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Sample records for investigations radionuclide distribution

  1. The investigation of radionuclides distributions in beach sand by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation of radionuclides distributions in beach sand by means of GIS techniques. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work ...

  2. Investigation of radionuclide distribution in soil particles in different landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkinev, V. M.; Korobova, E. M.; Linnik, V. G.

    2012-04-01

    Russian and foreign publications have been analyzed for understanding the role of micro- and nano- particles in distribution and migration of technogenic elements in soils in different landscape conditions. A technique for application of various fractionation methods to separate and study -particles of different size down to micro- and nano-level has been developed. The dry sit method on the first stage of particle separation is recommend to be followed by the membrane filtration method. For obtaining more comprehensive information, combinations of fractionation technique should be chosen taking into account that (1) the efficiency of particles' separation using subsequent technique would be higher than using the preceding one; (2) separation methods should preferably be based on different principles (separation according size, density, charge etc.); (3) initial fractionation should separate particles according to their size, that makes possible to create an even scale for various samples. A study of distribution and balance of technogenic radionuclides' in soil particles of the size intervals 1.0—0.25, 0.25-0.1, 0.1-0.05, 0.05-0.01, 0.01-0.005, 0.005-0.001 and soil layers. Contribution of the silt particles (0,05-0,01 mm) to Cs-137 contamination ranged from 26 to 33,8%, 45% maximum due to "optimal" combination of both factors. Clay fraction was responsible for approximately 30% of Cs-137 contained in soil horizons due to higher sorption capacity. Relatively high correlation between the activity of 152,154Eu and 60 and the content of silt and clay allowed suggesting their incorporation mainly in clay fraction. Selected experimental plots near the Kola NPP (northern taiga) were used to compare soil particles (fractions 140-71; 71-40 and radioactivity found in soil litter appeared to be related to the Chernobyl contamination. Concentration of s-137 was higher in small size fractions. Obtained results were considered to be useful for understanding of radionuclide

  3. The investigation of radionuclides distributions in beach sand by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides on various beaches in and around Saldanha Bay, located on the West Coast of South Africa. Several mathematical techniques were applied to obtain GIS overlay that could be ...

  4. Preliminary investigation on determination of radionuclide distribution in field tracing test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Guo Zede; Li Shushen; Kamiyama, Hideo.

    1993-12-01

    Field tracing tests for radionuclide migration have been conducted by using 3 H, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 134 Cs, in the natural unsaturated loess zone at field test site of China Institute for Radiation Protection. It is necessary to obtain confidable distribution data of the radionuclides in the test site, in order to evaluate exactly the migration behavior of the radionuclides in situ. An available method to determine the distribution was proposed on the basis of preliminary discussing results on sampling method of soils from the test site and analytical method of radioactivity in the soils. (author)

  5. Investigation of exposure rates and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.T.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    Studies have been conducted to investigate exposure rates, and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Columbia River where it borders the Hanford Site. The last major field study was conducted in 1979. With recently renewed interest in various land use and resource protection alternatives, it is important to have data that represent current conditions. Radionuclides and trace metals were surveyed in Columbia River shoreline soils along the Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). The work was conducted as part of the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The survey consisted of taking exposure rate measurements and soil samples primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates

  6. Radionuclide distributions and migration mechanisms at shallow land burial sites. 1982 annual report of research investigations on the distribution, migration and containment of radionuclides at Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.

    1984-02-01

    Subsurface waters at Maxey Flats are anoxic, have a high alkalinity and contain high concentrations of ferrous, sulfide and ammonium ions and organic carbon. The trench leachates are extremely variable in composition. Prominent radionuclides include 3 H, 60 Co, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 239 240 Pu and 241 Am. A wide spectrum of dissolved organic compounds is present in the leachates, including EDTA, polar organics and decomposition products from the waste forms. Cobalt-60 and plutonium are present as EDTA complexes and 90 Sr and 137 Cs are associated with carboxylic acid type compounds. The chemistry of these waters changes drastically as they become oxic and plutonium becomes less mobile under these new conditions. Water enters the trenches by infiltration through the trench caps, through subsidence areas, and through interfaces between new landfill and the original soil. Lateral flow is very complex and slow, and apparently occurs mainly by fracture flow. The plastic infiltration barrier installed in 1981 to 1982 has been effective in reducing soil moisture if cracks and leaks are eliminated. To date, no direct evidence of radionuclide transport to offsite locations by subsurface flow has been confirmed. The offsite distribution of radionuclides, except for tritium, is comparable to the ambient fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Tritium concentrations in water offsite are orders of magnitude below MPC levels. 24 figures, 31 tables

  7. Radionuclide distributions and migration mechanisms at shallow land burial sites. Annual report of research investigations on the distribution, migration and containment of radionuclides at Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.

    1982-07-01

    Subsurface waters at Maxey Flats are anoxic systems with high alkalinity and high concentrations of dissolved ferrous ion. Americium and cobalt in these trench waters are made more soluble by the presence of EDTA, while strontium and cesium are unaffected under the same conditions. EDTA is the major organic complexing component in waste trench 27 leachate, but other polar, water-soluble organics are also present. Evidence points to the migration of plutonium between waste trench 27 and inert atmosphere wells as an EDTA complex. Polar organic compounds may influence the migration of 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The primary pathway of water entry into the waste burial trenches is through the trench caps, but major increases in water level have occurred in an experimental trench by subsurface flow. The areal distribution of radionuclides at Maxey Flats has been influenced by surface runoff, deposition from the evaporator plume, subsurface flow and the actions of burrowing animals or deep-rooted trees. Vegetal and surface contamination on site and near site are quite low, and only 60 Co exceeds commonly observed fallout levels. Radionuclide concentrations in surface soil at Maxey Flats are comparable to concentrations resulting from normal fallout in other areas of high rainfall

  8. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  9. RADIONUCLIDES DISTRIBUTION NEAR FORMER URANIUM MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows, that radionuclides from the stony rocks of uranium mines can be leached by atmospheric precipitations. In acid conditions, a degree of leaching is greater.Goal. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of radionuclides in uranium minings and their impact on the environmental contamination.Materials and methods. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a blade of rock was mixed with distilled water in proportions of 0,3 kg of gravel and 1 liter of water. After thirty days of soaking, water was sent to the gamma-spectrometric analysis to Canberra’s spectrometer (USA with a high-purity germanium detector. In the second stage, we carried out the similar experiment with water, wich was acidified to pH = 3. Contamination levels of areas near the in-situ leaching mine were determined. Intervention levels were used to estimate risk and possible water consumption by the population. Estimations were carried out taking into account the combined presence of several radionuclides in the water.Results. The results of these studies have shown that the distribution of radionuclides from the source of the contamination is about 360 meters during the 30 y period. The stream, along which samples of soil were collected and studied, was formed by the miner waters that flow along small ruts towards a village, thereby increasing the likelihood of water use by the public.Conclusions. The uranium mines are the source of radioactive contamination. Radionuclides are distributed due to the erosion of rocks and leached out of the stony rock by precipitations. The extent of leaching is significantly increased in an acidic environment, which takes place near the in-situ leaching mines.

  10. Investigation of radionuclide distribution using aircraft for surrounding environmental survey from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Tatsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Shikaze, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Masaki; Ishida, Mutsushi; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Urabe, Yoshimi; Sugita, Takeshi; Kondo, Atsuya

    2012-12-01

    We carried out aerial radiation monitoring (ARM) of all Japan area in order to investigate the influence of the radio cesium which was emitted into the atmosphere by disaster of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. AMS can measure a gamma ray quickly by flight from 300 m height above the ground. Moreover, ARM has an advantage which can grasp self-possessed quantity distribution of an air dose rate and radioactive cesium in f ield , and is visually intelligible. Although there were apparatus and the technique of ARM in our country, sufficient preparations for wide area monitoring were not made. Therefore, it fixed based on the method of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) about the method of the conversion to all radiation dose, and the conversion method to radiocesium deposition and the method of mapping. It is possible to discriminate from a background (cosmic-ray, self-contamination and natural nuclides) at the time of western-part-of-Japan measurement by improving of the method in parallel to data acquisition. By this monitoring, it was able to check about the distribution situation of the air dose rate of the Japanese whole region, or the radioactive cesium deposition. Here, the measurement technique and a result are described. (author)

  11. Radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations in liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhibekov, M.Kh.; Rikhsieva, L.Eh.; Nazyrov, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    Combined radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations (UNI) were performed in 95 patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by portal hypertension. Liver and splenic shape structure and the presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity were assessed in USI. Radionuclide methods of investigation of the hepatic blood flow, assessment of the shape, size and structure of RP distribution in the liver and spleen, and for calculation of the hepatosplenic index. The most significant signs of differentiation of stages of portal hypertension were the presence and amount of fluid in the abdominal cavity and a hepatic blood flow value reflecting the gravity of portal hypertension. Combined radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations permitted a differentiated approach to staging of portal hypertension and assessment of liver and splenic morphofunctional state that could play an important role in the choice of tactics of surgery of liver cirrhosis

  12. Radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations in liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodzhibekov, M Kh; Rikhsieva, L Eh; Nazyrov, F G

    1988-08-01

    Combined radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations (UNI) were performed in 95 patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by portal hypertension. Liver and splenic shape structure and the presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity were assessed in USI. Radionuclide methods of investigation of the hepatic blood flow, assessment of the shape, size and structure of RP distribution in the liver and spleen, and for calculation of the hepatosplenic index. The most significant signs of differentiation of stages of portal hypertension were the presence and amount of fluid in the abdominal cavity and a hepatic blood flow value reflecting the gravity of portal hypertension. Combined radionuclide and ultrasonic investigations permitted a differentiated approach to staging of portal hypertension and assessment of liver and splenic morphofunctional state that could play an important role in the choice of tactics of surgery of liver cirrhosis.

  13. The vertical distribution of radionuclides in a Ribble Estuary saltmarsh: transport and deposition of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; McDonald, P.; Parker, A.; Rae, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Routine discharges of low-level liquid radioactive waste by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Sellafield and Springfields have resulted in enhanced levels of radionuclides in sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England, UK. Variations in radionuclide concentrations ( 137 Cs, 230 Th, and 239240 Pu) with depth in a mature saltmarsh core were analysed in order to investigate historical discharge trends and waste-dispersal mechanisms. Core samples from Longton/Hutton Marsh were analysed by gamma-spectrometry and α-spectrometry for radionuclides and by laser granulometry to establish grain-size variations with depth. Distinct subsurface maxima were present for 137 Cs and 239240 Pu with activities as high as 4500 Bq kg -1 for 137 Cs and 600 Bq kg -1 for 239240 Pu. Thorium-230 exhibited complex activity profiles with depth, specific activities ranging between 200 and 2400 Bq kg -1 . The vertical distributions of Sellafield-derived radionuclides ( 137 Cs and 239240 Pu) in mature saltmarsh deposits reflect the time-integrated discharge pattern from Sellafield, implying a transport mechanism that has involved the mixing of sediment labelled with radioactivity from recent discharges and sediment labelled from historical discharge events before deposition. A mechanism involving the transport of contaminated silt therefore seems to dominate. The vertical distribution of Springfields-derived 230 Th in the same areas reflects the annual gross-α discharge pattern from BNFL Springfields. In contrast to the Sellafield-derived radionuclides, a fairly rapid transport mechanism from source to sink is implied, with little or no time for mixing with radionuclides discharged years earlier. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Research on sorption behavior of radionuclides under shallow land environment. Mechanism and standard methodologies for measurement of distribution coefficients of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Tadao; Takebe, Shinichi; Nagao, Seiya; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Komiya, Tomokazu; Hagiwara, Shigeru

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two categories' research works. One is research on sorption mechanism of radionuclides with long half-life, which are Technetium-99, TRU elements and U series radionuclides, on soil and rocks, including a development of database of distribution coefficients of radionuclides. The database on the distribution coefficients of radionuclides with information about measurement conditions, such as shaking method, soil characteristics and solution composition, has been already opened to the public (JAERI-DATABASE 20001003). Another study is investigation on a standard methodology of the distribution coefficient of radionuclide on soils, rocks and engineering materials in Japan. (author)

  15. The distribution and abundance of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    The distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments was investigated. Samples were collected using a systematic design in the vicinity of Pickering and Darlington, and supplemented by lakewide offshore samples. Naturally occurring 40 K was the predominant source of gamma activity. 60 Co was the only potentially CANDU released radionuclide which showed a distributional association with the Pickering 'A' NGS discharge

  16. Distribution of radionuclides by organs of wild animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, V.P.; Korol', R.A.; Bykovskij, V.V.; Bazhanov, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of radionuclides by organs of wild animals, are studied, for evacuation zone of Chernobyl NPP. The distribution of Cs 137 have a total character, Sr 90 are distributed on critical organs, us a rule. (authors)

  17. Vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Slivka, J.; Krmar, M.; Chonkic, Lj.; Veskovic, M.; Hadzhic, V.

    1990-01-01

    Pedological profiles were opened at selected representative locations on different geomorphic types and in certain soil layers down to 3 m depth. The mechanical composition, hydro physical and chemical features were studied. The vertical distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides and 137 Cs was analyzed during 1988 and 1989. The parameter alpha of the exponential dependence of activity concentration vs. depth were calculated for the three soil types, as well as the activity concentration of 137 Cs at depths of 1 and 3 m. The extent of 137 Cs migration was evaluated at these depths and it is shown that the coefficient α is proportional to the reciprocal of the time elapsed from the surface contamination. (author)

  18. Distribution coefficients for radionuclides in aquatic environments. Volume 2. Dialysis experiments in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, T.H.; Nevissi, A.E.; Schell, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to obtain new information that can be used to predict the fate of radionuclides that may enter the aquatic environment from nuclear power plants, waste storage facilities or fuel reprocessing plants. Important parameters for determining fate are the distribution of radionuclides between the soluble and particulate phases and the partitioning of radionuclides among various suspended particulates. This report presents the results of dialysis experiments that were used to study the distribution of radionuclides among suspended sediments, phytoplankton, organic detritus, and filtered sea water. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium distribution of (59)Fe, (60)Co, (65)Zn, (106)Ru, (137)Cs, (207)Bi, (238)Pu, and (241)Am in marine system. Diffusion across the dialysis membranes depends upon the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides, proceeding quite rapidly for ionic species of (137)Cs and (60)Co but much more slowly for radionuclides which occur primarily as colloids and solid precipitates such as (59)Fe, (207)Bi, and (241)Am. All the radionuclides adsorb to suspended particulates although the amount of adsorption depends upon the specific types and concentration of particulates in the system and the selected radionuclide. High affinity of some radionuclides - e.g., (106)Ru and (241)Am - for detritus and phytoplankton suggests that suspended organics may significantly affect the eventual fate of those radionuclides in marine ecosystems

  19. Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules

  20. Tumour control probability (TCP) for non-uniform activity distribution in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusijaervi, Helena; Bernhardt, Peter; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Non-uniform radionuclide distribution in tumours will lead to a non-uniform absorbed dose. The aim of this study was to investigate how tumour control probability (TCP) depends on the radionuclide distribution in the tumour, both macroscopically and at the subcellular level. The absorbed dose in the cell nuclei of tumours was calculated for 90 Y, 177 Lu, 103m Rh and 211 At. The radionuclides were uniformly distributed within the subcellular compartment and they were uniformly, normally or log-normally distributed among the cells in the tumour. When all cells contain the same amount of activity, the cumulated activities required for TCP = 0.99 (A-tilde TCP=0.99 ) were 1.5-2 and 2-3 times higher when the activity was distributed on the cell membrane compared to in the cell nucleus for 103m Rh and 211 At, respectively. TCP for 90 Y was not affected by different radionuclide distributions, whereas for 177 Lu, it was slightly affected when the radionuclide was in the nucleus. TCP for 103m Rh and 211 At were affected by different radionuclide distributions to a great extent when the radionuclides were in the cell nucleus and to lesser extents when the radionuclides were distributed on the cell membrane or in the cytoplasm. When the activity was distributed in the nucleus, A-tilde TCP=0.99 increased when the activity distribution became more heterogeneous for 103m Rh and 211 At, and the increase was large when the activity was normally distributed compared to log-normally distributed. When the activity was distributed on the cell membrane, A-tilde TCP=0.99 was not affected for 103m Rh and 211 At when the activity distribution became more heterogeneous. A-tilde TCP=0.99 for 90 Y and 177 Lu were not affected by different activity distributions, neither macroscopic nor subcellular

  1. Investigation of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Sanming; Liu Ruye

    1992-01-01

    The survey of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China (1983-1990) is a part of investigation of environmental natural radioactivity level on China. The results of the investigation area as follows: (1) The average content of natural radionuclides 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K(area weighted) and its standard deviation for single measurement is 39.5 and 34.4,36.5 and 22.0, 49.1 and 27.6, 580.0 and 202.0 Bq.kg -1 ,respectively.(2) The content of natural radionuclides is apparently correlated to the types of soil-forming rock. The analysis results from 1552 soil samples of soil-forming rock show that: the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K for magmatic rock type is the highest, 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th of metamorphic rock type higher, sedimentary rock type the lowest. However, the content of 40 K of sedimentary rock type is more higher, magmatic rock type the lowest. In magmatic rock type, the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th of granite and acidic magmatic rock type, and the content of 40 K of acidic and alkaline magmatic rock type are higher. (3) The analysis results from 9613 various types of soil samples show that for crimson soil of ferralsol wind soil of rock soil-forming order at northern part is lower. For frigid dessert soil of alpine soil order, alpine dessert soil, and the burozem, dark burozem and drab soil of alfisol order and semialfisol order, the content of 40 K is shown to be higher, and it is lower for latosol of ferralsol order, crimson soil, yellow soil and various lime soil. (4) The geographical distribution of the natural radionuclide content in soil appears apparently regional

  2. Procedures for economic distribution of radionuclides in research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, N.A.

    1979-01-01

    A radionuclide accountability system for use in a research facility is described. It can be operated manually or adapted for computer use. All radionuclides are ordered, received, distributed and paid for by the Radiological Control Office who keep complete records of date of order, receipt, calibration use, transfer and/or disposal. Wipe leak tests, specific activity and lot number are also recorded. The procedure provides centralized total accountability records, including financial records, of all radionuclide orders, and the economic advantages of combined purchasing. The use of this system in two medical facilities has resulted in considerable financial savings in the first year of operation. (author)

  3. [The distribution of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of macrophytes of the Yenisei River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The Yenisei River is contaminated with artificial radionuclides due to the operation of the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (MCC), Rosatom, producing weapon grade plutonium for several decades. Artificial radionuclides including activation isotopes and transuranics, are detected in the biomass of submerged aquatic plants of the river. We investigated the distribution of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of macrophytes from radioactively contaminated part of the Yenisei River with chemical fractionation techniques. Artificial radionuclides were detected in extracellular and intracellular compartments of the macrophytes. The distribution of radionuclides among the biomass fractions differed essentially. 54Mn was preferably in mobile, exchangeable form compared to other isotopes. Essential portion of 137Cs was in non exchangeable form. Significant activity of artificial radionuclides was detected in the particles of suspended matter of the river, attached to the plant surfaces. Radioactive isotopes were distributed among biomass fractions similar to stable isotopes. The distribution of potassium and 137Cs differed essentially. On the basis of the results obtained the assumptions on the further migration of radionuclides accumulated by aquatic macrophytes in the Yenisei River have been done.

  4. Radionuclides distribution coefficient of soil to soil-solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The present book addresses various issues related with the coefficient of radionuclides distribution between soil and soil solution. It consists of six sections and two appendices. The second section, following an introductory one, describes the definition of the coefficient and a procedures of its calculation. The third section deals with the application of the distribution coefficient to the prediction of movements of radionuclides through soil. Various methods for measuring the coefficient are described in the fourth section. The next section discusses a variety of factors (physical and chemical) that can affect the distribution coefficient. Measurements of the coefficient for different types of oils are listed in the sixth section. An appendix is attached to the book to show various models that can be helpful in applying the coefficient of distribution of radionuclides moving from soil into agricultural plants. (N.K.)

  5. Radionuclide distributions and migration mechanisms at shallow land burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.; Toste, A.P.; Thomas, C.W.; Rickard, W.H.; Nielson, H.L.; Campbell, R.M.; McShane, M.C.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Robertson, D.E.

    1991-02-01

    During the past several years, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted research at the Maxey Flats Disposal Site (MFDS) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This work has identified the spectrum of radionuclides present in the waste trenches, determined the processes that were occurring relative to degradation of radioactive material within the burial trenches, determined the chemical and physical characteristics of the trench leachates and the chemical forms of the leached radionuclides, determined the mobility of these radionuclides, investigated the subsurface and surface transport processes, determined the biological uptake by the native vegetation, developed strategies for environmental monitoring, and investigated other factors that influence the long-term fate of the radionuclide inventory at the disposal site. This report is a final summary of the research conducted by PNL and presents the results and discussions relative to the above investigative areas. 45 refs., 31 figs., 17 tabs

  6. Investigation on the behavier of radionuclides in the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Kenzo.

    1978-10-01

    Concerning the safety of the ground storage of radioactive wastes, many investigations were done at A block in an atomic institute. For the purpose of the presuming the behavior of radionuclide in the ground, many investigations were done at field and laboratory. The behavior through the saturated sand zone at A block of 2500 ppm NaBr solution, instead of radioactive water, surveyed using many observation wells at field. At laboratory the distribution coefficients of radioactive cations ( 60 Co and 85 Sr) to the sand, which governs the movement of radioactive cations, were obtained experimentally with imitated ground water. In these results, the behavior of radioactive nuclides ( 60 Co and 90 Sr) in the ground at A block were presumed. (author)

  7. Investigations of Differential Scanning Techniques using Two Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrall, M. F.; French, Rosemary J.; Trott, N. G. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1969-01-15

    In the development of scanning procedures difficulties sometimes arise because a particular radiopharmaceutical, which is selectively concentrated in an organ of interest, is also widely distributed in neighbouring sites in the body. Investigations have been made of a method which involves the use of a second radioactive substance to label such sites. By means of suitable electrical circuits fitted to a conventional mechanical scanner (Picker Magnascanner III), a direct colour scan of the organ under study can be obtained. Signals from the two radionuclides are distinguished by pulse-height analysis and used to operate the colour shift mechanism. Experimental studies with phantoms and clinical trials are reported. An analysis of the statistical limitations of the technique is given, including a discussion of the most suitable operating conditions for particular pairs of radionuclides. Illustrations include the use of {sup 75}Se selenomethionine and {sup 99m}Tc sulphur colloid or {sup 198}Au colloid in the delineation of the pancreas, and reference is also made to work with {sup 18}F, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 133m}In and {sup 197}Hg, which are used in various chemical forms to visualize specific types of tumours in vascular surroundings labelled with other suitable tracers. Some discussion of the dosimetry of these procedures is made, since the extent to which the technique can be applied may be limited by the activities which can be administered. However, successful results are being obtained using activities within the range generally accepted for single radionuclide scanning procedures. For example, the pancreas can be successfully visualised using 250 {mu}Ci {sup 75}Se selenomethionine in combination with 1 mCi {sup 99m}TC sulphur colloid. (author)

  8. SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide activities within the human body is affected by several physical and instrumental factors including attenuation of photons within the patient, Compton scattered events, the system's finite spatial resolution and object size, finite number of detected events, partial volume effects, the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics, and patient and/or organ motion. Furthermore, other instrumentation factors such as calibration of the center-of-rotation, sampling, and detector nonuniformities will affect the SPECT measurement process. These factors are described, together with examples of compensation methods that are currently available for improving SPECT quantification. SPECT offers the potential to improve in vivo estimates of absorbed dose, provided the acquisition, reconstruction, and compensation procedures are adequately implemented and utilized. 53 references, 2 figures

  9. Postshot distribution and movement of radionuclides in nuclear crater ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koranda, John J; Martin, John R; Wikkerink, Robert; Stuart, Marshall [Bio-Medical Division, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The distribution and postshot movement of radionuclides in nuclear crater ejecta are discussed in this report. Continuing studies of tritium movement in ejecta at SEDAN crater demonstrate that variations in tritium concentration are correlated with seasonal rainfall and soil water movements. Losses of 27 mCi H{sup 3}/ft{sup 2} are evident on SEDAN crater lip at the end of a three year period of measurements in -which an unusually large flux of rain was received. The distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides and tritium is described in the recently created SCHOONER crater ejecta field. The specific activity of radionuclides in the SCHOONER ejecta continuum is shown for ejecta collected from the crater lip to 17 miles from GZ. The movement of W{sup 181} and tritium into the sub-ejecta preshot soil is described at a site 3000 feet from GZ. (author)

  10. Natural radionuclide distribution in phosphate fertilizer and superphosphate production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisachenko, Eh P; Ponikarova, T M; Lisitsyna, Yu Z

    1987-01-01

    The obtained data on the natural radionuclide distribution by phosphate fertilizer and superphosphate production process stages testify to phosphate fertilizer enrichment 2-4 times in relation to initial ore, depending in the raw material used. In this case uranium and thorium series element concentration value (in equilibrium with their decomposition products), proposed as a regulating one in phosphorus-containing fertilizers, is not achieved. However, the fact of lurichment as it is and the enrichment factor, stated in the course of the work, should be taken into account for evaluation of phosphorite new deposit raw material with higher concentrations of natural radionuclides. Natural radionuclide separation in the enrichment process and superphosphate production is not revealed.

  11. Dosimetric characterization of radionuclides for systemic tumor therapy: Influence of particle range, photon emission, and subcellular distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusijaervi, Helena; Bernhardt, Peter; Ericsson, Thomas; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Various radionuclides have been proposed for systemic tumor therapy. However, in most dosimetric analysis of proposed radionuclides the charged particles are taken into consideration while the potential photons are ignored. The photons will cause undesirable irradiation of normal tissue, and increase the probability of toxicity in, e.g., the bone marrow. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties according to particle range, photon emission, and subcellular radionuclide distribution, of a selection of radionuclides used or proposed for radionuclide therapy, and to investigate the possibility of dividing radionuclides into groups according to their dosimetric properties. The absorbed dose rate to the tumors divided by the absorbed dose rate to the normal tissue (TND) was estimated for different tumor sizes in a mathematical model of the human body. The body was simulated as a 70-kg ellipsoid and the tumors as spheres of different sizes (1 ng-100 g). The radionuclides were either assumed to be uniformly distributed throughout the entire tumor and normal tissue, or located in the nucleus or the cytoplasm of the tumor cells and on the cell membrane of the normal cells. Fifty-nine radionuclides were studied together with monoenergetic electrons, positrons, and alpha particles. The tumor and normal tissue were assumed to be of water density. The activity concentration ratio between the tumor and normal tissue was assumed to be 25. The radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons combined with a low photon contribution, and the alpha emitters showed high TND values for most tumor sizes. Electrons with higher energy gave reduced TND values for small tumors, while a higher photon contribution reduced the TND values for large tumors. Radionuclides with high photon contributions showed low TND value for all tumor sizes studied. The radionuclides studied could be divided into four main groups according to their TND values: beta emitters, Auger electron

  12. Distribution of six radionuclides between soluble and particulate phase at the sea-freshwater interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of the soluble and particulate phases of radionuclides has been studied in water samples of various salinities (0 per mill; 3.8 per mill; 7.6 per mill; 15.2 per mill; 22.8 per mill; 30.4 per mill; 34 per mill). Cesium 137, cobalt 60, manganese 54, zinc 65, chromium 51 and sodium 22 were investigated. The results are expressed as retention percentages or distribution coefficients (Kd). Increased salinities resulted in decreased retention rates varying with the radionuclides; this appeared with the lowest salinities, and the evolution was small beyond 7 per mill. Other parameters were considered beside salinity, viz.: the suspended matter characteristics (mineralogy, particle size distribution); particulate load of water; organic content, whether associated to the soluble or particulate phase; physico-chemical forms of the radionuclides. To determine the particle size spectra of the suspended matter in the experimental samples, a laser granulometer was used [fr

  13. Comparative study of the radionuclide uptake and distribution within plants for barley and maize varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, O.

    1998-01-01

    Differences in the Cs-134 and Sr-85 uptake by three barley and two maize varieties were investigated in a water culture experiment. In barley, the maximum differences were about 30% for cesium and 50% for strontium. The differences between the maize varieties were negligible. The maximum difference between the varieties of the two species of crops was approximately 30% for cesium and 1 70% for strontium with higher radionuclide uptake by maize. All barley varieties accumulated cesium nearly 3.5 times more effectively than strontium, whereas for the maize varieties, cesium was accumulated about 2 times more effectively. There is a large difference in the radionuclide distribution within the plants: the amount of radiocesium in the green part of plants of both species was approximately 30% of the total, while for radiostrontium it was about 80%. As a result, approximately the same amount of the radionuclides were present in the green part of plants, despite the large difference in the uptake of the radionuclides by the whole plants. It is concluded that crop selection as a provision to reduce radionuclide contamination of the food chain should only be applied taking into account the different radionuclide distributions within the plants

  14. Distribution of radionuclides in surface seawater obtained by an aerial radiological survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi; Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo; Tsubono, Takaki; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution in seawater of anthropogenic radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) as preliminary attempt using a rapid aerial radiological survey performed by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration on 18 April 2011. We found strong correlations between in-situ activities of 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs measured in surface seawater samples and gamma-ray peak count rates determined by the aerial survey (correlation coefficients were 0.89 for 131 I, 0.96 for 134 Cs, and 0.92 for 137 Cs). The offshore area of high radionuclide activity extended south and southeast from the FNPP1. The maximum activities of 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs were 329, 650, and 599 Bq L -1 , respectively. The 131 I/ 137 Cs ratio in surface water of the high-activity area ranged from 0.6 to 0.7. Considering the radioactive decay of 131 I (half-life 8.02 d), we determined that the radionuclides in this area were directly released from FNPP1 to the ocean. We confirm that aerial radiological surveys can be effective for investigating the surface distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in seawater. Our model reproduced the distribution pattern of radionuclides derived from the FNPP1, although results simulated by a regional ocean model were underestimated. (author)

  15. Environmental radionuclide concentrations: statistical model to determine uniformity of distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawley, C.N.; Fenyves, E.J.; Spitzberg, D.B.; Wiorkowski, J.; Chehroudi, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    In the evaluation of data from environmental sampling and measurement, a basic question is whether the radionuclide (or pollutant) is distributed uniformly. Since physical measurements have associated errors, it is inappropriate to consider the measurements alone in this determination. Hence, a statistical model has been developed. It consists of a weighted analysis of variance with subsequent t-tests between weighted and independent means. A computer program to perform the calculations is included

  16. Radionuclide distribution in LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides well-characterized spent fuel from light-water reactors (LWRs) for use in laboratory tests relevant to nuclear waste disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Interpretation of results from tests on spent fuel oxidation, dissolution, and cladding degradation requires information on the inventory and distribution of radionuclides in the initial test materials. The MCC is obtaining this information from examinations of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs), which include spent fuel with burnups from 17 to 50 MWd/kgM and fission gas releases (FGR) from 0.2 to 18%. The concentration and distribution of activation products and the release of volatile fission products to the pellet-cladding gap and rod plenum are of particular interest because these characteristics are not well understood. This paper summarizes results that help define the 14 C inventory and distribution in cladding, the ''gap and grain boundary'' inventory of radionuclides in fuels with different FGRs, and the structure and radionuclide inventory of the fuel rim region within a few hundred micrometers from the fuel edge. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nondestructive measurement for radionuclide concentration distribution in soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hiromichi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-01-01

    A nondestructive method has been studied for determining the concentration of radionuclide (Cs-137) distributed in a soil column. The concentration distribution was calculated from the counting rate distribution using the efficiency matrix of a detector. The concentration distribution obtained by this method, with measuring efficiencies of theoretical calculation, coincides well with that obtained by the destructive sampling method. This method is, therefore, found to be effective for the measurement of one dimensional concentration distribution. The measuring limit of this method is affected not only by the radionuclide concentration but also by the shape of concentration distribution in a soil column and also by the way it is divided into concentration blocks. It is found that, the radioactive concentration up to 2.6 x 10 -4 μCi/g (9.62 Bq/g), and also the distribution up to where the concentration reduces to half at every 1 cm of depth, can be measured by this system. The concentration blocks can be divided into 1 cm of thickness as a minimum value. (author)

  18. Distribution of radionuclides during melting of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, W.C.; MacKinney, J.

    1997-02-01

    During the melting of steel with radioactive contamination, radionuclides may be distributed among the metal product, the home scrap, the slag, the furnace lining and the off-gas collection system. In addition, some radionuclides will pass through the furnace system and vent to the atmosphere. To estimate radiological impacts of recycling radioactive scrap steel, it is essential to understand how radionuclides are distributed within the furnace system. For example, an isotope of a gaseous element (e.g., radon) will exhaust directly from the furnace system into the atmosphere while a relatively non-volatile element (e.g., manganese) can be distributed among all the other possible media. This distribution of radioactive contaminants is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous chemical and physical factors, including composition of the steel bath, chemistry of the slag, vapor pressure of the particular element of interest, solubility of the element in molten iron, density of the oxide(s), steel melting temperature and melting practice (e.g., furnace type and size, melting time, method of carbon adjustment and method of alloy additions). This paper discusses the distribution of various elements with particular reference to electric arc furnace steelmaking. The first two sections consider the calculation of partition ratios for elements between metal and slag based on thermodynamic considerations. The third section presents laboratory and production measurements of the distribution of various elements among slag, metal, and the off-gas collection system; and the final section provides recommendations for the assumed distribution of each element of interest.

  19. Distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in chernozem soil/crop system from stationary experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarap, Nataša B; Rajačić, Milica M; Đalović, Ivica G; Šeremešić, Srđan I; Đorđević, Aleksandar R; Janković, Marija M; Daković, Marko Z

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the determination of radiological characteristics of cultivated chernozem soil and crops from long-term field experiments, taking into account the importance of distribution and transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system, especially in agricultural cropland. The investigation was performed on the experimental fields where maize, winter wheat, and rapeseed were cultivated. Analysis of radioactivity included determination of the gross alpha and beta activity as a screening method, as well as the activities of the following radionuclides: natural ((210)Pb, (235)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (7)Be) and artificial ((90)Sr and (137)Cs). The activities of natural and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides were determined by gamma spectrometry, while the artificial radionuclide (90)Sr was determined by a radiochemical analytical method. Based on the obtained results for the specific activity of (40)K, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr, accumulation factors for these radionuclides were calculated in order to estimate transfer of radionuclides from soil to crops. The results of performed analyses showed that there is no increase of radioactivity that could endanger the food production through the grown crops.

  20. Sources and distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in different marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1997-01-01

    The knowledge of the distribution in time and space radiologically important radionuclides from different sources in different marine environments is important for assessment of dose commitment following controlled or accidental releases and for detecting eventual new sources. Present sources from nuclear explosion tests, releases from nuclear facilities and the Chernobyl accident provide a tool for such studies. The different sources can be distinguished by different isotopic and radionuclide composition. Results show that radiocaesium behaves rather conservatively in the south and north Atlantic while plutonium has a residence time of about 8 years. On the other hand enhanced concentrations of plutonium in surface waters in arctic regions where vertical mixing is small and iceformation plays an important role. Significantly increased concentrations of plutonium are also found below the oxic layer in anoxic basins due to geochemical concentration. (author)

  1. Radioactive waste-Portland cement systems: I, radionuclide distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Glasser, F.P.; Lachowski, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Crystal chemical stabilization of radioactive wastes can be achieved during clinkering of, or with, ordinary portland cement. Waste loadings of 20 to 30 wt% are achieved by dilute solid solution of waste ions into cementitious host lattices. Higher waste loadings result in compatible noncementitious radiophases. The cementitious phases hydrate without loss of compressive strength. Crystallochemical relationships predict that the radionuclide partitioning in the anhydrous clinkered phases will be maintained in the hydration products. These cementitious hydroxylated radiophases would be in internal equilibrium under anticipated repository conditions. The radionuclide distributions observed are described in the context of established phase equilibria for commercial waste cement systems, but are applicable to transuranic, medium- and low-level wastes

  2. Sediments as indicators of artificial radionuclide distribution west of La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guegueniat, P.; Auffret, J.P.; Ballada, J.

    1981-01-01

    Four-year investigations of the coastal surface sediments and associated radionuclides in the English Channel show complex distribution patterns around La Hague. Plutonium ratios in the particulate fraction confirm the general understanding gathered from long-term gamma studies - mainly that accumulation of La Hague generated radionuclides is in the Bay of Mont-Saint-Michel and along the Normandy-Brittany Coast. The oil from the Amoco Cadiz accident caused a significant increase in coastal sediment activity of 144 Ce. Experimental studies with plutonium and hydrocarbons indicate that plutonium is more difficult to desorb than 144 Ce. (author)

  3. Pulmonary blood flow distribution measured by radionuclide computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Itoh, H.; Ishii, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Distributions of pulmonary blood flow per unit lung volume were measured in sitting patients with a radionuclide computed tomography (RCT) by intravenously administered Tc-99m macroaggregates of human serum albumin (MAA). Four different types of distribution were distinguished, among which a group referred as type 2 had a three zonal blood flow distribution as previously reported (West and co-workers, 1964). The pulmonary arterial pressure (Pa) and the venous pressure (Pv) were determined in this group of distribution. These values showed satifactory agreements with the pulmonary artery pressure (Par) and the capillary wedged pressure (Pcw) measured by Swan-Ganz catheter in eighteen supine patients. Those good correlations enable to establish a noninvasive methodology for measurement of pulmonary vascular pressures

  4. The radionuclide migration experiment - overview of investigations 1985 - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, U.; McKinley, I.G.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Eikenberg, J.; Heer, W.; Hoehn, E.; Smith, P.A.; Alexander, W.R.; Bossart, P.; Buehler, C.; Fierz, T.

    1992-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the investigations conducted from 1985 to 1990 as a part of the radionuclide migration experiment which is currently in progress in the Nagra underground research laboratory at the Grimsel pass in the Central Swiss Alps. The major aims of the project are (1) to test the extrapolation of laboratory sorption data to field conditions, (2) to analyse retardation processes in a fractured rock, (3) to improve and develop the necessary methodologies for site characterization and (4) to test existing geochemical, hydrodynamic, and solute transport models or their associated data bases. Field and modeling work are complemented by an extensive laboratory support programme. The Grimsel migration experiment demonstrates conclusively how the combined efforts of modeling, laboratory and field investigations can substantially widen the understanding of radionuclide transport in a geological environment. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  5. Radionuclides distribution in artificial reservoir V-17 (old swamp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenkova, N. [Vernadsky Institute of geochemistry and analytical chemistry RAS (Russian Federation); Vlasova, I.; Sapozhnikov, Y.; Kalmykov, S. [Lomonosov MSU, Chemistry Dep. (Russian Federation); Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research center for radiation medicine (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir V-17 (Old Swamp) was formed as a result of the construction of dams in 1952 and 1954 (MAYAK Production Association),located in a natural depression relief. Intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes (ILLW) have been discharged to this reservoir since 1949. The water surface area of the lake is 0.13 km{sup 2} with the volume of 0.36 Mm{sup 3}. The maximum depth is 6.5 m with the average value of 2.8 m. Among 74 PBq deposited to the reservoir, the major portion is concentrated in the bottom sediments (as determined in 2007). The aim of this study is to determine radionuclide distribution among abiotic and biotic aquatic components, that includes study of various radionuclides distribution between water and bottom sediments, their speciation and evaluation of condition of zooplankton community. As a result of field research at the reservoir, 4 sampling locations were chosen from which bottom sediments, water samples and some hydrobionts were collected. Pore waters were separated from the wet sediments by high-speed centrifugation. All samples were analyzed by gamma spectrometry using HPGe detector Canberra GR 3818.The radioactivity of tritium in the pore and lake waters was determined by liquid-scintillation spectrometry. The strontium-90 was detected by Cherenkov counting of the daughter {sup 90}Y. The preliminary data show for sediments samples: for {sup 137}Cs amount varies from 75,5 KBq/g to 232 KBq/g, {sup 154}Eu - from 460 to 990 Bq/g, {sup 241}Am - from 1 to 4 KBq/g, {sup 134}Cs - from 50 to 220 Bq/g; for water samples: large contribution from strontium-90 and tritium (varies from 2 to 25 Bq/g). Pore water contains medium amount of radionuclides between sediments and water samples. For {sup 137}Cs varies between 160 to 1100 Bq/g, {sup 154}Eu - from 0,1 to 0,3 Bq/g, {sup 241}Am - from 0,3 to 11 Bq/g, {sup 134}Cs - from 0,1 to 1,7 Bq/g. Variation depends on the sampling place. Activity distribution among hydrobionts was studied by digital Radiography

  6. Role of tomography in providing radionuclide distribution and kinetic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major limitation in radionuclide dosimetry has been the lack of human organ-specific radionuclide distribution and kinetic data because methods of acquiring sequential quantitative information from volumes of interest were not available. Developments in emission computed tomography instrumentation and associated algorithms have overcome this basic limitation, thus allowing in vivo noninvasive tissue distribution studies to be performed. Five aspects of kinetic data acquisition using tomography are: (1) the resolution volume for quantitative work is about two times larger than the system resolution element size as defined by a spread function criterion of full width at half (peak) maximum; (2) scattered radiation might account for 30% of the activity in a given resolution volume and must be taken into account for accurate calculations; (3) proper attenuation compensation must be made to yield quantitative data, particularly with single photon tomography; (4) for dosimetry studies with short half-life labels, multisection systems with dynamic imaging capabilities commensurate with the half-life are needed; (5) the biological conditions such as patient disease and dietary history and the specific activity of the radiopharmaceutical are factors of prime importance in the distribution kinetics

  7. Investigation of cosmogenic radionuclide carriers in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujaniene, G.

    2000-01-01

    Speciation of 7 Be, 32 P, 33 P, 35 S and stable S carriers and their changes in the atmosphere were investigated. It has been determined that aerosol-carriers of 7 Be, 32 P and 33 P radionuclides can have different properties, and after several days their transformation was observed. The amount of water-soluble carriers in aerosol samples differed widely (from 11 to 95 %). The dependence of radionuclide carrier solubility on pH was obtained for 7 Be, 32 P and 33 P. It has been found that 7 Be carriers can be soluble compounds such as mixed chlorides, sulphates and nitrates as well as insoluble carbonates and insoluble hydrous Fe(III) oxides. High percentage of 32 P and 33 P was found in exchangeable fraction. The 35 S carriers were found to be more soluble than those of 7 Be, 32 P and 33 P and exhibited a lower or the same solubility as stable sulphur. (author)

  8. Recent drilling program to investigate radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    Recent drilling affords new opportunities to investigate the occurrence, distribution and transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated and saturated zone at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This program is unique becmise of the elevated activities of radionuclides encountered during drilling (> 3.7E+6 Bq/L 3H), extreme completion depths (> 950 m), the expense of constructing new wells (> $IE+6/borehole), and collaboration of government, academic, and industrial partners in the planning and execution of the program. The recent chilling is significant because it substantively augments earlier field of radionuclide migration at NTS, most notably the 1974 CAMBRIC RNM experiment Sites of five nuclear tests fired below or adjacent to the saturated zone have been drilled. Three of the events were fired in Yucca Flat which is a hydrologically closed basin and two were fired in fractured volcanics of Pahute Mesa. Results from Yucca Flat indicate that volatile and refractory radionuclides, fractionated at zero time, we not highly mobile under sawmted conditions. In contrast, borcholes completed on Pahute Mesa indicate Wgh concentrations of tritium (> 3.7E+6 Bq/L 3H) and other radionuclides may be rted more than 300 m from event cavities as dissolved species or as colloids

  9. An investigation of the speciation of radionuclides in sediments and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Stanney, K.A.; Williams, G.A.

    1981-08-01

    A sequential chemical extraction procedure has been used to investigate the speciation of the radionuclides 210 Pb and 226 Ra in three soil and sediment samples from the Mt. Brockman area in the Northern Territory. The analyses, by γ-ray spectrometry, are in terms of those species that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to iron or manganese oxides, bound to organic matter, and tightly bound in the crystal lattices of various minerals. The results for the radionuclides indicate significant differences between 210 Pb and 226 Ra in their distribution among the fractions, with very little 226 Ra present in all residual fractions. Very low concentrations of both radionuclides were present in the fractions representing species bound to carbonates, with 226 Ra concentrations greater that 210 Pb. Where the iron content of the sample is high, and in the form of iron oxides, both radionuclides are associated largely with the iron oxide phase. The fraction representing species bound to organic matter contained relatively high concentrations of both radionuclides in all samples

  10. Recent drilling program to investigate radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.K.

    1997-04-01

    Recent drilling affords new opportunities to investigate the occurrence, distribution and transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated and saturated zone at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This program is unique becmise of the elevated activities of radionuclides encountered during drilling (> 3.7E+6 Bq/L 3H), extreme completion depths (> 950 m), the expense of constructing new wells (> $IE+6/borehole), and collaboration of government, academic, and industrial partners in the planning and execution of the program. The recent chilling is significant because it substantively augments earlier field of radionuclide migration at NTS, most notably the 1974 CAMBRIC RNM experiment Sites of five nuclear tests fired below or adjacent to the saturated zone have been drilled. Three of the events were fired in Yucca Flat which is a hydrologically closed basin and two were fired in fractured volcanics of Pahute Mesa. Results from Yucca Flat indicate that volatile and refractory radionuclides, fractionated at zero time, we not highly mobile under sawmted conditions. In contrast, borcholes completed on Pahute Mesa indicate Wgh concentrations of tritium (> 3.7E+6 Bq/L 3H) and other radionuclides may be rted more than 300 m from event cavities as dissolved species or as colloids.

  11. Investigation of transformation of radionuclides in soils oil polluted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbatov, F.Y.; Ahmedov, M.M.; Ibadov, N.A.; Balayev, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Despite of constant improvement in view of last achievement of a science and technique the technological processes of oil production are accompanied by coming in environment a number of chemical substances - oil products, poly aromatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, salts of heavy metals, including soluble and insoluble compound of stable and radioactive isotopes of metals, various gases etc. Technological processes of production, transportation of crude oil and its complex processing is followed with essential pollution of soil by oil products, radioactive substances because of crude oil and grounds waters spillage. The problem of radioactive pollution of environment in oil-extracting sites and especially in old deposits of Apsheron peninsula, in particular, in oil fields of Surakhani and Balakhani by the various factors is rather urgent in Azerbaijan. On a whole, radioactive-ecological situation is defined by the quantitative contents of natural radionuclides, chemical structure of grounds waters and oil, and also accumulation of radioactive substances in pipelines and modular items as crystals radiobarits or calcium and magnesium salts. Systemic and complex research on this direction will allow creating the mechanism of radionuclides transformation in oil-contaminated soils. The condition of radioactive background of soil cover of oil field in Surakhani was studied in our researches. The soil samples taken from various depths of deposit are investigated. The quantities of total oil components, aliphatic and poly aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals and natural radionuclides are determined. The attempt is made to explain dependence of various meanings of carried out analyses on the depth of taken samples. In summary it is necessary to note, that the researches on more detailed study of influence of the factors on processes of accumulation and transformation natural radionuclides proceed. The systemic researches on this direction will allow securing of

  12. All-union Conference. Principles and methods of regional and geochemical investigations into radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitrov, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The collection presents abstracts of papers concerning landscape-geochemical research of radionuclides migration; aspects of 'hot particles' study; radionuclides forms and behaviour in soils, in soil-plant; soil-natural water systems, as well as in water ecosystems. Methods of natural objects artificial radioactivity study are reviewed. Distribution of natural radionuclides in soils. natural waters, etc. is discussed

  13. Calculated distribution of radionuclides in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Bergstroem, U.

    1994-12-01

    The description of the accumulation of radionuclides in some biospheric compartments is in general based on a sorption distribution coefficient K d . This value is very decisive for the concentration of long-lived radionuclides in reservoirs that are important from the dose point of view. Sorption is due to several processes such as ion-exchange and a variety of physical and chemical interactions which are difficult to interpret with the current K d -methodology. In addition, many of the K d values are obtained from laboratory or geospheric conditions not comparable to conditions prevailing in the biosphere. The main objective with this work is to deepen the knowledge about the theoretical background of K d -values. To achieve this purpose, available theoretical models for ion-exchange and surface complexation have been adapted for simulation under biospheric conditions. The elements treated are cesium, radium, neptunium, uranium and plutonium The results show that a triple layer surface complexation model may be used in estimating K d -values for actinides as a function of important chemical parameters such as pH and E H . It is concluded that by estimating some equilibrium constants and making some careful approximations, surface complexation models can be used for performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. 72 refs, 7 figs

  14. Fundamental investigations in the barite flotation using the radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.; Wiese, K.; Hunsinger, H.

    1977-01-01

    The application of radioactive tracers in flotation is described taking the example of barite/silicate separation in a mechanically improved laboratory cell. The particular suitability of the radionuclide technique is not only brought out in the field of fundamental investigations, but also in the determination of dynamic systems data. The labelling of the liquid phase was done with Na 24 whereas useful mineral and gangue were traced by means of neutron-induced double-labelling. The necessary labelling, measuring and evaluating technique is described. (orig.) [de

  15. Seasonal distribution and uptake of gamma emitting radionuclides at the test reactor area leaching ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    Radioactive leaching ponds adjacent to the Test Reactor Area (TRA) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site were investigated to determine the seasonal distribution and ecological behavior of gamma emitting radionuclides in various pond compartments. The physical, chemical and biological properties of the TRA ponds were documented including basic morphometry, water chemistry and species identification. Penetrating radiation exposure rates at the ponds ranged from 35 to 65 mR/d at the water surface and up to 3400 mR/d one meter above bottom sediments. Seasonal concentrations and concentration ratios were determined for 16 principle radionuclides in filtered water, sediment, seston, zooplankton, net plankton, nannoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, thistle, speedwell and willow. Seston and nannoplankton had the highest concentration ratios with substantial decreases observed for higher trophic level compartments. Significant (P < 0.01 to P < 0.001) seasonal effects wee found for concentration ratios. Radionuclides without nutrient analogs had the highest ratios in spring for periphyton, macrophytes and littoral plants. Concentration ratios were highest in summer, fall or winter for radionuclides with nutrient analogs

  16. Assessment of the Chernobyl NPP radionuclide distribution at the territory of Kiev industrial-urban agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Results were presented of the complex of geological-ecological studies conducted in 1991-1992 with the aim of establishment of radionuclide distribution character in the upper part of geologic medium of the Kiev industrial-urban agglomeration (IUA). Soil, vegetative biomass, surface and underground water, atmospheric precipitations, atmospheric moisture were sampled for study. Distributions of 134,137 Cs, 144 Ce, 106 Ru, 238,239,240 Pu, 90 Sr, 3 H were investigated. Environmental contamination levels were compared with the preaccidental values. Anomaly fields of contamination density with radioisotopes of the Kiev IUA were revealed. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Concerning initial and secondary character of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Specificity of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) treated as local system of geochemically linked elementary terrestrial units (in toposequence: watershed-slope-closing depression), belongs to one of the less investigated but practically significant problems of current geochemistry. First measurements after the Chernobyl accident showed a considerable variation of Cs-137 distribution in all examined ELGS (Shcheglov et al, 2001; Romanov, 1989; Korobova, Korovaykov, 1990; Linnik, 2008). The results may be interpreted in frames of two alternative hypotheses: 1) irregularity of the initial contamination; 2) secondary redistribution of the initially regular level of fallout. But herewith only a disproof of the first hypothesis automatically justifies the second one. Factors responsible for initial irregularity of surface contamination included: 1) the presence of the so-called "hot" particles in the initial fallout; 2) interception of radionuclides by forest canopy; 3) irregular aerial particles deposition; 4) uneven initial precipitation. Basing on monitoring Cs-137 spatial distribution that has been performed since 2005, we demonstrate that the observed spatial irregularity in distribution of Cs-137 in ELGS reflects a purely secondary distribution of initial reserves of radionuclides in fallout matter due to its migration with water in local geochemical systems. This statement has some significant consequences. 1. Mechanism of migration of matter in ELGS is complicated and could not be reduced solely to a primitive moving from watershed to closing depression. 2. The control of migration of "labeled atoms" (Cs-137) permits to understand common mechanism of migration of water in all systems on the level of ELGS. 3. Understanding formation of the structure of contamination zones in ELGS permits to use mathematical model to solve the inverse problem of restoration of the initially equable level of their contamination. Performed

  18. Distribution functions to estimate radionuclide solid-liquid distribution coefficients in soils: the case of Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Mart i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    In the frame of the revision of the IAEA TRS 364 (Handbook of parameter values for the prediction of radionuclide transfer in temperate environments), a database of radionuclide solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) in soils was compiled with data coming from field and laboratory experiments, from references mostly from 1990 onwards, including data from reports, reviewed papers, and grey literature. The K{sub d} values were grouped for each radionuclide according to two criteria. The first criterion was based on the sand and clay mineral percentages referred to the mineral matter, and the organic matter (OM) content in the soil. This defined the 'texture/OM' criterion. The second criterion was to group soils regarding specific soil factors governing the radionuclide-soil interaction ('cofactor' criterion). The cofactors depended on the radionuclide considered. An advantage of using cofactors was that the variability of K{sub d} ranges for a given soil group decreased considerably compared with that observed when the classification was based solely on sand, clay and organic matter contents. The K{sub d} best estimates were defined as the calculated GM values assuming that K{sub d} values were always log-normally distributed. Risk assessment models may require as input data for a given parameter either a single value (a best estimate) or a continuous function from which not only individual best estimates but also confidence ranges and data variability can be derived. In the case of the K{sub d} parameter, a suitable continuous function which contains the statistical parameters (e.g. arithmetical/geometric mean, arithmetical/geometric standard deviation, mode, etc.) that better explain the distribution among the K{sub d} values of a dataset is the Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF). To our knowledge, appropriate CDFs has not been proposed for radionuclide K{sub d} in soils yet. Therefore, the aim of this works is to create CDFs for

  19. The Project on the distribution of fallout radionuclide and their transfer through environment by Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Fukushima, Takehiko; Patin, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Radioactive contamination has been detected in Fukushima due to the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Following comprehensive investigation (FMWSE project funded by MEXT, Japan; http://fmwse.suiri.tsukuba.ac.jp/) was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. Experimental catchments have been established in Yamakiya district, Kawamata Town, Fukushima prefecture, located about 35 km from Fukushima power plant, and designated as the evacuated zone. Approximate Cs-137 fallout in this area is 200 - 600 kBq/m2. (1) Migration study of radionuclides in natural environment including forests and rivers: 1) Depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland, 2) Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests, 3) Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use, 4) Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils. (2) Migration study of radionuclides through hydrological cycle such as soil water, rivers, lakes and ponds, ground water: 1) Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use, 2) Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments, 3) Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments, 4) Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs. The main finding is as follows: 1) Migration of radionuclides to soil water, stream water and ground water was confirmed low at present. On the other hand, concentration of radiocaesium was found approximately 50 kBq/kg in the suspended sediments flowing down the river. 2) Amount of sediments deposited in the tank placed at the end of downstream within the USLE plot was confirmed together with the concentrations of

  20. Radionuclide cisternography: a prudent investigation in diagnosing spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Aditi Khurana; Sethi, Ravinder Singh; Namgyal, Padma A.; Raghavan, Samudrala

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a cause of new persistent headache, which disappears on recumbence and reappears in sitting/standing position (orthostatic headache). We present a case of orthostatic headache, where the patient was suspected to have SIH and was subjected to radionuclide cisternography (RNC) using 99m Technetium Diethylenetriaminepenta acetic acid for confirmation of diagnosis. After due consent from the patient, the radiotracer was injected intra-thecally and serial images were acquired until 24 h. The direct and indirect evidences of Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, which were revealed in our study, provided objective evidence to the clinical diagnosis. RNC is an important investigation in diagnosing SIH and also identifying the site of CSF leak, which may aid the management. (author)

  1. Influence of break structures on the distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments of the Kyiv reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Lyal'ko, V.I.; Fedorovskij, A.D.; Sirenko, L.A.; Khodorovskij, A.Ya.

    2000-01-01

    We study the distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments of the Kyiv reservoir on the basis of research of adjacent territory break - block structures with deciphering space-born images and ground measurements and forecast the occurrence of extreme situations due to the redistribution of bottom water flows and sediments of radionuclides

  2. Study on vertical distribution of radionuclides ({sup 40}K, Th and U) in soil collected from Manjung district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainal, Fetri; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Khalik [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Alias, Masitah [TNB Research Sdn. Bhd. 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The accumulation of radionuclides in soil is a greatest concerns due to their toxicity. This study investigated the vertical distribution of radionuclides and radiological assessment in a soil profile were collected in three different directions [North (N), North-East (NE) and South-East (SE)] within 40 km from Manjung district. All profile samples were collected down to 45cm at 7.5cm interval using hand auger. Soil density and radionuclides ({sup 40}K, Th and U) concentrations were determined by gravimetric method and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique, respectively. The radionuclides concentrations was in decreasing order of {sup 40}K > Th > U. Soil quality assessment was carried out using Enrichment Factor (EF), Pollution Index (PI) and Geoaccumulation Index (I {sub geo}) where all radionuclides show significant enrichment (5 < EF < 20), PI classified as middle pollution classes and 0 < Igeo < 1, indicating moderately polluted, respectively. From the concentration of radionuclides, the radiological risk was calculated and the present result show external hazard index (H{sub ex}) is below than unity indicate low radiological risk.

  3. Investigation and assessment of natural radionuclides in groundwater and geothermal fluid of Tianjin city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiao; Duan Xigui; Gao Liang; Yang Yuxin

    2012-01-01

    Investigation on the specific activities of natural radionuclides in the groundwater and geothermal fluids of Tianjin city were conducted. Based on the investigation, internal dose level posed by drinking the water and fluid to local public was evaluated. Results show the specific activities of natural radionuclides in the groundwater and geothermal fluid of Tianjin city is under control, no abnormal radioactivity discovered. (authors)

  4. New best estimates for radionuclide solid-liquid distribution coefficients in soils. Part 3: miscellany of radionuclides (Cd, Co, Ni, Zn, I, Se, Sb, Pu, Am, and others)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Garcia, C.; Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.

    2009-01-01

    New best estimates for the solid-liquid distribution coefficient (K d ) for a set of radionuclides are proposed, based on a selective data search and subsequent calculation of geometric means. The K d best estimates are calculated for soils grouped according to the texture and organic matter content. For a limited number of radionuclides this is extended to consider soil cofactors affecting soil-radionuclide interaction, such as pH, organic matter content, and radionuclide chemical speciation. Correlations between main soil properties and radionuclide K d are examined to complete the information derived from the best estimates with a rough prediction of K d based on soil parameters. Although there are still gaps for many radionuclides, new data from recent studies improve the calculation of K d best estimates for a number of radionuclides, such as selenium, antimony, and iodine.

  5. Oceanic distributions of radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1977-01-01

    Data on the transport of fallout radionuclides in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are reviewed. Relevance of water column fallout data to the disposal of radioactive waste in marine locations is discussed. It is pointed out that regional patterns of delivery of soluble radionuclides must be assumed to persist at least for decades, in spite of the homogenizing action of ocean current systems and that, although there are delays in relation to density discontinuities in the water column, particle-associated radionuclides are generally delivered directly to the sediment surface. The chemistry of particle association appears increasingly complex, in relation both to the element selectivity among kinds of particles, and the stability of the associations once formed, and regional conditions may lead to retention of Pu (and possibly other nuclides) in discrete layers or throughout the water column, in opposition to its general tendency to associate with particles

  6. Literature review of the studies on uptake, retention and distribution of radionuclides by the foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamothe, E.S.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the available literature from the last 10 years dealing with studies on uptake, retention and distribution of radionuclides by an embryo or foetus following maternal intakes. The review concentrates on isotopes commonly used by Canadian licensees. From the animal studies and from the limited human data, it is evident that after maternal contamination, the embryo or foetus accumulates and retains most radionuclides. Very little human data is available and a large fraction of the quoted values for human foetal dose retention are obtained from extrapolation from animal experiments. The information obtained in animal experiments is useful in determining general patterns of retention and distributions of radionuclides within the foetoplacental unit

  7. Distribution of technogenic radionuclides in alluvial deposits and fractions of soils in neighboring zone of Krasnoyarsk GKhK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnik, V.G.; Volosov, A.G.; Korobova, E.M.; Borisov, A.P.; Potapov, V.N.; Surkov, V.V.; Borguis, A.P.; Braun, Dzh.; Alekseeva, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Distribution of synthetic radionuclides using landscape-radiation profile of Berezovyj island. Difference in density of contamination deals with heterogeneous lithological composition of soil-forming rocks and so with different duration of flooding. Radionuclide distribution in alluvial deposits and soil fractions near Balchug village is considered, the role of thin fraction in radionuclides accumulation is determined [ru

  8. The RRP Project: investigating radionuclide retardation in the host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Frieg, B.; Ota, K.; Bossart, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Radionuclide Retardation Project (RRP), which is a joint Nagra/PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.) project, has two components: the first (the Excavation Project, EP) looks at the behaviour of radionuclides which are so strongly retarded in the experimental shear zone that they cannot pass through the zones in experimentally reasonable times. In order to determine where radionuclide retardation has occurred in the pore space, as well as the flowpath geometry in the shear zone, the entire injection zone has to be excavated and taken back to the laboratory for analysis of the sites of retardation of the radionuclides. This approach has the advantage of allowing a detailed 3D description of the experimental shear zone. The aim of the second component of the project (Connected Porosities, CP) is to examine the fate of those radionuclides which diffuse out of the main water-conducting features in the shear zone and into the pore spaces of the rock matrix, where they become trapped. This represents a potentially significant retardation mechanism in a repository host rock. (author) 8 figs., refs

  9. Introduction to CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk investigation system for assessing atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Murphy, B.D.

    1985-08-01

    The CRRIS is a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System consisting of eight fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport of atmospheric releases of radionuclides and resulting doses and health risks to individuals or populations. Each code may also be used alone for various assessment applications. Radionuclides are handled by the CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or the exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and decay products that grow in during environmental transport. The CRRIS is not designed to simulate short-term effects. 51 refs

  10. A study on distribution of natural radionuclide polonium-210 in a pond ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahul Hameed, P.; Shaheed, K.; Somasundaram, S.S.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on the distribution of 210 Po in Mutharasanallur pond ecosystem. It has been demonstrated that 210 Po is non-uniformly distributed within the ecosystem. The results of the study show a dissolved 210 Po concentration in pond water of 1.4mBql -1 . The sediment sample recorded a 210 Po activity of 59.9 Bqkg -1 . The aquatic organism showed differential accumulation of the radionuclide with enhanced bioaccumulation in soft tissues and muscle. The 210 Po activity in the biota fell within the range of 1.2-53.3 Bqkg -1 (wet weight). The bivalve mussel, Lamellidens marginalis was identified to accumulate higher concentration of 210 Po in soft tissues, suggesting that these organisms could serve as a bio-monitor of 210 Po radionuclide in a freshwater system. The concentration factors of 210 Po for the biotic components ranged from ∼ 10 2 - ∼ 10 4 . Analyses of the results indicate that prawn and fish represent an important source of supply of 210 Po to humans via dietary intake. Results of 210 Po activity in the abiotic and biotic components of the pond ecosystem were higher when compared with those of Cauvery river system, the primary water source of the pond. (author)

  11. Thermographic and radionuclide investigation in combined diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushakhmanov, A.Kh.

    1986-01-01

    The results of examination of 157 women with breast diseases are given. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 94 patients, benign diseases in 63. The combined use of the thermographic and radionuclide methods was shown to raise the accuracy of breast cancer diagnosis

  12. Age-dependent effective doses for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effective doses for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air are reported. The calculations were performed for 160 radionuclides, which are important for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. The energies and intensities of photons emitted from radionuclides were taken from the decay data DECDC used for dose calculations. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ) for 6 age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years-old and adult. The effective doses for the adult are also compared to values given in the literature.

  13. Radionuclide distributions in phytocenoses elements of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, I.S.; Mishenkov, N.N.; Arkhipov, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to estimate the radioecological situation in phytocenoses of the 30-km zone consisting in the main of conifer and conifer-foliage forests, the studies, which give, an opportunity to divide the pine forests into five zones according to degrees of radiation injury character revealing, are made. These zones are characterized by total death, strong injury, intermediate injury, weak injury and stimulation. Radionuclides redistribution in the system including wood fier, forest litter and soil, their accumulation in organs and elements if each cenosis component are studied. The characteristics of experimental sections are given. The data on radionuclide distributions in soil profile of forest tracts, radionuclide concentrations in pine organs, radionuclide contents in mushrooms (conifers), contamination distribution (%) in pines under different levels of soil contamination are given. 6 tabs

  14. Emission, transport, deposition, and re-suspension of radionuclides from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in the atmosphere - Overview of 2-year investigations in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2013-04-01

    Following a huge earthquake and tsunami in Eastern Japan on 11 March, 2011, the accident in Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) occurred to emit a large amount of artificial radionuclides to the environment. Soon after the FDNPP accident, many Japanese researchers, as well as researchers in other countries, started monitoring radionuclides in various environmental fields and/or model calculations to understand extent and magnitude of radioactive pollution. In this presentation, we overview these activities for the atmospheric radionuclides in Japan as followings: 1. Investigations to evaluate radionuclide emissions by explosions at FNDPP in March 2011 and to estimate the respiration dose of the radiation at this stage. 2. Investigations to evaluate atmospheric transport and deposition processes of atmospheric radionuclide to determine the extent of radionuclide pollution. -- Based on results of the regular and urgent monitoring results, as well as the mapping of the distribution of radionuclide s accumulated by the deposition to the ground, restoration of their time-dependent emission rates has been tried, and processes determining atmospheric concentration and deposition to the ground have been investigated by using the model calculations. 3. Monitoring of the atmospheric concentrations of radionuclide after the initial, surge phase of FNDPP accident. 4. Investigations to evaluate re-suspension of radionuclide from the ground, including the soil and the vegetation. -- Intensive monitoring of the atmospheric concentrations and deposition amount of radionuclide after the initial, surge phase of the accident enable us to evaluate emission history from FNDPP, atmospheric transport and deposition processes, chemical and physical characteristics of atmospheric radionuclide especially of radio cesium, and re-suspension processes which has become dominant process to supply radio cesium to the atmosphere recently.

  15. Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigations on the immobilization of radionuclides by hardened cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Bonhoure, I.; Tits, J.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Bradbury, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The uptake of safety-relevant radionuclides was studied using a combination of macroscopic (wet chemistry) and spectroscopic (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy) techniques with the aim of gaining a mechanistic understanding of the uptake processes on hardened cement paste (HCP) and deducing robust sets of sorption values. HCP contains impurities of metal cations in the ppb to ppm concentration range. As a consequence, the inventories of stable isotopes are expected to be significant in a cementitious near-field and may even exceed the radionuclide inventories of the waste matrix for many safety-relevant radioelements. In view of the significant inventories of stable isotopes, it is suggested that isotopic exchange - replacement of stable isotopes by their radioactive counterparts in the cement matrix - is an important immobilisation process in HCP. However, it is not a priori known what proportion of each elemental inventory is available for isotopic exchange. Wet chemistry studies with Cs and Sr show that the total inventory of these elements is reversibly bound and that their partitioning between HCP and pore water can be modelled using the distribution values deduced from studies of the corresponding tracers ( 137 Cs and 85 Sr). This finding corroborates the relevance of isotopic exchange in cementitious systems. Wet chemistry investigations need to be complemented by spectroscopic techniques, e.g., XAFS, in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of the chemical processes by which waste ions become immobilised in cement-based matrices. XAFS can be used to obtain information at the atomic/molecular level, i.e., the type, number and distance of neighbouring atoms. XAFS studies on cementitious systems are still rather rare, and therefore information on the potential and limitations of this technique is sparse. Mechanistic aspects of the immobilisation processes are discussed for some safety-relevant radionuclides (e.g. Ni and Sr) using the

  16. Investigating radionuclide bearing suspended sediment transport mechanisms in the Ribble estuary using airborne remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkin, P.A.

    2000-10-01

    BNFL Sellafield has been authorised to discharge radionuclides to the Irish Sea since 1952. In the aquatic environment the radionuclides are adsorbed by sediments and are thus redistributed by sediment transport mechanisms. This sediment is known to accumulate in the estuaries of the Irish Sea. BNFL Springfields is also licensed to discharge isotopically different radionuclides directly to the Ribble estuary. Thus there is a need to understand the sediment dynamics of the Ribble estuary in order to understand the fate of these radionuclides within the Ribble estuary. Estuaries are highly dynamic environments that are difficult to monitor using the conventional sampling techniques. However, remote sensing provides a potentially powerful tool for monitoring the hydrodynamics of the estuarine environment by providing data that are both spatially and temporally representative. This research develops a methodology for mapping suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the Ribble estuary using airborne remote sensing. The first hypothesis, that there is a relationship between SSC and 137 Cs concentration is proven in-situ (R 2 =0.94), thus remotely sensed SSC can act as a surrogate for 137 Cs concentration. Initial in-situ characterisation of the suspended sediments was investigated to identify spatial and temporal variability in grain size distributions and reflectance characteristics for the Ribble estuary. Laboratory experiments were then performed to clearly define the SSC reflectance relationship, identify the optimum CASI wavelengths for quantifying SSC and to demonstrate the effects on reflectance of the environmental variables of salinity and clay content. Images were corrected for variation in solar elevation and angle to give a ground truth calibration for SSC, with an R 2 =0.76. The remaining scatter in this relationship was attributed to the differences in spatial and temporal representation between sampling techniques and remote sensing. The second hypothesis

  17. Behaviour and fate radionuclides in soils. Mathematical modelling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovdan, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides as result of Chernobyl accident has led to contamination of 23% of territory of Republic of Belarus. Soil has high capacity to adsorb radionuclides and their intensive sorption provides the creation of a long-lived radionuclide source in a terrestrial environment. In the management of the contaminated areas and application of a countermeasure strategy it is extremely important to know the environmental mechanisms governing the behaviour of radionuclides in soils. Basic attention in the work is paid to the study of 137 Cs and 90 Sr because they are the main radionuclides from the view point of radioactive danger in polluted areas. The main features and processes that control radionuclide behaviour in soil have been analysed. On the basis of natural researches, lab test and mathematical modelling the impact of physical-chemical factors and the soil component composition changes upon the radionuclides migration and sorption in natural dispersed systems (peat, sand, bentonite, kaolin, sapropel) has been investigated. The investigations done allowed to substantiate the mathematical models of the radionuclides migration in the regions of positive and negative temperatures, to develop methods of experimental identification of main transfer characteristics and to compile a data base for these models. (orig.)

  18. Distribution of radionuclides and elements in Cubatao River sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.S.C.; Mazzilli, B.P.; Favaro, D.I.T.

    2006-01-01

    Cubatao River is located in Santos Basin, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. This region is characterized by the occurrence of estuaries and mangrove. Due to its location, near the coastal line, it is also an important industrial area, where phosphate fertilizer plants, petrol refineries, and chemical and steel industries are present. Such human activities contribute to the enhancement of elemental composition in sediments and, in some cases, also increase the radionuclide concentrations, the so called Technologically Enhanced Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). The contamination of land and sediments by TENORM is of major concern. The activity concentration of U and Th series radionuclides was determined in five sediment samples from Cubatao River. The activity concentration ratio was also determined. Equilibrium was observed for the ratio 234 U/ 238 U. The activity ratios of Th/ 238 U, 228 Ra/ 226 Ra and 210 Pb/ 226 Ra were higher than the unity. In the first two cases, the observed values are due to the higher activity of Th in the sediment and in the last case are probably due to the atmospheric deposition of 210 Pb. (author)

  19. Anthropogenic radionuclide fluxes and distribution in bottom sediments of the cooling basin of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marčiulionienė, D.; Mažeika, J.; Lukšienė, B.; Jefanova, O.; Mikalauskienė, R.; Paškauskas, R.

    2015-01-01

    Based on γ-ray emitting artificial radionuclide spectrometric measurements, an assessment of areal and vertical distribution of 137 Cs, 60 Co and 54 Mn activity concentrations in bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai was performed. Samples of bottom sediments from seven monitoring stations within the cooling basin were collected in 1988–1996 and 2007–2010 (in July–August). For radionuclide areal distribution analysis, samples from the surface 0–5 cm layer were used. Multi sample cores sliced 2 cm, 3 cm or 5 cm thick were used to study the vertical distribution of radionuclides. The lowest 137 Cs activity concentrations were obtained for two stations that were situated close to channels with radionuclide discharges, but with sediments that had a significantly smaller fraction of organic matter related to finest particles and consequently smaller radionuclide retention potential. The 137 Cs activity concentration was distributed quite evenly in the bottom sediments from other investigated monitoring stations. The highest 137 Cs activity concentrations in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai were measured in the period of 1988–1989; in 1990, the 137 Cs activity concentrations slightly decreased and they varied insignificantly over the investigation period. The obtained 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu activity ratio values in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai represented radioactive pollution with plutonium from nuclear weapon tests. Higher 60 Co and 54 Mn activity concentrations were observed in the monitoring stations that were close to the impact zones of the technical water outlet channel and industrial rain drainage system channel. 60 Co and 54 Mn activity concentrations in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai significantly decreased when operations at both INPP reactor units were stopped. The vertical distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments revealed complicated sedimentation features, which may have been affected by a number of natural and

  20. Natural radionuclide distribution in soils of Gudalore, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Manikandan, N.M.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Raghunath, V.M.; Gajendran, V.

    2000-01-01

    The concentration of primordial radionuclides in soil samples of Gudalore Taluk in the Udagamandalam district has been measured from the gamma ray spectrum of the soil. The mean activities of 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K are 75.3±44.1, 37.7±10.1 and 195.2±85.1 Bq kg -1 dry weight, respectively. The average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1 m above ground is 74.3±27.8 nGy h -1 , corresponding to an annual effective dose equivalent of 455.6 μSv. The dose equivalent ranges from 168.3 to 1250.5 μSv. The results have been compared with other global radioactivity measurements and evaluations

  1. Natural radionuclide distribution in soils of Gudalore, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvasekarapandian, S. E-mail: spandian@bharathi.ernet.in; Sivakumar, R.; Manikandan, N.M.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Raghunath, V.M.; Gajendran, V

    2000-02-01

    The concentration of primordial radionuclides in soil samples of Gudalore Taluk in the Udagamandalam district has been measured from the gamma ray spectrum of the soil. The mean activities of {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 40}K are 75.3{+-}44.1, 37.7{+-}10.1 and 195.2{+-}85.1 Bq kg{sup -1} dry weight, respectively. The average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1 m above ground is 74.3{+-}27.8 nGy h{sup -1}, corresponding to an annual effective dose equivalent of 455.6 {mu}Sv. The dose equivalent ranges from 168.3 to 1250.5 {mu}Sv. The results have been compared with other global radioactivity measurements and evaluations.

  2. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mattigod, Shas V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Powers, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whyatt, Greg A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the

  3. An improved in situ method for determining depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, R.R.; Kearfott, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry determines the quantities of radionuclides in some medium with a portable detector. The main limitation of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry lies in determining the depth distribution of radionuclides. This limitation is addressed by developing an improved in situ method for determining the depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in large area sources. This paper implements a unique collimator design with conventional radiation detection equipment. Cylindrically symmetric collimators were fabricated to allow only those gamma-rays emitted from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis) to be detected. Positioned with its axis normal to surface of the media, each collimator enables the detection of gamma-rays emitted from a different range of polar angles and preferential depths. Previous in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. However, the absolute method presented in this paper determines the depth distribution as a histogram and does not rely on such assumptions. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method only requires a single gamma-ray emission, provides more detailed depth information, and offers a superior ability for characterizing complex depth distributions. Collimated spectrometer measurements of buried area sources demonstrated the ability of the method to yield accurate depth information. Based on the results of actual measurements, this method increases the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry as an independent characterization tool in situations with unknown radionuclide depth distributions

  4. Radionuclide distributions and sorption behavior in the Susquehanna--Chesapeake Bay System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; McLean, R.I.; Domotor, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclides released into the Susquehanna--Chesapeake System from the Three Mile Island, Peach Bottom, and Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plants are partitioned among dissolved, particulate, and biological phases and may thus exist in a number of physical and chemical forms. In this project, we have measured the dissolved and particulate distributions of fallout 137 Cs; reactor-released 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 65 Zn, 60 Co, and 58 Co; and naturally occurring 7 Be and 210 Pb in the lower Susquehanna River and Upper Chesapeake Bay. In addition, we chemically leached suspended particles and bottom sediments in the laboratory to determine radionuclide partitioning among different particulate-sorbing phases to complement the site-specific field data. This information has been used to document the important geochemical processes that affect the transport, sorption, distribution, and fate of reactor-released radionuclides (and by analogy, other trace contaminants) in this river-estuarine system. Knowledge of the mechanisms, kinetic factors, and processes that affect radionuclide distributions is crucial for predicting their biological availability, toxicity, chemical behavior, physical transport, and accumulation in aquatic systems. The results from this project provide the information necessary for developing accurate radionuclide-transport and biological-uptake models. 76 refs., 12 figs

  5. Studies on distribution coefficient (Kd) of naturally occurring radionuclides in geological matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of fate and transport of toxic and radioactive metals in the subsurface of uranium tailing pond sites is critical to the assessment of environmental impact and to the development of effective remediation technologies. The mobility of radionuclides and toxic metals is enhanced by acidification of tailings due to sulphide oxidation catalysed by microbial activity. Due to infiltration of water, there is a possibility of leaching of these radionuclides and toxic metals from the tailings pond to the ground water. Sorption onto mineral surfaces is an important mechanism for reducing radionuclide concentrations along ground water flow paths and retarding radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Reactive transport of ground water contaminants often assume that the reaction governing the retardation of a particular contaminant or radionuclide can be described by simple partitioning constant, K d . This constant is assumed to account for all the reversible sorption processes affecting transport of the contaminant. Experimental determination of site-specific K d values is absolutely essential for the accurate estimation of reactive transport of these contaminants. The results of such studies would be helpful to model migration of these pollutants and to estimate the radiation dose to members of the public through groundwater drinking pathway at different distances from the tailings pond. In the present study it is clearly observed that K d values of most of the radionuclides are strongly dependent on different soil and ground water parameters. The relationships generated between distribution coefficient values of different radionuclides and different soil and ground water parameters can be used to generate look up table. And these relationships can also be used for the prediction of K d values of different radionuclides by using the different physico-chemical parameters of soil and ground water of the particular location

  6. Distribution of some radionuclides in the St. Lawrence estuary, Quebec, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serodes, J.B.; Roy, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of γ-emitting radionuclides in the St. Lawrence estuary was studied in 1978 and 1979, by means of double sampling and the flocculation and centrifugation of very large volumes of water. Eleven radionuclides were detected, originating from a variety of sources, including soil erosion and nuclear weapons testing. The concentrations measured in 1979 were higher than those of 1978; the 21st Chinese nuclear test could be responsible for the increase of some radionuclides. Concentrations decrease markedly from the freshwater part to the marine region of the estuary. Dilution by oceanic waters, relative affinity with suspended matter and radioactive decay are the principal mechanisms involved in the distribution patterns. Cesium-137, 144 Ce, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 228 Th are strongly associated with suspended matter, while about two thirds of 7 Be, 106 Ru and 235 U are present in the liquid phase. Results suggest that 235 U is released from sediments in the maximum turbidity zone

  7. Radionuclides distribution in internal organs of wild animals in alienation zone of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatova, T.A.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Mironov, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Activities of caesium 137, strontium 90, plutonium isotopes and americium 241 are experimentally defined in the internal organs of bearer and wolf alienation zone of Chernobyl NPP. Radionuclides distribution in the internal organs of wild animals is defined by destruction of nuclear fuel particles

  8. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, Dan

    1998-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accident are identified as the three main sources. From measurements in the Eurasian shelf seas it is concluded that the total input of 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 90 Sr from these sources has been decreasing during the 1990's, while 129 I has increased. The main fraction of the reprocessing and Chernobyl activity found in Arctic Ocean surface layer is transported from the Barents Sea east along the Eurasian Arctic shelf seas to the Laptev Sea before entering the Nansen Basin. This inflow results in highest 137 Cs, 129 I and 90 Sr concentrations in the Arctic Ocean surface layers, and continuously decreasing concentrations with depth. Chernobyl-derived 137 Cs appeared in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean around 1991, and in the mid 1990's the fraction to total 137 Cs was approximately 30% in the entire Eurasian Arctic region. The transfer times for releases from Sellafield are estimated to be 5-7 years to the SE Barents Sea, 7-9 years to the Kara Sea, 10-11 years to the Laptev Sea and 12-14 years to the central Arctic Ocean. Global fallout is the primary source of plutonium with highest concentrations found in the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. When transported over the shallow shelf seas, particle reactive transuranic elements experience an intense scavenging. A rough estimate shows that approximately 75% of the plutonium entering the Kara and Laptev Seas are removed to the sediment. High seasonal riverine input of 239 , 240 Pu is observed near the mouths of the large Russian rivers. Sediment inventories show much higher concentrations on the shelf compared to the deep Arctic Ocean. This is primarily due to the low particle flux in the open ocean

  9. Distributed models of radionuclide transport on watersheds: development and implementation for the Chernobyl and Fukushima catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivva, S.; Zheleznyak, M. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The distributed hydrological 'rainfall- runoff' models provide possibilities of the physically based simulation of surface and subsurface flow on watersheds based on the GIS processed data. The success of such modeling approaches for the predictions of the runoff and soil erosion provides a basis for the implementation of the distributed radionuclide transport watershed models. Two distributed watershed models of radionuclide transport - RUNTOX and DHSVM-R have been used to simulate the radionuclide transport in the basin of the Dnieper River, Ukraine and watersheds of Prefecture Fukushima. RUNTOX is used for the simulation of radionuclide wash off from the experimental plots and small watersheds, and DHSVM-R is used for medium and large watersheds RUNTOX is two dimensional distributed hydrological model based on the finite-difference solution of the coupled equations the surface flow, subsurface flow, groundwater flow and advection- dispersion equations of the sediments (eroded soil) and radionuclide transport in liquid and solid phases, taking into parameterize the radionuclide exchanges between liquid and solid phases.. This model has been applied to the experimental plots in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident and experimental plots in the Fukushima Prefecture. The experience of RUNTOX development and application has been used for the extension of the distributed hydrological model DHSVM by the including of the module of the watershed radionuclide transport. The updated model was named by DHSMV-R. The original DHSVM (Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model) was developed in the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. DHSVM is a physical distributed hydrology-vegetation model for complex terrain based on the numerical solution of the network of one dimensional equations. The model accounts explicitly for the spatial distribution of land-surface processes, and can be applied over a range of scales, from plot to large

  10. The distribution of artificial radionuclides in the waters of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea in 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, C.; Gabriel, H.; Goroncy, I.; Framcke, G.

    1997-01-01

    In the summer of 1985, sea water samples were taken to determine 3 H, 90 Sr, 134 Cs, 137 Cs and transuranics within a grid of 165 stations including 16 depth series down to the seafloor, covering all ice-free areas. The distribution of the activity concentrations and the nuclide ratios reveal the contamination pathway into the surface and deeper layers of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea from nuclear weapon fallout and civil nuclear technology. Moreover, the investigations show that: (1) a yearly discharge of 1 TBq (10 12 Bq) 90 Sr into the Irish Sea (English Channel) is diluted on its way to the southern Norwegian Sea, raising the concentration by about 0.04 m Bql -1 ; (2) the drift time to this sea area is around 4 years; (3) about 40% of the 137 Cs discharged does not reach the Norwegian Sea and (4) a further 30% leaves the Norwegian-Greenland Sea via the North Cape and flows into the Barents Sea. Investigations into the vertical distribution and stratification of the radioactivity indicate the time scale on which the radionuclides travel to the deeper layers. (author)

  11. The distribution of radionuclides between the sediments and macrophytes in the cooling pond of the Ignalina NPP - The Distribution of Radionuclides in Freshwater Hydro Ecosystem's Bottom Sediments and Macrophytes depending on the Ecological Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciulioniene, D.; Jefanova, O.; Mazeika, J.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn in the aquatory of lake Drukshiai (the monitoring stations), the coastal area of this lake, the industrial drainage systems channel of the Ignalina NPP and the cooling water channel of the Ignalina NPP was analyzed on the basis of long-term (1988-2009) investigations of radionuclides specific activity in bottom sediments and macrophytes, also the ability of radionuclides falling into lake Drukshiai from the Ignalina NPP through effluents channels was assessed. It was established that 137 Cs, 60 Co and 54 Mn in the bottom sediments and the macrophytes were distributed quite differently in the monitoring stations of lake Drukshiai and the coastal area as well as in the industrial drainage systems channel of the Ignalina NPP and the cooling water channel of the Ignalina NPP. The different characteristics of the sediments, various ecological conditions, as well as the existing anthropogenic environmental factors and the different in the ecological groups of the plants could have had impact on the distribution of 137 Cs, 60 Co and 54 Mn in the bottom sediments and the aquatic plants in lake Drukshiai and the effluents channels of the Ignalina NPP. The 137 Cs, 60 Co and 54 Mn specific activity's values were significantly higher in macrophytes from the industrial drainage systems channel of Ignalina NPP than in macrophytes from the cooling water channel. Nevertheless the specific activities level of these radionuclides differed only slightly in the macrophytes from the areas which were impacted by the effluents channels of the Ignalina NPP. This can be explained by the fact that the phyto-remediation (as the form of auto-purification) of these effluents from the radionuclides had been present in the industrial drainage systems channel of Ignalina NPP before entering the water into lake Drukshiai. (authors)

  12. The distribution of radionuclides between the sediments and macrophytes in the cooling pond of the Ignalina NPP - The Distribution of Radionuclides in Freshwater Hydro Ecosystem's Bottom Sediments and Macrophytes depending on the Ecological Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciulioniene, D.; Jefanova, O.; Mazeika, J. [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos str. 2, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lietuva (Lithuania)

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn in the aquatory of lake Drukshiai (the monitoring stations), the coastal area of this lake, the industrial drainage systems channel of the Ignalina NPP and the cooling water channel of the Ignalina NPP was analyzed on the basis of long-term (1988-2009) investigations of radionuclides specific activity in bottom sediments and macrophytes, also the ability of radionuclides falling into lake Drukshiai from the Ignalina NPP through effluents channels was assessed. It was established that {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 54}Mn in the bottom sediments and the macrophytes were distributed quite differently in the monitoring stations of lake Drukshiai and the coastal area as well as in the industrial drainage systems channel of the Ignalina NPP and the cooling water channel of the Ignalina NPP. The different characteristics of the sediments, various ecological conditions, as well as the existing anthropogenic environmental factors and the different in the ecological groups of the plants could have had impact on the distribution of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 54}Mn in the bottom sediments and the aquatic plants in lake Drukshiai and the effluents channels of the Ignalina NPP. The {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 54}Mn specific activity's values were significantly higher in macrophytes from the industrial drainage systems channel of Ignalina NPP than in macrophytes from the cooling water channel. Nevertheless the specific activities level of these radionuclides differed only slightly in the macrophytes from the areas which were impacted by the effluents channels of the Ignalina NPP. This can be explained by the fact that the phyto-remediation (as the form of auto-purification) of these effluents from the radionuclides had been present in the industrial drainage systems channel of Ignalina NPP before entering the water into lake Drukshiai. (authors)

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of a radionuclide distribution within a medium of uniform coefficient of attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The non-invasive, fully three-dimensional reconstruction of a radionuclide distribution is studied. The problem is considered in ideal form. Several solutions, ranging from the completely analytical to the completely graphical, are presented for both the non-attenuated and uniformly attenuated cases. A function is defined which, if enacted as a response to each detected photon, will yield, upon superposition, a faithful reconstruction of the radionuclide density. Two and three-dimensional forms of this functions are defined for both the non-attenuated and uniformly attenuated case

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, Dan

    1998-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accident are identified as the three main sources. From measurements in the Eurasian shelf seas it is concluded that the total input of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from these sources has been decreasing during the 1990`s, while {sup 129}I has increased. The main fraction of the reprocessing and Chernobyl activity found in Arctic Ocean surface layer is transported from the Barents Sea east along the Eurasian Arctic shelf seas to the Laptev Sea before entering the Nansen Basin. This inflow results in highest {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I and {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the Arctic Ocean surface layers, and continuously decreasing concentrations with depth. Chernobyl-derived {sup 137}Cs appeared in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean around 1991, and in the mid 1990`s the fraction to total {sup 137}Cs was approximately 30% in the entire Eurasian Arctic region. The transfer times for releases from Sellafield are estimated to be 5-7 years to the SE Barents Sea, 7-9 years to the Kara Sea, 10-11 years to the Laptev Sea and 12-14 years to the central Arctic Ocean. Global fallout is the primary source of plutonium with highest concentrations found in the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. When transported over the shallow shelf seas, particle reactive transuranic elements experience an intense scavenging. A rough estimate shows that approximately 75% of the plutonium entering the Kara and Laptev Seas are removed to the sediment. High seasonal riverine input of {sup 239}, {sup 240}Pu is observed near the mouths of the large Russian rivers. Sediment inventories show much higher concentrations on the shelf compared to the deep Arctic Ocean. This is primarily due to the low particle flux in the open ocean

  15. Distribution of radionuclides in potato tubers. Implication for dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T.; Poultney, S.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the distribution of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, Pu and Am in potato tubers has been carried out. Cesium-137 was essentially uniformly distributed throughout the tuber, whereas up to about 50% of the 90 Sr activity was found in the peel. Results for actinides indicated that most of the activity would be found in the peel and of this more than half would be located in the thin outermost skin. When account is taken of the form in which potatoes are consumed in the UK, the values of soil-plant transfer factors currently assumed in the NRPB model FARMLAND are reasonable for general assessment purposes. (author)

  16. Radionuclide distribution and transport in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. A critical review of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, C.H.; Thorne, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    These volumes present the results of a study undertaken for the Commission of the European Communities. The aim was to review available data concerning the movement of radionuclides through the environment and to recommend values of parameters for use in environmental transport models. The elements reviewed all have radioactive isotopes which could contribute significantly to the radiological impact of chronic releases of radioactivity from nuclear installations within the countries of the European community, i.e. the major activation and fission products. In dividing these elements between volumes an effort has been made to take account of the method of production of their major radioisotopes, together with their chemical similarities and environmental interactions. This volume covers the radionuclide distribution of americium and curium. The main areas which are covered include the deposition of radionuclides on plants and soils, transport in soils, uptake and translocation in plants via the roots and foliage, metabolism in domestic animals and radionuclide transfers through the main physical and biotic components of the aquatic environment. In reviewing these subject areas, account has been taken not only of the literature relating to specific radionuclides, but also of the literature relating to the stable element of which they are radioisotopes. (Auth.)

  17. Distribution of uranium series radionuclides in upland vegetation of northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheard, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Multivariate methods are used to explore patterns of accumulation of radionuclides and stable elements among 10 plant species at four localities in northern Saskatchewan. Principal components analysis and canonical correlation analysis of the radionuclides and stable elements showed that lead-210 and polonium-210 are correlated with crustal elements distributed in the atmoshpere and therefore are accumulated more abundantly by lichen and moss species than by vascular plants. Uranium showed a similar trend. Neither these radionuclides nor radium-226 showed strong correlations with other stable elements. The highest accumulation of uranium was in the Wollaston Lake region, especially for the nonvascular plants, where the soil levels are lowest. This tends to substantiate previous suggestions that uranium available for uptake by vascular plants is associated with groundwater rather than soil particles. Canonical variates analysis on radionuclide levels in vegetation by species group shows that trees, shrubs, lichens, and moss all have significantly different patterns of accumulation. The vascular and nonvascular groups are separated primarily by lead-210 and polonium- 210 accumulation. The trees and shrubs are separated by radium-226 levels. A similar analysis by locality showed significant differences in radionuclide accumulation by vegetation in all possible pairs of localities, except between the two Wollaston Lake localities. The largest distances were between regions and were based primarily on uranium accumulation in the nonvascular plants. Differences in radium-226 levels among the shrub species are responsible for the significant difference between the two localities in the Churchill River region

  18. Spatiotemporal distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in nearby marine surface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusakabe, M.; Oikawa, S.; Takata, H.; Misonoo, J. [Marine Ecology Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Spatiotemporal distributions of anthropogenic radionuclides in marine surface sediments off Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures were analyzed on the basis of data collected during the monitoring program launched by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology in 2011 right after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident began. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in the surface sediments varied spatially by two orders of magnitude, from 1.7 to 580 Bq kg-dry{sup -1}, and there was no obvious correlation between {sup 137}Cs concentration and the proximity of the sampling location to the accident site. The total inventory of {sup 137}Cs accumulated in the upper 3 cm of surface sediments in the monitoring area was estimated to be 3.78 x 10{sup 13} Bq, that is, 0.1-2% of the total {sup 137}Cs flux from the plant to the ocean as a result of the accident (the percentage depends on the model used to estimate the total flux). The spatial variations of {sup 137}Cs concentration and inventory depended on two main factors: the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the overlying water during the first several months after the accident and the physical characteristics of the sediments (water content and bulk density). The temporal variations of the concentrations of other anthropogenic radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 95}Nb, {sup 110} {sup m}Ag, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}Te, and {sup 129} {sup m}Te) in the sediments were also investigated. Activity ratios of these nuclides to {sup 137}Cs suggest that the nuclides themselves were not homogenized before they were removed from seawater to the sediments.

  19. Testing-ground investigations of radionuclide migration in temporary area for radioactive waste localization << Ryzhy Les >>.; Poligonnye issledovaniya migratsii radionuklidov na uchastke punkta vremennoj lokalizatsii radioaktivnykh otkhodov << Ryzhij les >>.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhepo, S P; Skal` skij, A S; Bugaj, D A; Gudzenko, V V; Mogil` nyj, S A; Proskura, N I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Geologicheskikh Nauk; [Admyinyistratsyiya zoni vyidchuzhennya, Chernobil` (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    Experimental investigations carried out on testing grounds have permitted studying hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, contamination levels of ground waters and mechanisms of radionuclide migration in the areas of radioactive waste burial in sector 2.1 of temporary area for radioactive waste localization << Ryzhy Les >>. Distribution coefficients for {sup 137} Cs and {sup 90} Sr as well as chemical forms of sorbed radionuclides have been determined under in situ conditions. Lateral rates of radionuclide migration in ground waters are estimated.

  20. Particle size distribution measurements of radionuclides from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, B.; Tschiersch, J.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of the size distribution of the Chernobyl aerosol have been measured at four locations along the trajectory of the cloud. Changes in time and differences between 131 I and the other isotopes are explained by aerosol physical processes. The relevance of the measurements for dose calculations are discussed

  1. Computed tomography of surface related radionuclide distributions ('BONN'-tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Koenig, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method called the 'BONN' tomography is described to produce planar projections of circular activity distributions using standard single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical value of the method is demonstrated for bone scans of the jaw, thorax, and pelvis. Numerical or projection-related problems are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. A study on the radiation and environmental safety -Studies on radionuclide migration and distribution in terrestrial ecosystem-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hoh; Lee, Hyun Duk; Kim, Sam Lang; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Yong Hoh; Kim, Sang Bok; Lee, Myung Hoh; Hong, Kwang Heui; Lee, Won Yoon; Park, Doo Won; Choi, Sang Doh

    1995-07-01

    In order to investigate the migrational behaviors of radionuclides deposited onto the farm-land during crop cultures, potato and red pepper were cultured on lysimeters installed in a greenhouse and the solution of mixed radionuclides such as Mn-54, Co-60, Sr-85 and Cs-137 was distributed over the land surface on different growth stages of the crops. For rice, soybean, Chinese cabbage and radish, the second or third year's radio-tracer experiments were carried out. Experimental results on Sr-85 and Cs-137 transfer factors for Chinese cabbage and radish were compared with their root-uptake concentrations calculated using existing methods. Samples of farm-land soils and crop plants were collected in the middle part of Korea and concentrations of several γ-emitters were measured. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of Cs-137 measured in outdoor fields were compared with those from greenhouse experiments. 20 figs, 35 tabs, 58 refs. (Author)

  3. Spatial distribution and risk assessment of radionuclides in soils around a coal-fired power plant: A case study from the city of Baoji, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Lijun; Wei Haiyan; Wang Lingqing

    2007-01-01

    Coal burning may enhance human exposure to the natural radionuclides that occur around coal-fired power plants (CFPP). In this study, the spatial distribution and hazard assessment of radionuclides found in soils around a CFPP were investigated using statistics, geostatistics, and geographic information system (GIS) techniques. The concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K in soils range from 12.54 to 40.18, 38.02 to 72.55, and 498.02 to 1126.98 Bq kg -1 , respectively. Ordinary kriging was carried out to map the spatial patterns of radionuclides, and disjunctive kriging was used to quantify the probability of radium equivalent activity (Ra eq ) higher than the threshold. The maps show that the spatial variability of the natural radionuclide concentrations in soils was apparent. The results of this study could provide valuable information for risk assessment of environmental pollution and decision support

  4. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: • Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways • Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually • Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or “compartment” • Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU • Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, • Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs • Computing the

  5. Distribution and behavior of radionuclides and stable elements in Lake Obuchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Inaba, Jiro

    2000-01-01

    Distribution and behavior of radionuclides and related stable elements in the lake water of brackish Lake Obuchi were investigated by field observations. Concentrations of 238 U and stable elements were measured at various points in the lake, and compiled to obtain the elemental distributions and variation characteristics. The concentrations of 238 U in the lake water were higher in areas nearer to the Pacific Ocean, and correlated well with those of Na, K, Ca, Mg and Sr (r = 0.86 to 0.92). These observations implied that 238 U in the lake originated from seawater. The bottom layer water was reductive during July and September (stratified period) in deep areas (> 3 m). In this condition, concentrations of PO 4 3- -P, NH 4 + -N, Fe and Mn in the water increased. Concentration ratios of 238 U to those of Na strongly suggested the following conclusions. The concentrations of 238 U in the turn-over period were represented by a simple mixture of seawater and fresh water. However, in the stratified period, part of the 238 U was lost from the seawater near the bottom of the lake due to the reductive condition. (author)

  6. Radionuclide investigations in clinical cardiology - 10 years of cooperation in Frankfurt/FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Kaltenbach, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclide investigations today are an important tool in cardiology. They close the diagnostic gap in cases where non-invasive procedures of cardiological diagnosis such as ecg, exercise-ecg, echocardiography and chest-x-ray remains unrevealing. Further, they are helpful when an exact quantitation of the disease or a precise follow-up is required. Radionuclide techniques are very useful to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease and to judge myocardial function in patients with aortic or mitral regurgitation. Follow-up investigations after therapy (aortocoronary bypass, PTCA, valve replacement) permit conclusions regarding the benefit of these measures. Results of radionuclide investigations should consider the Bayes' theorem in order to keep false-negative and false-positive reports as low as possible. (orig.) [de

  7. Distributions of radionuclides among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Ueda, Taishi

    1976-01-01

    Distributions of radionuclides ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh) among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment were examined by radioisotope tracer experiment in order to estimate the influence of sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by the alga. By the application of the compartment model to the experimental results, exponential formulas of distributions were obtained. Through comparison of the transfer coefficients of radionuclides calculated from the exponential formulas, the influence of the sediment on the accumulation of the radionuclides by the green alga was determined to be the largest for 60 Co, followed by 95 Zr,- 95 Nb, 106 Ru- 106 Rh and 137 Cs in this order. The activity ratios of 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh calculated from the transfer coefficients are larger for the alga than for the sediment, inversely those of 60 Co and 137 Cs show higher values for the sediment than for the alga. Especially, in the case of 60 Co, the activity ratio for the sediment is approximately 20 times greater than that for the alga. Biological half lives in green alga estimated from the transfer coefficients were 10 days for 60 Co, 7 days for 137 Cs, 26 days for 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 24 days for 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 24 days for 106 Ru- 106 Rh. (auth.)

  8. Iodine-125 toxicity as a function of intranuclear radionuclide distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Hofer, K.G.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were synchronized in the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle by isoleucine deprivation and then subjected to 8 hr. labeling with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine (/sup 125/IUdR) either in the presence or absence of aphidicolin. Cells labeled in the presence of aphidicolin showed a D/sub 0/ of 30 decays/cell as compared to a D/sub 0/ of 90-100 decays for control cells. Presumably, aphidicolin had shifted /sup 125/IUdR incorporation into a sensitive sub-fraction of the nuclear genome. However, no aphidicolin effect was seen in identical studies on asynchronous cell populations, i.e., both control and aphidicolin treated cells showed a D/sub 0/ of 90-100 decays/cell. An attempt was made to correlate /sup 125/I toxicity with intranuclear /sup 125/I distribution. Electron-microsopic autoradiography and Chi=squared analysis revealed that in all experimental groups grain density was highest in the heterochromatin region of the nucleus. However, isoleucine deprivation lead to a dramatic decrease in the nuclear area occupied by heterochromatin (19.5% in control cells, 0.7% in synchronized cells), resulting in a corresponding increase in area and grain density for the euchromatin containing portion of the nucleus. These observations suggest that any shift in intranuclear distribution of /sup 125/I causes a dramatic change in the toxic effects of intranuclear /sup 125/I decays

  9. Radionuclide Distribution in the Soil on the Stabatishkes Site in the Vicinity of the Ignalina NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevgenij Aliončik

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A near surface repository for low and intermediate-level short-lived radioactive waste will be built on the Stabatiškės site in the vicinity of Ignalina NPP during decommissioning works. The reservoir can also be used for the waste stored in the temporary repositories of the Ignalina NPP. Engineering and nature protective barriers are used in the repository for radioactive waste, however, radionuclides can spread into the environment, extend in the biosphere and cause (define the external power light exposure of the environment due to the natural and premature (prescheduled degradation of the engineering barriers of the repository. The properties of the soil (acidity, quantity of organic substances, humidity are being investigated for estimating the possible migration and dispersion of radionuclides. The activity of radionuclides in the soil is also estimated before building the repository. Natural and artificial radionuclides make the pollution of the soil, and therefore the accumulation and vertical migration of artificial (137Cs, 60Co and natural (226Ra, 232Th, 40K radionuclides are being researched in the soil on the Stabatiškės site.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Environmental distribution of long-lived radionuclides /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csupka, S [Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-01-01

    Between 1963 and 1974 the content was investigated of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs in various parts of human environment. From food chains milk and dairy products, flour and flour products were chosen being the main sources of radioactivity produced by the above mentioned radionuclides to which the human population is exposed. In 1972 /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs in the daily intake of food were responsible for 60 to 70% of total radioactivity in milk and flour products. On a world scale radioactive fallout continues to be the primary source of radioactive contamination with the soil in which radionuclides are accumulated being the secondary source.

  11. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  12. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  13. Distributions and kinetics of inert radionuclides in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami; Yamasaki, Keizo; Okamoto, Ken-ichi; Yoshimoto, Taka-aki

    1988-01-01

    Recently there has been increased concern over the exposures not only in the nuclear energy field but in natural radiation environment. So this paper presents a study on distributions and kinetics of radioactive gases such as 41 Ar and radon progeny in the Kyoto University Reactor, Research Institute (KUR-RI) and radon in the earth, which is one of the main radiation sources in out-door and has been continually generated. Amount of 41 Ar released from the KUR has been decreased by about one-tenth within past seven years and further efforts have been focused on minimizing the released activity according to the concept of ALARA. The simultaneity of the diurnal variations in the radioactive dust observed in several buildings at the KUR-RI indicates that the concentration changes are not caused by the activities of man. Peak concentrations in vertical profile of radon are observed at ca 40 cm below ground surface and a rising of water table following precipitation causes a brust of radon concentration by upflow in ground. Exposure levels on workers and the public resulting from the KUR operation and natural radiation induced by radon progeny will be discussed at this meeting. (author)

  14. Distribution of radionuclides in urban areas and their removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Garger, E.; Sobotovitch, E.; Matveenko, I.I.

    1996-01-01

    The major contamination processes in the urban environment are wet and dry deposition with the former leading to much greater deposition per unit of time. Typical deposition patterns for radiocesium in urban areas have been identified for these processes and recent in situ measurements have been used to verify these relations and to investigate the urban weathering effect over long periods. The results of a recent series of field trials of decontamination methods in urban or suburban Russian areas are reported, and this experience has been incorporated in an example of formation of strategies for clean-up in an urban contamination scenario

  15. An investigation of electrostatically deposited radionuclides on latex balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.; Caly, A.

    2012-01-01

    Use of Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) education material for a community science education event to promote science awareness, science culture and literacy (Science Rendezvous 2011) lead to investigation of observed phenomena. Experiments are done on balloons that are electrostatically charged then left to collect particulate. Alpha spectroscopy was performed to identify alpha emitting radioisotopes present on the balloons. The time dependent behaviour of the activity was investigated. Additionally, the Alpha activity of the balloon was compared to Beta activity. The grounds for further investigations are proposed. (author)

  16. An investigation of electrostatically deposited radionuclides on latex balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, T.; Caly, A., E-mail: Terry.Price@gmail.com [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Use of Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) education material for a community science education event to promote science awareness, science culture and literacy (Science Rendezvous 2011) lead to investigation of observed phenomena. Experiments are done on balloons that are electrostatically charged then left to collect particulate. Alpha spectroscopy was performed to identify alpha emitting radioisotopes present on the balloons. The time dependent behaviour of the activity was investigated. Additionally, the Alpha activity of the balloon was compared to Beta activity. The grounds for further investigations are proposed. (author)

  17. Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in surficial sediments of Jakarta bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Arman Lubis

    2006-01-01

    he concentration and distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclide in surficial sediments of Jakarta Bay were investigated with the aim of evaluating its level and environmental radioactivity. Sediments were sampled in 30 locations using Smith-McIntyre Grab sampler. Sediments were dried, homogenized and sealed for 1 month for equilibration and for the detection, analysis and data acquisition, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a high resolution multichannel analyzer (MCA) was used. Additionally, the grain sizes were analyzed by means of hydrometer. The result shows that the specific activity of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs range from 6.71±1.01 Bq/kg to 28.63±4.29 Bq/kg, 6.46±0.97 Bq/kg to 28.21±4.23 Bq/kg, 16.62±2.49 Bq/kg to 40.46±6.07 Bq/kg, 115.80±12.16 Bq/kg to 358.69±30.49 Bq/kg, and 0.03±0.01 Bq/kg to 1.99±0.34 Bq/kg with the average value are 12.83±2.11 Bq/kg, 12.03±1.98 Bq/kg, 26.55±4.36 Bq/kg, 235.55±19.37 Bq/kg, and 0.77±0.13 Bq/kg, respectively. It shows that the activity of radionuclides in the research area are in natural level and the variation may be influenced by the grain size distribution in the sample. The absorbed dose rate and radium equivalent of gamma radiation was estimated to be 32.06±7.72 nano Grey/h and 68.14±11.20 Bq/kg, respectively. (author)

  18. Spatial distribution of radionuclides in Lake Michigan biota near the Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, M.A.; Yaguchi, E.M.; Nelson, D.M.; Marshall, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    A survey was made of four groups of biota in the vicinity of the Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant near Charlevoix, Michigan, to determine their usefulness in locating possible sources of plutonium and other radionuclides to Lake Michigan. This 70 MW boiling-water reactor, located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, was chosen because its fuel contains recycled plutonium, and because it routinely discharges very low-level radioactive wastes into the lake. Samples of crayfish (Orconectes sp.), green algae (Chara sp. and Cladophora sp.), and an aquatic macrophyte (Potamogeton sp.) were collected in August 1973, at varying distances from the discharge and analyzed for 239 240 Pu, 90 Sr, and five gamma-emitting radionuclides. Comparison samples of reactor waste solution have also been analyzed for these radionuclides. Comparisons of the spatial distributions of the extremely low radionuclide concentrations in biota clearly indicated that 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 65 Zn, and 60 Co were released from the reactor; their concentrations decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the discharge. Conversely, concentrations of 239 240 Pu, 95 Zr, and 90 Sr showed no correlation with distance, suggesting any input from Big Rock was insignificant with respect to the atmospheric origin of these isotopes. The significance of these results is discussed, particularly with respect to current public debate over the possibility of local environmental hazards associated with the use of plutonium as a nuclear fuel. (U.S.)

  19. Determination of distribution coefficient (Kd's) of some artificial and naturally occurring radionuclide in fresh and marine coastal water sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Mamish, S; Haleem, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Distribution coefficients of artificial and natural radionuclides in fresh and marine water sediment are used in modeling radionuclide dispersion in water system, and the radiation risk and environmental investigating of impact of radioactive emissions, due to routine operations of nuclear plants or disposal and burial of radioactive waste in the environment. In the present work, distribution coefficient of uranium, lead, polonium, radium (naturally occurring radionuclides that may be emitted into the Syrian environment by the phosphate and oil industry with relatively high concentrations) and caesium 137 and strontium 85, in fresh water sediment (Euphrates River, Orantos River and Mzzerib Lake) and marine coastal water (Lattakia, Tartous and Banias). Distribution coefficients were found to vary between (5.8-17.18)*10 3 , (2.2-8.11)*10 3 , (0.22-2.08)*10 3 , (0.16-0.19)*10 3 , (0.38-0.69)*10 3 and 49-312 for polonium, lead, uranium, radium, cesium and strontium respectively. Results have indicated that most measurement distribution coefficients in the present study were lower than those values reported in IAEA documents for marine coastal sediment. In addition, variations of Kd's with aqueous phase composition and sediment elemental and mineralogical composition and its total organic materials content have been studied, where liner correlation coefficients for each isotope with different parameters have been determined. The obtained data reported in this study can be used for radioactive contaminants dispersion and transfer in Syrian river, lake and coast to assess risks to public due to discharges of the phosphate and oil industry into the Syrian environment. (Authors)

  20. Workplaces with natural radionuclides - investigation results from Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifenhaeuser, C.; Koerner, S.; Mallick, R.

    2008-01-01

    After the Radiation Protection Ordinance came into force the Bavarian Environment Agency informed all water supply facilities, breweries, dairies, mineral water manufacturers, operators of underground workplaces and radon spas that the annual radon exposure of their staff has to be estimated. In Bavaria approximately 3330 companies with workplaces with exposure to radon were investigated. Herein the water supply facilities represented the largest group with 2550 companies. In about 96% of all investigated companies the radon exposure of the staff is below the action level of 6 mSv per year. In 75 water supply facilities and two mines the radon exposure of the staff exceeded the action level (6 mSv/a) or the annual limit (20 mSv/a). Workplaces with increased exposure due to uranium and thorium are of secondary importance in Bavaria. (orig.)

  1. Non-destructive investigation of technical plants and processes and natural processes by short-lived radionuclides (radiotracer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentsch, Thorsten; Zeuner, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Short lived open radionuclides are very suitable to investigate transport and mixing processes. They do not pollute the product. After decay of the radionuclide, the product can be used without any restrictions. Examples are showed for technical processes investigation by aid of radiotracer. (orig.)

  2. Investigations of the emission of radionuclides from coal fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Hoetzl, H.; Rosner, G.; Winkler, R.

    1980-02-01

    Samples of coal, brown coal, bottom ash, collected fly ash and 4 sieve fractions of collected fly ash from various electrostatic filter stages as well as samples of escaping fly ash, all taken simultaneously on 3 operating-days, have been investigated. In samples from coal through fly ash sieve fractions U-238, Th-232, Ra-226, Pb-210 and K-40 have been determined by γ-spectrometry, Po-210 by chemical separation with subsequent α-spectrometry. In escaping fly ash samples, which are available in small amounts only (ca. 1 g or less), after chemical separation U-238, U-234, Th-232, Th-230, Th-228 and Po-210 were determined by α-spectrometry and Pb-210 by low-level β-counting. Furthermore, Po-210 has been determined by direct α-spectrometry in several particle size fractions collected with a cascade impactor from the exhaust stream. The analytical procedures, which partially had to be developed for the purposes of the present study, are presented shortly. Specific activities of escaping fly ash are in good agreement with specific activities of the fly ash collected from the last electrostatic precipitator stage, provided that, for the latter, the particle size distribution in escaping fly ash is taken into account. Using these specific activities annual air-borne radionuclide emissions are calculated. The resulting activity concentrations in ground level air are compared to values of natural radioactivity. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Distribution of natural radionuclides and radiation level measurements in Karnataka State, India. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation from natural sources is a continuing and inescapable feature of life on earth. A large number of natural radioactivity measurements were conducted throughout world, in order to know their distribution and to assess their radiological health hazards. In this regard, considerable studies have been conducted by different research groups in Karnataka state and more data are reported. In this article, all the studies of natural radioactivity measurements have been combined and reviewed. The majority of the reported articles are about monitoring, distribution and assessment of the radiological health hazards of naturally occurring radionuclides. (author)

  4. Radionuclide adsorption distribution coefficients measured in Hanford sediments for the low level waste performance assessment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Serne, R.J.; Owen, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary modeling efforts for the Hanford Site's Low Level Waste-Performance Assessment (LLW PA) identified 129 I, 237 Np, 79 Se, 99 Tc, and 234 , 235 , 238 U as posing the greatest potential health hazard. It was also determined that the outcome of these simulations was very sensitive to the parameter describing the extent to which radionuclides sorb to the subsurface matrix, i.e., the distribution coefficient (K d ). The distribution coefficient is a ratio of the radionuclide concentration associated with the solid phase to that in the liquid phase. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure iodine, neptunium, technetium, and uranium K d values using laboratory conditions similar to those expected at the LLW PA disposal site, and (2) evaluate the effect of selected environmental parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, moisture concentration, and radio nuclide concentration, on K d values of selected radionuclides. It is the intent of these studies to develop technically defensible K d values for the PA. The approach taken throughout these studies was to measure the key radio nuclide K d values as a function of several environmental parameters likely to affect their values. Such an approach provides technical defensibility by identifying the mechanisms responsible for trends in K d values. Additionally, such studies provide valuable guidance regarding the range of K d values likely to be encountered in the proposed disposal site

  5. Distribution of uranium and radium radionuclides in the 'solid phase-interstitial soil solution' system and their migratory properties in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The background content of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides of uranium and radium in the soils of the south-east territory of the Republic of Belarus has been established. The reserve of migratory active species of uranium and radium in the soils has been determined using the data on the content of the radionuclides in the interstitial soil solutions, which are the most important chain of geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements in ecosystems. The values of radionuclides distribution coefficients in the 'solid phase - interstitial solution of soil' system were estimated. It was shown that the migratory ability of uranium in the investigated soils is higher than that of radium. A direct correlation between the contents of organic components and uranium in the soil solution has been revealed. The used approach to the investigation of the uranium and radium behavior allows comparing their abilities to the migration in dependence of the soil medium peculiarities. (authors)

  6. Upscaling the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Soil Erosion and Sediment Budget Investigations: Addressing the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Walling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of fallout radionuclides in soil erosion investigations and related sediment budget studies has provided a widely used tool for improving understanding of soil erosion and sediment transfer processes. However, most studies using fallout radionuclides undertaken to date have focussed on small areas. This focus on small areas reflects both the issues addressed and practical constraints associated with sample collection and analysis. Increasing acceptance of the important role of fine sediment in degrading aquatic habitats and in the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants within terrestrial and fluvial systems has emphasised the need to consider larger areas and the catchment or regional scale. The need to upscale existing approaches to the use of fallout radionuclides to larger areas represents an important challenge. This contribution provides a brief review of existing and potential approaches to upscaling the use of fallout radionuclides and presents two examples where such approaches have been successfully applied. These involve a national scale assessment of soil erosion rates in England and Wales based on 137Cs measurements and an investigation of the sediment budgets of three small/intermediate-size catchments in southern Italy.

  7. Distribution of 137Cs Radionuclide in Industrial Wastes Effluents of Gresik, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs was measured from industrial waste effluent of Gresik to Gresik Sea in east Java, Indonesia. The activity of 37Cs detected at all stations was much lower than in northeast Japan both before and after NPP Fukushima accident. This indicated that in Gresik industrials waste did not consist of 137Cs. The lowest activity 137Cs occurred at the station nearest to the industrial waste effluent that contained some particle ions that were able to scavenge 137Cs and then precipate this radionuclide. Furthermore, the greatest 137Cs occured at the station that has high current speeds that stirred up sediment to release 137Cs in seawater as a secondary source. The lowest salinity did not effect on the activity of 137Cs even though the lowest salinity and activity 137Cs occured at the same station

  8. Distribution of selected natural radionuclides in soil of the district Ziar nad Hronom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubcanova, B.; Nikodemova, D.; Mojzes, A.

    2015-01-01

    Slovakia like a part of a difficult geological structure of the Western Carpathians is a typical place with a different field of radioactivity. The district Ziar nad Hronom belongs to regions which are characteristic by their high values of radioactivity in comparison with Slovakia. It is due to a geological background which is mostly compound from neovulcanites. In this area were measurement concentrations of uranium-238, thorium- 232 and potassium-40. Consequently, these values were shown by maps which reflect distribution of chosen radionuclides. Sequential research was focus on demographic processing. There turned out that in this area is increased number of deaths in particular due to malignancies. This fact can be affected by natural radionuclides which exist in this area. (authors)

  9. Lognormal distribution of natural radionuclides in freshwater ecosystems and coal-ash repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drndarski, N.; Lavi, N.

    1997-01-01

    This study summarizes and analyses data for natural radionuclides, 40 K, 226 Ra and 'Th, measured by gamma spectrometry in water samples, sediments and coal-ash samples collected from regional freshwater ecosystems and near-by coal-ash repositories during the last decade, 1986-1996, respectively. The frequency plots of natural radionuclide data, for which the hypothesis of the regional scale log normality was accepted, exhibited single population groups with exception of 226 Ra and 232 Th data for waters. Thus the presence of break points in the frequency distribution plots indicated that 226 Ra and 232 Th data for waters do not come from a single statistical population. Thereafter the hypothesis of log normality was accepted for the separate population groups of 226 Ra and '-32 Th in waters. (authors)

  10. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T.; Bergman, R.; Bunzl, K.; Jaakkola, T.

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the main pollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg -1 at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg -1 at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived 137 Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for 239+240 Pu and least for 90 Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu decreased with increasing pollution. Residence half-times: in the root zone, the residence half-times of 90

  11. New ecological mechanism of formation of spatial distribution of radionuclides in river ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degermendzhy, A.G.; Shevyrnogov, A.P.; Kosolapova, L.G.; Levin, L.A.; Chernousov, A.V.; Vlasik, P.V.

    1996-01-01

    Radioecological expeditions on the Yenissei river revealed 'spotty' distribution of radioisotopes in bottom sediments and along the coastline of the river. This work presents results of theoretical analysis of the formation mechanism of stable spatial non-uniformities of river ecosystem components by population interactions of 'predator-prey' type between the phytoplukton and zooplankton. 'Patchiness contrast' (i.e. the amplitude of the radionuclide spatial propagation wave in the water) for the large oscillations control by increasing or decreasing current velocity depends both on the boundary concentrations of phytoplankton and zooplankton and on the established nature of their interpopulation interactions (or coefficients of interactions). Variation of the below given interaction parameters within the 'phytoplanbon-zooplankton' system makes increase the amplitude of spatial distribution wave: decrease of algal growth rate; increase of algal death rate; decrease of zooplankton death rate; increase of interaction coefficients. It was shown for small oscillations that the period of component distribution waves is in proportion to the current velocity and the amplitude of 'small' waves does not depend on the water current velocity. Theoretically it has been also found that with deep limitation of phytoplankton growth by biogenous elements the 'standing wave' is observed to deteriorate and monotonous distribution of radionuclide concentration fields is found to form. (author)

  12. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  13. Distribution of radionuclides in the sediments of Cananeia-Iguape Estuarine Complex (SP, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Andreza P.; Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of techniques that enabled the detection of radioactivity, a new frontier was opened in the many areas of Earth sciences, as the radionuclides can be used as tracers for processes of physical, chemical and biological natures. In this context, natural ( 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U) and artificial ( 137 Cs) radionuclides were measured through the means of high-resolution gamma spectrometry, a non-destructive technique, in the Cananeia-Iguape Estuarine Complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The activities obtained are 107.61 - 573.84 Bq kg -1 for 40 K, 11.11 - 73.65 Bq kg -1 for 232 Th, 2.27 - 60.76 Bq kg -1 for 238 U, and 0.23 - 3.49 Bq kg -1 for 137 Cs, with 137 Cs content within the observed range for samples environmentally affected only by the fallout of past nuclear tests. Also, these radionuclides presented a significant (α = 0.05) correlation with grain size distribution and organic carbon content as well. (author)

  14. Distribution of radionuclides in soils in surroundings of Bratislava, capital of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matel, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Svec, V.

    2000-01-01

    The actual distribution of the concentration natural and man-made radionuclides in the soil from the area of Podunajske Biskupice, locality from outer part of Bratislava, Capital of Slovakia is presented. Documentation is based on the collection of soil and analysed for cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-239,240, and americium-241. Occurrence of natural potassium-40 as well as radionuclides from decay series of uranium and thorium in chosen soil profile are in accordance with the average concentration of those radionuclides in dominant type of soils in the monitored area. The soils were analysed using gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector with relative efficiencies 28 %, Cs-137, Ortec). Analytical procedure involve total dissolution of the samples, followed by radiochemical separation and purification using solvent extraction (Aliquat-336 - Pu-239,240; TBP - Sr-90), calcium oxalate precipitation and extraction chromatography an Eichrom TRU Resin - Am-241, UTEVA Resin - uranium and thorium.The intervals of specific activities of Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-239,240 and Am-241 are 14.1-83.8; 3.8-29.2; 0.130-2.904, and 0.804-0.580 Bq/kg. The average values of specific activity of potassium, uranium and thorium are 481 ± 159; 270.3 ± 4.5, and 29.2 ± 4.6 Bq/kg. (authors)

  15. Study on distribution and behavior of long-lived radionuclides in surface soil environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigemitsu; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Katagiri, Hiromi; Akatsu, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    1996-01-01

    Technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) and Neptunium-237 ( 237 Np) are important radionuclides for environmental assessment around nuclear fuel cycle facilities, because these have long-lives and relatively high mobility in the environment. Therefore, we have been studied the determination, distribution and behavior of such long-lived radionuclides in surface soil environment. A new analytical technique using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to the determination of long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples. The determination method consists of dry ashing, anion exchange and solvent extraction to eliminate the interfering elements and ICP-MS measurement. The sensitivity of this method was 10 to 100,000 times higher, and the counting time was 300 to 100,000 times shorter than the conventional radioanalytical methods. The soil samples were collected at nine points and core soil sample was collected by an electric core sampler at one point. The core soil sample was divided into eight layers. The depth profiles showed that more than 90% of 99 Tc and 237 Np were retained in the surface layer up to 10cm in depth which contained much amount of organic materials. The results suggest that content of organic materials in soil is related to adsorption of 99 Tc and 237 Np onto soil. (author)

  16. Ways of investigating radionuclide migration processes in the lithosphere and hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousova, A.P.; Shmakov, A.I.; Galaktionova, O.V.

    1994-01-01

    In Russia, until recently, it was considered that groundwater was protected from surface radioactive contamination by soil and rocks in the zone aeration. Groundwater was not a subject of radiation control. The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant showed, however, that groundwater is vulnerable to radioactive contamination. In this connection, the vulnerability of groundwater to and the problems of protecting groundwater from radioactive contamination became urgent. The assessment of natural protection of groundwater from radioactive contamination is now considered a top priority. The zone of aeration is generally considered to be the zone separating groundwater from surface contamination. In respect to radioactive contamination, soils that may fix a large quantity of radionuclides serve as a protection zone of a higher order. The mapping of protectibility was done for each radionuclide taking into consideration the specific structure of the flow medium and migration properties of a radionuclide. 90 Sr and 137 Cs have different mechanisms of transport; convective transport is characteristic of the former and diffusive transfer of the latter. This is conditioned by different physico-chemical properties of the radionuclides and principally by their sorption capacities. The coefficient of distribution of 90 Sr is in many times less than the coefficient of distribution of 137 Cs. The environmental protection problem in regions with nuclear power plants and in areas subjected to radioactive contamination may be solved using a monitoring, system including interrelated systems of observation and prediction of the lithosphere and the hydrosphere. The problem of mathematical modeling of migration processes is related to the complexities of modeling the processes of flow, mass transfer, and the accompanying physicochemical processes in zones of full and partial saturation, as well as difficulties in mathematical calculations. 4 refs

  17. Distribution of some artificial and natural radionuclides and trace elements in Syrian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Shaik Khalil, H.; Amin, Y.; Ibrahim, S.; Hassan, M.

    2004-07-01

    Within the environmental monitoring program in Syria, about 115 surface soil and 38 profile soil samples were collected and analyzed during the period of 1998 to 2003 in order to determine the levels of natural and artificial radionuclides and some of trace elements (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb). The concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the surface samples were found to vary from area to another and ranged from 2-50 Bq/kg, 4-228 Bq/kg, 4-55 Bq/kg, 1-143 Bq/kg and 96-672 Bq/kg for 224 Ra, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 137 Cs and 04 K, respectively. While, the concentrations of the studied trace elements were varied between 0.5-5.6 mg/kg for U, 3.2-31.7 mg/kg for Pb, 14-141 mg/kg for Zn, 1.6-114 mg/kg for Cu and 0.25-2.7 mg/kg for Cd. Most of the reported values in this study were in the range of the natural uncontaminated surface soil concentrations and published values in many countries in the world. The results showed that the relation between the distribution of the natural radionuclides and depth was approximately the same for all radionuclides except for 137 Cs, which was extremely binded in the upper layers of soil. In addition, some differences in the concentrations of the studied trace elements with depth were observed. These differences may be due to the average of rainfall and the existence of some potential sources of contamination of such elements. However, the results of this study can be considered as a database for the natural background in Syria that helps to establish the radiation map of the country.(author)

  18. Distribution of natural radionuclides on coats of Bushehr, Persian Gulf, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdi, M. R.; Faghihian, H.; Kamali, M.; Mostajaboddavati, M.; Hasanzadeh, A.

    2006-01-01

    :A reconnaissance study has been made on the distribution of 2 38U , 2 32T h, 4 0K , 1 37C s and geochemical features in soil and sediment samples at various locations on the coast of Bushehr in the Persian Gulf. In this study a gamma-ray spectrometer based on a High Purity Germanium detector and a PC based MCA and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method were used. Estimation of the measured radionuclide content have been made for the absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation. The Activity concentration (A), the equivalent radium (R eq ), and the external hazard index (H ex ) which resulted from the natural radionuclides in soil and sediment are also calculated. The base-line data of radionuclides and heavy metals in view of the commissioning of nuclear and non-nuclear industries for the coast of Bushehr, which does not yet exist, was obtained. Activity concentration levels due to radionuclides were measured in 50 soil and sediment samples collected from this region. The measurement was performed with respect to their gamma radioactivity for a counting time of 24 hour intervals. From the accumulated spectra, activity concentration were determined for 4 0K (range from 108 to 520 Bq Kg -1 ), 1 37 Cs (from 6 to 40 Bq Kg 1 ), 2 38U (from 12 to 75 Bq Kg -1 ) and 2 32T h (from 8 to 33 Bq Kg -1 ) with the lowest limit detection (LLD) of, respectively, 68, 3.2, 4.3 and 4.3 Bq Kg -1 . The dose rate from ambient air at the soil ranges was between 14 to 44 nGy h -1 with an average of 30.56±7.86 nGy h -1

  19. Elemental and radionuclides distribution in the production and use of phosphate fertilizers in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saueia, Catia Heloisa Rosignoli

    2006-01-01

    Fertilizer is considered an essential component for agriculture, because its use increases the natural soil nutrients, which are lost slow waste or erosion. The Brazilian phosphate fertilizer is obtained by wet reaction of igneous phosphate rock with concentrated sulphuric acid, giving as final product, phosphoric acid and dihydrated calcium sulphate (phosphogypsum) as by-product. Phosphoric acid is the starting material for triple superphosphate (TSP), single superphosphate (SSP), monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP). The phosphate rock used as raw material presents in its composition, radionuclides of the U and Th natural series in. During the chemical attack of the phosphate rock, this equilibrium is disrupted and the radionuclides and the elements migrate to intermediate, final products and byproducts, according to their solubility and chemical properties. While the fertilizers are commercialized, the phosphogypsum is disposed in stack piles and can cause an impact in the environment. In order to evaluate the radionuclides and the elements distribution in the industrial process of phosphate fertilizer production, samples of concentrated rock, fertilizers (SSP, TSP, MAP and DAP) and phosphogypsum from three national industries (A, B and C), were analyzed. The characterization of the elements Ba, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Na, Sc, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr, and the rare earths La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu, were performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results obtained showed that, in general, the rare earth elements are distributed uniformly in the fertilizers and phosphogypsum, except for Lu. The elemental concentration present in the fertilizers SSP and TSP are of the same order of magnitude of the source rock. The same behavior was observed in the fertilizers MAP and DAP, except for the elements Co, Sc and U. The radionuclides of the U series ( 238 U, 234 U, 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb) and of the Th series ( 232 Th, 228 Ra, 228 Th

  20. Vertical distribution of Pu radionuclides, 241Am and 99Sr in soil Samples from Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breban, D.; Mocanu, N.; Moreno-Bermudez, J.

    2002-01-01

    The investigated area is a natural alpine pasture located in the South chain of the Carpathian Mountains, which was found as one of the most contaminated areas in Romania after the Chernobyl accident.Radioactive concentrations of Pu radioisotopes, 2 41Am and 9 0Sr were determined in successive layers from 4 soil sections downward a depth of 6-8 cm, providing for the first time information on the effect of fallout acumulation of these radionuclides in soil samples from Romania. Pu and Am were separated by using a combined sequential procedure based on anion exchange and extraction chromatography. The measurements of 241Pu were performed by Liquid Scintillation Counting. 9 0Sr was determined by chemical separation of Sr using the classical precipitation method and Cerenkov counting of 9 0Y. For Quality Control IAEA reference materials were analyzed along with the samples. In a soil section of 8 cm depth radioactive inventories were approximately 500 Bq/m 2 for 2 41Pu, 115 Bq/m 2 for 2 39 +2 40Pu, 8 Bq/m 2 for 2 38Pu, 50 Bq/m2 for 2 41Am and 2500 Bq/m 2 for 9 0Sr. The data on each of the radioisotopes vertical distribution profile are compared between themselves and give an idea for their migration. On the basis of activity isotopic ratios in the soil depth profile, the origin of the contamination (Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapon test fallout) is discussed. The results are also compared to previous data on Cs-137

  1. Radionuclides in the investigation of the circulation of toxic metals in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stary, J.; Zeman, A.; Kratzer, K.; Prasilova, J.

    1982-01-01

    Radionuclides of chromium(III) and (VI), zinc, cadmium, inorganic mercury(II), methylmercury and phenylmercury were used for the investigation of the cumulation of these toxic elements or compounds in algae and fish in different experimental conditions in order to describe quantitatively the processes occurring in nature. Cumulation factors of different chemical forms of elements studied were determined for algae as were biological half-times for fish which allowed the calculation of the maximum concentration of toxic elements in fish. (author)

  2. Assimilation of spatio-temporal distribution of radionuclides in early phase of radiation accident

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofman, Radek; Šmídl, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, 7/8 (2010), s. 226-228 ISSN 1210-7085 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/1596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : decision support * early phase * Gaussian model * radioactive pollution transport Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/AS/hofman-assimilation of spatio-temporal distribution of radionuclides in early phase of radiation accident .pdf

  3. Distribution of radionuclides in different parts of a mushroom: Influence of the degree of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, Antonio [Department of Physics, Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Avda de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain)]. E-mail: ymiralle@unex.es; Guillen, Fco. Javier [Department of Physics, Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Avda de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain); Salas, Alejandro [Department of Physics, Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Avda de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain); Manjon, Jose Luis [Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-04-15

    Mushrooms are known to be bioaccumulators of radionuclides, but little is known about their distribution within the fruiting bodies or the influence of the degree of maturity on uptake. We carried out a series of cultures of the species Pleurotus eryngii under controlled laboratory conditions to analyze these variables. The maximal uptake of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 85}Sr was found to occur in mature fruiting bodies, and with the growth of the mushroom the distribution of radionuclides within the fruiting bodies became inhomogeneous. In particular, there was an exponential increase in the percentage of the total activity of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 6}Co in the cap + gills as the fruiting bodies matured, accompanied by a complementary decrease in the stem. Radiocaesium, potassium, calcium, {sup 239+24}Pu, {sup 234,238}U, {sup 228,230,232}Th, and {sup 226}Ra were assayed in the cap, gills, and stem of fruiting bodies of Tricholoma equestre collected in a natural ecosystem and cultured P. eryngii. Potassium and radiocaesium were mainly located in the cap + gills, and {sup 226}Ra in the gills. There was a disequilibrium between {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 228}Th in the different parts of the fungi, probably due to uptake of {sup 228}Ra and subsequent decay to {sup 228}Th. Finally, the distribution pattern of{sup 239+24}Pu, {sup 234,238}U, and {sup 230,232}Th seemed to be species dependent.

  4. Preliminary investigation of PAGAT polymer gel radionuclide dosimetry of Tc-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Kelly; Bailey, Dale; Hill, Brendan; Baldock, Clive

    2009-05-01

    PAGAT polymer gel was investigated as a suitable dosimeter materials for measuring absorbed dose from the unsealed source radionuclide Tc-99m. Differing amounts of Tc-99m over the range of 25-5000 MBq were introduced into a normoxic polymer gel mixture (PAGAT) in sealed nitrogen-filled P6 glass vials. After irradiation the gels were evaluated using MRI more than 48 hours after preparation to allow for radioactive decay. The dose delivered to the vial was also calculated empirically. R2 versus total activity curves were obtained over a number of experiments and these were used to evaluate the relationship between the amount of gel polymerization and the dose deposited by the radionuclide. A linear response up to 1000 MBq (corresponding to 20Gy) was displayed and was still behaving monotonically at 5000 MBq. Polymer gels offer the potential to measure radiation dose three-dimensionally using MRI.

  5. A Monte Carlo program converting activity distribution to absorbed dose distributions in a radionuclide treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagesson, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    In systemic radiation therapy, the absorbed dose distribution must be calculated from the individual activity distribution. A computer code has been developed for the conversion of an arbitrary activity distribution to a 3-D absorbed dose distribution. The activity distribution can be described either analytically or as a voxel based distribution, which comes from a SPECT acquisition. Decay points are sampled according to the activity map, and particles (photons and electrons) from the decay are followed through the tissue until they either escape the patient or drop below a cut off energy. To verify the calculated results, the mathematically defined MIRD phantom and unity density spheres have been included in the code. Also other published dosimetry data were used for verification. Absorbed fraction and S-values were calculated. A comparison with simulated data from the code with MIRD data shows good agreement. The S values are within 10-20% of published MIRD S values for most organs. Absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in spheres (masses between 1 g and 200 kg) are within 10-15% of those published. Radial absorbed dose distributions in a necrotic tumor show good agreement with published data. The application of the code in a radionuclide therapy dose planning system, based on quantitative SPECT, is discussed. (orig.)

  6. System of automated processing of radionuclide investigations (SAPRI-01) in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    The author described the results of clinical testing of a system SAPRI-01 designed for automated collection, storage and processing of data on radionuclide investigations. He gave examples of automated processing of RCG and the results of positive scintigraphy of tumors of different sites using 67 Ga-citrate and 99m Tc pertechnetate in statistical and dynamic investigations. Short-comings and ways for updating 4 the system during its serial production were pointed out. The introduction of the system into clinical practice on a wide scale was shown to hold promise

  7. Investigation of rare earth natural radionuclide in Gannan region, Jiangxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huiping; Zhong Minglong; Hu Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify the types, level and migration law of natural radionuclide in ionic rare earth during its development and utilization process, the natural radionuclide in raw ore, waste residues and wastewater of south ionic rare of Gannan region, Jiangxi province were investigated. The results showed that: the natural radionuclide in rare earth raw ore in An'yuan and Longnan is with high content, in which the specific activities of natural U, 226 Ra and 232 Th are 3.69 × l0 4 , 8.33 × l0 3 and 3,40 × l0 3 Bq/ kg respectively; And the specific activities of the acid-soluble slag are 2.58 × l0 4 , 2.81 × l0 4 and 2.75 × l0 4 Bq/kg respectively; The radioactive level of natural U and 232 Th in some rare earth tailings, and the specific activity of natural U in the neutralizing slag of some individual enterprises is higher than national standards' exemption level (1000 Bq/kg). Also, the total content of Th and U in the efflux wastewater of some rare earth enterprises efflux wastewater are higher than the national emission standards limit (0.1 mg/L). (authors)

  8. A preliminary investigation of radiation level and some radionuclides in imported food and food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinakhom, F.; Mongkolphantha, S.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary study of gross beta activity and content of some long-lived radionuclides associated with fission products in various types of imported food and food-products was carried out. Food samples were purchased monthly during 1976-1977 from general well-known supermarkets and local grocery stores up to a total of 89 samples. The gamma spectrum of long-lived radionuclides was searched using a 128 channel analyzer coupled with 3'' x 3'' NaI (T1) crystal detector. Two radionuclides were frequently found to be present in these food samples, viz. potassium-40 and cesium-137 and their concentrations were subsequently determined. The limits of detection under the conditions used for potassium-40 and cesium-137 were 0.04 and 0.03 pCi/g-wet weight, respectively. Samples were dry-ashed and counted for gross beta activity utilizing a low background anti-coincidence G.M. counter. The content of strontium-90 was also investigated concurrently by solvent extraction technique employing tri-n-butyl phosphate as an extractant. Results of the study are tabulated. (author)

  9. An investigation of radionuclide uptake into food crops grown in soils treated with bauxite mining residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Clarke, P.C.; Robertson, W.; McPharlin, I.R.; Jeffrey, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Sandy soils of the coastal plain area of Western Australia have poor phosphorous retention capacity which leads to pollution of surface water bodies in the region. Application of bauxite mining residues (termed 'red mud') to vegetable and crops has been proposed as a solution to increase the phosphorous and water retention and thereby reduce the leaching of nutrients. The thorium and radium-226 concentrations in the 'red mud' residues are in excess of 1 kBq/kg, and 300 Bq/kg respectively. Potentially, the use of these residues on agricultural land could result in increased levels of radionuclides in food grown in amended soils. The transfer of long-lived radionuclides of both the natural thorium and uranium series to a variety of vegetable crops grown under controlled conditions is investigated. The effects of varying the rates of application of 'red mud' and phosphate fertilizers on radionuclide uptake are studied. It has been shown previously that fallout caesium-137 is sandy soils of the region transfers readily to food and grazing crops. Some of the parameters which influence that transfer are also examined. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  10. Distribution coefficient of radionuclides on rocks for performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibutani, Tomoki; Shibata, Masahiro; Suyama, Tadahiro

    1999-11-01

    Distribution coefficients of radionuclides on rocks are selected for safety assessment in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan (H12 Report)'. The categorized types of rock are granitic rocks (crystalline and acidic rocks), basaltic rocks (crystalline and basic rocks), psammitic rocks (neogene sedimentary (soft)), and tuffaceous-pelitic rocks (pre-neogene sedimentary rocks (hard)). The types of groundwater are FRHP (fresh reducing high-pH), FRLP (fresh reducing low-pH), SRHP (saline reducing high-pH), SRLP (saline reducing low-pH), MRNP (mixing reducing neutral-pH) and FOHP (fresh oxidizing high-pH) groundwater. The elements to be surveyed are Ni, Se, Zr, Nb, Tc, Pd, Sn, Cs, Sm, Pb, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. Distribution coefficients are collected from literatures describing batch sorption experimental results, and are selected under consideration of conservativity. (author)

  11. Distribution of Hanford reactor produced radionuclides in the marine environment, 1961-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    At Hanford (U.S.A.), the plutonium-producing reactors were in operation during 1944-1971. The period of maximum reactor operation was 1955-1965, when eight reactors were in operation. The reactor deactivation programme began in 1965 and the last reactor was deactivated in 1971. All these reactors were cooled by Columbia River water which passed through the reactors and then was discharged to the river and ultimately to the North Pacific. The Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE) of the University of Washington started an environmental survey programme in 1965 and continued it upto 1973 i.e. even after the last plutonium producing reactor was deactivated. The programme objectives were: (1) to find the geographical distribution and concentration of Hanford produced radionuclides in water, sediments and biota of the marine environment, (2) to relate the operation of the Hanford reactors during the period of deactivation to the concentration of radionuclides in marine organisms, and (3) to observe the rate at which the marine organisms cleansed themselves of 65 Zn after the primary source had been removed. An account of the programme and highlights of the observations are reported. Most of the radioactivity entering the river water and marine organisms was due to 51 Cr, 65 Zn and 32 P of which 65 Zn was found to be the most abundant radionuclide in the biological samples. The rate of radioactivity from the river water entering into the Ocean was about 1000 curies per day and it did not produce any observable effects on populations of marine organisms. The internal dose to man from 65 Zn via seafoods was only a small fraction of the permissible dose for individual members of the population. (M.G.B.)

  12. Nuclear-physical methods in macro- and microanalytical investigations of contamination with radionuclides at Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukhin, V.P.

    2005-01-01

    A complex of nuclear-physical methods developed in the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center for the investigations of the rate, character and peculiarities of contamination with radionuclides of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) is presented. The developed method combines both macroinvestigations (radionuclide analysis, NAA, XRFA, ESR- and NGR-spectroscopy) and microinvestigations (MS, micro-PIXE, electron microscopy). The results of the investigations at the main SNTS test sites 'Opytnoye pole' and 'Degelen' are presented. (author)

  13. Influence of the submarine orography on the distribution of long-lived radionuclides in the Palomares marine ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    To trace the consequences of the Palomares accident which occurred in southeastern Spain in 1966, a number of studies were performed upon sediments collected in the adjacent marine ecosystem in 1985. The research revealed a land-to-sea transport of part of the transuranics residual contamination still remaining in the affected area after the clean-up operations. The transfer routes to the Mediterranean sea (via river flooding and airborne relocation) were elucidated through the reconstruction of the sediment cores' depositional history. Present investigations focus on the distribution of Pu, Am and Cs along the complex system of submarine canyons shaping the orography of the Palomares marine environment. Marine samples were collected in 1991 to evaluate the possible removal of the radionuclides deposited in the continental shelf towards the deep sea, favoured by the strong turbidity currents and/or the topography of the canyon itself. (Author)

  14. Radionuclide distributions in sediments of marine areas used for dumping solidified radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.; Livingston, H.D.

    A number of sediment samples, collected both by coring and by grabbing, from the shallow Pacific solid waste radioactive dump site and from the Atlantic dump site, have been analyzed carefully for a number of long-lived radionuclides. Both dump sites yielded samples that were expected to serve as controls, collected at considerable distance from any visually-located waste containers, as well as other samples that were collected close to identified waste drums, some of which showed evidence of physical disintegration. The Atlantic site shows evidence of wide-spread, general contamination, with 137 Cs and possibly with 241 Am. The Pacific site is perhaps less generally contaminated with 137 Cs, but shows evidence of widespread general contamination with several transuranic nuclides. Samples collected near to identified waste containers, at both sites, show that significant portions of leached radioactivity ( 137 Cs, 239 240 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, 242 Cm, and 244 Cm) are immobilized by the sediments within very short distances, possibly measured in meters or tens of meters. The data also suggest considerable differences among the horizontal trajectories of the various leached transuranic elements. It is argued that careful study of nuclide distributions around such old waste containers would provide data of great value in helping to predict long-term behavior of radionuclides released to marine environments

  15. Natural radionuclides distribution in the shelf and upper slope of southeast Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Luisa M.; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Tessler, Moyses G.

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades, Oceanography has been using a variety of radionuclides as tracers to understand the ocean dynamic processes, handling and disposal of sediments of seabed. In this context, the determination of natural radionuclides distributions ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) has been carried out with sediments samples from the shelf and upper slope off Southeast Brazil using a gamma spectrometry technique. The samples were sliced into strata of 2 cm, dried, ground and properly packed to be analysed. The concentration of activities was performed in a hyperpure Ge detector with a resolution of 1,9 keV for the peak of 1332,3 keV of 60 Co, model GEM50P by EGG and ORTEC. The study area is located between latitudes 28 deg 40'S and 23 deg 00'S and extends from Cabo Frio (RJ) to Cabo de Santa Marta Grande (SC). The activity concentrations varied from 0,6 to 52,8 BqKg -1 for 238 U, from 1,6 to 50,9BqKg -1 for 232 Th and from 65,4 to 873,3 BqKg -1 for 40 K. From these results it is possible to establish a correlation between the depositional area dynamics and the samples size parameters. (author)

  16. VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF HYDROXO-, CHLORO-, EDTA AND CARBOHYDRATE COMPLEXES OF LEAD, CHROMIUM, ZINC, CADMIUM AND COPPER: POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO METAL SPECIATION STUDIES IN BREWERY WASTEWATER.

  17. The MIRAGE project: large scale radionuclide transport investigations and integral migration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Bidoglio, G.; Chapman, N.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of radionuclide migration through the geosphere must be supported by large-scale, long-term investigations. Several research areas of the MIRAGE Project are devoted to acquiring reliable data for developing and validating models. Apart from man-made migration experiments in boreholes and/or underground galleries, attention is paid to natural geological migration systems which have been active for very long time spans. The potential role of microbial activity, either resident or introduced into the host media, is also considered. In order to clarify basic mechanisms, smaller scale ''integral'' migration experiments under fully controlled laboratory conditions are also carried out using real waste forms and representative geological media. (author)

  18. Multiwire proportional gamma camera for imaging /sup 99/Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J E; Connolly, J F [Science Research Council, Chilton (UK). Rutherford Lab.

    1978-05-01

    A gamma camera made of multiple multiwire proportional chambers with thin converter foils has been evaluated for clinical application. Results are presented from a small prototype (10 cm x 10 cm) showing good imaging of /sup 99/Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions and confirming the predictions of the theory regarding quantum efficiency and spatial resolution. The technique is especially aimed at creating a gamma camera with an active area > approximately 3 1m/sup 2/, a quantum efficiency of 15% and a spatial resolution approximately 3 mm, whole body scanning and tomographic applications. The results generated by the current prototype indicate that the above requirements can be met using relatively cheap mass production techniques from the electronics industry. This apparatus is covered by patent application number 26595/77.

  19. A multiwire proportional gamma camera for imaging 99Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera made of multiple multiwire proportional chambers with thin converter foils has been evaluated for clinical application. Results are presented from a small prototype (10 cm x 10 cm) showing good imaging of 99 Tcsup(m) radionuclide distributions and confirming the predictions of the theory regarding quantum efficiency and spatial resolution. The technique is especially aimed at creating a gamma camera with an active area > approximately 3 1m 2 , a quantum efficiency of 15% and a spatial resolution approximately 3 mm, whole body scanning and tomographic applications. The results generated by the current prototype indicate that the above requirements can be met using relatively cheap mass production techniques from the electronics industry. This apparatus is covered by patent application number 26595/77. (author)

  20. Radionuclide distributions in deep-ocean sediment cores. Progress report, 1 October 1976 -- 31 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1978-04-01

    Disruption, in the past year, of the supply of 237 Pu tracer from Oak Ridge caused us to put more of effort into analyses of core samples previously collected, and into data collation, than into the laboratory experiments originally projected. Accompanying this report are two review papers, one for a Congressional Committee and one in press, a report in press of a device for conducting microbiological tracer experiments under controlled atmospheres, and a description of radionuclide distributions in sediments of Atlantic and Pacific solid waste dump sites. Described in the body of the report are experiments relating the time course of association of 237 Pu tracer with diatoms (dead or alive) or glass beads, to the constitution of the media, the history of the cells, or the presence of exometabolites. Also described are studies of the differential removal of 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 137 Cs from coastal seawater currents contaminated by waste released from a fuel-reprocessing facility

  1. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  2. Standardization of methods of date processing of radionuclide investigations at SAPRI-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.; Ishchenko, V.P.; Zozulya, A.A.; Romanenko, V.A.; Dzhuzha, D.A.; Lazar', D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Series production of SAPRI-complex (system of automated processing of radionuclide information) intended for automatization of the process of data acquisition and processing of diagnostic radionuclide examination was set up. The features of SAPRI system having the wide possibilities for development and use of algorithms and programs for processing and analysis of radionuclide information were considered

  3. Distribution and behavior of radionuclides in the coastal ecosystem in Rokkasho Village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunio; Kawabata, Hitoshi; Ueda, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Inaba, Jiro

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate, through both field studies and laboratory experiments, the mechanism for the elution of radionuclides and other materials from suspended organic matter that accompanies the decomposition of organic matter, consisting mainly of phytoplankton, in the coastal sea region off Rokkasho Village. The effect of water temperature on the decomposition rate of organic matter suspended in seawater was investigated in laboratory experiments. The results demonstrated that the decomposition process was divided into two steps for each of the items of dry weight (SS), particulate organic carbon (POC), and particulate organic nitrogen (PON). The first step in decomposition progressed rapidly over several days. The second step of decomposition occurred at a slower rate than the first step. The decomposition rate of organic material was found to be strongly dependent on temperature, with decomposition progressing faster the higher the temperature. The amounts of Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni, Be, V, Ti, Ba, Cr, Sr, and the radionuclides 232 Th and 238 Ur eluted from organic matter by decomposition (30 days) of suspended organic matter were in the range of 31-72% of the amounts contained in the organic matter. (author)

  4. Radionuclides distribution, properties, and microbial diversity of soils in uranium mill tailings from southeastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xun; Luo, Xuegang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To collect the radioactive contamination data for environmental rehabilitation in uranium mill tailings in southeastern China. Method: The sample areas were divided into high, moderate and low concentration areas, according to the uranium concentration. For every area, 3 soil samples were collected at 0–15 cm, 15–30 cm and 30–45 cm depth respectively, with 5 repetitions for each. Total 45 (3 × 5 × 3) soil samples were collected. Physicochemical properties and enzyme activities of soils were determined as described by references. The concentrations of the radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in soils were determined by using HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. Soil microbial diversity was analyzed via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results: Soil samples were all acidic. Physicochemical properties, like pH, content of total/available N, P and K, as well as enzyme activities were all increased along with decreased uranium concentration. The 232 Th concentration was increased with the decreased uranium concentration and was not influenced by the depth of sample sites. However, uranium concentration and depth of sample showed no significant influence on the concentrations of 226 Ra and 40 K. The concentration of 232 Th was significantly correlated with that of 226 Ra and 40 K, while the concentrations of 226 Ra and 40 K were significantly correlated. However, Pearson correlation coefficients between 238 U and other radionuclides were not significant. The microbial population in different concentration areas was different with four domain strains in low area, and two for both moderate and high areas. Furthermore, in each sample site, Proteobacteria was the most dominant flora, while environmental samples were the second according to GenBank database. Moreover, Serratia sp. of Proteobacteria was the dominant strain. Conclusion: Radionuclides distribution in the uranium mill tailing showed a profound influence on soil properties and

  5. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclide distributions in the Nansen Basin, Artic Ocean: Scavenging rates and circulation timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk Cochran, J.; Hirschberg, David J.; Livingston, Hugh D.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Key, Robert M.

    Determination of the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 230Th, 228 Th and 210Pb, and the anthropogenic radionuclides 241Am, 239,240Pu, 134Cs and 137Cs in water samples collected across the Nansen Basin from the Barents Sea slope to the Gakkel Ridge provides tracers with which to characterize both scavenging rates and circulation timescales in this portion of the Arctic Ocean. Large volume water samples (˜ 15001) were filtered in situ to separate particulate (> 0.5 μm) and dissolved Th isotopes and 241Am. Thorium-230 displays increases in both particulate and dissolved activities with depth, with dissolved 230Th greater and particulate 230Th lower in the deep central Nansen Basin than at the Barents Sea slope. Dissolved 228Th activities also are greater relative to 228Ra, in the central basin. Residence times for Th relative to removal from solution onto particles are ˜1 year in surface water, ˜10 years in deep water adjacent to the Barents Sea slope, and ˜20 years in the Eurasian Basin Deep Water. Lead-210 in the central basin deep water also has a residence time of ˜20 years with respect to its removal from the water column. This texture of scavenging is reflected in distributions of the particle-reactive anthropogenic radionuclide 241Am, which shows higher activities relative to Pu in the central Nansen Basin than at the Barents Sea slope. Distributions Of 137Cs show more rapid mixing at the basin margins (Barents Sea slope in the south, Gakkel Ridge in the north) than in the basin interior. Cesium-137 is mixed throughout the water column adjacent to the Barents Sea slope and is present in low but detectable activities in the Eurasian Basin Deep Water in the central basin. At the time of sampling (1987) the surface water at all stations had been labeled with 134Cs released in the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. In the ˜1 year since the introduction of Chernobyl 134Cs to the Nansen Basin, it had been mixed to depths of ˜800 m at

  6. Radionuclide distribution of Holocene sediments and its effects on the habitat of recent foraminifers: A case study from the Western Marmara Sea (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Murat Kılıc, Ali

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Radionuclides cause radioactive contamination in aquatic environments just as other non-biodegradable pollutants, such as heavy metals, sink to the seafloor and accumulate in the sediments. These radioactive pollutants especially affect benthic foraminifera living on the sediment surface or in the sediments in the seafloor. Foraminifera were used as bioindicators to analyze the effect of radioactivity pollution on ecosystems. In this study, we have investigated natural and artificial radionuclide (232Th, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs) distribution in sediment samples taken in the living areas of benthic foraminifera in the Western Marmara Sea by means of gamma spectrometry. Accordingly, 29 core samples taken in 2016 from depths of about 20-35 m close to the shores of the Marmara Sea were used. Core samples representing the pollution of the study area were collected at locations such as discharge points for domestic and industrial areas, port locations, and others. Other samples were taken from areas unaffected or less affected by pollution. The radionuclide concentration activity values in the sediment samples obtained from the locations, in Bq/kg, were 137Cs, 0.9-9.4; 232Th, 18.9-86; 226Ra, 10-50; 40K, 24.4-670. These values were compared with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) data, and an environmental analysis was carried out. The 226Ra series, the 232Th series, and the 40K radionuclides accumulate naturally, and they are also increasing continuously due to anthropogenic pollution. Although the 226Ra values obtained throughout the study areas remained within normal limits according to the UNSCEAR values, the 40K and 232Th series values were found to be higher in almost all locations. According to these results, the main causes of radioactive pollution in the investigation area are agricultural and mining activities. Keywords: Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, Cs-137, radionuclide, Western Marmara Sea, Foraminifera

  7. Direct investigations of the immobilization of radionuclides in the alteration phases of spent nuclear fuel. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.C.; Finch, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    'In an oxidizing environment, such as in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, rapid alteration rates are expected for spent nuclear fuel. Lab.-scale simulations have repeatedly shown that the dominant alteration products under repository conditions will be uranyl phases. There is an inadequate database that relates to the effects of the alteration products on the release of radionuclides, but this information is essential to provide a radionuclide release estimate. It is likely that many of the radionuclides contained in the fuel will be incorporated into the alteration products that form, potentially with a profound impact on the future mobility of radionuclides in the repository. The authors objective is to characterize the incorporation of radionuclides into alteration products by synthesis of uranyl phases doped with radionuclides, appropriate surrogate elements, or non-radioactive isotopes, followed by detailed phase characterization by diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. The research will permit a more realistic estimate of the release rates of the radionuclides from the near-field environment. This report summarizes work after 8 months of a 3-year project. The objective of investigating radionuclide incorporation in uranyl phases has required the development of synthesis techniques for various uranyl phases that are expected to form under repository conditions. The authors have synthesized and determined the structures of several uranyl phases that are new to science and that may be important alteration products under repository conditions. They have also undertaken the determination and refinement of the crystal structures of various uranyl phases that are likely to form under repository conditions. Other experiments include the investigation of the ion-exchange properties of uranyl phases under repository conditions.'

  8. Use of 137Cs and other fallout radionuclide in soil erosion investigations: progress, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerated erosion and soil degradation currently represent serious problems for the global environment. Against this background there is a need to assemble reliable information on the rates of soil loss involved. Existing techniques for documenting rates of soil loss possess many limitations and there is increasing interest in the potential for using fallout radionuclides, particularly 137 Cs, to obtain such information. An example of the application of the 137 Cs approach to a cultivated field at Rufford Forest Farm, Nottinghamshire, UK, is presented to illustrate its value. The key advantages of the approach are that it provides a means of assembling retrospective estimates of medium-term (ca. 40 years) rates of soil loss and the spatial pattern of erosion and deposition involved, on the basis of a single site visit. There are, however, currently a number of problems and uncertainties associated with the use of 137 Cs in soil erosion investigations, and these are reviewed and needs for further research identified. Potential developments of the approach, including the use of other fallout radionuclides such as unsupported 210 Pb and 7 Be are also considered. (author)

  9. Investigations and technical reviews on the reliability of prediction for migration behavior of radionuclides (H15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hirokazu

    2004-02-01

    The research plan of the validation on effects of colloids and organic materials drawn up by the Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute and its' research outcome were reviewed comprehensively by an expert committee established in the Nuclear Safety Research Association. Additionally, experimental investigations for the migration behavior of actinide elements and fission products in engineering barrier and natural barrier medias, and for solution chemistry of them were carried out and discussed by the committee, in order to enhance the reliability of prediction for migration behavior of radionuclides. The subjects investigated by the expert committee are as follows: (1) Research on solubility products of An(III) hydroxide. (2) Diffusion and electromigration behavior of plutonium in buffer material. (3) Analysis of the nuclide solubility in compacted bentonite. (4) Survey of the actual contamination by alpha emitters in steel materials. (author)

  10. Radionuclide migration in fractured rock: hydrological investigations at an experimental site in the Carnmennellis granite, Cornwall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, M.J.; Durrance, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives, methods and results of hydrological investigation of the granite at an experimental site in Cornwall are described and discussed. Constant head injection tests and radioactive tracer experiments have revealed a fracture permeability in which water movement is confined to discrete fractures separated by rock of very low permeability. Data on flow path frequency, orientation and effective hydraulic aperture, required for network modelling, are presented for a 700 m borehole, with additional hydraulic data from three other boreholes. In addition to fractures of average hydraulic conductivity a small number of major hydraulic features (''main drains'') with major implications for radionuclide migration have been identified. A mean hydraulic conductivity for the granite investigated of 1.57x10 -7 ms -1 has been obtained, 2.11x10 -8 ms -1 if the major hydraulic features are excluded

  11. Stable tracer investigations in humans for assessing the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Cantone, M.C.; Giussani, A.; Maggioni, T.; Birattari, C.; Bondardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Garlaschelli, I.; Werner, E.; Roth, P.; Hoellriegl, V.; Louvat, P.; Felgenhauer, N.; Zilker, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans is justified by the potential radiological risk represented by their radionuclides. Only a few data related to the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans are available and, accordingly, the biokinetic models currently recommended by the ICRP for these elements are mainly based on data from animal experiments. The use of stable isotopes as tracers, coupled with a proper analytical technique (nuclear activation analysis with protons) for their determination in biological samples, represents an ethically acceptable methodology for biokinetic investigations, being free from any radiation risk for the volunteer subjects. In this work, the results obtained in eight biokinetic investigations for ruthenium, conducted on a total of three healthy volunteers, and six for zirconium, performed on a total of three subjects, are presented and compared to the predictions of the ICRP models. (author)

  12. Distribution of radionuclides in leaf-stem biomass of lupine and clover under production of protein concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, Yu.F.; Lobach, G.A.; Buzenko, T.A.; Zaretskaya, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    The basic regularities of radionuclide distribution between the obtained products have been studied using the fractionation of lupine and clover phytomass as an example. The content of radionuclides in protein concentrates has been shown to be strongly related to the crop species. A scheme and a regime of the fractionation of leaf-stem lupine biomass contaminated with cesium radioisotopes and strontium-90 which ensured the minimizing of their residual content in protein-vitaminic and protein concentrates have been selected with due accout of experimental data

  13. The distribution of radionuclides between the dissolved and particulate phases of a contaminated freshwater stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdock, R.N.; Johnson, M.S.; Hemingway, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Streamwater concentrations of the radionuclides 137 Cs, 241 Am and 239,240 Pu from a contaminated freshwater stream showed significant relationships between total concentration and flow rate. When total concentrations were divided into their dissolved and particulate components 239,240 Pu was shown to exist mainly (>80%) in the solute phase ( 137 Cs and 241 Am were distributed equally between the two phases. 137 Cs was most likely present either as the dissolved ion or as the specifically adsorbed ion on particulate sediments. Particle-associated 241 Am and the small particulate component of 239,240 Pu, were believed to be bound to sediment surface coatings, such as organic or oxide/hydroxides, rather than the truly adsorbed ion. Solute phase 239,240 Pu was most likely associated with colloidal organic carbon species (such as humic or fulvic acids). This was also apparent, but to a lesser extent, for 241 Am. Distribution coefficients were determined for a number of discrete sites and environmental conditions. The response of the stream to removal of its source of radioactivity (via a re-routing scheme) was both significant and rapid. (author)

  14. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Bergman, R. [National Defence Research Establishment (Sweden); Bunzl, K. [National Research Center for Environmental and Health (Germany); Jaakkola, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Radiochemical Lab.; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the mainpollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg{sup -1} at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg{sup -1} at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for {sup 239+240}Pu and least for {sup 90}Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu decreased with increasing pollution

  15. A systematic investigation of PET Radionuclide Specific Activity on Miniaturization of Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanne M Link, PhD

    2012-03-08

    The PET radionuclides, 18F and 11C consist of very high radiation to mass amounts and should be easily adapted to new technologies such as chip chemistry with nanofluidics. However, environmental contamination with nonradioactive fluorine, carbon and other trace contaminants add sufficient mass, micrograms to milligrams, to prevent adapting PET radiochemistry to the nanochip technologies. In addition, the large volumes of material required for beam irradiation make it necessary to also remove the 18F and 11C from their chemical matrices. These steps add contaminants. The work described in this report was a systematic investigation of sources of these contaminants and methods to reduce these contaminants and the reaction volumes for radiochemical synthesis. Several methods were found to lower the contaminants and matrices to within a factor of 2 to 100 of those needed to fully implement chip technology but further improvements are needed.

  16. Distribution of natural radionuclides in soils and beach sands of Abana-Çatalzeytin (Kastamonu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaz, Aslı, E-mail: akurnaz@kastamonu.edu.tr; Özcan, Murat, E-mail: murat-ozcan@kastamonu.edu.tr; Çetiner, M. Atıf, E-mail: macetiner@kastamonu.edu.tr [Kastamonu University, Arts and Sciences Faculty, Department of Physics, Kastamonu (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    A gamma spectrometric study of distribution of natural radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples collected from the terrestrial and coastal environment of Abana and Çatalzeytin counties of Kastamonu Province in Turkey was performed with the aim of estimating the radiation hazard of the tourist area and the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K were determined. The activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K were determined in the ranges 14.95–56.0, 46.5–99.4 and 357.5–871.3 Bqkg{sup −1} for soil samples and the mean concentrations were ascertained as 42.34, 71.24 and 624.18 Bqkg{sup −1}, respectively. In sand samples, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K contents were varied in the ranges of 13.35-41.6, 30.9-53.4 and 275.5-601.3 Bqkg{sup −1} and the mean concentrations were ascertained as 20.57, 45.05 and 411.71 Bqkg{sup −1}, respectively. The mean annual effective doses were calculated as 113.08 and 69.16 µSvy{sup −1} for the soil and sand samples, respectively.

  17. Distribution of natural radionuclides and hot points in coasts of Hormozgan, Persian Gulf, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdi, M.R.; Mostajaboddavati, M.; Hasanzadeh, A.; Faghihian, H.; Kamali, M.

    2006-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has been made on the distribution of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, 137 Cs and geochemical features in soil and sediment samples at various locations in the coast of Persian Gulf. Activity concentration levels due to radionuclides were measured in 50 samples of soils and sediments collected from the coast of Hormozgan. From the measured spectra, activity concentrations were determined for 40 K (range from 140 to 1172 Bq x kg -1 ), 137 Cs (from 0 to 15 Bq x kg -1 ), 238 U (from 29 to 385 Bq x kg -1 ) and 2321 Th (from 9 to 156 Bq x kg -1 ) with the lowest limit of detection (LLD) of 68, 3.2, 4.3 and 4.3 Bq x kg -1 , respectively. The dose rate from ambient air at the soil ranges was between 23 to 177 nGy x h -1 with an average of 60±7.86 nGy x h -1 . (author)

  18. Investigation of the radionuclide inventory and the production yields of the target stacks at the PEFP radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang-Pil; Hong, In-Seok; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) will construct a radioisotope production facility by using the nuclear reaction between the 100-MeV proton beam and the solid target. For investigating the radionuclide inventory and the production yield of the radioisotope production facility, we have optimized the thickness of the prototype target stacks by using a SRIM calculation. The target stacks consist of RbCl encapsulated in inconel alloy, Zn metal, and Ga metal encapsulated in niobium. Typical beam parameters were 300 μA and 95 hours. An inventory of all generated radionuclide activities is mandatory in order to prepare the operation scenario and design the hot cell. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to investigate what radionuclide is generated. The obtained radionuclide inventory indicated that about 100 radionuclides were generated and that the total radioactivity of the irradiated target stacks was 1324.1 Ci at the end of the bombardment. The production yields of Sr-82, Cu-67, and Ge-68 were 3.79 Ci, 2.74 Ci, and 1.23 Ci at the end of the bombardment.

  19. Determination of distribution coefficients of some natural radionuclides (U, Ra, Pb, Po) between different types of Syrian soils and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Al-Hamwi, A.; Amin, Y.; Al-Akel, B.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, distribution coefficients of some natural radionuclides ( 226 Ra, U, 210 Pb and 210 Po) between different types of soils in Syria and their solutions were determined. The distribution coefficients values ranged from (164-1933, 280-1722, 350-4749 and 101-117) l kg - 1 for 226 Ra, U, 210 Pb and 210 Po, respectively at pH = 4.0. While, the distribution coefficients values ranged from (207-6706, 673-2397, 149-2147 and 103- 292) l kg - 1 for 226 Ra, U, 210 Pb and 210 Po, respectively at pH = 5.5. In addition, the distribution coefficients values ranged from (167-1707, 126- 1239, 44-1122 and 125-1475) l kg - 1 for 226 Ra, U, 210 Pb and 210 Po, respectively at pH = 7.0. Moreover, the results showed that 210 Po distribution coefficients had the maximum values at pH 7. While 210 Pb distribution coefficients had the minimum values at same pH. In addition to, U distribution coefficients had the maximum values at pH 5.5. On the other hand, the effect of soil mineral content, CEC, ECE, pH and soluble ions on the distribution coefficients were investigated. In general, the results showed that there are logarithmic relationships between studied radionuclide activity in the soil and their distribution coefficients in all soil types (R 2 ranged from 0.59 to 1.00 at pH 4.0). On the other hand, there were no relationships between the distribution coefficients and soil pH. (authors)

  20. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in particle-size fractions of soil on fallout plumes of nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabdyrakova, A M; Lukashenko, S N; Mendubaev, A T; Kunduzbayeva, A Ye; Panitskiy, A V; Larionova, N V

    2018-06-01

    In this paper are analyzed the artificial radionuclide distributions ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 241 Am, 239+240 Pu) in particle-size fractions of soils from two radioactive fallout plumes at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. These plumes were generated by a low-yield surface nuclear test and a surface non-nuclear experiment with insignificant nuclear energy release, respectively, and their lengths are approximately 3 and 0,65 km. In contrast with the great majority of similar studies performed in areas affected mainly by global fallout where adsorbing radionuclides such as Pu are mainly associated with the finest soil fractions, in this study it was observed that along both analyzed plumes the highest activity concentrations are concentrated in the coarse soil fractions. At the plume generated by the surface nuclear test, the radionuclides are concentrated mainly in the 1000-500 μm soil fraction (enrichment factor values ranging from 1.2 to 3.8), while at the plume corresponding to the surface non-nuclear test is the 500-250 μm soil fraction the enriched one by technogenic radionuclides (enrichment factor values ranging from 1.1 to 5.1). In addition, the activity concentration distributions among the different soil size fractions are similar for all radionuclides in both plumes. All the obtained data are in agreement with the hypothesis indicating that enrichment observed in the coarse fractions is caused by the presence of radioactive particles resulted from the indicated nuclear tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distribution of anthropogenic and naturally occurring radionuclides in soils and lakes of Central Spitsbergen (Arctic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokas, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    This work provides the first results on activity concentrations, inventories and activity ratios of the artificial and natural fallout ("1"3"7Cs, "2"3"8Pu, "2"3"9"+"2"4"0Pu, "2"4"1Am, "2"1"0Pb) and lithogenic radionuclides ("2"2"6Ra, "2"2"8Ra, "4"0K) in soils and lake sediments of the inland Spitsbergen. The depths of activity peaks of the artificial radionuclides point to accumulation of up to 10 cm thick deposits during last 50 years. The activity ratios of the radionuclides suggest global fallout as their source. Despite low annual precipitation the inventories of fallout radionuclides in sites not affected by the secondary deposition agree with those reported from the more humid areas of Spitsbergen. (author)

  2. Study of radionuclides distribution mechanism at the territory of ''Qum Adasi'' OGPD and in layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmudov, H.M; Musayeva, Sh.Z.; Asgarova, V.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Its for several yeras that Inistitute of Radiation Problems ANAS has already started fundamental researches of radiation background state and radionuclide composition at the territories of oil and gas production departments. Base labaratories equipped with modern measurement units were established and strong specialists group was trained for fulfillment of these works and also for comprehensive analysis of obtained results. Over a long perios of time oil and gas production is realized at the territory of Q um Adasi O PGD. This territory with 3000 ha covers B ahar , h ovsan a nd Q um Adasi o il near the trestle and H ovsan o il-fields wells are located on-shore. These wells take their sources from different dephts and layers, thats why study of these layers radionuclide composition excites great interest. It has mainly two reasons: Study of dependence of produced crude oils radionuclide composition on oil layers;Dependence of oil-polluted areas and local radionuclide centers on natural layers.In order to protect environment and provide radiation safety of people working in oil-gas industry and the population living there, radiation background of these areas must be regularly kept under monitoring and the dependence of radionuclides creating this background on layers must be studied on the level of researches and practical result must be obtained. According to analysis results of the samples taken from local areas of oil-gas producing departments having high radiation background, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are the main natural radionuclides that create radiation background at the territory of Q um Adasi O GPD. According to the results of the conducted analysis, though in the areas having 5-8 mkR/h radiation background the effective activity of natural radionuclides is 38-40 Bk/kg, at the areas having 50-200 mkR/h radiation background effective activity increases to 1000-6500. And it shows that effective activity of radionuclides exceeds the norm for several

  3. U isotopes distribution in the Lower Rhone River and its implication on radionuclides disequilibrium within the decay series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebracki, Mathilde; Cagnat, Xavier; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Cariou, Nicolas; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boulet, Béatrice; Antonelli, Christelle

    2017-11-01

    The large rivers are main pathways for the delivery of suspended sediments into coastal environments, affecting the biogeochemical fluxes and the ecosystem functioning. The radionuclides from 238 U and 232 Th-series can be used to understand the dynamic processes affecting both catchment soil erosion and sediment delivery to oceans. Based on annual water discharge the Rhone River represents the largest river of the Mediterranean Sea. The Rhone valley also represents the largest concentration in nuclear power plants in Europe. A radioactive disequilibrium between particulate 226 Ra (p) and 238 U (p) was observed in the suspended sediment discharged by the Lower Rhone River (Eyrolle et al. 2012), and a fraction of particulate 234 Th was shown to derive from dissolved 238 U (d) (Zebracki et al. 2013). This extensive study has investigated the dissolved U isotopes distribution in the Lower Rhone River and its implication on particulate radionuclides disequilibrium within the decay series. The suspended sediment and filtered river waters were collected at low and high water discharges. During the 4-months of the study, two flood events generated by the Rhone southern tributaries were monitored. In river waters, the total U (d) concentration and U isotopes distribution were obtained through Q-ICP-MS measurements. The Lower Rhone River has displayed non-conservative U-behavior, and the variations in U (d) concentration between southern tributaries were related to the differences in bedrock lithology. The artificially occurring 236 U was detected in the Rhone River at low water discharges, and was attributed to the liquid releases from nuclear industries located along the river. The ( 235 U/ 238 U) (d) activity ratio (=AR) in river waters was representative of the 235 U natural abundance on Earth. The ( 226 Ra/ 238 U) (p) AR in suspended sediment has indicated a radioactive disequilibrium (average 1.3 ± 0.1). The excess of 234 Th in suspended sediment =( 234 Th xs

  4. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (U, Th) in Timahdit's black shale (Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, C.; Mougin, L.; Nourreddine, A.; Fakhi, S.

    2006-01-01

    Attention has been recently focused on the use of Moroccan's black shale as the raw material for production of a new type of adsorbents. The purpose of the present work was to characterize a black shale specimen, collected in the region of Timahdit, in terms of the total uranium and thorium contents, measurements of some geochemically important elements (Al, Fe, Si, K, Mn, P, Ca), and XRD/SEM analysis. Selective leaching procedure, followed by radiochemical purification and alpha-counting, was also performed to assess the distribution of 238 U, 234 U, 235 U, 232 Th, 228 Th, 230 Th in the main structures. It was found that calcite, dolomite, quartz, clays constitute the main bulk composition of inorganic matrix. Organic matter counts for at least 15 wt. % of the sample. As in most other organic rich rocks, uranium is highly enriched in the black shale. It was interpreted to have been concentrated over a long period of time under anaerobic environment. This actinide is associated predominantly with humic acids, the precursor of kerogen. An integrated isotopic approach points out its mobilization from these humic acids to carbonates and apatite phases. The radionuclide that is the less mobile in this environment is 232 Th, as was expected from its chemical properties, and in agreement with the most common view in the literature. It is partitioned between silicate minerals (49%), pyrite and kerogen (51%). Speciation, chemical behaviour of uranium and thorium and alpha decay related processes are widely responsible for disequilibria in the uranium decay series. (author)

  5. Distribution of radionuclides and radiation levels in some district of Karnataka State, India - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannappa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation is a form of energy that can be travelled through the medium in the form of waves or particles. The heat, sound and light are different forms of radiations that peoples can feel or see but there are other kinds of radiations that human senses cannot detect. Indeed we are constantly receiving such invisible radiation from the sky, earth crust, air, food and even our own body. Such radiations can be divided into ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation from natural sources is a continuing and inescapable feature of life on earth. Our environment contains natural radionuclides in variable amounts. A large number of natural radioactivity measurements were conducted throughout world, in order to know their distribution and to assess their radiological health hazards. Karnataka state has 30 districts and having 74,051 sq m area and it is having various geological formations. The Archean complex made up of Dharwad schists and granitic gneisses, these cover around 60% of the area of the state and it consists of gneisses, granite and charnockite rocks. Some of the minerals found in this region are dolomite, lime stone, gabbro, quartzite, pyroxenite, manganese and iron ore and metabasalt. In addition the proposed uranium mining region is also present in Googi region of Yadagiri district. In many places Iron and manganese mining activities, crushing and quarrying activities are continuously going on. It is expected that such mining and extraction activities can enhance the natural radiation level in the environment. Hence there is a need to estimate the environmental radiation levels in the habitats of these areas. Our research group along with many researches in the Karnataka state initiated systematic study on the dose received by the population in some district of different environmental matrixes and more data are reported in Karnataka state, which have been reviewed and compiled in this paper. (author)

  6. Collection and presentation of animal data relating to internally distributed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from laboratory animals on the distribution of an internally administered radionuclide may be put to use by various people in ways quite different from the one for which the original observations were made. Consideration for these other scientists, sometimes in unrelated fields, can be shown by attention to a few details in the method of data collection and reporting that may improve the author's credibility, the reader's comprehension, and the value of the data. Briefly stated, two rules should be followed: Account for 100% of the administered radioactivity; and report data as fraction of administered activity per organ. The first rule serves as an internal check on the proper functioning of counting equipment, and may disclose excretion, contamination of counting tubes, or failure to inject the desired amount of activity. The second rule allows anyone to make use of the raw data. Presentation of the data only in complicated, manipulated form either totally prevents reconstruction of the raw data, or demands tedious, uncertain conversions. Examples of such manipulated data include percent dose per gram per 1% body weight and percent kilogram dose per gram. At the other extreme in reporting data for radioactivity, and to be equally avoided, are completely unprocessed values, such as counts per minute, with no reference made to the number of counts injected or to the time lapse between counts. Adherence to these two principles will permit the reader to follow through on any permutations of the data that the author may make, and to apply the data in unrelated situations

  7. Modification of the natural radionuclide distribution by some human activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, G.B.; Makepeace, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Examples are presented of three types of human activity that have resulted in elevated natural radiation levels. Investigations carried out by a Federal-Provincial Task Force are described. The distributions of grab sample measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations are compared for the Bancroft area, Cobourg, Deloro, Elliot Lake, and Port Hope in Ontario, and Uranium City in Saskatchewan; it is concluded that the major point of difference between the communities that were investigated and the reference community of Cobourg is the departure from a symmetrical lognormal distribution at the higher concentrations

  8. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quine, T.A.; Walling, D.

    1998-01-01

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 ( 210 Pb) and beryllium-7( 7 Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  9. A method for determining the analytical form of a radionuclide depth distribution using multiple gamma spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Steven Clifford, E-mail: sdewey001@gmail.com [United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Environmental Health Division, Health Physics Branch, Radiation Analysis Laboratories, 2350 Gillingham Drive, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235 (United States); Whetstone, Zachary David, E-mail: zacwhets@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Kearfott, Kimberlee Jane, E-mail: kearfott@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    When characterizing environmental radioactivity, whether in the soil or within concrete building structures undergoing remediation or decommissioning, it is highly desirable to know the radionuclide depth distribution. This is typically modeled using continuous analytical expressions, whose forms are believed to best represent the true source distributions. In situ gamma ray spectroscopic measurements are combined with these models to fully describe the source. Currently, the choice of analytical expressions is based upon prior experimental core sampling results at similar locations, any known site history, or radionuclide transport models. This paper presents a method, employing multiple in situ measurements at a single site, for determining the analytical form that best represents the true depth distribution present. The measurements can be made using a variety of geometries, each of which has a different sensitivity variation with source spatial distribution. Using non-linear least squares numerical optimization methods, the results can be fit to a collection of analytical models and the parameters of each model determined. The analytical expression that results in the fit with the lowest residual is selected as the most accurate representation. A cursory examination is made of the effects of measurement errors on the method. - Highlights: > A new method for determining radionuclide distribution as a function of depth is presented. > Multiple measurements are used, with enough measurements to determine the unknowns in analytical functions that might describe the distribution. > The measurements must be as independent as possible, which is achieved through special collimation of the detector. > Although the effects of measurements errors may be significant on the results, an improvement over other methods is anticipated.

  10. Investigations on the effect of grazing intensity on the transfer of radionuclides to cow`s milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Schotola, C. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Crout, N.M.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physiology and Environmental Science; Absalom, J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physiology and Environmental Science

    1997-03-01

    For these investigations two farms were chosen. Farm A carries out a rotational grazing regime with 4 grazed pastures which is the more commonly used farm practice in Bavaria, farm B practises a continuous grazing regime with one grazed pasture only. In farm B a tenfold lower Cs-137 activity concentration was observed in milk though activity concentrations in soil and pasture grass were the same as that at farm A, indicating the same transfer rate soil-plant at both locations. It could be shown under normal agricultural conditions that with a higher grazing pressure lower activity concentrations in milk (in this case a factor of about 2 to 3) were obtained. Therefore changing stock density in combination with a continuous grazing regime on a given pasture after a major nuclear accident can be considered as a possible countermeasure which can be easily applied. Mainly to get more synchronised growth rates and a homogeneous distribution of radiocontamination plot experiments were performed to simulate the influence of grazing intensity. Under the experimental design used here no effect of grazing intensity on the transfer of radionuclides to vegetation could be found. Effects of grazing intensity as found for the farm experiment, therefore must be due to other sources than vegetation activities, and are presumably due to soil ingestion preventing uptake of soluble plant incorporated radiocaesium in the animal rumen. (orig./MG)

  11. The use of classical and radionuclide methods to investigate soil erosion in the Beskidy Mts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, W.

    1997-01-01

    Information concerning the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition on cultivated hillslopes is difficult to obtain using conventional soil loss monitoring techniques. The use of the fallout radionuclides 134 Cs and 137 Cs as a sediment tracers offers considerable potential for elucidating patterns of soil redistribution. This paper presents the results of an investigation of soil erosion on a cultivate hillslope within the Homerka drainage basin in the Polish Flysch Carpathians, based on 134 Cs and 137 Cs measurements. The 137 Cs inventories of soils in this region reflect inputs from both bomb and Chernobyl-derived fallout. The high degree of spatial variability associated with Chernobyl fallout deposition poses considerable limitations on the potential for using radiocesium measurements to elucidate detailed patterns of soil loss. With an application of cesium method it was stated that during the last 35 years sediment storage within the edge of agricultural terraces is ca. 4 mm year -1 on the average on agricultural experimental slope in the drainage basin of Homerka. This value reflects tillage and dispersed wash and is comparable with the intensity of erosion on agricultural plots. The results provided by the 137 Cs measurements are consistent with other process-based measurements undertaken on the slopes and with available evidence concerning the dominant sources of suspended sediment transported by the local streams. A general model of soil loss and sediment delivery from cultivated slopes in the Polish Flysch Carpathians is proposed. (author)

  12. Beta Autoradiography. An analytical technique to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficher, P.; Goutelard, F.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In decommissioning of old buildings and after disposal of nuclear facilities (materials, glove boxes,...), the inventory of the radioactive contamination of various building materials needs to be obtained in order to fix the working condition for dismantling. The challenge of this study was to classify different building materials of a whole research laboratory that was dedicated to research on organic molecules labeled with H-3 and C-14. The problem of waste classification is essential for safety treatment of waste and also for its cost. The analytical technique of beta autoradiography particularly well known for biological researches has been tested to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface. This technique is mainly interesting for beta and alpha emitters but also sensitive to gamma radiation. The first step of this technique is the deposit of a film on the surface of material to be analyzed. Films can be deposited on the ground or also fixed on the walls or even on the ceiling. The film is a plastic sheet covered with an emulsion containing photostimulable crystals and Eu that is activated when the film is exposed on radioactive source. The exposed films are then scanned with the Cyclone Plus equipment to get a digitized image. This image represents the radioactivity of the surface studied. The possibility to re-use the films is very important to investigate a large area. This autoradiography technique has retained our attention for its sensitivity and moreover the possibility of 2-dimensional investigation has been found as a real advantage. However it remains now as a qualitative technique and new studies must be launched to prove its quantitative potentialities. The high spatial resolution was not as important as in biological observation, and the mm resolution is totally sufficient

  13. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Raghunath, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., 238 U series, 232 Th series and 40 K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed

  14. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India); Raghunath, V. M. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2001-09-15

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., {sup 238}U series, {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed.

  15. Radionuclide distributions in vertical soil cross sections of the Chernobyl NPP 30-kilometer zone along the western fallout track. II. Chernozem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogozin, Yu.M.; Smirnova, E.A.; Krivokhatskii, A.S.; Bryzgalova, R.V.; Alekseev, V.A.; Avdeev, V.A.; Kuksov, A.A.; Zudova, I.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Radionuclide distributions in vertical cross sections taken from chernozem in a former garden and tillable field along the western fallout track at distances of 5, 13.5, and 22 km from the fourth block of the Chernobyl NPP are studied. The distributions through the chernozem cross sections are more complicated than those of sandy soil. Although the main mass of radionuclides in the cross sections is concentrated at depths of 0-3 cm, instances are observed where up to 5-15% of the radionuclides penetrate to greater depths

  16. Distribution and speciation of radionuclides in the environment: their implication in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Following the discovery of X-ray and radioactivity, radioecological researches were initiated all over the world. But only after the 2nd World War the knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiations on the organisms and the processes of the diffusion of radionuclides in the environment achieved an outstanding level. On account of the great sensitivity of the radioactivity measurements, negligible amounts of radionuclides could be easily identified and measured in different environmental compartments without any slight interference with the metabolisms of living organisms. Many processes and phenomena could then be detected and studied. Ecology took advantage from such studies and its growth in a few years was probably greater than in the whole of the previous century. As a result a great interest in the determination of concentration factors in any organism spread widely in many laboratories, a large number of values were available in a few years time. Further it appeared that the transfer of the radionuclides from the environment to man could be better evaluated and monitored through the definition of some 'critical' quantity: a critical group, a critical radionuclide, a critical pathway, etc. The fallout dispersed by the experimental detonation of nuclear weapons and, more recently, the contamination due to the Chernobyl accident, were the most important sources of radionuclides in most of the environmental compartments. Undoubtedly in the post Chernobyl situation radioecology is in a better position because the description of the environment is presently much closer to reality and its conclusions much more reliable. But, as it is usual in science development, new problems appeared and new questions were asked. Speciation of radionuclides and other pollutants is considered and some of the effects on the diffusion and consequences are discussed. Finally, the application of the great amount of knowledge obtained by the radioecological research to a better

  17. Distribution of natural radionuclide in soil of Ukhimath region of Garhwali Himalaya and its radiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Manjulata; Rawat, Mukesh; Prasad, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Gusain, G.S.; Ramola, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides present in soil include 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K some of these radionuclides are transferred to man through food chain or inhalations, while the extraterrestrial radiation originate from outer space as primary cosmic rays. External exposure will occur as a result of irradiation, and internal exposure will occurs as result of inhalation. Therefore, the assessment of gamma radiations dose from natural sources is of particular importance as natural radiation is the largest contributor to the external dose of world population

  18. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  19. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  20. Assessment of atmospherically-released radionuclides using the computerized radiological risk investigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.B.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1986-01-01

    For radionuclides, the standards are in terms of an annual dose, and the regulations require assurance that no member of the general public receives a dose in excess of that standard. Thus, spatial variations in the population around an emission source must be considered. Furthermore, for most chemical pollutants the standards are written in terms of an air concentration while for radionuclides other pathways of exposure, e.g., uptake of the airborne emissions by terrestrial food chains must also be considered. The remainder of this paper discusses the computer codes that make up the CRRIS and how they are used to perform an assessment of the health impacts on man of radionuclides released to the atmosphere

  1. Investigation of radionuclides and anthropic tracer migration in groundwater at the Chernobyl site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal La Salle, Corinnne; Simonucci, Caroline; Roux, Céline; Bugai, Dmitry; Aquilina, Luc; Fourré, Elise; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Labasque, Thierry; Michelot, Jean-Luc; Fifield, Keith; Team Aster Team; Van Meir, Nathalie; Kashparov, Valeriy; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Lancelot, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Following the reactor 4 explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP), at least 1019 Bq of radionuclides (RN) were released in the environment. In order to protect workers and prevent further atmospheric RN dispersion in the area adjacent to the ChNPP, contaminated wastes including fuel particles, topsoil layer and forest remains were buried in approximately 800 shallow trenches in the sand formation in the Red Forest waste dump site [1]. No containment measures were taken, and since then RN have leaked to the unsaturated zone and to the groundwater. Since 1999, migration of RN in the vicinity of the trench 22 at Red Forest site has been investigated within the frame of the EPIC program carried out by IRSN in collaboration with UIAR and IGS [2, 3]. A plume of 90Sr was shown downgradient from the trench 22 with activites reaching 3750 Bq/L [2]. In 2008, further studies were initiated through the TRASSE research group, based on a collaboration between IRSN and CNRS. These programs aim at combining groundwater dating with RN migration monitoring studies in order to constrain RN transport models [3]. Groundwater residence time was investigated based on 3H/He and CFC. Both tracers led to ages ranging from modern (1-3 y) at 2 m depth below the groundwater table to significantly higher apparent ages of 50-60 y at 27 m below the groundwater table [3]. 36Cl/Cl ratios 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural ratio are measured in groundwater. Similarly, SF6 shows concentrations as high as 1200 pptv while natural concentrations are in the order of 6-7 pptv. Based on apparent groundwater ages, both contaminations are linked to the Chernobyl explosion. Hence those tracers show excellent potential to constrain conservative and reactive transport, respectively. In contrast, 238U/235U ratio down gradient from trench 22 remains similar to the natural ratio. This suggests that either most of the U contained in the trench is in a non soluble form

  2. Orientating investigation to Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in Dutch aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, H.W.; Marwitz, P.A.; Berger, G.W.; Weers, A.W. van; Hagel, P.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    1990-08-01

    In 1985/86 reconnaissance investigations were carried out of Po-210, Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230 of the U-238 series, and of Th-232 and its daughter Th-228. In the lower reaches of the Rhine, Westerschelde, and Hoogoven(furnace)-channel concentrations were markedly elevated. The average Po-210 concentrations of these waters were between 3-4 Bq.m -3 dissolved in water, between 200-500 Bq.kg -1 in dry suspended matter, between 300-400 Bq.kg -1 in mussels dry matter. These elevated levels could be ascribed to emissions on these waters by the phosphate rock and iron-ore-processing industries. In bottom sediment of waterways or of docks close to these industries Pb-210 and Po-210 concentrations varied from 150 to 750 Bq.kg -1 dry sediment. The lowest average Po-210 concentrations were found in the Oosterschelde: 0.8 Bq.m -3 dissolved in water, 70 Bq.kg -1 in dry suspended matter, 100 Bq.kg -1 in mussels dry matter. It was found that several organisms incorporate Po-210 more strongly than the other natural radionuclides. Po-210 also contributes most to the radiation burden caused by the consumption of fish products, in particular mussels and shrimps. Consumption of 1 kg. a -1 of shrimps from the Oosterschelde or from the coastal area causes respectively a radiation exposure of 10 μSv.a -1 or 30 μSv.a -1 . This study points out the necessity for further studies of the emissions of Po-210 and other U-238 daughters and their dispersal and/or accumulation in the aquatic environment. Furthermore it is important to identify critical groups with respect to the radiation exposure caused by the consumption of mussels and other fish products, and the contribution to this radiation exposure by the industries. (author). 43 refs.; 58 figs.; 52 tabs

  3. Transfer of fallout radionuclides derived from Fukushima NPP accident: 1 year study on transfer of radionuclides through hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Patin, Jeremy; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tsujimura, Maki; Wakahara, Taeko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    Previous experiences such as Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident have confirmed that fallout radionuclides on the ground surface migrate through natural environment including soils and rivers. Therefore, in order to estimate future changes in radionuclide deposition, migration process of radionuclides in forests, soils, ground water, rivers should be monitored. However, such comprehensive studies on migration through forests, soils, ground water and rivers have not been conducted so far. Here, we present the following comprehensive investigation was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. 1)Study on depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland 2)Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests 3)Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use 4)Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils 5)Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use 6)Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments 7)Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments 8)Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs

  4. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in abandoned cattle in the evacuation zone of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Fukuda

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP accident released large amounts of radioactive substances into the environment. In order to provide basic information for biokinetics of radionuclides and for dose assessment of internal exposure brought by the FNPP accident, we determined the activity concentration of radionuclides in the organs of 79 cattle within a 20-km radius around the FNPP. In all the specimens examined, deposition of Cesium-134 ((134Cs, half-life: 2.065 y and (137Cs (30.07 y was observed. Furthermore, organ-specific deposition of radionuclides with relatively short half-lives was detected, such as silver-110m ((110mAg, 249.8 d in the liver and tellurium-129m ((129mTe, 33.6 d in the kidney. Regression analysis showed a linear correlation between the radiocesium activity concentration in whole peripheral blood (PB and that in each organ. The resulting slopes were organ dependent with the maximum value of 21.3 being obtained for skeletal muscles (R(2 = 0.83, standard error (SE = 0.76. Thus, the activity concentration of (134 Cs and (137Cs in an organ can be estimated from that in PB. The level of radioactive cesium in the organs of fetus and infants were 1.19-fold (R(2 = 0.62, SE = 0.12, and 1.51-fold (R(2 = 0.70, SE = 0.09 higher than that of the corresponding maternal organ, respectively. Furthermore, radiocesium activity concentration in organs was found to be dependent on the feeding conditions and the geographic location of the cattle. This study is the first to reveal the detailed systemic distribution of radionuclides in cattle attributed to the FNPP accident.

  5. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in deep sediments of the Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Orellana, J.; Pates, J.M.; Masque, P.; Bruach, J.M.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial radionuclides enter the Mediterranean Sea mainly through atmospheric deposition following nuclear weapons tests and the Chernobyl accident, but also through the river discharge of nuclear facility effluents. Previous studies of artificial radionuclides impact of the Mediterranean Sea have focussed on shallow, coastal sediments. However, deep sea sediments have the potential to store and accumulate pollutants, including artificial radionuclides. Deep sea marine sediment cores were collected from Mediterranean Sea abyssal plains (depth > 2000 m) and analysed for 239,240 Pu and 137 Cs to elucidate the concentrations, inventories and sources of these radionuclides in the deepest areas of the Mediterranean. The activity - depth profiles of 210 Pb, together with 14 C dating, indicate that sediment mixing redistributes the artificial radionuclides within the first 2.5 cm of the sedimentary column. The excess 210 Pb inventory was used to normalize 239,240 Pu and 137 Cs inventories for variable sediment fluxes. The 239,240 Pu/ 210 Pb xs ratio was uniform across the entire sea, with a mean value of 1.24 x 10 -3 , indicating homogeneous fallout of 239,240 Pu. The 137 Cs/ 210 Pb xs ratio showed differences between the eastern (0.049) and western basins (0.030), clearly significant impact of deep sea sediments from the Chernobyl accident. The inventory ratios of 239,240 Pu/ 137 Cs were 0.041 and 0.025 in the western and eastern basins respectively, greater than the fallout ratio, 0.021, showing more efficient scavenging of 239,240 Pu in the water column and major sedimentation of 137 Cs in the eastern basin. Although areas with water depths of > 2000 m constitute around 40% of the entire Mediterranean basin, the sediments in these regions only contained 2.7% of the 239,240 Pu and 0.95% of the 137 Cs deposited across the Sea in 2000. These data show that the accumulation of artificial radionuclides in deep Mediterranean environments is much lower than predicted by

  6. Radionuclide investigation of the bone marrow with 99mTc-coren in patients with polycythemia vera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, L.Ya.; Prikhod'ko, A.G.; Rozdil'skij, S.I.; Astap'eva, O.N.; Grusha, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of radionuclide investigation of the bone marrow in 44 patients (of them 32 with polycythemia vera) were presented. The informative value of bone marrow scintigraphy and whole-body radiometry using 99m Tc-coren was shown in the patients with polycythemia vera at advanced stages. The results obtained made it possible to specify a clinical stage and prognosis of disease, and to optimize therapy

  7. Developing of Watershed Radionuclide Transport Model DHSVM-R as Modification and Extension of Distributed Hydrological and Sediment Dynamics Model DHSVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Kivva, S.; Onda, Y.; Nanba, K.; Wakiyama, Y.; Konoplev, A.

    2015-12-01

    The reliable modeling tools for prediction wash - off radionuclides from watersheds are needed as for assessment the consequences of accidental and industrial releases of radionuclides, as for soil erosion studies using the radioactive tracers. The distributed model of radionuclide transport through watershed in exchangeable and nonexchangeable forms in solute and with sediments was developed and validated for small Chernobyl watersheds in 90th within EU SPARTACUS project (van der Perk et al., 1996). New tendency is coupling of radionuclide transport models and the widely validated hydrological distributed models. To develop radionuclide transport model DHSVM-R the open source Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model -DHSVM http://www.hydro.washington.edu/Lettenmaier/Models/DHSVM was modified and extended. The main changes provided in the hydrological and sediment transport modules of DHSVM are as follows: Morel-Seytoux infiltration model is added; four-directions schematization for the model's cells flows (D4) is replaced by D8 approach; the finite-difference schemes for solution of kinematic wave equations for overland water flow, stream net flow, and sediment transport are replaced by new computationally efficient scheme. New radionuclide transport module, coupled with hydrological and sediment transport modules, continues SPARTACUS's approach, - it describes radionuclide wash-off from watershed and transport via stream network in soluble phase and on suspended sediments. The hydrological module of DHSVM-R was calibrated and validated for the watersheds of Ukrainian Carpathian mountains and for the subwatersheds of Niida river flowing 137Cs in solute and with suspended sediments to Pacific Ocean at 30 km north of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The modules of radionuclide and sediment transport were calibrated and validated versus experimental data for USLE experimental plots in Fukushima Prefecture and versus monitoring data collected in Niida watershed. The role

  8. Investigation on the relationship between systemic burden and annual limits on intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yongzeng

    1984-01-01

    The concept of systemic burden and the calculation of annual limits on intake (ALI) of radionuclides are discussed. The relationship between these two quantities is also described. Using this relationship, the ratio of actual amount of intake to ALI can be obtained for the assessment of the risk to internal exposure

  9. Distribution and transport of radionuclides in a boreal mire – assessing past, present and future accumulation of uranium, thorium and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Ramebäck, Henrik; Bengtsson, Åsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2013-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 238 U, 226 Ra, 40 K and the daughters of 232 Th, 228 Ra and 228 Th, were measured in a small mire in northern Sweden. High activity concentrations of 238 U and 232 Th (up to 41 Bq 238 U kg −1 ) were observed in parts of the mire with a historical or current inflow of groundwater from the surrounding till soils, but the activities declined rapidly further out in the mire. Near the outlet and in the central parts of the mire the activity concentrations were low, indicating that uranium and thorium are immobilized rapidly upon their entering the peat. The 226 Ra was found to be more mobile with high activity concentrations further out into the mire (up to 24 Bq kg −1 ), although the central parts and the area near the outlet of the mire still had low activity concentrations. Based on the fluxes to and from the mire, it was estimated that approximately 60–70% of the uranium and thorium entering the mire currently is retained within it. The current accumulation rates were found to be consistent with the historical accumulation, but possibly lower. Since much of the accumulation still is concentrated to the edges of the mire and the activities are low compared to other measurements of these radionuclides in peat, there are no indications that the mire will be saturated with respect to radionuclides like uranium, thorium and radium in the foreseen future. On the contrary, normal peat growth rates for the region suggest that the average activity concentrations of the peat currently may be decreasing, since peat growth may be faster than the accumulation of radionuclides. In order to assess the total potential for accumulation of radionuclides more thoroughly it would, however, be necessary to also investigate the behaviour of other organophilic elements like aluminium, which are likely to compete for binding sites on the organic material. Measurements of the redox potential and other redox indicators demonstrate that uranium possibly could

  10. Biological effects of disintegration of electrocaptured radionuclides: the role of physical characteristics of disintegration and distribution of the absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Problems pertaining to the internal irradiation by radionuclides radiating during the disintegration according to the electron capture scheme a great amount of low-energy monoenergetic electrons (Auger electrons, internal conversion electrons) are considered. Main attention has been paid to the role of low-energy electrons and transmutation effects in the selective injury of intranuclear sensitive locuses as well as to the importance of the character of absorption dose distribution over the tissue microstructures. It is shown that very promising seems to be in principle the possibility of using electronradiating atoms for the radiotherapy purposes

  11. A new method for the determination of radionuclide distribution in the soil by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, P.; Andrasi, A.; Nemeth, I.

    1992-06-01

    A method was searched for to estimate the penetration characteristics of fallout radioactivity, using only spectral information obtained by in situ spectrometric measurements, and avoiding the need for long and tiresome sampling and sample analysis procedures. To speed up the analysis for depth distribution determination of fallout radioactivity in soil, an instrumental method based on the shape of spectra was developed. The ratio of peak to valley (the region between the photopeak and Compton edge) depends on the penetration of radionuclides in soil, providing an estimation of depth profile. These ratios were calculated and the method was tested by actual measurements. (R.P.) 7 refs.; 14 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Distribution and migration of cesium and strontium radionuclides in Estonian scots pine stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.; Tekko, S.; Aaspollu, J.; Martin, J.; Vilde, R.; Nifontova, M.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive pollution from the Chernobyl NPS reactor accident in 1986 has wide scale impact through radionuclides fallout over large areas. We used mushrooms, macrolichenes, mosses and pine needles, forest litter and soil for the investigaton of 137 Cs and 90 Sr accumulation and migration in pine ecosystems. Systematic collections were made on 63 field sites, total amount of samples analyzed is 350. Highest concentrations of radiocaesium were determined in mushrooms (41.8 kBq/kg) in north-east of Estonia, in macrolichens at the Lahemaa National Park (6.2 kBq/kg). At the Rumpo Botanical Reserve the level of radiocaesium exceeded background concentration (1985) 1.3-1.8 times and at the Koljaku 4.0-4.4 times. During five years of observations (1986-1991) decrease of radionuclides pollution revealed 15 times the Rumpo and Koljaku. Radiostrontium concentrations in different ecosystem compartments all over the territory did not exeed harmful levels. (author). 2 tabs

  13. Alternative methods and radionuclides for use in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Q.; Walling, D.E.; Wallbrink, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of 137 Cs for documenting rates and patterns of soil redistribution and sediment deposition represents an important advance that overcomes many of the limitations of existing techniques. Thus, the 137 Cs approach presents several key advantages but a number of potential limitations must also be recognized and addressed in any application. For example, traditional procedures for applying 137 Cs measurements in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations involve the collection of soil or sediment cores from a study site and their subsequent transfer to the laboratory for preparation and analysis of 137 Cs activity by gamma spectrometry. The resulting measurements of 137 Cs activity (Bq g -1 ) are used to calculate the 137 Cs inventories (Bq m -2 ) for the individual cores and, thus the sampling points. In cases where a large number of cores are collected and require analysis, their processing and laboratory measurement will involve substantial effort. Furthermore, an extended period of time will generally be required for the measurements, because long count times are required for environmental samples containing relatively low levels of 137 Cs activity. Appreciable delays in obtaining results may, therefore, arise and it is not generally possible to obtain immediate data for use in planning and developing an ongoing sampling programme for detailed investigations. In view of these limitations, there is clearly a need to explore the potential for enhancing and extending the 137 Cs technique by using other methods to obtain the 137 Cs measurements within a shorter period of time and by using other fallout radionuclides with behaviour similar to that of 137 Cs but with a continuous input or a half-life extending to days rather than years, that could be used to document either the short-term contemporary rates of soil redistribution and sediment deposition or address issues of variability. This chapter discusses the procedures involved in employing field

  14. Distribution and dynamics of radionuclides and stable elements in the coastal waters off Rokkasho Village, Japan, prior to the opening of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Part 3. Concentration levels of radionuclides in seawater off Rokkasho Village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kawabata, H.; Ueda, S.; Akata, N.; Inaba, J.; Ohmomo, Y.; Mitamura, O.; Seike, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the concentration levels of 3 H, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 238,239+240 Pu, and 234,235,238 U in seawater off Rokkasho Village, Japan, before the start-up of a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. The level, fluctuation range and distribution characteristics of each radionuclide was determined. (author)

  15. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbadago, J K; Darko, E O [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, PO Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Faanhof, A [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Schandorf, C, E-mail: jgbada@yahoo.com [School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra (Ghana)

    2011-09-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment.

  16. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbadago, J K; Darko, E O; Faanhof, A; Schandorf, C

    2011-01-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment.

  17. Supplementary investigations on the validation of the atmospheric radionuclide transport model (ARTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Cornelia; Thielen, Harald; Sogalla, Martin

    2015-09-01

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SBG) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of non-radioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. The research project 3612S50007 serves, on the one hand, to validate ARTM systematically. On the other hand, the development of science and technology were investigated and, if reasonable and possible, were implemented to the program system. The dispersion model and the user interface were advanced and optimized. The program package was provided to the users as a free download. Notably t he work program comprises the validation of the approach used in ARTM to model short emission periods, which are of interest in view of the SBG. The simulation results of the diagnostic wind and turbulence model TALdia, which is part of the GO-ARTM program package, were evaluated with focus on the influence of buildings on the flow field. The user interface was upgraded with a wind field viewer. To simplify the comparison with the model still in use, a Gaussian plum e model was implemented into the graphical user interface. The ARTM web page was maintained, user questions and feedback were answered and analysed concerning possible improvements and further developments of the program package. Numerous improvements were implemented. An ARTM user workshop was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation

  18. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Peter C.; Finch, Robert J.; Wronkiewicz, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached

  19. Radionuclide investigation of the blood flow in tumor and normal rat tissues in induced hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istomin, Yu.P.; Shitikov, B.D.; Markova, L.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography was performed in rats with transplantable tumors. Induced hyperglycemia was shown to result in blood flow inhibition in tumor and normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. Some differences were revealed in a degree of reversibility of blood flow disorders in tissues of the above strains. The results obtained confirmed the advisability of radiation therapy at the height of a decrease in tumor blood

  20. Field investigations of the uptake of radionuclides by a dairy herd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, N J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1983-11-01

    A brief outline is given of a current study of the transfer of radionuclides in the pasture-cow-milk pathway at a farm situated close to the Sellafield nuclear installation. Samples collected include airborne dust, rainwater, herbage, supplementary feed, milk and tissue, bone and organs from slaughtered cows. Data collected so far have been used to derive coefficients that quantify the transfer of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am to meat and milk.

  1. Immunological and epidemiological investigations in regions contaminated by radionuclides after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubik, V M [Institute of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    We have carried out in Novozybkov district of Bryansk region, Russia, immunologic inspection of residents with simultaneous evaluation of radionuclides content in the body and individual dose burden. We have not found any correlation between the dose and immune characteristics: amount of T and B lymphocytes, antibodies level. Only 3 months after the accident increased level of antibodies against thyroid antigens, thyroglobulin and microsomes was found at thyroid doses over 75 cGy. 3 tabs.

  2. Immunological and epidemiological investigations in regions contaminated by radionuclides after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubik, V.M.

    1997-01-01

    We have carried out in Novozybkov district of Bryansk region, Russia, immunologic inspection of residents with simultaneous evaluation of radionuclides content in the body and individual dose burden. We have not found any correlation between the dose and immune characteristics: amount of T and B lymphocytes, antibodies level. Only 3 months after the accident increased level of antibodies against thyroid antigens, thyroglobulin and microsomes was found at thyroid doses over 75 cGy. 3 tabs

  3. Field investigations of the uptake of radionuclides by a dairy herd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief outline is given of a current study of the transfer of radionuclides in the pasture-cow-milk pathway at a farm situated close to the Sellafield nuclear installation. Samples collected include airborne dust, rainwater, herbage, supplementary feed, milk and tissue, bone and organs from slaughtered cows. Data collected so far have been used to derive coefficients that quantify the transfer of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and 241 Am to meat and milk. (U.K.)

  4. Investigation of radionuclide release from Solid Waste Disposal Area 3, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueber, A.M.; Webster, D.A.; Munro, I.L.; Farrow, N.D.; Scott, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Radionuclide release from Solid Waste Disposal Area (SWDA) 3 has been studied through the analysis of surface and ground waters from the local drainage areas. SWDA 3 is located in the Northwest Tributary drainage basin, a part of the White Oak Creek drainage; 90 Sr is the only radionuclide being discharged in solution in the main stream. Water-level measurements in wells around SWDA 3 suggest the presence of a ground-water divide beneath the southwestern end of the disposal area. Ground water below this area may be moving southwestward toward the Raccoon Creek drainage system. Strontium-90 activity has been detected in this watershed, discharging from a seep adjacent to a Raccoon Creek tributary stream about 640 m southwest of SWDA 3. It appears that 90 Sr is moving through ground-water flow to the northeast and to the southwest of SWDA 3 and that this direction of movement is related to bedrock structure. The trend of a line connecting the two seeps passes through the disposal area and is parallel to bedrock strike. Information from core-hole logs and televiewer logs suggests that 90 Sr in ground water may be moving through solution channels near the contact between units F and G of the Chickamauga Limestone. The apparent extent of migration of 90 Sr in bedrock has implications regarding potential underground radionuclide movement in Melton Valley

  5. Radionuclide ventilation-perfusion studies in pediatric respiratory diseases: 157 measurements of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in 130 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Saudubray, F.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide investigations provide regional quantitative and kinetic data with a very low exposure. Results are dissonant with roentgenographic findings in 52% of cases and enhance diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Although it provides poor quality images. The use of 133 Xe is preferable for ventilation studies to ensure correct evaluation of washout and trapping. According to the patient's age and position, 50% washout times vary from 5.6 to 8.7 seconds in the upper segments and from 5.6 to 8.5 seconds in the lower segments. Distribution of blood flow can be studied after intravenous injection of either sup(99m)Tc labelled microspheres of human albumin or 133 Xe saline solution. The former provides better quality images with studies of all incidences but may be contraindicated in cases of severe pulmonary hypertension or major right-to-left shunts. The latter allows a better sequential study. Radionuclide ventilation-perfusion studies are one of the major advances in pediatric pneumology in recent years [fr

  6. Distribution of radionuclides in mussels, winkles and prawns: Pt. 1; Study of organisms under environmental conditions using conventional radio-analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, P [Scottish Research Reactor Centre, East Kilbride (United Kingdom); Baxter, M S; Fowler, S W [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.

    1993-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and winkles (Littorina littorea), collected from Ravenglass, Cumbria, England in the vicinity of the British Nuclear Fuels plc nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and prawns (Palaemon serratus), landed nearby at Whitehaven, have been investigated to determine the distributions of [alpha]-emitting ([sup 210]Po, [sup 238]Pu, [sup 239] [sup +] [sup 240]Pu, [sup 241]Am) and [gamma]-emitting ([sup 95]Nb, [sup 95]Zr, [sup 103]Ru, [sup 106]Ru, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 241]Am) radionuclides in their tissues and organs. Previous studies have attempted to determine the principal nuclide source to marine organisms by comparing nuclide activity ratios in their tissues, sea water and particulate material. From the environmental samples studied here, no single transport medium appears to dominate uptake. The primary radiological implantation of the observed radionuclide concentrations in Ravenglass mussels and winkles is that, from seafood ingestion, the critical group receives only a small percentage (ca. 10%) of the ICRP-recommended subsidiary dose limit. Dose contributions from [sup 210]Po are higher than those from [sup 239] + [sup 240]Pu in mussels but are less than those from [sup 239] [sup +] [sup 240]Pu in winkles. (Author).

  7. Application of probability distributions for quantifying uncertainty in radionuclide source terms for Seabrook risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.H.; Savin, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    The calculational models developed for the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) have traditionally been used to generate 'point estimate values' for radionuclide release to the environment for nuclear power plant risk assessments. The point estimate values so calculated are acknowledged by most knowledgeable individuals to be conservatively high. Further, recent evaluations of the overall uncertainties in the various components that make up risk estimates for nuclear electric generating stations show that one of the large uncertainties is associated with the magnitude of the radionuclide release to the environment. In the approach developed for the RSS, values for fission product release from the fuel are derived from data obtained from small experiments. A reappraisal of the RSS release fractions was published in 1981 in NUREG-0772. Estimates of fractional releases from fuel are similar to those of the RSS. In the RSS approach, depletion during transport from the core (where the fission products are released) to the containment is assumed to be zero for calculation purposes. In the containment, the CORRAL code is applied to calculate radioactivity depletion by containment processes and to calculate the quantity and timing of release to the environment

  8. Vertical random variability of the distribution coefficient in the soil and its effect on the migration of fallout radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the field, the distribution coefficient, K d , for the sorption of a radionuclide by the soil cannot be expected to be constant. Even in a well defined soil horizon, K d will vary stochastically in horizontal as well as in vertical direction around a mean value. The horizontal random variability of K d produce a pronounced tailing effect in the concentration depth profile of a fallout radionuclide, much less is known on the corresponding effect of the vertical random variability. To analyze this effect theoretically, the classical convection-dispersion model in combination with the random-walk particle method was applied. The concentration depth profile of a radionuclide was calculated one year after deposition assuming constant values of the pore water velocity, the diffusion/dispersion coefficient, and the distribution coefficient (K d = 100 cm 3 x g -1 ) and exhibiting a vertical variability for K d according to a log-normal distribution with a geometric mean of 100 cm 3 x g -1 and a coefficient of variation of CV 0.53. The results show that these two concentration depth profiles are only slightly different, the location of the peak is shifted somewhat upwards, and the dispersion of the concentration depth profile is slightly larger. A substantial tailing effect of the concentration depth profile is not perceivable. Especially with respect to the location of the peak, a very good approximation of the concentration depth profile is obtained if the arithmetic mean of the K d -values (K d = 113 cm 3 x g -1 ) and a slightly increased dispersion coefficient are used in the analytical solution of the classical convection-dispersion equation with constant K d . The evaluation of the observed concentration depth profile with the analytical solution of the classical convection-dispersion equation with constant parameters will, within the usual experimental limits, hardly reveal the presence of a log-normal random distribution of K d in the vertical direction in

  9. Study of distribution coefficient of some radionuclides in liquid-solid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafar, M.; Abdul-Hadi, A.; Al-Hassanieh, O.

    2001-10-01

    The distribution of the elements U, Th, Am, Eu, Cs, Sr and Ra in a solid-aqueous system. Natural phosphate in contact with groundwater, was investigated usingγ and α spectroscopy. The effect of various factors such as phase contact time, Ph, particle size of the solid phase, and the concentration of a element Ca, were studied. The obtained results show that, more than 98% of the actinide elements and europium are adsorbed by the solid phase under all conditions. The fission products Cs and Sr have different behaviours, depending on experiment conditions. The behaviour of Ra is closer to the actinides than to the fission products. There are small differences between the behaviour of the actinide elements, which can be interpreted by migration mechanism from the aqueous to the solid phase i.e. adsorption or precipitation. (author)

  10. Laboratory experiments to investigate radionuclide enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickmott, S.J.B.

    1982-02-01

    Samples of simulated seawater, and seawater from the Irish Sea, were contained in a plastic tank in the laboratory, and bubbles were passed through them to burst at the water surface. The emitted jet droplets, as representing the surface microlayer, were collected on filter papers. Such measurements are easier to perform than similar measurements at sea, and the lack of waves enables greater collection efficiencies to be obtained. The droplet samples were analysed for stable Na, 137 Cs and actinides, and compared with the concentrations in the bulk tank water, in order to examine possible concentration factors for radionuclides in the surface microlayer. (author)

  11. X-ray and radionuclide investigations of the bones and joints in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuzyak, M.I.; Vasil'ev, A.A.; Belyaev, G.M.; Vikman, Ya.Eh.

    1990-01-01

    Radiography of the bones and joints was performed in 133 psoriatic patients; osteoscintigraphy with 99m Tc-phosphate compounds was also performed in 42 of them. On the basis of x-ray findings 3 types of osteoarticular psoriasis were singled out: psoriatic polyarthritis, psoriatic polyarthrosis and psoriatic arthropathy. The most ample information on the type, activity and spreading of a pathological process in the bones and joints in psoriasis can be obtained from the combination of the x-ray and radionuclide methods

  12. Investigations on high temperature coking of lignite with the help of radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koennecke, H.G.; Luther, D.; Abendroth, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    The time characteristics and the varying flow characteristics of fine-grained briquettes during the high temperature coking of lignite according to Rammler and Bilkenroth were studied with the help of radionuclide technique. The process parameters (tsub(V), zsub(R), etc.) refer to the different zones of the coke furnace (bunker/dryer, coker/cooler). The different time charakteristics of the coke-grain fractions formed during the BHT-process enables a correlation of the retention time and the quality factors of the coke. The results obtained would enable a better operation of the individual furnaces in the plant and offer the basis for further process developments. (orig.) [de

  13. Radionuclide disequilibria studies for investigating the integrity of potential nuclear waste disposal sites: subseabed studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.; Thomas, C.W.; Petersen, M.R.; Perkins, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    This study of subseabed sediments indicates that natural radionuclides can be employed to define past long-term migration rates and thereby evaluate the integrity of potential disposal sites in ocean sediments. The study revealed the following conclusions: (1) the sedimentation rate of both the long and short cores collected in the North Pacific is 2.5 mm/1000 yr or 2.5 m/m.yr in the upper 3 meters; (2) the sedimentation rate has been rather constant over the last one million years; and (3) slow diffusive processes dominate within the sediment. Reworking of the sediment by physical processes or organisms is not observed

  14. Investigation into kinetics of sorption of some radionuclides by mixed sorbents based on amorphous niobium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, R.M.; Sukharev, Yu.I.; Egorov, Yu.V.; Plotnikov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of kinetics of sorption of radionuclides 110 Ag, 60 Co, and 51 Cr by samples of amorphous stoichiometric niobium (5) phosphate. Ratios of the concentration conductivity to the mean radius of sorbent particles were calculated which are proportional to diffusivities. Increased specificity towards Cr 3+ ions of samples of ion exchangeable niobium phosphate containing cerium and treated with 0.1N HCl was established. This effect was explained by formation and subsequent destruction of the copolymer oxo-ol matrix of niobium and cerium, as a result of which a gel is formed with mosaic structure being favourable for sorption of three-charged ions

  15. Distribution of natural radionuclides and uranium activity ratio in Gulf of Thailand sediments as base line data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Hideki, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Kritsananuwat, R.; Fukushi, M. [Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Chanyotha, S.; Pangza, K. [Chulalongkorn University (Thailand)

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides and uranium activity ratio in marine sediments from selected coast, along the Gulf of Thailand to establish baseline data. Thailand has a plan to construct nuclear power plants (NPPs) as well as coal-fired thermal power plants to generate adequate and reliable electricity supply for rapid growth of industrialization. Therefore, it is important to focus not only on security and adequacy of power system but also on environmental protection and monitoring and risk assessment. To carry out environmental monitoring, baseline data plays a significant role. These data should be established and available before set up of mega projects that could impact the environment and health. Therefore, we have collected samples from five areas in the Gulf of Thailand, which are proposed as potential sites, to set up power plants by Thailand government. A total number of fifty-four marine sediment samples were collected. Gamma spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides e.g. {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ac and {sup 40}K. Activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ac and {sup 40}K vary from 2.91-67.17 Bq/kg with an average of 26.64±14.57 Bq/kg, 4.42-109.17 Bq/kg with an average of 43.79±23.92 Bq/kg and 3.36-1004.56 Bq/kg with an average of 393.56±208.04 Bq/kg, respectively. The radiation hazard parameters including absorbed dose rate (D), annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), radium equivalent activity (AGDE) and external hazard index (Hex) were calculated and compared with the international recommended values. We have noticed that sediments from two sites characterized by similar geological nature of landforms with a rocky coast have higher concentration of natural radionuclides. Concentration of uranium was determined using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotopic composition of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U were determined using

  16. Distribution of radionuclides in soil samples from a petrified wood forest in El-Qattamia, Cairo, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, A.; Abd-El Maksoud, T.M.; Abu-Zeid Hosnia, M.; El-Nagar, T.; Awad, S.

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations and distribution of radionuclides in a petrified wood forest in El-Qattamia have been determined using high-resolution gamma spectrometry to evaluate the environmental radioactivity. The mean activity concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were 65.26±12.99, 23.66±0.95 and 146.33±1.50 Bq kg -1 , respectively. Data of the soil samples show evidence of possible deposition and accumulation of 137 Cs. The mean activity concentration of 137 Cs in the soil samples was 4.37±0.16 Bq kg -1 with a range of 0.00-35.70 Bq kg -1 . The measured activity concentration range of 137 Cs was compared with reported ranges in the literature from some of the other locations in the world. The radium-equivalent, dose rate in air and annual effective dose rate were evaluated. The mean activity concentrations of the γ-ray emissions from radionuclides in El-Qattamia petrified wood forest region were relatively low

  17. Determination of distribution coefficients for 134 Cs, 60 Co and 234 Th radionuclides in Pinheiro river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution coefficients (K α) were determined in order to foresee the fate of the radionuclides discharged to the environment. Based upon the source-term released by IPEN's facilities in Pinheiros River during the year of 1988, three radionuclides were chosen as being the more critical, according to the radiation protection standards: 137 Cs, 60 Co and 232 Th. Their K α were determined experimentally in laboratory by using the corresponding radioactive tracers 134 Cs, 60 Co and 234 Th. Three different experimental methodologies were used: the static method, the shaken method and the dynamic method. The parameters studied were the effects of pH, aerobic condition and time of contact. The results obtained experimentally for the Kds confirm the predictions that: the cesium is slowly retained by the sediment along the Pinheiros River, the cobalt is an unstable element, therefore its retention by the sediment is affected by variations in the pH values, and finally, the thorium is almost completely retained in the vicinity of the discharge point. (author)

  18. The Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metals and Radionuclides in the South Ural

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, L I; Staines, E; Lyapunov, S M; Cherdintsev, V D; Romanov, S A; Samosadnyi, V T

    2003-01-01

    Samples of the mosses Hylocomium splendens, Pleurozium schreberi and surface soil, collected in 1997-2001, were used to study the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals and radionuclides in the South Ural Mountains characterized by intense anthropogenic impact from various industries. A total of 38 elements in soil and 33 elements in moss were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis. The elements Cu, Cd and Pb were determined in moss samples only by atomic absorption spectrometry. ^{90}Sr and ^{137}Cs activity was measured in surface soil samples also. VARIMAX rotated principal component analysis and GIS maps of factor scores were used to identify and characterise different pollution sources and to point out the most polluted areas.

  19. Simulation of deposition and activity distribution of radionuclides in human airways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, A.; Balashazy, I.; Szoke, I.; Hofmann, W.; Golser, R.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our research activities is the modelling of the biological processes related to the development of lung cancer at the large central-airways observed in the case of uranium miners caused by the inhalation of radionuclides (especially alpha-emitting radon decay products). Statistical data show that at the uranium miners the lung cancer has developed mainly in the 3-4.-5. airway generations and especially in the right upper lobe. Therefore, it is rather important to study the physical and biological effects in this section of the human airways to find relations between the radiation dose and the adverse health effects. These results may provide useful information about the validity or invalidity of the currently used LNT (Linear-No-Threshold) dose-effect hypothesis at low doses

  20. Matrix diffusion: heavy-tailed residence time distributions and their influence on radionuclide retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.

    2002-01-01

    Matrix diffusion in rocks is frequently assumed to be both Fickian and effectively homogeneous over space- and time-scales relevant to radionuclide retention. This paper discusses some cases of rocks where one or both of these assumptions may be invalid and what the consequences may be for modeling and performance assessment: a single pore diffusivity and matrix block size which is not representative of the diffusion process at all time- or space-scales, a scale-dependent diffusion rate coefficient which decreases with time- and space-scales, a retention capacity of host rocks that may be smaller than apparent in laboratory and field tests because all of the pore space is not accessible via diffusion over the performance assessment-scale transport time. (J.S.)

  1. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  2. Direct Investigations Of The Immobilization Of Radionuclides In The Alteration Phases Of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Peter C.; Finch, Robert J.; Wronkiewicz, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geologic repository is one of the most significant and difficult scientific endeavors of the twenty-first century. Unique scientific challenges are posed by the very long-lived radioactivity of nuclear waste. Many radionuclides of vastly different chemical character must be retained by the repository for several thousand years. Some with longer half-lives, such as Pu-239 and Tc-99, need to be isolated for periods approaching a million years. In order to ensure the safety of a geologic repository, a detailed understanding of the mobility of radionuclides in complex natural systems is essential. Most of the radioactivity in a geological repository will be associated with spent nuclear fuel. In the United States spent fuel is derived from several sources. The majority is UO2 (LWR) spent fuel from commercial reactors. About 30,000 metric tons of spent fuel was in storage at commercial reactors by 1995, with the expectation that this quantity will more than double by 2010 (Integrated Data Report 1995). All spent fuel derived from commercial reactors is intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. In addition, the DOE is the custodian of about 8000 metric tons of spent fuel, most of which is also intended for disposal in a geological repository. Although there are more than 250 types of spent fuel in the DOE inventory, the fuels may be broadly classified into (1) uranium metal fuel, (2) aluminum-based fuel, (3) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel containing substantial plutonium, and (4) graphite fuel (Colleen Shelton-Davis, personal communications, January 2000). Disposal of spent fuel in a geological repository requires detailed knowledge of the longterm behavior of the waste forms under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the waste packages as containers are breached. The proposed Yucca Mountain repository is intended to hold 70,000 metric tons of high-level nuclear waste. Nine

  3. Measurement of distribution coefficients of U series radionuclides on soils under shallow land environment (2). pH dependence of distribution coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Shinichi; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Inagawa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Tomozou

    2001-01-01

    In order to study sorption behavior of U series radionuclides (Pb, Ra, Th, Ac, Pa and U) under aerated zone environment (loam-rain water system) and aquifer environment (sand-groundwater system) for safety assessment of U bearing waste, pH dependence of distribution coefficients of each element has been obtained. The pH dependence of distribution coefficients of Pb, Ra, Th, Ac and U was analyzed by model calculation based on aqueous speciation of each element and soil surface charge characteristics, which is composed of a cation exchange capacity and surface hydroxyl groups. From the model calculation, the sorption behavior of Pb, Ra, Th, Ac and U could be described by a combination of cation exchange reaction and surface-complexation model. (author)

  4. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  5. Distribution of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in the process of artesian water treatment for drinking consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grashchenko, S.M.; Gritchenko, Z.G.; Shishkunova, L.V.

    1997-01-01

    Distribution of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series during the treatment of artesian water for drinking consumption is studied using vacuum-emanation and gamma spectrometry methods. During the water treatment hydroxide precipitates are produced at the station, which are isolated using a sand filter, radium isotopes being coprecipitated alongside with them. As a result of this radioactive waste is accumulated at the station, radium isotope concentration in it being equivalent to radium isotope concentration in uranium-thorium ores with 0:11% uranium and 0.56% thorium content. radium isotope concentration in water, delivered to the user do not exceed the established domestic normatives do not exceed the established domestic normatives

  6. Distribution and correlation of the natural radionuclides in a coal mine of the West Macedonia Lignite Center (Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikritzis, L I; Fotakis, M; Tzimkas, N; Kolovos, N; Tsikritzi, R

    2008-02-01

    The distribution and correlation of six natural nuclides in the West Macedonia Lignite Center, Northern Greece were studied. Fifty-five samples of lignite, aged from 1.8 to 5 million years, and corresponding steriles, beds of marls, clays and sands alternating with the lignite, were collected perpendicular to the mine benches and measured spectroscopically. The mean concentrations of (238)U and (226)Ra in lignites were found to be higher than that in steriles since these nuclides are associated with the organic material of lignite, whereas (238)U/(226)Ra equilibrium was not observed in either lignites or steriles. Finally, the ratio (226)Ra/(228)Ra in lignites was approximately double of that in steriles, confirming the affinity of the (238)U series with the coal matrix in contrast to the (232)Th series. No correlation was found between radionuclide concentrations and the depth of the sample, nor with the ash content of lignite.

  7. Distribution of the radionuclide 137Cs in the soils of a wet mountainous forest in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.-Y.; Lai, S.-Y.; Lin, Y.-M.; Chiang, H.-C.

    1999-01-01

    The behavior of 137 Cs was studied in the Yuanyang lake ecosystem, a wet mountainous forest in subtropical Taiwan. Soils investigated are either partially podzolic soils or nearly pure peats with a high organic matter concentration in the surface layer. Concentration of 137 Cs was highest in the organic surface layers, particularly in the Oe horizon or in the underlying A horizon. The downwards migration to the mineral horizons is limited, in spite of the high rainfall. Topography is a critical factor for the distribution of 137 Cs. It is shown that the concentration of 137 Cs is highest at the foot of the slope and lower near the summit and near the lakeshore. The variation of the concentration along the landscape has been attributed to erosion-deposition in combination with surface run-off of the undisturbed forest. The amount of 137 Cs in the site studied is significantly higher than at any other place in Taiwan. The accumulation of 137 Cs is attributed to the high rainfall, which brought large amounts of 137 Cs with the precipitation in the early 1960s. A very remarkable feature of the ecosystem is that 137 Cs is not leached to the subsoils, but is stored in the biomass. Due to permanent recycling it remains available, without being leached downward

  8. Distribution and behavior of radionuclides and stable elements in Lake Obuchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Takaku, Yuichi; Kondo, Kunio; Inaba, Jiro

    2001-01-01

    This investigation focused on the relationship between the uranium concentration and organic matter in the lake water and the bottom sediment of Lake Obuchi, Rokkasho Village, Aomori. Concentrations of 238 U and organic matter were measured at various points in the lake, and compiled to obtain the distributions and variation characteristics. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the lake water were approximately 1.8 mg l -1 . In contrast, these concentrations were low (0.5 mg l -1 ) in Futamata River. The relationship between the concentrations of 238 U and DOC in the lake water did not have a significant correlation. However, there was a close relationship (r=-0.87) between the ratios of 238 U/salinity and DOC in the bottom layer water. Moreover, a relationship between concentration of uranium and total organic carbon in core sediment had a significant correlation (r=0.80). These results suggest that uranium was reduced from a stable form +6 valence from to an unstable +4 valence form and was removed from the lake water, after the consumption of O 2 accompanied by the decomposition of the organic matter in sediment caused chemical reduction in the bottom layer. (author)

  9. Radionuclides distribution in blooming of the permian sediments from the Irati Formation of the Parana Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ademar de Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this work is to study natural radionuclides in sedimentary rocks. The concentration of them reflects the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment as well as some mineralogical characteristics of the rock matrix, and also more recent events as weathering and erosion. Using gamma ray high resolution spectrometry, the profile of activity concentration of the natural radionuclides was assessed for 226 Ra, 238 U, 32 Th and 40 K in rocks of the Irati Formation belonging to Parana Sedimentary Basin. The samples were collected at a limestone abandoned mine, in the city of Sapopema, (PR). 24 samples were collected, eleven from the exposed vertical profile with approximately 5.50 m, whose stratigraphy is represented by an alternation among decimetrics layers of limestones, bituminous shales, and some rhythmits layers (milimetric sheets of limestone and bituminous shales), 9 repetitions of a sample to study the variability, and three rigolits samples in sequential apprenticeships of weathering. Each sample was dried in the sun during about 48 hours, broken, drizzled in a sieve of 4 mesh and put, in a cylindrical container. The measures were accomplished using a Germanium Hyper Pure detector (HPGe) with relative efficiency of 66%, connected to a standard spectrometry electronic chain. The measured concentrations of activity of 238 U were smaller for the limestones (17.80 ±0.09 Bq.Kg -1 ), larger for the bituminous shales (125.5 ± 2.6 Bq.Kg -1 with enrichment of uranium in the sample (200), 548 ± 16 Bq.Kg -1 , upper part of the column), and intermediate for the rhythmits (23.0 ± 1,3 Bq.Kg -1 . The ratio eTh/K obtained for the studied profiles has equivalent values, indicating similar mineralogical characteristics for the limestones, bituminous shales, rhythmits and studied rigolits. On the other hand, to the ratio eTh/eU showed that two of the three regolits samples belong to oxidizer atmospheres, favoring the leaching of uranium, what can be

  10. Study on plutonium distribution in Palomares ecosystem after an accidental aerosol release of transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge of plutonium and transuranic elements accidentally ocurred near Palomares (Almeria, Spain) in 1966. After decontamining operations, about 10 g of finely dispersed plutonium remained on the soil and was spreaded on the sorroundings and into Mediterranean sea. An analytical study including a 34 sampling sites of marine sediments, chemical clean-up, analytical methods for isolating plutonium from interfering radionuclides in the alfa-spectra was carried out. The detection limit level reached for the 239 u+ 240 Pu was 10 mBq/Kg one of the lowest cited in the Spanish analytical literature until now. These results were attained following a careful electroplating Pu deposition method developed by our laboratory as result of the high signal/noise rates measured and a 20 KeV resolution. Several analytical assurance quality procedures specially developed for the Palomares ecological system were applied to the results, at the CIEMAT laboratories using reference standard certified samples. The values were unbiased and with no differences statistically significants between them. Interlaboratory comparisons were carried out. After 20 years of plutonium traces environmental transport their concentration were from two at three times the leves of radionuclides in the fallout of the zone studied. The plutonium concentration range in surface sediments was 0.3-5.0 Bq/Kg. The highest values corresponding in the coastal sediments and the lowest in the deep sea. Plutonium concentrations are highly correlated with the sediments structure, grain size composition and distance from the mouth of Almanzora river. The most important contribution at the transport from the land into sea could be the freshet occured at 1973. For this reason the plutonium ecologycal path has been from Palomares sorroundings into the sea. Sites in the Mediterranean sea not affected by plutonium apportation from Almanzora river showed Pu levels approximately the same as the mean value for the whole

  11. Assessment of function of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension using radionuclide methods of investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, N.M.; Babayan, A.S.; Mikaehlyan, R.S.; Mnatsakyan, Eh.L.

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage 1-2A HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage 2B-3 HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radioangiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing

  12. Cardiointervalography investigation of the nervous system of children from the radionuclide contaminated districts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedvetskaya, V.V.; Lyalikov, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using cardiointervalography the vegetative status of 177 children living in the supervised Belarus regions (more 15 Ci/km 2 of 137 Cs) and of 1291 children from the areas which are not contaminated with radionuclides is assessed. It is stated that the most characteristic peculiarity common for children living on supervised territories is an increase of the subcortical nervous centers activity, reinforcement of the central regulation stability, bettering of relations between the central and peripheral regulation profiles at rest and damage of these relations under physical load. Changes in the vegetative regulation developing in children from these districts are more pronounced in girls as compared to boys and are characterized by the nervous system sympathetic section tone decrease, by the liability to hyporeactivity accompanied by the parasympathetic section compensatory mechanisms tension. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Distribution and characterization of radionuclides in soils from Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.

    1985-01-01

    Selected physicochemical properties of plutonium-bearing radioactive particles and their association with host soils from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were studied to aid in the environmental assessment of the radionuclides in the area and to provide technological concepts for potential cleanup operations. The dominant radioactive particles were amorphous to X-ray diffraction, very fragile by compression tests, and extremely porous with particle density 3 . The physical properties of the particles suggest that they can be broken to smaller respirable sizes by saltation during wind erosion and that their unique physical properties may be useful for mechanically separating them from the nonradioactive soil particles. Experimental results revealed that more than 90% of the total radioactivity was recovered in about 25% of the total sample weight through density separation techniques and in about 18% of the total weight by a grinding-sieving process. Radioactive particles might therefore be removed from the contaminated soil by a controlled vacuum collector, density separation, grinding-sieving separation, or a combination of these techniques on the basis of the density and compressibility differences between radioactive and nonradioactive particles. 21 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  14. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  15. Investigation of the fluctuation range of activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Hoetzl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Daily and seasonal concentration fluctuations of short-lived Rn fission products observed and the seasonal and long-term concentration fluctuations of Pb-210, Po-210, Ra-226, Ra-228, K-40 and Be-7 are discussed; the frequency distributions of the concentration values are illustrated. For a period of several years, the following mean values of activity concentrations were found (μBq/m 3 ): Pb-210: 600 Ra-226: 1.3 K-40: 13, Po-210: 33 Ra-228: 0.5 Be-7: 3700. In accordance with the origin from the soil, there is a significant correlation between the respective activity concentration and air-borne dust concentration for Ra-226, Ra-228, and K-40. The investigation revealed a most significant correlation between the Pb-210 concentration and the stagnancy index, the latter being a measure for the degree of blending of the surface layer of air. The resuspension factors found for Ra-226 and Pb-210 are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  16. The distribution of radionuclides and some trace metals in the water columns of the Japan and Bonin trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Y.; Yamada, M.; Shitashima, K.; Tsubota, H.

    1998-01-01

    Presented here is the first geochemical data on the U/Th series Th, Pa, Ac, and Pb isotopes and artificial fallout radionuclides ( 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and Pu isotopes), and some trace elements (V, Zn, Cd, Cu, Mn, and Ni) in two water columns of the Japan and Bonin trenches down to the bottom depths of 7585 m and 9750 m, respectively. Hydrographic properties such as temperature, salinity dissolved oxygen, and nutrient content within the trench valley remain constant at the same levels as those in the bottom water of the Northwest Pacific basin (typically ∼6000 m in depth). The radionuclide activities and most trace metal concentrations are also not very different from those in the overlying water at depths of around 5000-6000 m. This means that any chemical alteration which sea water undergoes during its residence within the trench was not obviously detected by the techniques used here. The suggestion follows that the trench water is rather freely communicating y isopycnal mixing with the bottom water overlying the Northwest Pacific abyssal plain. The trench waters contain high 239,240 Pu activities throughout, indicating that Pu is actively regenerating from rapidly sinking, large particles at the bottom interface, probably due to a change in the oxidation state. On the other hand, the vertical profiles of 210 Pb and 231 Pa show lower activities within the trench than those in the overlying deep waters, suggesting that the effect of boundary and bottom scavenging is significant in controlling their oceanic distributions. However, none of the trace metals studied here obviously follows the behaviour of the above nuclides. The 228 Th data show scattering within the Bonin Trench that is largely ascribable to analytical errors. If, however we accept that the scatter of 228 Th data is real and the variation is caused solely by decay of its parent 228 Ra, we can set an upper limit of ∼5 years for the renewal time of the trench water. (authors)

  17. investigations on the synthesis of humic acid and its radionuclide complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madbouly, H.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    interest in the chemistry and reactions of organic substances in soils, sediments and natural water has been fortified in recent years by major advances in methodology and recognition of the important role of humic substances in environmental processes. humic substances contribute to plant growth through their effect on the physical, chemical and biological properties of the soil . for a full understanding of the role and function of humic substances in the environment, it is necessary to synthesize a functional model humic acid having similar chemical behavior to the natural one. the aim of this thesis is to prepare and characterize some synthetic humic acids with simpler overall structures but under different preparation conditions. also, the work is devoted to compare between synthetic and the natural humic acid samples in properties and interactions with the metal ions Cs + ,Sr 2+ ,Cd 2+ ,Hg 2+ ,Pb 2+ ,Cr 3+ , Ce 3+ ,Pr 3+ ,Nd 3+ ,Gd 3+ ,Er 3+ ,Dy 3+ ,Tb 3+ ,Tm 3+ and Se 4+ in the presence of the radionuclides Eu 3+ and Co 2+

  18. Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in beach sand samples from Mediterranean Coast of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özmen, S.F.; Cesur, A.; Boztosun, I.; Yavuz, M.

    2014-01-01

    Following Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, a huge amount of radionuclides were released in atmosphere and ocean. It's impact on the environment is of great concern to the good of the public at large. In this regard environmental radioactivity monitoring such as external dose rate and radioactivity measurements in environmental samples has been carried out. For this purpose, several beach sand samples were collected from south coast of the Turkey in September 2011 and radioactivity concentrations of 226 Ra ( 238 U), 228 Ac ( 232 Th), 40 K, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were determined by gamma spectrometry using a high-purity Germanium detector. The measured activity concentrations in beach sand samples ranged from 4.0±0.5 to 21.5±1.8 Bq/kg, 1.8±0.4 to 27.9±2.4 Bq/kg, 19.0±2.2 to 590.3±28.6 Bq/kg and 0.1±0.0 to 1.0±0.1 Bq/kg for 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs, respectively. However there was no sign of 134 Cs in the sample spectrum after Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Hence we can safely conclude that there was no significant material transfer from Fukushima to Turkey. The other activities are in good agreement with the published results of neighboring areas. The absorbed gamma dose rate (D) and the annual effective dose (AED) of beach sand samples were below the world wide average implying that the radiation hazard is insignificant. The data presented in this study would also be very useful to determine the possible future effects of the nuclear power plant to the environment. - Highlights: • Activity values of all samples are lower than the world wide average values. • Gamma dose rates of beach sand samples are in the range of 10–200 nGy/h. • Ra eq activity and AED values of samples are less than world wide average values. • No significant material transfer from Fukushima to Turkey. • Strong correlations detected in between elemental and radioactivity concentration

  19. Post ischemic reperfusion and anoxic perfusion in the isolated heart: alteration in distribution of radionuclides and in protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, S S; Oratz, M; Rothschild, M A [Veterans Administration Hospital, New York (USA)

    1980-12-01

    Reperfusion after ischemia and perfusion with total anoxia were studied in the isolated guinea pig heart model, Deprivation of oxygen in both situations resulted in a marked shift of circulation from the left to the right ventricle, with markedly increased spaces of distribution of sup(99m)Tc radionuclides and albumin in the latter. In view of the complexities of measuring protein synthesis during ischemia, continuous anoxic perfusion was used to evaluate this parameter in anoxic induced arrest. There was a profound fall in protein synthesis associated with this arrest, accompanied by a fall in ATP, creatine phosphate, glycogen, potassium, and a rise in lactate production. The fall in protein synthesis was more marked in the left ventricle. The changes in synthesis were almost completely prevented by initiating cardiac arrest with high K/sup +/ (16 meq/l) at the same time as anoxia; energy metabolism remained near normal, and recovery of contractility was nearly complete. The studies demonstrated the differences in vascular distribution between the ventricles after ischemia or with perfusion anoxia, the possible difference in availability of substrate to the two ventricles under these conditions, as well as the difference in protein synthetic response, and further support the protective effect of potassium induced arrest on the hypoxic heart.

  20. Estimation of errors due to inhomogeneous distribution of radionuclides in lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelled, O.; German, U.; Pollak, G.; Alfassi, Z.B.

    2006-01-01

    The uncertainty in the activity determination of uranium contamination due to real inhomogeneous distribution and assumption of homogenous distribution can reach more than one order of magnitude when using one detector in a set of 4 detectors covering most of the whole lungs. Using the information from several detectors may improve the accuracy, as obtained by summing the responses from the 3 or 4 detectors. However, even with this improvement, the errors are still very large, up to almost a factor of 10 when the analysis is based on the 92 keV energy peak and up to 7 for the 185 keV peak

  1. Activity size distributions of some naturally occurring radionuclides 7Be, 40K and 212Pb in indoor and outdoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.

    2005-01-01

    The activity size distributions of natural radionuclides 7 Be and 40 K were measured outdoor in El-Minia city, Egypt by means of gamma spectroscopy. A low-pressure Berner cascade impactor was used as a sampling device. The activity size distribution of both 7 Be and 40 K was described by one log-normal distribution, which was represented by the accumulation mode. The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 7 Be and 40 K was determined to be 530 and 1550nm with a relative geometric standard deviation (δ, which was defined as the dispersion of the peak) of 2.4 and 2, respectively. The same sampling device (Berner impactor) and a screen diffusion battery were used to measure the activity size distribution, activity concentration and unattached fraction (f P ) of 212 Pb in indoor air of El-Minia City, Egypt. The mean activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of the accumulation mode for attached 212 Pb was determined to be 250nm with a mean geometric standard deviation (δ) of 2.6. The mean value of the specific concentration of 212 Pb associated with that mode was determined to be 460+/-20mBqm -3 . The activity median thermodynamic diameter (AMTD) of unattached 212 Pb was determined to be 1.25nm with δ of 1.4. A mean unattached fraction (f p ) of 0.13+/-0.02 was obtained at a mean aerosol particle concentration of 1.8x10 3 cm -3 . The mean activity concentration of unattached 212 Pb was found to be 19+/-3mBqm -3 . It was found that the aerosol concentration played an important role in varying the unattached, attached activity concentration and unattached fraction (f P )

  2. Elementary analyses in behalf of the project: Orientating investigation to Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in Dutch aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.J. 't; Breugem, P.M.; Koester, H.W.

    1989-11-01

    In this report, results of the determinations of total, organic and inorganic carbon analysis are reported for the project 'Orientating investigations of Polonium-210 and other natural radionuclides in Dutch aquatic ecosystems', projectnumber 248476. The method used is a modification of the method described by Froelich and is based on elemental analysis. Sediment samples from several locations of sea and river water show a large variation of the carbon content. The organic carbon concentration varies from 2.78 to 22.42 percent; the inorganic carbon varies from 1.25 to 5.66 percent. The analyses were run in duplicate with a mean standard deviation of 0.1 percent. (author). 4 refs.; 5 figs.; 7 tabs

  3. Effect of alteration processes on the distribution of radionuclides in uraniferous sedimentary rocks and their environmental impact, southwestern Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Aassy, I.E.; El Galy, M.M.; El Feky, M.G.; Ibrahim, E.M.; Nada, A.A.; Abd El Maksoud, T.M.; Talaat, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The contents of natural radionuclides in various types of sedimentary rocks in Um Bogma Formation and base of El Hashash Formation were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Three types of lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks were investigated; sandstone (El Hashash Formation), dolostone and argillaceous sediments (Um Bogma Formation). The alteration processes are dolomitization, dedolomitization, karstification and lateritization. The specific radioactivity of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K determined in different samples, indicate that 238 U and its decay products contribute primarily to the high natural radioactivity of rocks. The maximum concentration of 238 U reached up to 2129.36 ppm in argillaceous sediments. The average concentrations of determined radionuclides ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) are 8.34 ppm, 7.88 ppm, 4.68 ppm and 0.3%, respectively in sandstone. In dolostones the average concentrations are 418.69 ppm, 808.75 ppm, 3.14 ppm and 0.29%, respectively. For argillaceous sediments are 276.88 ppm, 419.49 ppm, 11.47 ppm and 0.93%, respectively. The 238 U/ 226 Ra ratio in sandstone ranges between 0.89 and 1.25, while in dolostones and argillaceous sediments are 0.27-2.63 and 0.27-1.83, respectively. These variations in the concentrations of radioelements and their ratios are due to the action of the alteration processes affected these different sedimentary rocks in different times. Environmentally, the Raeq in dolostones and argillaceous sediments exceeds the permitted limits, while in the sandstone samples; it is within the permissible levels. (author)

  4. Absorption, distribution and milk secretion of radionuclides by the dairy cow. V. Radiotungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, A L; Bretthauer, E W; Stanley, R E [Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, Nev. (USA). Environmental Monitoring and Support Lab.

    1976-11-01

    In a study conducted in 1969 and 1970 lactating cows were given oral or intravenous (I.V.) doses of radiotungsten. Blood, milk, urine and feces were collected and analyzed to measure transfer rate and quantity of tungsten eliminated over an extended period during and after exposure. Several lactating and nonlactating cows were sacrificed to measure tissue distribution of radiotungsten and several calves were sacrificed following oral administration of radiotungsten to determine the distribution in rapidly growing young. The average per cent of administered dose secreted per liter of milk at peak activity was 0.01 and 0.1 for the groups receiving oral and I.V. doses, respectively. During the 84-hr period after dosing, 79% of the orally administered dose was recovered, with 64% recovered in the feces, 14.6% in urine and 0.4% in milk. In the same time period, 68% of the intravenous dose was recovered with 65% in urine, 2% in the milk and less than 1% in feces. Tissue distribution results indicate the principal sites of short-term radiotungsten deposition were skin, liver and soft tissue. Long-term retention sites in mature cows were bone, muscle and skin. Long-term retention sites in calves were bone, adrenal, skin and spleen.

  5. Absorption, distribution and milk secretion of radionuclides by the dairy cow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, A.L.; Bretthauer, E.W.; Stanley, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    In a study conducted in 1969 and 1970 lactating cows were given oral or intravenous (I.V.) doses of radiotungsten. Blood, milk, urine and feces were collected and analyzed to measure transfer rate and quantity of tungsten eliminated over an extended period during and after exposure. Several lactating and nonlactating cows were sacrificed to measure tissue distribution of radiotungsten and several calves were sacrificed following oral administration of radiotungsten to determine the distribution in rapidly growing young. The average per cent of administered dose secreted per liter of milk at peak activity was 0.01 and 0.1 for the groups receiving oral and I.V. doses, respectively. During the 84-hr period after dosing, 79% of the orally administered dose was recovered, with 64% recovered in the feces, 14.6% in urine and 0.4% in milk. In the same time period, 68% of the intravenous dose was recovered with 65% in urine, 2% in the milk and less than 1% in feces. Tissue distribution results indicate the principal sites of short-term radiotungsten deposition were skin, liver and soft tissue. Long-term retention sites in mature cows were bone, muscle and skin. Long-term retention sites in calves were bone, adrenal, skin and spleen. (author)

  6. Radionuclide 252Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolevatov, Yu.I.; Trykov, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of radionuclide neutron sourses of 252 Cf base with the activity from 10 6 to 10 9 n/s have been investigated. Energetic distributions of neutrons and gamma-radiation have been presented. The results obtained have been compared with other data available. The hardness parameter of the neutron spectrum for the energy range from 3 to 15 MeV is 1.4 +- 0.02 MeV

  7. Vertical and horizontal distribution of radionuclides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 40}K) in sediment from Manjung coastal water area Perak, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Anisa, E-mail: coppering@ymail.com; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been widely studied in marine coastal area. Due to rapid population growth and socio-economic development in Manjung area such as coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development, waste discharged from factories and agriculture runoff may contribute to increase in pollution rate. The radioactive materials from anthropogenic activities could deteriorate the quality of the marine ecosystem and thus lead to possible radiological health risk to the population. Radionuclides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 40}K) content in surface and profile sediment from Manjung coastal area was determined in this study. Radionuclides in sediment from seven locations were collected using sediment core sampling and measurements were carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy. The results show that the concentration of radionuclides in surface sediment and distribution trend of depth vertical profile sediment generally varies depending on locations. Enrichment factors (EF), geo-accumulation index (I{sub geo}) and pollution index (PI) were applied to determine level of pollution of this study area. The radiological risks related to human exposure were evaluated based on external hazard index (H{sub ex})

  8. Vertical and horizontal distribution of radionuclides (232Th, 238U and 40K) in sediment from Manjung coastal water area Perak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Anisa; Hamzah, Zaini; Saat, Ahmad; Wood, Ab. Khalik

    2016-01-01

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been widely studied in marine coastal area. Due to rapid population growth and socio-economic development in Manjung area such as coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development, waste discharged from factories and agriculture runoff may contribute to increase in pollution rate. The radioactive materials from anthropogenic activities could deteriorate the quality of the marine ecosystem and thus lead to possible radiological health risk to the population. Radionuclides (232Th, 238U and 40K) content in surface and profile sediment from Manjung coastal area was determined in this study. Radionuclides in sediment from seven locations were collected using sediment core sampling and measurements were carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy. The results show that the concentration of radionuclides in surface sediment and distribution trend of depth vertical profile sediment generally varies depending on locations. Enrichment factors (EF), geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and pollution index (PI) were applied to determine level of pollution of this study area. The radiological risks related to human exposure were evaluated based on external hazard index (Hex).

  9. Vertical and horizontal distribution of radionuclides (232Th, 238U and 40K) in sediment from Manjung coastal water area Perak, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, Anisa; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been widely studied in marine coastal area. Due to rapid population growth and socio-economic development in Manjung area such as coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development, waste discharged from factories and agriculture runoff may contribute to increase in pollution rate. The radioactive materials from anthropogenic activities could deteriorate the quality of the marine ecosystem and thus lead to possible radiological health risk to the population. Radionuclides ( 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K) content in surface and profile sediment from Manjung coastal area was determined in this study. Radionuclides in sediment from seven locations were collected using sediment core sampling and measurements were carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy. The results show that the concentration of radionuclides in surface sediment and distribution trend of depth vertical profile sediment generally varies depending on locations. Enrichment factors (EF), geo-accumulation index (I geo ) and pollution index (PI) were applied to determine level of pollution of this study area. The radiological risks related to human exposure were evaluated based on external hazard index (H ex )

  10. Local area distribution of fallout radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant determined by autoradiography analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Igarashi, Shosuke; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yoshida, Zenko; Tanaka, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    The environmental behavior of radioactive Cs in the fallout from the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has been studied by measuring its spatial distribution on/in trees, plants, and surface soil beneath the plants using autoradiography analysis. The results of autoradiography analysis showed that radioactive Cs was distributed on the branches and leaves of trees that were present during the accident and that only a small fraction of radioactive Cs was transported to new branches and leaves grown after the accident. Radioactive Cs was present on the grass and rice stubble on the soils, but not in the soils beneath the grass and rice stubble, indicating that the radioactive Cs was deposited on the grass and the rice plant. In addition, the ratio of the radioactive Cs that penetrated into the soil layer by weathering was very small two months after the accident. These results indicate that trees and other plants are the reservoir of the fallout Cs and function to retard the fallout Cs migration with rain water. (author)

  11. The CdZnTe Detector with Slit Collimator for Measure Distribution of the Specific Activity Radionuclide in the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. E.; Volkovich, A. G.; Potapov, V. N.; Semin, I. A.; Stepanov, A. V.; Simirskii, Iu. N.

    2018-01-01

    From 2011 in the NRC "Kurchatov Institute" carry out the dismantling of the MR multiloop research reactor. Now the reactor and all technological equipment in the premises of the reactor were dismantled. Now the measurements of radioactive contamination in the reactor premises are made. The most contaminated parts of premises - floor and the ground beneath it. To measure the distribution of specific activity in the ground the CdZnTe detector (volume 500MM3) was used. Detector placed in a lead shielding with a slit collimation hole. The upper part of shielding is made movable to close and open the slit of the collimator. At each point two measurements carried out: with open and closed collimator. The software for determination specific activity of radionuclides in ground was developed. The mathematical model of spectrometric system based on the Monte-Carlo method. Measurements of specific activity of ground were made. Using the results of measurements the thickness of the removed layer of ground and the amount of radioactive waste were calculated.

  12. Investigations of the uptake of transuranic radionuclides by humic and fulvic acids chemically immobilized on silica gel and their competitive release by complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.; Szabo, G.; Clayton, R.F.; Clayton, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    The chemistry of the interactions of transuranic elements (TUs) with humic substances needs to be understood so that humate-mediated movement of transuranic radionuclides through the environment can be predicted. This paper reports the chemical immobilization on silica gel of humic and fulvic acids and evaluates the potential of these new materials for the retention of Pu and Am. In addition to the preparation of the foregoing immobilized humic substances, other low molecular weight metal-binding ligands have also been immobilized on silica gel to investigate the binding sites for transuranic elements (TUs) in humic substances. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of Th(IV) complexed by humic acid and the immobilized humic acid are similar thus it appears that immobilization of humic acid does not generate any configurational changes in the Th(IV)-binding sites of the macromolecule. A variety of chelating agents partly mobilize these TUs sorbed on the solid phases. A batch method was used to determine the distribution coefficients (R d ) of Pu and Am between the silica gels and aqueous solutions of phosphate and citrate. The effects of the immobilized ligands, the anions and pH in the solution on sorption were assessed. Distributed coefficients (R d ) for the uptake of Pu and Am by these prepared solid phases are, in some cases, of a similar order of magnitude as those determined for soil and particles suspended in terrestrial surface waters

  13. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey

  14. Radionuclide distributions in sediment cores retrieved from marine radioactive waste dumpsites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.; Livingston, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations, distributions and inventories of 55 Fe, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 238 Pu, sup(239,240)Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm and 242 Cm were measured in sediment samples collected in 1975-1976 from some Atlantic and Pacific sites used by the United States of America from 1946-1970 to dump solidified radioactive waste. Criteria used to distinguish waste-contaminated sediments from fallout-contaminated sediments include deviations of nuclide concentrations, inventories, internuclide ratios and depth distributions. The detection of nuclides absent from fallout is a further indicator. The data set used in comparing dumpsite sediment radioactivity with non-dumpsite radioactivity comes from a population of 11 North Atlantic cores in the depth range 2000-4000 m. A further set of 19 cores from the central North Pacific provides an interesting contrast to the data set for the shallower sediments closer to the coasts. The principal conclusion drawn from consideration of a large body of data, especially for 15 sediment cores from the Atlantic dumpsite, is that contamination is extremely localized with respect to the sources from which the waste is believed to originate. The majority of cores from both dumpsites are indistinguishable from populations of cores contaminated only by world-wide fallout. Clearly, contaminated sediments from both dumpsites show evidence of the introduction of waste radioactivity below the sediment surface before subsequent redistribution by in-sediment processes. These findings have significance for the selection and monitoring of sites to be used in connection with the ocean disposal of radioactive waste. (author)

  15. Determination of the distribution coefficients for the radionuclides 134Cs, 60Co and 234Th in the Pinheiros river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Marina Ferreira

    1992-01-01

    The distribution coefficients (Kd) were determined in order to foresee the fate of the radionuclides discharged to the environment. Based upon the source-term released by IPEN's facilities in Pinheiros River during the year of 1988, three radionuclides were chosen as being the more critical, according to the radiation protection standards: 137 Cs, 60 Co and 232 Th. Their Kd were determined experimentally in laboratory by using the corresponding radioactive tracers 134 Cs, 60 Co and 234 Th. Three different experimental methodologies were used: the static method. the shaken method and the dynamic method. The parameters studied were the effects of pH, aerobic condition and time of contact. No considerable changes were observed for the cesium Kd with the variation of pH and aerobic condition, the kd extreme values being 20 ml/g and 30 ml/g for the pH range between 4 and 8. The study of the time of contact showed that the equilibrium between the cesium concentration in the water and sediment was achieved in a few days. For the cobalt, the pH effect was considerable, since the Kd increased from 46 ml/g for pH 4 to 2,25x10 3 ml/g for pH 8. The Kd observed with the agitation with air was around 420 ml/g, rising to 670 ml/g with the agitation with N 2 . The results obtained in the study of the time of contact effect showed that the equilibrium between the cobalt concentration in the water and sediment was not achieved even after 15 days of contact. For the thorium, also, the pH effect was considerable, since the Kd increased fram 1,40 x 10 5 ml/g for pH 4 to 2,55 x 10 6 ml/g for pH 8. No effect was observed, on the other hand, for the kd values obtained in the experiment carried out with air agitation or N 2 agitation, around 2,75 x 10 6 ml/g. The results obtained in the study of the time of contact effect showed that the equilibrium between the thorium concentration in the water and sediment was achieved after just one hour of contact. The results obtained can be

  16. A new method for the determination of radionuclide distribution in the soil by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, P.; Andrasi, A.; Nemeth, I.

    1995-01-01

    In case of major nuclear accidents when larger amount of radioactive material is released into the atmosphere vast areas can become contaminated by the nuclear fallout. The deposited radioactivity penetrates the soil in a complex manner: dry and wet deposition lead to different initial distribution patterns which are further modified by the later transport processes in the upper layers of the soil. The distribution is influenced by various factors (physico-chemical characteristics of the radioisotopes, soil type, weather conditions, environment etc.), the resulting soil profile is hardly predictable. An important lesson we learned from the Chernobyl reactor accident is the great variability of the contamination both in the extent of the deposition and in the penetration features. In recent years - following the reactor accident in Chernobyl - an increased interest for rapid methods of monitoring environmental radioactivity was expressed. The International Atomic Energy Agency initiated a research project to co-ordinate the activities carried out in various laboratories aiming at the development of rapid monitoring procedures. The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) G6 10 01 under the title Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and the Environment has given a frame for 11 research programs. The Health Physics Department of the KFKI Institute for Atomic Energy Research (the former Central Research Institute for Physics) has taken a part in this CRP with a project titled: Rapid In Situ Gamma Spectrometric Determination of Fallout Radioactivity in the Environment. The main objective of our study was to find a method to estimate the penetration characteristics of the fallout radioactivity by using only spectral information obtained by the in situ spectrometric measurement thus avoiding the need for a long and tiresome sampling and sample analysis procedure

  17. Occupational health experience in the production and distribution of radionuclides used in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaburo, J.C.; Sanches, M.P.; Gian, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    A brief description of the main operations performed in the Radioisotope Production Facility at IPEN-CNEN/SP is presented. This facility is provided with hot cells which must be periodically replaced due to deterioration by reagent processing and hard treatment to which they are submitted. When the lifetime of these hot cells are at their limit, leaking of airborne materials arises bringing forth incorporation by workers. As a safe control, a series of procedures have been implemented in a program of internal monitoring by urine sampling and external monitoring by film badge. From this program it became possible to evaluate the radiation dose received by workers. The results obtained within the last 10 years where analyzed against the lifetime of the hot cells and studies were made to verify possible explicit or implicit relations between doses and the natural stress of these hot cells. In the distribution of the effective dose equivalent among 304 workers submitted for individual monitoring of internal exposure by urine samples, some significant exposures higher than 4.5 mSv. The sum of effective doses and doses from external exposures can lead to levels close to regulatory limits. The internal effective dose equivalent is small when compared with whole body external dose equivalent, however it is not negligible

  18. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be 133 Xe, and 198 Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing

  19. Radiology now. Radionuclide investigations and pregnancy -protection of the embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the application of the 'ten-day principle' in diagnostic radiological investigations involving the administration of radiopharmaceuticals to women of reproductive capacity. The recommendations made in 1977 for protecting embryo and fetus in such investigations are discussed in relation to more recent literature on the subject. In particular, the relevance of factors such as radiopharmaceutical half-lives, radiation damage repair and the gonad dose limit before applying the 'ten-day principle' are considered. In the light of this information, revised recommendations are proposed. These are (1) that the 'ten-day principle' should be applied to all diagnostic radiopharmaceutical investigations in which the calculated gonad dose exceeds 500 mrem unless there are overriding clinical reasons for carrying out the investigation as an urgent procedure; (2) that when the gonad dose exceeds 500 mrem, the patient be advised to avoid becoming pregnant for a period of two months, or four times the effective half-life of the radiopharmaceutical if this time is longer than two months, following the investigations; and (3) that for all volunteers in research investigations the 'ten-day principle' should be applied strictly in all cases when the gonad dose exceeds 50 mrem. (U.K.)

  20. Pharmacokinetics of 99mTc-technefit in radionuclide investigations of liver and spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovdienko, N.I.; Starovojtova, L.P.; Kodina, G.E.; Malysheva, A.O.; Tul'skaya, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the results of an experimental study of pharmacokinetics of a new Soviet drug 99m Tc-technefit for scintigraphy of the liver and spleen. The results of biological distribution of the agent in rat, scintigrams of the liver and spleen in rabbits and dogs have shown a high accumulation of 99m Tc-technefit in the liver (up to 90%). The agent is prepared within one stage from a kit of reagents and 99m Tc-sodium pertechnate obtained using a generator

  1. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  2. Distribution of natural occurring radionuclide in some industral residues used in new type wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingmin; Li Fusheng; Xu Jiaang; Deng Daping; Yuan Ming; Ma Shi; Chen Yue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the natural radioactive nuclide distribution characteristic of fly ash, gangue and various kinds of slag used in the new-type wall material and offer scientific basis for reducing the radiation dosage that the public suffers. Methods: The activity concentrations of the contents of natural radioactive nuclides of different industral waste residues have been determined by HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. Results: The mean Raeq is successively fly ash (279.13 Bq kg -1 ), slag (225.69 Bq kg -1 ), gangue (141.26 Bq kg -1 ) from high to low and all of the samples is lower than the limit set in the OECD. The arithmetic mean activities of 236 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K in fly-ash samples are 127.88, 93.83, 221.75 Bq kg -1 ; for coal slag samples are 73.89, 97.13, 283.44 Bq kg -1 and for coal gangue samples are 47.85, 45.21, 413.56 Bq kg -1 . For the same power plant, the radioactive nuclide activity of the fly ash gathered in different time may have very great differences, the maximum can reach more than 2 times of the minimum. Conclusion: the fly ash and slag should be controlled strictly on rational proportion, which should not exceed 70% of the total mass. The mixing of the average radioactive level of the gangue is nearly equal that of to clay, it can be unrestricted in the mixing proportion in process of production. The manufacturer of new-type wall materials should often measure the radioactive level of the industrial waste residue in production. Make the content of radioactive nuclide in the products reach the rational level as low as possible. (authors)

  3. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  4. Temporal evolution of natural radionuclides distributions 238U, 234Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 210Po in the Bransfield strait, Antarctica peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapa, Flavia Valverde

    2013-01-01

    Research on the distribution of natural radionuclides in Antarctica is rare and thus, there is great interest in to know their occurrence and factors related to its mobilization, transference and accumulation in this extremely fragile environment. Natural radionuclides have been used intensively as tracers in the ocean, helping to better understand processes as sinking and particle resuspension, water masses mixture and oceanic circulation. 234 Th (t½ = 24.1 days) is a particle-reactive radionuclide produced continuously in seawater by the decay of its soluble precursor conservative with salinity 238 U (t½ = 4.5 10 9 years). Since 234 Th presents relatively short half-life, it is used to quantify processes that occur in temporal scale varying from days to weeks. The disequilibrium 234 Th/ 238 U in the surface ocean has been applied to estimate carbon fluxes exported via sinking material. The flux of particles biologically productive out of the euphotic zone in the Southern Ocean has special attention due to its importance in the control of CO 2 atmospheric concentrations. The radionuclides 210 Pb (t½ = 22.3 years) and 210 Po (t½ = 138 days) are also particle-reactive. The disequilibrium 210 Po/ 210 Pb has been used to estimate fluxes of particles exported in the ocean in the time scale of weeks. The long-lived Ra isotopes, 226 Ra (t½ = 1,600 years) and 228 Ra (t½ = 5.75 years) are soluble in seawater, presenting unique properties that make them excellent tracers of water masses. This research work had the aim to study the distributions of natural radionuclides 238 U, 234 Th, 22 '6Ra, 22 '8Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po in the Bransfield Strait during 2 samplings carried out in the 2011 Austral Summer (OPERANTAR XXIX and XXX). (author)

  5. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides activity concentration in East Malaysian marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yii, M.W. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)], E-mail: yii@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Zaharudin, A.; Abdul-Kadir, I. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2009-04-15

    Studies of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) distribution of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in East Malaysia were carried out as part of a marine coastal environment project. The results of measurements will serve as baseline data and background reference level for Malaysia coastlines. Sediments from 21 coastal locations and 10 near shore locations were collected for analyses. The samples were dried, finely ground, sealed in a container and stored for a minimum of 30 days to establish secular equilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra and their respective radioactive progenies. They were counted using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometer covering the respective progeny energy peak. For {sup 40}K, the presence of this was measured directly via its 1460 keV energy peak. The concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples obtained from coastal Sarawak ranged between 23 and 41 (mean 30{+-}2) Bq/kg, 27 and 45 (mean 39{+-}4) Bq/kg and 142 and 680 (mean 462{+-}59) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from coastal Sabah ranged between 16 and 30 (mean 23{+-}2) Bq/kg, 23 and 45 (mean 35{+-}4) Bq/kg and 402 and 842 (mean 577{+-}75) Bq/kg, respectively. For the Sarawak near shore stations, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K ranged between 11 and 36 (mean 22{+-}2) Bq/kg, 21 and 65 (mean 39{+-}5) Bq/kg and 149 and 517 (mean 309{+-}41) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from Sabah ranged between 9 and 31 (mean 14{+-}2) Bq/kg, 10 and 48 (mean 21{+-}3) Bq/kg and 140 and 580 (mean 269{+-}36) Bq/kg, respectively. The calculated external hazard values of between 0.17 and 0.33 (less than unity) showed that there is little risk of external hazard to the workers handling the sediments.

  6. Distribution of natural radionuclides in soil around Sultan Azlan Shah Coal-Fired Power Plant at Manjung, Perak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Fetri Zainal; Ahmad Saat; Abdul Khalik Wood

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: A radionuclide is an atom with an unstable nucleus which is created by excess energy. This radionuclide will undergo radioactive decay where gamma ray or sub atomic particles are released making them radioactive which can be harmful if the safe level is exceeded. This study was carried out in Manjung, Perak near Sultan Azlan Shah coal-fired power plant. Coal combustion from power plant generates emissions of potentially toxic radionuclides besides major pollutants which are particulates, sulphur and nitrogen oxides. It is noted that emission of particulates, sulphur and nitrogen oxides are strictly control. Soil is one of the most important media for plant to growth however soil is subject to contamination and its quality must be protected. The concentration of natural radionuclides in soil can be affected from coal combustion process from power plant in order to generate electricity. In this study, natural radionuclides concentration such as 238 U and 232 Th concentration in soil at nine points around this power plant were determined to assess radioactivity level and the possible radiation hazard to local population that residence in that area will be carried out in future study. Concentrations of natural radionuclides have been determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The concentration of 238 U in the area were in the ranged between 3.42 mg/ kg to 7.59 mg/ kg. While the concentration of 232 Th ranged from 12.19 mg/ kg to 21.67 mg/ kg respectively. (author)

  7. Sorption of radionuclides on geological samples from the Bradwell, Elstow, Fulbeck and Killingholme site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Coates, H.A.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1988-06-01

    The sorption of chloride, caesium, calcium, nickel and americium on geological samples collected during the site investigations at Bradwell, Elstow, Fulbeck and Killingholme has been studied. Through-diffusion and batch sorption techniques were used and experiments were designed to give a direct comparison between the sorptive behaviour of material from each site. (author)

  8. Lung mucociliary transport function in chronic bronchitis and radionuclide methods of its investigation (a review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrenkova, N.Yu.; Faradzheva, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods for studying lung clearance of smokers and non-smoking patients with chronic bronchitis (CB) are described. Modified technique for investigating mucociliary transport (MCT) in CB patients, using 99m Tc-macroaggregate of human serum albumin, is suggested. The method enables to examine more patients and obtain the most comprehensive data on MCT state on any level of tracheobronchial tree

  9. Concentration and distribution of heavy metals and radionuclides in topsoils from Middle Jiu Valley surface coal exploitations sourrounding area (Gorj County, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneanu, Mihaela; Corneanu, Gabriel; Lacatusu, Anca-Rovena; Cojocaru, Luminita; Butnariu, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Middle Jiu Valley is one of the largest surface coal exploitation area in Romania. The coal exploitation area is a dense populated one, along the valleys are villages and the inhabitants produce for their own consumption fruits and vegetables, in their personal gardens, or cereals in the fields, nearby the villages. There was considered to be of great interest to investigate the heavy metals and radionuclides content in gardens and cropfield soils from the villages sourrounding the Thermo Electric Power Plants (TEPP) and coal surface exploitation, as well as in crude /cultivated sterile soil or ash. The topsoil samples (104) were harvested from population gardens (58), cropfields sourronding Thermo Electric Power Plants (24), crude sterile dumps (7), cultivated sterile dumps (9) and ash dumps (6). The content in radionuclides in soil was performed by Duggan (1988) method. Radionuclide activity was expressed in Bqkg-1, confidence level 95%. The total content of heavy metals in soil (Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, Co) was measured with flame atomic mass spectrometry. The content in heavy metals was expressed in mgkg-1. Soil analysis revealed the presence of natural radionuclides, beloging from ash and coal dust, as well as of Cs-137, of Cernobal provenance. In the cropfields radionuclides content in topsoil is lower than in gardens, due to the deepper soil mobilisation. Radionuclides content over the normal limits for Romania were registered for Th-234, Pb-210, U-235 and in few locations for Ra-226. The soil content for all analysed metals was over the normal limits in most samples, in few cases with values close to allert limits. Concentrations between allert and intervention limits were registered in samples collected from 15-20 km North of TEPP Turceni, in population gardens.

  10. Investigation of the transfer of radionuclides in water and marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guegueniat, P.

    1977-01-01

    The investigation of the behavior of radioactive isotopes in the system sea water-sediments has been carried out at various distances from a release radioactive waste locality. The analytical procedure for the measurement of radioactivity and stable isotopes in sea water, the difficulties arising for the sampling of sediments have been discussed. The dispersion of 125 Sb - good tracer for displacements of water - was explained by very slow hydrolysis speed and by the possible existence of synergy phenomena [fr

  11. Distribution of natural radionuclides in sediment around Sultan Azlan Shah coal-fired power plant coastal water area in Manjung, Perak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Anisa Abdullah; Abdul Khalik Wood; Ahmad Saat

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: A rapid and simple analytical method for the determination of the natural radionuclides in sediment around Sultan Azlan Shah Coal-Fired Power Plant coastal water area in Manjung, Perak of Malaysia was carried out by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The concentration of radionuclides contents in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health and the environment when exposed through food chain. Furthermore, radionuclide is an atom with an unstable nucleus and they are naturally origin undergoes radioactive decay and emits a gamma ray or subatomic particles radiated from a coal fired power plant activity that contained in raw coal, fly ash and bottom ash, where a potential risk exposed into the atmosphere. However, coal is a heat source for electric power generation and operation of a coal burning power plant is one of the sources radiation contaminations and leads to a distributes of natural radionuclides. Sediment particle is a common pollutant that settles at the bottom of body water can be degrades water quality and demanding of oxygen in the marine ecosystem. Ten points of sediment cores will be taken along the coastal area in the study. The results of present study showed the concentration of natural radionuclides 238 U and 232 Th in surface sediment samples were in the ranged between 2.47 to 3.80 mg/ kg and 8.84 to 12.49 mg/ kg respectively. Thus, based on the concentration value obtained it can be determines assessment of potential hazard and radioactivity level in the future. (author)

  12. Investigation of solution chemistry effects on sorption behavior of radionuclide 64Cu(II) on illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitong Yang; Guodong Sheng; Zhiqiang Guo; Yubing Sun; Donglin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of various environmental factors such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, coexisting electrolyte ions, humic substances and temperature on the sorption behavior of illite towards 64 Cu(II). The results indicated that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite achieved equilibrium quickly. The pH- and ionic strength-dependent sorption suggested that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite was dominated by ion exchange or outer-sphere surface complexation at pH 7. A positive effect of humic substances on 64 Cu(II) sorption was found at pH 6.5. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of 64 Cu(II) at three different temperatures of 293, 313, and 333 K. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , and ΔG 0 ) of 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of 64 Cu(II) on illite was endothermic and spontaneous. From the experimental results, it is possible to conclude that illite has good potentialities for cost-effective treatments of 64 Cu(II)-contaminated wastewaters. (author)

  13. Studies of up date radionuclides, macro- and microelements distribution in system 'soil from water-collecting areas - water - bottom sediment' of the Skazka's lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosel, Yu.S.; Strakhovenko, V.D.

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of radionuclides, macro- and microelements have been studied in bottom sediments of lake Skazka. The lake occur in south Baikal coast. The average contents of the radiocesium excess over background 3 times more. From the 137 Cs and 210 Pb distribution throughout the column, we have estimated the dynamics of changes in the sediments. The known depth and time of formation of these bench marks permitted estimation of the rate of recent sedimentation in the lake: 0,3 and 0,2 sm/year.

  14. Simulation of the distribution of radionuclides in the reservoir bed for deep-well injection disposal of acid liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, M.D.; Istomin, A.D.; Kesler, A.G.; Zubkov, A.A.; Zakharova, E.V.; Egorov, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for describing the changes in the state of the reservoir bed for dee-well injection disposal of acid liquid radioactive waste. The model considers the multicomponent filtration of the solution in the heterogeneous bed, sorption-desorption of radionuclides, taking into account the dependence of the distribution coefficient on the temperature and pH, as well as radioactive decay, interaction of acids with minerals, radiation-chemical and thermochemical decomposition of the acids, and dynamics of the temperature field, taking into account the convective heat transfer, thermal conductivity, and radiogenic heat release. The results of the simulation of the migration of radionuclides were reported, as well as of the distribution of the acids and the dynamics of the temperature field in the vicinity of the injection well of the site for deep-well injection disposal of the waste from Siberian Chemical Combine. A man-caused barrier is formed in the vicinity of the injection well, hindering the spread of radionuclides in the reservoir bed [ru

  15. Transfer parameters of radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    To increase the accuracy of estimation of exposure dose by radionuclides in the marine, the informations of environmental parameter data in the marine were collected, arranged and discussed. The informations were discussed by 'a sectional committee of marine suspended solids and sediment'. The following problems were investigated and the studies were recorded in this report, clear explanation about the distribution factor (kd), the estimation method of kd, the fluctuating factor of kd data (properties of suspension and sediment, differences among the experimental methods), the physical and chemical behavior of radionuclides, sediment of radionuclides by means of sorption to the suspended particles in the marine, sorption of radionuclides into the marine soil (sediment), re-eluent of radionuclides sorpted in the marine soil (sediment), and relation between marine organism and marine suspended materials and sediment. (S.Y.)

  16. Basic microscopic theory of the distribution, transfer and uptake kinetics of dissolved radionuclides by suspended particulate matter - Part I; Theory development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Recently much experimental effort has been focused on determining those factors which affect the kinetics and the final equilibrium conditions for the uptake of radionuclides from the aqueous phase by particulate matter. At present, some of these results appear to be either surprising or contradictory and introduce some uncertainty in which parameter values are most appropriate for environmental modelling. In this paper, we study the ionic exchange between the dissolved phase and suspended particles from a microscopic viewpoint, developing a mathematical description of the kinetic transfer and the k d distribution coefficients. The most relevant contribution is the assumption that the exchange of radionuclides occurs in a specific surface layer on the particles, with a non-zero thickness. A wide range of experimental findings can be explained with this theory. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. An Investigation of the Sampling Distribution of the Congruence Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbooks, Wendy J.; Elmore, Patricia B.

    This study developed and investigated an empirical sampling distribution of the congruence coefficient. The effects of sample size, number of variables, and population value of the congruence coefficient on the sampling distribution of the congruence coefficient were examined. Sample data were generated on the basis of the common factor model and…

  18. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  19. Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides deposited on peat and urban surfaces in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, A.

    1992-10-01

    In the thesis the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on Finland was studied in three aspects: (1) the areal distribution of Chernobyl fallout in Finland was determined by measuring peat samples, (2) the behaviour of fallout radionuclides was investigated in the combustion of peat in power plants, and (3) the removal rates of fallout radionuclides on urban surfaces were resolved

  20. Distribution and Solubility of Radionuclides and Neutron Absorbers in Waste Forms for Disposition of Plutonium Ash and Scraps, Excess Plutonium, and Miscellaneous Spent Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Denis M. Strachan; Dr. David K. Shuh; Dr. Rodney C. Ewing; Dr. Eric R. Vance

    2002-01-01

    The initial goal of this project was to investigate the solubility of radionuclides in glass and other potential waste forms for the purpose of increasing the waste loading in glass and ceramic waste forms. About one year into the project, the project decided to focus on two potential waste forms - glass at PNNL and initiate ceramics at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

  1. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  2. Effects of arctic temperatures on distribution and retention of the nuclear waste radionuclides 241Am, 57Co, and 137Cs in the bioindicator bivalve Macoma balthica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, D.A.; Stupakoff, I.; Hook, S.; Luoma, S.N.; Fisher, N.S.

    1998-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in Arctic seas has made it important to understand the processes affecting the accumulation of radionuclides in food webs in coldwater ecosystems. We examined the effects of temperature on radionuclide assimilation and retention by the bioindicator bivalve Macoma balthica using three representative nuclear waste components, 241Am, 57Co, and 137Cs. Experiments were designed to determine the kinetics of processes that control uptake from food and water, as well as kinetic constants of loss. 137Cs was not accumulated in soft tissue from water during short exposures, and was rapidly lost from shell with no thermal dependence. No effects of temperature on 57Co assimilation or retention from food were observed. The only substantial effect of polar temperatures was that on the assimilation efficiency of 241Am from food, where 10% was assimilated at 2??C and 26% at 12??C. For all three radionuclides, body distributions were correlated with source, with most radioactivity obtained from water found in the shell and food in the soft tissues. These results suggest that in general Arctic conditions had relatively small effects on the biological processes which influence the bioaccumulation of radioactive wastes, and bivalve concentration factors may not be appreciably different between polar and temperate waters.

  3. Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, O.V.; Zheleznyak, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ''Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,'' of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising 90 Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum 90 Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak 90 Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, 90 Sr concentrations in Kiev's drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike 90 Sr, 137 Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated 137 Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for 137 Cs

  4. Examination of the soil redistribution through the vertical distribution of the radionuclide-content of undisturbed soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihari, A.; Dezsoe, Z.; Szabo, Sz.

    2006-01-01

    Recent concern for the problems of natural and anthropogenic landscape- and slope transformation has highlighted the need for quantitative data on longer term soil redistribution rates. The analysis of the vertical distribution of fallout 137 Cs in soils can be used to deduce information on the magnitude and temporal pattern of soil erosion. This paper summarizes the intermediate results of a pilot study testing the capabilities of this kind of analysis in Hungary. The basics of the fallout 137 Cs method, the characteristics of the studied area and the determination of the reference inventory and depth distribution have been introduced in our previous report [1]. Continuing, we have started to examine a rapidly evolving dell downslope to the ref. point. It is an uncultivated piece of land with an altitude between approx. 230 and 260 m a.s.l. This area is of particular interest because its deepening and opening in the backward direction threatens the sustainability of the agricultural work around the valley head (near the ref. point). The basic assumption of the fallout 137 Cs method is that landscape points with higher/lower radiocaesium inventory compared to the local ref. inventory are subjected to net accumulation/erosion, respectively. This assumption is valid mostly for cultivated areas where radiocaesium is thoroughly homogenized in the plough layer so the 137 Cs content of the eroded/accumulated material is more or- less constant. In case of uncultivated soils, however, usually there is a decrease in 137 Cs activity concentration (AC Cs ) with increasing depth. This means that the radiocaesium content of the eroded and the accumulated sediment can be rather different for the same landscape point as these possess a much larger temporal variation, compared to a cultivated area receiving the same fallout input. This kind of depth dependent radionuclide analysis is very rarely applied in practice (e.g. [2]) because commonly used models require the knowledge of

  5. In situ gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of radionuclide distributions at a commercial shallow land burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis conducted at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky (USA) shallow land burial site confirmed that the waste radionuclides have been retained largely within the restricted area of the burial site. Concentrations of 137 Cs and 60 Co were comparable with those originating from global fallout and lower than concentrations measured in several other areas having similar rainfall. In-situ spectrometric analyses, corroborated by soil sample and vegetation analyses, indicate that the site has influenced 60 Co levels slightly in the west drainage channel, but 137 Cs did not originate from the site. Concentrations of 60 Co, 90 Sr and 137 Cs determined in subsurface soils by well logging techniques confirmed that subsurface migration of waste-derived radionuclides to points outside the restricted area has not been a significant source of contamination of the environs adjacent to the site. 8 references, 8 figures

  6. Investigation of the tube side flow distribution in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuRomia, M.M.; Pyare, R.

    1977-01-01

    The tube side flow distribution in heat exchangers is being investigated through the solution of the governing equations of fluid mechanics with distributed resistances that simulate the presence of the tubes. The modeling scheme used in the analysis and the numerical methods of solving the governing equations are described. The analysis is applied to the CRBRP-Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX), where its tube side plenum is simulated by several models that approximate its spherical boundary. The flow field within the plenum and the distribution of the total flow rate among the tubes are determined by the analysis

  7. Migration of radionuclides in the soil-crop-food product system and assessment of agricultural countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdevitch, I.; Ageyets, V.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on dynamics of redistribution of radionuclides through of profile of the different soils on uncultivated agricultural lands of Belarus during the 1986-1995 period show that vertical migration occurs with low rate. In arable soils the radionuclides are distributed in comparatively uniform way through the whole depth of the 25-30 cm cultivated layer. Investigations on migration of radionuclides with wind erosion on the drained series of wet sandy and peat soils and water erosion on sloping lands show that one should take into consideration the secondary contamination of soils while forecasting a possible accumulation of radionuclides in farm products

  8. Technogenic radionuclides of Chernobyl NPP accidental release and their physical and chemical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lypska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of radionuclides in the vertical soil profile on the nearest Chernobyl NPP zone of alienation was investigated. It is showed experimentally that the main activity of radionuclides is concentrated in the topsoil (10 сm. Coefficients of accumulation of 137Cs and 90Sr radionuclides by plants are estimated. The physico-chemical forms of radionuclides in soil and plants were defined using the method of sequential chemical extraction. It was established that the main contents of 137Cs and 90Sr in soils are represented in non-exchange and fixed forms, in plants - mainly in exchange-adsorption and organic forms.

  9. Investigation of Pockels Cells Crystal Contrast Ratio Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrius Sinkevičius

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The BBO Pockel’s cell has been investigated. The investigation results of optimal operating area on the surface of the crystal dependent of intrinsic contrast ratio (ICR and voltage contrast ratio (VCR for Pockel’s cell are presented. The block diagram of Pockel’s cells contrast measurement stand and measurement methodology are introduced and discussed. The graphs of intrinsic contrast ratio distribution on crystal surface, contrast ratio with voltage dependency and voltage contrast ratio distribution on crystal surface with half-wave voltage are presented.

  10. SPECT/CT: can it be helpful in the evaluation of the distribution of the radionuclide in the joint following radio-synovectomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozulker, F.; Kucukoz Uzun, A.; Ozulker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Planar control scintigraphies have been used for the detection of any possible extra articular leakage after radio-synovectomy in patients with haemophilic arthropathy. In this study we aimed at assessing whether utilization of SPECT-CT for the same purpose can provide additional information. Patients who fulfilled the following prerequisites were included for radio synovectomy application: (1) more than four hemorrhagic episodes in six months, (2) at least a Stage II haemophilic arthropathy according to the classification of Arnold and Haltering, and (3) persistent synovitis. Six male patients (5 hemophilia A, 1 hemophilia B) who suffered from haemophilic arthropathy with a mean age of 10.5 (range between 8-15) were included in this study. We administered 148-185 MBq Yttrium 90 silicate (Y-90) to 5 knee joints, 74 MBq Rhenium 186 (Re-186) to 1 elbow joint and 74 MBq Re-186 to two ankle joints of these patients. The median number of bleedings into the target joints was 10.1 ± 1.4 in the six months prior to the procedure. All patients were admitted to the hospital and treated with factor replacement so as to raise the factor level of the patient to 80% the following morning and 50% for three days thereafter. The effusion in the joint was evacuated before the injection of the radiocolloid. Intra-articular injections in ankle and elbow joints were done under fluoroscopic guidance. The joint was moved rapidly a few times to distribute the radiocolloid, after which a plaster of paris cast was applied for 72 hours. One hour after the RS, planar images of the treated joints and the regional lymph nodes were obtained with gamma camera and SPECT-BT acquisitions were obtained from treated joints to confirm the appropriate distribution of the radionuclide in the joint. Distribution of the radionuclide in joint spaces was normal and we haven't encountered any extra articular leakage. In one patient there was loculation at activity in

  11. Higher water plants in a lake contaminated with radionuclides: composition, distribution, reserves and accumulation of Cs-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlyutin, A.P.; Babitskij, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Species composition, specials distribution, seasonal pattern and accumulation of cesium-137 by aquatic plants had been investigated in the small not flowing meso trophic lake (Belarus) during vegetative season of 1993. Macrophyte phytomass storage is equal 10,56 t, and mass of its roots is 4.28 t of dry weight. Cesium-137 stock's in green mass and macrophytes roots are equal to 108.6 and 96.4 MBK respectively. Total accumulation of cesium-137 by macrophyte constituted 5% from its stock in the whole lake water mass

  12. Investigation of acupuncture-point injection combined with intratumor injection of radionuclide phosphorus 32 in treatment of metastatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen patients with carcinoma and three patients with benign lesions of the head were studied by acupuncture-point injection combined with intratumor injection of radionuclide P-32 for treatment of metastatic carcinoma. The metastatic cervical nodules shrank to half their original sizes within 2-3 weeks in five cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The injected dose ranged from 0.222 to 0.421 mCi, approximately 10 times less than that given by the ordinary method. The acupuncture points are selected according to the Theory of Channels and Collaterals of Chinese traditional medicine. The mechanism of therapeutic action of radionuclide P-32 is possibly by the delivery of destructive ionizing radiation from beta emission properties of P-32. This method appears to offer a low-dose means of P-32 treatment of metastatic carcinoma

  13. Investigation of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China and evaluation of internal dose to public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Changshou; Liu Yulan; Xu Ning; Hu Aiying; Kou Tiluo; Shi Zhongxin

    1992-12-01

    In order to obtain background radiation levels of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China, the determination and analysis of water and food samples have been completed by organizations of radiological protection from 28 provinces, autonomous regions and three major cities. Ranges of specific activity of natural radionuclides for U, Th, Ra, K, Pb and Po are (2.2 ∼ 25.5) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (0.5 ∼ 6.9) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (3.4 ∼ 25.5) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (25 ∼ 420) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (3.9 ∼ 55) x 10 -2 Bq/kg and (2.7 ∼ 58) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, respectively. Samples of drinking water were taken from tap water or well. The average concentrations in tap water and well water are 2.8 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 3.7 x 10 -2 Bq/L for U, 0.8 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 1.3 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Ra, 0.07 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 0.06 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Th, 0. 3 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 1.1 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Pb and 0.3 Bq/L and 0.5 Bq/L for Po respectively. The annual intakes by ingestion have been calculated. The annual intake of male adult from six main natural radionuclides is about 205 Bq. Among them 64% of total intake of U is from drinking water. The contributions from grains to the total intake of Ra, Pb and Po are 55.7%, 59.7% and 70% respectively. The total annual average effective dose equivalent of 6 natural radionuclides for male adult in China is about 310 μSv

  14. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  15. Radionuclide diagnosis of emergency states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishmukhametov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Solution of emergency state radionuclide diagnostics from the technical point of view is provided by the application of the mobile quick-operating equipment in combination with computers, by the use of radionuclides with acceptable for emergency medicine characteristics and by development of radionuclide investigation data propcessing express-method. Medical developments include the study of acute disease and injury radioisotope semiotics, different indication diagnostic value determining, comparison of the results, obtained during radionuclide investigation, with clinicolaboratory and instrumental data, separation of methodical complex series

  16. Radioactivity and natural radionuclides distribution in river water, coastal water, sediment and Eichornia Crassipes (Mart) solms and their accumulation factor at Surabaya area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus Taftazani; Sumining; Muzakky

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of radioactivity and natural radionuclides in water, sediment and eichornia crassipes (mart) solms from Surabaya River and coastal area have been evaluated. Five sampling locations were selected to represent fresh water and coastal water environment. The samples consist of water (fresh & coastal), bottom surface sediment and eichornia crassipes (mart) solms. The result showed that the gross-β activity from water environment were lower than the threshold value of Environmental Minister Act. Kep.02/MENKLH/I/1988 (1000 mBq/L) and indicated that β-radio ecological quality of water were still good. But the activity of the gross-α of water environment were higher than the threshold value of Environmental Minister Act. Kep.02/MENKLH/I/1988 (100 mBq/L). The eichornia crassipes (mart) solms (gross) activity were higher than water and sediment activities and indicated that transfer of radio nuclides from water to sediment and organism can be detected in water environment. Two natural radionuclide can be identified by γ-Spectrometric technique, they were K"4"0 and Tl"2"0"8. Generally the distribution factors F_D were smaller than bioaccumulation factor F_B. (author)

  17. Distribution of some natural and man-made radionuclides in soil from the city of Veles (Republic of Macedonia) and its environs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, Snezana; Stafilov, Trajce; Sajn, Robert; Frontasyeva, Marina

    2010-02-01

    A systematic study of soil radioactivity in the metallurgical centre of the Republic of Macedonia, the city of Veles and its environs, was carried out. The measurement of the radioactivity was performed in 55 samples from evenly distributed sampling sites. The gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements were made as a screening, using a low background gas-flow proportional counter. For the analysis of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th and (137)Cs, a P-type coaxial high purity germanium detector was used. The values for the activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides fall well within the worldwide range as reported in the literature. It is shown that the activity of man-made radionuclides, except for (137)Cs, is below the detection limit. (137)Cs originated from the atmospheric deposition and present in soil in the activity concentration range of 2-358 Bq kg(-1) is irregularly distributed over the sampled territory owing to the complicated orography of the land. The results of gamma spectrometry are compared to the K, U, and Th concentrations previously obtained by the reactor neutron activation analysis in the same soil samples.

  18. ASSESSMENTOF BETA PARTICLE FLUX FROM SURFACE CONTAMINATION AS A RELATIVE INDICATOR FOR RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION ON EXTERNAL SURFACES OF A MULTI-STORY BUILDING IN PRIPYAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-17

    How would we recover if a Radiological Dispersion Device (e.g., dirty bomb) or Improvised Nuclear Device were to detonate in a large city? In order to assess the feasibility of remediation following such an event, several issues would have to be considered, including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of the required resources to accomplish decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Presently little is known about the distribution, redistribution, and migration of radionuclides in an urban environment. However, Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to determine the radionuclide distribution on a Pripyat multi-story building, which had not been previously decontaminated and therefore could reflect the initial fallout and its further natural redistribution on external surfaces. The 7-story building selected was surveyed from the ground floor to the roof on horizontal and vertical surfaces along seven ground-to-roof transections. Some of the results from this study indicate that the upper floors of the building had higher contamination levels than the lower floors. The authors consequently recommend that existing decontamination procedures for tall structures be re-examined and modified accordingly.

  19. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    During FY-1980, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory contributions to the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology program were primarily in the areas of migration-rate studies using crushed rock, whole core, and fractured core columns; parametric studies of variables which may influence radionuclide sorption-desorption behavior; and initial studies of actinide chemistry in near-neutral solutions and Eh control. Batch experiments in both air and a controlled atmosphere (nitrogen, less than or equal to 0.2 ppM oxygen, less than or equal to 20 ppM carbon dioxide) for the sorption of several radionuclides on granite and argillite were completed. These data also provided informaton on the effects of other parameters, such as particle size and contact time. All nine elements studied had different sorption ratios for argillite when measured under the controlled atmosphere than when measured in air, except possibly for americium where any effect was smaller than the standard deviations. As expected, strontium, cesium, and barium are least affected by the presence or absence of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Columns of crushed rock and solid and cracked cores were used to study the migration of radionuclides through such materials. In general, sorption ratios measured by batch techniques are 2 to 3 times greater than those for columns; however, a wide variation in behavior was observed, depending upon the element and the mineralogy. Work has begun on a system wherein traced groundwater is circulated through a crushed rock column; this should provide a link between the usual, single-pass, crushed rock columns and the batch experiments. Materials characterization has continued, and techniques for the determination of Fe(II) in silicate rocks and groundwater have been made operational. Work on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has been started

  20. Examinations on the removal of natural radionuclides from drinking water and overview on their distribution in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staubmann, K.

    2002-09-01

    The objective of the thesis was to give an overview about available data regarding natural radioactivity in Austrian ground and spring water and to examine the capability of membrane processes, ion exchange processes and processes for iron and manganese removal to remove natural radionuclides from drinking water. There are already Austrian-wide data existing for the activity concentrations of radon-222 in ground- and spring water, only few values are available for radium-226 (Ra-226), lead-210 (Pb-210), uranium (U) and polonium-210 up til now. From the existing data it is to be expected that in Austria only in exceptions water treatment will be necessary. The tested reverse osmosis and nanofiltration systems removed between 95.6 % and 99.8 % of Ra-226, U and Pb-210 on the average. Laboratory scale experiments for ion exchange showed an essential influence of the concurrent ions in the water on the removal of the radionuclides. With water softeners (cation exchangers) Ra-226 to more than 90 % and Pb to more than 80 % could be removed. By the use of other ones than the standard cartridge fillings for pour-through-filters (ion exchangers) the radionuclides could be removed more selectively and more effectively and the influence on the chemical composition of the water could be minimized. In a laboratory scale experiment simulating the planned treatment process at a waterwork for the removal of iron and manganese Ra-226 was removed to 61%. At the examined processes often disadvantageous side effects onto the water quality which require a subsequent treatment were observed. During the operation of the systems it should be aimed at keeping the activity in the produced waste low so that no radiation protection relevant risk starts from that. (author)

  1. Use of the bleeding sap for investigation of radionuclide transfer to crops through root and translocation of the nuclide in the crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Sumiya, Misako; Yanagisawa, Kei; Ohmomo, Yoichiro.

    1991-01-01

    Adsorption and translocation characteristics of radionuclides in the root of tomato plant were investigated. Mature tomato plant was transplanted to culture solution containing 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 131 I, 54 Mn, 60 Co and 65 Zn. Immediately after transplantation, the tomato plant was cut at 10 cm above the surface of the culture solution in order to collect bleeding sap solution (Experiment-1). Another mature tomato plant was cultured for 3 days in culture solution containing radionuclides as mentioned above and then transplanted to fresh culture solution. Bleeding sap solution was also collected in the same way as shown in Experiment-1 (Experiment-2). Activity ratios of bleeding sap to culture solution were measured for several hours. Adsorption and removement of those radionuclides in tomato plant were summarized as follows; 137 Cs was taken up by the root almost at the same speed as that of water and accumulated in the lowest among the six nuclides used in the experiments. The concentrations of 85 Sr, 54 Mn and 65 Zn in the bleeding sap of 3 days' uptake experiment were higher than the initial concentrations of the culture solution for several hours even after the tomato plant was transplanted to fresh culture solution. 131 I and 60 Co were accumulated much in the root and found extremely low in the bleeding sap during the experiment, suggesting that the nuclide were absorbed on the surface of the roots and scarcely moved. (author)

  2. Investigating the distribution of the value of travel time savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of the value of travel time savings (VTTS) is investigated employing various nonparametric techniques to a large dataset originating from a stated choice experiment. The data contain choices between a fast and more expensive alternative and a slow and less expensive alternative....... Increasing the implicit price of time leads to an increased share of respondents who decline to pay to save time. But a significant proportion of respondents, 13%, remain willing to pay to save time at the highest price of time in the design. This means that the right tail of the VTTS distribution...

  3. Moessbauer investigation of characteristic distribution of iron oxides in sediments from the Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A.; Garg, V.K.; De Oliveira, A.C.; De Souza Junior, P.A.; Schuch, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Sediments from the Admirally Bay, King George Island, Antarctica, were investigated by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and radiometry. Quartz, feldspar, chlorite, calcite, dolomite, mica, kaolinite, hematite and magnetite were identified as constituent minerals in the sediment samples. The phase composition and the iron distribution among the crystallographic sites of iron-bearing minerals (silicates, magnetite and hematite) of samples from different location have been derived from the complex Moessbauer spectra. At different locations sediments has significant characteristic differences in the mineral composition, in the iron distribution among the crystallographic site of silicates, and in the specific radioactivity of Cs radionuclides. These results indicate differences in the rock formation and alteration by the sediments in this maritime part of Antarctica. There is a much higher amount of iron oxides in the sediments from south part of the geological fault across the Admirally Bay than in the north part. This can be associated with much more alteration in the rocks in the south part compared to the northern one. This finding can contribute to the question of the history of the formation and alteration of volcanic rocks in the border of Antarctica. (author)

  4. Implications of sedimentological and hydrological processes on the distribution of radionuclides: the example of a salt marsh near Ravenglass, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, A.P.; Blackley, M.W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes sedimentological and hydrological studies at a salt marsh site on the north bank of the River Esk near Ravenglass which have a bearing on the fate of the low-level radioactive effluent from the reprocessing facility at Sellafield, Cumbria. A range of techniques has been used including electromagnetic distance measurement (EDM) and pore water pressure studies. The results show that: (a) Over a two-year period there were no significant net changes in salt marsh creek level, although shorter-term (probably seasonal) fluctuations, of the order of 2 cm, occurred. These were attributed to expansion of clay particles during the winter months. Nearby, however, there were vertical changes of the order of 1 m due to erosion. (b) Pore water pressures indicated a dynamic situation with very rapid responses both to tidal fluctuations and to rainfall. During neap tides there was clear evidence for water seeping upwards from the underlying clay/sand interface. Shortlived radionuclides ( 95 Zr/ 95 Nb and 106 Ru) were detected in this zone. (c) soil polygons, once initiated by desiccation, thereafter provide preferential routes for water (and radionuclides) to the sub-surface sediment. These, and other results, are discussed in the context of previous studies. It is concluded that the complexity of the estuarine environment results in most data being site specific. (author)

  5. Behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water (Crouzille, Limousin). Geochemical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, J.

    2008-06-01

    Understanding natural radionuclides behaviour in surface water is a required step to achieve uranium mine rehabilitation and preserve water quality. The first objective of this thesis is to determine which are the radionuclides sources in a drinking water reservoir. The second objective is to improve the knowledge about the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides, especially actinium. The investigated site is a brook (Sagnes, Limousin, France) which floods a peat bog contaminated by a former uranium mine and which empties into the Crouzille lake. It allows studying radionuclides transport in surface water and radionuclides retention through organic substance or water reservoir. Radionuclides distribution in particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases is determined thanks to ultra-filtrations. Gamma spectrometry allows measuring almost all natural radionuclides with only two counting stages. However, low activities of 235 U series radionuclides impose the use of very low background well-type Ge detectors, such as those of the Underground Laboratory of Modane (France). Firstly, this study shows that no or few radionuclides are released by the Sagnes peat bog, although its radioactivity is important. Secondly, it provides details on the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water. More specifically, it provides the first indications of actinium solubility in surface water. Actinium's behaviour is very close to uranium's even if it is a little less soluble. (author)

  6. Investigation of the potential of fuzzy sets and related approaches for treating uncertainties in radionuclide transfer predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, W.; Grindrod, P.

    1989-01-01

    This document encompasses two main items. The first consists of a review of four aspects of fuzzy sets, namely, the general framework, the role of expert judgment, mathematical and computational aspects, and present applications. The second consists of the application of fuzzy-set theory to simplified problems in radionuclide migration, with comparisons between fuzzy and probabilistic approaches, treated both analytically and computationally. A new approach to fuzzy differential equations is presented, and applied to simple ordinary and partial differential equations. It is argued that such fuzzy techniques represent a viable alternative to probabilistic risk assessment, for handling systems subject to uncertainties

  7. An investigation of some heavy metals and radionuclides in sediments from the Sudanese coast of the red sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, Abubakr Mustafa

    1999-07-01

    In this study, surface sediments from port Sudan and Sawakin harbors and the fringing reefs area, located the Sudanese coast of the Red Sea, were analyzed for some heavy metals and radionuclides. The sampling was performed to provide good spatial coverage taking into account man's activity in Port Sudan harbor and the fringing reefs sea. A total of 31 bulk sediments samples were fractionated to five fractions using dry sieving method. A total of of 155 sub-samples (fractions) were digested by wet digestions and analyzed for Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb content using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. For radioactivity measurement, a total of 26 bulk sediment samples were treated and analyzed for natural and anthropogenic radionuclides 2 26Ra, 2 28Ra, 2 28K, 1 37Cs) using direct gamma-ray spectrometry. Quality assurance of the data was achieved through the analysis of certified reference materials. The range of concentration for Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Pb are 53.3-819 μg/g, 1.4-51 mg/g, 8-131μg/g, 9.5-113 μg/g, 18.4-142 μg/g, and 4.0-26.6 μg/g respectively. The ranges of radioactivity concentration of 2 26Ra, 2 28Ra, and 4 0K are 2.5-25.1 Bq/kg, 2.1-13.1 Bq/kg, respectively, while most of the measurements for 1 37Cs were below detection limits and the highest value is 8.3 Bq/kg. With respect to heavy metals for some samples the metal content increasing with decreasing particle-size, this results obtained by statistical multi-variant analysis methods. factor analysis indicates that: the silt/clay fraction (≥63 μm) the is dominant source for the emission form anthropogeic activities. the results from cluster analysis showed that the samples fell into two clusters based on minerological composition variations. Dominant elements in sediments recorded significant positive correlation with both trace elements and natural radionuclides. From the comparative study it appeared that: the fringing reefs area and few locations in Port Sudan and Sawakin harbors can be

  8. Investigation of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China and evaluation of internal dose to public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changshou, Zhu; Yulan, Liu; Ning, Xu; Aiying, Hu; Tiluo, Kou; Zhongxin, Shi [Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene, Ministry of Public Health (China); and others

    1992-12-01

    In order to obtain background radiation levels of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China, the determination and analysis of water and food samples have been completed by organizations of radiological protection from 28 provinces, autonomous regions and three major cities. Ranges of specific activity of natural radionuclides for U, Th, Ra, K, Pb and Po are (2.2 {approx} 25.5) x 10 {sup -2} Bq/kg, (0.5 {approx} 6.9) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, (3.4 {approx} 25.5) x 10 {sup -2} Bq/kg, (25 {approx} 420) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, (3.9 {approx} 55) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg and (2.7 {approx} 58) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, respectively. Samples of drinking water were taken from tap water or well. The average concentrations in tap water and well water are 2.8 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 3.7 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for U, 0.8 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 1.3 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Ra, 0.07 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 0.06 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Th, 0. 3 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 1.1 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Pb and 0.3 Bq/L and 0.5 Bq/L for Po respectively. The annual intakes by ingestion have been calculated. The annual intake of male adult from six main natural radionuclides is about 205 Bq. Among them 64% of total intake of U is from drinking water. The contributions from grains to the total intake of Ra, Pb and Po are 55.7%, 59.7% and 70% respectively. The total annual average effective dose equivalent of 6 natural radionuclides for male adult in China is about 310 {mu}Sv.

  9. Horizontal distribution of natural radionuclides (Pb-210, Po-210, Ra-226, Th-232, K-40) and of toxic heavy metals (Pb, Co, Ni) in soil samples in the surroundings of a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.; Hoetzl, H.; Rosner, G.; Schmidt, W.; Winkler, R.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the specific activities of the above radionuclides in the soil within 5 km of the plant as well as the ratios Pb-210/Ra-226 and Po-210/Ra-226 did not reveal any noticeable effects on the natural concentrations of these radionuclides in the soils. The specific activities of the radionuclides in the fly ash of the plant are obviously too small to disturb the natural distribution pattern significantly. A similar behaviour was observed for the concentrations of the heavy metals in the soils around the plant, which were also within the same range of values as observed for largely unpolluted soils. Increased metal concentrations in the soils downwind of the stack of the power plant were not observable. The concentrations of these metals in the fly ash were not sufficiently high to significantly change the local distribution of the elements in the soils in the surroundings of the plant. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Ergonomic investigation of weight distribution of laparoscopic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Chen, Hung-Jen; Lo, Ying-Chu

    2011-06-01

    Laparoscopic surgery procedures require highly specialized visually controlled movements. Investigations of industrial applications indicate that the length as well as the weight of hand-held tools substantially affects movement time (MT). Different weight distributions may have similar effects on long-shafted laparoscopic instruments when performing surgical procedures. For this reason, the current experiment aimed at finding direct evidence of the weight distribution effect in an accurate task. Ten right-handed subjects made continuous Fitts' pointing tasks using a long laparoscopic instrument. The factors and levels were target width: (2.5, 3, 3.5, and 4 cm), target distance (14, 23, and 37 cm), and weight distribution (uniform, front, middle, and rear). Weight distribution was made by chips of lead attached to the laparoscopic instrument. MT, error rate, and throughput (TP) were recorded as dependent variables. There were significant differences between the weight distribution in MT and in TP. The middle position was found to require the least time to manipulate the laparoscopic instrument in pointing tasks and also obtained the highest TP. These analyses and findings pointed to a design direction for the ergonomics and usability of the long hand-held tool such as the laparoscopic instrument in this study. To optimize efficiency in using these tools, the consideration of a better weight design is important and should not be neglected.

  11. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  13. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  14. Sorption of radionuclides from Pb-Bi melt. Report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, Eh.E.; Il'icheva, N.S.; Trifonova, O.E.

    2015-01-01

    Results of laboratory investigations of sorption and interfacial distribution of 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 154,155 Eu and 235,238 U radionuclides in the system Pb-Bi melt - steel surface are analyzed. It is shown that 106 Ru and 125 Sb are concentrated in Pb-Bi melt and other radionuclides with higher oxygen affinity are sorbed on oxide deposits on structural materials. Temperature dependences of sorption efficiency of radionuclides are studied. It is shown that there is sharp increase of this value for all radionuclides near the temperature range 350-400 deg C. Recommendations are given on the use of 106 Ru and 125 Sb as a reference for fuel element rupture detection system with radiometric monitoring of coolant melt samples and 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 134m Cs with radiometric monitoring of sorbing samples [ru

  15. Radionuclide transport in the vicinity of the repository and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, C.T.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; Shinta, A.; Smith, L.N.

    2000-01-01

    The following topics related to radionuclide transport in the vicinity of the repository in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant are presented: (i) mathematical description of models; (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e. epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases; (iii) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e. aleatory) uncertainty; and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented results indicate that no releases to the accessible environment take place due to radionuclide movement through the anhydrite marker beds, through the Dewey Lake Red Beds or directly to the surface, and also that the releases to the Culebra Dolomite are small. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for release to the Culebra Dolomite fall to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194)

  16. INVESTIGATION OF CURVES SET BY CUBIC DISTRIBUTION OF CURVATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ustenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Further development of the geometric modeling of curvelinear contours of different objects based on the specified cubic curvature distribution and setpoints of curvature in the boundary points. Methodology. We investigate the flat section of the curvilinear contour generating under condition that cubic curvature distribution is set. Curve begins and ends at the given points, where angles of tangent slope and curvature are also determined. It was obtained the curvature equation of this curve, depending on the section length and coefficient c of cubic curvature distribution. The analysis of obtained equation was carried out. As well as, it was investigated the conditions, in which the inflection points of the curve are appearing. One should find such an interval of parameter change (depending on the input data and the section length, in order to place the inflection point of the curvature graph outside the curve section borders. It was determined the dependence of tangent slope of angle to the curve at its arbitrary point, as well as it was given the recommendations to solve a system of integral equations that allow finding the length of the curve section and the coefficient c of curvature cubic distribution. Findings. As the result of curves research, it is found that the criterion for their selection one can consider the absence of inflection points of the curvature on the observed section. Influence analysis of the parameter c on the graph of tangent slope angle to the curve showed that regardless of its value, it is provided the same rate of angle increase of tangent slope to the curve. Originality. It is improved the approach to geometric modeling of curves based on cubic curvature distribution with its given values at the boundary points by eliminating the inflection points from the observed section of curvilinear contours. Practical value. Curves obtained using the proposed method can be used for geometric modeling of curvilinear

  17. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  18. Vertical soil migration of radionuclide fallout from the Chernobyl' accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silant'ev, A.N.; Shkuratova, I.G.; Bobovnikova, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    The most suitable model for describing the behavior of radionuclide fallout on a soil surface is quasidiffusion transfer with directional transfer taken into account. The parameter values for this have been determined previously and are supplemented by the results of this work. To investigate the initial radionuclide distribution along the soil profile, monolithic soil samples 5 cm thick were taken in June-September 1986 in areas which had been subjected to contamination due to the Chernobyl' accident. The samples taken were cut up into layers. The first layer, 0.5 cm thick, was cut off from the surface of the soil monolith together with the grass. The next layer cut off was also 0.5 cm thick. Then two layers, each 1 cm in thickness, were cut off. The thickness of the last layer was 2 cm. The vertical distribution of radionuclides along the soil profile which was examined may be called the initial distribution, which will then change due to nonimmediate migration of radionuclides in the soil. Based on the research which has been performed, the following conclusions may be drawn. One portion of the radionuclides resulting from fallout is trapped by plant cover, while the other enters immediately into the soil. For a thick plant covering, about 80% of the radionuclide fallout is sorbed by the grass; for sparse cover, about 40%. The radionuclides entering the soil along with rainwater penetrate into the soil depths, producing contamination which falls off exponentially with depth. The exponent index is close to 1 cm -1 . In a forest, the main amount of radionuclide fallout is trapped by litter. Approximately 10% of the contamination fallout penetrates beneath the litter

  19. Experimental investigations on frictional resistance and velocity distribution of rough wall with regularly distributed triangular ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motozawa, Masaaki; Ito, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawashima, Hideki; Ando, Hirotomo; Senda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow over the regularly distributed triangular ribs was investigated. • Simultaneous measurement of flow resistance and velocity profile was performed. • Flow resistance was measured directly and velocity profile was measured by LDV. • Flow resistance was estimated by the information of the velocity field. • Estimated flow resistance has good agreement with the measured flow resistance. -- Abstract: The relationship between the flow resistance of a turbulent flow over triangular ribs regularly distributed on a wall surface and the velocity distribution around the ribs was investigated experimentally. A concentric cylinder device composed of an inner test cylinder and an outer cylinder was employed to measure the flow resistance using the torque of the shaft of the inner cylinder and the velocity distribution of the flow around a rib by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) simultaneously. We prepared four inner test cylinders having 4, 8, 12 and 16 triangular ribs on the surface with the same interval between them. Each rib had an isosceles right triangle V-shape and a height of 2 mm. To investigate the relationship between flow resistance and velocity distribution, we estimated the frictional drag and pressure drag acting on the surface of the ribs separately using the velocity distribution. Therefore, we could also estimate the total flow resistance using the velocity distribution. As a result of the experiment, the flow resistance and the attachment point downstream of the rib were shown to depend on the distance between ribs. Moreover, the flow resistance estimated using the velocity distribution had good agreement with the flow resistance measured using the torque of the inner cylinder

  20. The analysis of impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nerosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was analyzed. On engineering software MATHCAD the program for calculation of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was created. To verify this algorithm the calculation model for MCNP code was established and represented the area consisted of soft biological tissue or any other tissue in which the grid of microsources was incorporated. Using the developed system the value of possible systematic irregular coating of radioactivity on the microsource’s core was analyzed. The distribution of activity along the surface of microsource was simulated to create distribution of absorbed dose rate corresponding to experimental data on radiation injury. The obtained model of microsource with irregular distribution of activity was compared to conventional microsource with core coated regularly along the entire area of the silver stem by main dosimetry characteristics. The results showed that even for extremely irregular distribution of activity the distribution of dose rate produced by microsource in the tumor area was not substantially different from dose-rate field obtained for microsource with regularly coated activity. The differences in dose rates (up to 10% in areas which were the nearest to the center of the grid were significantly lower than its decline from center to periphery of the grid. For spatial distribution of absorbed dose for specific configuration of microsource set and tracing of curves of equal level by selected cut-off the program SEEDPLAN was developed. The developed program represents precisely enough the spatial distribution of selected configuration set of microsources using results of calculation data for absorbed dose around the single microsource as basic data and may be used for optimal planning of brachytherapy with microsources. 

  1. Cooperative research at JAERI on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. 3. Distribution and migration characteristics of long-lived radionuclides in the environment around the damaged Chernobyl reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Hikaru

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the actual long-term migration characteristics of radionuclides released and accumulated on the earth surface environment after the reactor accident. The objective areas were mainly in 30 km distant areas from the reactor. The study concerned the distribution of radionuclides on the ground surface, their physical and chemical forms, their migration characteristics, their migration from the ground to aqueous system like river, their physical and chemical forms in that system, their migration into vegetables, and their re-floating and concentration in air. The study involved those methods such as a newly developed liquid scintillation counting of 241 Pu for assessing 241 Am accumulation and the alpha-track method for detection of hot particles. Findings were: Hot particles of small diameters around several microns were still present; Depth distribution of radionuclides was dependent on the soil sort; Chemical forms of 90 Sr, 137 Cs and transuranium elements were different; Depth distribution in the soil depended on chemical forms; Annual change of radionuclides was evident in air; Migration coefficients to vegetables were determined; High molecular weight organic colloid was important in the migration to water system; Amounts of 137 Cs and transuranium elements depended on those of suspended matters in the river water and >90% 90 Sr were in soluble forms; Apparent partition ratios (soluble/suspended) of radionuclides in the river and lake were determined; Soluble transuranium elements were bound to humus materials in the river. (K.H.)

  2. Experimental investigation of statistical models describing distribution of counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1992-01-01

    The binomial, Poisson and modified Poisson models which are used for describing the statistical nature of the distribution of counts are compared theoretically, and conclusions for application are considered. The validity of the Poisson and the modified Poisson statistical distribution for observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally for various measuring times. The experiments to measure the influence of the significant radioactive decay were performed with 89 Y m (T 1/2 =16.06 s), using a multichannel analyser (4096 channels) in the multiscaling mode. According to the results, Poisson statistics describe the counting experiment for short measuring times (up to T=0.5T 1/2 ) and its application is recommended. However, analysis of the data demonstrated, with confidence, that for long measurements (T≥T 1/2 ) Poisson distribution is not valid and the modified Poisson function is preferable. The practical implications in calculating uncertainties and in optimizing the measuring time are discussed. Differences between the standard deviations evaluated on the basis of the Poisson and binomial models are especially significant for experiments with long measuring time (T/T 1/2 ≥2) and/or large detection efficiency (ε>0.30). Optimization of the measuring time for paired observations yields the same solution for either the binomial or the Poisson distribution. (orig.)

  3. Elemental and radionuclides distribution in the production and use of phosphate fertilizers in Brazil; Distribuicao elementar e de radionuclideos na producao e uso de fertilizantes fosfatados no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saueia, Catia Heloisa Rosignoli

    2006-07-01

    Fertilizer is considered an essential component for agriculture, because its use increases the natural soil nutrients, which are lost slow waste or erosion. The Brazilian phosphate fertilizer is obtained by wet reaction of igneous phosphate rock with concentrated sulphuric acid, giving as final product, phosphoric acid and dihydrated calcium sulphate (phosphogypsum) as by-product. Phosphoric acid is the starting material for triple superphosphate (TSP), single superphosphate (SSP), monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP). The phosphate rock used as raw material presents in its composition, radionuclides of the U and Th natural series in. During the chemical attack of the phosphate rock, this equilibrium is disrupted and the radionuclides and the elements migrate to intermediate, final products and byproducts, according to their solubility and chemical properties. While the fertilizers are commercialized, the phosphogypsum is disposed in stack piles and can cause an impact in the environment. In order to evaluate the radionuclides and the elements distribution in the industrial process of phosphate fertilizer production, samples of concentrated rock, fertilizers (SSP, TSP, MAP and DAP) and phosphogypsum from three national industries (A, B and C), were analyzed. The characterization of the elements Ba, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Na, Sc, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr, and the rare earths La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu, were performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results obtained showed that, in general, the rare earth elements are distributed uniformly in the fertilizers and phosphogypsum, except for Lu. The elemental concentration present in the fertilizers SSP and TSP are of the same order of magnitude of the source rock. The same behavior was observed in the fertilizers MAP and DAP, except for the elements Co, Sc and U. The radionuclides of the U series ({sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb) and of the Th series

  4. The biological transport of radionuclides in grassland and freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, S.A.

    1989-12-01

    This thesis examines the biological transport of radionuclides through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with particular reference to radiocaesium. The semi-natural grassland habitat was located at Drigg, W. Cumbria, contaminated primarily by radioactive fallout, from several sources over the past decade. Advantage was made of the deposition of radionuclides from the Chernobyl reactor incident, which occurred during the early stages of the investigation. The study examined the distribution of radiocaesium for the major components of the grassland ecosystem, within the soil-plant-invertebrate-small mammal food chain. Data concerning temporal fluctuation of radionuclide transfer factors between food chain components are presented. The final section examines the spatial distribution of radiocaesium in sediment and the freshwater eel (Anguilla anguilla) in a small stream contaminated by radioactive effluent. The relationship between activity levels in eels and the sediments in which they rest and forage was investigated. Factors influencing uptake of radiocaesium in freshwater fish were also examined. (author)

  5. Spatial and vertical distribution and risk assessment of natural radionuclides in soils surrounding the lignite-fired power plants in Megalopolis basin, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthymiou, H V; Manousakas, M; Fouskas, A; Siavalas, G

    2013-01-01

    Twenty soil profile samples and fourteen surface soil samples collected from the vicinity of the lignite-fired power plants in the Megalopolis basin (Greece) were analysed for their natural radionuclide concentration and (137)Cs, since fossil fuels are associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials and hence with radiological impact. No significant enhancement of surface soil radioactivity levels in the vicinity of lignite-fired plants was observed. A downcore decreasing trend of (137)Cs was observed in a number of cores reflecting its atmospheric origin, whereas the uniform distribution observed in a number of other cores gave information on the mechanical alteration of the soil. The average dose rate value was found to be 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1), while the annual average effective dose from the terrestrial gamma radiation was found to be 0.08 ± 0.03 mSv.

  6. Isotopic ratio and vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil affected by the accident of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Saito, Takumi; Muroya, Yusa; Sawahata, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Yuji; Nagasaki, Shinya; Okamoto, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Katsumura, Yosuke; Tanaka, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The results of γ analyses of soil samples obtained from 50 locations in Fukushima prefecture on April 20, 2011, revealed the presence of a spectrum of radionuclides resulted from the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). The sum γ radioactivity concentration ranged in more than 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the sampling locations. The contamination of soils in the northwest of the FDNPP was considerable. The 131 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios of the soil samples plotted as a function of the distance from the F1 NPPs exhibited three distinctive patterns. Such patterns would reflect not only the different deposition behaviors of these radionuclides, but also on the conditions of associated release events such as temperature and compositions and physicochemical forms of released radionuclides. The 136 Cs/ 137 Cs activity ratio, on the other hand, was considered to only reflect the difference in isotopic compositions of source materials. Two locations close to the NPP in the northwest direction were found to be depleted in short-lived 136 Cs. This likely suggested the presence of distinct sources with different 136 Cs/ 137 Cs isotopic ratios, although their details were unknown at present. Vertical γ activity profiles of 131 I and 137 Cs were also investigated, using 20–30 cm soil cores in several locations. About 70% or more of the radionuclides were present in the uppermost 2-cm regions. It was found that the profiles of 131 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios showed maxima in the 2–4 cm regions, suggesting slightly larger migration of the former nuclide. - Highlights: ► We report the results of γ analyses of soil samples around Fukushima Dai-ichi NPPs. ► The contamination of soils in the northwest of the power plant was considerable. ► The 131 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios exhibited three distinctive patterns. ► Most of 131 I and 137 Cs were present in the uppermost 2-cm regions of soil.

  7. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of plutonium concentration and distribution in burrowing crayfish from the White Oak Creek floodplain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaney, M.S.; Dahlman, R.C.; Craig, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    The White Oak floodplain was contaminated with several radionuclides, including /sup 239/Pu, during the Manhattan Project in 1944. Plutonium distribution in the soil is nonhomogeneous. An investigation was conducted to deterine Pu accumulation in a resident animal population. Crayfish were chosen because they complete their life-cycle within the contaminated environment, they directly contact contaminated muds, and they function in a food chain of significance to man. Two major conclusions of the research were that Pu concentrations in contaminated crayfish typically exceed those of control crayfish by two orders of magnitude and that if an incident were to occur in which a standard man ingested the soft tissues of ten crayfish from the floodplain, an insignificant whole body dose would accrue over the subsequent 50 years of life. The digestive tract of contaminated crayfish contained 21 to 33% of the Pu body burden, soft tissues contained 11 to 31% of the Pu body burden, and 48 to 62% of the Pu body burden of contaminated crayfish was associated with the carapace. Therefore, at a molt a large proportion of its accumulated Pu is deposited in the environment. A supplementary laboratory investigation using /sup 237/Pu included a chronic Pu uptake study by uncontaminated crayfish. In these crayfish, from 64 to 82% of the /sup 237/Pu was associated with the body tissues. Complementary data for /sup 237/Pu associated with the carapace ranged from 18 to 37% of the distribution. An inventory of /sup 239/Pu in crayfish at two sites on the floodplain was calculated by multiplying the estimated biomass of the crayfish by their average /sup 239/Pu concentration. This evaluation of Pu associated with the crayfish population was compared to an inventory of /sup 239/Pu in the soil in which they burrow and was found to be eight orders of magnitude less.

  9. Investigation of plutonium concentration and distribution in burrowing crayfish from the White Oak Creek floodplain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.S.; Dahlman, R.C.; Craig, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    The White Oak floodplain was contaminated with several radionuclides, including 239 Pu, during the Manhattan Project in 1944. Plutonium distribution in the soil is nonhomogeneous. An investigation was conducted to deterine Pu accumulation in a resident animal population. Crayfish were chosen because they complete their life-cycle within the contaminated environment, they directly contact contaminated muds, and they function in a food chain of significance to man. Two major conclusions of the research were that Pu concentrations in contaminated crayfish typically exceed those of control crayfish by two orders of magnitude and that if an incident were to occur in which a standard man ingested the soft tissues of ten crayfish from the floodplain, an insignificant whole body dose would accrue over the subsequent 50 years of life. The digestive tract of contaminated crayfish contained 21 to 33% of the Pu body burden, soft tissues contained 11 to 31% of the Pu body burden, and 48 to 62% of the Pu body burden of contaminated crayfish was associated with the carapace. Therefore, at a molt a large proportion of its accumulated Pu is deposited in the environment. A supplementary laboratory investigation using 237 Pu included a chronic Pu uptake study by uncontaminated crayfish. In these crayfish, from 64 to 82% of the 237 Pu was associated with the body tissues. Complementary data for 237 Pu associated with the carapace ranged from 18 to 37% of the distribution. An inventory of 239 Pu in crayfish at two sites on the floodplain was calculated by multiplying the estimated biomass of the crayfish by their average 239 Pu concentration. This evaluation of Pu associated with the crayfish population was compared to an inventory of 239 Pu in the soil in which they burrow and was found to be eight orders of magnitude less

  10. Investigation of liquid phase axial dispersion in Taylor bubble flow by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin J.H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow occurs in small diameter channels in which gas bubbles are separated by slugs of pure liquid. This type of flow regime is well suited for solid catalyzed gas-liquid reactors in which the reaction efficiency is a strong function of axial dispersion in the regions of pure liquid. This paper presents an experimental study of liquid phase axial dispersion in a Taylor bubble flow developed in a horizontal tube using high speed photography and radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD analysis. A parametric dependence of axial dispersion on average volume fraction of gas phase was also investigated by varying the relative volumetric flow rates of the two phases. 137mBa produced from a 137Cs/137mBa radionuclide generator was used as radiotracer and measurements were made using the NaI(Tl scintillation detectors. Validation of 137mBa in the form of barium chloride as aqueous phase radiotracer was also carried out. Axial Dispersion Model (ADM was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system and the results of the experiment are presented. It was observed that the system is characterized by very high values of Peclet Number (Pe∼102 which reveals an approaching plug type flow. The experimental and model estimated values of mean residence times were observed in agreement with each other.

  11. Concentration and distribution patterns of naturally occurring radionuclides in sediments and flood plain soils of the catchment area of the river Elbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, A.; Jurk, M.; Weiß, D.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of uranium mining and milling as well as that of traditional mining activities on river sediments and flood plain soils in the catchment area of the river Elbe was investigated over the years 1994 to 1995. Contamination resulting from mining activities has been identified by comparing the median values for the measured radionuclides, and by establishing the ratio between Ra-226 and Ra-228. The transport and deposition of contaminated materials as a result of high water events, and river discharge of waste water from mining and milling facilities, can be considered to be the main paths of sediment and soil contamination. Sediments and flood plain soils located in the vicinity of former uranium mining and milling sites are primarily influenced by discharges of waste water. Long distance transport and deposition at dams, barrages and on flood plains has mainly been caused by high water events. In many cases the radionuclide concentrations were higher in the subsurface layer than in the top layer of flood plain soil. Due to termination of uranium mining and milling activities, no significant contamination of newer or fresh sediments was found. Radiation exposure arising in relation to angling or walking on flood plains is low

  12. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  13. Research leadership and investigators: gender distribution in the federal government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarren, Madeline; Goldman, Steven

    2012-08-01

    The National Academies reported in Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering (2006) that "women are very likely to face discrimination." In academic medicine, gender distribution is becoming more balanced. In the federal government, women also have made progress, doubling their representation in professional positions to 44%. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a research program and a mission to train health care professionals; however, its gender distribution has not been described. We conducted a descriptive study using public data for positions in the VA, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). We followed with a case-control analysis of predictors of receipt of grant funding in the VA. Participants were 224 leadership positions and 132 principal investigators. Women comprised 33% (AHRQ), 27% (NIH), and 0% (VA) of the top research leadership. Across all VA research levels, women comprised 45% to 0%, depending on the service. In the case-control analysis of principal investigators, men had greater odds (odds ratio 8.0) of a Cooperative Studies Program (CSP) trial award. History of first, last, or any authorship on a clinical trial publication in the 10 years before the index trial was only weakly associated with award of a CSP trial. The gender imbalance was not explained by publication history. Marked gender disparities were seen in the VA, except in Health Services Research. Organizations must investigate their practices to reveal disparities, investigate underlying factors, and intervene as needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Spatial distribution of radionuclides in soil around a coal-fired power plant: lead 210, polonium 210, radium 226, thorium 232, kalium 40 emitted with the fly ash and cesium 137 from the worldwide weapon testing fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunzl, K.; Hoetzl, H.; Rosner, G.; Winkler, R.

    1984-09-01

    To determine the effect of airborne emissions of radionuclides from coal-fired power plants on the environment, the concentrations of the most important radionuclides were measured in soil samples from the local environments (0.4-5.2 km) as well as in fly ash. The spatial distribution of the radionuclides in the soil did not indicate any significantly increased concentrations in the area downwind of the plant compared to other areas; the ratios lead 210/radium 226 and polonium 210/radium 226 were within the range observed for unaffected soils. The emissions from the plant, though present, are obviously too small to significantly change the natural local distribution pattern of the radionuclides in the soil. A highly significant correlation between potassium 40 and thorium 232 was observed which was independent of the different types of soils found in this area. The concentration of cesium 137 in topsoil, which is the result of worldwide fallout from nuclear weapons testing, varied at some places even within a small distance (approx. 2 km) by up to one order of magnitude. Furthermore, it was observed that the concentration of cesium 137 in soils from cropland was on average a factor of 2 less than in those from grassland. This variability has to be considered in planning monitoring programs around nuclear power plants, which may also release this radionuclide. (A.V.)

  15. Experimental investigation of long-lived radionuclide migration in floodplain soils of Chernobyl NPP 10-km zone and risk estimation of ground water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnov, V.G.; Popov, V.E.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily polluted with long-lived radionuclides, the floodplain soils of Chernobyl NPP 30-km zone is a potential danger for the river system and reservoirs of the Ukraine. In 1991, the building of a dam along the river left bank was started to isolate the river-bed. However, during the spring rise of water in the river body, the water will all the same infiltrate through the soil to the floodplain because of hydraulic pressure. The main goal of this work was to estimate the strontium 90 content in the top water and it's dependence on the depth of water over the soil surface. We studied the strontium 90 different chemical forms distribution in the left bank part of the floodplain and experimentally determined the strontium 90 washing out by river water taken into account it's upward flow

  16. Kinetic approach for interactive reactions of radionuclide, bacteria and granitic crushed rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang; Kim, Seung Soo; Oh, Jong Min; Lee, Tae Yup

    2011-01-01

    For many radionuclides, sorption is an important phenomenon as their migration rates in groundwater are reduced in both engineered barrier and fractured rock matrix. Sorption of radionuclides is strongly dependent on the chemistry of the surrounding groundwater, such as pH, Eh, ionic strength, etc., by changing their valence states (e.g.,). In addition, it is also known that some bacteria can change the mobility and speciation of a radionuclide in groundwater. Biological immobilization mechanisms of radionuclides include precipitation, transformation to less soluble forms and so on. On the other hand, bacteria can also play a role of sorbent for radionuclides. Since bacteria can not only be mobile as a colloid but also be immobile as biofilm in the rock fracture, the bacteria as the sorbents of radionuclides in the groundwater can have both positive and negative effects on the radionuclide migration. In this study, therefore, sorption of radionuclide onto rock surface in the presence of bacteria was investigated via batch experiments. Although sorption equilibrium state can be expected in the transport of weakly sorbing (distribution coefficient, K d -3 m 3 kg -1 ) or strongly adsorbing (K d > ∼4.6 m 3 kg -1 ) nuclides in fractured rock, sorption kinetics needs to be considered in the intermediate range. Therefore, the sorption of radionuclide whose valence state is expected to be changed by biological reduction was evaluated in a kinetic approach

  17. A Study of the Distribution of Natural Radionuclides and their Environmental Impacts in Halayeb Triangle Area, along the South Eastern Coast of the Red Sea, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, M.H.M.; Khedr, R.F.E.

    2017-01-01

    Thirty samples (14 surficial soil, 3 Sea water-3 desalinated water, and 10 plant) were collected from halayeb triangle are a along the south eastern Coast of the Red Sea, Egypt . Distributions of natural radionuclides of "2"2"6 Ra, "2"3"2 Th, "4"0 K and "1"3"7Cs in these samples were determined using γ-ray spectrometry. The average activities of natural radionuclides in all samples in the study are a are 19.38 (3.35-61.09) Bq kg"-"1 for "2"2"6 Ra, 10.87 (1.39-24.28) Bq kg"-"1 for "2"3"2 Th, 245.25 (132.46-531.19) Bq kg"-"1 for "40 K, and 1.48 (0.67 - 2.52) Bq kg"-"1 "1"3"7 Cs for surficial soil samples . These values were 8.59 (1.48-21.57) Bq kg"-"1 for 226 Ra, 11.34 (2. 64-25.44) Bq kg"-"1 for "2"3"2Th, and 254.66(69.73-450.58) Bq kg"-"1 for "4"0K, for plant samples. For sea water samples, the average activity for "2"2"6 Ra is 3.20 (1.99-3.91) Bq kg"-"1, for "2"3"2Th is 1.73(1.24-2.45) Bq kg"-"1, and 15.10 (8.67-23.25) Bq kg"-"1 for "4"0 K. For desalinised water the average activity is under detection limits for "2"2"6Ra, "2"3"2Th, and 13.49 (8.67-17.85) Bq kg"-"1 for "4"0K. A comparison of radionuclide activities in the study area and in other coastal and aquatic environments is given. The radiation hazard parameters (absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, internal hazard index, external hazard index ,annual gonadal dose equivalent); and transfer factor of elements from soil to plant were calculated. The results of measurements will serve as base line data and background reference level for south Egyptian coastlines

  18. Investigation and analysis to the content of natural radionuclides at rate-earth ore and solid waste in China through the first nationwide pollution source survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jianjun; Liu Guifang; Sun Qinghong

    2011-01-01

    China has launched the First Nationwide Pollution Source Survey (FNPSS) during 2006-2009. Ministry Environmental Protection (MEP) sponsored the campaign of measuring the natural radionuclide contents. And the Ministry Environmental Protection (MEP) organized the measurements of natural radionuclide contents of in the factories and mines associated with rare-earth, niobium/tantalum, zircon, tin, lead/zinc, copper, iron, phosphate, coal, aluminum and vanadium. This paper analyzes mainly the data on the contents of U, 232 Th and 226 Ra in the rare-earth ore and solid waste produced by the rare-earth industry in China, as one of a series of papers on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) s investigation. It is concluded that the average of the U, 232 Th and 226 Ra for the monazite sand of rare-earth ore is 16911, 49683, and 20072 Bq/kg, respectively. The average of U, 232 Th and 226 Ra in bastnaesite is 42, 701 and 91 Bq/kg, respectively. The average of U, 232 Th and 226 Ra in the ionic type rare-earth ore is 3918.6, 2315 and 1221 Bq/kg, respectively. (authors)

  19. Sorption of radionuclides on a soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami

    1979-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes into the ground has been discussed, and this paper emphasized significance of the investigation for underground water flow and for the prediction of radionuclides through a stratified aquifer using column experiments to evaluate the internal radiation dose. Distributions and redistributions of radionuclides in a sandy layer were observed to identify the sorption model which predicts the behavior, and the underground water flow in the Plio-Pleistocene Osaka Group was investigated as an example, by mean of the measurement of 222 Rn concentration, the pumping technique and the tracer technique using the activation analysis. Then, the estimation of radioactive concentration in the underground water was worked out for the boundary condition of steady state inflow of liquid wastes and of which the 90 Sr are leached from the solidified body, moreover, the equation which easily evaluates the suitability of the disposal site was proposed. These approach may be useful for the actual site selection of radioactive wastes disposal. (author)

  20. Radionuclides (40K, 232Th and 238U) and Heavy Metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As and Pb) Distribution Assessment at Renggam Landfill, Simpang Renggam, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, E.; FahrulRazi, MJ; Azhar, ATS; Hazreek, ZAM; Shakila, A.; Norshuhaila, MS; Omeje, M.

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of radioactivity levels and the distribution of heavy metals in soil samples at CEP Farm landfill, Renggam in Johor State was to determine the activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides and heavy metal concentrations of this landfill. The background radiation was monitored to estimate the exposure level. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples were determined using HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy whereas the heavy metal concentration was measured using X-RF analysis. The mean exposure rate at the landfill site was 36.2±2.4 μR hr-1 and the annual effective dose rate at the landfill site was 3.19 ± 0.22 mSv yr-1. However, residential area has lower mean exposure dose rate of about 16.33±0.72 μR hr-1 and has an annual effective dose rate of 1.43±0.06 mSv yr-1 compared to landfill sites. The mean activity concentration of 40K, 238U and 232Th at landfill site were 239.95±15.89 Bq kg-1, 20.90±2.49 Bq kg-1 and 40.61±4.59 Bq kg-1, respectively. For heavy metal compositions, Cr, Ni and Cu have mean concentration of 232±10 ppm, 23±2 ppm, and 46±19 ppm, respectively. Whereas, Zn has concentration of 64±9 ppm and concentration of 12±1 ppm and 71±2 ppm was estimated for As and Pb respectively. The higher activity concentration of 40K down the slope through leaching process whereas the higher activity level of 238U content at the landfill site may be attributed to the soil disruption to local equilibrium.

  1. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  2. Influence of marine sediments in the distribution of the main radionuclides of the effluent from the nuclear power plant Almirante Alvaro Alberto (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnara, Miriam

    1977-01-01

    This study aimed to: 1) Characterize bottom sediments of the Angra dos Reis region, in the dispersion area of the effluent of the central Almirante Nuclear Alvaro Alberto, Unit 1. 2) Determining the adsorption capacity of these sediments to the long half-life and mean radionuclides to be released in the reactor effluent in a higher concentration. 3) Estimate the fraction of the different studied radionuclides that will be immobilized in sediments. 4) Identify critical radionuclides available for food chain

  3. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Investigations on the distribution and decorporation of inorganic mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, W.

    1977-01-01

    The mercury excretion with 203 Hg poisoned rats was measured whereby the effectiveness of various chelate therapies with sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane sulphonate (DMPS) and sodium mercapto-ethyl iminodiacetate (MEIDA) was investigated. Certain combinations of the chelating agent lead to an almost complete excretion of the heavy metal. Rats treated with DMPS/MEIDA or MAIDA/DMPS showed the lowest Hg content in the organs after 11 days. The consequences of the results in practice are discussed. The distribution of inorganic Hg in human serum was studied in vitro. A dose-dependent bonding to the serum proteins was found. Albumin was found as main bonding position for the metal at higher Hg concentrations. The 14C labelled chelating agent DMPS is loosely bonded to all serum proteins. The decorporation effectivity of DMPS and MEIDA was compared on Hg-poisoned human serum. DMPS removed under the same test conditions about five times as much mercury as MEIDA from the serum proteins. At higher Hg concentrations, the chelating agent almost entirely removed the albumin-bonded mercury. The effects of the in vitro findings on the Hg distribution in the organism are discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  6. Technogenic and natural radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the Sea of Azov: regularities of distribution and application to the study of pollutants accumulation chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. N.; Fedorov, Yu A.; Yaroslavtsev, V. M.

    2018-01-01

    The study of pollutants vertical distribution in seabed sediments is of high interest as they conserve the information on the chronology of pollution level in the past. In the present paper, the results of layer by layer study of Cs-137, Am-241, Pb-210 specific activities as well as concentrations of petroleum components, lead and mercury in 48 sediment cores of the Sea of Azov, the Don River and the Kuban River are examined. In most sediment cores, two peaks of Cs-137 and Am-241 are detected. The upper of them was formed due to the Chernobyl accident in 1986 and the other is related to the global nuclear fallout of 1960s. The specific activity of naturally occurring atmospheric Lead-210 decreases exponentially with the sediment core depth. However, it is influenced by fluvial run-off, coastal erosion, Radium-226 and Radon-222 decay. The data on the radionuclides distribution in the seabed sediments is used to date them. According to the results of dating, most of petroleum components, lead and mercury quantities are concentrated in the upper sediment layer formed in the last 50 to 70 years i.e. in the period of the most important anthropogenic pressure.

  7. Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the seabed. volume 7: Review of laboratory investigations of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    One of the options suggested for disposal of high-level radioactive waste resulting from the generation of nuclear power is burial beneath the deep ocean floor in geologically stable sediment formations which have no economic value. The 8-volume series provides an assessment of the technical feasibility and radiological safety of this disposal concept based on the results obtained by ten years of co-operation and information exchange among the Member countries participating in the NEA Seabed Working Group. This volume contains a review of the laboratory investigations of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments. In addition, it discusses the data selected for the radiological assessment, on the basis of both field and laboratory studies

  8. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  9. Radionuclide characterization of graphite stacks from plutonium production reactors of the Siberian group of chemical enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushuev, A.V.; Verzilov, Yu.M.; Zubarev, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The residual radionuclide concentrations and distributions in graphite from moderator stack of plutonium production reactors at Tomsk-7 have been investigated. It was found that the dominant activity of graphite is 14 C. To gain information on surface and volume contamination of graphite blocks from the moderator stack, the special sets of samples were collected and assayed. The schemes are proposed for evaluation of individual radionuclide inventories together with results of the evaluations performed. (author)

  10. Report of drilling and radionuclide migration investigations at UE20n number-sign 1, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Exploratory hole UE20n number-sign 1 was drilled 305 m down hydraulic gradient of the Cheshire event (U20n) as part of the Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site. The hole was designed to investigate the possibility of groundwater transport of radionuclides from the U20n cavity region. Drilling reached a total depth of 1005.8 m. Composite static water levels in the borehole were measured at approximately 620 m below ground surface. The borehole penetrated about 386 m of saturated zone, which was comprised primarily of rhyolite lava flows of the Upper Rhyolite Lavas, Tuffs, and Rhyolites of Area 20. Evidence from UE20n number-sign 1 suggests the presence of a relatively more permeable zone in the 730 to 750-m depth interval. The neutron log suggests that greater quantities of water were present at depths between 729 and 747 m. Core collected over three depth intervals showed the highest fracture density in a reddish-grey rhyolite lava flow in the 733.8 to 738.1-m core interval. Groundwater flow away from U20n through this permeable zone is suggested by the UE20n number-sign 1 borehole temperature logs. Elevated 3 H activities were observed with the highest activities found near 732 m. The 3 H activities observed in the 732 to 802-m interval in UE20n number-sign 1 were of similar magnitude to those found in the cavity region in the U20n post-shot hole. The activities of 125 Sb and 85 Kr, which are known to be mobile in groundwater, were of similar magnitude to those found near the cavity region, while 137 Cs, which is thought to be adsorbed during transport, was found in activities two to three orders of magnitude lower than near the cavity. These temperature and radioisotope data suggest that radionuclide migration via groundwater flow may be occurring laterally from the U20n rubble chimney through the permeable zone located at the 730 to 750-m depth. 25 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in aquatic plants of the Yenisei River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    The Yenisei River is contaminated with artificial radionuclides released by one of the Russian nuclear plants. The aquatic plants growing in the radioactively contaminated parts of the river contain artificial radionuclides. The aim of the study was to investigate accumulation of artificial radionuclides and stable elements by submerged plants of the Yenisei River and estimate the strength of their binding to plant biomass by using a new sequential extraction scheme. The aquatic plants sampled were: Potamogeton lucens, Fontinalis antipyretica, and Batrachium kauffmanii. Gamma-spectrometric analysis of the samples of aquatic plants has revealed more than 20 radionuclides. We also investigated the chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in the biomass and rated radionuclides and stable elements based on their distribution in biomass. The greatest number of radionuclides strongly bound to biomass cell structures was found for Potamogeton lucens and the smallest for Batrachium kauffmanii. For Fontinalis antipyretica, the number of distribution patterns that were similar for both radioactive isotopes and their stable counterparts was greater than for the other studied species. The transuranic elements (239)Np and (241)Am were found in the intracellular fraction of the biomass, and this suggested their active accumulation by the plants.

  12. The dynamics of radionuclide behaviour in soil solution with special reference to the application of countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Lembrechts, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Any investigations into the effect of countermeasures on radionuclide transfer to plants should include a comprehensive chemical analysis of soil solution. This is because of the disturbances that soil-based countermeasures cause on soil:solution equilibria and radionuclide distribution between solid and liquid phases. As it is difficult to determine directly the effects of countermeasures under field conditions, it is recommended that laboratory-based studies be done first. These should include batch equilibrium experiments for soil:solution interactions, and hydroponic studies for solution:plant relationships. Speciation of radionuclides should form a fundamental part of both studies. (author)

  13. The Distributions of the Radionuclides Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 in Various Parts of The Alfalfa Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahel Din, K.; Harb, S.; Abbady, A.; Saad, N.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of naturally occurring Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 in different part of alfalfa plant from two different soils of Qena (South Valley University and Qena governorate farms) was studied under natural field conditions. Sixty two samples (alfalfa plant and its soil) were taken from nine sites inside farms. The samples were analyzed for their Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 activity concentrations using gamma ray spectrometer consists of 3 x 3 NaI (Tl). The daily intakes of these radioisotopes by calves, milking cattle and sheep were calculated by multiplying concentrations in alfalfa and the daily consumption rates of these plants.

  14. Radionuclides in the study of marine processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, P.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, the radioactive properties of the naturally occurring radionuclides have been used to determine their distributions in the marine environment and, more generally, to gain an understanding of the dynamic processes which control their behaviour in attaining these distributions. More recently the inputs from human activities of both natural and artificial (i.e. man-made) radionuclides have provided additional opportunities for the study of marine processes on local, regional and global scales. The primary objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the insights concerning processes in the marine environment which can be gained from studies of radionuclide behaviour. Papers have been grouped within the following principal themes; the uses of radionuclides as tracers of water transport; scavenging and particulate transport processes in the oceans as deduced from radionuclide behaviour; processes in the seabed and radionuclides in biological systems. (Author)

  15. Comparison of the distribution coefficients of plutonium and other radionuclides in Lake Michigan to those in other systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, M.A.; Nelson, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Filtration of Lake Michigan water samples has been carried out routinely since 1973, and some plutonium concentrations in the seston have been reported. During 1975 and 1976 a sufficient number of filter samples from various depths was obtained throughout the field seasons to establish whether or not a distribution coefficient also controls the uptake of plutonium by the formation of particulates and their settling from the surface waters. Samples from ANL station 5 (10 km SW of Grand Haven, Michigan, water depth 67 m), of the southern basin, and from the lower Great Lakes have been analyzed for dry weight, ash weight, total organic (loss of weight on ignition), amorphous silica, calcite, and residual minerals. Distribution coefficients were calculated on the basis of each of these solid components, and self-consistent values were observed for depth, season, or lake only, on the basis of dry weight of seston. The findings strongly suggest that the uptake of fallout plutonium (including inputs of new fallout during the summer of 1975) is dominated by a surface coating process common to all seston particle types. An insufficient number of 137 Cs analyses were obtained to correlate its uptake to a specific component of the seston, but its behavior is clearly different from that of plutonium

  16. Evaluation of energy spectral information in nuclear imaging and investigation of protein binding of cationic radionuclides by lactoferrin. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, P. B.

    1980-06-10

    Construction of an Anger camera-computer system which allows collection of both the position and energy signals from events detected by the scintillation camera has been completed. The system allows correction of energy response non-uniformity of the detector and facilitates research related to effects of energy discrimination in radionuclide scintigraphy. The system consists of electronic hardware to transmit and digitize the energy signal, software to record and process that signal in conjunction with spatial positioning signals, and additional hardware for recording the processed images so that they can be evaluated by observers. Preliminary results indicate that the system is useful in evaluating clinical images. Assymetric (eccentric) energy windows do improve image quality and are of value in improving detection of lesions on liver scintigraphs. The mechanisms by which Ga-67 is taken up in infection and tumor has been elucidated, and the uptake of radiogallium in microorganisms as a function of its interaction with siderophores was also studied. The primary function of these low molecular weight compounds is to trap ferric ion. However, gallium may be substituted for ferric ion and becomes trapped within the microorganism. The uptake of radiogallium by neutrophils and the role that lactoferrin plays in both intracellular localization of radiogallium and subsequent deposition of the radionuclide at sites of infection were also studied. Investigation of ferric ion analogs reveals definate differences in the affinity of these metals for binding molecules which helps explain their biologic activity. While ferric ion has the strongest affinity for such molecules, gallium has very high affinity for siderophores, moderate affinity for lactoferrin, and lower affinity for transferrin. The relative affinity of indium for these molecules is in approximately the reverse order.

  17. Reconstruction of the size of nuclear fuel particle aerosol by the investigation of a radionuclide behaviour in body of the Chernobyl accident witnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutkov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident aerosol particles of dispersed nuclear fuel were released to the atmosphere. Inhalation of those aerosol became the source of internal exposure for witnesses of the Chernobyl accident. To assess correctly internal doses from a mixture of radionuclides present in air in the form of aerosol particles one mast assign each radionuclide to a certain inhalation class by its chemical speciation in aerosol and define the airborne characteristics (the activity median aerodynamic diameter, AMAD and the standard geometric deviation, fig) of that particular aerosol. Moreover, information on any particular radionuclide is useless for other components since, in such a mixture, the radionuclides are generally independent and may belong to different particles. On the contrary, all nuclear fuel particle (NFP) radionuclides belong to the same particle, being matrix-bound. The collective behaviour of the matrix-bound radionuclides in the environment and in the human barrier organs makes it possible to spread to the aerosol of NFP any estimates of AMAD and β g obtained for any particular NFP radionuclide. This is principal feature of NFP aerosol as distinguished from a mere mixture of aerosol particles carry different radionuclides. (author)

  18. Radionuclide co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Sandino, A.

    1987-12-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the minor components of the spent fuel matrix has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two different situations have been studied: Part I, the near field scenario, where the release and migration of the minor components is dependent on the solubility behaviour of UO 2 (s); Part II, the far field, where the solubility and transport of the radionuclides is related to the major geochemical processes occurring. (orig.)

  19. An Investigation of the Sampling Distributions of Equating Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Frank B.

    1996-01-01

    Using the characteristic curve method for dichotomously scored test items, the sampling distributions of equating coefficients were examined. Simulations indicate that for the equating conditions studied, the sampling distributions of the equating coefficients appear to have acceptable characteristics, suggesting confidence in the values obtained…

  20. A study on vertical distribution of radionuclides in the soil layers 0-30 cm deep in relation to their particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megumi, K.; Sato, Y.; Matsunami, T.; Fukuda, K.; Ishiyama, T.; Kimura, S.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1991-01-01

    It is fundamentally important to have a detailed knowledge of distribution of radionuclides in soils in natural environments for an understanding of behavior of nuclides during a lengthy period beyond the limit of the possible in experimental systems. Core soil samples (30 cm) were taken from surface of the ground in the central parts (Osaka and Wakasa) of Japan. Each core sample was sliced into 5 cm sections and the parts of the soil larger than 10 mesh were excluded by standard sieves. Some of the samples were further sieved into four classes of soil particles, such as, 10-60, 60-100, 100-200 and more than 200 mesh. The concentrations of U-series nuclides ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb), Th-series nuclides ( 232 Th, 228 Ra), 40 K and 137 Cs in the samples were determined by gamma ray spectrometry and photon activation analysis. The photon activation analysis with a planer type of Ge detector was made by irradiating the samples with bremsstrahlung of tungsten target from electron accelerator, 16 MeV, at Res. Inst. for Advanced Sci. and Tech., Univ. of Osaka Pref. Fallout 137 Cs and 210 Pb deposition in the soil layers showed vertical variation mainly depending on the organic substances contents, the ratios of water contents and particle sizes at each location. A good correlation was found between the concentrations of these two nuclides. This correlation is available to evaluate of the 137 Cs contamination levels in soils. The concentrations of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 228 Ra and 40 K contained originally in soils, changed slightly with the depth and the vertical distributions of these nuclides were found to relate mainly to the soil particle size in the layer. This tendency was evidently observed in the soil originating from the weathering of granite rock. (author)

  1. Surface diffusion of sorbed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Surface diffusion has in the past been invoked to explain rates of radionuclide migration which were greater than those predicted. Results were generally open to interpretation but the possible existence of surface diffusion, whereby sorbed radionuclides could potentially migrate at much enhanced rates, necessitated investigation. In this work through-diffusion experiments have shown that although surface diffusion does exist for some nuclides, the magnitude of the phenomenon is not sufficient to affect repository safety assessment modelling. (author)

  2. Radionuclide generators for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Molinski, V.J.; Hupf, H.B.; Kramer, H.

    1983-10-01

    This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of this work is to provide a reference point for the investigator who is interested in the development of a particular generator system and the refinements which have been reported. Moreover, the incorporation of the particular daughter radionuclide into a suitable radiodiagnostic agent is presented

  3. Radionuclide transfer from mother to embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toader, M.; Vasilache, R.A.; Scridon, R.; Toader, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of radionuclides from mother to embryo is still a matter of high interest. Therefore, the relation was investigated between the amount of radionuclides in the embryo and the dietary intake of the mother, this for two scenarios: a recurrent intake of variable amounts of radionuclides, and a long-term intake of a relatively constant amount of radionuclides, the radionuclide being 137 Cs. In the first case, the amount of radionuclides present in the embryo increases with the age of the embryo and with the intake of the mother. In the second case, no correlation could be found between the age of the embryo and its radioactive content; only the correlation between the intake of the mother and the radionuclide content of the embryo remained. (A.K.)

  4. Hydrologic processes and radionuclide distribution in a cavity and chimney produced by the Cannikin nuclear explosion, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of hydraulic, chemical, and radiochemical data obtained in the vicinity of the site of a nuclear explosion (code-named Cannikin, 1971), on Amchitka Island, Alaska, was undertaken to describe the hydrologic processes associated with the saturation of subsurface void space produced by the explosion. Immediately after detonation of the explosive, a subsurface cavity was created surrounding the explosion point. This cavity soon was partly filled by collapse of overburden, producing void volume in a rubble chimney extending to land surface and forming a surface-collapse sink. Surface and groundwater immediately began filling the chimney but was excluded for a time from the cavity by the presence of steam. When the steam condensed, the accumulated water in the chimney flowed into the cavity region, picking up and depositing radioactive materials along its path. Refilling of the chimney voids then resumed and was nearly complete about 260 days after the explosion. The hydraulic properties of identified aquifers intersecting the chimney were used with estimates of surface-water inflow, chimney dimensions, and the measured water-level rise in the chimney to estimate the distribution of explosion-created porosity in the chimney, which ranged from about 10 percent near the bottom to 4 percent near the top. Chemical and radiochemical analyses of water from the cavity resulted in identification of three aqueous phases: groundwater, surface water, and condensed steam. Although most water samples represented mixtures of these phases, they contained radioactivity representative of all radioactivity produced by the explosion

  5. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  6. Ten years of investigation on radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Incorporation, by marine algae and animals, of hydrogen-3 and other radionuclides present in effluents of nuclear or industrial origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Colard, J.; Koch, G.; Kirchmann, R.; Strack, S.; Luettke, A.; Carraro, G.

    1981-01-01

    Several marine plants and animals were investigated for their capability of incorporating the main radionuclides present in selected effluents. Accumulation factors are reported for 3 H, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 58 Co, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 131 I 226 Ra and 124 Sb. Marine algae, which are involved in food chains leading to man, show the highest accumulation factors. The stable element composition of the alga Acetabularia was determined by gamma-activation analysis. The preferential accumulation of particular radionuclides by marine organisms suggests that they may have a significant role in the turnover rate of elements in the marine environment. (author)

  7. Dispersion of long-lived radionuclides from uranium mining, milling and fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.B.L.

    1990-11-01

    The principal aim of the study was to gain further insight into the environmental dispersion of long-lived U series radionuclides from selected part of the nuclear fuel cycle and to assess the resulting exposure of members of the public. The specific objectives of this study were: 1. To determine the levels of natural radioactivity in the vicinity of two U deposits in Sweden and to establish whether U prospecting had generated significant radiological impact on man. 2. To investigate the spatial distributions of long-lived U series radionuclides caused by the dispersion of dust from the Ranger open-pit U mine in Australia. 3. To study the uptakes of long-lived U and T series radionuclides by the waterlily in order to facilitate assessment of natural exposures to the public and predictions of exposures arising from consumption of the plant due to any subsequent discharges of water from the Ranger U mine. 4. To investigate the spatial distributions of U isotopes in environmental air as a result of the release of radionuclides from the ABB-ATOM nuclear fuel factory at Vaesteraas in Sweden. In these investigations special emphasis was given to - activity ratio techniques suitable for distinguishing between natural and operation-related concentrations and for facilitating determination of the source of radionuclide uptake in the waterlily, and - the use of passive air samplers such as 'sticky vinyl' and bioindicators in investigating the aerial dispersion of radionuclides. (author)

  8. Natural radionuclides in soil profiles surrounding the largest coal-fired power plant in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanić Milan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of the largest Serbian coal-fired power plant on radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles up to 50 cm in depth. Thirty soil profiles were sampled from the plant surroundings (up to 10 km distance and analyzed using standard methods for soil physicochemical properties and gamma ray spectrometry for specific activities of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 232Th. Spatial and vertical distribution of radionuclides was determined and analyzed to show the relations between the specific activities in the soil and soil properties and the most influential factors of natural radionuclide variability were identified. The radiological indices for surface soil were calculated and radiological risk assessment was performed. The measured specific activities were similar to values of background levels for Serbia. The sampling depth did not show any significant influence on specific activities of natural radionuclides. The strongest predictor of specific activities of the investigated radionuclides was soil granulometry. All parameters of radiological risk assessment were below the recommended values and adopted limits. It appears that the coal-fired power plant does not have a significant impact on the spatial and vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in the area of interest, but technologically enhanced natural radioactivity as a consequence of the plant operations was identified within the first 1.5 km from the power plant. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije br. III43009 i br. III41005

  9. The analytical investigation of temperature distribution in off-central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    central diode-pumped; diode-pumped; temperature distribution. ... In our model we consider a laser crystal of radius b and length L. Heat is deposited ..... [13] M Abramawitz and I A Stegun (eds), Handbook of mathematical function (Dover,.

  10. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide migration have been studied in natural fissures orieted parallel to the axis of granite drill cores. A short pulse of the radionuclides solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. After several hundred fissure volumes water had been pumped through the fissure following the radionuclide pulse the activity distribution on the fissure surfaces was measured. From the retardation of 152 Eu, 235 Np and 237 Pu it is concluded that these radionuclides are transported in the oxidation states Eu(III), Pu(IV) and Np(V). The distribution coefficients K sub (d) calculated from flow and activity distribution data on the basis of geometric surface area/volume ratios are of the same order as published K sub (d) values obtained from batch equilibrium experiments. (Author)

  11. Radionuclide migration test using undisturbed aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    As one of the most important part of safety assessment on the shallow land disposal of lowlevel radioactive waste, the radionuclide migration was studied using undisturbed soil samples, in order to evaluate an exact radionuclide migration in an aerated soil layer. Soil samples used in the migration test were coastal sand and loamy soil which form typical surface soil layers in Japan. The aqueous solution containing 60 CoCl 2 , 85 SrCl 2 and 137 CsCl was fed into the soil column and concentration of each radionuclide both in effluent and in soil was measured. Large amount of radionuclides was adsorbed on the surface of soil column and small amount of radionuclides moved deep into the soil column. Difference in the radionuclide profile was observed in the low concentration portion particularly. It is that some fractions of 60 Co and 137 Cs are stable in non-ionic form and move downward through the soil column together with water. The radionuclide distribution in the surface of soil column can be fairly predicted with a conventional migration equation for ionic radionuclides. As a result of radionuclide adsorption, both aerated soil layers of coastal sand and loamy soil have large barrier ability on the radionuclide migration through the ground. (author)

  12. Possible applications of radionuclide techniques in criminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stverak, B.; Kopejtko, J.; Chodora, F.; Chyska, J.

    1976-01-01

    The use of radioindicator methods in dactyloscopy is described, in which is used the bond of suitable radioindicators to certain components of the sweat secretion with subsequent detection of the local distribution of these radionuclides using the autoradiographic method. The use of autoradiography and gamma spectrometry is given in ballistics, neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence analysis in the investigation of motor car accidents and in the verification of historical objects, in forensic medicine, the use of autoradiography in the expertise of photographs, beta radiography in graphology and the use of radioactive labelling for trapping criminals. (J.P.)

  13. theoretical investigation of stresses distributions in hollow sandcrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The test thin plate distributes the load on the block and the hollow block is regarded as a two ... Some research works had been done on the relationship between cavity ... The results would help reduce the cost, labour and time necessary to.

  14. Investigation of Spatial Distribution Properties of Mid-Infrared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial distribution properties of quantum cascade lasers with emission wavelengths around 7 µm were measured. In addition, the emission profile on a plane orthogonal to the propagation axis of the beam were measured and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) on the orthogonal and lateral directions calculated.

  15. Investigations of the corrosion behaviour of the Si-containing stainless steel 1.4361 with combined surface analysis, electrochemistry and radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maar-Stumm, M.

    1990-03-01

    The present work aimed at detailed information on the corrosion behaviour and particularly the corrosion mechanism of the steel 1.4361 in concentrated nitric acid by use of a combination of electrochemical methods, radionuclide technique and surface analysis. For comparison steel samples corroded by other methods were investigated by surface analysis, too. At the beginning of the corrosion in nitric acid Fe and Ni are dissolved preferentially. Cr and Si are enriched in the surface region. A primary corrosion layer is formed which is equivalent to the oxidic overlayer of atmospherically oxidized samples. It consists of the oxides of chromium and iron mixed up with glass-like SiO 2 . Ni does not contribute to the formation of the oxidic overlayer. On top of this primary corrosion layer there is an isolating gel-like SiO 2 -layer with a thickness depending on strength and duration of the corrosive attack. Its mechanical stability decreases with increasing layer thickness. At the boundary to the primary corrosion layer this gel-like SiO 2 -layer is closed, mechanically stable and conducting. Samples corroded under the standardized conditions of the Huey-test show a similar structure of the overlayer with the exception that the primary corrosion layer consists only of glass-like SiO 2 . The combination of several methods revealed detailed information about mass loss and structure of the overlayer at different electrode potentials. (orig./MM) [de

  16. Environmental implications and spatial distribution of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in sediments from four harbours in the Egyptian Red Sea coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, Atef; Zakaly, Hesham M H; Elsaman, Reda

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of natural radionuclides concentrations ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) in sediments collected from sea, rivers or ocean is significant to protect the sea water ecosystem and to human health from radiation. Thirty-three sample of sediment have been collected from four ports in the Red Sea coast, Egypt for investigation by gamma-ray spectrometer using NaI(Tl) detector. The average and range activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were 26(5-58), 19(4-33) and 458(16-2665)Bqkg -1 in Quseir Harbour, 30(14-53), 20(14-34) and 430(378-511)Bqkg -1 in Abu-Tartour Harbour. However, the average and range activity concentrations were 23(14-35), 21(15-32), and 602(327-821)Bqkg -1 in Touristic Harbour and 14(5-26), 13(2-23) and 489(36-950)Bqkg -1 in Hurghada harbour. These results were compared with reported ranges in the literature from other location in the world. The radiation hazard parameters; radium equivalent activity annual dose, external hazard were also calculated and compared with the recommended levels by UNSCEAR reports. Eight heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Co, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd) have been measured and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometer. The concentration for the investigated heavy metals overtakes the allowable limits recommended by the Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines. Because there are no existing databases for the natural radioactivity in the sediment samples from Egyptian Red Sea ports, our results are a start to establishing a database for Red Sea harbours environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Historical records pertaining to the 300 North and Wye Burial Grounds at the Hanford Reservation were reviewed as a prerequisite to determining programs for land reclamation. All available historical documents, agency communications, and engineering drawings related to the study areas were located, reviewed, and analyzed. An inventory of recorded location, type, and quantity of radionuclides and associated materials in each burial ground was completed and distributed to cooperating investigators. A geophysical survey of the 300 North Burial Ground was conducted as a basis for detecting the composition, size, distribution, and depth of buried objects and characterizing the sediments in which they are buried. Acoustic, radar, magnetic, and metal detection surveys were completed and their applicability evaluated; drilling techniques and equipment for recovering and characterizing sediments and radioactive contaminated material were developed. Drilling will also determine the amount and dimensional extent of radionuclide migration; sediment-fluid interaction and fluid migration through the unsaturated zone at the 300 North Burial Ground were characterized. A study to determine biological transport of radionuclides at the Wye Burial Ground was also initiated. This study involved a preliminary survey of present flora and fauna inhabiting the Wye Burial Ground site. Plant tissue was chemically and radiochemically analyzed to determine radionuclide migration and possible dose effects and population dynamics of burrowing animals that could potentially be exposed to buried waste materials were investigated

  18. Geochemistry and radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretically, the geochemical barrier can provide a major line of defense in protecting the biosphere from the hazards of nuclear waste. The most likely processes involved are easily identified. Preliminary investigations using computer modeling techniques suggest that retardation is an effective control on radionuclide concentrations. Ion exchange reactions slow radionuclide migration and allow more time for radioactive decay and dispersion. For some radionuclides, solubility alone may limit concentrations to less than the maximum permissible now considered acceptable by the Federal Government. The effectiveness of the geochemical barrier is ultimately related to the repository site characteristics. Theory alone tells us that geochemical controls will be most efficient in an environment that provides for maximum ion exchange and the precipitation of insoluble compounds. In site selection, consideration should be given to rock barriers with high ion exchange capacity that might also act as semi-permeable membranes. Also important in evaluating the site's potential for effective geochemical controls are the oxidation potentials, pH and salinity of the groundwater

  19. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadev, V.

    1980-01-01

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  20. Radionuclide migration studies in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a brief description about retention and migration parameters of radionuclides in soil, including main methods to determine the distribution coefficient (K) are given. Some of several factors that can act on the migration are also mentioned. (author) [pt

  1. AN INVESTIGATION ON PATHOGENIC VIBRIOS DISTRIBUTION IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. Almasi

    2005-01-01

    Municipal wastewater is one of the most important pollution sources for water supply resources. Identification and enumeration of pathogenic agents particularly pathogenic Vibrios are beneficial for controlling and prevention planning of the infectious diseases. This research was carried out to identify the distribution of the recognized pathogenic Vibrios with emphasizing on identification of Vibrio cholera in the wastewater of Kermanshah city western Iran in 2002. The method of study was cr...

  2. Preliminary investigations on TINI based distributed instrumentation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezboruah, T.; Kalita, M.

    2006-04-01

    A prototype web enabled distributed instrumentation system is being proposed in the Department of Electronics Science, Gauhati University, Assam, India. The distributed instrumentation system contains sensors, legacy hardware, TCP/IP protocol converter, TCP/IP network Ethernet, Database Server, Web/Application Server and Client PCs. As part of the proposed work, Tiny Internet Interface (TINI, TBM390: Dallas Semiconductor) has been deployed as TCP/IP stack, and java programming language as software tools. A feature supported by Java, that is particularly relevant to the distributed system is its applet. An applet is a java class that can be downloaded from the web server and can be run in a context application such as web browser or an applet viewer. TINI has been installed as TCP/IP stack, as it is the best suited embedded system with java programming language and it has been uniquely designed for communicating over One Wire Devices (OWD) over network. Here we will discuss the hardware and software aspects of TINI with OWD for the present system. (author)

  3. Investigation on 3D dose distribution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo calculations for dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) require experimental validations. We measured the 3D dose distribution in a breast phantom in a DBT scan, using XR-QA2 radiochromic films. We positioned film pieces at the entrance surface, at the bottom surface and at four depths between adjacent slabs in the 5-slabs, 5-cm-thick phantom simulating a compressed breast with 50% glandular fraction. We irradiated the phantom at 40kV (half value layer 1.1mm Al) for three angular tilting of the beam central axis ( {±}25° and 0° normal incidence). We determined the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the average dose in the phantom (in terms of air kerma normalized to the entrance air kerma), showing the angular dependence of the depth-resolved 3D dose distributions. In transverse planes the maximum dose variations were between 5.0% and 14.8% for normal incidence, and by 8.6% from the central to the tilted view. In the direction of the beam axis, the dose decreases up to about 71% from the entrance to the exit value. The extimated backscatter fraction was between 3% and 8%.

  4. Distribution of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in seawater in the Pacific off the coast of Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oikawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The activities of artificial radionuclides in seawater samples collected off the coast of Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures were measured as part of a monitoring program initiated by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology immediately after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The spatial and temporal distributions of those activities are summarized herein. The activities of strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-134 and -137 (i.e. 90Sr, 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs derived from the accident were detected in seawater samples taken from areas of the coastal ocean adjacent to the power plant. No 131I was detected in surface waters (≤ 5 m depth or in intermediate and bottom waters after 30 April 2011. Strontium-90 was found in surface waters collected from a few sampling stations in mid-August 2011 to mid-December 2011. Temporal changes of 90Sr activity in surface waters were evident, although the 90Sr activity at a given time varied widely between sampling stations. The activity of 90Sr in surface waters decreased slowly over time, and by the end of December 2011 had reached background levels recorded before the accident. Radiocesium, 134Cs and 137Cs, was found in seawater samples immediately after the accident. There was a remarkable change in radiocesium activities in surface waters during the first 7 months (March through September 2011 after the accident; the activity reached a maximum in the middle of April and thereafter decreased exponentially with time. Qualitatively, the distribution patterns in surface waters suggested that in early May radiocesium-polluted water was advected northward; some of the water then detached and was transported to the south. Two water cores with high 137Cs activity persisted at least until July 2011. In subsurface waters radiocesium activity was first detected in the beginning of April 2011, and the water masses were characterized by σt (an indicator of density values

  5. Distribution of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in seawater in the Pacific off the coast of Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, S.; Takata, H.; Watabe, T.; Misonoo, J.; Kusakabe, M. [Marine Ecology Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan). Head Office

    2013-07-01

    The activities of artificial radionuclides in seawater samples collected off the coast of Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures were measured as part of a monitoring program initiated by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology immediately after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The spatial and temporal distributions of those activities are summarized herein. The activities of strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-134 and -137 (i.e. {sup 90}Sr, {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs) derived from the accident were detected in seawater samples taken from areas of the coastal ocean adjacent to the power plant. No {sup 131}I was detected in surface waters (≤ 5 m depth) or in intermediate and bottom waters after 30 April 2011. Strontium-90 was found in surface waters collected from a few sampling stations in mid-August 2011 to mid-December 2011. Temporal changes of {sup 90}Sr activity in surface waters were evident, although the {sup 90}Sr activity at a given time varied widely between sampling stations. The activity of {sup 90}Sr in surface waters decreased slowly over time, and by the end of December 2011 had reached background levels recorded before the accident. Radiocesium, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, was found in seawater samples immediately after the accident. There was a remarkable change in radiocesium activities in surface waters during the first 7 months (March through September 2011) after the accident; the activity reached a maximum in the middle of April and thereafter decreased exponentially with time. Qualitatively, the distribution patterns in surface waters suggested that in early May radiocesium-polluted water was advected northward; some of the water then detached and was transported to the south. Two water cores with high {sup 137}Cs activity persisted at least until July 2011. In subsurface waters radiocesium activity was first detected in the beginning of April 2011, and the water masses were

  6. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  7. The distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides from ores processing to the environment - a case study of milling and treatment of ores for gold in Golden Star Resources of Bogoso Prestea Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbadago, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    This research work was geared towards studying the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides from the processing stages of oxide and sulphide ores for gold to the critical environment of the Golden Star Resources of Bogoso Prestea Limited in the Western region of Ghana. The study was carried out by measuring the natural radionuclide contents of raw feed ore and pulp samples from physical and chemical processing stages of oxide and sulphide ore treatment plants; tailings; de-silted sediments of a run-off from the tailings dam vicinity through a critical community and; soils and drinking water from the critical community. Also, as part of a comprehensive approach, the geochemical compositions were measured to determine any possible influence on the radionuclide distributions. Amongst the radionuclide decay chains, 238 U-series were the dominant throughout all the measurements. However, the concentrations are lower than the world permissible limits. The indicative doses associated with the activity concentration distributions in the processed feed ores at various processing stages ranged from 2 to 70 μSv/y in the oxide plant and from 2 to 108 μSv/y for the sulphide plant. If effective dose of ≤ 10 μSv/y recommended by IAEA for exemption from regulatory control is applied, the processing of ores in the plants must be regulated. However, the estimated annual effective dose received by the workers from any of these stages of operation did not exceed the range of 1-2 mSv recommended by the ICRP-75 (10 μSv/y ≤ Effective dose ≤ 1-2 mSv/y) for the exemption of a practice. This range is far lower than the annual occupational dose limit of 20 mSv/y recommended by IAEA for artificial radioactive sources. Imposing the IAEA recommendation of effective dose of ? 10 μSv/y for exemption from regulatory control of practices could result in many mining and other NORMs industries being regulated without any net benefit in terms of risk reduction. Conversely, Sn, As

  8. General characterisation of study area and definition of experimental protocols. WP 1 in the project 'Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahola, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Albers, B. [National Research Center for Environmental and Health (Georgia); Bergman, R. [National Defence Research Establishment (Germany)] [and others

    1999-08-01

    The research project EPORA (Effects of Industrial Pollution on the Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems) is part of the EU Nuclear Fission Safety Programme 1994 - 1998. The main purpose of EPORA is to study the influence of strong chemical pollution on the behaviour of artificial radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs,{sup 90}Sr, {sup 239},{sup 240}{sub Pu}) in a northern boreal ecosystem and subsequently to assess the significance of the findings to the radiation exposure of the population in such areas. The present report is a documentation of the selection of study areas based on the assessment of available information on pollution in the Kola Peninsula and Northern Fennoscandia and of sampling and analysing methods. (orig.)

  9. General characterisation of study area and definition of experimental protocols. WP 1 in the project 'Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Albers, B.; Bergman, R.

    1999-08-01

    The research project EPORA (Effects of Industrial Pollution on the Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems) is part of the EU Nuclear Fission Safety Programme 1994 - 1998. The main purpose of EPORA is to study the influence of strong chemical pollution on the behaviour of artificial radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 , 240 Pu ) in a northern boreal ecosystem and subsequently to assess the significance of the findings to the radiation exposure of the population in such areas. The present report is a documentation of the selection of study areas based on the assessment of available information on pollution in the Kola Peninsula and Northern Fennoscandia and of sampling and analysing methods. (orig.)

  10. A study on the radionuclide transport by bacteria in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous and fractured media. The mass balance for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase, rock matrix and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of the radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacteria and supplied primary substrate as limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. We also found that, depend on the transport of bacteria the temporal and spatial distribution of radionuclide concentration was significantly altered. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria in the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model would be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety

  11. The effect of bacterial generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three-phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the radionuclide transport in porous media. The mass balance equations for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations, between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacterial and supplied primary substrate as a limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. It was also found that, depending on the transport of bacteria, the temporal and spatial distribution of the radionuclide concentration was significantly affected. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria to the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model can be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety. (Author)

  12. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for loW--level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements

  13. The soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides. Feasibilities and limits of the transfer concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper discusses the simple transfer model. After the Chernobyl fallout in Austria field investigations dealt with the behaviour of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. They led to the following conclusions: (1) A single plowing does not result in a homogeneous radionuclide distribution in the A p horizon. (2) Low plant availability of radionuclides (e.g. 137 Cs) led to a higher contribution of outer contamination (resuspension) to concentrations in plants in the first years after the fallout. Differences arose between high and low contamination areas. This was not true for 90 Sr, which exhibited three to ten times higher transfer factors as compared to 137 Cs. (3) The contamination source has a distinct impact on the plant availability of radionuclides. (4) In semi-natural environments radiocaesium can be bound to the biomass to a great extent, which results in significantly higher biological half-lives as compared to agricultural ecosystems. (author)

  14. The influence of soil type and climate on the uptake of radionuclides into wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.

    1992-03-01

    The study investigated the uptake by winter wheat of radionuclides deposited onto the soil surface following a hypothetical accidental release to atmosphere from a nuclear power station. A series of lysimeters were filled with four soil types characteristic of wheat growing areas of Europe. Four radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 106 Ru, 125 Sb) were watered onto the soil surface and the subsequent contamination of winter wheat crops was monitored over two seasons. Subsidiary experiments considered: effects of ploughing and pot size on root uptake; movement of radionuclides in soil profiles; soil contamination of wheat plants and of grain leaving the field; the influence of climate on root uptake; and, the availability of radionuclides. Compared with the literature, this study found a smaller range of transfer factors appropriate to agricultural soils that predominate in the wheat growing areas of the EEC. The use of pots or tubes to investigate soil-to-plant transfer was justified. The study showed that resuspension of radionuclides bound to soil particles must be considered when assessing soil-to-plant transfer. It was demonstrated that the contribution of soil-bound activity to the radionuclide content of combine harvested grain is underestimated in existing dose assessment methodologies by at least an order of magnitude on average and by over two orders of magnitude in extreme cases. Climatic conditions simulated in a growth chamber had little impact on radionuclide transfer. The relative availability of radionuclides for extraction by ammonium acetate did not reflect percentage transfer to grain. Ploughing reduced uptake by winter wheat, resulted in different patterns of transfer between cultivation treatments and influenced the distribution of activity between grain and straw. Results of this work were used in the development of a multi-compartmental time-dependent model called WHEAT which predicts radionuclide transfer from soil to winter wheat. (author)

  15. Investigation of Thermal Stress Distribution in Laser Spot Welding Process

    OpenAIRE

    Osamah F. Abdulateef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the laser spot welding process of low carbon steel sheet. The investigations were based on analytical and finite element analyses. The analytical analysis was focused on a consistent set of equations representing interaction of the laser beam with materials. The numerical analysis based on 3-D finite element analysis of heat flow during laser spot welding taken into account the temperature dependence of the physical properties and latent heat of transf...

  16. Investigating the Statistical Distribution of Learning Coverage in MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Learners participating in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC have a wide range of backgrounds and motivations. Many MOOC learners enroll in the courses to take a brief look; only a few go through the entire content, and even fewer are able to eventually obtain a certificate. We discovered this phenomenon after having examined 92 courses on both xuetangX and edX platforms. More specifically, we found that the learning coverage in many courses—one of the metrics used to estimate the learners’ active engagement with the online courses—observes a Zipf distribution. We apply the maximum likelihood estimation method to fit the Zipf’s law and test our hypothesis using a chi-square test. In the xuetangX dataset, the learning coverage in 53 of 76 courses fits Zipf’s law, but in all of 16 courses on the edX platform, the learning coverage rejects the Zipf’s law. The result from our study is expected to bring insight to the unique learning behavior on MOOC.

  17. Investigation of the statistical distance to reach stationary distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, S.B.; Kim, Eun-jin

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic length gives a Riemannian metric to a system's phase space. Here we extend the traditional thermodynamic length to the information length (L) out of equilibrium and examine its properties. We utilise L as a useful methodology of analysing non-equilibrium systems without evoking conventional assumptions such as Gaussian statistics, detailed balance, priori-known constraints, or ergodicity and numerically examine how L evolves in time for the logistic map in the chaotic regime depending on initial conditions. To this end, we propose a discrete version of L which is mathematically well defined by taking a set theoretic approach. We identify the areas of phase space where the loss of information of the system takes place most rapidly. In particular, we present an interesting result that the unstable fixed points turn out to most efficiently drive the logistic map towards a stationary distribution through L. - Highlights: • Define a set theoretic version of the discrete thermodynamic length. • These sets allow one to analyse systems having zero probabilities in their evolution. • Numerically analyse the Logistic map using the thermodynamic length. • Show how the unstable fixed points most efficiently lead the system to equilibrium

  18. An Investigation of New Distribution Forms for Traditional Media Online

    OpenAIRE

    Näsman, Markus

    2008-01-01

    For decades watching the news, movies or television series has been something you do in front of your TV. But things are changing, more and more TV-channels make parts of their playlists available online. But exacly how much broadcast material is available online? And is it possible to collect all available broadcast material on a single web portal and enable users not only to watch but also to record this material? The objectives of this thesis were to investigate how much and in which form ...

  19. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Sean B.; Christensen, Candace; Jennings, Terry L.; Jaros, Christopher L.; Wykoff, David S.; Crowell, Kelly J.; Shuman, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and subsequent

  20. Experimental investigation of leak detection using mobile distributed monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Zheng, Junli; Xiong, Feng; Ge, Qi; Yan, Qixiang; Cheng, Fei

    2018-01-01

    The leak detection of rockfill dams is currently hindered by spatial and temporal randomness and wide monitoring range. The spatial resolution of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensing technology is related to the distance between measuring points. As a result, the number of measuring points should be increased to ensure that the precise location of the leak is detected. However, this leads to a higher monitoring cost. Consequently, it is difficult to promote and apply this technology to effectively monitor rockfill dam leakage. In this paper, a practical mobile distributed monitoring system with dual-tubes is used by combining the FBG sensing system and hydrothermal cycling system. This dual-tube structure is composed of an outer polyethylene of raised temperature resistance heating pipe, an inner polytetrafluoroethylene tube, and a FBG sensor string, among which, the FBG sensor string can be dragged freely in the internal tube to change the position of the measuring points and improve the spatial resolution. In order to test the effectiveness of the system, the large-scale model test of concentrated leakage in 13 working conditions is carried out by identifying the location, quantity, and leakage rate of leakage passage. Based on Newton’s law of cooling, the leakage state is identified using the seepage identification index ζ v that was confirmed according to the cooling curve. Results suggested that the monitoring system shows high sensitivity and can improve the spatial resolution with limited measuring points, and thus better locate the leakage area. In addition, the seepage identification index ζ v correlated well with the leakage rate qualitatively.

  1. Investigation of the cooling film distribution in liquid rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Antonio Silva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of the investigation of a cooling method widely used in the combustion chambers, which is called cooling film, and it is applied to a liquid rocket engine that uses as propellants liquid oxygen and kerosene. Starting from an engine cooling, whose film is formed through the fuel spray guns positioned on the periphery of the injection system, the film was experimentally examined, it is formed by liquid that seeped through the inner wall of the combustion chamber. The parameter used for validation and refinement of the theoretical penetration of the film was cooling, as this parameter is of paramount importance to obtain an efficient thermal protection inside the combustion chamber. Cold tests confirmed a penetrating cold enough cooling of the film for the length of the combustion chamber of the studied engine.

  2. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G.; Du, Yong [Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.

  3. Transcuticular translocation of radionuclides on plant leaf surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Tadakazu; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1996-01-01

    The cuticle covering all the outermost surfaces of the aerial parts of plants could play a selective role in uptake and translocation of radionuclides from air into plants. In this study, we investigated the transcuticular uptake and translocation behavior via water droplets of various radionuclides in red clover, orchard grass, Japanese radish and mung bean. Ten μl of an aqueous solution of the multitracer generated from Au was applied to the upper surface of the 2nd leaf of the plants at the 5th leaf stage. The plants were then grown for 14 days at 25degC and 70% RH under illumination of artificial solar lights. The transcuticular uptake and translocation throughout the plant were periodically assayed by determining the radioactivity in the surface residue, the cuticle layer beneath the applied site, the leaf area outside the applied site, the other aerial parts and the root of the plant, using an HPGe detector. The applied radionuclides were absorbed into, in turn, the cuticle layer beneath the applied site and then translocated through the cuticle to the inner tissue and eventually to the other aerial parts and finally to the roots, of the plant. The distribution and accumulation in the plant seems to depend upon the characteristics of each radionuclide and plant species. Ca * and Te * tended to remain on leaf surfaces without being absorbed into the cuticle. On the other hand, Sc * , Co * , Zn * , Se * , Rb * , and Eu * were easily absorbed and translocated to every part of the plant including the root. The other radionuclides such as Be * , Mn * , Sr * , Y * , Ba * , Ce * , Pm * , Gd * , Hf * , Yb * , Lu * , Os * , Ir * , and Pt * remained in the region close to the site of their application. The above results possibly indicate the existence of mechanisms common to these plants for selective transcuticular uptake and translocation of radionuclides within plant tissues, though their translocation was considerably influenced by the plant species. (author)

  4. Sediment distribution coefficients (KD) and concentration factors (CF) in fish for natural radionuclides in a pond of a tropical region and their contributions to estimations of internal absorbed dose rate in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pereira, Wagner de; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Attention has been paid only recently to the protection of biota against radiation effects. Protection is being considered through modeling of the calculation of absorbed dose rate. In these models, the inputs are the fluxes of radionuclides of environmental concern and their resulting distribution between environmental compartments. Such distribution is estimated for dispersion models. In freshwater systems and when fish is used as biomaker, relevant environmental transfer parameters are transfer between sediment and water (sediment distribution coefficients KD, in l kg -1 ), and between water and fish (concentration factor CF, in l kg -1 ). These coefficients are under the influence of a number o physical, chemical and biological factors, and display following the literature a great variability. The present work establishes the KD's and CF's for uranium, thorium, radium and lead for two ponds: one that receives treated effluents from an ore treatment unit (UTM) situated at Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil and the other pond from the uranium concentration unit (URA) situated at Caetite, Bahia, Brazil, and for fish used as biomarker. It intends also to compare these parameters with the values recommended by IAEA. Depending on considered radionuclide and on the site, CF's (l kg -1 ) observed values were of the same magnitude as, or one order of magnitude lower than recommended by IAEA. KD's (l kg -1 ) observed values were found of the same magnitude as those recommended by IAEA, approximately 10 times lower or up to 100 times higher than recommended by IAEA, again depending on the radionuclides and on the site. It can be concluded that local parameters should be established in order to obtain a more accurate estimative of biota exposition from man activities. (author)

  5. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates: BIOFILM DISTRIBUTION AND RATE SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng [Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen China; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Earth Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Bailey, Vanessa L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models, and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  6. Osnovnye zakonomernosti raspredelenija, migracii i nakoplenija radionuklidov v donnyh otlozhenijah Baltijskogo morja [The basic patterns of the distribution, migration and accumulation of radionuclides in the bottom sediment of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryev Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the impact of certain factors on the contemporary distribution of natural (226Ra, 232Th, 40К and anthropogenic (137Cs, 60Co radionuclides in the sediments of the Baltic Sea. The results of the study suggest that the distribution of 137Cs is determined by the content of hydromica of silty-clay and clay grain-size fractions, while radiocaesium is mainly accumulated by silty fractions. The accumulation of 226Ra by bottom sediments is mainly determined by the pH geochemical barrier at the water-seafloor boundary. The accumulation of 232Th occurs mainly in clayey fractions of the sediment. The distribution and accumulation of 40K is predominantly determined by the ratio of potassium contained in hydromica minerals. Significant 60Co activity was registered only in a few samples.

  7. Effect of industrial pollution on behaviour of radionuclides in forest ecosystems; Forests ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-06-15

    To investigate how and to what extent industrial pollution affects the behaviour of radionuclides in forest ecosystems, studies were conducted in the vicinity of two Cu-Ni smelters: one in a pine forest at Harjavalta, Finland, and the other in a spruce forest at Monchegorsk, Russia. Industrial pollution had significant effects on the distribution of radionuclides in soil horizons. With the increase in pollution towards the smelter, radionuclides were accumulated more in the litter layer because the conversion of litter into organic material was diminished due to inhibited microbial activity. As a result, the organic layer contained less radionuclides towards the smelter. The effect of industrial pollution on soil-to-plant transfer was complex. The effect varied with radionuclide, plant species and also on forest type. For 137Cs, soil-to-plant transfer decreased significantly as industrial pollution increased in pine forest, whereas the decrease was less pronounced in spruce forest. Root uptake of 239,240Pu by plants is extremely small, and plant contamination by resuspended soil is an important factor in considering the soil-to-plant transfer of this radionuclide. In spruce forest, more plutonium was transferred into plants when pollution load increased due to resuspension of litter particles, which contained higher concentrations of plutonium in the vicinity of the smelter. Soil-to-plant transfer of plutonium was much less affected in pine forests contaminated with industrial pollution. This research clearly indicates the sensitivity of the northern forest ecosystem to inorganic pollutants. Prediction of the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in industrially polluted forest ecosystems requires detailed information on the total deposition, vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil, soil microbiological factors, other soil parameters as well as the rooting depths of the plants. (LN)

  8. Effect of industrial pollution on behaviour of radionuclides in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outola, I.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate how and to what extent industrial pollution affects the behaviour of radionuclides in forest ecosystems, studies were conducted in the vicinity of two Cu-Ni smelters: one in a pine forest at Harjavalta, Finland, and the other in a spruce forest at Monchegorsk, Russia. Industrial pollution had significant effects on the distribution of radionuclides in soil horizons. With the increase in pollution towards the smelter, radionuclides were accumulated more in the litter layer because the conversion of litter into organic material was diminished due to inhibited microbial activity. As a result, the organic layer contained less radionuclides towards the smelter. The effect of industrial pollution on soil-to-plant transfer was complex. The effect varied with radionuclide, plant species and also on forest type. For 137 Cs, soil-to-plant transfer decreased significantly as industrial pollution increased in pine forest, whereas the decrease was less pronounced in spruce forest. Root uptake of 239,240 Pu by plants is extremely small, and plant contamination by resuspended soil is an important factor in considering the soil-to-plant transfer of this radionuclide. In spruce forest, more plutonium was transferred into plants when pollution load increased due to resuspension of litter particles, which contained higher concentrations of plutonium in the vicinity of the smelter. Soil-to-plant transfer of plutonium was much less affected in pine forests contaminated with industrial pollution. This research clearly indicates the sensitivity of the northern forest ecosystem to inorganic pollutants. Prediction of the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in industrially polluted forest ecosystems requires detailed information on the total deposition, vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil, soil microbiological factors, other soil parameters as well as the rooting depths of the plants. (LN)

  9. Investigating last mile distribution challenges of wine suppliers in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The last mile distribution is the final link of successful supply chain operations. The high demand for products, lead time uncertainties and replenishment time complicate the distribution task. In order to achieve a competitive business edge, suppliers need to work at developing and improving their last mile distribution link. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the last mile wine distribution in Lagos Island, Nigeria, and to determin...

  10. Supplementary investigations on the validation of the atmospheric radionuclide transport model (ARTM); Ergaenzende Untersuchungen zur Validierung des Atmosphaerischen Radionuklid-Transport-Modells (ARTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Thielen, Harald; Sogalla, Martin

    2015-09-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SBG) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of non-radioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. The research project 3612S50007 serves, on the one hand, to validate ARTM systematically. On the other hand, the development of science and technology were investigated and, if reasonable and possible, were implemented to the program system. The dispersion model and the user interface were advanced and optimized. The program package was provided to the users as a free download. Notably t he work program comprises the validation of the approach used in ARTM to model short emission periods, which are of interest in view of the SBG. The simulation results of the diagnostic wind and turbulence model TALdia, which is part of the GO-ARTM program package, were evaluated with focus on the influence of buildings on the flow field. The user interface was upgraded with a wind field viewer. To simplify the comparison with the model still in use, a Gaussian plum e model was implemented into the graphical user interface. The ARTM web page was maintained, user questions and feedback were answered and analysed concerning possible improvements and further developments of the program package. Numerous improvements were implemented. An ARTM user workshop was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation

  11. Investigation of the radiological impact of naturally occurring radionuclides from the usage of phosphate and organic fertilizers on farmlands in the New Juaben Municipality of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenfie, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiological impact of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) from the usage of phosphate and organic fertilizers in the New Juaben Municipality of Ghana was investigated. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were measured in seven (7) widely used phosphate and organic fertilizers using gamma spectroscopy. The activity concentrations were found to be 32.10±2.60 Bq/kg, 12.20±1.60 Bq/kg and 3005.50±68.80 Bq/kg respectively. The radioactivity level index (Iγ ) which gives an estimate of the level of risk associated with natural radionuclides in specific material was found to be higher than the recommended limit of one (1) in some of the fertilizer samples collected from storage. The storage also recorded a relatively high dose rates (ranging from 96-624 μSv/a) compared to the surrounding background (ranging from 109-241 μSv/a) suggesting that the storage of large quantities of these fertilizers can lead to a possible increase in the dose rates. The mean activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in cultivated (fertilized) soils were found to be 12.50±3.30 Bq/kg, 10.60 ± 2.80 Bq/kg and 206.0 ± 30.2 Bq/kg respectively. These values were relatively higher than those found in their respective virgin (unfertilized) soils ( 226 Ra- 9.0±1.7 Bq/kg; 232 Th - 8.10±1.70 Bq/kg; and 40 K-139.0±13.3 Bq/kg). This might be considered as an indication that the use of fertilizers to increase soil fertility enhances the level of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in agricultural soils. The averages of other risk indices such as radium equivalent, the absorbed dose rate in air at 1m above the ground, the mean outdoor annual effective dose and the external hazard index estimated for the cultivated soils were found to be higher than their corresponding virgin soils but generally lower than the world averages. Therefore, the radiological impact associated with NORMs in the cultivated lands as a result of the application of fertilizers is expected to

  12. Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasennykh, M.Yu.; Apps, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions)

  13. Radionuclides in plankton from the South Pacific Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been initiated of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review has shown that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10 4 . In 1956 and 1958 considerable work was done on the accumulation and distribution of a variety of fission and activation products produced by nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Since then, studies, have largely been confined to a few radionuclides, and most of the work in the last twenty years has been done in the northern hemisphere. The authors participated in Operations Deepfreeze 1981 and 1982, collecting a total of 48 plankton samples from the USCGC Glacier on its Antarctic cruises. Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories sampled air, water, rain, and fallout. The authors were able to measure concentrations in plankton of the naturally-occurring radionuclides 7 Be, 40 K, and the U and Th series, and they believe that they have detected low levels of 144 Ce and 95 Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68 0 . Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and the protozoa content of the samples. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  14. The main trends in clinical use of radionuclides in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranat, V.Z.

    1979-01-01

    The main trends of using radionuclide methods in clinical oncology are shown. Two main aspects of using radionuclide methods are pointed out: radionuclide investigation of the primary tumour as ''local'' manifestation of the cancer disease, radionuclide investigation of the body ''response'' to the tumour process. Each of the aspects of the problem is briefly considered on some examples. Examples of positive scintigraphy of tumours are given. It is shown that tumorotropic properties of some radionuclides make possible using visualization methods realizing the differential diagnosis of some tumours. Considered are direct and indirect signs which allow determining the presence of metastases and testifying to the tumour process spread

  15. Decontamination of organic wastes containing radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsworth, T.J.; Pimblott, S.M.; Brown, N.W.

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical oxidation treatment has been developed by Arvia Technology for organic wastes containing radionuclides, in which GIC-bisulphate is used as an adsorbent and electrode. Significant work has been carried out in the irradiation of graphite for medical and nuclear applications and in the use of carbonaceous adsorbents but knowledge of the applicability of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) in these roles is limited. This project will attempt to fill this gap. It will investigate the suitability of GIC-bisulphate as an adsorbent in an electrochemical treatment process for radioactive organic liquids. The process was initially used to treat waste-water from non-nuclear operations and now requires technical knowledge and research to adapt the treatment for the nuclear industry. Adsorption processes involving organic wastes containing mobile radionuclides such as 137 Cs are difficult to understand. The effects of gamma radiation on the chemistry of water and organics could complicate the treatment process further. To ensure the suitability and effectiveness of the electrochemical oxidation treatment for radioactive organic wastes, the following effects are being investigated: -) radiolytic degradation of GIC-bisulphate in solution, -) leaching of intercalated ions due to gamma radiation, -) effect of gamma radiation on the adsorption of organics by GIC-bisulphate, -) changes in the sorption behaviour of radioactive contaminants, -) distribution coefficients of contaminants in organic and aqueous phases, and -) selective or competitive adsorption on graphite surface sites

  16. Biogeochemistry of radionuclides in ecosystems (historical aspect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the most important results of the study on the radionuclides' behaviour in natural and model biogeocenoses(ecosystems) obtained by N.W.Timofeev-Ressovskij and co-workers during the period 1947-1968. As early as at that period, radionuclides were classified according to the types of distribution, accumulation and migration within the surface and freshwater ecosystems, and the methods of biological purification of radioactive sewage were proposed

  17. Radionuclides in the environment: Risks and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzerman, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemistry plays a critical role in the open-quotes nuclear ageclose quotes. It makes a vital contribution to understanding of the sources, fate and effects of radionuclides in the environment, both man-made and natural. Risk assessment of radionuclides in the environment relies heavily on the tools of environmental chemistry. On the other hand, radionuclides provide unique opportunities to exploit in environmental chemistry investigations due to their well-defined sources, traceability in environmental processes, analytical sensitivities, and open-quotes built-inclose quotes radioactive decay open-quotes clocksclose quotes. In some cases naturally present radionuclides are utilized, while in others tracers are deliberately added or have already been added by the nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear testing. Several examples in each of these categories are discussed to spotlight the current status of environmental chemistry and radionuclides in the environment as an example application

  18. Radionuclides in forest biogeocenose elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulavik, I.M.; Zhuchenko, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1991 year investigations are made on a studying of the radionuclide distribution (CS-137 and Sr-90) through the main forest biogeocenose elements (a litter a mineral soil layer, overground trees parts) on 5 experimental objects of Gomel' region with a various contamination. Radiation characters of the objects are done. As compared with 1989 year cesium and strontium migration from tress into the litter and from the litter to the soil is shown. In the litter and upper soil layer (5 m) contents of Cs-137 and Sr-90 are 95 and 80% accordingly. The Sr-90 concentration in the wood and the isotope concentration change through yearly layers (1986-1991 years) are studied. Wood layers formed to the accident have a lesser cesium concentration, especially in the oax-tree. The highest Cs and Se translocation, into the wood is noted in the pine the lesse one in the oax-tree. Among all elements of the biogeocenose the highest Cs-137 concentration the litter has and then one-year-old shoots, needles, lives, the bark and the wood go on. Even on the sixth year after the accident Cs concentration in the wood was 20-30 times less, than the one in needes and one-year-old shoot of this year. 4 refs.; 5 tabs

  19. Vertical Distribution and Estimated Doses from Artificial Radionuclides in Soil Samples around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Tsuchiya, Rimi; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides (241Am, 134Cs, 137Cs, and 60Co) were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides (241Am, 57Co, 137Cs, 95Zr, 95Nb, 58Co, and 60Co) were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991). These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public. PMID:23469013

  20. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Taira

    Full Text Available For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS, the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (134Cs, (137Cs, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (57Co, (137Cs, (95Zr, (95Nb, (58Co, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991. These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP, and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  1. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Tsuchiya, Rimi; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (57)Co, (137)Cs, (95)Zr, (95)Nb, (58)Co, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991). These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  2. Distribution and Multivariate Pollution Risks Assessment of Heavy Metals and Natural Radionuclides Around Abandoned Iron-Ore Mines in North Central Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isinkaye, Omoniyi Matthew

    2018-02-01

    The Itakpe abandoned iron-ore mines constitute the largest iron-ore deposits in Nigeria with an estimated reserve of about three million metric tons of ore. The present effort is a part of a comprehensive study to estimate the environmental and radiological health hazards associated with previous mining operations in the study area. In this regard, heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd, Cr, Mn, Pb, Ni, Co and As) and natural radionuclides (U, Th and K) were measured in rock, soil and water samples collected at different locations within the mining sites. Atomic absorption and gamma-ray spectrometry were utilized for the measurements. Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr, Co Pb and As were detected at varying concentrations in rock and soil samples. Cd, Cr, Pb and As were not detected in water samples. The concentrations of heavy metals vary according to the following pattern; rock ˃ soil ˃ water. The mean elemental concentrations of K, U and Th are 2.9%, 0.8 and 1.2 ppm and 1.3%, 0.7 and 1.7 ppm, respectively, for rock and soil samples. Pearson correlation analyses of the results indicate that the heavy metals are mostly negatively correlated with natural radionuclides in the study area. Cancer and non-cancer risks due to heavy metals and radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides to the population living within the vicinity of the abandoned mines are lower than acceptable limits. It can, therefore, be concluded that no significant environmental or radiological health hazard is envisaged.

  3. Investigating The Neutron Flux Distribution Of The Miniature Neutron Source Reactor MNSR Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Hai; Do Quang Binh

    2011-01-01

    Neutron flux distribution is the important characteristic of nuclear reactor. In this article, four energy group neutron flux distributions of the miniature neutron source reactor MNSR type versus radial and axial directions are investigated in case the control rod is fully withdrawn. In addition, the effect of control rod positions on the thermal neutron flux distribution is also studied. The group constants for all reactor components are generated by the WIMSD code, and the neutron flux distributions are calculated by the CITATION code. The results show that the control rod positions only affect in the planning area for distribution in the region around the control rod. (author)

  4. Characterisation of discharge areas of radionuclides originating from nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, L.; Woerman, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that will generally act as discharge areas for radio-nuclides leaking from a subsurface deposit of nuclear waste. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. Understanding the processes controlling the clustering of discharge to certain areas is an additional topic of study. Landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radio-nuclides, the topography will determine the flow paths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is the main scope of this study. An analytical and a numerical model are used. Conclusions are: Our results suggest that the varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving significant amounts of radio-nuclides are limited. To save recourses, the surficial radiological assessments should therefore be focused in these areas. Furthermore, the discharge areas of groundwater from repository depth have defining characteristics that distinguish them from discharge areas of shallower groundwater flow cells. Due to the similarities within deep groundwater discharge areas, one can make site-specific analyses of those areas, which have a broad applicability for migration of radio-nuclides originating from a nuclear waste repository (author)(tk)

  5. Status report on radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    At the suggestion of the Federal Minstry of the Interior, in June 1978, a group of scientists from several institutions who are active in the field of radionuclide transfer or are interested in these problems got together. During the discussions of the work team, especially the transfer soil/plants was emphasized. Then the work team set up a status report on the transfer of the radionuclides relevant in the sense of the radiation protection act. The nuclides H 3 and C14, the isotopes of the Sr, J, and Cs, Tc99, the so-called corrosion nuclides Mn54, Fe59, co-isotopes and Zn65, and isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm were regarded as important for a possible radiation exposition. Recent investigations revealed that also the natural radionuclides Ra226, Po210, and Pb210 should be covered by the investigations. The goal of this status report is to present the level of knowledge on the transfer of these radionuclides to man in a brief form, giving hints at the most important literature. It was requested by the Federal Ministry of the Interior, as fas as possible, to indicate transfer factors which are necessary for the radio-occology act to be decreed according to Para. 45 of the radiation protection act. Another goal of the report was to show the gap in the knowledge on the radio nuclide transfer. This was thought to help to create a basis for the decisions of the Federal Ministry concerning the support of other investigation projects in the field of transfer of radionuclides. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  7. Human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.

    2009-01-01

    Forest soil, understorey vegetation and trees are all sources of radionuclides and human radiation doses after contaminating atmospheric deposition. People are exposed to radiation externally from sources outside the body and internally via ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides. Understorey vegetation contributes to ingestion doses through berries, herbs, wild honey, mushrooms and game meat; also trees provide feed to terrestrial birds and big game. During stay in forests people are subject to external radiation from forest floor and overstorey, and they may inhale airborne radioactive aerosol or gaseous radionuclides in ground level air. In the early phase of contamination also resuspended radionuclides may add to the internal dose of people via inhalation. People in Nordic countries are most exposed to radiation via ingestion of radionuclides in wild foods. The distribution of radionuclides in forests is changed by environmental processes, and thereby also the significance of various dose pathways to humans will change with time. External exposure is received in living environment from contaminated stemwood used as building timber and for manufacturing of furniture and other wood products. The aim of this paper is to outline the significance of various human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests considering the public and workers in forestry and production of bioenergy. Examples on effective doses are given based on two historical events, atmospheric nuclear weapon tests (mostly in 1950's and in 1960's) and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. (au)

  8. Radionuclides in air, water, and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, A.H.; Nelson, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Air, water, and biological samples collected before and after the 1965, 1969, and 1971 underground nuclear detonations at Amchitka Island were analyzed for natural and fallout radionuclides by gamma spectrometry. Selected samples were also analyzed for tritium, 55 Fe, and 90 Sr. The objectives were to search for and identify radionuclides of Amchitka origin in the samples and to contribute to the general knowledge of the distribution of radionuclides in the environment. The studies showed that there has been no escape of radionuclides from the underground sites of the three nuclear detonations at Amchitka Island except for trace quantities of radionuclides, principally tritium, in water and soil gas samples from the immediate vicinity of the surface ground zero for the 1965 event. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, 40 K and 7 Be, were the most abundant radionuclides in the samples, usually by a factor of 10 or more, except for 137 Cs in lichen samples. All levels were well below applicable Radiation Protction Guides, often being near the statistical limit of detection

  9. Deep sea radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanisch, G.; Vobach, M.

    1993-01-01

    Every year since 1979, either in sping or in summer, the fishing research vessel 'Walther Herwig' goes to the North Atlantic disposal areas of solid radioactive wastes, and, for comparative purposes, to other areas, in order to collect water samples, plankton and nekton, and, from the deep sea bed, sediment samples and benthos organisms. In addition to data on the radionuclide contents of various media, information about the plankton, nekton and benthos organisms living in those areas and about their biomasses could be gathered. The investigations are aimed at acquiring scientifically founded knowledge of the uptake of radioactive substances by microorganisms, and their migration from the sea bottom to the areas used by man. (orig.) [de

  10. Migration of heavy natural radionuclides in a humid climatic zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titaeva, N.A.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Taskaev, A.I.; Maslov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Regularities and biochemical peculiarities of the migrations of heavy natural radionuclides in the environment are examined, with special reference to two regions in a humid climatic zone representing natural patterns of radionuclide distribution and to four plots artificially contaminated with high levels of natural radioactivity more than 20 years previously. It was determined that the migration of thorium, uranium, and radium isotopes through the rock-water-soil-plant system is dependent on many physiochemical properties of these radionuclides, their compounds, and the local environment. Isotopic activity ratios provide a useful tool for studying the direction of radionuclide migration and its influence on observed distribution patterns

  11. Investigation of Effect of Different Run-Time Distributions on Smartnet Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armstrong, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This thesis investigates, using in-line simulation, the effect of non-deterministic runtime distributions on the performance of SmartNet's schedule execution using the Opportunistic Load Balancing (OLB...

  12. Experimental evaluation of admission and disposition of artificial radionuclides including transuranium elements in agricultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhakhanov, T.; Lukashenko, S. [Institute of radiation safety and ecology (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-01

    Processes of radionuclides migration and transfer to agricultural plants are quite well developed worldwide, but the information on character of accumulation of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu transuranium radionuclides in agricultural plants is still fragmentary. Even in generalized materials of worldwide studies, IAEA guide, accumulation coefficient (AC) can have wide range of values (5-6 orders), no data exists on radionuclides' distribution in different organs of plants and they are given for joined groups of plants and types of soils. That is why the main aim of this work was to obtain basic quantitative parameters of radionuclides' migration in 'soil-plant' system, and firs of all- for transuranium elements.. In 2010 a series of experiments with agricultural plants was started at the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site aimed to investigate entry of artificial radionuclides by crop products in natural climatic conditions. To conduct the experiment for study of coefficient of radionuclides' accumulation by agricultural corps, there was chosen a land spot at the STS territory, characterized by high concentration of radionuclides: {sup 241}Am - n*10{sup 4} Bq/kg, {sup 137}Cs - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg, {sup 90}Sr - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg and {sup 239+240}Pu- n*10{sup 5} Bq/kg. As objects of investigation, cultures, cultivated in Kazakhstan have been selected: wheat (Triticum vulgare), barley (Hordeum vulgare), oat (Avena sativa L.), water melon (Citrullus vulgaris), melon (Cucumis melo), potato (Solanum tuberosum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), pepper (Capsicum annuum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), sunflower (Helianthus cultus), onion (Allium cepa), carrot (Daucus carota), parsley(Petroselinum vulgare)and cabbage (Brassica oleracea). Investigated plants have been planted within the time limits, recommended for selected types of agricultural plants. Cropping system included simple agronomic and amelioration measures. Fertilizers were not

  13. Life-span health effects of relatively soluble forms of internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Nikula, K.J.; Griffith, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a large research effort to study the lifetime health risks of inhaled radionuclides, Beagle dogs inhaled 90 SrCl 2 or 144 CeCl 3 or were injected intravenously with 137 CsCl. Because these three compounds were soluble in body fluids, the resulting widely differing patterns of radionuclide distribution and dose reflected tissue affinities of the elements involved. Long-term health effects, predominantly cancers, were seen in the organs receiving the highest doses. Investigations are continuing on the extent to which other less irradiated organs may have also been affected

  14. Migration of radionuclides in sub-surface soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachhuber, H.; Bunzl, K.; Dietl, F.; Kretner, R.; Schimmack, W.; Schultz, W.

    1981-08-01

    The object of the investigations was to draw the most realistic conclusions about the spreading rate of the radionuclides Sr, I, Cs and Ce in a model accident contaminating the earth surface for various subsurface soils taken from the environment of the Gorleben salt done. The retardation factors were hence determined for these radionuclides in columntests in undisturbed soil samples and the distribution coefficients determined in disturbed soil samples by shaking tests (batch method). The following mobility series can be given very globally for the examined soil profiles where especially columnar-results had been used: Ranker (Trebel) J > Sr > Ce > Cs, Podsol (Gorleben) J > Cs > Sr > Ce, Braunerde (Bruenkendorf) J approx. >= Sr > Ce approx. >= Cs. Arable Soils: Podsol (Gorleben) J > Sr > Cs > Ce, Parabraunerde (Eschweiler) J > Sr > Ce approx. >= Cs. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Organic migration forms of radionuclides and performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gouqing

    2010-01-01

    Much attention is paid to inorganic migration forms of radionuclides in groundwater during performance assessment before and organic migration forms, are seldom noted. Therefore some question may come into confidence level in performance assessment. This paper mainly discusses the distribution of organic substances in groundwater and their potential effect on performance assessment. The results obtained in recent years show that clay rocks are generally impermeable to water, but in some cases the interstitial water may be observed in them and the concentration of DOC, HA and FA is rather higher than that in granitic groundwater. The concentration of DOC is relatively low in granitic groundwater, but up to now the effect of organic migration forms of radionuclides in granitic groundwater on performance assessment is not finally determined, it is necessary to make further investigations. (authors)

  16. Distribution of radionuclides in a marine sediment core off the waterspout of the nuclear power plants in Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Dongmei; Li, Haitao; Fang, Hongda; Huang, Chuguang; Zhang, Yusheng; Zhang, Hongbiao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Junjie; Wang, Hua; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A sediment core was collected and dated using 210 Pb ex dating method off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides were analyzed using HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation and to study the past environment changes. It suggested that NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment based on the low specific activity of 137 Cs. Two broad peaks of TOC, TC and LOI accorded well with the commercial operations of Daya Bay NPP (1994.2 and 1994.5) and LNPP Phase I (2002.5 and 2003.3), implying that the mass input of cooling water from NPP may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities. - Graphical abstract: A sediment core was collected and dated using 210 Pb ex dating method, off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides analyzed using the HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to study the past environment changes and assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation. NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment, but the mass input of cooling water from nuclear power plants may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities. - Highlights: • A sediment core collected from Daya Bay, South China Sea was dated using 210 Pb ex method. • The γ-emitting radionuclides, gross α and β, TOC, TIC, TC, LOI were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation. • The low activity of 137 Cs in sediment suggested NPP provided no new radioactivity source. • Two peaks of TOC, TC and LOI implied that the mass input of NPP cooling water may

  17. Migration of 137Cs artificial radionuclide in the valley of the Takhtakushuk river of the Degelen massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitskij, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Study of horizontal and vertical radionuclide distribution in the valley of the Takhtakushuk River of the 'Degelen' Massif is carried out in the framework of ecological and biological investigations of soil and plant cover within radioactive contaminated areas, and radionuclide migration in biological chain 'soil - plant - animal'. For the first time, the pool-type method was used in the studies of soil of the valley that allows tracing solid and liquid substances migrating by means of surface and soil drainage from its head to final part. This paper presents some physical and chemical properties of the study landscape's soils, radionuclide content in soil genetic horizons of the valley. The study results showed that major mass of 137 Cs radionuclide is sorbed by soil humus and fine-dispersed clay particles of grass soils within the valley. (author)

  18. Radionuclide transfer onto ground surface in surface water flow, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Komiya, Tomokazu; Kamiyama, Hideo

    1991-07-01

    Radionuclides migration in ground surface water flow is considered to be one of the important path way in the scenario for environmental migration of radionuclides leaked from low level radioactive waste repository. Simulating the slightly sloped surface on which contaminated solution is flowing downward, testing for radionuclide migration on ground surface had been started. As it's first step, an experiment was carried out under the condition of restricted infiltration in order to elucidate the adsorption behavior of radionuclides onto the loamy soil surface in related with hydraulic conditions. Radionuclides concentration change in effluent solution with time and a concentration distribution of radionuclides adsorbed on the ground surface were obtained from several experimental conditions combining the rate and the duration time of the water flow. The radionuclides concentration in the effluent solution was nearly constant during each experimental period, and was reduced under the condition of lower flow rate. The surface distribution of radionuclides concentration showed two distinctive regions. The one was near the inlet vessel where the concentration was promptly reducing, and the other was following the former where the concentration was nearly constant. The characteristic surface distribution of radionuclides concentration can be explained by a two dimensional diffusion model with a first order adsorption reaction, based on the advection of flow rate distribution in perpendicular direction. (author)

  19. Applications of radionuclides in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1955-01-01

    After a brief recall of a few concepts (mass number, charge and beams properties) and the description of used detectors (ionization chamber, Geiger-Mueller counter, scintillation counters), some radionuclides applications are described. In a first part, the well-developed applications are presented in three distinct groups: continuous applications such as β and γ gauges (determination hydrogen content of an hydrocarbon and content of an emulsion; discharge of static electricity), discontinuous applications such as radiography and autoradiography, wear or manufacture problems (distribution of a fungicide on tobacco) and finally, applications in research laboratories such as diffusion, exchange and solubility. It also describes the applications which are still in development such as the action of beams on matter (reticulation and degradation of polymers, monomers polymerisation, cold sterilization). In conclusion, few advices on the opportunity of such applications and the choice of the radionuclides are given. (M.P.)

  20. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, F.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1981-01-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except 137 Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For 137 Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes. (author)

  1. Radionuclide cinematography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.E.; Sigel, H.; Geffers, H.; Bitter, F.; Meyer, G.; Kampmann, H.; Stauch, M.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide cinematography is described as a procedure making use of radiation-level variations above the heart after equipartitioning of sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin in the blood pool. Regional ventricular and vestibular variations are phase-shifted. This procedure permits delineation of aneurysmas with interphasic course, cicatrization of the cardiac wall not producing any cyclical variation. The study included normal subjects and 16 patients with full course infarction. Characteristic disturbances of motility distribution were found in all cases of scarred or aneurysmic alterations in the frontal and side walls of the left ventricle. The procedure was unable to detect two small infarction scars on the rear wall. The possibility of using radionuclide cinematography to prove coronary insufficiency as well as a comparison with other methods are discussed

  2. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide migration has been studied in natural fissures running parallel to the axes of granitic drill cores. A short pulse of radionuclide solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. At the end of each experiment the fissure was opened and the radionuclide distribution on the fissure surfaces measured. The retardation of 241 Am(III) at pH 8.2 as well as the variation in 235 Np(V) retardation with pH are found to be in good agreement with K d-values obtained in batch experiments. The reduction of (TcO - 4 ) to Tc(IV) leads as expected to increasing retardation.(author)

  3. Distribution of radionuclides in a marine sediment core off the waterspout of the nuclear power plants in Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Dongmei; Li, Haitao; Fang, Hongda; Huang, Chuguang; Zhang, Yusheng; Zhang, Hongbiao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Junjie; Wang, Hua; Yang, Jie

    2015-07-01

    A sediment core was collected and dated using (210)Pbex dating method off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides were analyzed using HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation and to study the past environment changes. It suggested that NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment based on the low specific activity of (137)Cs. Two broad peaks of TOC, TC and LOI accorded well with the commercial operations of Daya Bay NPP (1994.2 and 1994.5) and LNPP Phase I (2002.5 and 2003.3), implying that the mass input of cooling water from NPP may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The glass block site radionuclide migration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killey, R.W.D.; Champ, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    In 1960 25 nepheline syenite glass blocks containing 14 TBq of mixed fission products in 50 kg of glass were placed below the water table in a shallow sand aquifer at Chalk River Laboratories. Experimental studies undertaken at the site since 1960 have included detailed mapping of the plume of 90 Sr in 1963, 1966 and 1971. Mathematical modeling studies have employed the radiostrontium plume data in determining the split between ion exchange and chemisorption of 90 Sr, and in obtaining reaction rate data for chemisorption. The distribution of 137 Cs on downgradient soils was mapped in 1963 and 1979. An extended plume of low-level 137 Cs contamination observed in the 1979 study prompted an investigation of the role of particulate materials in radionuclide transport. IN 1983, large volume groundwater sampling and separation of cationic, anionic, and neutral dissolved species, as well as particulates, detected anionic and cationic dissolved europium isotopes (154 and 155), and again encountered particulate 137 Cs. A variety of investigations of cesium and strontium sorption have provided a data base on sediment mineralogy, particle surface features, and information on sorption sites and processes. The year 1990 saw the inauguration of a three-year program to update investigations of radionuclide release, transport, and sorption at the glass block site. The first stage of the program has been a detailed definition and simulation of the hydrogeologic setting. Plume mapping and aqueous speciation studies are in progress. This paper summarizes past investigations, reviews the status of the current program, and discusses components of future studies, including investigations of sediment sorption mechanisms. (Author) (17 refs., 8 figs.)

  5. Natural radio-nuclides in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deflorin, O.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the presence of radio-nuclides in Switzerland's drinking water. The article describes research done into the natural radioactivity to be found in various drinking water samples taken from the public water supply in the Canton of Grisons in eastern Switzerland. The various natural nuclides to be expected are listed and the methods used to take the samples are described. The results of the analysis are presented in the form of sketches showing the geographical distribution of the nuclide samples. Diagrams of the cumulative frequency of the quantities of nuclides found are presented, as are such diagrams for the yearly radioactive doses that the population is exposed to. The results and their consequences for the water supply are discussed in detail and further investigations to be made in the region are proposed

  6. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The

  7. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with 137 Cs, 210 Pb and 7 Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of 239,240 Pu, 241 Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The obtained findings and the

  8. Technical investigation of cerebral blood flow measurements using the Patlak plot method. A contrivance for positioning of the gamma camera at data collection in radionuclide angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaki, Akihiro; Okada, Kazuhiro; Urata, Johji; Yonehara, Toshiro [Saiseikai Kumamoto Hospital (Japan); Mizuta, Yoshihiko

    1999-02-01

    The time-activity curve for the aortic arch obtained from radionuclide angiography (RNA) is handled as an input function parameter according to the method of Matsuda et al., which determines regional cerebral blood flow non-invasively. The data are collected from a frontal view of the thorax captured by RNA by their method, however we encountered a case in which it was difficult to identify aortic arch in the data collection from the frontal view. The precise identification of the aortic arch was implemented when the RNA data were collected from the left anterior oblique view of the thorax. No significant difference was noted in the measured values between the data collection from the frontal view and from the left anterior oblique view. Our method seems to be useful modification of the Patlak plot method. (author)

  9. Distribution and inventories of fallout radionuclides (239+24Pu, 137Cs) and 21Pb to study the filling velocity of salt marshes in Donana National Park (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M.P.; Pozuelo, M.; Clemente, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Yanez, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Meral, J.

    2006-01-01

    Within an extensive multinational and multidisciplinary project carried out in Donana National Park (Spain) to investigate its preservation and regeneration, the filling velocity of the salt marshes has been evaluated through the calculation of their average sediment accumulation rates. 239+24 Pu and 137 Cs from weapons testing fallout and total 21 Pb distribution profiles and inventories have been determined in some of the most characteristic zones of the park, namely, the ponds (or 'lucios') and the waterjets (or 'canos'). Plutonium inventories range from 16 to 101 Bq m -2 , 137 Cs values fluctuate between 514 and 3758 Bq m -2 and unsupported 21 Pb values comprise between 124 and 9398 Bq m -2 . Average sedimentation rates range from 3 to 5 mm y -1 (1952-2002). These data are higher than those obtained by carbon dating for the period 6500 AD-present, estimated as 1.5-2 mm y -1 , suggesting an increase in the accumulation of sediments and the alteration of the park's hydrodynamics caused by the re-channeling of the major rivers feeding the salt marshes

  10. Radionuclide sorption studies on abyssal red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radionuclide sorption properties of a widely distributed abyssal red clay are being experimentally investigated using batch equilibration techniques. This paper summarizes sorption equilibrium data obtained when 0.68 N NaCl solutions containing either Tc, U, Pu, Am or Cm were contacted with samples of the red clay and also summarizes some initial results from experiments designed to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for various nuclides. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, the sorption equilibrium distribution coefficients for technetium were essentially zero. At solution-phase nuclide concentrations on the order of 10 -6 M and less and at solution pH values of about 6.9, the distribution coefficients for plutonium were about 3 x 10 3 m1/gm and for uranium, americium, and curium were about 10 5 ml/gm or greater. However, at solution pH values of about 2.7, the distribution coefficients for each of the nuclides were greatly diminished. Initial experiments conducted in order to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for cesium, barium, and cerium, indicated that the silicate phases in the clay were selective for cesium over barium and cerium. These experiments also indicated that the hydrous oxide phases were selective for cerium over barium and for barium over cesium

  11. Experimental investigation of particle size distribution influence on diffusion controlled coarsening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhigang; Patterson, B.R.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of initial particle size distribution on coarsening during liquid phase sintering has been experimentally investigated using W-14Ni-6Fe alloy as a model system. It was found that initially wider size distribution particles coarsened more rapidly than those of an initially narrow distribution. The well known linear relationship between the cube of the average particle radius bar r -3 , and time was observed for most of the coarsening process, although the early stage coarsening rate constant changed with time, as expected with concomitant early changes in the tungsten particle size distribution. The instantaneous transient rate constant was shown to be related to the geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, of the instantaneous size distributions, with higher rate constants corresponding to larger 1nσ values. The form of the particle size distributions changed rapidly during early coarsening and reached a quasi-stable state, different from the theoretical asymptotic distribution, after some time. A linear relationship was found between the experimentally observed instantaneous rate constant and that computed from an earlier model incorporating the effect of particle size distribution. The above results compare favorably with those from prior theoretical modeling and computer simulation studies of the effect of particle size distribution on coarsening, based on the DeHoff communicating neighbor model

  12. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  13. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  14. Radioisotope investigations on the stratigraphic distribution of poly/methyl methacrylate/grafted onto leather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrucha, K.; Kroh, J.

    1984-01-01

    Investigations on the stratigraphic distribution of poly/methyl methacrylate/ in leather follow our earlier experiments on radiation grafting of vinyl monomers in situ. Polymer distribution was determined for pigskins and cattlehides tanned with basic sulphates of chromium/III/. 14 C-labelled methyl methacrylate was used in present experiments. Precision slicing technique was employed to cut consecutive slices parallel to the grain surface of the radiation modified leather. Quantative analysis of polymer distribution in leather was based on radioactivity measurements. Each layer was burned in Oxymat apparatus and resulting 14 CO 2 was analysed by liquid scintillation method. On the basis of radioactivity measurements and visual observations with light microscope conclusion on desirable distribution of polymer was reached. In the midcorium part of leather polymer is evenly distributed and its content is much higher than for outer layers next to surface and flesh. Mechanism of relevant processes as well as formation and role played by peroxide compounds is discussed

  15. Radioisotope investigations on the stratigraphic distribution of poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted onto leather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrucha, K.; Kroh, J.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations on the stratigraphic distribution of poly(methyl methacrylate) in leather follow our earlier experiments on radiation grafting of vinyl monomers in situ. Polymer distribution was determined for pigskins and cattlehides tanned with basic sulphates of chromium (III). 14 C-labelled methyl methacrylate was used in present experiments. Precision slicing technique was employed to cut consecutive slices parallel to the grain surface of the radiation modified leather. Quantitative analysis of polymer distribution in leather was based on radioactivity measurements. Each layer was burned in Oxymat apparatus and resulting 14 CO 2 was analysed by liquid scintillation method. On the basis of radioactivity measurements and visual observations with light microscope conclusion on desirable distribution of polymer was reached. In the midcorium part of leather polymer is evenly distributed and its content is much higher than for outer layers next to surface and flesh. Mechanism of relevant processes as well as formation and role played by peroxide compounds are discussed. (author)

  16. Investigations on the droplet distributions in the atomization of kerosene jets in supersonic crossflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liyin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Li, Qinglian; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2015-09-01

    Phase Doppler anemometry was applied to investigate the atomization processes of a kerosene jet injected into Ma = 1.86 crossflow. Physical behaviors, such as breakup and coalescence, are reproduced through the analysis of the spatial distribution of kerosene droplets' size. It is concluded that Sauter mean diameter distribution shape transforms into "I" type from "C" type as the atomization development. Simultaneously, the breakup of large droplets and the coalescence of small droplets can be observed throughout the whole atomization process.

  17. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  18. Radionuclide therapy practice and facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Clarke, S.E.M.; Fischer, M.; Chatal, J.F.; Lewington, V.J.; Nilsson, S.; Troncone, L.; Vieira, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a questionnaire the EANM Task Group Radionuclide Therapy in 1993 collected data on the current practice of radionuclide therapy in European countries. Subsequently, at the request of the EANM Executive Committee, the EANM Radionuclide Therapy Committee has made an inventory of the distribution of facilities for radionuclide therapy and undertaken an assessment of the total number of patients treated throughout Europe and of the types of treatment provides, with the aim of supporting the development of policy to adjust the available capacity to the needs by the year 2000. For this purpose, a second, more detailed questionnaire was sent out the members and national advisors of the Committee (see below), who gathered the data for each country that was a member of the EANM at the time. It is concluded that a wide bariation in therapy practice exists across Europe, particularly in the utilisation of radionuclide therapy, the requirement and availability of proper isolation facilities and the background training of those undertaking therapy. More uniform guidelines and legislation are required, although changes in legislation may have a significant impact in some countries. Although there is wide variation in the therapies used in each country, one the whole it appears that there is an underutilisation of nuclear medicine as a therapeutic modality. A rapidly increasing role may be expected, in particular for oncological indications requiring high-dose radionuclide treatment. Therefore there is an urgent need for a greater number of isolation beds in dedicated centers throughout Europe

  19. Characterization of Discharge Areas of Radionuclides Originating From Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, L.; Xu, S.; Worman, A.

    2009-05-01

    If leakages in nuclear waste repositories located in crystalline bedrock arise, radionuclides will reach the biosphere and cause a risk of radiological impact. The extent of the radiological impact depends on in which landscape elements the radionuclides emerge. In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that generally will act as discharge areas for radionuclides leaking from subsurface deposits. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. In humid regions, landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radionuclides, the topography will determine the flowpaths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is therefore an important scope of this study. To address these issues, we developed a 3-D transport model. Our analyses are based on site-specific data from two different areas in Sweden, Forsmark, Uppland, and Oskarshamn, Småland. The Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Company (SKB) has selected these two areas as candidate areas for a deep repository of nuclear waste and the areas are currently subject to site investigations. Our results suggest that there are hot-spots in the landscape i.e. areas with high probability of receiving large amounts of radionuclides from a leaking repository of nuclear waste. The hot-spots concentrate in the sea, streams, lakes and wetlands. All these elements are found at lower elevations in the landscape. This pattern is mostly determined by the landscape topography and the locations of fracture zones. There is a relationship between fracture zones and topography, and therefore the importance of the topography for the discharge area distribution is not contradicted by the heterogeneity in the bedrock. The varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving

  20. Distribution and dynamics of radionuclides and stable elements in the coastal waters off Rokkasho Village, Japan, prior to the opening of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Part 1. Sedimentation flux of suspended particles and elimination of radionuclides and stable elements from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kawabata, H.; Ueda, S.; Hasegawa, H.; Inaba, J.; Ohmomo, Y.; Mitamura, O.; Seike, Y.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear fuel reprocessing facility is currently under construction in Rokkasho Village, Aomori, Japan. After completion and start-up, this facility will discharge radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean through an outlet pipe set on the seafloor offshore. For future assessments of the stability of these radionuclides in the environment, a sufficient understanding of the behavior of radionuclides in this ocean ecosystem before the start-up of the facility is necessary. To understand the processes by which radionuclides and various other types of elements are eliminated from seawater, we measured the sedimentation flux of suspended particles in the coastal waters off Rokkasho Village where the sea emissions pipes will be placed. (author)

  1. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  2. Generator for radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  3. Metabolic transformation of radionuclides in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Taku

    1987-01-01

    Physico-chemical form of radionuclides is one of the important factors governing the concentration by marine organisms, whereas biological activities affect the existing states of radionuclides especially in coastal waters. Radioiodine in the form of iodate which is predominant species in seawater is reduced to iodide ion by biological activities and concentration factor of iodide is an order of magnitude higher than those of iodate. Extremely high accumulation of transition elements, actinides, or natural radionuclides in branchial heart of octopus is explained by the fuction of adenochrome, a glandular pigment in the organ as a natural complexing agent, and similar metal-binding proteins with relatively low molecular weight have been found in various marine invertebrates. High accumulation of some elements also found in mollusk kidney is considered to be caused by the intracellular concretions composed of calcium phosphate. All these biological processes suggest the significance of further investigations on metabolic transformation of radionuclides in marine organisms. (author)

  4. On the usability of frequency distributions and source attribution of Cs-137 detections encountered in the IMS radio-nuclide network for radionuclide event screening and climate change monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A.; Wotawa, G.; Zähringer, M.

    2009-04-01

    Under the provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), airborne radioactivity is measured by means of high purity Germanium gamma ray detectors deployed in a global monitoring network. Almost 60 of the scheduled 80 stations have been put in provisional operations by the end of 2008. Each station daily sends the 24 hour samples' spectroscopic data to the Vienna based Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the CTBT Organization (CTBTO) for review for treaty-relevant nuclides. Cs-137 is one of these relevant isotopes. Its typical minimum detectable concentration is in the order of a few Bq/m3. However, this isotope is also known to occur in atmospheric trace concentrations, due to known non CTBT relevant processes and sources related to, for example, the re-suspension of cesium from historic nuclear tests and/or the Chernobyl reactor disaster, temporarily enhanced by bio-mass burning (Wotawa et al. 2006). Properly attributed cesium detections can be used as a proxy to detect Aeolian dust events (Igarashi et al, 2001) that potentially carry cesium from all aforementioned sources but are also known to play an important role for the radiative forcing in the atmosphere (shadow effect), at the surface (albedo) and the carbon dioxide cycle when interacting with oceanic phytoplankton (Mikami and Shi, 2005). In this context this paper provides a systematic attribution of recent Cs-137 detections in the PTS monitoring network in order to Characterize those stations which are regularly affected by Cs-137 Provide input for procedures that distinguish CTBT relevant detection from other sources (event screening) Explore on the capability of certain stations to use their Cs-137 detections as a proxy to detect aeolian dust events and to flag the belonging filters to be relevant for further investigations in this field (-> EGU-2009 Session CL16/AS4.6/GM10.1: Aeolian dust: initiator, player, and recorder of environmental change). References Igarashi, Y., M

  5. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    2001-01-01

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β - emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  6. Radionuclide evaluation of the liver in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Razzak, M.; El-Ashmawy, A.

    1982-01-01

    Hepatic involvement in diabetes has been previously demonstrated in experimental animals and in patients by clinical examination as well as by autopsy. The aim of the present work is to investigate the extent and type of hepatic involvement in diabetics by radionuclide scanning which is objective and not liable to the errors and difficulties inherent in the method of physical examination. The present study was performed on 40 diabetics, comprising 24 females and 16 males, aged between 17 and 80 years. Scanning was performed with 99m - Tc sulphur colloid using a rectilinear scanner and the gamma camera. The liver size was assessed from the scan pictures by the application of certain measurements and by surface area determination. The obtained results demonstrated marked discrepancy between the liver size as determined clinically and that evaluated by radionuclide scanning. By scintiscanning, the incidence of hepatic enlargement varied according to the parameter used. It amounted to 48% on the basis of the maximum vertical dimension and 37% with hepatic surface area measurement. Using the vertical dimension at halfway between the xiphoid and right lateral hepatic margin, the incidence of liver enlargement was 35%. Uneven distribution of radioactivity was seen in the right and/or left lobe in 20/40 patients. Furthermore, in 10 patients the ratio of hepatic to splenic radioactivity was below one. These changes could be explained by fatty infiltration and/or cirrhosis. Accordingly, hepatic scanning could be used to select diabetes having abnormal scan picture whether regarding liver dimensions or distribution of radioactivity and subjecting them to liver biopsy in order to define the nature of liver involvement. (Author)

  7. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries