diffusion. This study can help to further understand the kinetic of absorption of Si. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY TRANSPORT ON THE BASIS OF AEROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NYITRAI L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global upper-air data base over the last 40 years is available by courtesy of College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University of Wyoming. Considering the fact, that in the atmospheric moisture transport between the oceans and the continents the humidity flow is much stronger towards the mainland than in the reverse direction, therefore it is reasonable to look for some correlation between the moisture transport and precipitation climate of the continents. For Europe, this is not easy because of the highly indented coastlines. According to laws of physics moisture transport influx to a (part of a continent i.e. through the border of a closed curve occurs as rain falling out in the water balance of the geographical area investigated. We are interested in quasi-stationary temporal changes showed by the stationary approach mentioned above that can be related to climate change. In Europe the precipitation regime of the rainy coast in Western Balkans can be described as a stationary approach, while the relationship between the moisture coming from the seas and the precipitation climate of Central and Eastern Europe in the past 40 years can be examined as a quasi-stationary process. This change in our region moves towards more frequent droughts having great economic influences, mainly in agriculture and hydrology. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between moisture convergence calculated by the radiosonde measurements and the precipitation climate of a selected area of land.

  2. Audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-07

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (Commission) mission is to oversee America`s natural gas and oil pipeline transportation, electric utility, and hydroelectric power industries to ensure that consumers receive adequate energy supplies at just and reasonable rates. To carry out this mission, the Commission issues regulations covering the accounting, reporting, and rate-making requirements of the regulated utility companies. The Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant performs financial related audits at companies to ensure compliance with these regulations. The purpose of this audit was to evaluate the office of Chief Accountant`s audit performance. Specifically, the objectives were to determine if the most appropriate audit approach was used and if a quality assurance process was in place to ensure reports were accurate and supported by the working papers.

  3. An investigation of the electrical transport properties of graphene-oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, Gunasekaran; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Mohan, Rajneesh; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Four terminal electrical transport characterization of graphene-oxide thin film. ► Low temperature R–T and I–V studies on GO thin film. ► Electrical transport obeys VRH mechanism supported by Raman spectra. ► GO characterizations by SEM, AFM, UV–vis, XRD, FTIR and XPS. ► GO-FET confirms the p-type semiconducting behavior. - Abstract: The electrical transport properties of graphene-oxide (GO) thin films were investigated. The GO was synthesized by a modified Hummers method and was characterized by X-ray diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The thin film of GO was made on a Si/SiO 2 substrate by drop-casting. The surface morphology of the GO film was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques. Temperature dependent resistance and current–voltage measurements were studied using four-terminal method at various temperatures (120, 150, 175, 200, 250 and 300 K) and their charge transport followed the 3D variable range hopping mechanism which was well supported by Raman spectra analysis. The presence of various functional groups in GO were identified by using high resolution X-ray photo electron (XPS) and Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques. Graphene-oxide thin film field effect transistor devices show p-type semiconducting behavior with a hole mobility of 0.25 cm 2 V −1 s −1 and 0.59 cm 2 V −1 s −1 when measured in air and vacuum respectively.

  4. The chief data officer handbook for data governance

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    A practical guide for today's chief data officers to define and manage data governance programs   The relatively new role of chief data officer (CDO) has been created to address the issue of managing a company's data as a strategic asset, but the problem is that there is no universally accepted "playbook" for this role. Magnifying the challenge is the rapidly increasing volume and complexity of data, as well as regulatory compliance as it relates to data. In this book, Sunil Soares provides a practical guide for today's chief data officers to manage data as an asset while delivering the truste

  5. Investigation of methods for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion tartets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate methods for fabricating, characterizing and transporting cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets on a continuous basis. A microprocessor-based data acquisition system has been built that converts a complete target image to digital data, which are then analyzed by automated software procedures. The low temperatures required to freeze the hydrogen isotopes contained in a target is provided by a cryogenic cold chamber capable of attaining 15 K. A new method for target manipulation and positioning is studied that employs molecular gas beams to levitate a target and an electrostatic quadrupole structure to provide for its lateral containment. Since the electrostatic target-positioning scheme requires that the targets be charged, preliminary investigation has been carried out for a target-charging mechanism based on ion-bombardment

  6. Investigation of tritium transport by the water courses from the territory of Krasnoyarsk MCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosov, A.V.; Martynova, A.M.; Shabanov, V.F.; Savitskij, Yu.V.; Shishlov, A.E.; Revenko, Yu.A.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the Enisej river contamination as a result of tritium transport from the territory of the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Complex is discussed. The results of investigations realized for the Complex sewerage waters and streams running out from its territory and flowing into the Enisej river within the controlled area are analyzed. The investigations include hydrometric measurements of water flow rate, dosimetric measurements of of water stream profiles and sampling of water, bottom sediments, tidal soils, as well as hydrobionts for radioisotope and chemical analysis. Maximum tritium concentration revealed amounts to 125 Bq/l which is not dangerous from ecological viewpoint. The conclusion on necessity of the tritium monitoring in the zone affected by the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Complex is made [ru

  7. Using molecular-scale tracers to investigate transport of agricultural pollutants in soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D.; Dungait, J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We explore the use of molecular-scale tracers to investigate the transport of potential pollutants due to the application of slurry to soil. The molecular-scale approach allows us to separate the pollutants which are moved to water bodies through sediment-bound and dissolved transport pathways. Slurry is applied to agricultural land to as a soil-improver across a wide-range of topographic and climatic regimes, hence a set of experiments were designed to assess the effect of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on the transport of pollutants. The experiments were carried out using University of Bristol's TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) facility. The facility includes a dual axis soil slope (6 x 2.5 x 0.3 m3) and 6-nozzle rainfall simulator, which enables the manipulation of the slope to simulate different slope gradient and rainfall scenarios. Cattle slurry was applied to the top 1 metre strip of the experimental soil slope followed by four rainfall simulations, where the gradient (5° & 10°) and the rainfall intensity (60 & 120 mm hr-1) were co-varied. Leachate was sampled from different flow pathways (surface, subsurface and percolated) via multiple outlets on the slope throughout the experiments and soil cores were taken from the slope after each experiment. Novel tracers were used to trace the pollutants in both dissolved and sediment-bound forms. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to trace dissolved slurry-derived material via water flow pathways, as the slurry was found to have a distinct signature compared with the soil. The fluorescence signatures of the leachates were compared with those of many organic compounds in order to characterise the origin of the signal. This allowed the assessment of the longevity of the signal in the environment to establish if it could be used as a robust long-term tracer of slurry material in water or if would be subject to transform processes through time. 5-βstanols, organic compounds

  8. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2009-12-15

    Presented is the 2009 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office.

  9. A Commander in Chief's Network-Centric Odyssey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Copley, E

    2002-01-01

    .... Each Armed Service has begun training and equipping its force using the tenets of Network-Centric Operations, but those forces come together for the first time under the combatant Commander-in-Chief...

  10. 78 FR 4138 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... (SDOCH), 401 West Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85003-21178. Agenda: The Board will advise the Chief of... interested person may attend. However, all attendees will enter and exit SDOCH through the appropriate...

  11. The changing role of the hospital chief financial officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, T R; Freitag, W

    1980-01-01

    Things are changing. That statement is obviously true of things political, economic and scientific. Not surprisingly, therefore, the statement applies to the activities, responsibilities, qualifications and, ultimately, status of the hospital chief financial officer (CFO).

  12. Water transport in gas diffusion media for PEM fuel cells. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Joerg

    2010-08-20

    The water flux in partially saturated hydrophobic carbon fibre paper for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications is investigated and compared with the frequently used constitutive two-phase flow model based on Darcy's law. Further, the first steps towards a math-based material design for gas diffusion media are explored in this thesis. Two self-developed ex-situ experiments to investigate the liquid water transport are introduced. The first is a newly developed buoyancy-based measurement of the pressuresaturation relationship on thin porous material with an accuracy of 0.5 kPa for the pressure and {+-} 5% for the saturation. The second experiment measures the pressure drop in dependence of flow rates down to magnitudes of {mu}L/s across the partially saturated thin porous material. This flow rate is relevant for the fuel cell application. The liquid water transport through Toray 060 carbon fibre paper, impregnated with 7% and 10% PTFE is investigated at wet and dry boundary conditions. The experiments are also accompanied by analytical and numerical free surface modelling with the consideration of the material morphology and liquid-solid interaction. The imbibing and draining cases of an arrangement of six fibres at varying solid-liquid interaction and boundary conditions are studied with 'Surface Evolver'. In order to evaluate the findings of ex-situ and modelling work for applicability to water transport in fuel cell operation, the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is assessed. The focus is on the visualisation of 2D and 3D water distribution in the operating fuel cell. The compatibility of the NMR experiment with fuel cell operation in relation to material selection, operating temperature, and current density is addressed. NMR imaging is employed for different current densities, stoichiometries, and fuel cell arrangements. The fuel cell arrangements differ by the cathode diffusion medium. Plain, hydrophobic, and

  13. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  14. Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Ohlsson, Yvonne; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2003-06-01

    This report comprises a strategy for the handling of laboratory investigations of diffusivity and sorption characteristics within the discipline-specific programme 'Transport Properties of the Rock' in the SKB site investigations. The aim of the transport programme is to investigate the solute transport properties at a site in order to acquire data that are required for an assessment of the long-term performance and radiological safety of the deep repository. The result of the transport programme is the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model, i.e. a description of the site-specific properties for the transport of solutes in the groundwater at a site. A strategy for the methodology, control of sampling and characterisation programme and interpretation of the results, is proposed. The basis for the laboratory investigations is a conceptual geological model based on the geological model produced in the geology programme. Major and minor types of rock and fractures are defined and characterised according to the quality of the general database and site-specific needs. The selection of samples and analyses is determined in close co-operation with the geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics programmes. The result of the laboratory investigations is a retardation model, which is used as an input in the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model. The interpretation and production of a retardation model is described and exemplified. Lastly, method-specific strategies and recommendations are given, including strategies for the selection of tracers in the experiments and for the treatment of the sampled geologic materials

  15. Chief Scientist Grants: a Waste of Public Money

    OpenAIRE

    Zev Golan

    2009-01-01

    The chief scientist program is designed to support Israeli technological projects. The level of subsidization, as revealed in JIMS' position paper, is much higher than the level used by OECD members. In fact, the Chief Scientist office distributes freely taxpayers' money without filtering and sorting the best projects. Usually, the bulk of the budget is given to large companies with extended public relations budgets. In the past 10 years, national expenditure on civilian R&D as a percent of G...

  16. From the Editor-in-Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Oka

    2011-01-01

    while under review by the Journal." At the end I have a pleasure to frankly appreciate to Professor Jan Erik Johnsson, from Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, for his contribution, as member of the International Advisory Board from the very beginning, to the scientific scope and orientation of the Journal, and to the quality of the papers published in more than 15 years. I am sorry that his wish was not to be member of the International Advisory Board, since he was retired. In the name of Editorial Boards of the journal Thermal Science I wish to him many nice activities in his free time. Finally, I am happy that, following the wish of Prof. Arun Mujumdar, the world known scientist and member of our International Advisory Board, that I can pay your attention to the link: http://serve.me.nus.edu.sg/arun/E_books.htm, where you can download many interesting e-books, and review of the activity of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Technology Centre, of the Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore. April, 2011 Professor Simeon Oka, Ph. D. Editor-in-chief

  17. Development of atmosphere-soil-vegetation model for investigation of radioactive materials transport in terrestrial biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Zhang, Leiming; Held, Andreas; Serca, Dominique; Klemm, Otto

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the transport of radionuclides in the terrestrial biosphere we have developed a one-dimensional numerical model named SOLVEG that predicts the transfer of water, heat, and gaseous and particulate matters in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system. The SOLVEG represents atmosphere, soil, and vegetation as an aggregation of several layers. Basic equations used in the model are solved using the finite difference method. Most of predicted variables are interrelated with the source/sink terms of momentum, water, heat, gases, and particles based on mathematically described biophysical processes in atmosphere, soil and vegetation. The SOLVEG can estimate dry, wet and fog deposition of gaseous and particulate matters at each canopy layer. Performance tests of the SOLVEG with several observational sites were carried out. The SOLVEG predicted the observed temporal changes in water vapor, CO 2 , and ozone fluxes over vegetated surfaces. The SOLVEG also reproduced measured fluxes of fog droplets and of fine aerosols over the forest. (author)

  18. Investigation of high-p{sub T} phenomena within a partonic transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochler, Oliver

    2011-10-26

    In the work presented herein the microscopic transport model BAMPS (Boltzmann Approach to Multi-Parton Scatterings) is applied to simulate the time evolution of the hot partonic medium that is created in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and in Pb+Pb collisions at the recently started Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The study is especially focused on the investigation of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}, that quantifies the suppression of particle yields at large transverse momentum with respect to a scaled proton+proton reference, and the simultaneous description of the collective properties of the medium in terms of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} within a common framework. (orig.)

  19. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    2001-05-29

    This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  20. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and 137 Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of 137 Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations

  1. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, Douglas; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  2. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    , in his hands, the expansion continued and the transition to electronic production took place. In 2005, an agreement was signed with IOP Publishing and the bustling production work of the in-house team moved abroad to Bristol, leaving just the Editor-in-Chief to man the ship at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2011, however, as Roger prepared to step down, submissions had reached astounding levels as is evident from figure 1: that year, almost 1500 manuscripts were received by Physica Scripta, now acknowledged to be amongst the fastest growing journals in IOP Publishing, when measured in these terms. The year on year increase stands at 20% and, once again, of the extensive range of topics covered, condensed matter physics had been identified as the subject area in most need of attention because the burden of reviewing had become too great for one editor to oversee alone. Thus, when I joined Physica Scripta in January of this year, securing new External Editors for this field was perceived to be the most urgent task. It is, therefore, with the greatest of pleasure that I am able to announce the arrival of two new editors for this section: Professors David Keen and Tapio Rantala. Physica Scripta statistics Figure 1. The annual submissions made to Physica Scripta in recent years have rocketed and the rejection rate (given as a percentage) has increased rapidly. The modest increase in the number of articles accepted (shaded in blue) reflects a deliberate policy to augment the scientific quality. Professor Rantala has been selected by the Finnish Physical Society to replace Professor Matti Manninen, who is stepping down as the Finnish representative on the journal's Editorial Board. Professor Rantala is a prominent theorist and has been engaged in active research in a number of fields. In his early work, he was interested in surface science and molecular physics, however his expertise is predominantly in the domain of solid or materials physics related to

  3. Foreword from the Editor-in-Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M. Truby

    2012-04-01

    Highness the Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, for this vision. I am grateful to all of those involved in the production of this and future issues, and hope the demands of our readers are met. May the journal continue to be a success. Dr. Jon M. Truby Ph.D, Editor-in-Chief

  4. [A model on turnover intention of chief nurse officers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Ok; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Se Young; Chang, Sunju

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the turnover intention model for chief nurse officers in general hospitals. The variables for the study included job stress, social support, job satisfaction, and organization commitment. A predictive, non-experimental design was used with a sample of 144 chief nurse officers from 144 general hospitals. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS, AMOS program. The overall fitness of the hypothetical model to the data was good (χ²=16.80, p=.052, GFI=.96, AGFI=.90, NFI=.97, CFI=.99). Job stress, social support, job satisfaction, and organization commitment explained 59.0% of the variance in turnover intention by chief nurse officers. Both organization commitment and social support directly influenced turnover intention for chief nurse officers, and job stress and job satisfaction indirectly influenced turnover intention. The results imply that chief nurse officers in hospitals need social support and management of job stress to increase job satisfaction and organization commitment, and lower turnover intention.

  5. 76 FR 69030 - Delegation of Authority for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Delegation of Authority and Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer; Notices #0... of the Chief Human Capital Officer AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Notice of delegation... Human Capital Officers Act of 2002 to the Chief Human Capital Officer. The Chief Human Capital Officer...

  6. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  7. Investigating the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments: A Precursor for Optimal Neuronal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are the most abundant structure of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Once synthesized within the cell body they are then transported throughout the axon along microtubule tracks, driven by the molecular motors kinesin and dynein. This movement is characterized by long pauses with no movement interrupted by infrequent bouts of rapid movement, resulting in an aggregate dense cytoskeletal structure, which serves to regulate an axon's shape and size. Curiously, the modulated kinetics of these polymers produces a very regular, yet non-uniform, morphology in myelinated axons which are composed of discretely spaced myelin-ensheathed segments that are separated by short constricted regions called "nodes of Ranvier". This unique design optimizes the conduction velocity of myelinated axons at minimal fiber size. Hence, neurofilaments regulate the axon caliber to optimize neuron function. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the motile mechanism of neurofilament transport as well as the resulting electrophysiological effects that follow. We start by examining highly time-resolved kymograph images generated from recorded neurofilament movement via epifluorescence microscopy. Using kymograph analysis, edge detection algorithms, and pixel smoothing tactics, neurofilament trajectories are extracted and used to obtain statistical distributions for the characteristics of how these filaments move within cells. The results suggest that the observed intermittent and bidirectional motions of these filaments might be explained by a model in which dynein and kinesin motors attach to a single neurofilament cargo and interact through mechanical forces only (i.e. a "tug-of-war" model). We test this hypothesis by developing two discrete-state stochastic models for the kinetic cycles of kinesin and dynein, which are then incorporated into a separate stochastic model that represents the posed tug-of-war scenario. We then

  8. Fundamental investigation on electrostatic travelling-wave transport of a liquid drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Basic research has been carried out on the transport of a liquid drop and a soft body in an electrostatic travelling field. A conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes was constructed and a four-phase electrostatic travelling wave was applied to the electrodes to transport the drop on the conveyer. The following were clarified by the experiment. (1) Drops and soft bodies can be transported by virtue of the travelling wave in an insulative liquid that is insoluble to the drop, because the drop was charged on the conveyer by friction and driven by the Coulomb force. (2) A drop that covered less than three arrays of the parallel electrode can be transported in the travelling wave field. (3) A threshold voltage exists for the transport. (4) Although the transport was possible not only for insulative but also for conductive drops, the insulative drop can be transported efficiently. (5) The modes of transport can be classified into three categories, namely, a synchronous region where the motion of the liquid drop is in synchrony with the travelling wave, a delayed response regime, and a regime where transport does not occur. (6) Mixing of drops for a chemical reaction was demonstrated on the conveyer with scroll electrodes. A simple model was proposed to simulate the dynamics of the drop in the electrostatic travelling field

  9. Investigation of transfection efficacy with transcatheter arterial transporting transferring to enhance p53 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; Niu Huanzhang; Zhu Guangyu; An Yanli; Qiu Dinghong; Teng Gaojun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the function of transferrin-DNA complex, transported by transferrin(Tf) and trans-arterial injection via interventional approach be the duel-target-orientated delivery and the transferring into malignant cells to get more effective therapy. Methods: p53-LipofectAMINE ligand with different concentrations of Tf (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 μg)transfected the 4 strains including LM6,Hep3B,YY and L02 in vitro to evaluate the gene transfection efficiency through western blot. Then, after setting up the VX2 hepatocarcinoma models, we delivered the Tf-p53-LipofectAMlNE complex into the hepatic arteries via interventional techniques to analyse the transfection efficiency in vivo. Results: Tf, within the range of l0 100 μg, could increase gene transfection efficiency mediated by liposome, and the efficiency increases with the raise of Tf concentration. Combination with interventional technique to inject Tf-DNA complex into tumor arteries, gene transfection efficiency was enhanced in rabbit models. Conclusion: Tf can enhance gene-liposome transfection efficiency, furthermore with combination of interventional catheter technique, there would be a potential duel-target-orientated gene therapy method. (authors)

  10. An investigation of the information propagation and entropy transport aspects of Stirling machine numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Louis F.

    1992-01-01

    Aspects of the information propagation modeling behavior of integral machine computer simulation programs are investigated in terms of a transmission line. In particular, the effects of pressure-linking and temporal integration algorithms on the amplitude ratio and phase angle predictions are compared against experimental and closed-form analytic data. It is concluded that the discretized, first order conservation balances may not be adequate for modeling information propagation effects at characteristic numbers less than about 24. An entropy transport equation suitable for generalized use in Stirling machine simulation is developed. The equation is evaluated by including it in a simulation of an incompressible oscillating flow apparatus designed to demonstrate the effect of flow oscillations on the enhancement of thermal diffusion. Numerical false diffusion is found to be a major factor inhibiting validation of the simulation predictions with experimental and closed-form analytic data. A generalized false diffusion correction algorithm is developed which allows the numerical results to match their analytic counterparts. Under these conditions, the simulation yields entropy predictions which satisfy Clausius' inequality.

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation into the structural features and transport properties of C60 in liquid argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kuan-Chuan; Weng, Cheng-I

    2007-07-05

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the structural features and transport properties of C60 in liquid argon. The results reveal that an organized structure shell of liquid argon is formed close to the surface of a C60 fullerene molecule, thereby changing the solid/liquid interfacial structure. Furthermore, the simulation indicates that the C60-liquid argon fluid becomes structurally more stable as the C60 molecule volume fraction and the temperature increase. The viscosity of the fluid increases significantly as the C60 molecule loading is increased, particularly at a lower temperature. The thermal conductivity enhancement of the fluid in the present simulations is anomalously an order of magnitude higher than the theoretical predictions from either the Maxwell or the Lu and Liu models, and is found to vary approximately linearly with the C60 molecule volume fraction. The increased thermal conductivity is attributed to the nature of heat conduction in C60 molecule suspensions and an organized structure at the solid/liquid interface.

  12. On an investigation into Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) safety and traffic efficiency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedebe, Nnanna

    2015-05-01

    Vehicle-to-X (V2X) ( vehicle-to-vehicle [V2V], and vehicle-to-infrastructure [V2I]) communication, used in intelligent transportation system (ITS)/vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs), promises improved traffic efficiency, road safety, and provision of infotainment services, etc. However, the levels of these improvements have not been clearly researched and documented especially in realistic environments [2]. Consequently, using field and simulation data, we investigate the safety and traffic efficiency application benefits of V2V communication applications in a realistic scenario. In order to do this, we built a real-world simulation test-bed using real-world/field traffic data of the Maryland (MD)/Washington DC and Virginia (VA) area from July 2012 to December 2012. In addition, we developed an application called incident warning application (IWA) of which IWA-equipped vehicles make use of it to bypass a compound road accident, slippery roadway caused by ice, and reduced visibility as a result of fog; unequipped/classic vehicles are unaware of this and hence suffer adverse effects. On the average, our results show that, indeed, tangible benefits/improvements with respect to travel time (126.78%), average speed (56.12%), fuel consumption (8.05%), CO2 emissions (8.05%) together with other evaluated performance metrics are derivable from V2V communication especially at specific IWA-equipped vehicles penetration rates.

  13. Khnifiss Beach's Black Sand: Provenance and Transport Pathways Investigation Using Heavy Minerals' Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnani, M.; Elbelrhiti, H.; Ahmamou, M.; Masmoudi, L.

    2014-12-01

    Arid areas in south of Morocco suffer from silting problem causing destruction of villages infrastructure, roads, agriculture land and oasis heritage. Black sand on Khnifiss beach near Tarfaya city (S-W Morocco) is marked by enrichment of heavy minerals. This later is an important fraction that could help to assess the provenance and transport pathways of sediment. The sand's origin investigation could be useful to fight against erosion and silting problems from the source of supply, to this end, mineralogical analysis was carried out in Khnifiss beach's sand using Optic Microscope and Scanning Electronic Microscope with dispersive energy (SEM- EDS), in addition to physico-chemical analysis provided by Electronic Microprobe. The results revealed: (i) a high grade of oxides (Rutile, Ilmenite, Magnetite, Ulvöspinel) in samples, (ii) silicates (Quartz, Clinopyroxene, feldspar, Zircon), (iii) phosphate (apatite) and (iv) carbonate (calcite). The dominance of iron oxides justifies the black sand's colour. Then, the mineral composition supposes interference between different origins: proximal source (Calcareous cliff) for calcite, distal sources of oxides and silicates are supposed to be eroded and carried by Drâa valley from granite and igneous rocks in Anti-Atlasic field. Another source supposed might be a proximal volcanic island (Canaries island).

  14. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  15. Investigation of magnetic drift on transport of plasma across magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Parismita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Das, Bidyut; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak

    2015-01-01

    When a metallic body is inserted inside plasma chamber it is always associated with sheath which depends on plasma and wall condition. The effect of sheath formed in the magnetic drift and magnetic field direction on cross field plasma transport has been investigated in a double Plasma device (DPD). The drifts exist inside the chamber in the transverse magnetic field (TMF) region in a direction perpendicular to both magnetic field direction and axis of the DPD chamber. The sheath are formed in the magnetic drift direction in the experimental chamber is due to the insertion of two metallic plates in these directions and in the magnetic field direction sheath is formed at the surface of the TMF channels. These metallic plates are inserted in order to obstruct the magnetic drift so that we can minimised the loss of plasma along drift direction and density in the target region is expected to increase due to the obstruction. It ultimately improves the negative ion formation parameters. The formation of sheath in the transverse magnetic field region is studied by applying electric field both parallel and antiparallel to drift direction. Data are acquired by Langmuir probe in source and target region of our chamber. (author)

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Silver Nanoparticle Transport under Variable Flow and Ionic Strength in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makselon, Joanna; Zhou, Dan; Engelhardt, Irina; Jacques, Diederik; Klumpp, Erwin

    2017-02-21

    Unsaturated column experiments were conducted with an undisturbed loamy sand soil to investigate the influence of flow interruption (FI) and ionic strength (IS) on the transport and retention of surfactant-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and the results were compared to those obtained under continuous flow conditions. AgNP concentrations for breakthrough curves (BTCs) and retention profiles (RPs) were analyzed by ICP-MS. Experimental results were simulated by the numerical code HP1 (Hydrus-PhreeqC) with the DLVO theory, extended colloid filtration theory and colloid release model. BTCs of AgNP showed a dramatic drop after FI compared to continuous flow conditions. Evaporation increased due to FI, resulting in increased electrical conductivity of the soil solution, which led to a totally reduced mobility of AgNP. A reduction of IS after FI enhanced AgNP mobility slightly. Here the strongly increased Al and Fe concentration in the effluent suggested that soil colloids facilitated the release of AgNP (cotransport). The numerical model reproduced the measured AgNP BTCs and indicated that attachment to the air-water interface (AWI) occurring during FI was the key process for AgNP retention.

  17. Big-Men and Small Chiefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent the significant material changes observable at the end of the Neolithic reflect transformations of the underlying social dynamics. Answering this question will help us to understand the formation of Bronze Age societies. The analysis concerns southern Scandi...

  18. Source investigation methods to determine PCE transport pathways to groundwater at dry cleaners in Chicao, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.; Venus, T.; Lubke, R.; Graydon, J.; Riddle, G.

    1992-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination of groundwater underlying Chico, California has caused the closure of 5 public water supply wells, degraded the water quality in 23 private wells, and rendered up to 32,000 acre-ft of groundwater non-potable. The principal source of the PCE is believed to be waste disposal from dry cleaning operations. The investigative tools employed to characterize the distribution of PCE in the vadose zone and shallow groundwater at dry cleaner sites included: soil gas surveys; soil core sampling; depth-discrete groundwater sampling using the HydroPunch II sampler; groundwater samples obtained from monitoring wells; soil gas samples obtained from vapor monitoring wells; and dye-testing, video surveying, and high-pressure flush sampling of sanitary sewer lines. Quantitative results of field gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of soil vapor, groundwater, sanitary sewer flow, and soil samples compared favorably with concentrations reported from split samples analyzed by a California-certified laboratory. Results from the field GC analyses were used to guide the selection of monitoring well location, depth, and screened interval, and reduced the number of samples submitted to the laboratory. Results show that while modest levels of PCE (10-100 ppb) were found in soil and shallow groundwater at the sites, substantial concentrations (up to 0.1%) were found in sewer flush samples taken downstream from one of the active sites. PCE in sewer lines is believed to originate from the disposal of PCE-saturated wastewaters from the dry cleaners. This study indicates that employing several methods of contaminant detection increases the potential for source confirmation and determination of contaminant transport pathways. The high concentrations of PCE found in sewer lines downstream from dry cleaners in this study indicate that priority should be given early in the project to investigations of sanitary sewers

  19. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  20. Investigation on cause of outage of Wide Range Monitor (WRM) in High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Transport operation toward investigation for cause of outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masanori; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Taiki; Saito, Kenji; Takada, Shoji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Isozaki, Ryosuke; Katsuyama, Kozo; Motegi, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    An event, in which one of WRMs were disabled to detect the neutron flux in the reactor core, occurred during the period of reactor shut down of HTTR in March, 2010. The actual life time of WRM was unexpectedly shorter than the past developed life time. Investigation of the cause of the outage of WRM toward the recovery of the life time up to the developed life is one of the issues to develop the technology basis of High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Then, a post irradiation examination was planned to specify the damaged part causing the event in the WRM was also planned. For the investigation, the X-ray computed tomography scanner in Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF). This report describes the preliminary investigation on the cause of outage of the WRM. The results of study for transportation method of the irradiated WRM from HTTR to FMF is also reported with the record to complete the transport operation. (author)

  1. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  2. Frequency of Migraine as a Chief Complaint in Otolaryngology Outpatient Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Ali, Maria; Al Zayer, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify the frequency of typical (headache and dizziness) and common atypical (ear fullness, pressure, pain, tinnitus, facial fullness, and nasal congestion) migraine symptoms as chief complaints among patients presenting to otolaryngology clinic. Methods. This is a descriptive study of prospectively collected data from a general otolaryngology practice. Typical migraine presentations were diagnosed by applying international headache society (IHS) criteria for migraine headache and Neuhauser's criteria for migrainous vertigo. Atypical otologic and rhinologic migraine symptoms were diagnosed using individualized criteria. Charts were reviewed at 6-month interval from the first presentation. Results. Out of 1002 consecutive patients, 10.8% presented with “migrainous chief complaint.” All migrainous chief complaint patients had a history of headache but not all of them presented with headache. Corrected female to male ratio in the migraine group was 3 to 1; age distributions were significantly different between the migraine and nonmigraine groups by applying t-test. Out of the atypical complaints, 86% of the patients had a history of concomitant typical presentation. Conclusion. Actual diagnostic criteria for migraine do not satisfy the diversity of its presentation. Investigating the history of migraine is enough to diagnose most atypical presentations. Sound knowledge about migraine seems essential for any ENT practitioner. PMID:25695049

  3. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems and concepts; and (e... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst. 200...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization...

  4. 14 CFR 141.36 - Assistant chief instructor qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instrument ratings if an instrument rating is required by the course of training for the category and class... of § 61.57 of this chapter; (3) Pass a knowledge test on— (i) Teaching methods; (ii) Applicable... leading to the issuance of an instrument rating or a rating with instrument privileges, an assistant chief...

  5. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  6. The chief information security officer insights, tools and survival skills

    CERN Document Server

    Kouns, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Chief Information Security Officers are bombarded with huge challenges every day, from recommending security applications to strategic thinking and business innovation. This guide describes the hard and soft skills that a successful CISO requires: not just a good knowledge of information security, but also attributes such as flexibility and communication skills.

  7. Chief of staff finance | Lillie | Scientia Militaria: South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (1982) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Chief of staff finance. Ashley C ...

  8. Reclaiming the Educational Role of Chief Admission Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Patricia; Robertson, Larry

    1995-01-01

    Describes changes that have occurred in high schools, colleges, and the entrepreneurial admission sector. Relates the evolution of the admission officer's job since the early 1960s and the profession's rapid growth. Details the hybrid role of marketer and educator for chief admissions officers, and issues a call for professional standards. (RJM)

  9. Digelas Tukda (The Story of a Tanaina Chief).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pete, Shem

    This story in the Tanaina Athapascan language (Susitna dialect) is about a Tanaina Chief and tells about Tanaina life in the nineteenth century. It is intended for competent speakers of the Alaskan language who have knowledge of the writing system. An interlinear English translation is included as well as a free English translation. (NCR)

  10. Traditional chiefs and modern land tenure law in Niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lund, C.; Hesseling, G.S.C.M.; Rouveroy van Nieuwaal, van E.; Dijk, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Many local tenure arrangements in Niger were largely implicit, not recorded in any codified form. In the process of codification now underway, chiefs are regarded as the key interpreters of tradition, mutating the implicit into the explicit. Land tenure reform is not without contradictions. How are

  11. Chief Zibi Sidinane: Negotiating Moravian Christianity and Settlements in 'Nomansland'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anne Folke

    2009-01-01

    I artiklen analyseres de komplicerede forhandlinger, strategier og magtkampe, der knyttede sig til etablering af kristne missionsstationer i slutningen af 1800-tallet i det østlige Sydafrika. De implicerede herrnhutiske missionærer og konvertitter - som artiklens hovedperson Chief Zibi Sidinane...

  12. Inside Back Cover | Chief | Ghana Journal of Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS must be submitted in English (except for special issues reserved for African languages), in electronic format to the current Editor-in-Chief, via our website at https://gjl.laghana.org. Authors ...

  13. Organisational age cultures : The interplay of chief executive officers age and attitudes toward younger and older employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Gielnik, Michael M.

    This article investigates the interactive effects of chief executive officer (CEO) age and CEO attitudes toward younger and older employees on organisational age cultures. Data was collected from 66 CEOs of small and medium-sized businesses and 274 employees. Results were consistent with

  14. Experimental and modelling investigations of tracer transport in variably saturated agricultural soil of Thailand: Column study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulaya Masipan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracer (Bromide movement through the unsaturated agricultural soil was investigated in soil columns. Two tracer column experiments, with a diameter of 7 cm and a depth of 25 cm, were vertically homogeneous packed with sandy loam and then carried out to investigate bromide (Br− transport under different water contents (at steady flow condition. One soil column (Column 1 represents the unsaturated agricultural soil in dry season (with water content ranging from 0.23 to 0.26 and the other (Column 2 represents the soil in wet season (water content from 0.24 to 0.35. Bromide samples were periodically collected by vacuum tubes inserted at 6.25 cm equally spaced intervals (e.g., 6.25, 12.5, 18.75 and 25 cm along the length of the column and the effluent collected at the end of the column. The observed breakthrough curves (BTCs of bromide in both columns represented a relative smooth and sigmodal curves at different distances (sampling ports. Dispersivity (α, cm for sandy loam at different locations was numerically estimated by curve fitting the experimental data with HYDRUS-1D. The α can be well described by the convection–dispersion equation and these values derived from Column 1 (ranging from 0.37 to 0.98 cm are more than those from Column 2 (0.25–0.59. Moreover, the α in both columns increases with the travel distance due to the scale-dependent effect. Furthermore, the α values were plotted on a log–log scale against travel distances and they yield empirical power law relationships with an excellent correlation (α = 0.102 (L0.697, R2 = 0.999 and α = 0.086 (L0.579, R2 = 0.963 for Column 1 and 2, respectively.

  15. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    in water. These experiments indicate that the partially dispersed systems tend to be problematic and are more severe cases with respect to flow assurance when compared to systems where the water is completely dispersed in oil. We have found that the partially dispersed systems are distinct, and are not an intermediate case between water dominated, and water-in-oil emulsified systems. Instead the experiments indicate that the hydrate formation and plugging mechanism for these systems are very complex. Hydrate growth is very rapid for such systems when compared to 100% water cut systems. The plugging mechanism for these systems is a combination of various phenomena (wall growth, agglomeration, bedding/settling, etc). Three different oils with different viscosities have been used to investigate the transportability of hydrates with respect to oil properties. The experiments indicate that the transportability of hydrates increases with increase in oil viscosity. The data from the tests performed provide the basis for a mechanistic model for hydrate formation and plugging in partially dispersed systems. It is found that in systems that were in stratified flow regime before hydrate onset, the hydrates eventually settled on the pipe walls thereby decreasing the flow area for the flow of fluids. In systems that were in the slug flow regime before hydrate formation, moving beds of hydrates were the main cause for plugging. In both the flow regimes, the systems studied entered a plugging regime beyond a certain hydrate concentration. This is termed as φplugging onset and can be used as an indicator to calculate the amount of hydrates that can be transported safely without requiring any additional treatment for a given set of flow characteristics. A correlation to calculate this hydrate concentration based on easily accessible parameters is developed in terms of flow characteristics and oil properties. The work performed in this thesis has enhanced the understanding of the

  16. From the Editor-in-Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Oka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2011 Editorial Board of the journal Thermal Science continues with the policy to prepare special issues, Supplements, devoted to the specific, actual scientific topics. Supple ments, issued besides four regular issues per year, have double role in publishing the journal Thermal Science: from one side Supplemental issues gives possibility to present to readers most interesting topics, and from the other side it is possible to publish greater number of papers, following permanent growing interest of the researchers to publish results of their investigations in our journal. Following those ideas, Editorial Board with greatest interest accepted proposal of the organizer of the Mini-symposium on Analytical Methods for Thermal Science, Professor Ji-Huan He and Shanghai Modern Textile Institute, to pre pare special issue with selected papers presented this Symposium. More over, to devote special issue of the journal Thermal Science, to analytical methods, seems to be very challenging, in this era of numerical models and commercial CFD software, used by every researcher, even at the beginning of the professional career. The beginners in investigations think that by numerical modelling it is possible to solve every physical problem, in thermal sciences, too. After wards, they realize that it is not the case, and that other scientific tools, experiments, and analytical methods can not be avoided, and even give better and more correct physical explanation of the processes. For those reasons, my personal opinion is that this issue of the journal Thermal Science is especially important, and will present new impulse for increasing quality of the journal. Papers presented at Symposium "Analytical Methods for Thermal Science", in the frame of the 3rd International Symposium on Nonlinear Dynamics, September 25-28, 2010, Shanghai, China, and selected for this special issue, convey a strong, reliable, efficient, and promising development of thermal

  17. 41 CFR 301-31.1 - Why pay subsistence and transportation expenses for threatened law enforcement/investigative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Why pay subsistence and transportation expenses for threatened law enforcement/investigative employees? 301-31.1 Section 301-31.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...

  18. From the Editor-in-Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Oka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Editorial Board of the journal Thermal Science is continuing to pay great attention to the processes in internal combustion engines, both due to their environmental impact and ability to use renewable energy sources i. e. different types of biofuels. Concerning that motor vehicles contribute about 14% of the global CO2 emission, it is understandable that many research efforts are devoted to processes in internal combustion engines and use of biofuels. The number of submitted papers dealing with processes in internal combustion engines is growing from months to months, so in the journal Thermal Science also will published in 2011 one issue devoted to the same topics. Papers submitted are already in the reviewing process. Professor Dragoslava Stojiljkovi} and Professor Stojan Petrovi} as Guest editors, had again a difficult task to make appropriate choice of the papers, covering wide range of topics. I am very grateful to Guest editors for their extremely competent choice of the topics and papers. Reviewers of the papers made, also, tremendous contributions to the quality of the papers published. This time, also, as in No. 3, 2009, we asked experts in traffic engineering to give their contribution. They pointed out importance of the internal combustion engine energy efficiency, vehicle fleet operation management and logistic efficiency, and painted large scale picture of the environmental problems caused by large density traffic. We hope that this point of view will make new impulse for many new joint projects with the aim to investigate impact of the processes in internal combustion engines and logistic of motor fleet management, and organization of traffic flows, especially in large towns, on environment. Papers devoted to the thermal processes in internal combustion engines are grouped in Part one of this issue. Due to large number of papers accepted for publication, we have been forced to introduce Part two, in which are grouped selected

  19. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  20. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  1. Investigation of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in advanced microelectronics and optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.; Booth, T.; Gray, M. [and others

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The next generation of electronic microchips will utilize components with sub-micron feature size and optoelectronic devices with picosecond response time. Fundamental understanding of the device performance can only be obtained through first principles physics modeling of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in realistic geometries with material interfaces and dispersive properties. We have developed a general model incorporating important physics such as charge transport processes in materials with multilevel band structures and electromagnetic effects to simulate device characteristics. Accurate treatment of material interfaces and boundaries is included. The Monte Carlo charge transport is coupled self-consistently to Maxwell`s equations to accurately model scattering processes in the presence of an externally biased potential. This detailed multidimensional simulation capability is compared with and verified by experimental data, and could become an industrial standard for benchmarking and improving the {open_quotes}reduced model{close_quotes} codes used for semiconductor design. Specific tasks are the extension of existing capabilities in particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique and Monte Carlo charge transport to study the physics of charged particle dynamics in realistic microelectronic devices, such as bipolar semiconductors, heterojunction transistors, and optoelectronic switches. Our approach has been based on the coupled particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo technique, which can simultaneously treat both electromagnetic wave propagation and charged-particle transport.

  2. Investigating the environmental transport of human pharmaceuticals to streams in the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, D.; Hilton, M.; Thomas, K.V

    2004-10-15

    The occurrence of 12 selected pharmaceutical compounds and pharmaceutical compound metabolites in sewage treatment works (STW) effluents and surface waters was investigated. The substances selected for the monitoring programme were identified by a risk ranking procedure to identify those substances with the greatest potential to pose a risk to the aquatic environment. STW final effluent and surface water samples were collected from Corby, Great Billing, East Hyde, Harpenden and Ryemeads STWs. Ten of the 12 pharmaceutical compounds were detected in the STW effluent samples: propranolol (100%, median=76 ng/l), diclofenac (86%, median=424 ng/l), ibuprofen (84%, median=3086 ng/l), mefenamic acid (81%, median=133 ng/l), dextropropoxyphene (74%, median=195 ng/l), trimethoprim (65%, 70 ng/l), erythromycin (44%, <10 ng/l), acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (33%, median=<50 ng/l), sulfamethoxazole (9%, median=<50 ng/l), tamoxifen (4%, median=<10 ng/l). In the corresponding receiving streams, fewer compounds and lower concentrations were found: propranolol (87%, median=29 ng/l), ibuprofen (69%, median=826 ng/l), mefenamic acid (60%, median=62 ng/l), dextropropoxyphene (53%, median=58 ng/l), diclofenac (47%, median=<20 ng/l), erythromycin (38%, median=<10 ng/l), trimethoprim (38%, median=<10 ng/l), acetyl sulfamethoxazole (38%, median=<50 ng/l). Four human pharmaceutical compounds were detected in samples upstream of the STWs sampled: ibuprofen (57%, median=181 ng/l), trimethoprim (36%, median <10 ng/l), erythromycin (17%, median=<10 ng/l), propranolol (14%, median=<10 ng/l), suggesting that longer range stream transport of some compounds is possible. The particular STW that was sampled and the month that it was sampled significantly influenced the measured concentrations of several, but not all, substances. There was no significant relationship between usage data and the overall frequency with which different substances were detected. There was however, some evidence to suggest that

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling Investigation of High Dissolved Sulfide Concentrations in Sedimentary Basin Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M.; Mayer, U. K.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.

    2017-12-01

    Water with total dissolved sulfide in excess of 1 mmol L-1is widely found in groundwater at intermediate depths in sedimentary basins, including regions of the Michigan basin in southeastern Ontario, Canada. Conversely, at deeper and shallower depths, relatively low total dissolved sulfide concentrations have been reported. The mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of these brackish sulfide-containing waters are not fully understood. Anaerobic microbial sulfate reduction is a common process resulting in the formation of high sulfide concentrations. Sulfate reduction rates depend on many factors including the concentration of sulfate, the abundance of organic substances, redox conditions, temperature, salinity and the species of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). A sedimentary basin-specific conceptual model considering the effect of salinity on the rate of sulfate reduction was developed and implemented in the reactive transport model MIN3P-THCm. Generic 2D basin-scale simulations were undertaken to provide a potential explanation for the dissolved sulfide distribution observed in the Michigan basin. The model is 440 km in the horizontal dimension and 4 km in depth, and contains fourteen sedimentary rock units including shales, sandstones, limestones, dolostone and evaporites. The main processes considered are non-isothermal density dependent flow, kinetically-controlled mineral dissolution/precipitation and its feedback on hydraulic properties, cation exchange, redox reactions, biogenic sulfate reduction, and hydromechanical coupling due to glaciation-deglaciation events. Two scenarios were investigated focusing on conditions during an interglacial period and the transient evolution during a glaciation-deglaciation cycle. Inter-glaciation simulations illustrate that the presence of high salinity brines strongly suppress biogenic sulfate reduction. The transient simulations show that glaciation-deglaciation cycles can have an impact on the maximum depth of

  4. Investigating the environmental transport of human pharmaceuticals to streams in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, D.; Hilton, M.; Thomas, K.V.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of 12 selected pharmaceutical compounds and pharmaceutical compound metabolites in sewage treatment works (STW) effluents and surface waters was investigated. The substances selected for the monitoring programme were identified by a risk ranking procedure to identify those substances with the greatest potential to pose a risk to the aquatic environment. STW final effluent and surface water samples were collected from Corby, Great Billing, East Hyde, Harpenden and Ryemeads STWs. Ten of the 12 pharmaceutical compounds were detected in the STW effluent samples: propranolol (100%, median=76 ng/l), diclofenac (86%, median=424 ng/l), ibuprofen (84%, median=3086 ng/l), mefenamic acid (81%, median=133 ng/l), dextropropoxyphene (74%, median=195 ng/l), trimethoprim (65%, 70 ng/l), erythromycin (44%, <10 ng/l), acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (33%, median=<50 ng/l), sulfamethoxazole (9%, median=<50 ng/l), tamoxifen (4%, median=<10 ng/l). In the corresponding receiving streams, fewer compounds and lower concentrations were found: propranolol (87%, median=29 ng/l), ibuprofen (69%, median=826 ng/l), mefenamic acid (60%, median=62 ng/l), dextropropoxyphene (53%, median=58 ng/l), diclofenac (47%, median=<20 ng/l), erythromycin (38%, median=<10 ng/l), trimethoprim (38%, median=<10 ng/l), acetyl sulfamethoxazole (38%, median=<50 ng/l). Four human pharmaceutical compounds were detected in samples upstream of the STWs sampled: ibuprofen (57%, median=181 ng/l), trimethoprim (36%, median <10 ng/l), erythromycin (17%, median=<10 ng/l), propranolol (14%, median=<10 ng/l), suggesting that longer range stream transport of some compounds is possible. The particular STW that was sampled and the month that it was sampled significantly influenced the measured concentrations of several, but not all, substances. There was no significant relationship between usage data and the overall frequency with which different substances were detected. There was however, some evidence to suggest that

  5. Opto-electro-modulated transient photovoltage and photocurrent system for investigation of charge transport and recombination in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiangjian; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Wu, Huijue; Meng, Qingbo

    2016-12-01

    An opto-electro-modulated transient photovoltage/photocurrent system has been developed to probe microscopic charge processes of a solar cell in its adjustable operating conditions. The reliability of this system is carefully determined by electric circuit simulations and experimental measurements. Using this system, the charge transport, recombination and storage properties of a conventional multicrystalline silicon solar cell under different steady-state bias voltages, and light illumination intensities are investigated. This system has also been applied to study the influence of the hole transport material layer on charge extraction and the microscopic charge processes behind the widely considered photoelectric hysteresis in perovskite solar cells.

  6. Simultaneous Investigation of Hot-electron Transport and Preplasma Formation in Cone-wire Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Singh, S.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Ma, T.; Hey, D.; Ping, Y.; Chen, C. D.; Macphee, A.; Key, M. H.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P.; MacKinnon, A.; Pasley, J.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R.; Link, A.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.; van Woerkom, L. D.; Westover, B.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.

    2010-11-01

    The generation and transport of MeV electrons is essential to the realization of Fast Ignition fusion. An important factor in determining the hot electron source is the preplasma distribution that is inevitably formed even in high-contrast short-pulse laser systems. A larger preplasma moves the critical surface further from the region where heating is required, and has a significant effect on the electron source and transport. In this paper we present analysis of results where bremstrahhlung emission from the preplasma region was imaged simultaneously with k-alpha emission from a copper tracer in cone-wire targets using a grazing-incidence x-Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope. The predicted scalings from simulations and theory will be compared with experimental results to determine unique characteristics of how the hot electron source and transport are affected by the presence of the wire as well as preplasma.

  7. Investigation of Single Phase NanoCellulose Transport through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Carter Jordan

    The application of nanotechnology to the petroleum industry has seen many recent advancements. Nanocellulose is an emerging nanoparticle at the forefront of research. Before nanocellulose can be injected into petroleum reservoirs, further understanding is needed as to the retention mechanisms that occur during nanocellulose transport through porous media. A series of unconsolidated sandpack floods were preformed with nanocellulose and the resulting retention and permeability reduction were measured. The experimental variables include nanocellulose type, sand grain size, flowrate, and salinity. It was found that all types of nanocellulose tested showed significantly different transport properties. Retention and permeability reduction increased as grain size decreased or flowrate decreased. As a general trend, the larger the size of aggregates in bulk solution, the greater the retention and permeability reduction. Salinity was found to be the primary parameter affecting transport. Increased salinity caused additional aggregation which resulted in increased straining and filter cake formation.

  8. A Quantitative and Systematic Methodology to Investigate Energy Consumption Issues in Multimodal Intercity Transportation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Du

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy issues in transportation systems have garnered increasing attention recently. This study proposes a systematic methodology for policy-makers to minimize energy consumption in multimodal intercity transportation systems considering suppliers’ operational constraints and travelers’ mobility requirements. A bi-level optimization model is developed for this purpose and considers the air, rail, private auto, and transit modes. The upper-level model is a mixed integer nonlinear program aiming to minimize energy consumption subject to transportation suppliers’ operational constraints and traffic demand distribution to paths resulting from the lower-level model. The lower-level model is a linear program seeking to maximize the trip utilities of travelers. The interactions between the multimodal transportation suppliers and intercity traffic demand are considered under the goal of minimizing system energy consumption. The proposed bi-level mixed integer model is relaxed and transformed into a mathematical program with complementarity constraints, and solved using a customized branch-and-bound algorithm. Numerical experiments, conducted using multimodal travel options between Lafayette, Indiana and Washington, D.C. reiterate that shifting traffic demand from private cars to the transit and rail modes significantly reduce energy consumption. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides tools to quantitatively analyze system energy consumption and traffic demand distribution among transportation modes under specific policy instruments. The results illustrate the need to systematically incorporate the interactions among traveler preferences, network structure, and supplier operational schemes to provide policy-makers insights for developing traffic demand shift mechanisms to minimize system energy consumption. Hence, the proposed methodology provide policy-makers the capability to analyze energy consumption in the transportation sector by a

  9. Geohydrology and possible transport routes of polychlorinated biphenyls in Haiku Valley, Oahu, Hawaii. Water resources investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izuka, S.K.; Hill, B.R.; Shade, P.J.; Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    The report discusses geohydrologic evidence of ground-water and surface-water movement and sediment transport in an effort to identify routes by which water-borne contaminants may be transported within and beyond Haiku Valley. Specifically, the report describes the geologic framework of the valley and the bearing it has on the movement of ground water, and water budget of the Haiku Valley basin, the exchange between ground water and surface water, and the movement of sediment by surface water. The concentration of PCBs carried in suspended stream sediment is also described.

  10. The dynamical response of the plasma as a tool for investigating transport mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moret, J.M.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Joye, B.; Lister, J.B.

    1992-02-01

    The dynamical response of the soft X-ray emission profile to different external perturbations - gas feed, impurity injection, RF power, surface loop voltage - has been studied on the TCA tokamak and analysed using the same techniques. The frequency dependence of the response has been exploited to distinguish between the dominant transport processes. Remarkably similar phase response profiles were obtained with the different stimuli; they show a link with the sawtooth activity. The model which most plausibly explains these experimental observations requires diffusive transport with the diffusive coefficient locally modulated by the perturbation. (author) 15 figs., 27 refs

  11. Experimental investigations on a fuel element transportation vessel for analysis of mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diersch, R.; Ulrich, N.; Huggenberg, R.; Janberg, K.; Ettemeyer, A.

    1995-01-01

    During approval of fuel element transportation vessels extensive proofs have to be made to qualify the theoretical calculations. In order to get maximum information about the behaviour of the components of the vessels and the real boundary conditions holographic measuring techniques are used. The application of holography on the experimental analysis of a fuel element transportation vessel is shown on a THTR-CASTOR-container. As an example, the deformation of a lifting lug is analysed and the flexible bending of the vessel cap is measured. The experimental results are compared with analytical calculation results. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of the pathway of contaminated soil transported to plant surfaces by raindrop splash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Hakonson, T.E.; Whicker, F.W.; White, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The environmental transport pathway of soil-borne radioisotopes to vegetation surfaces via raindrop splash was studied. The data show that soil can significantly contribute to the contamination found on plants. Further detailed study is needed to calculate the rate constant for the raindrop splash and retention pathways. 8 references, 1 figure

  13. Investigation of the transport of air masses to Germany from nuclear facility sites east of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, F.W.; Spoden, E.

    2000-05-01

    The accident in the Chernobyl-4 reactor demonstrated that even far distant reactor sites may cause some danger to the German territory, so that emergency preparedness measures are required. The geographic position of a site has an important influence on the transport of air masses starting at the site. The geographic positions of sources determine the potential danger to Germany that may result from an accident, and consequently the required emergency preparedness plans. For sites of nuclear power plants and spent fuel reprocessing facilities east of Germany (Nuclear Facilities East), the transport ways of air masses were calculated daily by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) for the period from November 1995 to October 1999. Those data were used to derive estimates of the frequency of transport to Germany, the time distribution for the cases of air masses reaching Germany, and the corresponding time of travelling. Until 31 October 1999, trajectories (transport ways) were calculated by the DWD for 1444 days, and were submitted for analysis to the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS). The fraction of days for which trajectories with travelling times below seven days are reaching Germany decreases from 46 % for Dukovany (at a distance of 200 km) through to 17 % for Chernobyl (at a distance of 1000 km), 11 % for Kola (at a distance of 2000 km), and 1.3 % for Chelyabinsk (at a distance of 2900 km). (orig) [de

  14. INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF PDZ-DOMAIN INTERACTIONS FOR DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER FUNCTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Gether, Ulrik

    PICK1 has been shown to interact with the distal dopamine transporter (DAT) C-terminus via its PDZ domain. Although we recently have shown that ER export and targeting of the DAT to the cell surface is critically dependent on discrete epitopes in the distal C-terminus, these events do not require...

  15. Investigate the causes of transport and tramming accidents on coal mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rushworth, AM

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport and tramming accidents on coal mines in South Africa are a major component in the overall pattern of colliery accidents. Furthermore, there is now a widespread acceptance that human error is a common cause of failure in accident patterns...

  16. Exploiting nanotechnologies and TRPV1 channels to investigate the putative anandamide membrane transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Ligresti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable efforts have been made to characterize the pathways regulating the extracellular levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide. However, none of such pathways has been so argued as the existence of a carrier-mediated transport of anandamide across the membrane. Apart from the lack of molecular evidence for such a carrier, the main reasons of this controversy lie in the methodologies currently used to study anandamide cellular uptake. Furthermore, the main evidence in favor of the existence of an "anandamide transporter" relies on synthetic inhibitors of this process, the selectivity of which has been questioned.We used the cytosolic binding site for anandamide on TRPV1 channels as a biosensor to detect anandamide entry into cells, and exploited nanotechnologies to study anandamide membrane transport into intact TRPV1-overexpressing HEK-293 cells. Both fluorescence and digital holographic (DH quantitative phase microscopy were used to study TRPV1 activation. Poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanoparticles (PCL-NPs were used to incorporate anandamide, which could thus enter the cell and activate TRPV1 channels bypassing any possible specific protein(s involved in the uptake process. We reasoned that in the absence of such protein(s, pharmacological tools previously shown to inhibit the "anandamide transporter" would affect in the same way the uptake of anandamide and PCL-NP-anandamide, and hence the activation of TRPV1. However, when masked into PCL-NPs, anandamide cellular uptake became much less sensitive to these agents, although it maintained the same pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics as that of "free" anandamide.We found here that several agents previously reported to inhibit anandamide cellular uptake lose their efficacy when anandamide is prevented from interacting directly with plasma membrane proteins, thus arguing in favor of the specificity of such agents for the putative "anandamide transporter", and of the existence of such

  17. Investigation on the oxygen transport mechanisms in the Sarcheshmeh waste rock dumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yousefi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pyrite oxidation and acid mine drainage (AMD are the serious environmental problems associated with the mining activities in sulphide ores. The rate of pyrite oxidation is governed by the availability of oxygen (Borden, 2003. Therefore, the identifying oxygen supplying mechanism is one of the most important issues related to the environmental assessment of waste rock dumps (Cathles and Apps, 1975; Jaynes et al., 1984; Davis and Ritchie, 1986. Although comprehensive researches were performed on the mathematical description of oxygen transport processes using the numerical modeling (Morin et al., 1988; Blowes et al., 1991; Wunderly et al., 1986; Elberling et al., 1994; Jannesar Malakooti et al., 2014, so far, the interactions between these processes and geochemical and mineralogical characteristics has not been studied especially in waste rock dumps. Therefore the main objective of this study is to identify the evidences for knowing the oxygen transport mechanisms in the waste dumps and also, its role in intensity of pyrite oxidation. It is expected that such these structural studies could be useful for better understanding of dominant processes in numerical modeling and also providing environmental management strategies in the study area and other sites by similar characteristics. Materials and Methods In this study, thirty solid samples were collected from six excavated trenches in the waste rock dumps No. 19 and 31 of the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper mine. Collected samples were studied using several methods such as XRD, ASTM-D2492, paste pH and grain size distribution. The results obtained from these methods were used with the field observations in order to characterize some detail information about oxygen supplying mechanisms for oxidation reactions in the waste rock dumps. Result The main minerals found by the XRD analysis were quartz and muscovite which were present in all samples. Pyrite, orthose, albite, and chlorite were also

  18. Outcomes of the first Family Practice Chief Resident Leadership Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygdal, W K; Monteiro, M; Hitchcock, M; Featherston, W; Conard, S

    1991-01-01

    In June 1989 the first Family Practice Chief Resident Leadership Conference was presented to 27 Texas second-year residents who had been selected to serve as chief residents during their third year. The objectives of the conference were to assist these emerging leaders to develop better stress management and leadership skills and to strengthen their ties with the Texas Academy of Family Physicians. The conference featured two major workshops on stress management and leadership skills, and included plenary speeches and large and small group discussions. This article reports the outcomes of the conference as measured by the evaluation instrument completed by participants. Analysis of the results indicated that the conference had a positive effect on the residents.

  19. 76 FR 17658 - National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement. SUMMARY...

  20. Chief Human Capital Officers Council (CHCOC)'s Members and Assistants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — List of members of the Chief Human Capital Officers Council (CHCOC): Federal Chief Human Capital Officers (CHCOs) and Deputy CHCOs, as well as the council's chair,...

  1. 32 CFR 705.2 - Chief of Information and the Office of Information (CHINFO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activities of mutual interest. (b) The Chief of Information will keep Navy commands informed of Department of.... (vii) Advise the Chief of Information on current trends and significant problems relating to local...

  2. Numerical investigation of diesel exhaust particle transport and deposition in the CT-scan based lung airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Saha, Suvash C.; Sauret, Emilie; Gu, Y. T.; Molla, Md Mamun

    2017-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particulates matter (DEPM) is a compound mixture of gasses and fine particles that contain more than 40 toxic air pollutants including benzene, formaldehyde, and nitrogen oxides. Exposure of DEPM to human lung airway during respiratory inhalation causes severe health hazards like diverse pulmonary diseases. This paper studies the DEPM transport and deposition in upper three generations of the realistic lung airways. A 3-D digital airway bifurcation model is constructed from the computerized tomography (CT) scan data of a healthy adult man. The Euler-Lagrange approach is used to solve the continuum and disperse phases of the calculation. Local averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate the transport of the continuum phase. Lagrangian based Discrete Phase Model (DPM) is used to investigate the particle transport and deposition in the current anatomical model. The effects of size specific monodispersed particles on deposition are extensively investigated during different breathing pattern. The numerical results illustrate that particle diameter and breathing pattern have a substantial impact on particles transport and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways. The present realistic bifurcation model also depicts a new deposition hot spot which could advance the understanding of the therapeutic drug delivery system to the specific position of the respiratory airways.

  3. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  4. The chief nurse executive role in large healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Jane; Perlin, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Community hospitals are most frequently led by nonclinicians. Although some may have employed physician leaders, most often clinical leadership is provided by a chief nurse executive (CNE) or chief nursing officer. Clinical leadership of community hospital and health systems may similarly be provided by a system-level nursing executive or, often, by a council of facility CNEs. The increasingly competitive healthcare environment in which value-based purchasing of healthcare and pay-for-performance programs demand improved clinical performance for financial success has led to reconsideration of whether a council model can provide either the leadership or adequate attention to clinical (and operational) improvement. In turn, community hospitals and health systems look to CNE or chief nursing officer roles at the highest level of the organization as resources that are able to segue between the clinical and operational domains, translating clinical performance demands into operating strategies and tactics. This article explores CNE characteristics required for success in these increasingly responsible and visible roles.

  5. Investigation of thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid transition metals using Wills-Harrison potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleque, M.A.; Bhuiyan, G.M.; Rashid, R.I.M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat capacity at constant pressure and isothermal compressibility have been calculated for liquid 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals near melting temperature. The hard sphere diameter for all such systems is estimated from the potential profile generated from the Wills and Harrison's prescription using linearized WCA theory of liquid. Evaluated values of entropy and specific heat capacity are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Transport property like shear viscosity for these liquid metals is obtained using the same potential profile. Lack of experimental data at melting temperatures hampers detailed comparison for all such systems. However, for the case of transport property, the results obtained are found to compare qualitatively well with the available experimental data. (author)

  6. Investigation of silicate surface chemistry and reaction mechanisms associated with mass transport in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Perry, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration and rate of transport of radionuclides through geologic media can be strongly influenced by the extent of sorption on aquifer surfaces. Over time intervals relevant to such transport processes, rock and mineral surfaces cannot be considered as inert, unreactive substrates but rather as groundwater/solidphase interfaces which are commonly in a state of natural or artificially induced disequilibrium. The goal of the present research is to define experimentally the type of water/rock interactions that will influence surface chemistry and hence sorption characteristics and capacities of natural aquifers. As wide a range of silicate minerals as possible was selected for study to represent rock-forming minerals in basalt, tuff, and granite. The minerals include K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, olivine, hornblende, biotite, and volcanic glass

  7. The Human Dopamine Transporter: Investigating the Role of the C Terminus in Surface Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard

    2005-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission is involved in the modulation of locomotor activity, emotional behavior, memory and cognition. Hence, imbalances in the dopaminergic system in humans have been hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of illnesses, including Parkinson's disease...... these mechanisms in further detail. All together the obtained results provide new insight into the regulation of the dopamine transporter and will direct future research strategies in this field....

  8. Implications of high density operation on SOL transport: A multimachine investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carralero, D.; Müller, H.W.; Groth, M.; Komm, Michael; Adámek, Jiří; Birkenmeier, G.; Brix, M.; Janky, Filip; Háček, Pavel; Marsen, S.; Reimold, F.; Silva, C.; Stroth, U.; Wischmeier, M.; Wolfrum, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 123-127 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : SOL transport * tokamak * COMPASS Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002231151400703X

  9. An Investigation into the Non-bulk Rail Freight Transport in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Ghaderi; Stephen Cahoon; Hong-Oanh Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade freight transport has gained further momentum in Australia, partly through significant demand growth at both domestic and international levels and partly as the result of Australia's long term need for infrastructure decision making. Amongst the freight task, non-bulk freight is the fastest growing freight task in Australia and is forecast to grow much faster than the rate of population growth and the average national GDP growth. However, rail's share in the non-bulk market...

  10. Applications of aerosol inhalation cine-scintigraphy for, clinical investigations of mucociliary transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Mikami, Riichiro; Ryujin, Yoshitada; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohnuki, Masahiro; Narita, Nobuhiro

    1984-01-01

    Mucociliary transport and cough effect were studied in 10 healthy controls and 116 patients with respiratory diseases using aerosol inhalation cine-scintigraphy which permits visualization of the movement of inhaled aerosols. Additionally, the effectiveness of β-adrenergic stimulant on mucociliary transport was evaluated in 8 normal cases by this method. 1. In healthy controls, the aerosol-bolus moved to the cephalad side rapidly and smoothly in the main bronchus and the trachea, but in many cases of respiratory diseases, we recognized various abnormal patterns such as slow movement, spiral movement, regurgitation etc. We consider that the bolus movements can be used as an index of the mucociliary transport. 2. We found low grade abnormality of bolus movement in cases of atopic bronchial asthma, pulmonary emphysema, silicosis, interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis, but high grade abnormality in cases of bronchiectasis, pulmonary emphysema with chronic bronchitis, mixed or infectious bronchial asthma, chronic bronchitis and especially acute pulmonary infection and diffuse panbronchiolitis. Normal patterns were observed in atopic asthma patients in remission, but abnormal patterns in cases of attack. With larger daily volumes of sputum, the bolus movements showed higher greater abnormality. 3. Bolus movements by coughing were seen most frequently in patients who had produced moderate volumes of sputum and in whom the bolus had stopped at the first carina. Bolus movements by coughing were classified into three groups: expectoration, cephalad movement that stopped halfway, and regurgitation. When the bolus was in the trachea, especially located on the oral side, we observed that expectoration by coughing was more effective. Patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases had lower effciency of expectoration by coughing. 4. We confirmed that terbutaline (β-adrenergic stimulant) accelerated the mucociliary transport. (author)

  11. 46 CFR 97.45-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Master and chief engineer responsible. 97.45-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 97.45-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. It shall be the duty of the master and the chief engineer of any vessel to require that a steam pressure is not...

  12. 29 CFR 20.10 - Responsibilities of the Chief Financial Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Responsibilities of the Chief Financial Officer. 20.10 Section 20.10 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION Disclosure of Information to Credit Reporting Agencies § 20.10 Responsibilities of the Chief Financial Officer. The Chief...

  13. 76 FR 69031 - Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer AGENCY: Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice of order of succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Chief Human Capital Officer for the... Human Capital Officer. DATES: Effective Date: October 20, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lynette...

  14. 76 FR 53935 - Delegation Authority for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... Office of the Chief Financial Officer AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Notice of delegation of authority. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Secretary of HUD, pursuant to the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (CFO Act), which established the position of the Chief Financial Officer within HUD, is...

  15. Investigating transport capacity equations in sediment yield modelling for the Cariri semi-arid region of Paraiba-PB/Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. De Figueiredo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the semi arid Cariri region of the state of Paraiba, Brazil, runoff is of the Hortonian type generated by excess of rainfall over infiltration capacity, and soil erosion is governed by rainfall intensity and sediment size. However, the governing sediment transport mechanism is not well understood. Sediment transport generally depends on the load of sediment provided by soil erosion and on the transport capacity of the flow. The latter is mainly governed by mechanisms such as water shear stress, or stream power. Accordingly, the load of sediment transported by the flow may vary depending on the mechanism involved in the equation of estimation. Investigation of the sediment transport capacity of the flow via a distributed physically-based model is an important and necessary task, but quite rare in semi-arid climates, and particularly in the Cariri region of the state of Paraíba/Brazil. In this study, the equations of Yalin, Engelund & Hansen, Laursen, DuBoys and Bagnold have been coupled with the MOSEE distributed physically based model aiming at identifying the mechanisms leading to the best model simulations when compared with data observed at various basin scales and land uses in the study region. The results obtained with the investigated methods were quite similar and satisfactory suggesting the feasibility of the mechanisms involved, but the observed values were better represented with Bagnold’s equation, which is physically grounded on the stream power, and we recommend it for simulations of similar climate, runoff generation mechanisms and sediment characteristics as in the study region.

  16. Who Becomes a Limited Duty Officer and Chief Warrant Officer? An Examination of Differences of Limited Duty Officers and Chief Warrant Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manuel, Walter F

    2006-01-01

    .... The results of the study revealed the background characteristics age, education, race and ethnicity groups were significantly different between the Limited Duty Officer and Chief Warrant Officer Communities...

  17. Transport of lead in secondary systems of PWR plants: laboratory and plant investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.; Rocher, A.; Nordmann, F.

    1992-01-01

    Both in France and abroad, abnormally high lead concentrations have been found in the deposits on certain steam generator tubes subject to combined inter and transgranular corrosion on the secondary side. Many potential sources of lead have been identified in PWR steam-water system, mainly at the turbine level. Tests on a loop (ORION) have shown that lead (as Pb or PbO) can transport from the condenser to the steam generator and that the contaminant mainly concentrates in flow restricted areas of steam generators

  18. Investigating the Use of 3-D Deterministic Transport for Core Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. D. Gougar; D. Scott

    2004-04-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate the feasibility of using a three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to perform global (core-wide) criticality, flux and depletion calculations for safety analysis of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the ATR, model development, capabilities of Attila, generation of the cross-section libraries, comparisons to experimental results for Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) concepts, and future work planned with Attila.

  19. Investigation of the quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells using spectrally resolved resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deo Raj

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become an important tool to study proteins inside living cells. It has been used to explore membrane protein folding and dynamics, determine stoichiometry and geometry of protein complexes, and measure the distance between two molecules. In this dissertation, we use a method based on FRET and optical micro-spectroscopy (OptiMiS) technology, developed in our lab, to probe the structure of dynamic (as opposed to static) protein complexes in living cells. We use this method to determine the association stoichiometry and quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells. Specifically, the transporter we investigate originates from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative bacterium with several virulence factors, lipopolysaccharides being one of them. This pathogen coexpresses two unique forms of lipopolysaccharides on its surface, the A- and B-bands. The A-band polysaccharides, synthesized in the cytoplasm, are translocated into the periplasm through an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter consisting of a transmembranar protein, Wzm, and a nucleotide-binding protein, Wzt. In P. aeruginosa, all of the biochemical studies of A-band LPS are concentrated on the stages of the synthesis and ligation of polysaccharides (PSs), leaving the export stage involving ABC transporter unexplored. The mode of PS export through ABC transporters is still unknown. This difficulty is due to the lack of information about sub-unit composition and structure of this bi-component ABC transporter. Using the FRET-OptiMiS combination method developed by our lab, we found that Wzt forms a rhombus-shaped homo-tetramer which becomes a square upon co-expression with Wzm, and that Wzm forms a square-shaped homo-tetramer both in the presence and absence of Wzt. Based on these results, we propose a structural model for the double-tetramer complex formed by the bi-component ABC transporter in living cells. An understanding of the

  20. Adolescents who engage in active school transport are also more active in other contexts: A space-time investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tom; Duncan, Scott; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Although active school travel (AST) is important for increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), it is unclear how AST is related to context-specific physical activity and non-school travel. This study investigated how school travel is related to physical activity and travel behaviours across time- and space-classified domains. A total of 196 adolescents wore a Global Positioning System receiver and an accelerometer for 7 days. All data were classified into one of four domains: home, school, transport, or leisure. Generalized linear mixed models were used to compare domain-specific PA and non-school trips between active and passive school travellers. Active travellers accumulated 13 and 14 more min of MVPA on weekdays and weekend days, respectively. They also spent 15min less time in vehicular travel during non-school trips, and accrued an additional 9min of MVPA while walking on weekend days. However, those with no AST still achieved most of their MVPA in the transport domain. AST is related to out-of-school physical activity and transportation, but transport is also important for those who do not use AST. As such, future studies should consider overall mobility and destinations other than school when assessing travel and physical activity behaviours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Creative Design Methods and Investigation of Cellulose Fiber Transport and Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spencer, Mack-Jan

    1999-01-01

    .... Correlations between the four design methods were also discovered. These investigated methods were analogical reasoning, brainstorming, synectics, and the theory of inventive problem solving (TIPS...

  2. Investigation of thermal energy transport interface of hybrid graphene-carbon nanotube/polyethylene nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Xuyang; Hu, Ning; Ning, Huiming; Atobe, Satoshi; Yan, Cheng; Mo, Fuhao; Fu, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jianyu; Wang, Yu; Mu, Xiaojing

    2017-10-31

    It is well known the thermal properties of three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid graphene (GR)-carbon nanotube (CNT) structures are not superior to that of the individual GR and CNT, however, the 3-D hybrid GR-CNT structures can effectively improve the thermal properties of polymer matrix. Therefore, understanding the thermal energy transport in the interface between polymer matrix and 3-D hybrid GR-CNT structure is essential. Here, the enhancement mechanism of interfacial thermal transport of hybrid GR-CNT structure was explored by applying non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. Three different types of hybrid GR-CNT structures were built. The influences of CNT radius and CNT type for the hybrid GR-CNT on the interfacial thermal properties were also analyzed. Computational results show that among the three different types of hybrid GR-CNT structures, the Model-I, i.e., the covalent bond hybrid GR-CNT structures are of the best interfacial thermal properties. Meanwhile, the CNT radius of hybrid GR-CNT structure has a great influence on the interfacial thermal properties.

  3. Investigation of the energy transport mechanism in the TCA tokamak by studying the plasma dynamical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudok de Wit, Th.; Duval, B.P.; Joye, B.; Lister, J.B.; Moret, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The energy transport mechanisms that govern the electron temperature behaviour of a tokamak remain very badly understood and up to now no proper model has been proposed that can explain experimental observations such as profile consistency or the influence of the density profile. One approach to this problem, extensively used on TCA, is to study the dynamical response of the plasma due to externally imposed modifications of parameters which have an influence on the plasma energy content. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature will closely depend on the type and the characteristics of the implied mechanisms. Thus a detailed measurement of the dynamical response would reveal experimentally the dominant properties that would have to be taken into account in the elaboration of a model of the transport processes. Most of the results presented here were obtained by analysing the electron temperature response inferred from soft X-ray emissivity during modification of the plasma density due to either gas puffing, laser impurity ablation or alfven wave heating on TCA (a = 0.18 m, R = 0.61 m, B Φ = 1.52 T). 4 refs., 3 figs

  4. Computational investigation of the effects of perfluorination on the charge-transport properties of polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardia, R. [Università degli studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR – IOM), UOS di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Malloci, G., E-mail: giuliano.malloci@dsf.unica.it [Università degli studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Bosin, A.; Serra, G. [Università degli studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Cappellini, G., E-mail: giancarlo.cappellini@dsf.unica.it [Università degli studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Cagliari) (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR – IOM), UOS di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2016-10-20

    We present a systematic computational study of the effects of perfluorination on the charge-transport properties of three homologous classes of polyaromatic hydrocarbons of interest for molecular electronics: acenes, pyrenes, and circumacenes. By means of Density Functional Theory calculations we first obtained the key molecular properties for transport of both holes and electrons. We then used these parameters in the framework of Marcus theory to compare charge-transfer rates in the high temperatures regime for both unsubstituted and perfluorinated molecules. We additionally estimated the relative charge-mobility of each unsubstituted (perfluorinated) molecule with respect to unsubstituted (perfluorinated) pentacene. We found in all cases that perfluorination reduces the charge-transfer rate in absolute terms. This is largely due to the higher values of the molecular reorganization energies predicted for perfluorinated compounds. Interestingly, however, the charge-transfer rates for both holes and electrons of perfluorinated species are remarkably similar, especially for the larger species. In addition, in the case of the larger circumacenes the charge-mobility values relative to pentacene values are found to increase upon perfluorination.

  5. Investigation of strategies for the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts on southern Ontario sow farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Kate; Poljak, Zvonimir; Dewey, Cate; Deardon, Rob; Holtkamp, Derald; Friendship, Robert

    2012-11-09

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is of major concern to the swine industry; infection with the virus can lead to production losses, morbidity, and mortality within swine operations. Biosecurity practices related to the management of replacement animals are important for the prevention and control of the PRRS virus, as well as other diseases. The objectives of this study were: (i) to describe individual biosecurity practices related to the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts on southern Ontario sow farms, and (ii) to understand patterns in the implementation of these practices. The second objective was accomplished using multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), which allows visualization of the relationships between individual practices and provides information about which practices frequently occur together, and which practices rarely occur together. These patterns constitute strategies for the implementation of biosecurity practices related to the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts. Data were collected using version 2 of the Production Animal Disease Risk Assessment Program's survey for the breeding herd. Two subsets of variables were retained for analysis; one subset pertained to how replacements were managed upon arrival to the farm, and the other pertained to the transportation of genetic animals. For both subsets of variables, the results of the MCA procedure were similar; in both solutions the 1st dimension separated herds that were closed with respect to replacement animals from herds that were open, and the 2nd dimension described how open herds managed replacements. The most interesting finding of this study was that, in some cases where a risky practice was being implemented, it was closely associated with other biosecurity practices that may mitigate that risk. The findings from this approach suggest that one cannot always examine biosecurity on a variable-by-variable basis. Even if a practice that is

  6. Investigation of strategies for the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts on southern Ontario sow farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottoms Kate

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is of major concern to the swine industry; infection with the virus can lead to production losses, morbidity, and mortality within swine operations. Biosecurity practices related to the management of replacement animals are important for the prevention and control of the PRRS virus, as well as other diseases. The objectives of this study were: (i to describe individual biosecurity practices related to the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts on southern Ontario sow farms, and (ii to understand patterns in the implementation of these practices. The second objective was accomplished using multiple correspondence analysis (MCA, which allows visualization of the relationships between individual practices and provides information about which practices frequently occur together, and which practices rarely occur together. These patterns constitute strategies for the implementation of biosecurity practices related to the introduction and transportation of replacement gilts. Data were collected using version 2 of the Production Animal Disease Risk Assessment Program’s survey for the breeding herd. Two subsets of variables were retained for analysis; one subset pertained to how replacements were managed upon arrival to the farm, and the other pertained to the transportation of genetic animals. Results For both subsets of variables, the results of the MCA procedure were similar; in both solutions the 1st dimension separated herds that were closed with respect to replacement animals from herds that were open, and the 2nd dimension described how open herds managed replacements. The most interesting finding of this study was that, in some cases where a risky practice was being implemented, it was closely associated with other biosecurity practices that may mitigate that risk. Conclusions The findings from this approach suggest that one cannot always examine biosecurity

  7. Numerical investigation of plasma edge transport and limiter heat fluxes in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas with EMC3-EIRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Hölbe, H.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Reiter, D.; Stephey, L.; W7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The results of a first systematic assessment of plasma edge transport processes for the limiter startup configuration at Wendelstein 7-X are presented. This includes an investigation of transport from intrinsic and externally injected impurities and their impact on the power balance and limiter heat fluxes. The fully 3D coupled plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE is used. The analysis of the magnetic topology shows that the poloidally and toroidally localized limiters cause a 3D helical scrape-off layer (SOL) consisting of magnetic flux tubes of three different connection lengths L C. The transport in the helical SOL is governed by L C as topological scale length for the parallel plasma loss channel to the limiters. A clear modulation of the plasma pressure with L C is seen. The helical flux tube topology results in counter streaming sonic plasma flows. The heterogeneous SOL plasma structure yields an uneven limiter heat load distribution with localized peaking. Assuming spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients, increasing plasma density yields a reduction of the maximum peak heat loads from 12 MWm-2 to 7.5 MWm-2 and a broadening of the deposited heat fluxes. The impact of impurities on the limiter heat loads is studied by assuming intrinsic carbon impurities eroded from the limiter surfaces with a gross chemical sputtering yield of 2 % . The resulting radiative losses account for less than 10% of the input power in the power balance with marginal impact on the limiter heat loads. It is shown that a significant mitigation of peak heat loads, 40-50%, can be achieved with controlled impurity seeding with nitrogen and neon, which is a method of particular interest for the later island divertor phase.

  8. Investigations of the transportation characteristics of biomass fuel particles in a horizontal pipeline through CFD modelling and experimental measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubba, S.R.; Ingham, D.B.; Larsen, K.J.; Ma, L.; Pourkashanian, M.; Qian, X.; Williams, A.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Recent national and international emission legislations to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide are forcing power generation industries using coal to look at various alternatives, such as biomass and especially by co-firing techniques. Biomass is transported to the burners either mixed with the primary fuel, in general, coal, or used in dedicated pipelines. In both cases, transportation of biomass is difficult due to its composition, size, shape and physical behaviour in comparison to the transportation of coal. This study considers experimental measurements for biomass particle transportation in a pipeline with a transverse elbow and compares the results with those using computation fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. Various materials: flour, willow, wood, bark and a mixture of flour and willow, have been considered in the present investigation. The experimental work was performed using the dynamic changes in the electrostatic charges of biomass particles in conjunction with correlation signal processing techniques. The CFD simulations were performed by considering the effects of gravity, non-spherical drag (based on estimated shape factor), detailed information of the particle distribution, particle wall collisions and particle–particle interactions. Good quantitative and qualitative agreement was obtained between the CFD simulations and the experimental data. It is concluded that particle–particle interactions are of less importance if the mass loading ratio of particles to air is less than 0.03. -- Highlights: ► Dispersed biomass particle transportation is studied using experiments and CFD. ► Inclusion of asphericity in the drag model clearly demonstrated the improvements. ► Gravity effects are found to be important for correct particle distribution in pipe lines. ► Inter-particle collisions were less important for mass loading ratios <0.05 kg/kg.

  9. Transport investigations during neutral-beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and pellet injection experiments on TFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron frequency heating experiments have been carried out successively on TFR with inconel and carbon limiters. Heating efficiencies are for both methods lower with carbon limiters than with inconel. In the case of neutral-beam injection, the ion temperature saturation is supposed to be due to fast-ion charge-exchange losses. The electron temperature saturation is, in the two cases, correlated with small-scale density fluctuation enhancement. The difficulty of deeply modifying the electron temperature profile is also observed during pellet injection. These observations suggest that even slight modifications of the electron temperature gradients lead to enhanced transport. The role of plasma/wall interaction and recycling has not been clarified, but could be important, in particular with carbon limiters. (author)

  10. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid graphene and boron nitride nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Tao Sun

    2012-09-01

    graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (C-BN nanostructures receive much research interest due to the complementary electronic properties. Graphene is a zero-gap semiconductor, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN is a wide gap semiconductor. Here we studied the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid C-BN nanostructures by using first principles calculations and deformation potential theory. We have found that the physical quantities in these systems under study, band gap, effective mass, deformation potential, and carrier mobility, can be categorised into three different families depending on the width of graphene nanoribbon. This family behavior is similar to pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon, but with slight difference from the individual component. New opportunities of designing nanoelectric devices are discussed by utilizing the quantum confinement effect based on such kind of hybrid nanostructures.

  11. Emotional voice processing: investigating the role of genetic variation in the serotonin transporter across development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grossmann

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively respond to emotional information carried in the human voice plays a pivotal role for social interactions. We examined how genetic factors, especially the serotonin transporter genetic variation (5-HTTLPR, affect the neurodynamics of emotional voice processing in infants and adults by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs. The results revealed that infants distinguish between emotions during an early perceptual processing stage, whereas adults recognize and evaluate the meaning of emotions during later semantic processing stages. While infants do discriminate between emotions, only in adults was genetic variation associated with neurophysiological differences in how positive and negative emotions are processed in the brain. This suggests that genetic association with neurocognitive functions emerges during development, emphasizing the role that variation in serotonin plays in the maturation of brain systems involved in emotion recognition.

  12. Preliminary investigation of the transport of small plastic litter along a vegetated riverbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Valyrakis, Manousos

    2017-04-01

    Plastics are widely used in consumer products, due to its low cost, low weight and high durability compared to other types of materials. Contamination of marine ecosystems due to plastics (including microplastics) is a challenge that has received a lot of attention due to the significant risks it poses for the environment and human health. Plastics find their way to the ocean from land via the river system. Studying and obtaining a better understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the fate of plastic litter is therefore important in proactively devising methods to reduce their quantity or produce designs to trap plastic pollutants and prevent them from entering the ocean through estuaries. In this context, it is a common observation of hydraulic practitioners and field geomorphologists, that plastic litter can be trapped within riparian vegetation patches along streams or canals, which can be washed away in periods of high flows. To this goal this study aims to use a series of purpose specific physical experiments to examine the mechanisms of dispersion of plastic litter along the water surface of a channel with simulated riparian vegetation. The set of experiments are conducted in a recirculating flume with rigid riverbank and riparian vegetation modeled by a large number of acrylic rods, placed on the top of the riverbank section. Six different sizes of pieces of Styrofoam are used to simulate plastic litter. These are released from different locations upstream and in the vicinity of the riparian vegetation for various configurations (linear, staggered and random) of characteristic solid density. The trajectory of the plastic litter is recorded with a camera offering a top view of the arrangement. From the analysis of this a variety of results are obtained including transport metrics (including transport velocity and time to trapping) and litter-trapping location. The relation between the size of the litter, the vegetation configuration and the traveling

  13. Role of redox centre in charge transport investigated by novel self-assembled conjugated polymer molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongrui; Dong, Huanli; Li, Tao; Hviid, Rune; Zou, Ye; Wei, Zhongming; Fu, Xiaolong; Wang, Erjing; Zhen, Yonggang; Nørgaard, Kasper; Laursen, Bo W; Hu, Wenping

    2015-06-18

    Molecular electronics describes a field that seeks to implement electronic components made of molecular building blocks. To date, few studies have used conjugated polymers in molecular junctions despite the fact that they potentially transport charge more efficiently than the extensively investigated small-molecular systems. Here we report a novel type of molecular tunnelling junction exploring the use of conjugated polymers, which are self-assembled into ultrathin films in a distinguishable 'planar' manner from the traditional vertically oriented small-molecule monolayers. Electrical measurements on the junctions reveal molecular-specific characteristics of the polymeric molecules in comparison with less conjugated small molecules. More significantly, we decorate redox-active functionality into polymeric backbones, demonstrating a key role of redox centre in the modulation of charge transport behaviour via energy level engineering and external stimuli, and implying the potential of employing tailor-made polymeric components as alternatives to small molecules for future molecular-scale electronics.

  14. Corporate identity of the Chief Mines Inspectorate of Brandenburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mining administration of the Land Brandenburg abandoned its traditional self-image in order to be able to cope with the challenges presented by a modern and future-oriented mining industry. The reinstatement of the Chief Mines Inspectorate of the Land Brandenburg opened up a chance of breaking up obsolete administrative structures and, instead, giving this entity a Corporate Identity as its foundation. The inspectorate considers Corporate Identity as the way of making its work understood both internally and to the exterior. (orig.) [de

  15. On-boarding and enculturation of new chief nursing officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batcheller, Joyce A

    2011-05-01

    Given that chief nursing officers (CNOs) play a critical role in hospital organizations and require a diverse set of executive leadership and professional competencies, what competencies are most critical? What kind of support is needed for a leader who is new to this executive role? What is needed to successfully on-board an experienced leader who is new to the organization? How can a CNO demonstrate the unique value he/she brings to the executive "C" suite? The author presents findings from on-boarding 6 new CNOs by using an in-depth 360-degree process to assess competency, an on-boarding development road map, and a CNO scorecard.

  16. Environmental Assessment: Disposition of Chiefs’ Circle Residential Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    Joy J. Bernard – 78 CEG/CEAR Becky Crader – 78 CEG/CEAO Jim Gillis - 78 CEG/CEAP Ban Ngo - 778 CES/CEPT Stephen A. Hammack, URS Corp (78 CEG/CEAN On...Analysis cc: 78 CEG/CEA (Douglas Johnson) HQ AFMC/A617 ( Erwin Roemer) 778 CES/CL (Nancy Manley) 78 CES/CL (Paul Kelley) FRED HURSEY Chief...Alternative 4 Cost Analysis 4. Alternative 5 Cost Analysis 5. Alternative 6 Cost Analysis cc: 78 CEG/CEA (Douglas Johnson) HQ AFMC/ A617 ( Erwin

  17. Narrator-in-Chief:The Narrative Rhetoric of Barack Obama

    OpenAIRE

    Herron, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation Narrator-in-Chief: The Narrative Rhetoric of Barack Obama seeks to show how the concept of “narrative” can be used in rhetorical criticism of presidential speeches, particularly when considering the speeches and the biographical text, Dreams from My Father (1995), of Barack Obama.The use of narratives of and by presidents in the White House can be seen as an essential part of the ceremonial role of the presidency. This use of narratives in epideictic speech has increased with...

  18. Commanding in Chief, Strategic Leader Relationships in the Civil War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    Secretary of War, initially Simon Cameron and after January 1862, Edwin Stanton. No longer having to render reports through Scott simplified the lines of...Lincoln’s Chief of Staff, 63. 59 Hennessy, Return to Bull Run, 16. 60 Ibid., 21. 61 Daniel E. Sutherland , “Abraham Lincoln, John Pope, and the Origins...Life for the Nation, 199-200. 68 Ibid. 69 Sutherland , “Abraham Lincoln, John Pope, and the Origins of Total War”, 585. 70 U.S. Government, War of

  19. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI&SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI&SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations.

  20. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI ampersand SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations

  1. Update report on fracture flow in saturated tuff: Dynamic transport task for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecky, D.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Ott, M.; Mitchell, A.

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of continuing experiments on the behavior of tracers during fracture flow in saturated, welded tuff. These experiments were completed during the past year as part of the Dynamic Transport Task of geochemical investigations for the Yucca Mountain Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of fluid movement in fractures when coupled with matrix diffusion and sorption but isolated from the effects of capillary suction and two-phase flow characteristic of unsaturated conditions. The experiments reported here are continuations of experimental efforts reported previously. The behavior of three tracers [HTO (tritiated water), TcO 4 - (pertechnetate), and sulforhodamine B dye] have been investigated during flow through a saturated column of densely welded tuff from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, southern Nevada. 31 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  2. A Laboratory Investigation of the Suspension, Transport, and Settling of Silver Carp Eggs Using Synthetic Surrogates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Garcia

    Full Text Available Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water to survive, supported by the turbulence of the flow, until they hatch and develop the ability to swim. Analysis of the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs will facilitate the development and implementation of control strategies to target the early life stages. Experimenting with Asian carp eggs is complicated due to practical issues of obtaining eggs in close proximity to experimental facilities and extensive handling of eggs tends to damage them. Herein, we describe laboratory experiments using styrene beads (4.85 mm diameter as synthetic surrogate eggs to mimic the physical properties of water-hardened silver carp eggs. The first set of experiments was completed in a rectangular vertical column filled with salt water. The salinity of the water was adjusted in an iterative fashion to obtain a close approximation of the fall velocity of the styrene beads to the mean fall velocity of silver carp water-hardened eggs. The terminal fall velocity of synthetic eggs was measured using an image processing method. The second set of experiments was performed in a temperature-controlled recirculatory flume with a sediment bed. The flume was filled with salt water, and synthetic eggs were allowed to drift under different flow conditions. Drifting behavior, suspension conditions, and settling characteristics of synthetic eggs were observed. At high velocities, eggs were suspended and distributed through the water column. Eggs that touched the sediment bed were re-entrained by the flow. Eggs saltated when they touched the bed, especially at moderate velocities and with a relatively flat bed. At lower velocities, some settling of the eggs was observed. With lower velocities and a flat bed, eggs were trapped near the walls of the flume. When bedforms were present, eggs were trapped in the lee of the bedforms in addition to being trapped near the flume walls. Results of this

  3. A Laboratory Investigation of the Suspension, Transport, and Settling of Silver Carp Eggs Using Synthetic Surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tatiana; Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo; Jackson, P Ryan; Murphy, Elizabeth A; Garcia, Marcelo H

    2015-01-01

    Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water to survive, supported by the turbulence of the flow, until they hatch and develop the ability to swim. Analysis of the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs will facilitate the development and implementation of control strategies to target the early life stages. Experimenting with Asian carp eggs is complicated due to practical issues of obtaining eggs in close proximity to experimental facilities and extensive handling of eggs tends to damage them. Herein, we describe laboratory experiments using styrene beads (4.85 mm diameter) as synthetic surrogate eggs to mimic the physical properties of water-hardened silver carp eggs. The first set of experiments was completed in a rectangular vertical column filled with salt water. The salinity of the water was adjusted in an iterative fashion to obtain a close approximation of the fall velocity of the styrene beads to the mean fall velocity of silver carp water-hardened eggs. The terminal fall velocity of synthetic eggs was measured using an image processing method. The second set of experiments was performed in a temperature-controlled recirculatory flume with a sediment bed. The flume was filled with salt water, and synthetic eggs were allowed to drift under different flow conditions. Drifting behavior, suspension conditions, and settling characteristics of synthetic eggs were observed. At high velocities, eggs were suspended and distributed through the water column. Eggs that touched the sediment bed were re-entrained by the flow. Eggs saltated when they touched the bed, especially at moderate velocities and with a relatively flat bed. At lower velocities, some settling of the eggs was observed. With lower velocities and a flat bed, eggs were trapped near the walls of the flume. When bedforms were present, eggs were trapped in the lee of the bedforms in addition to being trapped near the flume walls. Results of this research study

  4. Investigation of nanostructured electrocatalysts and mass transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenaga, Gabriel A.

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC) are promising devices in the search of clean and efficient technologies to reduce the use of fossil fuels. However, their poor performance in dynamic applications and high cost of platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts, have prevented them from becoming an affordable solution. This dissertation comprehend three research projects that study the mass transport phenomena in modified PEMs, the reduction of the amount of PGM catalyst used for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the use of non-PGM catalysts as alternative catalyst to Pt for ORR. Nafion is the most used PEM for FC applications. Nafion proton conductivity is proportional to its degree of hydration, what imposes low temperature operation to maintain appropriate water content. In this research, Nafion composite membranes doped with hydrophilic metal inorganic particles have been studied using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The Nafion composite membranes were found to have higher water uptake, higher water retention, higher water diffusion and, in some cases, lower methanol diffusion (crossover) than the filler free Nafion membrane. The amount of Pt and PGM catalysts supported on carbon used in the electrodes, has a great impact in the PEMFC cost. In particular, it is of high relevance to reduce the amount of Pt in the cathode electrode, in which the sluggish ORR demands four to five times more Pt catalyst than in the anode. In this thesis is shown that the use of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) as Pt support, allows a more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoparticles, what in addition to their high hydrophobicity and high corrosive resistance, lead to improved mass transport and stability of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA), when compared to a benchmark MEA that uses Pt catalyst supported on carbon black. The improvement was accomplished using less Pt than in the benchmark MEA. Replacing Pt with non-PGM catalyst can lead to an

  5. A laboratory investigation of the suspension, transport, and settling of silver carp eggs using synthetic surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tatiana; Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo; Jackson, P. Ryan; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2015-01-01

    Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water to survive, supported by the turbulence of the flow, until they hatch and develop the ability to swim. Analysis of the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs will facilitate the development and implementation of control strategies to target the early life stages. Experimenting with Asian carp eggs is complicated due to practical issues of obtaining eggs in close proximity to experimental facilities and extensive handling of eggs tends to damage them. Herein, we describe laboratory experiments using styrene beads (4.85 mm diameter) as synthetic surrogate eggs to mimic the physical properties of water-hardened silver carp eggs. The first set of experiments was completed in a rectangular vertical column filled with salt water. The salinity of the water was adjusted in an iterative fashion to obtain a close approximation of the fall velocity of the styrene beads to the mean fall velocity of silver carp water-hardened eggs. The terminal fall velocity of synthetic eggs was measured using an image processing method. The second set of experiments was performed in a temperature-controlled recirculatory flume with a sediment bed. The flume was filled with salt water, and synthetic eggs were allowed to drift under different flow conditions. Drifting behavior, suspension conditions, and settling characteristics of synthetic eggs were observed. At high velocities, eggs were suspended and distributed through the water column. Eggs that touched the sediment bed were re-entrained by the flow. Eggs saltated when they touched the bed, especially at moderate velocities and with a relatively flat bed. At lower velocities, some settling of the eggs was observed. With lower velocities and a flat bed, eggs were trapped near the walls of the flume. When bedforms were present, eggs were trapped in the lee of the bedforms in addition to being trapped near the flume walls. Results of this research study

  6. Techno-Economic Investigation of Solar Powered Electric Auto-Rickshaw for a Sustainable Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Reddy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Technologies influencing alternative means of transportation have been expanding in recent years due to increasing urbanization and motorization. In this paper, a solar powered electric auto-rickshaw (SPEA is designed and developed for Indian conditions. The vehicle developed is comprehensively analyzed techno-economically for its viability in the Indian market. The performance analysis of SPEA results in an optimal charging rate of 2 kWh per day with an average solar irradiance of 325 W/m2 on a typical sunny day. The discharging characteristics are studied based on different loading conditions. The vehicle achieved a maximum speed of 21.69 km/h with battery discharge rate of 296 W at 90 kg load and also reached a maximum discharge rate of 540 W at 390 kg loading with a maximum speed of 12.11 km/h. Environmental analysis of SPEA indicated that the yearly CO2 emissions of 1777 kg, 1987 kg and 1938 kg from using Compressed Natural Gas, Liquefied Petroleum Gas and gasoline engines respectively can be mitigated using SPEA. The financial analysis of SPEA concluded that the investor’s payback duration is 24.44% less compared to a gasoline-run vehicle. Socio-Economic analysis of SPEA discussed its significant advantages and showed 15.74% and 0.85% increase in yearly income over gasoline driven and battery driven vehicles.

  7. Investigation of electronic transport through a ladder-like graphene nanoribbon including random distributed impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Esmat; Mardaani, Mohammad; Rabani, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The electronic transport of a ladder-like graphene nanoribbon which the on-site or hopping energies of a small part of it can be random is modeled by using the Green's function technique within the nearest neighbor tight-binding approach. We employ a unitary transformation in order to convert the Hamiltonian of the nanoribbon to the Hamiltonian of a tight-binding ladder-like network. In this case, the disturbed part of the system includes the second neighbor hopping interactions. While, the converted Hamiltonian of each ideal part is equivalent to the Hamiltonian of two periodic on-site chains. Therefore, we can insert the self-energies of the alternative on-site tight-binding chains to the inverse of the Green's function matrix of the ladder-like part. In this viewpoint, the conductance is constructed from two trans and cis contributions. The results show that increasing the disorder strength causes the increase and decrease of the conductance of the trans and cis contributions, respectively.

  8. An Investigation into the Non-bulk Rail Freight Transport in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghaderi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade freight transport has gained further momentum in Australia, partly through significant demand growth at both domestic and international levels and partly as the result of Australia's long term need for infrastructure decision making. Amongst the freight task, non-bulk freight is the fastest growing freight task in Australia and is forecast to grow much faster than the rate of population growth and the average national GDP growth. However, rail's share in the non-bulk market has declined significantly in the last four decades. This study therefore provides an insight into the efficiency and operational management issues facing by the Australian non-bulk rail sector by focusing on three areas; the level of track compatibility and the relevant operational issues, the demographics of non-bulk freight in Australia and the current status of intermodal terminals in relation to rail connectivity and location. As the result, a more detailed understanding of the current shortages in the Australian non-bulk rail freight sector is achieved and managerial implications are provided.

  9. Investigation of magnetic and electrical transport properties of Dy2Ni2Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S. K.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic and transport properties of the ternary rare-earth compound Dy2Ni2Sn are reported. The compound undergoes a long range antiferromagnetic ordering below TN=43 K with a collinear structure. A second transition is observed below about Tt=28 K, where spin canting takes place. We find clear thermal hysteresis in our magnetization data between 20 and 45 K, indicating the first order nature of the magnetic transitions occurring at TN and Tt. Clear signature of metamagnetism is observed in the canted antiferromagnetic phase. The change in entropy on the application of magnetic field (magnetocaloric effect) was calculated from the isothermal magnetization data and it shows negative and positive peaks at TN and Tt respectively. The thermal variation of resistivity shows clear peak like signature near TN, which gets suppressed under applied magnetic field resulting negative magnetoresistance. The low temperature resistivity (below Tt) can be well fitted with the model available for spin dependent s-f scattering in antiferromagnetic system having well localized moments. The data also indicate short range correlations well above the antiferromagnetic transition point, which might be related to the two dimensional spin-spin correlations in this layered compound.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF SAHARAN DUST TRANSPORT ON THE BASIS OF AEROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. TÓTH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sahara Desert is the largest dust source on Earth. Its dust is frequently emitted into the Mediterranean atmosphere and transported by the winds sometimes as far north as Central Europe. The accumulated particles contribute to soil forming processes, while the atmospheric mineral dust has an impact on the radiation budget, cloud forming processes, the pH of precipitation and biogeochemical cycles of marine ecosystems. The PM (particulate matter in ambient air does not contain only primary particles but secondary particles formed in the atmosphere from precursor gases as well. Especially these latter ones have significant negative impacts to human health. There are in average four-five Saharan dust episodes annually in Hungary, sometimes in form of colour precipitation (brown rainfall, red snow. There are several possibilities for providing evidence for the Saharan origin of the dust observed in our country: back-trajectories using NOAA HYSPLIT model, TOMS satellite maps of NASA, maps of aerosol index of Ozone Monitoring Instrument, observations of spectral aerosol optical depth of Aerosol Robotic Network, satellite maps of EUMETSAT, elemental analysis of dust samples. In this study we try to reveal the suitability of the upper-air wind fields in detection of Saharan dust episodes in Central Europe. We deployed the global upper-air data base of the last 41 years that is available by courtesy of College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at University of Wyoming. We apply this method also for tracking air pollution of vegetation fires.

  11. Investigation of cross-linking characteristics of novel hole-transporting materials for solution-processed phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaemin; Ameen, Shahid; Lee, Changjin

    2016-04-01

    After the success of commercialization of the vacuum-evaporated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), solutionprocessing or printing of OLEDs are currently attracting much research interests. However, contrary to various kinds of readily available vacuum-evaporable OLED materials, the solution-processable OLED materials are still relatively rare. Hole-transporting layer (HTL) materials for solution-processed OLEDs are especially limited, because they need additional characteristics such as cross-linking to realize multilayer structures in solution-processed OLEDs, as well as their own electrically hole-transporting characteristics. The presence of such cross-linking characteristics of solutionprocessable HTL materials therefore makes them more challenging in the development stage, and also makes them essence of solution-processable OLED materials. In this work, the structure-property relationships of thermally crosslinkable HTL materials were systematically investigated by changing styrene-based cross-linking functionalities and modifying the carbazole-based hole-transporting core structures. The temperature dependency of the cross-linking characteristics of the HTL materials was systematically investigated by the UV-vis. absorption spectroscopy. The new HTL materials were also applied to green phosphorescent OLEDs, and their device characteristics were also investigated based on the chemical structures of the HTL materials. The device configuration was [ITO / PEDOT:PSS / HTL / EML / ETL / CsF / Al]. We found out that the chemical structures of the cross-linking functionalities greatly affect not only the cross-linking characteristics of the resultant HTL materials, but also the resultant OLED device characteristics. The increase of the maximum luminance and efficiency of OLEDs was evident as the cross-linking temperature decreases from higher than 200°C to at around 150°C.

  12. 76 FR 2805 - Delegation of Authority to the Chief Accountant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ...The Securities and Exchange Commission is amending its rules to delegate authority to the Chief Accountant with respect to proposed rule changes of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board pursuant to Section 107 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Section 19(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as follows: To publish notices of proposed rule changes filed by the PCAOB; to approve or disapprove a proposed rule change; and to temporarily suspend a proposed rule of the PCAOB. In addition, the Commission is amending its rules to delegate authority to the Chief Accountant to determine the appropriateness of extending the time periods specified in Section 19(b) and publish the reasons for such determination as well as to effect any such extension and to institute proceedings to determine whether to disapprove a proposal and to provide to the PCAOB notice of the grounds for disapproval under consideration, and to find good cause to approve a proposal on an accelerated basis and to publish the reasons for such determination. This delegation is intended to conserve Commission resources and to maintain the effectiveness and efficiency of the Commission's PCAOB proposed rule filing process.

  13. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.I.; Meike, A.; Chuu, Y.J.; Sawvel, A.; Lin, W.

    1999-01-01

    Transport of bacteria is investigated as part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain Tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures, cultured, and injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C and to 60 C at the top and bottom of the block. Samples were collected from boreholes located approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant microbes also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time until the heater was deactivated. Negative indications in the collection holes after the heater was deactivated support the supposition that these bacteria were the species that were injected. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the collection boreholes suggests no pattern to the migration of bacteria through the block. The relationship between bacterial migration and the movement of water is not yet understood. These observations indicate the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting. The implications for colloid transport need to be reviewed

  14. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  15. INVESTIGATION OF MULTISCALE AND MULTIPHASE FLOW, TRANSPORT AND REACTION IN HEAVY OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannis C. Yortsos

    2003-02-01

    This is final report for contract DE-AC26-99BC15211. The report describes progress made in the various thrust areas of the project, which include internal drives for oil recovery, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes and the flow of fluids with yield stress. The report consists mainly of a compilation of various topical reports, technical papers and research reports published produced during the three-year project, which ended on May 6, 2002 and was no-cost extended to January 5, 2003. Advances in multiple processes and at various scales are described. In the area of internal drives, significant research accomplishments were made in the modeling of gas-phase growth driven by mass transfer, as in solution-gas drive, and by heat transfer, as in internal steam drives. In the area of vapor-liquid flows, we studied various aspects of concurrent and countercurrent flows, including stability analyses of vapor-liquid counterflow, and the development of novel methods for the pore-network modeling of the mobilization of trapped phases and liquid-vapor phase changes. In the area of combustion, we developed new methods for the modeling of these processes at the continuum and pore-network scales. These models allow us to understand a number of important aspects of in-situ combustion, including steady-state front propagation, multiple steady-states, effects of heterogeneity and modes of combustion (forward or reverse). Additional aspects of reactive transport in porous media were also studied. Finally, significant advances were made in the flow and displacement of non-Newtonian fluids with Bingham plastic rheology, which is characteristic of various heavy oil processes. Various accomplishments in generic displacements in porous media and corresponding effects of reservoir heterogeneity are also cited.

  16. Investigation of the Dominant Processes controlling Volume, Heat, and Freshwater Transports through the Bering Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Woodgate, R. A.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-02-01

    The 85-km wide Bering Strait serves as the only connection between the Pacific and Arctic oceans. Recent observations have shown increases in northward volume, heat and freshwater fluxes through this narrow and shallow strait, with implications for the prolongation of the ice-free season and enhancement of nutrient supply to the ecosystems in the Chukchi Sea. Further downstream the increased flux influences watermass transformations, heat and freshwater budgets, and stratification in the upper Arctic Ocean. Thus, quantifying the mechanisms that control the mean and variability of the flow through this vital gateway is important for understanding and predicting changes in the Arctic. Here, to identify these key mechanisms, we use 14 years of mooring observations from the Bering Strait and the non-linear inverse-modeling framework of the Arctic Sub-polar gyre sTate Estimate (ASTE). ASTE is a synthesis of the MITgcm coupled ocean-sea ice model with all available satellite and in-situ observations of sea ice and ocean, including hydrographic and mooring data from the Beaufort Sea and the major Arctic gateways (Fram, Bering, and Davis straits), and is developed using the estimation infrastructure of the ECCO consortium. In ASTE's optimization mode, after 19 iterations, misfits to ITP hydrography and SSM/I ice concentration have reduced by 80% and 50% respectively. With ASTE as the baseline solution, we use the "adjoint" tool to compute the sensitivity of the model transports of volume and water properties at the Bering Strait to a set of control variables including ocean hydrography and atmospheric forcing. The partition of dominant sensitivities is connected to the data in two ways: the data serve as a guide to the interpretation of the controlling process while the model sensitivity can provide insights into processes which can be further tested with additional observations.

  17. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon (Δ14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  18. Experimental investigation of airborne contaminant transport by a human wake moving in a ventilated aircraft cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussou, Stephane B.

    The air ventilation system in jetliners provides a comfortable and healthy environment for passengers. Unfortunately, the increase in global air traffic has amplified the risks presented by infectious aerosols or noxious material released during flight. Inside the cabin, air typically flows continuously from overhead outlets into sidewall exhausts in a circular pattern that minimizes secondary flow between adjacent seat rows. However, disturbances frequently introduced by individuals walking along an aisle may alter air distribution, and contribute to spreading of contaminants. Numerical simulation of these convoluted transient flow phenomena is difficult and complex, and experimental assessment of contaminant distribution in real cabins often impractical. A fundamental experimental study was undertaken to examine the transport phenomena, to validate computations and to improve air monitoring systems. A finite moving body was modeled in a 10:1 scale simplified aircraft cabin equipped with ventilation, at a Reynolds number (based on body diameter) of the order of 10,000. An experimental facility was designed and constructed to permit measurements of the ventilation and wake velocity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Contaminant migration was imaged using the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. The effect of ventilation was estimated by comparison with a companion baseline study. Results indicate that the evolution of a downwash predominant behind finite bodies of small aspect ratio is profoundly perturbed by the ventilation flow. The reorganization of vortical structures in the near-wake leads to a shorter longitudinal recirculation region. Furthermore, mixing in the wake is modified and contaminant is observed to convect to higher vertical locations corresponding to seated passenger breathing level.

  19. Experiential Leadership Training for Pediatric Chief Residents: Impact on Individuals and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Robert A.; Williams, Patricia D.; Brigham, Timothy P.; Seashore, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen a proliferation of leadership training programs for physicians that teach skills outside the graduate medical education curriculum. Objective To determine the perceived value and impact of an experiential leadership training program for pediatric chief residents on the chief residents and on their programs and institutions. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective study. Surveys were sent to chief residents who completed the Chief Resident Training Program (CRTP) between 1988 and 2003 and to their program directors and department chairs asking about the value of the program, its impact on leadership capabilities, as well as the effect of chief resident training on programs and institutions. Results Ninety-four percent of the chief residents and 94% of program directors and department chairs reported that the CRTP was “very” or “somewhat” relevant, and 92% of the chief residents indicated CRTP had a positive impact on their year as chief resident; and 75% responded it had a positive impact beyond residency. Areas of greatest positive impact included awareness of personality characteristics, ability to manage conflict, giving and receiving feedback, and relationships with others. Fifty-six percent of chief residents reported having held a formal leadership position since chief residency, yet only 28% reported having received additional leadership training. Conclusion The study demonstrates a perceived positive impact on CRTP participants and their programs and institutions in the short and long term. PMID:21975638

  20. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  1. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-04-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle - an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from -40.2 to -15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from -278.7 to -113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol-1) indicate that regional evaporation can account

  2. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Griffis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle – an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012. These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from −40.2 to −15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from −278.7 to −113.0 ‰ and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( >  25 mmol mol−1

  3. Experimental investigation of elastic mode control on a model of a transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, M.; Heimbaugh, R. M.; Nomura, J. K.; Pearson, R. M.; Shirley, W. A.; Stringham, R. H.; Tescher, E. L.; Zoock, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    A 4.5 percent DC-10 derivative flexible model with active controls is fabricated, developed, and tested to investigate the ability to suppress flutter and reduce gust loads with active controlled surfaces. The model is analyzed and tested in both semispan and complete model configuration. Analytical methods are refined and control laws are developed and successfully tested on both versions of the model. A 15 to 25 percent increase in flutter speed due to the active system is demonstrated. The capability of an active control system to significantly reduce wing bending moments due to turbulence is demonstrated. Good correlation is obtained between test and analytical prediction.

  4. Investigating erosion of building materials used in an installation for pneumatic transport of coke breeze and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandrowski, J.; Kot-Borkowska, Z.; Misztal, M.; Raczek, J.; Kaczmarzyk, G.

    1980-09-01

    This article investigates the influence of the following factors on erosion of building material used in pneumatic transport of coal and coke breeze: intensity of coal or coke breeze flow within the range of 47 to 120 kg/h for coke and 99 to 165 kg/h for coal; speed of solid material particles within the range 3.71 to 7.97 m/s for coke, and 3.30 to 7.58 m/s for coal; duration of the experiments 0.5 to 1.5 h for coke and 2.0 to 5.0 for coal; angle of inclination of the sample of building material 30 to 60 degrees for both coal and coke breeze. Three types of construction material used in pneumatic transport were tested: steel, concrete and chamotte bricks. Investigations show that concrete is characterized by the highest erosion, chamotte bricks by medium erosion and steel by the lowest erosion. As a result of mathematical processing of experimental data, empirical models of erosion of the three materials are constructed. (7 refs.)

  5. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    We are delighted to announce that Professor Martin Evans of University of Edinburgh has been appointed as the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Martin Evans has been Editor of the Statistical Physics section of the journal since 2009. Prior to this, he served as a Board Member for the journal. His areas of research include statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium systems, phase transitions and scaling regimes in nonequilibrium statistical physics, glassy dynamics, phase transitions and ordering in driven diffusive systems, mass transport models, condensation models, zero range processes and exclusion processes. We very much look forward to working with Martin to continue to improve the journal's quality and interest to the readership. We would like to thank our outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Professor Murray Batchelor. Murray has worked hard and provided excellent guidance in improving the quality of the journal and the service that the journal provides to authors, referees and readers. During the last five years, we have raised the quality threshold for acceptance in the journal and currently reject over 70% of submissions. As a result, papers published in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical are amongst the best in the field. We have also maintained and improved on our excellent receipt-to-first-decision times, which now average under 40 days for papers. With the help of Martin Evans and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  6. Investigation of radioactive cesium transportation from forest canopy to floor by litterfall, stemflow and throughfall in northern Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, I.; Ohte, N.; Iseda, K.; Tanoi, K.; Hirose, A.; Kobayashi, N. I.; Murakami, M.; Tokuchi, N.; Ohashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident due to Great East Japan Earthquake in March 11th 2011, large areas of forest have been highly contaminated by the radioactive nuclides. Most of the deposited radioactive material to the canopy is then washed out with rainfall or leaf fall due to the tree phenology. There have been studies showing that the amount of 137Cs transportation differs among litter components and water pathways, and was affected by seasonal variations. Thus, to evaluate the amount of 137Cs flux from canopy to forest floor, continuous monitoring of each component (litterfall, throughfall and stemflow) is required. We investigated the annual transfer of 137Cs from the forest canopy to the floor by litterfall, throughfall and stemflow at two different forest types in northern Fukushima after two years from the accident. Seasonal variations in 137Cs transportation and differences between forests types were also determined. Forest sites were set in the upstream part of Kami-Oguni River catchment at Date city, which locates approximately 50km northwest from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The study sites consisted of two deciduous (Mixed deciduous-1, Mixed deciduous-2) and one cedar (Cedar plantation) stands. The cumulative 137Cs transportation from the forest canopy to the floor was 6.6 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-1, 3.9 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-2 and 11.0 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Cedar plantation. 137Cs transportation with litterfall increased in the defoliation period which correlated with the increased amount of litterfall. 137Cs transportation with throughfall and stemflow increased in the rainy season. 137Cs flux by litterfall was higher in Cedar plantation compared with that of mixed deciduous forests, while the opposite result was obtained for stemflow. The ratio of annual 137Cs flux and the estimated 137Cs amount deposited in the forests will be discussed.

  7. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap. III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanko, S.; Ingversen, J.

    1971-01-01

    Xylem sap was collected from nitrogen-starved maize plants and investigations were made on the nitrogen transported. It appears from the results that several pools for different amino acids exist, which have different relations to the transport of nitrogen taken up. While in maize roots Glu, Glu...

  8. Investigation of the Multi-Physics of Laser-Induced Ignition of Transportation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathan D.

    Cleaner and more efficient combustion systems are expected to operate at conditions where successful spark ignition is difficult to achieve. Laser ignition is a proposed alternative ignition system capable of stable engine performance under these conditions. Fundamental studies are needed to fully characterize the complex, multi-physics nature of the laser ignition process. This thesis is a contribution in that direction, also characterizing the ignition and flame behavior of some engine-relevant fuels. This work investigates experimentally the early stages of the laser ignition process, characterizing breakdown and laser-induced shock waves. It then explores self-sustained flame behavior from early flame emergence to complete propagation or quenching. Regarding the early stages of laser ignition, the influence of focusing optics, thermodynamic conditions, and chemical structure of fuels on optical breakdown threshold is examined. These results are presented in a universal representation of the breakdown threshold, facilitating their comparison. The results agree with previous studies and new data sets are generated. Thermomechanical differences between breakdown in non-reactive and reactive mixtures are quantified, isolating the effect of exothermicity on plasma and shock wave propagation. The thermodynamic conditions of the gas near the focal volume are investigated and quantified using two-color interferometry. This information is applied toward developing accurate initial conditions for simulations based on absorbed laser energy and early kernel geometry. With respect to flame propagation, schlieren and interferometric imaging techniques are used to examine early flame behavior, especially near flammability limits. This provides insight into the mechanisms controlling quenching of fuel-lean laser ignited flames as well as the time-scales involved. Four fuels (methane, biogas, iso-octane, and E85) are characterized, highlighting thermochemical effects which

  9. Office of the Chief Financial Officer 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-01-31

    Fiscal Year 2012 was a year of progress and change in the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) organization. The notable accomplishments outlined below strengthened the quality of the OCFO’s stewardship and services in support of the scientific mission of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Three strategies were key to this progress: organizational transformation aligned with our goals; process redesign and effective use of technology to improve efficiency, and innovative solutions to meet new challenges. Over the next year we will continue to apply these strategies to further enhance our contributions to the Lab’s scientific mission. What follows is the budget, funding and costs for the office for FY 2012.

  10. 29 CFR 793.9 - “Chief engineer.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âChief engineer.â 793.9 Section 793.9 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.9 “Chief engineer.” A chief engineer is an employee who primarily supervises the operation... such engineer may be employed, and in some cases he may be assisted by part-time workers from other...

  11. Investigation of the electronic transport in polarization-induced nanowires using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcu, Camelia; Carnevale, Santino C.; Kent, Thomas F.; Akyol, Fatih; Phillips, Patrick J.; Mills, Michael J.; Rajan, Siddharth; Pelz, Jonathan P.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2013-03-01

    In the search to improve short wavelength light emitting diodes (LED's), where the dislocations limit their performance and hole doping (Mg) is a fundamental challenge, the III-Nitride polarization-induced nanowire LED provides a promising system to address these problems. The new type of pn diode, polarization-induced nanowire LED (PINLED), was developed by linearly grading AlGaN composition of the nanowires (from GaN to AlN and back to GaN) from 0% to 100% and back to 0% Al (Carnevale et al, Nano Lett., 12, 915 (2012)). In III-Nitrides (Ga,Al/N), the effects of polarization are commonly observed at the surfaces and interfaces. Thus, in the case of the polarization-induced nanowire LEDs, taking advantage of the bound polarization charge, due to the grading of the AlGaN, the pn diodes are formed. The polarity of the nanowires determines the carrier type in each graded region, and therefore the diode orientation (n/p vs p/n). We used conductive AFM to investigate polarity of the PINLED's as well as hole conductivity in PINLED's made of AlGaN with and without acceptor doping. The results reveal that most of the wires are n-top/p-bottom (N-face), but some are p-top/n-bottom (Ga-face). Also, we found that the current density is 3 orders of magnitude larger in the case of the doped nanowires than the nanowires with no impurity doping.

  12. 78 FR 46240 - Delegation of Procurement Authority and Chief Acquisition Officer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... strategies and specific plans for hiring, training, and professional development; and (3) Reporting to the... professional workforce, including working with the Department's Chief Human Capital Officer and principal...

  13. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation: Experiment, simulation, and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, C.; Kim, E.J.; Champeaux, S.; Gurcan, O.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.; Tynan, G.R.; Nevins, W.; Candy, J.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the physics of shear flow and structure formation in plasmas is a central problem for the advancement of magnetic fusion because of the roles such flows are believed to play in regulating turbulence and transport levels. In this paper, we report on integrated experimental, computational, and theoretical studies of sheared zonal flows and radially extended convective cells, with the aim of assessing the results of theory experiment and theory-simulation comparisons. In particular, simulations are used as test beds for verifying analytical predictions and demonstrating the suitability of techniques such as bispectral analysis for isolating nonlinear couplings in data. Based on intriguing initial results suggesting increased levels of nonlinear coupling occur during L-H transitions, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of bispectral quantities in fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, and compared these results with theoretical expectations. Topics of study include locality and directionality of energy transfer, amplitude scaling, and parameter dependences. Techniques for inferring nonlinear coupling coefficients from data are discussed, and initial results from experimental data are presented. Future experimental studies are motivated. We also present work investigating the role of structures in transport. Analysis of simulation data indicates that the turbulent heat flux can be represented as an ensemble of 'heat pulses' of varying sizes, with a power law distribution. The slope of the power law is shown to determine global transport scaling (i.e. Bohm or gyro-Bohm). Theoretical work studying the dynamics of the largest cells (termed 'streamers') is presented, as well as results from ongoing analysis studying connections between heat pulse distribution and bispectral quantities. (author)

  14. Difference in particle transport between two coastal areas in the Baltic Sea investigated with high-resolution trajectory modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corell, Hanna; Döös, Kristofer

    2013-05-01

    A particle-tracking model based on high-resolution ocean flow data was used to investigate particle residence times and spatial distribution of settling sediment for two geo-morphologically different Swedish coastal areas. The study was a part of a safety assessment for the location of a future nuclear-waste repository, and information about the particle-transport patterns can contribute to predictions of the fate of a possible leakage. It is also, to our knowledge, the first time particle-transport differences between two coastal areas have been quantified in this manner. In Forsmark, a funnel-shaped bay shielded by a number of islands, the average residence time for clay particles was 5 times longer than in the modeled part of Simpevarp, which is open to the Baltic Sea. In Forsmark, <10 % of the released particles left the domain compared to 60-80 % in Simpevarp. These site-specific differences will increase over time with the differences in land uplift between the areas.

  15. Pore-Scale Investigation of Micron-Size Polyacrylamide Elastic Microspheres (MPEMs) Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2014-05-06

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2007-12-18

    2007 was a year of progress and challenges for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO). I believe that with the addition of a new Controller, the OCFO senior management team is stronger than ever. With the new Controller on board, the senior management team spent two intensive days updating our strategic plan for the next five years ending in 2012, while making sure that we continue to execute on our existing strategic initiatives. In 2007 the Budget Office, teaming with Human Resources, worked diligently with our colleagues on campus to reengineer the Multi-Location Appointment (MLA) process, making it easier for our Principal Investigators (PIs) to work simultaneously between the Laboratory and UC campuses. The hiring of a point-of-contact in Human Resources to administer the program will also make the process flow smoother. In order to increase our financial flexibility, the OCFO worked with the Department of Energy (DOE) to win approval to reduce the burden rates on research and development (R&D) subcontracts and Intra-University Transfers (IUT). The Budget Office also performed a 'return on investment' (ROI) analysis to secure UCRP funding for a much needed vocational rehabilitation counselor. This new counselor now works with employees who are on medical leave to ensure that they can return to work in a more timely fashion, or if not able to return, usher them through the various options available to them. Under the direction of the new Controller, PriceWaterhouse Coopers (PWC) performed their annual audit of the Laboratory's financial data and reported positive results. In partnership with the Financial Policy and Training Office, the Controller's Office also helped to launch self-assessments of some of our financial processes, including timekeeping and resource adjustments. These self assessments were conducted to promote efficiencies and mitigate risk. In some cases they provided assurance that our practices are sound, and in

  17. Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer compensation relationship to company performance in state-owned entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H.R. Bussin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optimal contracting continues to dominate boardroom and dinner discussions worldwide in light of the 2008 global financial crisis and especially in South Africa, due to the growing income gap. Increased scrutiny is being placed on South African state-owned entities (SOEs, as a result of the seemingly poor performance of SOEs. Some of the SOEs are reported to have received financial bailouts from taxpayers’ money, while executives are raking in millions of rands in remuneration, provoking some concerns on the alignment of executive pay to company performance in SOEs. Aim: The study will assist remuneration committees and policymakers in the structuring of executive pay in SOEs to ensure alignment to company performance. Setting: The study sought to assess, based on empirical evidence, if there is a positive relationship between Chief Executive Officer (CEO and Chief Financial Officer (CFO remuneration and company performance in South African SOEs in the period between 2010 and 2014. All 21 Schedule 2 SOEs were included in the study. Methods: The research was a quantitative archival research methodology. Correlation and multiple regression analysis were the main statistical techniques used in this study. Results: Contrary to popular media, a positive relationship between CEO and CFO remuneration (fixed pay and short-term incentives and company performance in SOEs was observed. Company size appears to be the key determiner of fixed pay in SOEs. The positive relationship was mainly noted on absolute profitability measurements like EBITDA (earnings before interest and tax and depreciation and amortisation and net profit. Conclusion: SOE remuneration committees and policymakers should maintain the positive relationship; however, more emphasis should be placed on financial efficiency measurements so as to enhance efficiencies in SOEs.

  18. Investigation of transport mechanisms in Bi doped Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films for phase change memory application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarenko, Petr I.; Sherchenkov, Alexey A.; Kozyukhin, Sergey S.; Shtern, Maxim Y.; Timoshenkov, Sergey P.; Gromov, Dmitry G.; Redichev, Evgeniy N.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of Bi doping on the charge carrier transport mechanism in GST225 thin films was investigated. The three regions with different current-voltage dependencies were established. The energy diagrams for Bi doped GST225 thin films for different regions were analyzed. Analysis of experimental data showed that space charge limited current is the most possible explanation for the nonlinear I-V dependence in the middle electrical field strength (103 change I-V characteristic, resistivity, mobility gap, Urbach energy, density distribution of localized states, and activation energy of conductivity. The most pronounced modification of current-voltage characteristic and parameters of the thin films was established for GST225 + 0,5 wt. % Bi. Thus, doping of Ge2Sb2Te5 by Bi expands the range of material properties, which is important for the optimization of PCM technology.

  19. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian proton coupled transporter (POT) hPepT1 has been studied intensively due to its role in nutrient and drug absorption in the small intestine. In the absence of a crystal structure of hPepT1, the available structures of bacterial POTs, among which PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis has...... a strikingly high sequence identity, can be used to rationalize its mechanism and substrate preference. However, very little is known about the substrate specificity of PepTSo. To elaborate on this, the natural peptide specificity of PepTSo was investigated. Di and tri-peptides were found to be substrates...... for PepTSo in contrast to mono- and tetrapeptides as was indicated by previous competition studies. Interestingly, a negatively charged side chain was better accommodated on the dipeptide N- than the C-terminus position. Inversely, a positive charged side chain appeared to be tolerated better...

  20. Investigation of stickiness influence in the anomalous transport and diffusion for a non-dissipative Fermi-Ulam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livorati, André L. P.; Palmero, Matheus S.; Díaz-I, Gabriel; Dettmann, Carl P.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2018-02-01

    We study the dynamics of an ensemble of non interacting particles constrained by two infinitely heavy walls, where one of them is moving periodically in time, while the other is fixed. The system presents mixed dynamics, where the accessible region for the particle to diffuse chaotically is bordered by an invariant spanning curve. Statistical analysis for the root mean square velocity, considering high and low velocity ensembles, leads the dynamics to the same steady state plateau for long times. A transport investigation of the dynamics via escape basins reveals that depending of the initial velocity ensemble, the decay rates of the survival probability present different shapes and bumps, in a mix of exponential, power law and stretched exponential decays. After an analysis of step-size averages, we found that the stable manifolds play the role of a preferential path for faster escape, being responsible for the bumps and different shapes of the survival probability.

  1. A numerical investigation on multi-phase transport phenomena in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Anh Dinh; Zhou, Biao [Department of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Ave., Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    In this study, the simulation of a fuel cell stack is performed by applying a general numerical model with VOF method that has been successfully applied to single PEMFC model to investigate the fluid dynamics, mass transport, flooding phenomenon and the effects of liquid water on the stack performance. The performance of three single cells in series connection in the fuel cell stack is examined according to the presence of liquid water in different single cells. The distributions of fluid flow, species concentration and the current density are presented to illustrate the effects of liquid water on the performance of each single cell. The numerical results locate that the low distributions of species in the flooding cell certainly degrade the performance of this cell. Moreover, it can be seen that the performance of the flooding cell will significantly affect the whole stack performance since the values of average current density must be identical in all single cells. (author)

  2. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  3. An International Collaboration for the Training of Medical Chief Residents in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Ho, Janet J; Karigire, Claudine; Richards, Bradley; Sofair, Andre N

    The year-long position of chief medical resident is a time-honored tradition in the United States that serves to provide the trainee with an opportunity to gain further skills as a clinician, leader, teacher, liaison, and administrator. However, in most training programs in the developing world, this role does not exist. We sought to develop a collaborative program to train the first medical chief residents for the University of Rwanda and to assess the impact of the new chief residency on residency training, using questionnaires and qualitative interviews with Rwandan faculty, chief residents, and residents. The educational context and the process leading up to the appointment of Rwandan chief residents, including selection, job description, and necessary training (in the United States and Rwanda), are described. One year after implementation, we used a parallel, mixed methods approach to evaluate the new chief medical resident program through resident surveys as well as semistructured interviews with key informants, including site chief residents, chief residents, and faculty. We also observed chief residents and site chief residents at work and convened focus groups with postgraduate residents to yield additional qualitative information. Rwandan faculty and residents generally felt that the new position had improved the educational and administrative structure of the teaching program while providing a training ground for future academicians. A collaborative training program between developing and developed world academic institutions provides an efficient model for the development of a new chief residency program in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Announcement: New Editor-in-Chief Robert C. Kennicutt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-05-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish

  5. Announcement: New Editor-In-Chief, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not

  6. Hydrogeologic settings and groundwater-flow simulations for regional investigations of the transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants to public-supply wells—Investigations begun in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The study was designed to shed light on factors that affect the vulnerability of groundwater and, more specifically, water from public-supply wells to contamination to provide a context for the NAWQA Program's earlier finding of mixtures of contaminants at low concentrations in groundwater near the water table in urban areas across the Nation. The TANC study has included investigations at both the regional (tens to thousands of square kilometers) and local (generally less than 25 square kilometers) scales. At the regional scale, the approach to investigation involves refining conceptual models of groundwater flow in hydrologically distinct settings and then constructing or updating a groundwater-flow model with particle tracking for each setting to help quantify regional water budgets, public-supply well contributing areas (areas contributing recharge to wells and zones of contribution for wells), and traveltimes from recharge areas to selected wells. A great deal of information about each contributing area is captured from the model output, including values for 170 variables that describe physical and (or) geochemical characteristics of the contributing areas. The information is subsequently stored in a relational database. Retrospective water-quality data from monitoring, domestic, and many of the public-supply wells, as well as data from newly collected samples at selected public-supply wells, also are stored in the database and are used with the model output to help discern the more important factors affecting vulnerability in many, if not most, settings. The study began with investigations in seven regional areas, and it benefits from being conducted as part of the NAWQA Program, in which consistent methods are used so that meaningful comparisons can be

  7. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793.11 Section 793.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the amendment...

  8. 46 CFR 196.45-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Master and chief engineer responsible. 196.45-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 196.45-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. (a) It shall be the duty of the master and the engineer in charge of the boilers of any vessel to require that a...

  9. 46 CFR 78.55-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Master and chief engineer responsible. 78.55-1 Section... OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 78.55-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. It shall be the duty of the master and the engineer in charge of the boilers of any vessel to require that a steam pressure is...

  10. The Self-Perceived Leadership Styles of Chief State School Officers and Models of Educational Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the leadership styles of the chief state school officers of the United States and the District of Columbia. The entire population of 51 chief state school officers was surveyed and a response rate of 60% was obtained. The study examined the relationship between the leadership style, select demographic variables, and the…

  11. 8 CFR 1003.9 - Office of the Chief Immigration Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... matters to be decided by the immigration judges; (4) Evaluate the performance of the Immigration Courts... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of the Chief Immigration Judge. 1003... JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration Judge...

  12. 29 CFR 6.41 - Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administrative Law Judge to conduct such hearings as may be necessary to decide the disputed matters. A copy of... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. 6.41 Section 6... Substantial Interest Proceedings § 6.41 Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon timely receipt of...

  13. 43 CFR 4.2 - Membership of appeals boards; decisions, functions of Chief Judges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... direct that an appeal may be decided by a panel of any two Administrative Judges of the Board, but if..., functions of Chief Judges. 4.2 Section 4.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... appeals boards; decisions, functions of Chief Judges. (a) The Appeals Boards consist of regular members...

  14. Changes in Editorial board Rhinology, Prof. Valerie Lund demits office as Editor in Chief of Rhinology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    At the Editorial Board Meeting of Rhinology Valerie Lund indicated that she has decided to emit office as Editor in Chief of Rhinology. She became a member of the editorial board in 1993, a co-editor with Prof. Bert Huizing in 1999 and Editor in Chief in 2004. She leaves with our grateful thanks for

  15. 39 CFR 4.5 - Assistant Postmasters General, General Counsel, Judicial Officer, Chief Postal Inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assistant Postmasters General, General Counsel, Judicial Officer, Chief Postal Inspector. 4.5 Section 4.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE... Counsel, a Judicial Officer, a Chief Postal Inspector, and such number of officers, described in 39 U.S.C...

  16. 38 CFR 13.107 - Accounts of chief officers of public or private institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... officers of public or private institutions. 13.107 Section 13.107 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... chief officers of public or private institutions. (a) Department of Veterans Affairs benefits. The chief officer of an institution, other than a Federal institution, shall, when requested, render an account to...

  17. 29 CFR 6.30 - Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Contract Act) § 6.30 Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon timely receipt of a request for a... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. 6.30 Section 6.30 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS ENFORCING...

  18. 75 FR 22754 - Federal Advisory Committee; Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Chief of Engineers Environmental... environmental issues facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Secretary of the Army may act upon the Board's... may submit written statements to the Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board's membership...

  19. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating costs, as well higher product selectivities than traditional technologies. The oxygen permeation rate through a given ITM is defined by the membrane temperature and oxygen chemical potential difference across it. Both of these parameters can be strongly influenced by thermochemical reactions occurring in the vicinity of the membrane, though in the literature they are often characterized in terms of the well mixed product stream at the reactor exit. This work presents the development of a novel ITM reactor for the fundamental investigation of the coupling between fuel conversion and oxygen permeation under well defined fluid dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, including provisions for spatially resolved, in-situ investigations. A planar, finite gap stagnation flow reactor with optical and probe access to the reaction zone is used to facilitate in-situ measurements and cross-validation with detailed numerical simulations. Using this novel reactor, baseline measurements are presented to elucidate the impact of the sweep gas fuel (CH4) fraction on the oxygen permeation and fuel conversion. In addition, the difference between well-mixed gas compositions measured at the reactor outlet and those measured in the vicinity of the membrane surface are discussed, demonstrating the unique utility of the reactor. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An investigation into the hazards associated with the maritime transport of spent nuclear reactor fuel to the British Isles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Interim results are presented from an investigation into the potential hazard from maritime transport of spent reactor fuel. From a review of official safety studies the most severe accident is identified as a prolonged shipboard fire of 9 hours or more. According to studies performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency by the Batelle Laboratories such a fire could fail all fuel elements and release volatile radionuclides such as caesium to the environment. The consequences of such an accident are investigated for a release to the Irish Sea from a fire damaged vessel. Consequences are analysed for a release to the continental shelf waters following sinking, and also for an atmospheric release close to a conurbation. The port of Barrow is taken as an example. The report concludes that either of these events could have catastrophic consequences: the Irish Sea might have to be closed to fisheries and in the case of an atmospheric release large scale evacuation would be necessary to prevent loss of life. (author)

  1. Investigation of Optimal Configuration of Solar Energy System Considering Configuration of Apparatuses and Electricity Transportation between Interprofessional Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Mori, Shunsuke

    This paper describes about a decision model for solar energy utilization and an investigation of optimal configuration of solar energy system considering electricity transportation between interprofessional consumers. Solar energy is effective energy source for CO2 reduction. Available collectable area for solar energy is limited to consumer's condition. A photovoltaic can supply electricity which is flexible. However its efficiency is low compared to solar heat collector. A solar heat collector has high efficiency. But heat demand varies with consumer type. We investigate optimal ratio of photovoltaic and solar heat collector in several condition. The result shows that solar heat collector is effective energy supply system for consumers which require high hot water demand in daytime. On the other hand, electrical heat pump for hot water supply varies optimal configuration of solar energy system due to the shift of energy source from gas to electricity. To introduce electrical heat pump for hot water supply increases the ratio of photovoltaic due to the increase in electricity demand. However, there is no consumer without solar heat collector. Therefore, solar heat collector does not compare with electrification of consumer.

  2. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C. I.; Chuu, Y. J.; Lin, W.; Meike, A.; Sawvel, A.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the transport of bacteria in a large, thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. The study was part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), thermochemical and physical studies conducted on a 10 ft x 10 ft x 14 ft block of volcanic tuff excavated on 5 of 6 sides out of Fran Ridge, Nevada. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures. The double-drug-resistant mutants, which could be thus distinguished from the indigenous species, were injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly and steadily over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C. Samples (cotton cloths inserted the length of the hole, glass fiber swabs, and filter papers) were collected from the boreholes that were approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant bacteria were found in the collection boreholes nine months after injection. Surprisingly, they also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. These bacteria appear to be the species that were injected. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the observation boreholes and heater boreholes suggests that a random motion could be the pattern that the bacteria migrated in the block. These observations indicated the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting

  3. A comprehensive investigation on common polymorphisms in the MDR1/ABCB1 transporter gene and susceptibility to colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    Full Text Available ATP Binding Cassette B1 (ABCB1 is a transporter with a broad substrate specificity involved in the elimination of several carcinogens from the gut. Several polymorphic variants within the ABCB1 gene have been reported as modulators of ABCB1-mediated transport. We investigated the impact of ABCB1 genetic variants on colorectal cancer (CRC risk. A hybrid tagging/functional approach was performed to select 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were genotyped in 1,321 Czech subjects, 699 CRC cases and 622 controls. In addition, six potentially functional SNPs were genotyped in 3,662 German subjects, 1,809 cases and 1,853 controls from the DACHS study. We found that three functional SNPs (rs1202168, rs1045642 and rs868755 were associated with CRC risk in the German population. Carriers of the rs1202168_T and rs868755_T alleles had an increased risk for CRC (P(trend = 0.016 and 0.029, respectively, while individuals bearing the rs1045642_C allele showed a decreased risk of CRC (P(trend = 0.022. We sought to replicate the most significant results in an independent case-control study of 3,803 subjects, 2,169 cases and 1,634 controls carried out in the North of Germany. None of the SNPs tested were significantly associated with CRC risk in the replication study. In conclusion, in this study of about 8,800 individuals we show that ABCB1 gene polymorphisms play at best a minor role in the susceptibility to CRC.

  4. Investigating the role of transportation models in epidemiologic studies of traffic related air pollution and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Valois, Marie-France; Goldberg, Mark S; Crouse, Dan; Ross, Nancy; Parent, Marie-Elise; Yasmin, Shamsunnahar; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2015-07-01

    In two earlier case-control studies conducted in Montreal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a marker for traffic-related air pollution was found to be associated with the incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer and prostate cancer. These studies relied on a land use regression model (LUR) for NO2 that is commonly used in epidemiologic studies for deriving estimates of traffic-related air pollution. Here, we investigate the use of a transportation model developed during the summer season to generate a measure of traffic emissions as an alternative to the LUR model. Our traffic model provides estimates of emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the level of individual roads, as does the LUR model. Our main objective was to compare the distribution of the spatial estimates of NOx computed from our transportation model to the distribution obtained from the LUR model. A secondary objective was to compare estimates of risk using these two exposure estimates. We observed that the correlation (spearman) between our two measures of exposure (NO2 and NOx) ranged from less than 0.3 to more than 0.9 across Montreal neighborhoods. The most important factor affecting the "agreement" between the two measures in a specific area was found to be the length of roads. Areas affected by a high level of traffic-related air pollution had a far better agreement between the two exposure measures. A comparison of odds ratios (ORs) obtained from NO2 and NOx used in two case-control studies of breast and prostate cancer, showed that the differences between the ORs associated with NO2 exposure vs NOx exposure differed by 5.2-8.8%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of thermal energy transport from an anisotropic central heating element to the adjacent channels: A multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-02-01

    The problem of heat transfer from a central heating element pressed between two clad plates to cooling channels adjacent and outboard of the plates is investigated numerically. The aim of this work is to highlight the role of thermal conductivity anisotropy of the heating element and/or the encompassing plates on thermal energy transport to the fluid passing through the two channels. When the medium is anisotropic with respect to thermal conductivity; energy transport to the neighboring channels is no longer symmetric. This asymmetry in energy fluxes influence heat transfer to the coolant resulting in different patterns of temperature fields. In particular, it is found that the temperature fields are skewed towards the principal direction of anisotropy. In addition, the heat flux distributions along the edges of the heating element are also different as a manifestation of thermal conductivity anisotropy. Furthermore, the peak temperature at the channel walls change location and magnitude depending on the principal direction of anisotropy. Based on scaling arguments, it is found that, the ratio of width to the height of the heating system is a key parameter which can suggest when one may ignore the effect of the cross-diagonal terms of the full conductivity tensor. To account for anisotropy in thermal conductivity, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) is employed. Using this technique, it is possible to find a finite difference stencil which can handle full thermal conductivity tensor and in the same time enjoys the simplicity of finite difference approximation. Although the finite difference stencil based on MPFA is quite complex, in this work we apply the recently introduced experimenting field approach which construct the global problem automatically.

  6. Numerical investigation of interfacial mass transport resistance and two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell air channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koz, Mustafa

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are efficient and environmentally friendly electrochemical engines. The performance of a PEMFC is adversely affected by oxygen (O2) concentration loss from the air flow channel to the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Oxygen transport resistance at the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and air channel interface is a non-negligible component of the O2 concentration loss. Simplified PEMFC performance models in the available literature incorporate the O2 resistance at the GDL-channel interface as an input parameter. However, this parameter has been taken as a constant so far in the available literature and does not reflect variable PEMFC operating conditions and the effect of two-phase flow in the channels. This study numerically calculates the O2 transport resistance at the GDL-air channel interface and expresses this resistance through the non-dimensional Sherwood number (Sh). Local Sh is investigated in an air channel with multiple droplets and films inside. These water features are represented as solid obstructions and only air flow is simulated. Local variations of Sh in the flow direction are obtained as a function of superficial air velocity, water feature size, and uniform spacing between water features. These variations are expressed with mathematical expressions for the PEMFC performance models to utilize and save computational resources. The resulting mathematical correlations for Sh can be utilized in PEMFC performance models. These models can predict cell performance more accurately with the help of the results of this work. Moreover, PEMFC performance models do not need to use a look-up table since the results were expressed through correlations. Performance models can be kept simplified although their predictions will become more realistic. Since two-phase flow in channels is experienced mostly at lower temperatures, performance optimization at low temperatures can be done easier.

  7. Experimental investigation of the impact of compound-specific dispersion and electrostatic interactions on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of compound-specific diffusion/dispersion and electrochemical migration on transient solute transport in saturated porous media. We conducted laboratory bench-scale experiments, under advection-dominated regimes (seepage velocity: 0.5, 5, 25 m/d), in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup using pulse injection of multiple tracers (both uncharged and ionic species). Extensive sampling and measurement of solutes' concentrations (˜1500 samples; >3000 measurements) were performed at the outlet of the flow-through setup, at high spatial and temporal resolution. The experimental results show that compound-specific effects and charge-induced Coulombic interactions are important not only at low velocities and/or for steady state plumes but also for transient transport under high flow velocities. Such effects can lead to a remarkably different behavior of measured breakthrough curves also at very high Péclet numbers. To quantitatively interpret the experimental results, we used four modeling approaches: classical advection-dispersion equation (ADE), continuous time random walk (CTRW), dual-domain mass transfer model (DDMT), and a multicomponent ionic dispersion model. The latter is based on the multicomponent formulation of coupled diffusive/dispersive fluxes and was used to describe and explain the electrostatic effects of charged species. Furthermore, we determined experimentally the temporal profiles of the flux-related dilution index. This metric of mixing, used in connection with the traditional solute breakthrough curves, proved to be useful to correctly distinguish between plume spreading and mixing, particularly for the cases in which the sole analysis of integrated concentration breakthrough curves may lead to erroneous interpretation of plume dilution.

  8. The successful Chief Executive Officer understands quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, D.

    1984-01-01

    The successful Chief Executive Officer (CEO) will have recognized the benefits of, and have implemented, a total quality assurance program. The quality assurance program will be adequately defined in policies and procedures such that managers and supervisors of each organizational element understand their primary and supporting roles in carrying out an effective quality assurance program. The traditional practice of having all quality assurance activities reside in a quality assurance organization will have been cast aside. Instead, the quality assurance activities necessary to achieve and assure the quality of the desired end product will have been defined and assigned to responsible organization elements. The quality assurance organization's primary role will be to define the total quality assurance program, insure that the achieving and assuring functions are assigned in policies and procedures, conduct training necessary to have management and supervisors understand the total quality assurance program, measure the effectiveness of the program and feedback measurement data for improvements in the program. The successful CEO will have implemented a quality assurance program that provides for a graded approach for application of the program based upon the importance of the intended use of the product or service. The successful CEO will rely heavily on the scheduled progress reports and assessments to measure the pulse of his organization's successes and improvement needs. This paper will describe suggested approaches for the Quality Assurance Manager to implement a quality assurance program which results in his corporation's CEO being a supporter of and a driving force in the implementation of the quality assurance program

  9. Supplementary investigations on the validation of the atmospheric radionuclide transport model (ARTM); Ergaenzende Untersuchungen zur Validierung des Atmosphaerischen Radionuklid-Transport-Modells (ARTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Thielen, Harald; Sogalla, Martin

    2015-09-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SBG) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of non-radioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. The research project 3612S50007 serves, on the one hand, to validate ARTM systematically. On the other hand, the development of science and technology were investigated and, if reasonable and possible, were implemented to the program system. The dispersion model and the user interface were advanced and optimized. The program package was provided to the users as a free download. Notably t he work program comprises the validation of the approach used in ARTM to model short emission periods, which are of interest in view of the SBG. The simulation results of the diagnostic wind and turbulence model TALdia, which is part of the GO-ARTM program package, were evaluated with focus on the influence of buildings on the flow field. The user interface was upgraded with a wind field viewer. To simplify the comparison with the model still in use, a Gaussian plum e model was implemented into the graphical user interface. The ARTM web page was maintained, user questions and feedback were answered and analysed concerning possible improvements and further developments of the program package. Numerous improvements were implemented. An ARTM user workshop was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation

  10. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  11. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  12. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  13. Investigation of transport phenomena in HT-PEM-fuel cells; Untersuchung von Transportphaenomenen in der HT-PEM-Brennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huth, Andreas

    2007-03-26

    High temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEM-FC) are based on phosphoric acid as the electrolyte and polybenzimidazole as the polymer for the fuel cell membrane. The operating temperature is 160 C. There is little information about this kind of fuel cells in the literature, because the majority of research is done on Nafion {sup registered} fuel cells. The present work uses the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a tool for the development of HT-PEM-FCs that are resistant to performance losses during the temperature cycle. EIS is used to look inside the fuel cell for investigation of membrane and electrode processes. The proton pump approach is another investigation method. This approach helps to investigate the anode processes and the maximum proton transport capacity. Once the anode processes are allocated in the impedance spectra the other contributions can be found by systematically variation of temperature, cathode gas composition and cathode gas velocity during normal fuel cell operation. The result is an equivalent circuit of the HT-PEM-FC. The frequency-dependent detection of processes enables the user of the EIS-technique to recognise the reason for low power densities or power losses during operation in a temperature cycle. The decrease of the power density of HT-PEM-FCs can be addressed to flooding of the micro gas channels in the catalytic layer of the electrodes. The observed irreversible power loss during temperature cycling of HT-PEM-fuel cells is due to a loss of electrolyte. The solution is a combination of electrolytes as well as a combination of hydroscopic and hydrophobic layers. These MEAs have been tested in a temperature cycle test for more than 800 hours. The result is a performance loss of only 6 %.

  14. Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  15. The Chief Joseph Hatchery Program 2013 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Casey; Pearl, Andrea; Laramie, Matthew; Rohrback, John; Phillips, Pat; Wolf, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The Chief Joseph Hatchery is the fourth hatchery obligated under the Grand Coulee Dam/Dry Falls project, originating in the 1940s. Leavenworth, Entiat, and Winthrop National Fish Hatcheries were built and operated as mitigation for salmon blockage at Grand Coulee Dam, but the fourth hatchery was not built, and the obligation was nearly forgotten. After the Colville Tribes successfully collaborated with the United States to resurrect the project, planning of the hatchery began in 2001 and construction was completed in 2013. The monitoring program began in 2012 and adult Chinook Salmon were brought on station for the first time in June 2013. BPA is the primary funding source for CJH, and the Mid-Columbia PUDs (Douglas, Grant and Chelan County) have entered into cost-share agreements with the tribes and BPA in order to meet some of their mitigation obligations. The CJH production level was set at 60% in 2013 in order to train staff and test hatchery facility systems during the first year of operation. Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery (LNFH) provided 422 Spring Chinook broodstock in June, 2013; representing the official beginning of CJH operations. In July and August the CCT used a purse seine vessel to collect 814 summer/fall Chinook as broodstock that were a continuation and expansion of the previous Similkameen Pond program. In-hatchery survival for most life stages exceeded survival targets and, as of April 2014, the program was on track to exceed the 60% production target for its start-up year. The CJH monitoring project collected field data to determine Chinook population status, trend, and hatchery effectiveness centered on five major activities; 1) rotary screw traps (juvenile outmigration, natural-origin smolt PIT tagging) 2) beach seine (naturalorigin smolt PIT tagging) 3) lower Okanogan adult fish pilot weir (adult escapement, proportion of hatchery-origin spawners [pHOS], broodstock) 4) spawning ground surveys (redd and carcass surveys)(viable salmonid

  16. Investigation of the shape change of bio-flocs and its influence on mass transport using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, T T; Xiao, F; Sun, W J; Sun, F Y; Lam, K M; Li, X Y

    2014-01-01

    In this laboratory study, an advanced flow visualization technique - particle image velocimetry (PIV) - was employed to investigate the change of shape of activated sludge flocs in water and its influence on the material transport characteristics of the flocs. The continuous shape change of the bio-flocs that occurred within a very short period of time could be captured by the PIV system. The results demonstrate that the fluid turbulence caused the shift of parts of a floc from one side to the other in less than 200 ms. During the continuous shape change, the liquid within the floc was forced out of the floc, which was then refilled with the liquid from the surrounding flow. For the bio-flocs saturated with a tracer dye, it was shown that the dye could be released from the flocs at a faster rate when the flocs were swayed around in water. The experimental results indicate that frequent shape change of bio-flocs facilitates the exchange of fluid and materials between the floc interior and the surrounding water. This mass transfer mechanism can be more important than molecular diffusion and internal permeation to the function and behavior of particle aggregates, including bio-flocs, in natural waters and treatment systems.

  17. Heat Transport upon River-Water Infiltration investigated by Fiber-Optic High-Resolution Temperature Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, T.; Schirmer, M.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2010-12-01

    Infiltrating river water is of high relevance for drinking water supply by river bank filtration as well as for riparian groundwater ecology. Quantifying flow patterns and velocities, however, is hampered by temporal and spatial variations of exchange fluxes. In recent years, heat has become a popular natural tracer to estimate exchange rates between rivers and groundwater. Nevertheless, field investigations are often limited by insufficient sensors spacing or simplifying assumptions such as one-dimensional flow. Our interest lies in a detailed local survey of river water infiltration at a restored river section at the losing river Thur in northeast Switzerland. Here, we measured three high-resolution temperature profiles along an assumed flow path by means of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) using fiber optic cables wrapped around poles. Moreover, piezometers were equipped with standard temperature sensors for a comparison to the DTS data. Diurnal temperature oscillations were tracked in the river bed and the riparian groundwater and analyzed by means of dynamic harmonic regression and subsequent modeling of heat transport with sinusoidal boundary conditions to quantify seepage velocities and thermal diffusivities. Compared to the standard temperature sensors, the DTS data give a higher vertical resolution, facilitating the detection of process- and structure-dependent patterns of the spatiotemporal temperature field. This advantage overcompensates the scatter in the data due to instrument noise. In particular, we could demonstrate the impact of heat conduction through the unsaturated zone on the riparian groundwater by the high resolution temperature profiles.

  18. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  19. The interaction of escitalopram and R-citalopram at the human serotonin transporter investigated in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jacob P R; Plenge, Per; Sachs, Benjamin D; Pehrson, Alan L; Cajina, Manuel; Du, Yunzhi; Roberts, Wendy; Rudder, Meghan L; Dalvi, Prachiti; Robinson, Taylor J; O'Neill, Sharon P; Khoo, King S; Morillo, Connie Sanchez; Zhang, Xiaodong; Caron, Marc G

    2014-12-01

    Escitalopram appears to be a superior antidepressant to racemic citalopram. It has been hypothesized that binding of R-citalopram to the serotonin transporter (SERT) antagonizes escitalopram binding to and inhibition of the SERT, there by curtailing the elevation of extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HTExt), and hence anti-depressant efficacy. Further, it has been suggested that a putative allosteric binding site is important for binding of escitalopram to the primary, orthosteric, site, and for R-citalopram's inhibition here of. Primary: Investigate at the human (h)SERT, at clinical relevant doses, whether R-citalopram antagonizes escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation. Secondary: Investigate whether abolishing the putative allosteric site affects escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation and/or modulates the effect of R-citalopram. Recombinant generation of hSERT transgenic mice; in vivo microdialysis; SERT binding; pharmacokinetics; 5-HT sensitive behaviors (tail suspension, marble burying). We generated mice expressing either the wild-type human SERT (hSERT(WT)) or hSERT carrying amino acid substitutions (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T and I575T) collectively abolishing the putative allosteric site (hSERT(ALI/VFL+SI/TT)). One mg/kg escitalopram yielded clinical relevant plasma levels and brain levels consistent with therapeutic SERT occupancy. The hSERT mice showed normal basal 5-HTExt levels. Escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation was not decreased by R-citalopram co-treatment and was unaffected by loss of the allosteric site. The behavioral effects of the clinically relevant escitalopram dose were small and tended to be enhanced by R-citalopram co-administration. We find no evidence that R-citalopram directly antagonizes escitalopram or that the putative allosteric site is important for hSERT inhibition by escitalopram.

  20. Classifying free-text triage chief complaints into syndromic categories with natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Wendy W; Christensen, Lee M; Wagner, Michael M; Haug, Peter J; Ivanov, Oleg; Dowling, John N; Olszewski, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    Develop and evaluate a natural language processing application for classifying chief complaints into syndromic categories for syndromic surveillance. Much of the input data for artificial intelligence applications in the medical field are free-text patient medical records, including dictated medical reports and triage chief complaints. To be useful for automated systems, the free-text must be translated into encoded form. We implemented a biosurveillance detection system from Pennsylvania to monitor the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. Because input data was in free-text format, we used a natural language processing text classifier to automatically classify free-text triage chief complaints into syndromic categories used by the biosurveillance system. The classifier was trained on 4700 chief complaints from Pennsylvania. We evaluated the ability of the classifier to classify free-text chief complaints into syndromic categories with a test set of 800 chief complaints from Utah. The classifier produced the following areas under the ROC curve: Constitutional = 0.95; Gastrointestinal = 0.97; Hemorrhagic = 0.99; Neurological = 0.96; Rash = 1.0; Respiratory = 0.99; Other = 0.96. Using information stored in the system's semantic model, we extracted from the Respiratory classifications lower respiratory complaints and lower respiratory complaints with fever with a precision of 0.97 and 0.96, respectively. Results suggest that a trainable natural language processing text classifier can accurately extract data from free-text chief complaints for biosurveillance.

  1. Airborne lidar measurements to investigate the impact of long-range transported dust on shallow marine trade wind convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S.; Gutleben, M.; Wirth, M.; Ewald, F.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds are still main contributors to uncertainties in estimates and interpretation of the Earth's changing energy budget. Their interaction with the Earth's radiation budged has a direct component by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation, and an indirect component, e.g. as aerosols modify the properties and thus the life-time of clouds or by changing the atmosphere's stability. Up to know now sufficient understanding in aerosol-cloud interaction and climate feedback is achieved. Thus studies with respect to clouds, aerosols, their interaction and influence on the radiation budged are highly demanded. In August 2016 the NARVAL-II (Next-generation airborne remote sensing for validation studies) mission took place. Measurements with a combined active (high spectral resolution and water vapor differential absorption lidar and cloud radar) and passive remote sensing (microwave radiometer, hyper spectral imager, radiation measurements) payload were performed with the German high altitude and long-range research aircraft HALO over the subtropical North-Atlantic Ocean to study shallow marine convection during the wet and dusty season. With this, NARVAL-II is follow-up of the NARVAL-I mission which took place during the dry and dust free season in December 2013. During NARVAL-II the measurement flights were designed the way to sample dust influenced areas as well as dust free areas in the trades. One main objective was to investigate the optical and macro physical properties of the dust layer, differences in cloud occurrence in dusty and non-dusty areas, and to study the influence of aerosols on the cloud properties and formation. This allows comparisons of cloud and aerosol distribution as well as their environment between the dry and the wet season, and of cloud properties and distribution with and without the influence of long-range transported dust across the Atlantic Ocean. In our presentation we will give an overview of the NARVAL

  2. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  3. In situ investigation of the mechanisms of the transport to tissues of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto the root surface of Kandelia obovata seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ruilong; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for in situ determination of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed onto the root surface of Kandelia obovata seedlings was established using laser-induced time-resolved nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy (LITRF). The linear dynamic ranges for the established method were 1.5–1240 ng/spot for phenanthrene, 1.0–1360 ng/spot for pyrene and 5.0–1220 ng/spot for benzo[a]pyrene. Then, the mechanisms of PAHs transport from the Ko root surface to tissues were investigated. The three-phase model including fast, slow and very slow fractions was superior to the single or dual-phase model to describe the PAHs transport processes. Moreover, the fast fraction of PAHs transport process was mainly due to passive movement, while the slow and very slow fractions were not. Passive movement was the main process of B[a]P adsorbed onto Ko root surface transport to tissues. In addition, the extent of the PAHs transport to Ko root tissues at different salinity were evaluated. - Highlights: • A novel method in situ determination PAHs adsorbed onto root surface was established. • The mechanisms of PAHs transport from root surface to tissues are investigated. • Passive movement is the main process of B[a]P transport from root surface to tissues. • Effects of salinity on the PAHs transport from root surface to tissues are evaluated. - Passive movement for the PAHs adsorbed onto Kandelia obovata root surface to tissues was observed by a newly established in situ LITRF method

  4. Investigating Ozone Sources in California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Implications for Stratospheric Intrusion and Long Range Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Gore, Warren

    2016-01-01

    High ozone concentrations at low altitudes near the surface were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on May 30, 2012. We investigate the causes of the elevated ozone concentrations using the airborne measurements and various models. GEOSchem and WRF-STILT model simulations show that the contribution from local sources is small. From MERRA reanalysis, it is found that high potential vorticity (PV) is observed at low altitudes. This high PV appears to be only partially coming through the stratospheric intrusions because the air inside the high PV region is moist, which shows that mixing appears to be enhanced in the low altitudes. Considering that diabatic heating can also produce high PV in the lower troposphere, high ozone is partially coming through stratospheric intrusion, but this cannot explain the whole ozone concentration in the target areas of the western U.S. A back-trajectory model is utilized to see where the air masses originated. The air masses of the target areas came from the lower stratosphere (LS), upper (UT), mid- (MT), and lower troposphere (LT). The relative number of trajectories coming from LS and UT is low (7.7% and 7.6%, respectively) compared to that from LT (64.1%), but the relative ozone concentration coming from LS and UT is high (38.4% and 20.95%, respectively) compared to that from LT (17.7%). The air mass coming from LT appears to be mostly coming from Asia. Q diagnostics show that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that ozone from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. This study shows that high ozone concentrations can be detected by airborne measurements, which can be analyzed by integrated platforms such as models, reanalysis, and satellite data.

  5. Investigation of Ozone Sources in California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Implications for Stratospheric Intrusion and Long Range Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Gore, Warren

    2015-01-01

    High ozone concentrations at low altitudes near the surface were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on May 30, 2012. We investigate the causes of the elevated ozone concentrations using the airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-chem and WRF-STILT model simulations show that the contribution from local sources is small. From MERRA reanalysis, it is found that high potential vorticity (PV) is observed at low altitudes. This high PV appears to be only partially coming through the stratospheric intrusions because the air inside the high PV region is moist, which shows that mixing appears to be enhanced in the low altitudes. Considering that diabatic heating can also produce high PV in the lower troposphere, high ozone is partially coming through stratospheric intrusion, but this cannot explain the whole ozone concentration in the target areas of the western U.S. A back-trajectory model is utilized to see where the air masses originated. The air masses of the target areas came from the lower stratosphere (LS), upper (UT), mid- (MT), and lower troposphere (LT). The relative number of trajectories coming from LS and UT is low (7.7 and 7.6, respectively) compared to that from LT (64.1), but the relative ozone concentration coming from LS and UT is high (38.4 and 20.95, respectively) compared to that from LT (17.7). The air mass coming from LT appears to be mostly coming from Asia. Q diagnostics show that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that ozone from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. This study shows that high ozone concentrations can be detected by airborne measurements, which can be analyzed by integrated platforms such as models, reanalysis, and satellite data.

  6. Numerical investigation of transient transport and deposition of microparticles under unsteady inspiratory flow in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Arash; Shaghaghian, Sana; Abouali, Omid; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, unsteady airflow patterns and particle deposition in healthy human upper airways were simulated. A realistic 3-D computational model of the upper airways including the vestibule to the end of the trachea was developed using a series of CT scan images of a healthy human. Unsteady simulations of the inhaled and exhaled airflow fields in the upper airway passages were performed by solving the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for low breathing rates corresponding to low and moderate activities. The Lagrangian trajectory analysis approach was utilized to investigate the transient particle transport and deposition under cyclic breathing condition. Particles were released uniformly at the nostrils' entrance during the inhalation phase, and the total and regional depositions for various micro-particle sizes were evaluated. The transient particle deposition fractions for various regions of the human upper airways were compared with those obtained from the equivalent steady flow condition. The presented results revealed that the equivalent constant airflow simulation can approximately predict the total particle deposition during cyclic breathing in human upper airways. While the trends of steady and unsteady model predictions for local deposition were similar, there were noticeable differences in the predicted amount of deposition. In addition, it was shown that a steady simulation cannot properly predict some critical parameters, such as the penetration fraction. Finally, the presented results showed that using a detached nasal cavity (commonly used in earlier studies) for evaluation of total deposition fraction of particles in the nasal cavity was reasonably accurate for the steady flow simulations. However, in transient simulation for predicting the deposition fraction in a specific region, such as the nasal cavity, using the full airway system geometry becomes necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Streaked spectrometry using multilayer x-ray-interference mirrors to investigate energy transport in laser-plasma applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Henke, B.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.

    1981-08-01

    Transport of energy in laser-produced plasmas is scrutinized by devising spectrally and temporally identifiable characteristics in the x-ray emission history which identify the heat-front position at various times in the heating process. Measurements of the relative turn-on times of these characteristics show the rate of energy transport between various points. These measurements can in turn constrain models of energy transport phenomena. We are time-resolving spectrally distinguishable subkilovolt x-ray emissions from different layers of a disk target to examine the transport rate of energy into the target. A similar technique is used to measure the lateral expansion rate of the plasma spot. A soft x-ray streak camera with 15-psec temporal resolution is used to make the temporal measurements. Spectral discrimination of the incident signal is provided by multilayer x-ray interference mirrors

  8. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  9. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    LEHOUX, Alizée; FAURE, Paméla; LAFOLIE, Francois; RODTS, Stéphane; COURTIER-MURIAS, Denis; COUSSOT, Philippe; MICHEL, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in additio...

  10. Upper Blackstone Water Pollution Abatement District Chief Operator Recognized for Outstanding Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Nowak, a resident of Ware Mass. and Chief Operator of the Upper Blackstone Water Pollution Abatement District (District) in Milbury, Mass., was honored by EPA with a 2016 Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator of the Year Excellence Award.

  11. Strategic Planning by the Chairmen, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1990 to 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, RIchard

    2006-01-01

    .... This Letort Paper examines how four Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1990 to 2005 used a strategic planning system to enable them to meet their statutory responsibilities specified in Title 10 US...

  12. Health Informatics in the Public Health 3.0 Era: Intelligence for the Chief Health Strategists

    OpenAIRE

    DeSalvo, Karen; Wang, Y. Claire

    2016-01-01

    This commentary discusses health informatics in the Public Health 3.0 era and the role of chief health strategists to leverage data and partnerships to address the inputs to the public's health, including the broader social determinants.

  13. 76 FR 34745 - Delegation of Authority to the Chief Operating Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... strategic planning, and performance management and measurement. Section B. Authority Excepted The authority... the Office of Strategic Planning and Management; and the Chief Disaster and National Security Officer... technology systems, information security, protecting privacy, procurement and contracting, strategic planning...

  14. Seabrook, N.H. Wastewater Treatment Plant Chief Operator Recognized for Outstanding Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin Price, a resident of Berwick Maine and the Chief Operator of the Seabrook, N.H. Wastewater Treatment Plant, was honored by EPA with a 2016 Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator of the Year Excellence Award.

  15. CREW CHIEF: A computer graphics simulation of an aircraft maintenance technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aume, Nilss M.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 35 percent of the lifetime cost of a military system is spent for maintenance. Excessive repair time is caused by not considering maintenance during design. Problems are usually discovered only after a mock-up has been constructed, when it is too late to make changes. CREW CHIEF will reduce the incidence of such problems by catching design defects in the early design stages. CREW CHIEF is a computer graphic human factors evaluation system interfaced to commercial computer aided design (CAD) systems. It creates a three dimensional man model, either male or female, large or small, with various types of clothing and in several postures. It can perform analyses for physical accessibility, strength capability with tools, visual access, and strength capability for manual materials handling. The designer would produce a drawing on his CAD system and introduce CREW CHIEF in it. CREW CHIEF's analyses would then indicate places where problems could be foreseen and corrected before the design is frozen.

  16. Parameter and observation importance in modelling virus transport in saturated porous media - Investigations in a homogenous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, G.R.; Hill, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the importance of seven types of parameters to virus transport: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, dispersivity, sorption rate and distribution coefficient (representing physical-chemical filtration), and in-solution and adsorbed inactivation (representing virus inactivation). The first three parameters relate to subsurface transport in general while the last four, the sorption rate, distribution coefficient, and in-solution and adsorbed inactivation rates, represent the interaction of viruses with the porous medium and their ability to persist. The importance of four types of observations to estimate the virus-transport parameters are evaluated: hydraulic heads, flow, temporal moments of conservative-transport concentrations, and virus concentrations. The evaluations are conducted using one- and two-dimensional homogeneous simulations, designed from published field experiments, and recently developed sensitivity-analysis methods. Sensitivity to the transport-simulation time-step size is used to evaluate the importance of numerical solution difficulties. Results suggest that hydraulic conductivity, porosity, and sorption are most important to virus-transport predictions. Most observation types provide substantial information about hydraulic conductivity and porosity; only virus-concentration observations provide information about sorption and inactivation. The observations are not sufficient to estimate these important parameters uniquely. Even with all observation types, there is extreme parameter correlation between porosity and hydraulic conductivity and between the sorption rate and in-solution inactivation. Parameter estimation was accomplished by fixing values of porosity and in-solution inactivation.

  17. Chief nursing officers' perceptions of the Doctorate of Nursing Practice degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michelle L; Stanton, Marietta P

    2013-01-01

    Nurse executives practice in a business environment, which requires a skill set that has traditionally not been included in advanced nursing curriculum. The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) essentials are designed to address this gap in education while maintaining the focus on advanced nursing practice and executive management competency. Current literature supports the appropriateness of the DNP with practice focus areas of advanced practice specialties and nursing leadership. Although certification and educational bodies, and some professional nursing organizations, have embraced the DNP as the terminal degree for non-research-focused nurses, there remains a gap in the literature in regards to the perceptions of validity of the DNP for nurse executives. The purpose of this capstone project was to investigate the perceptions of practicing chief nursing officers (CNOs) in the acute care setting regarding the application of the DNP degree for nurse leaders. Utilizing an online survey, specific perceptions investigated included application and appropriateness of the DNP in a business-based practice model and managing daily nursing operations. CNOs practicing in the acute care setting differed on their responses regarding whether the DNP should be the recommended or the required degree in CNO development programs. CNOs with tenure responded more positively to the perception that the DNP curricula contains advanced nursing knowledge content appropriate to nurse executive practice. Practicing CNOs in the acute care setting do perceive the DNP as an appropriate degree option for nurse executive roles at aggregate, system, and organizational levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. On Non-Frattini Chief Factors and Solvability of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a group is said to be a semi C A P ∗ -subgroup of if there is a chief series 1 = G 0 < G 1 < ⋯ < G m = G of such that for every non-Frattini chief factor G i / G i − 1 , H either covers G i / G i − 1 or avoids G i / G i − 1 . In this paper, some sufficient conditions for a normal subgroup of a finite group to be ...

  19. Biosurveillance evaluation of SNOMED CT's terminology (BEST Trial): coverage of chief complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Peter L; Brown, Steven H; Balas, Andrew; Temesgen, Zelalem; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Froehling, David; Liebow, Mark; Trusko, Brett; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Poland, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The current United States Health Information Technology Standards Panel's interoperability specification for biosurveillance relies heavily on chief complaint data for tracking rates of cases compatible with a case definition for diseases of interest (e.g. Avian Flu). We looked at SNOMED CT to determine how well this large general medical ontology could represent data held in chief complaints. In this experiment we took 50,000 records (Comprehensive Examinations or Limited Examinations from primary care areas at the Mayo Clinic) from December 2003 through February 2005 (Influenza Season). Of these records, 36,097 had non-null Chief Complaints. We randomly selected 1,035 non-null Chief Complaints and two Board-certified internists (one Infectious Diseases specialist and one general internist) reviewed the mappings of the 1,035 chief complaints. Where the reviewers disagreed, a third internist adjudicated. SNOMED CT had a sensitivity of 98.7% for matching clinical terms found in the chief complaint section of the clinical record. The positive predictive value was 97.4%, the negative predictive value was 89.5%, the specificity was 81.0%, the positive likelihood ratio was 5.181 and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.016. We conclude that SNOMED CT and natural language parsing engines can well represent the clinical content of chief complaint fields. Future research should focus on how well the information contained in the chief complaints can be relied upon to provide the basis of a national strategy for biosurveillance. The authors recommend that efforts be made to examine the entire clinical record to determine the level of improvement in the accuracy of biosurveillance that can be achieved if we were to incorporate the entire clinical record into our biosurveillance strategy.

  20. Results of the 2014 survey of the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anup; Hammer, Mark; Gould, Jennifer; Evens, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    The American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology (A³CR²) conducts an annual survey of chief residents in accredited radiology programs in North America. The survey serves as a tool for observing trends and disseminating ideas among radiology programs. An online survey conducted through the SurveyMonkey Web site was distributed to chief residents from 187 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited radiology training programs. A variety of multiple-choice and free-response questions were designed to gather information about residency program details, benefits, chief resident responsibilities, call, preparations for the recent American Board of Radiology Core Examination, implementation of selectives (mini-fellowships), fellowships, health care economics and the job market, and ACGME milestones. Among those surveyed, 212 unique responses from 136 programs were provided, yielding a 73% response rate. Data were compared to historical data from prior surveys dating back through 2002. Programs are increasingly providing 24-hour sonographer coverage, full day routine services on weekends, and 24-hour attending radiologist coverage. The new American Board of Radiology examination format and schedule has driven many changes, including when chief residents serve, board preparation and review, and how the final year of residency training is structured. Despite facing many changes, there is slightly more optimism among chief residents regarding their future job prospects. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of cholecystokinin receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozaki, T.; Sakamoto, C.; Nagao, M.; Nishisaki, H.; Konda, Y.; Nakano, O.; Matsuda, K.; Wada, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kasuga, M.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of cholecystokinin (CCK) to its receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes were characterized by the use of 125 I-CCK-octapeptide (CCK8). At 30 degrees C optimal binding was obtained at acidic pH in the presence of Mg2+, while Na+ reduced the binding. In contrast to reports on pancreatic and brain CCK receptors, scatchard analysis of CCK binding to chief cell membranes revealed two classes of binding sites. Whereas, in the presence of a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, GTP gamma S, only a low affinity site of CCK binding was observed. Chief cell receptors recognized CCK analogs, with an order of potency of: CCK8 greater than gastrin-I greater than CCK4. Although all CCK receptor antagonists tested (dibutyryl cyclic GMP, L-364718 and CR1409) inhibited labeled CCK binding to chief cell membranes, the relative potencies of these antagonists in terms of inhibiting labeled CCK binding were different from those observed in either pancreatic membranes or brain membranes. The results indicate, therefore, that on gastric chief cell membranes there exist specific CCK receptors, which are coupled to G protein. Furthermore, chief cell CCK receptors may be distinct from pancreatic or brain type CCK receptors

  2. Equity Starts Early: How Chiefs Will Build High-Quality Early Education. A Policy Statement of the Council of Chief State School Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Deborah Roderick

    2016-01-01

    With the achievement gap beginning to manifest in children as young as nine months, and 90 percent of brain development occurring during the first five years of life, chiefs are committed to expanding and upgrading early childhood programs and strengthening early elementary teaching and learning to provide equal educational opportunities for every…

  3. In situ investigation of titanium nitride surface dynamics: The role of surface and bulk mass transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareno, Javier

    NaCl-structure TiN and related transition-metal (TM) nitrides are widely used as hard wear-resistant coatings on cutting tools, diffusion-barriers in microelectronic devices, corrosion-resistant layers on mechanical components, and abrasion-resistant thin films on optics and architectural glass. Since the elastic and physical properties of TiN are highly anisotropic, controlling the microstructural and surface morphological evolution of polycrystalline TM nitride films is important for all of the above applications. In this thesis, I used in-situ high-temperature low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to gain insight into film growth and microstructure development dynamics by studying mass-transport processes occurring during annealing of three dimensional (3D) structures on TiN surfaces. Additionally, in order to extend the current understanding of nanostructure development in binary nitride films to more complex ternary TM-nitride-based nanocomposites, I employed in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), as well as ab-initio modeling, to investigate the atomic structure of the SiNx/TiN heterointerfaces which control the properties of SiNx-TiN nanocomposites. The LEEM studies of mass transport on TiN(111) focus on two specific surface morphologies which are observed to be present during growth of TiN single-crystals. (1) I investigated the temperature-dependent coarsening/decay kinetics of three-dimensional TiN island mounds on large (>1000 A) atomically-flat terraces; showing that TiN(111) steps are highly permeable and exhibit strong repulsive temperature-dependent step-step interactions that vary from 0.03 eV-A at 1559 K to 0.76 eV-A at 1651 K. (2) I studied the nucleation and growth of spiral steps originating at surface-terminated screw dislocations; I developed a model of spiral growth relating the emission rate of point defects from the bulk to the temperature-dependent spiral rotation frequency o(T); and I

  4. Investigating the impact of regional transport on PM2.5 formation using vertical observation during APEC 2014 Summit in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hua

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Economic Leaders' 2014 Summit in Beijing, strict regional air emission controls were implemented, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the transport and formation mechanism of fine particulate matter (PM2.5. This study explores the use of vertical observation methods to investigate the influence of regional transport on PM2.5 pollution in Beijing before and during the APEC Summit. Vertical profiles of extinction coefficient, wind, temperature and relative humidity were monitored at a rural site on the border of Beijing and Hebei Province. Three PM2.5 pollution episodes were analyzed. In episode 1 (27 October to 1 November, regional transport accompanied by the accumulation of pollutants under unfavorable meteorological conditions led to the pollution. In episode 2 (2–5 November, pollutants left from episode 1 were retained in the boundary layer of the region for 2 days and then settled down to the surface, leading to an explosive increase of PM2.5. The regional transport of aged aerosols played a crucial role in the heavy PM2.5 pollution. In episode 3 (6–11 November, emissions from large point sources had been controlled for several days while primary emissions from diesel vehicles might have led to the pollution. It is found that ground-level observation of meteorological conditions and air quality could not fully explain the pollution process, while vertical parameters (aerosol optical properties, winds, relative humidity and temperature improved the understanding of regional transport influence on heavy pollution processes. Future studies may consider including vertical observations to aid investigation of pollutant transport, especially during episodic events of rapidly increasing concentrations.

  5. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-OK-11, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    ethnographically known people, there was no taboo against eating porcupines (Ray 1932:90). Embroidery of porcupine quIll Is was used to decorate...University of Chicago Press, Chicago. ~ Wiimsen, E.N. 1968 Funct IonalI analIys is of flIaked stone art If acts. Amer Ican Ant Iqu Ity 33:156-161

  6. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    form of short-term camps. r . . . • . . . . • • . . . " " ’"" -- -- =’ ’= . .. .. .. -- - .: ,’ " ’’ " ’", "F,.,’," " ", ,:,,." " ".. ,. 188 ONOLOGY

  7. Archaeological Investigations at Nonhabitation and Burial Sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    from their limited pollen dispersal capabilities or their rather Infrequent appearance In the local vegetation. Except for Juglans . Plantago. and...associated with disturbed sites. Its occurence in one of the topsoil samples is not remarkable. The presence of either Juglans or Hippocastanea Is rather

  8. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-326, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Quartz Bone/antLer ATTRIBUITE Us: TMI0WIeSS 2 DentaL iuw Och re PRakeam thickness is taken at the Indeterminate thickest point on the object, excluding the...where this material type constitutes 58.6% of the total. Bone and antler artifacts are rare, and only one dental lum shell was recovered from Zone 1...flake size by materiall by zone, 45-DO-326. Size (in) by Zone materist Totat 1 2 3 4 Jasper M1/4 904 1,070 1,296 6S4 3,914 0/4 1 3 1 7 12 ChaLcedony

  9. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-214, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A Feathered chipping, smoothing; bifecisL end point ProjectiLe Hide, Bone N/A Tip burination, striations, Impact BoiL, Stone hinge fracture ’ Adapted...wood cell walls. Three other fragments found in the same wrapping show marks of artiflcal cutting or trimming, as well as compression fractures across...fragments, 1 radius fragment, 2 ulnas, 1 ulna fragment, Incisor, 1 first phalanx, 1 calcaneus , I mandible fragment. Zone 4: 18 mandible fragments, I

  10. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-287 and 45-OK-288, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    sediments, and perhaps one tlood deposit, with an alluvial fan building In the draw. These upper deposits were def Ined as a separate zone, Zone 1, at 45...there Is no - build -up ot charcoal or other Indications of prolonged fIring. The floor Itself yielded two radiocarbon dates of 1046±69 B.P. (TX-4030...of the state of Washington. In Contributions to the U.S. National Herbarium (Vol. II). U.S. Government Printing Office, *. -. Washington, D.C. .1

  11. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Officer and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, esta 1lished an interim Memorandum of Agreement under which full-scale excavations at those six...fragments. Zone 13: 5 mandibles, 6 mandible fragments, 1 scapula fragment, 1 humerus, 1 uina fragment, 1 tibia. Zone 14: 2 skull, 2 mandibles, 4

  12. Archaeological Investigations at 30 Historic Sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    124 Figure 7-5. Excavation units at Condon Ferry trading post (45-DO-202H) ....... ....................... ... 125 Figure 7-6. Yellow brown alcoholic...lid and blue and yellow letters, Including "...UNION LEAGUE," surrounded by a green and yellow design. CM., ~PR T~ cm.’: Figure 5-3. Lid from resealable...from a catalog and some of wallpaper , were found. The 12 wallpaper pieces, all of the same crosshatched brown design, were found in Unit 16NOE along

  13. Use of tracer tests to investigate changes in flow and transport properties due to bioclogging of porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Dorte; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2007-01-01

    Tracer tests were conducted in three laboratory columns to study changes in the hydraulic properties of a porous medium due to bioclogging. About 30 breakthrough curves (BTCs) for each column were obtained. The BTCs were analyzed using analytical equilibrium and dual-porosity models, and estimates...... of the hydrodynamic dispersion and mass transfer coefficients were obtained by curve fitting. The change in transport properties developed in three stages: an initial phase (1) with no significant changes in transport properties, phase 11 with growth of biomass near the inlet of the columns causing changes...... in dispersivity, and phase III with added growth of micro-colonies deeper in the columns causing mass transfer of solutes from the water phase to the biophase. Tracer transport changed from being uniform to more non-uniform with increase in mass transfer of the tracer between the mobile phase and the immobile...

  14. Textural versus electrostatic exclusion-enrichment effects in the effective chemical transport within the cortical bone: a numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, T; Kaiser, J; Naili, S; Sansalone, V

    2013-11-01

    Interstitial fluid within bone tissue is known to govern the remodelling signals' expression. Bone fluid flow is generated by skeleton deformation during the daily activities. Due to the presence of charged surfaces in the bone porous matrix, the electrochemical phenomena occurring in the vicinity of mechanosensitive bone cells, the osteocytes, are key elements in the cellular communication. In this study, a multiscale model of interstitial fluid transport within bone tissues is proposed. Based on an asymptotic homogenization method, our modelling takes into account the physicochemical properties of bone tissue. Thanks to this multiphysical approach, the transport of nutrients and waste between the blood vessels and the bone cells can be quantified to better understand the mechanotransduction of bone remodelling. In particular, it is shown that the electrochemical tortuosity may have stronger implications in the mass transport within the bone than the purely morphological one. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Faure, Pamela; Lafolie, François; Rodts, Stéphane; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Coussot, Philippe; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-15

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in addition to particle breakthrough curves (BTCs), for testing and improving colloid transport models. We show that concentrations could not be simply computed from MRI data when both deposited and suspended colloids contributed to the signal. We propose a generic method whereby these data can still be used to quantitatively appraise colloid transport models. It uses the modeled suspended and deposited particle concentrations to compute modeled MRI data that are compared to the experimental data. We tested this method by performing transport experiments with sorbing colloids in sand, and assessed for the first time the capacity of the model calibrated from BTCs to reproduce the MRI data. Interestingly, the dispersion coefficient and deposition rate calibrated from the BTC were respectively overestimated and underestimated compared with those calibrated from the MRI data, suggesting that these quantities, when determined from BTCs, need to be interpreted with care. In a broader perspective, we consider that combining MRI and modeling offers great potential for the quantitative analysis of complex MRI data recorded during transport experiments in complex environmentally relevant porous media, and can help improve our understanding of the fate of colloids and solutes, first in these media, and later in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A gene-wide investigation on polymorphisms in the ABCG2/BRCP transporter and susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Försti, A.; Hemminki, K.; Barale, R.; Vodička, Pavel; Canzian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 645, 1-2 (2008), s. 56-60 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : ABCG2 * Transporter * Colorectal cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  17. Investigating Uranium Mobility Using Stable Isotope Partitioning of 238U/235U and a Reactive Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjack, M.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Shiel, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a numerical reactive transport model which explicitly incorporates the effectively stable isotopes of uranium (U) and the factors that influence their partitioning in bioactive systems. The model reproduces trends observed in U isotope ratios and concentration measurements from a field experiment, thereby improving interpretations of U isotope ratios as a tracer for U reactive transport. A major factor contributing to U storage and transport is its redox state, which is commonly influenced by the availability of organic carbon to support metal-reducing microbial communities. Both laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that biogenic reduction of U(VI) fractionates the stable isotope ratio 238U/235U, producing an isotopically heavy solid U(IV) product. It has also been shown that other common reactive transport processes involving U do not fractionate isotopes to a consistently measurable level, which suggests the capacity to quantify the extent of bioreduction occurring in groundwater containing U using 238U/235U ratios. A recent study of a U bioremediation experiment at the Rifle IFRC site (Colorado, USA) applied Rayleigh distillation models to quantify U stable isotope fractionation observed during acetate amendment. The application of these simplified models were fit to the observations only by invoking a "memory-effect," or a constant source of low-concentration, unfractionated U(VI). In order to more accurately interpret the measured U isotope ratios, we present a multi-component reactive transport model using the CrunchTope software. This approach is capable of quantifying the cycling and partitioning of individual U isotopes through a realistic network of transport and reaction pathways including reduction, oxidation, and microbial growth. The model incorporates physical heterogeneity of the aquifer sediments through zones of decreased permeability, which replicate the observed bromide tracer, major ion chemistry, U concentration, and U

  18. Investigating the consequences of urban volcanism using a scenario approach II: Insights into transportation network damage and functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Daniel M.; Deligne, Natalia I.; Wilson, Thomas M.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Woods, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Transportation networks are critical infrastructure in urban environments. Before, during and following volcanic activity, these networks can incur direct and indirect impacts, which subsequently reduces the Level-of-Service available to transportation end-users. Additionally, reductions in service can arise from management strategies including evacuation zoning, causing additional complications for transportation end-users and operators. Here, we develop metrics that incorporate Level-of-Service for transportation end-users as the key measure of vulnerability for multi-hazard volcanic impact and risk assessments. A hypothetical eruption scenario recently developed for the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, is applied to describe potential impacts of a small basaltic eruption on different transportation modes, namely road, rail, and activities at airports and ports. We demonstrate how the new metrics can be applied at specific locations worldwide by considering the geophysical hazard sequence and evacuation zones in this scenario, a process that was strongly informed by consultation with transportation infrastructure providers and emergency management officials. We also discuss the potential implications of modified hazard sequences (e.g. different wind profiles during the scenario, and unrest with no resulting eruption) on transportation vulnerability and population displacement. The vent area of the eruption scenario used in our study is located north of the Māngere Bridge suburb of Auckland. The volcanic activity in the scenario progresses from seismic unrest, through phreatomagmatic explosions generating pyroclastic surges to a magmatic phase generating a scoria cone and lava flows. We find that most physical damage to transportation networks occurs from pyroclastic surges during the initial stages of the eruption. However, the most extensive service reduction across all networks occurs 6 days prior to the eruption onset, largely attributed to the

  19. Heavy metal transport by humic acid in underground water - investigations on europium; Untersuchungen zum huminstoffgetragenen Schwermetall-Transport im unterirdischen Wasser - durchgefuehrt am Beispiel des Europiums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, D. (ed.)

    2001-12-01

    Colloids, i.e. particulates of 1 nm to 1 {mu}m suspended in water, are found in all types of groundwater, either as organic colloids, inorganic colloids, or mixtures of both. Their concentration, chemical composition, structure and particle size varies with the geochemistry of the sediment-water system. Inorganic colloids are Al-Fe-Mn mixed oxides, clays and other complex minerals. Organic colloids consist of humic and fulvic acids which are the main constituent of the dissolved organic carbon. Humic acids are capable of forming metal humate complexes with metal ions via proton-exchanging groups. Radionuclides, too, are transported with humic acid, especially trivalent and multivalent metal ions of the lanthanides and actinides as well as radio-iodine. [German] In allen Grundwaessern werden Kolloide, d.h. im Wasser suspendierte Teilchen mit Durchmessern im Bereich 1 nm bis 1 {mu}m gefunden. Die Zusammensetzung der Kolloide kann sowohl organischer als auch anorganischer Natur sein, wobei in vielen Grundwaessern eine Mischung beider Kolloidarten auftritt. Die Konzentration, die chemische Zusammensetzung, die Struktur und die Teilchengroesse natuerlicher Kolloide variieren stark, sie sind abhaengig von der Geochemie des Sediment-Wasser-Systems. Anorganische Kolloide sind Al-Fe-Mn-Mischoxide, Tone and andere komplexe Mineralien. Organische Kolloide bestehen aus Humin- und Fulvinsaeuren; diese Huminstoffe bilden den Hauptbestandteil des geloesten organischen Kohlenstoffs. Eine wichtige Eigenschaft der Huminstoffe ist ihre Faehigkeit, mit Metallionen ueber protonenaustauschende Gruppen Komplexe - sog. Metall-Humate - zu bilden. Auch Radionuklide, insbesondere drei- und mehrwertige Metallionen der Lanthaniden und Actiniden sowie Radio-Iod werden an Huminstoffe gebunden. Damit koennen Radionuklide nicht nur in Form einfacher Spezies, sondern auch huminstoffgebunden transportiert werden. (orig.)

  20. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2010-12-20

    In March, a review team consisting of CFOs from other national laboratories, industry, and members of the University of California Office of the President (UCOP) convened for three days to conduct a comprehensive peer review of the OCFO. This was the first time in almost a decade that the financial operations of the Laboratory had been reviewed. The Committee relayed their observations on our strengths, and their very thoughtful recommendations for improvement, which we are actively pursuing. These improvements, when implemented, will benefit the entire Laboratory for many years to come. The complete report is available on the OCFO website (www.lbl.gov/Workplace/CFO). In August, the senior management team of the OCFO participated in a strategic planning retreat. The purpose of the two and a half day exercise was, of course, to update our strategic plan, but instead of spending days developing a written document, we enlisted the expertise of a seasoned journalist who also happens to be a very talented graphic artist. He listened carefully to our ideas and committed them to a visual roadmap. All members of the OCFO, Business Managers, and the Laboratory Leadership Team reviewed this draft roadmap. By having a completely visual strategic plan that is posted widely throughout the OCFO, all employees can easily see and identify with the goals that we are all working towards. FY2010 was an extraordinary year. The Laboratory welcomed its seventh Director, Dr. Paul Alivisatos, who wasted no time communicating his vision and priorities for Berkeley Lab. They include five very ambitious initiatives: Carbon Cycle 2.0, The Next Generation Light Source, a Safe and Efficient Lab, Building Community, and Space. In response, the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) developed twelve specific initiatives that align completely with these five priorities. We will be very focused on these in the coming fiscal year, but for now, let's review what happened in FY2010. FY2010

  1. Investigating and Managing the Characteristics of Travel Behavior and Travel Patterns for the University of Kufa and Suggestion a Future Transportation Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Athab Al-Jameel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Educational institutions are one of the main trip generators and distributors in the cities around the world. The main campus of the University of Kufa has more than 10 faculties with more than 12,000 people (staff and students. This makes the university is one of the high attracting area of trips in the city. These attracted trips use different modes of transportation such as taxi, private car, min-bus and even walking mode. This study aims to investigate the travel behavior and travel patterns for the current trips and put the suitable suggestions for shifting the travel characteristics using efficient modern modes of transportation. More than 4000 samples have been investigated using interviews asking about the origin, the purpose of trips and the mode of trips. The results of this analysis indicate the urgent need for improving the current transportation system by encouraging public transport such as bus and tram. Moreover, there is a need for improving the design and traffic management for the gates of the university.

  2. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  3. Acoustic-sounder investigation of the effects of boundary-layer decoupling on long-distance polutant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.L.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of the nocturnal surface temperature inversion results in a decrease in vertical momentum transfer which, in turn, is accompanied by an associated reduction in the transfer of pollutants from the atmosphere to surface sinks, thus decoupling the surface layer from the layer above the inversion. The diurnal oscillation in the surface temperature profiles may therefore have a significant effect upon the transport of atmospheric pollutants over long distances. Flights of a large manned balloon with a diverse array of chemical and meteorological instrumentation aboard, known as Project de Vinci, provided a unique opportunity to combine acoustic-sounder observations of qualitative temperature structure in the atmospheric boundary layer with the chemical measurements necessary to gain increased understanding of this decoupling process and its consequences for pollutant transport. The data collected on ozone on the balloon and the grounds are reported

  4. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; (c) Development of elliptic beam theory; and (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX)

  5. Integration of Multiple Non-Normal Checklist Procedures into a Single Checklist Procedure for Transport Aircraft: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foernsler, Lynda J.

    1996-01-01

    Checklists are used by the flight crew to properly configure an aircraft for safe flight and to ensure a high level of safety throughout the duration of the flight. In addition, the checklist provides a sequential framework to meet cockpit operational requirements, and it fosters cross-checking of the flight deck configuration among crew members. This study examined the feasibility of integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single procedure for a typical transport aircraft. For the purposes of this report, a typical transport aircraft is one that represents a midpoint between early generation aircraft (B-727/737-200 and DC-10) and modern glass cockpit aircraft (B747-400/777 and MD-11). In this report, potential conflicts among non-normal checklist items during multiple failure situations for a transport aircraft are identified and analyzed. The non-normal checklist procedure that would take precedence for each of the identified multiple failure flight conditions is also identified. The rationale behind this research is that potential conflicts among checklist items might exist when integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single checklist. As a rule, multiple failures occurring in today's highly automated and redundant system transport aircraft are extremely improbable. In addition, as shown in this analysis, conflicts among checklist items in a multiple failure flight condition are exceedingly unlikely. The possibility of a multiple failure flight condition occurring with a conflict among checklist items is so remote that integration of the non-normal checklists into a single checklist appears to be a plausible option.

  6. Radioactive Ores and Concentrates (Packaging and Transport) Act 1980. No 26 of 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Act, which regulates the packaging, storage and transport of radioactive ores and concentrates lays down a detailed licensing system for such materials and prescribes the duties of the Chief Inspector responsible for implementation of the Act. (NEA) [fr

  7. The Chief Procurator of the Holy Synod А. А. Yakovlev and his Memoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezhanidze Georgii

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sphere of activities of the Chief Procurator of the Holy Synod A. Yakovlev, A. Herzen’s uncle, who left memoirs about his work in the Synod. The paper examines his origins and background, family life and personal qualities. The authors of the paper have compared Yakovlev’s memoirs with archival materials. It is shown that Yakovlev’s memoirs cannot be considered a reliable source. According to the opinion widespread in historiography, Yakovlev’s activities were the fi rst step in increasing the role of the Chief Procurator’s office. Yakovlev’s projects, aimed at strengthening the control functions of the Chief Procurator, gained no support from the Emperor. The monarch did not take the side of the Chief Procurator in his confl ict with the episcopate. Yakovlev’s resignation was caused by the need to find a post for A. Golitsin, the personal friend of Alexander I. Yakovlev did not wish to resign, which led to his resentment being reflected in his notes. This fact cannot be ignored when using Yakovlev’s memoirs as a historical source. The ministerial principle in church administration indeed came to be implemented in the 19th century, but the activities of the Chief Procurator A. Yakovlev had nothing to do with this process.

  8. Differential gene expression by oxyphil and chief cells of human parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Cynthia S; Haughey, Bruce H; Miller, Brent; Brown, Alex J

    2012-08-01

    Parathyroid oxyphil cells, whose function is unknown, are thought to be derived from chief cells. Oxyphil cells increase in number in parathyroid glands of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are even more abundant in patients receiving treatment for hyperparathyroidism with calcitriol and/or the calcimimetic cinacalcet. We examined oxyphil and chief cells of parathyroid glands of CKD patients for differential expression of genes important to parathyroid function. Parathyroid tissue from CKD patients with refractory hyperparathyroidism was immunostained for gene expression studies. Immunostaining for PTH, PTHrP, calcium-sensing receptor, glial cells missing 2, vitamin D receptor, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase, and cytochrome c was quantified and expression reported for oxyphil and chief cells. Expression of all proteins analyzed, except for the vitamin D receptor, was higher in oxyphil cells than in chief cells. Human parathyroid oxyphil cells express parathyroid-relevant genes found in the chief cells and have the potential to produce additional autocrine/paracrine factors, such as PTHrP and calcitriol. Additional studies are warranted to define the secretory properties of these cells and clarify their role in parathyroid pathophysiology.

  9. [Synergistic emission reduction of chief air pollutants and greenhouse gases-based on scenario simulations of energy consumptions in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan-bo; Li, Wei

    2013-05-01

    It is one of the common targets and important tasks for energy management and environmental control of Beijing to improve urban air quality while reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Here, based on the interim and long term developmental planning and energy structure of the city, three energy consumption scenarios in low, moderate and high restrictions were designed by taking the potential energy saving policies and environmental targets into account. The long-range energy alternatives planning (LEAP) model was employed to predict and evaluate reduction effects of the chief air pollutants and GHG during 2010 to 2020 under the three given scenarios. The results showed that if urban energy consumption system was optimized or adjusted by exercising energy saving and emission reduction and pollution control measures, the predicted energy uses will be reduced by 10 to 30 million tons of coal equivalents by 2020. Under the two energy scenarios with moderate and high restrictions, the anticipated emissions of SO2, NOx, PM10, PM2.5, VOC and GHG will be respectively reduced to 71 to 100.2, 159.2 to 218.7, 89.8 to 133.8, 51.4 to 96.0, 56.4 to 74.8 and 148 200 to 164 700 thousand tons. Correspondingly, when compared with the low-restriction scenario, the reducing rate will be 53% to 67% , 50% to 64% , 33% to 55% , 25% to 60% , 41% to 55% and 26% to 34% respectively. Furthermore, based on a study of synergistic emission reduction of the air pollutants and GHG, it was proposed that the adjustment and control of energy consumptions shall be intensively developed in the three sectors of industry, transportation and services. In this way the synergistic reduction of the emissions of chief air pollutants and GHG will be achieved; meanwhile the pressures of energy demands may be deliberately relieved.

  10. Chief complaint-based performance measures: a new focus for acute care quality measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Richard T; Pines, Jesse M; Farley, Heather L; Phelan, Michael P; Beach, Christopher; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2015-04-01

    Performance measures are increasingly important to guide meaningful quality improvement efforts and value-based reimbursement. Populations included in most current hospital performance measures are defined by recorded diagnoses using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes in administrative claims data. Although the diagnosis-centric approach allows the assessment of disease-specific quality, it fails to measure one of the primary functions of emergency department (ED) care, which involves diagnosing, risk stratifying, and treating patients' potentially life-threatening conditions according to symptoms (ie, chief complaints). In this article, we propose chief complaint-based quality measures as a means to enhance the evaluation of quality and value in emergency care. We discuss the potential benefits of chief complaint-based measures, describe opportunities to mitigate challenges, propose an example measure set, and present several recommendations to advance this paradigm in ED-based performance measurement. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/4. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhen, I.; Gustafson, Gunnar; Wikberg, P.

    1997-06-01

    The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory were started in 1986 and involved extensive field measurements, aimed at characterizing the rock formations with regard to geology, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. Prior to the excavation in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase concerning: geology, ground water flow and chemistry, transport of solutes and mechanical stability. This report presents a comparison between these predictions and the observations made during the excavation. Also, investigation methods for the 700-2874 m sections of the tunnel are evaluated

  12. A preliminary investigation of the applicability of surface complexation modeling to the understanding of transportation cask weeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granstaff, V.E.; Chambers, W.B.; Doughty, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    A new application for surface complexation modeling is described. These models, which describe chemical equilibria among aqueous and adsorbed species, have typically been used for predicting groundwater transport of contaminants by modeling the natural adsorbents as various metal oxides. Our experiments suggest that this type of modeling can also explain stainless steel surface contamination and decontamination mechanisms. Stainless steel transportation casks, when submerged in a spent fuel storage pool at nuclear power stations, can become contaminated with radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co. Subsequent release or desorption of these contaminants under varying environmental conditions occasionally results in the phenomenon known as open-quotes cask weeping.close quotes We have postulated that contaminants in the storage pool adsorb onto the hydrous metal oxide surface of the passivated stainless steel and are subsequently released (by conversion from a fixed to a removable form) during transportation, due to varying environmental factors, such as humidity, road salt, dirt, and acid rain. It is well known that 304 stainless steel has a chromium enriched passive surface layer; thus its adsorption behavior should be similar to that of a mixed chromium/iron oxide. To help us interpret our studies of reversible binding of dissolved metals on stainless steel surfaces, we have studied the adsorption of Co +2 on Cr 2 O 3 . The data are interpreted using electrostatic surface complexation models. The FITEQL computer program was used to obtain the model binding constants and site densities from the experimental data. The MINTEQA2 computer speciation model was used, with the fitted constants, in an attempt to validate this approach

  13. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidan AS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Zidan,1,2 Hibah Aldawsari1 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Abstract: Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. Keywords: CNS delivery, sizing, lipid based formulations, quality by design, sertraline hydrochloride

  14. Utilizing High-Performance Computing to Investigate Parameter Sensitivity of an Inversion Model for Vadose Zone Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Ward, A. L.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution geologic models have proven effective in improving the accuracy of subsurface flow and transport predictions. However, many of the parameters in subsurface flow and transport models cannot be determined directly at the scale of interest and must be estimated through inverse modeling. A major challenge, particularly in vadose zone flow and transport, is the inversion of the highly-nonlinear, high-dimensional problem as current methods are not readily scalable for large-scale, multi-process models. In this paper we describe the implementation of a fully automated approach for addressing complex parameter optimization and sensitivity issues on massively parallel multi- and many-core systems. The approach is based on the integration of PNNL's extreme scale Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (eSTOMP) simulator, which uses the Global Array toolkit, with the Beowulf-Cluster inspired parallel nonlinear parameter estimation software, BeoPEST in the MPI mode. In the eSTOMP/BeoPEST implementation, a pre-processor generates all of the PEST input files based on the eSTOMP input file. Simulation results for comparison with observations are extracted automatically at each time step eliminating the need for post-process data extractions. The inversion framework was tested with three different experimental data sets: one-dimensional water flow at Hanford Grass Site; irrigation and infiltration experiment at the Andelfingen Site; and a three-dimensional injection experiment at Hanford's Sisson and Lu Site. Good agreements are achieved in all three applications between observations and simulations in both parameter estimates and water dynamics reproduction. Results show that eSTOMP/BeoPEST approach is highly scalable and can be run efficiently with hundreds or thousands of processors. BeoPEST is fault tolerant and new nodes can be dynamically added and removed. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to use high-resolution geologic models to preserve

  15. Bis-aryl substituted dioxaborines as electron-transport materials: a comparative density functional theory investigation with oxadiazoles and siloles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risko, C.; Zojer, E.; Brocorens, P.; Marder, S.R.; Bredas, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a detailed quantum-chemical comparison of the electronic structures, vertical electron affinities, and intramolecular reorganization energies for bis-aryl substituted dioxaborine, oxadiazole, and silole derivatives. The results indicate that the HOMO and LUMO energies of the substituted compounds can be tuned on the order of 2-3 eV via minor changes in the substitution patterns, with the HOMO and LUMO levels for the dioxaborine derivatives consistently the most energy stabilized. Additionally, large vertical electron affinities and comparable intramolecular reorganization energies confirm that dioxaborine systems are interesting candidates for electron transport materials

  16. Contaminant transport in the sub-surface soil of an uncontrolled landfill site in China: site investigation and two-dimensional numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haijian; Chen, Yunmin; Thomas, Hywel R; Sedighi, Majid; Masum, Shakil A; Ran, Qihua

    2016-02-01

    A field investigation of contaminant transport beneath and around an uncontrolled landfill site in Huainan in China is presented in this paper. The research aimed at studying the migration of some chemicals present in the landfill leachate into the surrounding clayey soils after 17 years of landfill operation. The concentrations of chloride and sodium ions in the pore water of soil samples collected at depths up to 15 m were obtained through an extensive site investigation. The contents of organic matter in the soil samples were also determined. A two-dimensional numerical study of the reactive transport of sodium and chloride ion in the soil strata beneath and outside the landfill is also presented. The numerical modelling approach adopted is based on finite element/finite difference techniques. The domain size of approximately 300 × 30 m has been analysed and major chemical transport parameters/mechanisms are established via a series of calibration exercises. Numerical simulations were then performed to predict the long-term behaviour of the landfill in relation to the chemicals studied. The lateral migration distance of the chloride ions was more than 40 m which indicates that the advection and mechanical dispersion are the dominant mechanism controlling the contaminant transport at this site. The results obtained from the analysis of chloride and sodium migration also indicated a non-uniform advective flow regime of ions with depth, which were localised in the first few metres of the soil beneath the disposal site. The results of long-term simulations of contaminant transport indicated that the concentrations of ions can be 10 to 30 times larger than that related to the allowable limit of concentration values. The results of this study may be of application and interest in the assessment of potential groundwater and soil contamination at this site with a late Pleistocene clayey soil. The obtained transport properties of the soils and the contaminant transport

  17. Long-term (2002–2012 investigation of Saharan dust transport events at Mt. Cimone GAW global station, Italy (2165 m a.s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Duchi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mineral dust transport from North Africa towards the Mediterranean basin and Europe was monitored over an 11-y period (2002–2012 using the continuous observations made at Mt. Cimone WMO/GAW global station (CMN. CMN is in a strategic position for investigating the impact of mineral dust transported from northern Africa on the atmospheric composition of the Mediterranean basin and southern Europe. The identification of “dusty days” is based on coupling the measured in situ coarse aerosol particle number concentration with an analysis of modeled back trajectories tracing the origin of air masses from North Africa. More than 400 episodes of mineral dust transport were identified, accounting for 15.7% of the investigated period. Our analysis points to a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest frequency from spring to autumn, and a dust-induced variation of the coarse particle number concentration larger than 123% on a seasonal basis. In addition, FLEXTRA 10-d back trajectories showed that northwestern and central Africa are the major mineral dust source regions. Significant inter-annual variability of dust outbreak frequency and related mineral dust loading were detected and during spring the NAO index was positively correlated (R2 = 0.32 with dust outbreak frequency. Lastly, the impact of transported mineral dust on the surface O3 mixing ratio was quantified over the 11-y investigation period. Evidence of a non-linear and negative correlation between mineral dust and ozone concentrations was found, resulting in an average spring and summer decrease of the O3 mixing ratio down to 7%.

  18. "The chiefs, elders, and people have for many years suffered untold hardships"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacey, Paul Austin

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the use of tradition by minority groups whose territorial incorporation into British Northern Togoland under UN trusteeship was marked by political exclusion. This contrasts with the more typical pattern of productive and inclusive relations developing between chiefs...... and the administering authority within the boundaries of what was to become Ghana. In East Gonja marginalized groups produced their own chiefs while simultaneously appealing to the UN Trusteeship Council to protect their native rights. The article contributes to studies on the limits of the ‘invention of tradition...

  19. Experimental and numerical iInvestigations of effects of silica colloids on transport of strontium in saturated sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhit, Hesham M; Hassan, Ahmed E; Harris-Burr, Rebekah; Papelis, Charalambos

    2006-09-01

    Transport experiments with strontium were conducted using saturated sand columns in the presence and absence of silica colloids, and numerical modeling was performed with modeling results compared to experimental data. The experiments were aimed at testing the hypothesis that under certain chemical conditions colloids act as movement-retarding agents and yield a larger effective retardation factor for the migrating contaminant. Four individual experiments were conducted to identify conditions where the mobility of silica colloids is increased or decreased, and a similar set was conducted for strontium transport in the absence of colloids. Mobility of colloids was found to increase with decreasing ionic strength and increasing pH, with the ionic strength having the more significant impact. The reverse effect was obtained for strontium. Based on these results, two additional experiments were conducted where both colloids and strontium were injected at the column inlet. Results showed that under certain conditions of ionic strength and pH (I = 3.0 x 10(-2) M and pH = 4-5.4) colloids retarded the movement of strontium. The retardation effect was obtained in two experiments under slightly modified conditions, which confirms the role of colloids as retarding agents. Afinite difference numerical model was used to (a) simulate mobile breakthrough curves and compare to experimental data and (b) estimate the model parameters describing cotransport of strontium and colloids. The model accurately predicted arrival time and the overall shape of the breakthrough curves.

  20. Using MOPITT data and a Chemistry and Transport Model to Investigate Injection Height of Plumes from Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Kasischke, E. S.; Warner, J. X.

    2003-12-01

    Trace gas emissions from boreal forest fires are a significant factor in atmospheric composition and its interannual variability. A number of recent observations of emissions plumes above individual fire events (Fromm and Servranckx, 2003; COBRA 2003; Lamarque et al., 2003; Wotawa and Trainer, 2000) suggest that vertical properties of forest fire emission plumes can be very different from fossil fuel emission plumes. Understanding and constraining the vertical properties of forest fire emission plumes and their injection into the atmosphere during fire events is critical for accurate modeling of atmospheric transport and chemistry. While excellent data have been collected in a handful of experiments on individual fire events, a systematic examination of the range of behavior observed in fire events has been hampered by the scarcity of vertical profiles of atmospheric composition. In this study, we used a high-resolution model of boreal forest fire emissions (Kasischke et al, in review) as input to the Goddard/UM CTM driven by the GEOS-3 DAS, operating at 2 by 2.5 degrees with 35 vertical levels. We modeled atmospheric injection and transport of CO emissions during the fire season of 2000 (May-September). We altered the parameters of the model to simulate a range of scenarios of plume injection, and compared the resulting output to the CO profiles from the MOPITT instrument. The results presented here pertain to the boreal forest, but our methods should be useful for atmospheric modelers hoping to more realistically model transport of emission plumes from biomass burning. References: COBRA2003: see http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~cobra/smoke_canada_030530.pdf Fromm, M. and R. Servranckx, 2003. "Stratospheric Injection of Forest Fire Emissions on August 4, 1998: A Satellite Image Analysis of the Causal Supercell Convection." Geophysical Research Abstracts 5:13118. Kasischke, E.S.; E.J. Hyer, N.H.F. French, A.I. Sukhinin, J.H. Hewson, B.J. Stocks, in review. "Carbon

  1. A deuterium-based labeling technique for the investigation of rooting depths, water uptake dynamics and unsaturated zone water transport in semiarid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, M.; Koeniger, P.; Gaj, M.; Hamutoko, J. T.; Wanke, H.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2016-02-01

    Non- or minimum-invasive methods for the quantification of rooting depths of plants are rare, in particular in (semi-)arid regions; yet, this information is crucial for the parameterization of SVAT (Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer) models and understanding of processes within the hydrological cycle. We present a technique utilizing the stable isotope deuterium (2H) applied as artificial tracer to investigate the vertical extent of the root zone, characterize water uptake dynamics of trees and shrubs at different depths and monitor transport of water through the unsaturated zone of dry environments. One liter of 35% deuterated water (2H2O) was punctually applied at several depths (0.5 m, 1 m, 2 m, 2.5 m and 4 m) at six different plots at a natural forested site in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin (CEB), Namibia/Angola. Subsequently, uptake of the tracer was monitored by collecting plant samples (xylem and transpired water) up to seven days after tracer injection. Soil profiles at the plots were taken after the campaign and again after six months in order to evaluate the transport and distribution of 2H within the unsaturated zone. Of 162 plant samples taken, 31 samples showed clear signals of artificially introduced 2H, of which all originate from the plots labeled up to 2 m depth. No artificially injected 2H was found in plants when tracer application occurred deeper than 2 m. Results further indicate a sharing of water resources between the investigated shrubs and trees in the upper 1 m whilst tree roots seem to have better access to deeper layers of the unsaturated zone. The soil profiles taken after six months reveal elevated 2H-concentrations from depths as great as 4 m up to 1 m below surface indicating upward transport of water vapor. Purely diffuse transport towards the soil surface yielded an estimated 0.4 mm over the dry season. Results are of particular significance for a more precise parameterization of SVAT models and the formulation of water balances in

  2. Investigation of vertical size segregation in bedload sediment transport with a coupled fluid-discrete element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain understanding of kinetic sieving-type segregation in bedload sediment transport, numerical experiments of two-size particle mixtures were carried out, using a validated coupled fluid-discrete element model developed at Irstea. A 3D 10% steep domain consisting at initial time of a given number of layers of 4 mm particles deposited on top of a coarser 6 mm particle bed, was submitted to a turbulent and supercritical fluid shear flow (Shields numbers of 0.1 and 0.3. The elevation of the centre of mass of the infiltrated fine particles is observed to follow the same logarithmic decrease with time, whatever the initial number of fine layers. This decrease is steeper for a higher Shields number. The main result is that this typical behaviour is related at first order to the shear rate depth profile.

  3. Experimental investigation of the impact of compound-specific dispersion and electrostatic interactions on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    -dimensional flow-through setup using pulse injection of multiple tracers (both uncharged and ionic species). Extensive sampling and measurement of solutes' concentrations (∼1500 samples; >3000 measurements) were performed at the outlet of the flow-through setup, at high spatial and temporal resolution....... The experimental results show that compound-specific effects and charge-induced Coulombic interactions are important not only at low velocities and/or for steady state plumes but also for transient transport under high flow velocities. Such effects can lead to a remarkably different behavior of measured...... breakthrough curves also at very high Péclet numbers. To quantitatively interpret the experimental results, we used four modeling approaches: classical advection-dispersion equation (ADE), continuous time random walk (CTRW), dual-domain mass transfer model (DDMT), and a multicomponent ionic dispersion model...

  4. Numerical investigation of the transport phenomena occurring in the growth of SiC by the induction heating TSSG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Adkar, Nikhil; Okano, Yasunori; Ujihara, Toru; Dost, Sadik

    2017-09-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to examine the transport phenomena occurring during the Top-Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) process of SiC. The simulation model includes the contributions of radiative and conductive heat transfer in the furnace, mass transfer and fluid flow in the melt, and the induced electric and magnetic fields. Results show that the induced Lorentz force is dominant in the melt compared with that of buoyancy. At the relatively low coil frequencies, the effect of the Lorentz force on the melt flow is significant, and the corresponding flow patterns loose their axisymmetry and become almost fully disturbed. However, at the relatively higher frequency values, the flow is steady and the flow patterns remain axisymmetric.

  5. Subsurface to substrate: dual-scale micro/nanofluidic networks for investigating transport anomalies in tight porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Shaina A; Torres-Verdín, Carlos; Balhoff, Matthew T

    2016-08-07

    Micro/nanofluidic experiments in synthetic representations of tight porous media, often referred to as "reservoir-on-a-chip" devices, are an emerging approach to researching anomalous fluid transport trends in energy-bearing and fluid-sequestering geologic porous media. We detail, for the first time, the construction of dual-scale micro/nanofluidic devices that are relatively large-scale, two-dimensional network representations of granular and fractured nanoporous media. The fabrication scheme used in the development of the networks on quartz substrates (master patterns) is facile and replicable: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with lacey carbon support film were used as shadow masks in thermal evaporation/deposition and reactive ion etch (RIE) was used for hardmask pattern transfer. The reported nanoscale network geometries are heterogeneous and composed of hydraulically resistive paths (throats) meeting at junctures (pores) to mimic the low topological connectivity of nanoporous sedimentary rocks such as shale. The geometry also includes homogenous microscale grid patterns that border the nanoscale networks and represent microfracture pathways. Master patterns were successfully replicated with a sequence of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) 63 polymers. The functionality of the fabricated quartz and polymer nanofluidic devices was validated with aqueous imbibition experiments and differential interference contrast microscopy. These dual-scale fluidic devices are promising predictive tools for hypothesis testing and calibration against bulk fluid measurements in tight geologic, biologic, and synthetic porous material of similar dual-scale pore structure. Applications to shale/mudrock transport studies in particular are focused on herein.

  6. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanisms in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Ground Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1999-01-01

    In January 1992, the IML-1 FES experiment produced a set of classic experimental data and a 40 hour holographic "movie" of an ensemble of spheres in a fluid in microgravity. Because the data are in the form of holograms, we can study the three-dimensional distribution of particles with unprecedented detail by a variety of methods and for a wide variety of interests. The possession of the holographic movie is tantamount to having a complex experiment in space while working in an easily accessible laboratory on earth. The movie contains a vast amount of useful data, including residual g, g-jitter, convection and transport data, and particle fluid interaction data. The information content in the movie is so great that we have scarcely begun to tap into the data that is actually available in the more than 1000 holograms, each containing as much as 1000 megabytes of information. This ground-based project is exploiting this data and the concept of holographic storage of spaceflight data to provide an understanding of the effects of microgravity in materials processing. This paper provides the foundation, objectives, and status of the ground based project. The primary objective of this project is to advance the understanding of microgravity effects on crystal growth, convection in materials processing in the space environment, and complex transport phenomena at low Reynolds numbers. This objective is being achieved both experimentally and theoretically. Experiments are making use of existing holographic data recorded during the IML- I spaceflight. A parallel theoretical effort is providing the models for understanding the particle fields and their physics in the microgravity environment.

  7. Explosion protection for vehicles intended for the transport of flammable gases and liquids--an investigation into technical and operational basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Hans; Günther, Werner

    2009-05-30

    In Europe, the transport of flammable gases and liquids in tanks has been impacted by new developments: for example, the introduction of the vapour-balancing technique on a broad scale and the steady increase in the application of electronic components with their own power sources; furthermore, new regulatory policies like the ATEX Directives are being enforced in the European Union. With this background in mind, the present investigation aims to provide a basis for future developments of the relevant explosion protection regulations in the safety codes for the transport of dangerous goods (RID/ADR). Specifically, the concentration of gas in the air was measured under various practical conditions while tank vehicles were being loaded with flammable gases or liquids. These spot-test data were supplemented by systematic investigations at a road tanker placed in our test field. With respect to non-electrical ignition sources, a closer investigation of the effect of hot surfaces was carried out. With regard to improving the current regulations, the results of our investigation show that it would be reasonable to implement a stronger differentiation of the characteristics of the dangerous goods (gaseous/liquid, flashpoint) on the one hand and of the techniques applied (loading with and without vapour-balancing system) on the other hand. Conclusions for the further development of the current international regulations are proposed.

  8. A time for change: an exploration of attitudes toward part-time work in academia among women internists and their division chiefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rebecca A; Gregg, Jessica L

    2009-01-01

    Increasing numbers of clinicians desire part-time work, and many will opt out of academic medicine if the barriers to part-time work are too great. Purposeful sampling was used to investigate the experiences of part-time academic physicians and their division leaders to understand (1) how each identified the negative and positive consequences of part-time work, and (2) how each conceptualize part-time work. In 2004, the authors interviewed the Society of General Medicine Horn Scholars Program applicants and their division chiefs from the 2001 and 2004 award cycles and performed a qualitative analysis of the one- to two-hour audiotaped interviews. Seven out of nine eligible applicants and six of seven division chiefs participated. All applicants were female junior faculty clinician educators in academic internal medicine from seven institutions. All division chiefs were male full-time faculty members. Both applicants and division chiefs identified multiple specific negative and positive consequences of part-time work. Analysis of interviews suggested that both groups tended to frame part-time work as a decision to "work less" or to "work differently." Self-reflection and articulation of values helped some faculty determine where they derive the greatest happiness and fulfillment personally and professionally. As more academics seek work-life balance and consider part-time work as a tool to achieve that balance, academic medicine will be challenged to develop creative models for integrating successful part-time physicians, or it will lose that segment of the workforce. This study's findings suggest that one such model may require that physicians and their leaders reconceptualize work altogether.

  9. Associate Professor Jan Brandts, editor-in-chief of Applications of Mathematics, is fifty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-5 ISSN 0862-7940 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : editor-in-chief Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.618, year: 2016 http:// articles .math.cas.cz/10.21136/AM.2018.0326-17/?type=F

  10. 77 FR 63835 - Office of the Chief Information Officer; Submission for OMB Review; Temporary Contractor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Enterprise Solutions (IA), Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO), General Services Administration... . Submit comments via the Federal eRulemaking portal by searching the OMB control number. Select the link... and birth date. Executive Order 9397 Numbering System for Federal Accounts Relating to Individual...

  11. 77 FR 40884 - Office of the Chief Information Officer; Information Collection; Temporary Contractor Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Solutions (IA), Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO), General Services Administration (GSA... . Submit comments via the Federal eRulemaking portal by searching the OMB control number. Select the link... and birth date. Executive Order 9397 Numbering System for Federal Accounts Relating to Individual...

  12. 32 CFR 13.3 - Office of the Chief Defense Counsel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSIONS RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHIEF DEFENSE COUNSEL, DETAILED DEFENSE COUNSEL, AND CIVILIAN DEFENSE... United States, retain the services of a civilian attorney of the Accused's own choosing to assist in the... States armed force and shall be designated by the General Counsel of the Department of Defense. (2) The...

  13. Why Are There No Gay "Choir Boys"? Ask Your Friendly Chief of Police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongisto, Richard D.

    1980-01-01

    Asserts that the resolution recently adopted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police making it official policy not to hire homosexuals as policemen is unconstitutional. Describes the positive results achieved by the hiring of homosexuals in the San Francisco police and sheriff's departments. (GC)

  14. Board monitoring of the chief financial officer: A review and research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Uhde (David Alexander); P. Klarner (Patricia); A. Tuschke (Anja)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Research Question/Issue:__ Research on how boards govern individual top management team (TMT) members, i.e., senior executives aside from the CEO, is still scarce and fragmented. In this study, we review extant research on board monitoring of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) - an

  15. The Lived Experiences of Asian Americans Who Became Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramones, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of Asian Americans who became chief executive officers (CEOs) of a California Community College District. This study discussed the experiences, the influence of Asian culture, the perception of Asian Americans, and the challenges encountered by Asian American CEOs. To…

  16. Fostering the Intellectual and Tribal Spirit: The Role of the Chief Academic Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    His Horse Is Thunder, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and describes the academic leadership role of the chief academic officer (CAO), also referred to as the academic vice-president, academic dean, or the provost. The CAO is responsible for the development and implementation of all academic programs, including the curriculum content, assessment, instruction quality,…

  17. 'One chief, one vote' : the revival of traditional authorities in post-apartheid South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van W.M.J.; Oomen, B.

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the position of traditional leaders in postapartheid South Africa. It first surveys changing perspectives of chieftaincy within the ANC and its allied movements. During the apartheid era, chiefs were maligned as puppets of bantustan rule. In ANC-related circles, it was widely

  18. Air leakage control in chief tunnel of uranium mines using air screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Gengsheng

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the results of air leakage control are described using air screen in the chief tunnels of some uranium mines. The air leakage decreases by 79-91% after using air screen. On the basis of mathematical treatment, the formulas for calculating the air resistance efficiency of air screen are presented

  19. Reducing Firearm-Related Violence on College Campuses--Police Chiefs' Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Price, James H.; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2009-01-01

    Context: Firearms are used in the majority of college aged suicides and homicides. With recent efforts by various gun lobbying groups to have firearms more accessible to college students on campuses, there is the potential for more firearm-related morbidity and mortality. Objective: This study assessed university police chiefs' perceptions and…

  20. Dr. Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r.: Dr Austin Ball, Deputy Technical Coordinator, CMS experiment; Dr Roland Horisberger, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment; Dr Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand; Dr Michel Della Negra, Spokesman, CMS experiment and Dr Alick Macpherson, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment, in the CMS Silicon Tracker assembly hall.

  1. 18 CFR 375.304 - Delegations to the Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delegations to the Chief Administrative Law Judge. 375.304 Section 375.304 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION...

  2. 10 CFR 1.31 - Office of the Chief Financial Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... management policy including accounting principles and standards for the agency and provides policy guidance... accounting and financial management system, including an accounting system, and financial reporting and... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of the Chief Financial Officer. 1.31 Section 1.31...

  3. On non-Frattini chief factors and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 122, No. 2, May 2012, pp. 163–173. c Indian Academy of Sciences. On non-Frattini chief factors and solvability of finite groups. JIANJUN LIU1,∗. , XIUYUN GUO2 and QIANLU LI3. 1School of Mathematics and Statistics, Southwest University,. Chongqing 400715, People's Republic of China.

  4. 6 CFR 7.10 - Authority of the Chief Security Officer, Office of Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Direct and administer DHS implementation and compliance with the National Industrial Security Program in... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority of the Chief Security Officer, Office of Security. 7.10 Section 7.10 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE...

  5. 32 CFR 644.491 - Coordination with the Chief of Chaplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 644.491 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related... buildings. If the Chief of Chaplains does not approve this recommendation or issue other appropriate...

  6. Making the Case for Leadership: Profiles of Chief Advancement Officers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Smith, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The advancement industry has experienced tremendous growth in breadth and depth over the last few decades. Driving this growth is the chief advancement officer; however, as a relatively new position on most college and university campuses, little is formally known about the role and the people who fill it. In "Making the Case for Leadership", Jon…

  7. The Relationship between Chief Information Officer Transformational Leadership and Computing Platform Operating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate the strength of Chief Information Officer (CIO) transformational leadership behaviors to 1 of 5 computing platform operating systems (OSs) that may be selected for a firm's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) business system. Research shows executive leader behaviors may promote innovation through the use of…

  8. Chief Student Affairs Officers' Perceptions of Institutional Crisis Management, Preparedness, and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenberg, Heather Nicole Lancin

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examined chief student affairs officers' perceptions of institutional crisis management, preparedness, and response. A goal of this study was to uncover findings that can benefit crisis management protocols or best practices regarding crisis management team training, plan communications, and emergency management personnel on…

  9. The Role of the Chief Financial Officer in Large Public Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, William A.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics and qualifications of chief financial officers (CFOs) of large public universities, the internal organizational relationships of CFOs, and their responsibilities were studied in 1983. Findings of a similar 1973 study are also considered. A total of 135 usable questionnaire responses provided information on age; sex; length of…

  10. The Leadership Orientations of Public College and University Chief Financial Officers: A Frame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Charles Russell

    2013-01-01

    The role of the chief financial officer (CFO) is critical to the effective leadership of U.S. four-year public colleges and universities. Self-awareness and the capacity to view situations simultaneously in multiple ways and from different perspectives are essential elements of CFO effectiveness and success in the higher education environment. The…

  11. Health care capital market and product market constraints and the role of the chief financial officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J R; Smith, D G

    2001-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. The constraints imposed on health care systems by both capital and product markets has made the role of the CFO a challenge.

  12. Associate Professor Jan Brandts, editor-in-chief of Applications of Mathematics, is fifty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-5 ISSN 0862-7940 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : editor-in-chief Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.618, year: 2016 http://articles.math.cas.cz/10.21136/AM.2018.0326-17/?type=F

  13. [Determinants in the careers of male and female physicians from the viewpoint of chief physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B; Spindler, A; Peter, Y; Buddeberg, C

    2003-01-03

    Chief physicians play an important role for physicians' careers by providing advanced training and allocating time and research resources. This study examined which characteristics will help physicians to achieve a leadership position and how chief physicians conduct career promotion. All 532 chief physicians in Switzerland's German speaking cantons with medical schools were approached with a questionnaire covering professional motivation and personal attributes of career-oriented physicians career-promoting personal and institutional factors, and type of career promotion. 207 chief physicians (189 men, 18 women; participation rate 38.9 %;) participated. Respondents rated achievement motivation combined with professional interest and job enjoyment (intrinsic), and interest in advancement and social prestige (extrinsic motivation) as beneficial. Extraprofessional concerns such as family obligations and leisure interests were viewed as less important. Instrumental attributes were rated as advantageous. Expressive qualities were also seen as beneficial but less crucial. Ratings were independent of respondents' age, specialty, or type of workplace. The following personal factors were named: professional commitment, professional and social competence, goal orientation, endurance, and strength of character. The institutional factors referred to quality of training and teaching, a good work atmosphere, a transparent and flexible clinic structure. Career promotion was offered predominantly in the form of coaching, career planning, and support in job search. Career promotion should be more targeted and structured, e. g. be conducted in mentoring programmes, thus providing the prerequisites for a truly equal career promotion of female and male physicians.

  14. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area

  15. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O' Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan

  16. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  17. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  18. Reactive transport modeling of thermal column experiments to investigate the impacts of aquifer thermal energy storage on groundwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; Breukelen, Boris M van

    2014-10-21

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems are increasingly being used to acclimatize buildings and are often constructed in aquifers used for drinking water supply. This raises the question of potential groundwater quality impact. Here, we use laboratory column experiments to develop and calibrate a reactive transport model (PHREEQC) simulating the thermally induced (5-60 °C) water quality changes in anoxic sandy sediments. Temperature-dependent surface complexation, cation-exchange, and kinetic dissolution of K-feldspar were included in the model. Optimization results combined with an extensive literature survey showed surface complexation of (oxy)anions (As, B, and PO4) is consistently exothermic, whereas surface complexation of cations (Ca and Mg) and cationic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn) is endothermic. The calibrated model was applied to simulate arsenic mobility in an ATES system using a simple yet powerful mirrored axi-symmetrical grid. Results showed that ATES mobilizes arsenic toward the fringe of the warm water bubble and the center of the cold water bubble. This transient redistribution of arsenic causes its aqueous concentrations in the cold and warm groundwater bubbles to become similar through multiple heating cycles, with a final concentration depending on the average injection temperature of the warm and cold ATES wells.

  19. Investigation of the Mesoporous Metal-Organic Framework as a New Platform To Study the Transport Phenomena of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Hong, Seongmin; Fu, Chung-Wei; Hoang, Tran; Li, Xiao; Valencia, Veronica; Zhang, Zhenjie; Perman, Jason A; Ma, Shengqian

    2017-03-29

    Mesoporous materials, Tb-mesoMOF and MCM-41, were used to study the transport phenomena of biomolecules entering the interior pores from solution. Vitamins B 12 and B 2 were successfully encapsulated into these mesoporous materials, whereas Tb-mesoMOF (0.33 g of B 12 /g, 0.01 g of B 2 /g) adsorbed a higher amount of vitamin per mass than MCM-41 (0.21 g of B 12 /g, 0.002 g of B 2 /g). The diffusion mechanism of the biomolecules entering Tb-mesoMOF was evaluated using a mathematical model. The Raman spectroscopy studies showed vitamin B 12 has been encapsulated within Tb-mesoMOF's pores, and evaluation of the peak shifts indicated strong interactions linking vitamin B 12 's pyrroline moiety with Tb-mesoMOF's triazine and benzoate rings. Because of these stronger interactions between the vitamins and Tb-mesoMOF, longer egress times were observed than with MCM-41.

  20. Investigations into the environmental conditions experienced during ambient sample transport: impact to dried blood spot sample shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Chester L; Dopson, Wesley; Kemp, Daniel C; Lewis, Mark; Lad, Rakesh; Overvold, Carol

    2011-07-01

    Prior to bioanalysis, sample transport and storage are critical considerations in any pharmacokinetic or toxicokinetic study design. Care must be taken to ensure the shipment is properly packaged and tracked to make certain it arrives at the desired, final destination in the appropriate timeframe, and that the integrity of the sample is not compromised. When dealing with biological specimens, environmental conditions may have a deleterious effect on the stability and conditions of the sample. Currently, frozen plasma or blood samples are the matrix of choice within the pharmaceutical industry for analysis within both preclinical and clinical trials. Liquid samples are shipped and received frozen and, therefore, the assumption is made that the frozen conditions are maintained throughout the entire transit process. Dried blood spot and dried matrix spot samples are becoming popular alternatives to plasma sampling in many small- and even large-molecule applications. With the implementation of dried blood spot and dried matrix spot samples, shipping and storage occurs under ambient conditions. In this article we discuss various shipping containers for these samples, illustrate the environmental extremes encountered during the shipping process, demonstrate a cost-effective method of monitoring both temperature and humidity, and discuss validation steps that may be implemented to minimize the impact of these variables on your study design.

  1. Experimental studies on the dynamics of radionuclide transport in soils and plants: an investigation of the effects of soil type and chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Jones, C.; Jackson, D.; Thorne, M.C.

    1984-10-01

    The dynamics and distribution of radioisotopes of Ce, Ru, I, Sr and Cs have been studied in soils and grass in greenhouse conditions. Two soil types, representative of localities close to existing nuclear installations, have been investigated in combination with two chemical forms of Ce, Ru, Sr and Cs. The effect of administration of iodine at two different periods of growth has been investigated using I-125 and I-131. The time-dependent behaviour of the radionuclides has also been investigated by means of four harvests at various times after administration of the radionuclides. Parameter values for sorption of radionuclides to soil inorganic and organic fractions were determined by means of serial chemical extraction of soils at each harvest, and for transport from soil to root and from root to shoot by means of assay of derived plant material. In addition, the vertical distribution of radionuclides in the soil profile was determined by means of external scanning of undisturbed pots. The data from these scans have been used to calculate transfer coefficients for loss of radionuclides from surface soil for comparison with soil solution and mass transport parameters used in the model. The results are discussed. (author)

  2. Investigation of different piston ring curvatures on lubricant transport along cylinder liner in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, H; Klit, P; Vølund, A

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  3. Investigation of Different Piston Ring Curvatures on Lubricant Transport along Cylinder Liner in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Hannibal Christian; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  4. Using "CONNected objECT (CONNECT)" Algorithm to Explore Intense Global Water Vapor Transport to Investigate Impacts of Climate Variability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawzenuk, B.; Sellars, S. L.; Nguyen, P.; Ralph, F. M.; Sorooshian, S.

    2017-12-01

    The CONNected objECT (CONNECT) algorithm is applied to Integrated Water Vapor Transport (IVT) data from the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications - Version 2 reanalysis product for the period 1980 to 2016 to study water vapor transport globally. The algorithm generates life-cycle records as statistical objects for the time and space location of the evolving strong vapor transport events. Global statistics are presented and used to investigate how climate variability impacts the events' location and frequency. Results show distinct water vapor object frequency and seasonal peaks during NH and SH Winter. Moreover, a positive linear trend in the annual number of objects is reported, increasing by 3.58 objects year-over-year (with 95% confidence, +/- 1.39). In addition, we show five distinct regions where these events typically exist (southeastern United States, eastern China, South Pacific south of 25°S, eastern South America and off the southern tip of South Africa), and where they rarely exist (eastern South Pacific Ocean and central southern Atlantic Ocean between 5°N-25°S). In addition, the event frequency and geographical location are also shown to be related to the Arctic Oscillation, Pacific North American Pattern, and the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation.

  5. 14 CFR 385.21 - Authority of the Chief, Accounting Division, Office of Budget and Policy, Federal Transit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Office of Budget and Policy, Federal Transit Administration. 385.21 Section 385.21 Aeronautics and Space... of the Chief, Accounting Division, Office of Budget and Policy, Federal Transit Administration. The Chief, Accounting Division, Office of Budget and Policy, Federal Transit Administration, has authority...

  6. Post-Affirmative Action: A Phenomenological Study of Admission Initiatives by Chief Diversity Officers to Support Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichuru, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of chief diversity officers (CDOs) and how they enhanced admission of minority students in the post-affirmative action era. Six chief diversity officers, who played a pivotal leadership role in diversity of their respective campuses, described their experiences. Using…

  7. Connective Heating Improvement for Emergency Fire Shelters (CHIEFS): Composition and Performance of Fire Shelter Concepts at Close-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fody, Joshua M.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Bruce, Walter E., III; Wells, John M.; Wusk, Mary E.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Miller, Steve D.

    2018-01-01

    Summary of highlights of the Convective Heating Improvement for Emergency Fire Shelters (CHIEFS) taskunder NASA. CHIEFS was tasked with providing the US Forest Service with an emergency fire shelter forimproved resistance to flame contact. Emphasis is on the final shelter designs at task close-out (end of FY17).

  8. 77 FR 31161 - Designation of Officers of the Millennium Challenge Corporation To Act as Chief Executive Officer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... of May 21, 2012 Designation of Officers of the Millennium Challenge Corporation To Act as Chief Executive Officer of the Millennium Challenge Corporation Memorandum for the Chief Executive Officer of the... following officers of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), in the order listed, shall act as and...

  9. Investigation of transport phenomena and defect formation in pulsed laser keyhole welding of zinc-coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J [Department of Mechanical and Engineering Technology, Georgia Southern University, PO Box 8046, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States); Tsai, H L [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri-Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Lehnhoff, T F [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri-Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Lasers are being used to weld zinc-coated steels due to high welding speed, high aspect ratio, and narrow heat affected zone. However, escape of high-pressure zinc vapour in the welding process can damage the weld pool continuity and cause large voids and serious undercuts in the final welds. In this paper, a mathematical model and the associated numerical techniques have been developed to study the transport phenomena and defect formation mechanisms in pulsed laser keyhole welding of zinc-coated steels. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method is employed to track free surfaces. The continuum model is used to handle the liquid phase, the solid phase and the mushy zone of the metal. The enthalpy method is employed to account for the latent heat during melting and solidification. The transient heat transfer and melt flow in the weld pool during the keyhole formation and collapse processes are calculated. The escape of zinc vapour through the keyhole and the interaction between zinc vapour and weld pool are studied. Voids in the welds are found to be caused by the combined effects of zinc vapour-melt interactions, keyhole collapse and solidification process. By controlling the laser pulse profile, it is found that the keyhole collapse and solidification process can be delayed, allowing the zinc vapour to escape, which results in the reduction or elimination of voids. The good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental observations indicates that the proposed model lays a solid foundation for future study of laser welding of zinc-coated steels.

  10. All optical method for investigation of spin and charge transport in semiconductors: Combination of spatially and time-resolved luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadiz, F.; Paget, D.; Grebenkov, D.; Korb, J. P.; Rowe, A. C. H. [Physique de la matière condensée, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Barate, P.; Amand, T. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Arscott, S.; Peytavit, E. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), University of Lille, CNRS, Avenue Poincaré, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2014-07-14

    A new approach is demonstrated for investigating charge and spin diffusion as well as surface and bulk recombination in unpassivated doped semiconductors. This approach consists in using two complementary, conceptually related, techniques, which are time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and spatially resolved microluminescence (μPL) and is applied here to p{sup +} GaAs. Analysis of the sole TRPL signal is limited by the finite risetime. On the other hand, it is shown that joint TRPL and μPL can be used to determine the diffusion constant, the bulk recombination time, and the spin relaxation time. As an illustration, the temperature variation of these quantities is investigated for p{sup +} GaAs.

  11. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O3 in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu B; Yates, Emma L; Iraci, Laura T; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-10-15

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O3 (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O3 and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O3 and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O3 and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O3 observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O3 frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O3 at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O3 O3 across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of vertical and horizontal transport processes and their influence on the concentration of aerosols and ozone over the greater Berlin area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, E.; Kerschbaumer, A.; Beekmann, M.; Neißner, F.

    2003-04-01

    Urban emissions of particulate matter and precursors of ozone are very important in relation to the EU-council directives and national pollution abatement strategies. Knowledge about the contribution of anthropogenic urban sources and about long range transport of polluted air to local concentrations is needed for any reduction strategy. Thus, within the German Atmospheric Research Program AFO2000 a project has been started to investigate the formation and transport of PM10/PM2.5 in the greater Berlin area by sampling and analysing PM, using LIDAR as well as physico-chemical measurements to determine density, partical size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol. Participants are: Freie Universität Berlin, Institute for Meteorology BTU Cottbus, Air Chemistry Department Elight Laser Systems GmbH Freie Universität Berlin, Physics Department Environmental Administration, Berlin Government with an additional PM campaign Measurements at central Berlin monitoring stations exceed standard PM10 tresholds. Therefore, it is important to get a better knowledge about PM sources within and outside the city. Long term applications of the chemical transport model with an aerosol-module REM3/Calgrid is used to explain transport, formation and deposition processes. Backward and forward trajectories are used to determine source/receptor relationships between the observations and European wide emission maps for ozone, precursors and PM10 and PM2,5 by correlation between observed primary aerosols in Berlin and possible sources. The measurements obtained within the project are also used to validate REM3/Calgrid with special respect to SO4, NO3, NH4 and ozone precursors.

  13. Investigation of Structure and Transport in Li-Doped Ionic Liquid Electrolytes: [pyr14][TFSI], [pyr13][FSI] and [EMIM][BF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bennett, William R.; Hernandez-Lugo, Dione M.; Wu, James; Borodin, Oleg; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes have been proposed as a means of improving the safety and cycling behavior of advanced lithium batteries; however, the properties of these electrolytes under high lithium doping are poorly understood. Here, we employ both polarizable molecular dynamics simulation and experiment to investigate the structure, thermodynamics and transport of three potential electrolytes, N-methyl-Nbutylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsufonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N- methyl-Npropylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosufonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3-- methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]), as a function of Li-salt concentration and temperature. Structurally, Li(+) is shown to be solvated by three anion neighbors in [pyr14][TFSI] and four anion neighbors in both [pyr13][FSI] and [EMIM][BF4], and at all levels of x(sub Li) we find the presence of lithium aggregates. Furthermore, the computed density, diffusion, viscosity, and ionic conductivity show excellent agreement with experimental data. While the diffusion and viscosity exhibit a systematic decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing x(sub Li), the contribution of Li(+) to ionic conductivity increases until reaching a saturation doping level of x(sub Li) is approximately 0.10. Comparatively, the Li(+) conductivity of [pyr14][TFSI] is an order of magnitude lower than that of the other liquids, which range between 0.1 - 0.3 mS/cm. The differences in Li(+) transport are reflected in the residence times of Li(+) with the anions, which are revealed to be much larger for [pyr14][TFSI] (up to 100 ns at the highest doping levels) than in either [EMIM][BF4] or [pyr13][FSI]. Finally, we comment on the relative kinetics of Li(+) transport in each liquid and we present strong evidence for transport through anion exchange (hopping) as opposed to the net motion of Li(+) with its solvation shell (vehicular).

  14. Investigation of Structure and Transport in Li-Doped Ionic Liquid Electrolytes: [pyr14][TFSI], [pyr13][FSI], [EMIM][BF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bennett, William R.; Wu, James J.; Hernandez, Dionne M.; Borodin, Oleg; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Lawson, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes have been proposed as a means of improving the safety and cycling behavior of advanced lithium batteries; however, the properties of these electrolytes under high lithium doping are poorly understood. Here, we employ both polarizable molecular dynamics simulation and experiment to investigate the structure, thermodynamics and transport of three potential electrolytes, N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsufonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N- methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosufonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3-- methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]), as a function of Li (-) salt concentration and temperature. Structurally, Li(+) is shown to be solvated by three anion neighbors in [pyr14][TFSI] and four anion neighbors in both [pyr13][FSI] and [EMIM][BF4], and at all levels of xLi we find the presence of lithium aggregates. Furthermore, the computed density, diffusion, viscosity, and ionic conductivity show excellent agreement with experimental data. While the diffusion and viscosity exhibit a systematic decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing xLi, the contribution of Li(+) to ionic conductivity increases until reaching a saturation doping level of xLi 0.10. Comparatively, the Li(+) conductivity of [pyr14][TFSI] is an order of magnitude lower than that of the other liquids, which range between 0.1-0.3 mScm. The differences in Li(+) transport are reflected in the residence times of Li(+) with the anions, which are revealed to be much larger for [pyr14][TFSI] (up to 100 ns at the highest doping levels) than in either [EMIM][BF4] or [pyr13][FSI]. Finally, we comment on the relative kinetics of Li(+) transport in each liquid and we present strong evidence for transport through anion exchange (hopping) as opposed to the net motion of Li(+) with its solvation shell (vehicular).

  15. Investigation of Hg uptake and transport between paddy soil and rice seeds combining Hg isotopic composition and speciation

    OpenAIRE

    C. Feng; Z. Pedrero; P. Li; B. Du; X. Feng; M. Monperrus; E. Tessier; S. Berail; D. Amouroux

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human consumption of rice constitutes a potential toxicological risk in mercury (Hg) polluted areas such as Hg mining regions in China. It is recognized to be an important source of Hg for the local human diet considering the efficient bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in rice seed. To assess Hg sources and uptake pathways to the rice plants, Hg speciation and isotopic composition were investigated in rice seeds and their corresponding paddy soils from different locations withi...

  16. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  17. Investigation on the neutron beam characteristics for boron neutron capture therapy with 3D and 2D transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodeli, I.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of future Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experiments, where cells and animals irradiations are planned at the research reactor of Strasbourg University, the feasibility to obtain a suitable epithermal neutron beam is investigated. The neutron fluence and spectra calculations in the reactor are performed using the 3D Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-3 and the 2D SN code TWODANT. The preliminary analysis of Al 2 O 3 and Al-Al 2 O 3 filters configurations are carried out in an attempt to optimize the flux characteristics in the beam tube facility. 7 figs., 7 refs

  18. Review of data requirements for groundwater flow and solute transport modelling and the ability of site investigation methods to meet these requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.J.; Chapman, N.A.; Robinson, P.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the data requirements for the codes that may be used in the modelling of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport during the assessment of a Nirex site for the deep disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste and also the site investigation methods that exist to supply the data for these codes. The data requirements for eight codes are reviewed, with most emphasis on three of the more significant codes, VANDAL, NAMMU and CHEMTARD. The largest part of the report describes and discusses the site investigation techniques and each technique is considered in terms of its ability to provide the data necessary to characterise the geological and hydrogeological environment around a potential repository. (author)

  19. NMR and Electrochemical Investigation of the Transport Properties of Methanol and Water in Nafion and Clay-Nanocomposites Membranes for DMFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Baglio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water and methanol transport behavior, solvents adsorption and electrochemical properties of filler-free Nafion and nanocomposites based on two smectite clays, were investigated using impedance spectroscopy, DMFC tests and NMR methods, including spin-lattice relaxation and pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE diffusion under variable temperature conditions. Synthetic (Laponite and natural (Swy-2 smectite clays, with different structural and physical parameters, were incorporated into the Nafion for the creation of exfoliated nanocomposites. Transport mechanism of water and methanol appears to be influenced from the dimensions of the dispersed platelike silicate layers as well as from their cation exchange capacity (CEC. The details of the NMR results and the effect of the methanol solution concentration are discussed. Clays particles, and in particular Swy-2, demonstrate to be a potential physical barrier for methanol cross-over, reducing the methanol diffusion with an evident blocking effect yet nevertheless ensuring a high water mobility up to 130 °C and for several hours, proving the exceptional water retention property of these materials and their possible use in the DMFCs applications. Electrochemical behavior is investigated by cell resistance and polarization measurements. From these analyses it is derived that the addition of clay materials to recast Nafion decreases the ohmic losses at high temperatures extending in this way the operating range of a direct methanol fuel cell.

  20. Experimental modelling of wave amplification over irregular bathymetry for investigations of boulder transport by extreme wave events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Whittaker, Trevor; Cox, Ronadh; Elsäßer, Björn

    2017-04-01

    During the winter of 2013-2014 the west coast of Ireland was exposed to 6 storms over a period of 8 weeks with wind speeds equating to hurricane categories 3 and 4. During this period, the largest significant wave height recorded at the Marine Institute M6 wave buoy, approximately 300km from the site, was 13.6m (on 26th January 2014). However, this may not be the largest sea state of that winter, because the buoy stopped logging on 30th January and therefore failed to capture the full winter period. During the February 12th 2014 "Darwin" storm, the Kinsale Energy Gas Platform off Ireland's south coast measured a wave height of 25 m, which remains the highest wave measured off Ireland's coasts[1]. Following these storms, significant dislocation and transportation of boulders and megagravel was observed on the Aran Islands, Co. Galway at elevations of up to 25m above the high water mark and distances up to 220 m inland including numerous clasts with masses >50t, and at least one megagravel block weighing >500t [2]. Clast movements of this magnitude would not have been predicted from the measured wave heights. This highlights a significant gap in our understanding of the relationships between storms and the coastal environment: how are storm waves amplified and modified by interactions with bathymetry? To gain further understanding of wave amplification, especially over steep and irregular bathymetry, we have designed Froude-scaled wave tank experiments using the 3D coastal wave basin facility at Queen's University Belfast. The basin is 18m long by 16m wide with wave generation by means of a 12m wide bank of 24 top hinged, force feedback, sector carrier wave paddles at one end. The basin is equipped with gravel beaches to dissipate wave energy on the remaining three sides, capable of absorbing up to 99% of the incident wave energy, to prevent unwanted reflections. Representative bathymetry for the Aran Islands is modelled in the basin based on a high resolution

  1. Development of spheroidized graphite cast iron material for spent fuel transport and storage cask and investigation of its mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumura, O.; Shimizu, S.; Murata, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Maruoka, M.; Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1993-01-01

    We manufactured a 500mm thick ferrite base, spheroidized graphite cast iron cylindrical casting with a circular bottom (2000mm outside diameter and 2000mm height) for trial purpose. We then investigated the basic quality and performance by sampling specimens from various locations of the product. The results of the study can be summarized as follows. (1) Although there were some casting wrinkles, the overall surface of the casting was found to be good, without blowholes and other defects. (2) The nodularity tended to decline at the center of the interior where solidification occurred slowly. However, the nodularity was more than 75%, and no abnormal graphite was observed. Similarly, the ferrite area ratio had a tendency to decrease at the center, but it remained at more than 95%. (J.P.N.)

  2. Structural-dynamical investigation of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop: involvement in zinc management and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, Mattia; Oteri, Francesco; Di Palma, Francesco; Pandey, Saurabh; Battistoni, Andrea; Desideri, Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Comparative homology modelling techniques have been used to model the protein ZnuA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using the 3D structure of the homologous protein from Escherichia coli. These two-domain proteins bind one Zn(2+) atom, with high affinity, in the inter-domain cleft and possess a histidine-rich loop in the N-terminal domain. Alternative structures of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop, never resolved by the X-ray diffraction method, have been modelled. A model of the apo form, one with the histidine-rich loop deleted and two alternative structures with a second zinc ion bound to the histidine-rich loop, have been generated. In all the modelled proteins, investigated through molecular dynamics simulation, the histidine-rich loop is highly mobile and its fluctuations are correlated to the ligand stability observed in the zinc sites. Based on the plasticity of the histidine-rich loop and its significant effects on protein mobility a possible role in the capture and/or transfer of the zinc ions has been suggested.

  3. Investigation of nuclide importance to functional requirements related to transport and long-term storage of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; DeHart, M.D.; Ryman, J.C.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    This study investigates the relative importances of the various actinide, fission-product, and light-element isotopes associated with LWR spent fuel with respect to five analysis areas: criticality safety (absorption fractions), shielding (dose rate fractions), curies (fractional curies levels), decay heat (fraction of total watts), and radiological toxicity (fraction of potential committed effective dose equivalent). These rankings are presented for up to six different burnup/enrichment scenarios and at decay times from 2 to 100,000 years. Ranking plots for each of these analysis areas are given in an Appendix for completeness, as well as summary tables in the main body of the report. Summary rankings are presented in terms of high (greater than 10% contribution to the total), medium (between 1% and 10% contribution), and low (less than 1% contribution) for both short- and long-term cooling. When compared with the expected measurement accuracies, these rankings show that most of the important isotopes can be characterized sufficiently for the purpose of radionuclide generation/depletion code validation in each of the analysis areas. Because the main focus of this work is on the relative importances of isotopes associated with L at sign spent fuel, some conclusions may not be applicable to similar areas such as high-level waste (HLW) and nonfuel-bearing components (NFBC)

  4. Investigation of magnetic and transport properties of PrCa(MnCo)O prepared by solid state process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelifi, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux et des Nanomatériaux appliquée à l’Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Gabès cité Erriadh, Université de Gabès, 6079 Gabès (Tunisia); M’nassri, R. [Unité de recherche Matériaux Avancés et Nanotechnologies (URMAN), Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologie de Kasserine, Kairouan University, BP 471, Kasserine 1200 (Tunisia); Selmi, A. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Rahmouni, H., E-mail: rahmounihedi@yahoo.fr [Unité de recherche Matériaux Avancés et Nanotechnologies (URMAN), Institut Supérieur des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologie de Kasserine, Kairouan University, BP 471, Kasserine 1200 (Tunisia); Khirouni, K. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux et des Nanomatériaux appliquée à l’Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Gabès cité Erriadh, Université de Gabès, 6079 Gabès (Tunisia); and others

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic, magnetocaloric and electrical properties in distorted orthorhombic system Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.98}Co{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} has been studied. Complex impedance analysis confirms the contribution of grain boundary on the conduction process. The latter is dominated by thermally activated hopping mechanism. The sample exhibits two relaxations phenomena. Only one process persists at higher temperatures. Conductivity analysis indicates that the investigated compound exhibits a semiconductor behavior. The material reveals a dielectric transition and the experimental results are well fitted by Curie-Weiss law. The magnetic measurements show a clear paramagnetic–ferromagnetic transition with a large magnetic entropy change over a wide range of temperature. Furthermore, Banerjee's criteria and Landau theory of phase transitions are also studied to access magnetic ordering in the sample. A maximum magnetic entropy change increases from 0.5 to 2.18 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} when magnetic field rises from 1 T to 5 T. For the higher applied magnetic field, the material exhibits a high relative cooling power RCP=268.14 J/kg with a large temperature full-width at half maximum δ{sub TFWHM}=123 K.

  5. Electron transport investigation of layered MoO3 oxides doped with different concentrations of Nb2O5 oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khawaja, S.; Kasem, M.

    2008-07-01

    The dc and ac electric conductivity has been studied for numerous samples of molybdenum oxide MoO 3 doped with niobium oxide Nb 2 O 5 elaborated via the solid state reactions. By means of the electric resistivity and dielectricity curves obtained as a function of temperature, and according to the dopant concentration, the behaviour of these compounds has been allocated. Most of the investigated samples, which are insulating at room temperature, have been witnessed to exhibit simultaneously two different electric comportments; metallic and semiconducting within the range of low and high temperatures respectively, designated by a critical temperature related to the nature of the material. Both of these behaviours are attributed electronically to ionic conduction mechanism, occurring in the solid material formed upon doping with Nb 2 O 5 , which is utterly diffused into the layered structure of MoO 3 particularly for x≥40% concentrations and accompanied by relaxation in the dielectric function between 5 Hz and 13 M Hz.(Authors)

  6. Investigation of phonon transport and thermal boundary conductance at the interface of functionalized SWCNT and poly (ether-ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haoxiang; Kumar, Satish, E-mail: satish.kumar@me.gatech.edu [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Chen, Liang [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Varshney, Vikas [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States); Universal Technology Corporation, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Roy, Ajit K. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Carbon nanostructures such as carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene, and carbon fibers can be used as fillers in amorphous polymers to improve their thermal properties. In this study, the effect of covalent bonding of CNT with poly(ether ketone) (PEK) on interfacial thermal interactions is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The number of covalent bonds between (20, 20) CNT and PEK is varied in the range of 0–80 (0%–6.25%), and the thermal boundary conductance is computed. The analysis reveals that covalent functionalization of CNT atoms can enhance the thermal boundary conductance by an order of magnitude compared to the non-functionalized CNT-PEK interface at a high degree of CNT functionalization. Besides strengthening the thermal coupling, covalent functionalization is also shown to modify the phonon spectra of CNT. The transient spectral energy analysis shows that the crosslinks cause faster energy exchange from CNT to PEK in different frequency bands. The oxygen atom of hydroxyl group of PEK contributes energy transfer in the low frequency band, while aromatic and carbonyl carbon atoms play a more significant role in high frequency bands. In addition, by analyzing the relaxation time of the spectral temperature of different frequency bands of CNT, it is revealed that with increasing number of bonds, both lower frequency vibrational modes and higher frequency modes efficiently couple across the CNT-PEK interface and contribute in thermal energy transfer from CNT to the matrix.

  7. HRP Chief Scientist's Office: Conducting Research to Enable Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Fogarty, J.; Vega, L.; Cromwell, R. L.; Haven, C. P.; McFather, J. C.; Savelev, I.

    2017-01-01

    The HRP Chief Scientist's Office sets the scientific agenda for the Human Research Program. As NASA plans for deep space exploration, HRP is conducting research to ensure the health of astronauts, and optimize human performance during extended duration missions. To accomplish this research, HRP solicits for proposals within the U.S., collaborates with agencies both domestically and abroad, and makes optimal use of ISS resources in support of human research. This session will expand on these topics and provide an opportunity for questions and discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist. Presentations in this session will include: NRA solicitations - process improvements and focus for future solicitations, Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration - future directions (MHRPE 2.0), Extramural liaisons - National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Defense (DOD), Standardized Measures for spaceflight, Ground-based Analogs - international collaborations, and International data sharing.

  8. Leadership Primer for Current and Aspiring Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Academic Division Chiefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Thomson, Carey C; Kaminski, Naftali; Schnapp, Lynn M; Madison, J Mark; Glenny, Robb W; Dixon, Anne E

    2018-02-27

    An academic medical career traditionally revolves around patient care, teaching, and scholarly projects. Thus, when an opportunity for a leadership role arises, such as Division Chief, the new leader is often unprepared with little or no formal leadership training. In this article, academic leaders of the Association of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Division Directors reviewed several leadership concepts adapted from the business sector and applied years of their experience to aid new division chiefs with their first day on the job. The first 90 days are highlighted to include accomplishing the early wins, performing a division Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis, establishing division rapport, redefining the division infrastructure, avoiding conflicts, and managing their relationship with the department chair. The five levels of leadership applicable to academic medicine are discussed: position, permission, production, people, and pinnacle. Finally, emotional intelligence and behavior styles crucial to leadership success are reviewed.

  9. U.K. Chief Scientific Advisor Discusses Funding, Priorities, and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-05-01

    Like other countries facing a tough economy, the government in the United Kingdom has been under pressure to make cutbacks; as budgets are becoming increasingly tighter, funding for scientific research competes with other priorities. However, in its most recent spending review, which came out last fall and sets spending levels for the next 4 years, the U.K. government provided flat funding levels for scientific research, while most government departments saw their budgets cut by 30-40%. “That was actually a major commitment by a government that was cutting everything,” Sir John Beddington, U.K. chief scientific advisor, told Eos in a one-on-one telephone interview in mid-April. Beddington, who has been chief scientific advisor since 2008, shared with Eos his thoughts on priorities for science in the United Kingdom in a tough budget environment, getting expert science advice for policy making, providing scientific information following disasters, and communicating about climate change.

  10. Factors in adoption of a fire department wellness program: champ-and-chief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Hannah; Mabry, Linda; Elliot, Diane L; Kuehl, Kerry S; Favorite, Kim C

    2013-04-01

    To identify and evaluate determinants of fire departments' wellness program adoption. The Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects fire service wellness program was offered for free to all medium-sized fire departments in Oregon and Washington. An invitation to participate was mailed to key fire department decision makers (chief, union president, and wellness officer). These key decision makers from 12 sites that adopted the program and 24 matched nonadopting sites were interviewed and results were analyzed to define adoption determinants. Three adoption requirements were identified: (1) mailer connection, (2) local firefighter wellness champion, and (3) willing fire chief, whereas a fourth set of organizational factors had little or no impact on adoption including previous and ongoing wellness activities, financial pressures, and resistance to change. Findings identified determinants of medium-sized fire service wellness program adoption.

  11. Board monitoring of the chief financial officer: A review and research agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Uhde, David Alexander; Klarner, Patricia; Tuschke, Anja

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Research Question/Issue:__ Research on how boards govern individual top management team (TMT) members, i.e., senior executives aside from the CEO, is still scarce and fragmented. In this study, we review extant research on board monitoring of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) - an increasingly influential actor at the top of the firm - synthesize it, and propose an integrative future research agenda on board governing of the CFO. __Research Findings/Insights:__ Our review of...

  12. STUDY OF THE PRESENCE OF THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CHIEF OFFICER IN BANKING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    MIHAELA DUMITRASCU

    2014-01-01

    We present a study regarding the banking system from Romania with the aim to identify corporations that have a position of „Corporate Social Responsibility Cheif Officer” or „Corporate Social Responsibility Synonym: Citizenship/ Sustainability” included in the position title. To achieve this objective, we present some preliminary findings. Our first hypothesis was that there are a number of positions of Chief Officers of Corporate Social Responsibility in banking system. After...

  13. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Strategic Plan2008-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-11-19

    This is an update to the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's (OCFO's) multi-year strategy to continue to build a highly effective, efficient and compliant financial and business approach to support the scientific mission of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The guiding principles of this strategy are to provide the greatest capability for the least cost while continually raising the standards of professional financial management in service to the LBNL science mission.

  14. Chairs and chiefs of plastic surgery: is it an insider job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Neil; Levine, Steven M; Broer, P Niclas; Reavey, Patrick L; Weichman, Katie E; Roostaeian, Jason; Andrews, Brian T; Lerman, Oren Z; Saadeh, Pierre B; Levine, Jamie P

    2013-07-01

    There is no more important decision an academic Plastic Surgery Department or Division can make than naming a chair or chief. Externally recruited leadership brings fresh perspectives and connections. Critics, however, argue that they lack the in-depth knowledge of the institution's culture and history that may be needed to succeed. The ability and skill of an internal candidate is already known and can increase the odds of that person's success in the leadership position. Finally, external recruitment can be a more costly process. Ultimately, the decision is really a litmus test for a Plastic Surgery program. The authors aim to evaluate factors influencing ascent in Plastic Surgery leadership, including training history, internal promotion, and external recruiting. All Plastic Surgery residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were noted (n = 71). Academic departmental chairs or divisional chiefs of these residency programs were identified at the time of study design (October 1, 2011). For each chair or chief, gender, training history, and faculty appointment immediately prior to the current leadership position was recorded. There were 71 academic chairs or chiefs of Plastic Surgery residency programs at the time of data collection. The majority (62%) had done fellowship training following Plastic Surgery residency. Fellowships included hand (43%), craniofacial (29%), microsurgery (18%), and other types (10%). The majority (73%) of leaders were internal hires (P promotion. However, only a fraction (22%) of these internal hires had done Plastic Surgery residency or fellowship training at that institution (P promotion, but always with an eye towards the advantages of bringing in external talent as a valuable contribution to increase organizational success.

  15. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms' intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms.

  16. Experimental studies and modelling of cation interactions with solid materials: application to the MIMICC project. (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, Emmanuelle

    1999-01-01

    The study of cation interactions with solid materials is useful in order to define the chemistry interaction component of the MIMICC project (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes). This project will validate the chemistry-transport coupled codes. Database have to be supplied on the cesium or ytterbium interactions with solid materials in suspension. The solid materials are: a strong cation exchange resin, a natural sand which presents small impurities, and a zirconium phosphate. The cation exchange resin is useful to check that the surface complexation theory can be applied on a pure cation exchanger. The sand is a natural material, and its isotherms will be interpreted using pure oxide-cation system data, such as pure silica-cation data. Then the study on the zirconium phosphate salt is interesting because of the increasing complexity in the processes (dissolution, sorption and co-precipitation). These data will enable to approach natural systems, constituted by several complex solids which can interfere on each other. These data can also be used for chemistry-transport coupled codes. Potentiometric titration, sorption isotherms, sorption kinetics, cation surface saturation curves are made, in order to obtain the different parameters relevant to the cation sorption at the solid surface, for each solid-electrolyte-cation system. The influence of different parameters such as ionic strength, pH, and electrolyte is estimated. All the experimental curves are fitted with FITEQL code based on the surface complexation theory using the constant capacitance model, in order to give a mechanistic interpretation of the ion retention phenomenon at the solid surface. The speciation curves of all systems are plotted, using the FITEQL code too. Systems with an increasing complexity are studied: dissolution, sorption and coprecipitation coexist in the cation-salt systems. Then the data obtained on each single solid, considered

  17. Journal of Biomedical Investigation: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following instructions relating to submissions must be adhered to. Failure to conform can lead to delay in publication. Preferred method of submission. Manuscripts may be submitted by post (Editor-in-chief Journal of Biomedical Investigation, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine College ...

  18. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf [Heinrich-Heine University, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schramm, Nils [Research Center Juelich, Central Laboratory for Electronics, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-DPD and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V''{sub 3}) of 0.24{+-}0.26 (mean {+-} SD) and 1.09{+-}0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p<0.0001). Cortical V''{sub 3} values amounted to 0.05{+-}0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3{+-}0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and

  19. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [123I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf; Schramm, Nils

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [ 123 I]FP-CIT. [ 123 I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with 99m Tc-DPD and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with 99m Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V '' 3 ) of 0.24±0.26 (mean ± SD) and 1.09±0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p '' 3 values amounted to 0.05±0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3±0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [ 123 I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and small animal imaging systems. (orig.)

  20. Psychiatry chief resident opinions toward basic and clinical neuroscience training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey I; Handa, Kamna; Mahajan, Aman; Deotale, Pravesh

    2014-04-01

    The authors queried attendees to a chief resident conference on whether program education and training in neuroscience or in translating neuroscience research into practice is sufficient and what changes are needed. The authors developed and administered a 26-item voluntary questionnaire to each attendee at the Chief Residents' Leadership Conference at the American Psychiatric Association 2013 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA. Out of 94 attendees, 55 completed and returned questionnaires (58.5%). A majority of respondents stated that their program provided adequate training in neuroscience (61.8%); opportunities for neuroscience research existed for them (78.2%), but that their program did not prepare them for translating future neuroscience research findings into clinical practice (78.9%) or educate them on the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (83.3%). A majority of respondents stated that the ACGME should require a specific neuroscience curriculum (79.6%). Chief residents believe that curricular and cultural change is needed in psychiatry residency neuroscience education.

  1. Lgr5-expressing chief cells drive epithelial regeneration and cancer in the oxyntic stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushacke, Marc; Tan, Si Hui; Wong, Angeline; Swathi, Yada; Hajamohideen, Amin; Tan, Liang Thing; Goh, Jasmine; Wong, Esther; Denil, Simon L I J; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Barker, Nick

    2017-07-01

    The daily renewal of the corpus epithelium is fuelled by adult stem cells residing within tubular glands, but the identity of these stem cells remains controversial. Lgr5 marks homeostatic stem cells and 'reserve' stem cells in multiple tissues. Here, we report Lgr5 expression in a subpopulation of chief cells in mouse and human corpus glands. Using a non-variegated Lgr5-2A-CreERT2 mouse model, we show by lineage tracing that Lgr5-expressing chief cells do not behave as corpus stem cells during homeostasis, but are recruited to function as stem cells to effect epithelial renewal following injury by activating Wnt signalling. Ablation of Lgr5 + cells severely impairs epithelial homeostasis in the corpus, indicating an essential role for these Lgr5 + cells in maintaining the homeostatic stem cell pool. We additionally define Lgr5 + chief cells as a major cell-of-origin of gastric cancer. These findings reveal clinically relevant insights into homeostasis, repair and cancer in the corpus.

  2. The Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Influence of Clouds on the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are critical to the current Martian climate, and they interact with each other through cloud formation. Dust modulates the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly influences atmospheric circulation. Clouds provide radiative forcing and control the net hemispheric transport of water through the alteration of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent advancements in the quality and sophistication of both climate models and observations enable an increased understanding of how the coupling between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) impacts the dust and water cycles. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distributions of dust and water and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. We utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) to show that the magnitude and nature of the hemispheric exchange of water during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. Further, we investigate how clouds influence atmospheric temperatures and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to isolate and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  3. Dr Julia King CBE FREng, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (United Kingdom), visiting the NA48 experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (right) with A. Ceccucci and K. Peach. Photo 05: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (centre) with A. Ceccucci and C. Lazzeroni. Photo 08: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (second from left) with (left to right) R. Barlow, J. Wood, N. McCubbin, K. Peach, A. Ceccucci, C. Lazzeroni, M. Patel and D. Munday.

  4. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O3 in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu B.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-01-01

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O 3 (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O 3 and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O 3 and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O 3 and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O 3 observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O 3 frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O 3 at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O 3 < 2500 m which suggests that similar processes influence daytime O 3 across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. - Highlights: • Measurements indicate Asian LRT, STT, and

  5. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O{sub 3} in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, Rebekka, E-mail: rebekkafine@gmail.com [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Miller, Matthieu B. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T. [Atmospheric Science Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gustin, Mae Sexauer, E-mail: mgustin@cabnr.unr.edu [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O{sub 3} (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O{sub 3} and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O{sub 3} and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O{sub 3} and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O{sub 3} observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O{sub 3} frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O{sub 3} at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O{sub 3} < 2500 m which suggests that similar processes influence daytime O{sub 3} across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. - Highlights:

  6. Sorption of PAHs to humic acid- and iron(III)carbon ate particles by using passive dosing vials for investigating the transport of organic contamination in stormwater runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the growing urbanisation a nd increasing anthropogenic activities in urban areas have turned urban stormwater runoff int o a surface water quality contamination problem. The concerns of urban stormwater runoff as a source of contamination in the receiving surface water...... (lakes, rivers or sea) have been raised by researchers throughout the world (e.g. Broman et. al., 1987, and Xanthopoulos et. al., 1990), and have in Europe gained increased interest in relation to the implementatio n of the Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC). Particles (often defined as >0.45 μm...... abundance, and knowledge about their facilitated transport of persistent organic polluti on in natural waters, they are likely to diminish the efficiency of engineered treatment sys tems unless appropriately accounted for. In this work organic and inorganic nanosized partic les were investigated...

  7. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a semispan STOL jet transport wing body with an upper surface blown jet flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Letko, W.; Henderson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan STOL jet transport wing-body with an upper-surface blown jet flap for lift augmentation was conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel having a 12-ft octagonal test section. The semispan swept wing had an aspect ratio of 3.92 (7.84 for the full span) and had two simulated turbofan engines mounted ahead of and above the wing in a siamese pod equipped with an exhaust deflector. The purpose of the deflector was to spread the engine exhaust into a jet sheet attached to the upper surface of the wing so that it would turn downward over the flap and provide lift augmentation. The wing also had optional boundary-layer control provided by air blowing through a thin slot over a full-span plain trailing-edge flap.

  8. An Investigation of the Stoichiometry of Na+ Cotransport with Dopamine in Rat and Human Dopamine Transporters Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schumacher, Paul

    2001-01-01

    The neuronal membrane transporter for dopamine (DAT) is a member of the Na+ and Cl dependent family of transporters and concentrates dopamine intracellularly up to 106 fold over extracellular levels...

  9. 2013 Pharmacology Risk SRP Status Review Comments to Chief Scientist. The Risk of Clinically Relevant Unpredicted Effects of Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    On December 5, 2013, the Pharmacology Risk SRP, participants from the JSC, HQ, the NSBRI, and NRESS participated in a WebEx/teleconference. The purpose of the call (as stated in the Statement of Task) was to allow the SRP members to: 1. Receive an update by the HRP Chief Scientist or Deputy Chief Scientist on the status of NASA's current and future exploration plans and the impact these will have on the HRP. 2. Receive an update on any changes within the HRP since the 2012 SRP meeting. 3. Receive an update by the Element or Project Scientist(s) on progress since the 2012 SRP meeting. 4. Participate in a discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist, Deputy Chief Scientist, and the Element regarding possible topics to be addressed at the next SRP meeting.

  10. Experience counts: The chief justice, management tenure, and strategic behavior on the U.S. Supreme Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Daniel Ura

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop and test a theoretical account of the effect of management tenure on the strategic behavior of the chief justice of the United States. Substantial evidence from literatures on learning models and public management indicate that tenure (length of service is positively related to management performance in public organizations. This suggests that the chief justice’s tenure in office should be positively related to efficiency in the use of the chief justice’s formal powers. We assess this hypothesis by replicating and extending Johnson et al.’s study of chief justice Burger’s conference voting behavior. The data support our management tenure hypothesis, showing that Burger used greater discretion in reserving his conference vote over time as he became more adept at discriminating between circumstances when the tactic was strategically valuable and when it was not.

  11. Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff's Leadership Using the Joint Strategic Planning System in the 1990s: Recommendations for Strategic Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This monograph examines how the three Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff adapted and used the Joint Strategic Planning System from 1990 to 2000 to provide advice to the Secretary of Defense and to the...

  12. Investigating the dynamic nature of the ABC transporters: ABCB1 and MsbA as examples for the potential synergies of MD theory and EPR applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockner, Thomas; Mullen, Anna; MacMillan, Fraser

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporters are primary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. Human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, or P-glycoprotein, has an extremely broad substrate spectrum and confers resistance against chemotherapy drug treatment in cancer cells. The bacterial ABC transporter MsbA is a lipid A flippase and a homolog to the human ABCB1 transporter, with which it partially shares its substrate spectrum. Crystal structures of MsbA and ABCB1 have been solved in multiple conformations, providing a glimpse into the possible conformational changes the transporter could be going through during the transport cycle. Crystal structures are inherently static, while a dynamic picture of the transporter in motion is needed for a complete understanding of transporter function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can provide structural information on ABC transporters, but the strength of these two methods lies in the potential to characterise the dynamic regime of these transporters. Information from the two methods is quite complementary. MD simulations provide an all atom dynamic picture of the time evolution of the molecular system, though with a narrow time window. EPR spectroscopy can probe structural, environmental and dynamic properties of the transporter in several time regimes, but only through the attachment sites of an exogenous spin label. In this review the synergistic effects that can be achieved by combining the two methods are highlighted, and a brief methodological background is also presented. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Effect of crowding on length of stay for common chief complaints in the emergency department: A STROBE cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Linnéa; Svensson, Per; Djärv, Therese

    2017-11-01

    Crowding in emergency departments (EDs) is associated with long lengths of stay (LOS); however, it is not known whether the effect is equal across different chief complaints.The aim of the study was to compare the effect of crowding on LOS in the 10 most common medical or surgical chief complaints in the ED.All adult visits to a university hospital ED on weekdays between 8 AM and 9 PM in 2012 (n = 19,200) were stratified based on chief complaint and triage priority. The ED bed occupancy rate was measured and crowding was defined as an occupancy rate over one. The impact of crowding on LOS was calculated for the different groups.During crowding, LOS was longer among all chief complaints (P ≤.01) (except for high-acuity patients with wounds, where the study group was very small). During crowding, LOS increased the most among patients with extremity pain/swelling (145% among high-acuity patients, 125% among low-acuity patients) and flank pain (87% among high-acuity patients, 117% among low-acuity patients) and the least among patients with chest pain (32% among high-acuity patients, 45% among low-acuity patients) or arrhythmia (37% among high-acuity patients, 52% among low-acuity patients).The effect of ED crowding on LOS is unequal across different chief complaints. These findings could be used to improve the processing of specific chief complaints in the ED.

  14. Investigations of the in vitro transport of human milk oligosaccharides by a Caco-2 monolayer using a novel high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoth, M J; Rudloff, S; Kunz, C; Kinne, R K

    2001-09-14

    Complex lactose-derived oligosaccharides belong to the main components of human milk and are believed to exert multiple functions in the breast-fed infant. Therefore, we investigated the transepithelial transport of human milk oligosaccharides over Caco-2 monolayers. Main human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in the apical, basolateral, or intracellular compartment were separated by high performance liquid chromatography using a Hypercarb(TM) column and analyzed on line by mass spectrometry. This method allowed the identification and quantification of these components in intra- and extracellular fractions without prior purification. Using this technique we were able to show that acidic and neutral HMOs cross the epithelial barrier. The transepithelial flux of neutral, but not acidic, oligosaccharides was temperature-sensitive and partly inhibited by brefeldin A and bafilomycin A. Furthermore, net flux from the apical to the basolateral compartment was only observed for the neutral components. Similarly, apical cellular uptake was only found for neutral components but not for acidic oligosaccharides. Intracellular concentrations of neutral HMOs were significantly increased by inhibitors of transcytosis such as brefeldin A, N-ethylmaleimide, or bafilomycin A. The cellular uptake was saturable, and an apparent K(m) for lacto-N-fucopentaose I of 1.7 +/- 0.1 mmol/liter and for lacto-N-tetraose of 1.8 +/- 0.4 mmol/liter was determined. Furthermore, the uptake of lacto-N-fucopentaose I could be inhibited by the addition of the stereoisomer lacto-N-fucopentaose II but not by lacto-N-tetraose. These findings suggest that neutral HMOs are transported across the intestinal epithelium by receptor-mediated transcytosis as well as via paracellular pathways, whereas translocation of acidic HMOs solely represents paracellular flux.

  15. Magnetic, Electronic Transport, and Calorimetric Investigations of La1-xCaxCoO3 in Comparison with La1-xSrxCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Asai, Kichizo

    2002-11-01

    The magnetic and electronic transport properties and the specific heat of La1-xCaxCoO3 (0.05≤ x ≤ 0.5) have been investigated. In the whole composition range, the Co atoms are in an intermediate-spin (IS) state, and a spin glass or a ferromagnetic ordered state appears at low temperatures. The conductivity increases with x, and shows a metallic temperature dependence for x ≥ 0.4. The overall resemblance of the Ca substituted system with the Sr substituted one implies that the Ca substitution introduces holes into Co-O bonds as in the case of the Sr substitution. The present results reveal that the hole-doping, not the ionic size, is essential to stabilize the IS state of Co atoms in La1-xMxCoO3 with M being a divalent ion. The quantitative difference, lower TC and less conductivity for M = Ca than M = Sr with the same x, suggests less mobility and/or less number of holes in the system with M = Ca. The electronic specific heat coefficient, null for LaCoO3, increases sharply around x=0.2 for M = Sr and x=0.25 for M = Ca, and saturates at higher concentrations. The observation indicates the presence of the Fermi surface in the deeply substituted specimens. The magneto-transport properties of the metallic specimens, especially a large amplitude of the side-jump scattering in the extraordinary Hall resistivity, are characteristic of itinerant ferromagnetic metals, which supports the double exchange mechanism in the present system.

  16. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This

  17. Collected Works of the 30th Chief of Staff, United States Army, June 1983 - June 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    aid one ta Menor ing is not sp04 -,0r h4 of MptI q1A.. - ou hae to coe.. .I you rto* ca. e abowt yow. .av . . .. ron.i... o .the use oif..., on v- .ofe...Wh, as wel as utilization of combat pow- and thousands of men ubmo* depended on the al. er of. sis services and akies, It also shapes tactic. ysis. mal ...balancing process th produces all THE CHIEFS AND THE CINCS the aspects ol a fielded sysem in the Mal program %1A depend on a smooth relationship between

  18. O papel do Chief Financial Officer no contexto empresarial : o caso do Grupo NORS

    OpenAIRE

    São Pedro, Nuno Ricardo Marques

    2017-01-01

    A posição do Chief Financial Officer (CFO) configura a de um responsável ou “ator” incontornável no mundo empresarial. De facto, variados autores e académicos, corroborados pelos próprios CFO’s em exercícios das suas funções, têm vindo a sugerir um papel, cujas responsabilidades tradicionais de expertise financeira, nomeadamente de reporte financeiro, auditoria e controlo, planeamento, orçamentação e gestão financeira, se encontra “esgotado” ou “distanciado da realidade”. Ne...

  19. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage as an ecosystem service for Brussels, Belgium: investigating iron (hydr)oxide precipitation with reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Possemiers, Mathias; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    In an evolving energy system it is important that urbanized areas contribute to their own energy demands. To reduce greenhouse gas emissions sustainable energy systems with a high efficiency are required, e.g. using urban aquifers as an ecosystem service. Here the potential of seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage and recovery (ATES) for the Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium is investigated. An important shallow geologic formation in the Brussels Capital Region is the Brussels Sand formation, a 20-60 m thick phreatic aquifer. The Brussels Sand Formation is known for its potential for ATES systems, but also for its varying redox and hydraulic conditions. Important limiting factors for ATES systems in the Brussels Sand Formation therefore are the hydraulic conductivity and the geochemical composition of the groundwater. Near the redox boundary iron hydroxide precipitation can negatively influence ATES well performance due to clogging. The interactions between physical processes (e.g. particle transport and clogging in the wider proximity of the ATES well) and chemical processes (e.g. influence of the operation temperatures on precipitation processes) during ATES operation are complex but not well understood. Therefore we constructed numerical groundwater flow models in MODFLOW to estimate maximum pumping and injection rates of different hydraulic conditions and competing water uses in the Brussels Sand Formation. In further steps the thermal potential for ATES was quantified using MT3DMS and the reactive transport model PHT3D was applied to assess the effects of operating ATES systems near the redox boundary. Results show that initial mixing plays an important role in the development of iron(hydr)oxide precipitation around the ATES wells, with the highest concentrations around the cold wells. This behavior is enhanced by the temperature effect; temperature differences of ΔT≈10°C already influence the iron (hydr)oxide concentration. The initial injection into the

  20. [Panorama of the Nursing Models used by Chief Nursing Officers in bilingual and French speaking Belgian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan; Lefebvre, Hélène; Bachelet, Lucie; Berrabah, Ouassinia; Dyikpanu, David; Martin, Daniel; Siddu, Damien; Mengal, Yves; Pirson, Magali

    2017-06-01

    The use of a Nursing Model (NM) for nursing administration offers direct and indirect benefits for patients as for nurses. Depending the chosen NM, the concepts of person, health, nursing and environment are very different. Each NM has its special vision of the practice of nursing. The study investigated whether the Chief Nursing Officers (CNO) of the bilingual and French speaking Belgian hospitals integrate Nursing Models in the politics of their department. A quantitative descriptive and correlational survey was conducted. 97.5 % of the concerned CNO (78/80) participated to the research. It appears that a Nursing Model underlies the action of the nursing department in only 38 % of the departments (30/78). Where a Nursing Model is used, it is explicitly communicated to staff (26/30). Among the Models used, that of Virginia Henderson dominates (26/30). The seniority of the CNO in its function as well as variables related to educational courses and clinical context appear to influence the results. The Nursing Models of the paradigm of transformation remain rarely used. A qualitative research would be relevant to deepen the understanding of the experience of CNO related to Nursing Models.

  1. The impact of economic and noneconomic exchange on physicians' organizational attitudes: The moderating effects of the Chief Medical Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-physician relationships are critical to hospitals' organizational success. A distinction can be drawn between economic and noneconomic physician-hospital exchange. Physician senior leadership could be an important component of managerial strategies aimed at optimizing hospital-physician relationships. The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderating role of the quality of exchange with the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) in the relationship between economic and noneconomic exchange and physicians' key organizational attitudes. Self-employed physicians practicing at six Belgian hospitals were surveyed. Economic exchange was conceptualized by the concepts of distributive and procedural justice, whereas noneconomic exchange was conceptualized by the concepts of administrative and professional psychological contract. Our outcomes comprise three key organizational attitudes identified in the literature (job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, and intention to leave). The moderating role of leader-member exchange with the CMO in these relationships was assessed. Our results showed a relationship between both psychological contract breach and organizational justice and physicians' organizational attitudes. The quality of exchange with the CMO buffered the negative effect of psychological contract breach and reinforced the positive effects of organizational justice with respect to physicians' organizational attitudes. Our results demonstrate that both economic and noneconomic aspects are important when considering physicians' key organizational attitudes. The reciprocity dynamic between physician and hospital can be enhanced by high-quality exchange with the CMO.

  2. Characterization of Caco-2 cells stably expressing the protein-based zinc probe eCalwy-5 as a model system for investigating intestinal zinc transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maares, Maria; Keil, Claudia; Thomsen, Susanne; Günzel, Dorothee; Wiesner, Burkhard; Haase, Hajo

    2018-01-29

    Intestinal zinc resorption, in particular its regulation and mechanisms, are not yet fully understood. Suitable intestinal cell models are needed to investigate zinc uptake kinetics and the role of labile zinc in enterocytes in vitro. Therefore, a Caco-2 cell clone was produced, stably expressing the genetically encoded zinc biosensor eCalwy-5. The aim of the present study was to reassure the presence of characteristic enterocyte-specific properties in the Caco-2-eCalwy clone. Comparison of Caco-2-WT and Caco-2-eCalwy cells revealed only slight differences regarding subcellular localization of the tight junction protein occludin and alkaline phosphatase activity, which did not affect basic integrity of the intestinal barrier or the characteristic brush border membrane morphology. Furthermore, introduction of the additional zinc-binding protein in Caco-2 cells did not alter mRNA expression of the major intestinal zinc transporters (zip4, zip5, znt-1 and znt-5), but increased metallothionein 1a-expression and cellular resistance to higher zinc concentrations. Moreover, this study examines the effect of sensor expression level on its saturation with zinc. Fluorescence cell imaging indicated considerable intercellular heterogeneity in biosensor-expression. However, FRET-measurements confirmed that these differences in expression levels have no effect on fractional zinc-saturation of the probe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. CEO- CNE relationships: building an evidence-base of chief nursing executive replacement costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sredl, Darlene; Peng, Niang-Huei

    2010-06-03

    Explore professional relationships between Chief Nurse Executives (CNEs) and Chief Executive Officers (CEOs); CNE ethnic diversity; and CNE replacement costs. Theoretical frameworks - Marilyn Ray's Theory of Bureaucratic Caring, and Turkel's Theory of Relational Complexity espousing economic as well as caring variables. Exploratory mixed-method descriptive design using CNE mailed survey. CNE- cited opportunities for maintaining a positive relationship with the CEO: respect for CEO; goal- sharing (r=.782, p<0.01); having a strong relationship (r= .718, p<0.01); co-problem-solving (r=.437, p<0.01); having an interesting job (r=.406, p<0.01); having similar interests with CEO (r= .346, p<0.01); CEO and CNE maintaining specific roles (r= .261, p<0.05); satisfaction with CNE income (r=.251, p<0.05); willingness to improve relationship with CEO (r=.254, p<0.05). CNE positions demonstrated an ethnic diversity factor of 0.03%. CNE replacement costs to healthcare facilities were over 1.5 million dollars. CNE/CEO relationships have identified cohesive factors that may contribute to CNE longevity in position; an ethically diverse CNE deficit exists; and, CNE turnover and vacancy rates impact an organization's financial health and quality of care.

  4. The general surgery chief resident operative experience: 23 years of national ACGME case logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D; Goldin, Adam B; Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-09-01

    The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989-1990 through 2011-2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves.

  5. Actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on chief cells prepared from guinea pig stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutliff, V.E.; Raufman, J.P.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin increased cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion in dispersed chief cells from guinea pig gastric mucosa. With each peptide there was a close correlation between the dose-response curve for changes in cellular cAMP and that for changes in pepsinogen secretion. Vasoactive intestinal peptide- (10-28) and secretin- (5-27) had no agonist activity and antagonized the actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. Studies of binding of 125 I-vasoactive intestinal peptide and of 125 -secretin indicated that gastric chief cells possess four classes of binding sites for vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin and that occupation of two of these classes of binding sites correlates with the abilities of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin to increase cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. What function, in any, is mediated by occupation by the other two classes of binding sites remains to be determined

  6. [Stanisława Adamowiczowa--first editor in-chief of Journal "Przeglad Epidemiologiczny"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromulska, Marta

    2010-01-01

    First issue of Epidemiological Review was published in 1920. First editor in chief was Stanisława Adamowiczowa, PhD (1888-1965), who had worked in National Central Epidemiological Institute since 1919, and later, for period of 45 years, interrupted by breaks resulting from political situation, worked in National Institute of Hygiene. In this jubilee article, we present scientific resume of S. Adamowiczowa which focuses on her achievements in infectious diseases epidemiology, and particularly in analysis and evaluation of current epidemiological data distribution in Poland and worldwide in the period. She was the pioneer in systemic organization of registries of new cases of diseases in the highly populated Polish cities; she initiated use of statistical methods in this field. As editor in chief of Epidemiological Review, she started publishing Epidemiological Chronicle, which is continuously added as a supplement to every second issue, each year. Name of S. Adamowiczowa is associated with Ludwik Rajchman--director of Hygiene Section in League of Nations, with Witold Chodźko PhD--she led courses in National School of Hygiene in Warsaw, with prof. Marcin Kacprzak--as co-author and co-editor of books on hygiene and epidemiology. A brief list of scientific publications of S. Adamowiczowa is also presented.

  7. Investigating Direct Links between Depression, Emotional Control, and Physical Punishment with Adolescent Drive for Thinness and Bulimic Behaviors, Including Possible Moderation by the Serotonin Transporter 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Rozenblat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the relationship between psychological and social factors (depression, emotional control, sexual abuse, and parental physical punishment and adolescent drive for Thinness and Bulimic behaviors in a large community sample, and to investigate possible genetic moderation.Method: Data were drawn from the Australian Temperament Project (ATP, a population-based cohort study that has followed a representative sample of 2443 participants from infancy to adulthood across 16 waves since 1983. A subsample of 650 participants (50.2% female of Caucasian descent who provided DNA were genotyped for a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR. Adolescent disordered eating attitudes and behaviors were assessed using the Bulimia and Drive for Thinness scales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (15–16 years. Depression and emotional control were examined at the same age using the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire, and an ATP-devised measure of emotional control. History of sexual abuse and physical punishment were assessed retrospectively (23–24 years in a subsample of 467 of those providing DNA.Results: EDI-2 scores were associated with depression, emotional control, and retrospectively reported parental physical punishment. Although there was statistically significant moderation of the relationship between parental physical punishment and bulimic behaviors by 5-HTTLPR (p = 0.0048, genotypes in this subsample were not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium. No other G×E interactions were significant. Conclusion: Findings from this study affirm the central importance of psychosocial processes in disordered eating patterns in adolescence. Evidence of moderation by 5-HTTLPR was not conclusive; however, genetic moderation observed in a subsample not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium warrants further investigation.

  8. Investigating African trace gas sources, vertical transport, and oxidation using IAGOS-CARIBIC measurements between Germany and South Africa between 2009 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorenz, U. R.; Baker, A. K.; Leedham Elvidge, E. C.; Sauvage, C.; Riede, H.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Hermann, M.; Weigelt, A.; Oram, D. E.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Zahn, A.; Williams, J.

    2017-06-01

    Between March 2009 and March 2011 a commercial airliner equipped with a custom built measurement container (IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory) conducted 13 flights between South Africa and Germany at 10-12 km altitude, traversing the African continent north-south. In-situ measurements of trace gases (CO, CH4, H2O) and aerosol particles indicated that strong surface sources (like biomass burning) and rapid vertical transport combine to generate maximum concentrations in the latitudinal range between 10°N and 10°S coincident with the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Pressurized air samples collected during these flights were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases including C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and halocarbons. These shorter-lived trace gases, originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources, also showed near equatorial maxima highlighting the effectiveness of convective transport in this region. Two source apportionment methods were used to investigate the specific sources of NMHC: positive matrix factorization (PMF), which is used for the first time for NMHC analysis in the upper troposphere (UT), and enhancement ratios to CO. Using the PMF method three characteristic airmass types were identified based on the different trace gas concentrations they obtained: biomass burning, fossil fuel emissions, and "background" air. The first two sources were defined with reference to previously reported surface source characterizations, while the term "background" was given to air masses in which the concentration ratios approached that of the lifetime ratios. Comparison of enhancement ratios between NMHC and CO for the subset of air samples that had experienced recent contact with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to literature values showed that the burning of savanna and tropical forest is likely the main source of NMHC in the African upper troposphere (10-12 km). Photochemical aging patterns for the samples with PBL contact revealed that

  9. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  10. Computed tomographic scanning in patients presenting with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halim, A.; Khalid, W.; Haq, A.U.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of positive computed tomographic (CT)scan findings in patients presenting at PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Radiology department, PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi from Dec 2011 to Jun 2012. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study included referred patients with complaint of headache of one month duration or more without focal neurological signs. No gender restriction was considered and patients of age more than 14 years were included. Patients with headache due to other known clinical disorders such as intracranial neoplasm and stroke were excluded. Patients with focal neurological signs such as hemiparesis, cerebellar signs and cranial nerve palsies were also excluded from the study. A total of 105 patients were included in the study through non probability consecutive sampling. Informed written consent was taken from the patients by explaining all the risks and benefits of the study and use of data for research and publication. Plain CT scan brain was done by trained CT technician and reporting of CT scan was done by consultant radiologist. CT scan was done on Toshiba Scanner Aquilion-64 CT Scan machine. The imaging protocol consisted of appropriately angled continuous 5mm thick axial slices for the posterior fossa and 10 mm thick slices for the rest of brain from the base of skull to the vertex. Data was collected through a specially structured proforma. Confidentiality of the patients record was maintained. Results: Majority of the patients were between 31-40 years of age i.e. 29.52 percent (n=31) and mean and SD was calculated as 34.24 +- 8.72 years, 54.29 percent (n=57) females and 45.71 percent (n=48) male patients, frequency of positive CT scan findings in patients with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs was recorded as

  11. Using stable isotopes of reactive N in dry and wet deposition to investigate the source, transport, and fate of NOx and NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive N emissions (NH3 and NOx) can reach the land surfaces via both wet (NH4+, NO3) and dry (NOx, HNO3, NH3, NH4+) depositional processes. Together, these reactive N compounds are important global contributors to air and water quality degradation. Although nitrate concentrations in wet deposition have decreased in the U.S. during the last two decades due to NOx emission regulations set forth by the Clean Air Act, ammonium concentrations in wet deposition have recently increased. In order to further decrease NOx emissions and decrease NH3 emissions, additional tools for reactive N source apportionment are essential. The stable isotopic composition of reactive N may be one such tool for characterizing source, transport, and fate of reactive N emissions. Here, we present results from a comprehensive inventory of the isotopic composition of reactive N emission sources, focusing mainly on agricultural and fossil fuel sources. We build on these inventory results by tracing reactive N emissions across multiple landscapes including: a dairy operation, a conventionally managed cornfield, a tallgrass prairie, and a concentrated animal feeding operation. We then use two examples to illustrate how reactive N isotopes can be used in a regional context. First, we illustrate how passive NH3 samplers deployed at nine U.S. monitoring sites reflect spatial variations in predominant NH3 sources. Secondly, we reconstruct the regional influence of agricultural NOx emissions to nitrate deposition recorded in an ice core from Summit, Greenland. These results reveal significant evidence that the trend in the N isotopic composition of 20th century nitrate deposition in Greenland was driven by increasing biogenic soil NOx emissions induced by fertilizer application in the US over the last century. Together, these studies demonstrate the isotopic composition of reactive N emissions can be an additional tool for investigators to source and trace reactive N emissions in both historical and

  12. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 2 of 3: sources, sinks, and transport of organic matter with fine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Mackenzie K.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) is abundant in Fanno Creek, Oregon, USA, and has been tied to a variety of water-quality concerns, including periods of low dissolved oxygen downstream in the Tualatin River, Oregon. The key sources of OM in Fanno Creek and other Tualatin River tributaries have not been fully identified, although isotopic analyses from previous studies indicated a predominantly terrestrial source. This study investigates the role of fine sediment erosion and deposition (mechanisms and spatial patterns) in relation to OM transport. Geomorphic mapping within the Fanno Creek floodplain shows that a large portion (approximately 70%) of the banks are eroding or subject to erosion, likely as a result of the imbalance caused by anthropogenic alteration. Field measurements of long- and short-term bank erosion average 4.2 cm/year and average measurements of deposition for the watershed are 4.8 cm/year. The balance between average annual erosion and deposition indicates an export of 3,250 metric tons (tonnes, t) of fine sediment to the Tualatin River—about twice the average annual export of 1,880 t of sediment at a location 2.4 km from the creek’s mouth calculated from suspended sediment load regressions from continuous turbidity data and suspended sediment samples. Carbon content from field samples of bank material, combined with fine sediment export rates, indicates that about 29–67 t of carbon, or about 49–116 t of OM, from bank sediment may be exported to the Tualatin River from Fanno Creek annually, an estimate that is a lower bound because it does not account for the mass wasting of organic-rich O and A soil horizons that enter the stream.

  13. Investigation of association of serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes with Alzheimer's disease and depression in the VITA study cohort: a 90-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Jungwirth, Susanne; Danielczyk, Walter; Weber, Heike; Wichart, Ildiko; Tragl, Karl Heinz; Fischer, Peter; Riederer, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Grünblatt, Edna

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression (DE) are common psychiatric disorders strongly intertwined with one another. Nevertheless, etiology and early diagnosis of the disorders are still elusive. Several genetic variations have been suggested to associate with AD and DE, particularly in genes involved in the serotonergic system such as the serotonin transporter (SERT/SLC6A4), responsible for the removal from the synaptic cleft, and the monoamine-oxidase-A (MAOA), responsible for the presynaptic degradation of serotonin. Here, we attempt to characterize this pleiotropic effect for the triallelic SERT gene-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) and for the MAOA-uVNTR, in participants in the Vienna-Transdanube-Aging (VITA)-study. The VITA-study is a community-based longitudinal study following a birth cohort (75 years old at baseline examination, n = 606) from Vienna for a period of 90 months with a regular follow-up interval of 30 months. Our main finding, confirming previous reports, is that the 5HTTLPR S-allele is a risk allele for DE (OR = 1.55 CI 95% 1.03-2.32) and its carriers had a steeper increase in SGDS sum score. No association to AD was found. MAOA-uVNTR did not associate with either AD or DE. However, in AD MAOA-uVNTR S-allele carriers a steeper increase of HAMD and STAI1 sum scores (P power to detect gene alterations, the uniqueness of this very thoroughly investigated and homogenous cohort strengthens the results through exceptional data collection. Still, reinvestigation in a larger cohort similar to this, as well as a meta-analysis, is important to confirm these results. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Increases in cellular calcium concentration stimulate pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, J.P.; Berger, S.; Cosowsky, L.; Straus, E.

    1986-01-01

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i) and pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells from guinea pig stomach were determined before and after stimulation with calcium ionophores. [Ca]i was measured using the fluorescent probe quin2. Basal [Ca]i was 105 +/- 4 nM. Pepsinogen secretion was measured with a new assay using 125 I-albumin substrate. This assay is 1000-fold more sensitive than the widely-used spectrophotometric assay, technically easy to perform, rapid, and relatively inexpensive. The kinetics and stoichiometry of ionophore-induced changes in [Ca]i and pepsinogen secretion were similar. These data support a role for calcium as a cellular mediator of pepsinogen secretion

  15. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This is the first annual report of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). It addresses the Requirements for Departmental Annual Reports issued by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet as updated in May 1999, as well as the annual reporting requirements of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 . The report contains: a corporate overview which details the functions of ARPANSA, its corporate plan and organisational structure; a report on performance against the functions of ARPANSA and an account of some of the achievements of its achievements during the year under review; appendixes containing statistical and financial information on the performance and administration of ARPANSA as well as the financial statements for the Nuclear Safety Bureau and ARPANSA. An index showing compliance with the annual reporting requirements of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet is at Appendix 4F.Copyright (1999) Commonwealth of Australia

  16. Chief Financial Officer FY 1997 status report and five-year plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (CFO Act) establishes the legal framework for improved Federal financial management. The Act requires the agency CFO to prepare, and annually revise, a plan to implement the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Federal Financial Management Status Report and Five-Year Plan. This is the sixth Status Report and Five-Year Plan submission to OMB by the Department of Energy (DOE). Financial management at the Department operates in an environment of Government-wide efforts to improve financial management and implements legislation and administrative provisions which stress the need for change. This report sets forth the Department`s plans for financial management improvements in the coming years. It also highlights several new initiatives completed or currently underway that will significantly improve the overall effectiveness of financial management at the Department of Energy.

  17. Transformational leadership practices of chief nursing officers in Magnet® organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavelle, Joanne T; Drenkard, Karen; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership practices of Magnet® chief nursing officers (CNOs). It is believed that transformational leadership practices influence quality and are integral to Magnet designation. E-mail surveys of 384 Magnet CNOs were conducted in 2011 using the leadership practices inventory (LPI). Enabling others to act and modeling the way are top practices of Magnet CNOs. Those 60 years or older and those with doctorate degrees scored significantly higher in inspiring a shared vision and challenging the process. There was a significant positive relationship between total years as a CNO and inspiring a shared vision and between total scores on the LPI and number of beds in the organization. As CNOs gain experience and education, they exhibit more transformational leadership characteristics. Magnet organizations should take steps to retain CNOs and support their development and advancement.

  18. Chief physicians' attitudes towards early warning score systems in Switzerland: Results of a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aline; Frank, Olga; Schwappach, David

    2018-04-01

    Early warning score systems (EWS-S) have been shown to be valuable tools to recognize otherwise unnoticed clinical deterioration (CDET) of patients. They have been associated with fewer unplanned transfers to the intensive care unit (UTICU) and lower in-hospital mortality. Little is known about their current usage in Switzerland and about the attitudes towards such tools among chief physicians. We aimed to assess the use of EWS-S in Switzerland and the attitudes of chief physicians towards EWS-S depending on previously experienced CDET followed by UTICU, reanimation, or death. Chief physicians of medical and surgical departments from all acute care hospitals in Switzerland were asked to participate within a project that aims to develop recommendations for the use of EWS-S in Switzerland (n = 118). The explorative study assessed perceived CDET, which led to UTICU, reanimation, or death of a patient, the knowledge and usage about different EWS-S and attitudes towards EWS-S in a written questionnaire. Means and percentages were used, and differences were assessed with independent t tests, chi-square, or Fisher exact test, as appropriate. Adverse events based on CDET were reported frequently, and awareness among chief physicians was high. Less than half of the chief physicians knew tools that systematically assess CDET with one-fifth of responders reporting using tools at their department. Previous experiences of UTICU, reanimation, or death after due to CDET were associated with more positive attitudes towards EWS-S. Adverse events based on CDET of patients are frequent and the awareness of this problem is high among chief physicians. Positive attitudes were more common with previous experiences of adverse events due to CDET. Our results strengthen the argumentation that the recommendation and future implementation of EWS-S in Switzerland would be meaningful. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Bone marrow transplantation of CD117+ (c-Kit) stem cells and investigation of the bile acid transporter regulation in Abcb4-/- mice, a model of sclerosing cholangitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupuleti, Sravanthi

    2014-01-01

    Abcb4 (ATP-binding cassette sub family-b) or Mdr2 (multidrug resistance protein 2) is a gene which encodes for ABCB4 protein that mediates the transportation of phospholipids across the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes into the bile. Functional loss of the ABCB4 transporter disturbs the excretion of phospholipids into bile, leading to toxic bile composition, bile duct alterations, and damaged bile duct epithelia resembling sclerosing cholangitis (1). Long term consequences are biliary cirr...

  20. A chief of service rotation as an alternative approach to pediatric otolaryngology inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Eelam; Xiao, Roy; McGill, Trevor; Rahbar, Reza; Cunningham, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining an outpatient practice and providing high-quality inpatient care pose significant challenges to the traditional call team approach. To introduce a unique rotating hospitalist inpatient program and assess its clinical, educational, and financial impact. The chief of service (COS) program requires 1 attending physician to rotate weekly as chief of the inpatient service with no conflicting elective duties. This was a retrospective internal billing data review performed at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A total of 1241 patients were evaluated by the COS from October 2012 through October 2013. All patients were treated by the inpatient service under the supervision of the COS. A retrospective analysis of patient encounters and procedures, including International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, locations of service, clinicians, service dates, and average weekly relative value units (RVUs). Over the study period, the COS was involved in the care of 1241 patients, generating 2786 billable patient encounters. The COS averaged 11.2 patient encounters per day. The most common reasons for consultation were respiratory distress, dysphagia, and stridor. Of patient encounters, 63.0% resulted in a procedure; 82.8% of those procedures were performed in the operating room with the most common being lower airway endoscopy (340 [19.4%]). The average weekly RVUs for the COS (232) were comparable with those of the average weekly outpatient clinic and procedural RVUs of the other otolaryngology faculty in the group (240). The COS program was created to meet the clinical, educational, and organizational demands of a high-volume and high-acuity inpatient service. It is a financially sustainable model with unique advantages, particularly for the staff who maintain their outpatient practices without disruption and for the trainees who have the opportunity to work closely with the entire faculty. Patients are

  1. The influence of the CHIEF pathway on colorectal cancer-specific mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available Many components of the CHIEF (Convergence of Hormones, Inflammation, and Energy Related Factors pathway could influence survival given their involvement in cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and tumor invasion stimulation. We used ARTP (Adaptive Rank Truncation Product to test if genes in the pathway were associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Colon cancer (n = 1555 and rectal cancer (n = 754 cases were followed over five years. Age, center, stage at diagnosis, and tumor molecular phenotype were considered when calculating ARTP p values. A polygenic risk score was used to summarize the magnitude of risk associated with this pathway. The JAK/STAT/SOC was significant for colon cancer survival (PARTP = 0.035. Fifteen genes (DUSP2, INFGR1, IL6, IRF2, JAK2, MAP3K10, MMP1, NFkB1A, NOS2A, PIK3CA, SEPX1, SMAD3, TLR2, TYK2, and VDR were associated with colon cancer mortality (PARTP < 0.05; JAK2 (PARTP  = 0.0086, PIK3CA (PARTP = 0.0098, and SMAD3 (PARTP = 0.0059 had the strongest associations. Over 40 SNPs were significantly associated with survival within the 15 significant genes (PARTP < 0.05. SMAD3 had the strongest association with survival (HRGG 2.46 95% CI 1.44,4.21 PTtrnd = 0.0002. Seven genes (IL2RA, IL8RA, IL8RB, IRF2, RAF1, RUNX3, and SEPX1 were significantly associated with rectal cancer (PARTP < 0.05. The HR for colorectal cancer-specific mortality among colon cancer cases in the upper at-risk alleles group was 11.81 (95% CI 7.07, 19. 74 and was 10.99 (95% CI 5.30, 22.78 for rectal cancer. These results suggest that several genes in the CHIEF pathway are important for colorectal cancer survival; the risk associated with the pathway merits validation in other studies.

  2. Doing colonialism: reading the banishment of a »native chief« in the Tanganyika territory

    OpenAIRE

    Brockmeyer, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    This article takes a closer look at the »colonial situation« (Balandier 1970). It seeks to shed light on a multifaceted non-colonizing colonial biography during the time of European conquest. The focus lies on the interpretation of the banishment of a »chief« in the British-mandated territory of Tanganyika. This chief, Sapi Mkwawa (1879–1951), was an important figure within European colonization. He experienced two colonizing powers in a prominent but ambiguous position. I argue that through ...

  3. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    and shaped tools. The sheer diversity of the assemblages suggests that bone tool manufacturing was accomplished at the site. Two kinds of systematic...flotation sample from charcoal flecked soil around and under a wood concentration on the floor of Feature 49, contained a charred larch piano -convex point

  4. Theory of contributon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, J.W.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Pomraning, G.C.

    1980-10-01

    A general discussion of the physics of contributon transport is presented. To facilitate this discussion, a Boltzmann-like transport equation for contributons is obtained, and special contributon cross sections are defined. However, the main goal of this study is to identify contributon transport equations and investigate possible deterministic solution techniques. Four approaches to the deterministic solution of the contributon transport problem are investigated. These approaches are an attempt to exploit certain attractive properties of the contributon flux, psi = phi phi + , where phi and phi + are the solutions to the forward and adjoint Boltzmann transport equations

  5. An image processing approach for investigation on transport of iron oxide nanoparticles (FE3O4) stabilized with poly acrylic acid in two-dimensional porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzar, M; Azhdary Moghaddam, M; Saghravani, S F; Dahrazma, B

    2018-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized using poly acrylic acid (PAA) to yield stabilized slurry of Iron oxide nanoparticles. A two-dimensional physical model filled by glass beads was used to study the fate and transport of the iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with PAA in porous media under saturated, steady-state flow conditions. Transport data for a nonreactive tracer, slurry of iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with PAA were collected under similar flow conditions. The results show that low concentration slurry of iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with PAA can be transported like a tracer without significant retardation. The image processing technique was employed to measure the tracer/nanoparticle concentration inside the 2-D model filled with glass beads. The groundwater flow model, Visual MODFLOW, was used to model the observed transport patterns through MT3DMS module. Finally, it was demonstrated that the numerical model MODFLOW can be used to predict the fate and transport characteristics of nanoparticles stabilized with PAA in groundwater aquifers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of MODIS derived aerosol optical depth and an investigation on aerosol transport over the South East Arabian Sea during ARMEX-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aloysius

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of wind and humidity on aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Arabian sea is being investigated using MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Level 3 (Collection-5 and NCEP (National Centres for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data for the second phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX-II over the South East Arabian Sea (SEAS in the pre-monsoon period (14 March–10 April 2003. In order to qualify MODIS data for this study, MODIS aerosol parameters were first compared with ship borne Microtops measurements. This showed correlations 0.96–0.97 in the case of spectral AODs and a correlation 0.72 for the angstrom exponents. The daily AOD data from MODIS and winds from NCEP reveal that the ship observed episodic enhancement and decay of AOD at the TSL (Time Series Location during 23 March–6 April 2003 was caused by the southward drift of an aerosol pocket driven by an intensification and reduction of surface pressure in the North Western Arabian Sea with a low altitude convergence prevailing over SEAS. The AOD increase coincided with a decrease in the Angstrom exponent and the fine mode fraction suggesting the pocket being dominated by coarse mode particles. A partial correlation analysis reveals that the lower altitude wind convergence is the most influential atmospheric variable in modulating AOD over the ARMEX-II domain during the TSL period. However, surface winds at a distant zone in the north/north west upwind direction also had a moderate influence, though with a lag of two days. But this effect was minor since the winds were not strong enough to produce marine aerosols matching with the high AODs over the ARMEX-II domain. These findings and the similarity between MODIS column mass concentration and the ship borne QCM (Quartz Crystal Microbalance measured coarse mode mass concentration, suggest that the aerosol pocket was mostly composed of coarse mode mineral dust in the lower atmospheric altitudes

  7. Biogeochemical investigations on processes affecting the transport behaviour of trace elements in the tidal Elbe River; Biogeochemische Prozessuntersuchungen zum Transportverhalten von Spurenelementen in der Tide-Elbe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, K. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Gewaesserphysik

    1997-12-31

    This work concentrates on distribution and transport of micropollutants in anthropogenically affected estuary systems. Choosing the tidal Elbe River as an example, the influence of microlagae on two important partial processes of the transport regime, the remobilization (a) from undisturbed sediments and (b) from suspended particulate matter, was simulated and quantified in the laboratory. Benthic and planktonic release of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn into the dissolved phase of the river pelagial were estimated and comparatively evaluated for summer/late summer situation. During that season natural decomposition of suspended particulate matter in the water column thus represents the quantitatively most significant mobilization pathway for particle bound heavy metals in the river section between Hamburg and Glueckstadt. Knowing the composition and heavy metal load of suspended particulate matter, rich in algae, mobilization rates can consequently be calculated for the water column with regard to conditions typical for estuaries. The prognosis of the differing transport behaviour of single heavy metals for greater sections of estuaries is also possible if these rates are implemented into transport-reaction models. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit Verteilung und Transport von Spurenschadstoffen in anthropogen belasteten Aestuarsystemen. Am Beispiel der Tide-Elbe wurde der Einfluss von Mikroalgen auf zwei wichtige Teilprozesse des Transportregimes, die Remobilisierung (a) aus ungestoerten Sedimenten und (b) aus suspendierten Schwebstoffen, im Labor simuliert und quantifiziert. Benthische und planktische Freisetzung von Cd, Cu, Pb und Zn in die Loesungsphase des Flusspelagials der Tide-Elbe wurden fuer die Sommer-/Spaetsommer-Situation abgeschaetzt und vergleichend bewertet. Der natuerliche Schwebstoff-Abbau in der Wassersaeule stellt demnach in dieser Jahreszeit im Stromabschnitt zwischen Hamburg und Glueckstadt den quantitativ bedeutsamsten

  8. Long-range transport clusters and positive matrix factorization source apportionment for investigating transboundary PM2.5in Gothenburg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Peter; Tang, Lin; Sjöberg, Karin; Wichmann, Janine

    2017-10-18

    Source apportionment studies of particulate matter are common and have been performed either as source region analyses using air mass back trajectories or by source type using source apportionment techniques. By combining the two approaches, it is possible to estimate the relative importance of emitters in different regions. PM 2.5 samples were collected in Gothenburg between September 2008 and September 2009. The mean daily PM 2.5 level was 6.1 μg m -3 (range 0.79-30.91 μg m -3 ). Elemental analyses were done using Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy. Source apportionment was carried out using the US EPA PMF 5.0 software. The sources long-range transport (LRT), LRT-Pb (lead-containing LRT), ship emissions, combustion, marine, and resuspension were identified. Air mass trajectories were estimated using HYSPLIT model (version 4.9). Six transport clusters were identified: South Scandinavia 21%, North Scandinavia 11%, Baltic Sea 8%, Eastern Europe 6%, UK/North Sea/Denmark 25%, and North Atlantic Ocean 30%. LRT was the major contributor to PM 2.5 levels across all six transport clusters (48%) followed by ship emissions (20%) and combustion (19%). The transport cluster associated with the highest PM 2.5 levels was Eastern Europe followed by South Scandinavia, UK/North Sea/Denmark, and Baltic Sea. After considering the frequency of the transport clusters, the transport clusters associated with the highest PM 2.5 levels were UK-NorthS-DK, S-Scandic, and N-Atlantic, while Eastern Europe only contributed 9% towards PM 2.5 levels. Abatement strategies aimed at reductions of ship emissions, industry emissions, and road traffic emissions on an European level and local combustion sources on a city-scale level would be the two most effective directions for reducing ambient PM 2.5 in Gothenburg.

  9. Investigation of salt transport in vertical boreholes and brine invasion into freshwater aquifers. Interim report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, R.M.; Podio, A.L.

    1975-01-01

    A computer algorithm simulating salt transport in the wellbore system has been written. Earlier experiments performed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by T. N. Dixon have been duplicated. Attempts at simulating experimental data have not been successful because of limitations on allowable time step size. The algorithm is currently being modified to reduce the effects of this problem. An experimental system has been designed and constructed to simulate salt transport in vertical wellbores. Two preliminary tests have been run to evaluate the system design and it appears to be adequate. One of the two techniques for simulating miscible displacement has been implemented. Comparisons with experimental data are currently underway

  10. To Strive, to Seek, to Find, and Not Yield: How Chiefs of Staff of the Army Lead Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Capability examines how the Chief of Staff’s 23 Pape, “How the Army Resists Change,” 25. 24 Lolita C. Baldor and Robert Burns, Army Times (November 14, 2012...Massachusetts and London, England: Belknap Press, 2009. Baldor , Lolita C. and Robert Burns. Army Times. November 14, 2012. www.Armytimes.com/new/2012

  11. The Impact of a Chief Planning Officer on the Administrative Environment for Planning. AIR 1991 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Peter J.; Peterson, Marvin W.

    In the interest of understanding the role of Chief Planning Officers (CPO) in gaining broad support for planning within an institution of higher education, this paper used a national survey of administrators to examine that role. This study, conducted by the National Center for Postsecondary Governance and Finance, involved a survey of 3,333…

  12. Example of answers to the problems of the 37th examination for the Chief Engineer of Nuclear Fuel. 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Akio; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Yachi, Shigeyasu; Komuro, Yuichi; Kushita, Kouhei

    2005-09-01

    This report provides an example of answers to the problems of the 37th examination for the Chief Engineer of Nuclear Fuel. This examination was done as a national qualification in March 2005. Brief explanations or references are added to some answers. (author)

  13. Chief of Mission Authority as a Model for National Security Integration (INSS Strategic Perspectives, Number 2, December 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Reform’s Legal Working Group, makes clear.67 Lederman concludes, “Any individual in the interagency space who exercises meaningful authority to compel...indebted to Cody Brown, formerly Chief of Legal Research at PNSR, for this prelimi- nary analysis. 67 For a good review of this issue, see Gordon Lederman

  14. Trump: Apprentice-President, Failing Entertainer, or Disrupter-in-Chief? Three Possible Pathways for Trump's Foreign Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, Roberta

    America’s Secretary of Defense James Mattis made his first trip to Europe in February to discuss plans to fight against Islamic terrorism in the Middle East, plans that Trump demanded the Pentagon devise within 30 days. While European defense chiefs certainly engaged with the former general on his

  15. 18 CFR 385.503 - Consolidation, severance and extension of close-of-record date by Chief Administrative Law Judge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consolidation, severance and extension of close-of-record date by Chief Administrative Law Judge (Rule 503). 385.503 Section 385.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  16. The Roles, Duties, and Ethical Responsibilities of the Chief Financial Officer. Perspectives…Presenting Thought Leaders' Points of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Released in conjunction with the "Sustaining an Ethical Culture on Campus" webcast, this essay in the "Perspectives" series examines the complexities of the role of the chief financial officer. This white paper focuses on how the financial leader of an institution must balance technical knowledge along with stellar…

  17. 77 FR 61468 - Delegation by the Chief Financial Officer to the Comptroller of Certain Authorities Under the CFO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Delegation of Authority No. 345] Delegation by the Chief Financial Officer to the Comptroller of Certain Authorities Under the CFO Act By virtue of the authority vested in me by..., dated June 12, 2012, and to the extent authorized by law, I hereby delegate to the Comptroller the...

  18. Investigations on the applicability of pure gases in the transport of nuclear reaction products in a gas jet, and the use of this gas jet for radiochemical separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumann, D.C.; Presuhn, R.; Weismann, D.

    1975-01-01

    Earlier investigations on the effectivity of the transport of nuclear reaction products in a gas jet were continued where the transporting properties of ethylene and CO 2 in particular were examined in detail. By means of selected measurements, it is shown what influence the temperature of the gas bottle and that of the pressure releaser has on the transport yield. It is attempted from the results to explain the formation of aerosols in pure gases. The fission fragments of the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 are gamma-spectrometrically measured to determine the yields, or the total yield is determined by simple activity measurements. The determination of the isomeric ratio of Cs 138 m/g is described as an example of the possible application of a gas jet. Furthermore, an experiment for the search of super-heavy elements is suggested. (RB/LH) [de

  19. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville

  20. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven